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Sample records for optical turbulence forecast

  1. Turbulence forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to forecast turbulence, one needs to have an understanding of the cause of turbulence. Therefore, an attempt is made to show the atmospheric structure that often results when aircraft encounter moderate or greater turbulence. The analysis is based on thousands of hours of observations of flights over the past 39 years of aviation meteorology.

  2. Optical turbulence forecast: ready for an operational application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, E.; Lascaux, F.; Turchi, A.; Fini, L.

    2017-04-01

    One of the main goals of the feasibility study MOSE (MOdelling ESO Sites) is to evaluate the performances of a method conceived to forecast the optical turbulence (OT) above the European Southern Observatory (ESO) sites of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in Chile. The method implied the use of a dedicated code conceived for the OT called ASTRO-MESO-NH. In this paper, we present results we obtained at conclusion of this project concerning the performances of this method in forecasting the most relevant parameters related to the OT (CN^2, seeing ε, isoplanatic angle θ0 and wavefront coherence time τ0). Numerical predictions related to a very rich statistical sample of nights uniformly distributed along a solar year and belonging to different years have been compared to observations, and different statistical operators have been analysed such as the classical bias, root-mean-squared error, σ and more sophisticated statistical operators derived by the contingency tables that are able to quantify the score of success of a predictive method such as the percentage of correct detection (PC) and the probability to detect a parameter within a specific range of values (POD). The main conclusions of the study tell us that the ASTRO-MESO-NH model provides performances that are already very good to definitely guarantee a not negligible positive impact on the service mode of top-class telescopes and ELTs. A demonstrator for an automatic and operational version of the ASTRO-MESO-NH model will be soon implemented on the sites of VLT and E-ELT.

  3. Simulations and Data Analysis for Air Force Optical Turbulence Forecasting Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-22

    AFRL-VS-HA-TR-2007-1059 Simulations and Data Analysis for Air Force Optical Turbulence Forecasting Applications Joseph Werne...Numerical and Large-Eddy Simulations (DNS and LES) of relevant atmospheric dynamical processes occurring in the troposphere and stratosphere (e.g., wind... simulation and observational results so that they may be used to develop and/or improve atmospheric turbulence and optical turbulence ADAs. This

  4. Forecasting of Optical Turbulence in Support of Realtime Optical Imaging and Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2012-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical and imaging telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of free space optical communication (FSOC) links. Some of the degradation due to optical turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. In addition, clouds, precipitation, and inhomogeneities in atmospheric temperature and moisture all have the potential to disrupt imaging and communications through the atmosphere. However, there are strategies that can be employed to mitigate the atmospheric impacts. These strategies require an accurate characterization of the atmosphere through which the communications links travel. To date these strategies have been to climatological characterize OT and its properties. Recently efforts have been developed to employ a realtime forecasting system which provides planners useful information for maintaining links and link budgets. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. Atmospheric measurements provided by local instrumentation are valuable for link characterization, but provide an incomplete picture of the atmosphere. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). During realtime FSOC demonstrations, in situ measurements are supplemented with NWP simulations, which provide near realtime characterizations and forecasts of the Cn2, the Fried Coherence Length (ro), and time-varying, three-dimensional characterizations of the atmosphere. The three dimensional Weather

  5. MOSE: A Demonstrator for an Automatic Operational System for the Optical Turbulence Forecast for ESO Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, F.; Turchi, A.; Fini, L.

    2017-09-01

    "Most of the observations performed with new-generation ground-based telescopes are employing the Service Mode. To optimize the flexible-scheduling of scientific programs and instruments, the optical turbulence (OT) forecast is a must, particularly when observations are supported by adaptive optics (AO) and Interferometry. Reliable OT forecast are crucial to optimize the usage of AO and interferometric facilities which is not possible when using only optical measurements. Numerical techniques are the best placed to achieve such a goal. The MOSE project (MOdeling ESO Sites), co-funded by ESO, aimed at proving the feasibility of the forecast of (1) all the classical atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity) and (2) the optical turbulence i.e. the CN 2 profiles and all the main integrated astro-climatic parameters derived from the CN 2 (the seeing, the isoplanatic angle, the wavefront coherence time) above the two ESO sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones. The proposed technique is based on the use of a non-hydrostatic atmospheric meso-scale model and a dedicated code for the optical turbulence. The final goal of the project aimed at implementing an automatic system for the operational forecasts of the aforementioned parameters to support the astronomical observations above the two sites. MOSE Phase A and B have been completed and a set of dedicated papers have been published on the topic. Model performances have been extensively quantified with several dedicated figures of merit and we proved that our tool is able to provide reliable forecasts of optical turbulence and atmospheric parameters with very satisfactory score of success. This should guarantee us to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode of new generation telescopes. A conceptual design as well as an operational plan of the automatic system has been submitted to ESO as integral part of the feasibility study. We completed a negotiation with

  6. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the service mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck; Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of an atmospherical non-hydrostatical mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT and the E-ELT. At the end of 2016 a new project for the implementation of a demonstrator of an operational system to be run on the two ESO's sites will start. The fact that the system can be run simultaneously on the two sites is an ancillary appealing feature of the system. Our team is also responsible for the implementation of a similar automatic system at Mt.Graham, site of the LBT (ALTA Project). Our system/method will permit therefore to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode for new generation telescopes. Among the most exciting achieved results we cite the fact that we proved to be able to forecast CN2 profiles with a vertical resolution as high as 150 m. Such a feature is particularly crucial for all WFAO systems that require such detailed information on the OT vertical stratification on the whole 20 km above the ground. This important achievement tells us that all the WFAO systems can rely on automatic

  7. Environmental forecasting and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    This review describes the fundamental assumptions and current methodologies of the two main kinds of environmental forecast; the first is valid for a limited period of time into the future and over a limited space-time ‘target’, and is largely determined by the initial and preceding state of the environment, such as the weather or pollution levels, up to the time when the forecast is issued and by its state at the edges of the region being considered; the second kind provides statistical information over long periods of time and/or over large space-time targets, so that they only depend on the statistical averages of the initial and ‘edge’ conditions. Environmental forecasts depend on the various ways that models are constructed. These range from those based on the ‘reductionist’ methodology (i.e., the combination of separate, scientifically based, models for the relevant processes) to those based on statistical methodologies, using a mixture of data and scientifically based empirical modeling. These are, as a rule, focused on specific quantities required for the forecast. The persistence and predictability of events associated with environmental and turbulent flows and the reasons for variation in the accuracy of their forecasts (of the first and second kinds) are now better understood and better modeled. This has partly resulted from using analogous results of disordered chaotic systems, and using the techniques of calculating ensembles of realizations, ideally involving several different models, so as to incorporate in the probabilistic forecasts a wider range of possible events. The rationale for such an approach needs to be developed. However, other insights have resulted from the recognition of the ordered, though randomly occurring, nature of the persistent motions in these flows, whose scales range from those of synoptic weather patterns (whether storms or ‘blocked’ anticyclones) to small scale vortices. These eigen states can be predicted

  8. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  9. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  10. Modified-Dewan Optical Turbulence Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Kea Observatories on the Island of Hawaii (Businger et al. 2002) by converting standard Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecast model output into...describing optical turbulence. The Dewan parameterization is also being used to forecast optical seeing conditions for ground-based telescopes at the Mauna

  11. MOSE: a feasibility study for optical turbulence forecast with the Meso-Nh mesoscale model to support AO facilities at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck

    2012-07-01

    We present very encouraging preliminary results obtained in the context of the MOSE project, an on-going study aiming at investigating the feasibility of the forecast of the optical turbulence and meteorological parameters (in the free atmosphere as well as in the boundary and surface layer) at Cerro Paranal (site of the Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), both in Chile. The study employs the Meso-Nh atmospheric mesoscale model and aims at supplying a tool for optical turbulence forecasts to support the scheduling of the scientific programs and the use of AO facilities at the VLT and the E-ELT. In this study we take advantage of the huge amount of measurements performed so far at Paranal and Armazones by ESO and the TMT consortium in the context of the site selection for the E-ELT and the TMT to constraint / validate the model. A detailed analysis of the model performances in reproducing the atmospheric parameters (T, V, p, H, ...) near the ground as well as in the free atmosphere, is critical and fundamental because the optical turbulence depends on most of these parameters. This approach permits us to provide an exhaustive and complete analysis of the model performances and to better define the model operational application. This also helps us to identify the sources of discrepancies with optical turbulence measurements (when they appear) and to discriminate between different origins of the problem: model parameterization, initial conditions, ... Preliminary results indicate a great accuracy of the model in reproducing most of the main meteorological parameters in statistical terms as well as in each individual night in the free atmosphere and in proximity of the surface. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF-Arcetri (Italy).

  12. Clear turbulence forecasting - Towards a union of art and science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting over the last several decades is reviewed in the context of empirical and theoretical research into the nature of nonconvective turbulence in the free atmosphere, particularly at jet stream levels. Various qualitative CAT forecasting techniques are examined, and prospects for an effective quantitative index to aid aviation meteorologists in jet stream level turbulence monitoring and forecasting are examined. Finally, the use of on-board sensors for short-term warning is discussed.

  13. Optical Turbulence Forecasting: A Tutorial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-22

    by the term x in Eq. (57) under the integral sign , and x is to be interpreted as the distance from the receiver. In the case where N L<< I (that is...the weighting function W given by W - [L - z] 5/6 (66) This is the physical reason for x 5 / 6 under the integral sign in Eq. (57). 3.3.2 THE "WEAK

  14. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ngari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yao, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey for astronomical observatories and optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique and atmospheric optical transportation. The numerical approach, by use of meteorological parameters and according to parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as Cn2 profile, coherent length, coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and outer scale of turbulence. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by National Astronomical Observatories of China site survey team imply that the south-west Tibet, Ngari, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm sites. For searching the best site in Ngari area of hundreds of kilometers, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are given by the 1°x1°NCEP Global Final Analysis data. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented. The field investigation for the potential good site are also given.

  15. Optical distortions by compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ali

    Optical distortions induced by refractive index fluctuations in turbulent flows are a serious concern in airborne communication and imaging systems. This project focuses on aero-optical flows in which compressible turbulence is the dominant source of optical distortions. These flows include boundary layers, free shear layers, cavity flows, and wakes typically associated with flight conditions. The present study consists of two theoretical analyses and an extensive numerical investigation of optical distortions by separated shear layers and turbulent wakes. We present an analysis of far-field optical statistics in a general aero-optical framework. Based on this analysis, measures of far-field distortion, such as tilt, spread, and loss of focus-depth, are linked to key flow statistics. By employing these measures, we quantify distortion effects through a set of norms that have provable scaling properties with key optical parameters. The second analysis presents a theoretical estimate of the range of optically important flow scales in an arbitrary aero-optical flowfield. We show that in the limit of high Reynolds numbers, the smallest optically important scale does not depend on the Kolmogorov scale. For a given geometry this length scale depends only on the flow Mach number, freestream refractive index, and the optical wavelength. The provided formula can be used to estimate grid resolution requirements for numerical simulations of aero-optical phenomena. A rough estimate indicates that resolution requirements for accurate prediction of aero-optics is not much higher than typical LES requirements. As a model problem, compressible turbulent flows over a circular cylinder is considered to study the fundamental physics of aero-optical effects. Large-eddy simulation with a high-resolution numerical scheme is employed to compute variations of the refractive index field in the separated shear layers and turbulent wakes in a range of flow Mach numbers (0.2--0.85) and

  16. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  17. Measurements of Turbulent Dissipation During the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-16

    Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment 0601153N 73-6604-03-5 Silvia Matt, Weilin Hou, Sarah Woods, Ewa Jarosz, Wesley Goode and Alan Weidemann Naval...of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment Silvia Matt 1,2, Weilin Hou 2, Sarah Woods 3, Ewa Jarosz 2, Wesley Goode 2...SPEC Inc., Boulder, CO, USA Corresponding author: Silvia Matt: E-mail: silvia.matt.ctr.de@nrlssc.navy.mil Figure 1. Location of stations during BOTEX

  18. Nonlinear Optics and Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Oxford University Alejandro Aceves, (Ph.D., 1988, University of Arizona, Nonlinear Optics), 1988-1989, currently at University of New Mexico 3 Wayne...77; Humboldt Fellowship 1988-89; Member and Chairman 1987-88; NSF Advising Board on Math. Sciences 1986-89; Member, Board of Mathematical Sciences

  19. Optical Turbulence in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    to variations of ocean temperature and salinity is shown to contribute to the degradation, through model and field validation. Lab setup of a...transmission. While some might disagree with the term, as it is not the source of the turbulence, but rather the influences of temperature and/or salinity ...atmospheric optics, incorporating factors affecting the index of refraction (IOR) due to microstructure variations caused by temperature or/and salinity

  20. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  1. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christopher J; Yao, Alison M; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2016-01-29

    We present a spatiotemporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction, and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg-Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatiotemporal vortex-mediated turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability density functions (PDFs) with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  2. Measurements of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Woods, Sarah; Jarosz, Ewa; Goode, Wesley; Weidemann, Alan

    2013-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment (BOTEX) was conducted in the summer of 2011 to investigate the impact of turbulence on underwater optical imaging. Underwater optical properties can be affected by turbulence in the water, due to localized changes in the index of refraction. We discuss measurements of current velocity and temperature, made with a Nortek Vector Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and PME Conductivity- Temperature (CT) probe, as well as observations made with a Rockland Oceanographic Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP). The instruments were deployed in close proximity in the field and in the context of measurements of optical target clarity. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKED) and temperature dissipation (TD) rates are calculated from the ADV/CT measurements and compared to TKED and TD estimated from the data collected with the VMP. The results show reasonable agreement between the two methods; differences are attributed to turbulence patchiness and intermittence, as well as sampling challenges. The study also highlights the importance of collecting concurrent data on temperature, current velocity, and current shear to assess the turbulence impact on underwater optical properties.

  3. Creation of a Dynamical Stratospheric Turbulence Forecasting and Nowcasting Tool for High Altitude Airships and Other Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-20

    propagation to high altitudes (Broutman et al., 2003, 2006, 2008; Eckermann et al., 2006); 3 3. characterization of the statistical potential for...resolution across the forecasting domain. Examples of the turbulence structures for KHI and GW breaking from which we determine turbulence statistics ...improve. deterministic MW and turbulence forecast statistical convective GW and turbulence forecast statistical jet stream GW and

  4. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  5. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  6. Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX): preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Jorosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser; Nootz, Gero; Woods, Sarah; Weidemann, Alan D.; Goode, Wesley; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Metzger, B.; Ramos, B.

    2012-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) was conducted in the coastal waters of Florida and the Bahamas from June 30 to July 12 2011, onboard the R/V FG Walton Smith. The primary objective of the BOTEX was to obtain field measurements of optical turbulence structures, in order to investigate the impacts of the naturally occurring turbulence on underwater imaging and optical beam propagation. In order to successfully image through optical turbulence structures in the water and examine their impacts on optical transmission, a high speed camera and targets (both active and passive) were mounted on a rigid frame to form the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST). To investigate the impacts on active imaging systems such as the laser line scan (LLS), the Telescoping Rigid Underwater Sensor Structure (TRUSS) was designed and implemented by Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. The experiments were designed to determine the resolution limits of LLS systems as a function of turbulence induced beam wander at the target. The impact of natural turbulence structures on lidar backscatter waveforms was also examined, by means of a telescopic receiver and a short pulse transmitter, co-located, on a vertical profiling frame. To include a wide range of water types in terms of optical and physical conditions, data was collected from four different locations. . Impacts from optical turbulence were observed under both strong and weak physical structures. Turbulence measurements were made by two instruments, the Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP) and a 3D acoustical Doppler velocimeter with fast conductivity and temperature probes, in close proximity in the field. Subsequently these were mounted on the IMAST during moored deployments. The turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate and the temperature dissipation rates were calculated from both setups in order to characterize the physical environments and their impacts. Beam deflection by multiple point

  7. Turbulent Transitions in Optical Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangeli, D.; Di Mei, F.; Di Domenico, G.; Agranat, A. J.; Conti, C.; DelRe, E.

    2016-10-01

    We report the direct observation of the onset of turbulence in propagating one-dimensional optical waves. The transition occurs as the disordered hosting material passes from being linear to one with extreme nonlinearity. As the response grows, increased wave interaction causes a modulational unstable quasihomogeneous flow to be superseded by a chaotic and spatially incoherent one. Statistical analysis of high-resolution wave behavior in the turbulent regime unveils the emergence of concomitant rogue waves. The transition, observed in a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal, introduces a new and rich experimental setting for the study of optical wave turbulence and information transport in conditions dominated by large fluctuations and extreme nonlinearity.

  8. Turbulent Transitions in Optical Wave Propagation.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, D; Di Mei, F; Di Domenico, G; Agranat, A J; Conti, C; DelRe, E

    2016-10-28

    We report the direct observation of the onset of turbulence in propagating one-dimensional optical waves. The transition occurs as the disordered hosting material passes from being linear to one with extreme nonlinearity. As the response grows, increased wave interaction causes a modulational unstable quasihomogeneous flow to be superseded by a chaotic and spatially incoherent one. Statistical analysis of high-resolution wave behavior in the turbulent regime unveils the emergence of concomitant rogue waves. The transition, observed in a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal, introduces a new and rich experimental setting for the study of optical wave turbulence and information transport in conditions dominated by large fluctuations and extreme nonlinearity.

  9. Geometrical optics analysis of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Davis, Christopher C.

    2013-09-01

    2D phase screen methods have been frequently applied to estimate atmospheric turbulence in free space optic communication and imaging systems. In situations where turbulence is "strong" enough to cause severe discontinuity of the wavefront (small Fried coherence length), the transmitted optic signal behaves more like "rays" rather than "waves". However, to achieve accurate simulation results through ray modeling requires both a high density of rays and a large number of eddies. Moreover, their complicated interactions require significant computational resources. Thus, we introduce a 3D ray model based on simple characteristics of turbulent eddies regardless of their particular geometry. The observed breakup of a beam wave into patches at a receiver and the theoretical description indicates that rays passing through the same sequence of turbulent eddies show "group" behavior whose wavefront can still be regarded as continuous. Thus, in our approach, we have divided the curved trajectory of rays into finite line segments and intuitively related their redirections to the refractive property of large turbulent eddies. As a result, our proposed treatment gives a quick and effective high-density ray simulation of a turbulent channel which only requires knowledge of the magnitude of the refractive index deviations. And our method points out a potential correction in reducing equivalent Cn2 by applying adaptive optics. This treatment also shows the possibility of extending 2D phase screen simulations into more general 3D treatments.

  10. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency.

  11. Impacts of optical turbulence on underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Woods, S.; Goode, W.; Jarosz, E.; Weidemann, A.

    2011-06-01

    Optical signal transmission underwater is of vital interests to both civilian and military applications. The range and signal to noise during the transmission, as a function of system and water optical properties determines the effectiveness of EO technology. These applications include diver visibility, search and rescue, mine detection and identification, and optical communications. The impact of optical turbulence on underwater imaging has been postulated and observed by many researchers. However, no quantative studies have been done until recently, in terms of both the environmental conditions, and impacts on image quality as a function of range and spatial frequencies. Image data collected from field measurements during SOTEX (Skaneateles Optical Turbulence Exercise, July 22-31, 2010) using the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST) are presented. Optical properties of the water column in the field were measured using WETLab's ac-9 and Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometer (LISST, Sequoia Scientific), in coordination with physical properties including CTD (Seabird), dissipation rate of kinetic energy and heat, using both the Vector velocimeter and CT combo (Nortek and PME), and shear probe based Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP, Rockland). The strong stratification structure in the water column provides great opportunity to observe various dissipation strengths throughout the water column, which corresponds directly with image quality as shown. Initial results demonstrate general agreement between data collected and model prediction, while discrepancies between measurements and model suggest higher spatial and temporal observations are needed in the future.

  12. Can Turbulence Dominate Depolarization of Optical Blazars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2017-07-01

    We carefully examine the depolarization feature of blazars in the optical and near-infrared bands using the sample of Mead et al. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence could be one possible reason for the depolarization of optical/infrared blazars when we apply the theoretical analysis of Lazarian & Pogosyan. We further identify in the sample that the depolarization results shown in most blazars roughly obey the form of the three-dimensional anisotropic Kolmogorov scaling. The effective Faraday rotation window length scale is not small enough to resolve the polarization correlation length scale in the blazar sample. The depolarization and the related turbulent features show diversities in different blazar sources. We suggest more simultaneous observations in both the optical/infrared and the high-energy bands for the study of the blazar polarization.

  13. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Moore, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  14. Significance of anisotropy and the outer scale of turbulence for optical and radio seeing.

    PubMed

    Coulman, C E; Vernin, J

    1991-01-01

    The small value found for the outer scale of turbulence (namely, Optical and radio seeing measurements are analyzed in support of a proposed turbulence spectrum which exhibits a spectral gap for scales (and hence interferometer baselines) between approximately 10 and 1500 m but which obeys a 5/3 power law between 1500 and 20,000 m. The implications for forecasting the performance of optical and radio telescopes and interferometers are important.

  15. Application of Transient Turbulence Theory to Mesoscale Numerical Weather Forecasting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    convective boundary layer evaluated from large-eddy simulation. J. Atmos. Sci., (in press). Errico , R., and D . Baumhefner, 1987: Predictability...Nature of Turbulence b. Implementation of Turbulent Mixing c. Vertical Mixing d . Horizontal Mixing e. Computional Efficiency 3. Surface Heat Flus with...Li g~VJ ’d’C f ’: ... ..... . By Or ,tibutiur’ A,- *li y C,..eS U~st ,,c l + I iii 1. Introduction The parameterization of turbulence in meso- and

  16. A Bayesian regularized artificial neural network for adaptive optics forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Li, Xinyang; Qin, Xiaolin; Wang, Huiyong

    2017-01-01

    Real-time adaptive optics is a technology for enhancing the resolution of ground-based optical telescopes and overcoming the disturbance of atmospheric turbulence. The performance of the system is limited by delay errors induced by the servo system and photoelectrons noise of wavefront sensor. In order to cut these delay errors, this paper proposes a novel model to forecast the future control voltages of the deformable mirror. The predictive model is constructed by a multi-layered back propagation network with Bayesian regularization (BRBP). For the purpose of parallel computation and less disturbance, we adopt a number of sub-BP neural networks to substitute the whole network. The Bayesian regularized network assigns a probability to the network weights, allowing the network to automatically and optimally penalize excessively complex models. The simulation results show that the BRBP introduces smaller mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square errors (MSE) than other typical algorithms. Meanwhile, real data analysis results show that the BRBP model has strong generalization capability and parallelism.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  18. Forecasting Fluid Flows Using the Geometry of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Balachandra; Tithof, Jeffrey; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-03-01

    The existence and dynamical role of particular unstable solutions (exact coherent structures) of the Navier-Stokes equation is revealed in laboratory studies of weak turbulence in a thin, electromagnetically driven fluid layer. We find that the dynamics exhibit clear signatures of numerous unstable equilibrium solutions, which are computed using a combination of flow measurements from the experiment and fully resolved numerical simulations. We demonstrate the dynamical importance of these solutions by showing that turbulent flows visit their state space neighborhoods repeatedly. Furthermore, we find that the unstable manifold associated with one such unstable equilibrium predicts the evolution of turbulent flow in both experiment and simulation for a considerable period of time.

  19. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  20. Optical Random Riemann Waves in Integrable Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Gustave, François; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2017-06-01

    We examine integrable turbulence (IT) in the framework of the defocusing cubic one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This is done theoretically and experimentally, by realizing an optical fiber experiment in which the defocusing Kerr nonlinearity strongly dominates linear dispersive effects. Using a dispersive-hydrodynamic approach, we show that the development of IT can be divided into two distinct stages, the initial, prebreaking stage being described by a system of interacting random Riemann waves. We explain the low-tailed statistics of the wave intensity in IT and show that the Riemann invariants of the asymptotic nonlinear geometric optics system represent the observable quantities that provide new insight into statistical features of the initial stage of the IT development by exhibiting stationary probability density functions.

  1. Modeling, simulation, and estimation of optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formwalt, Byron Paul

    This dissertation documents three new contributions to simulation and modeling of optical turbulence. The first contribution is the formalization, optimization, and validation of a modeling technique called successively conditioned rendering (SCR). The SCR technique is empirically validated by comparing the statistical error of random phase screens generated with the technique. The second contribution is the derivation of the covariance delineation theorem, which provides theoretical bounds on the error associated with SCR. It is shown empirically that the theoretical bound may be used to predict relative algorithm performance. Therefore, the covariance delineation theorem is a powerful tool for optimizing SCR algorithms. For the third contribution, we introduce a new method for passively estimating optical turbulence parameters, and demonstrate the method using experimental data. The technique was demonstrated experimentally, using a 100 m horizontal path at 1.25 m above sun-heated tarmac on a clear afternoon. For this experiment, we estimated C2n ≈ 6.01 · 10-9 m-23 , l0 ≈ 17.9 mm, and L0 ≈ 15.5 m.

  2. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  3. Improved Climatological Characterization of Optical Turbulence for Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2010-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical or other telescopes. In addition, the quality of service of a free space optical communications link may also be impacted. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, particularly for OCONUS locations, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers (MHPCC) Mana cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering several hundreds of kilometers. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro). Nearly two years of simulations have been performed over various regions

  4. Simple algorithms for calculating optical communication performance through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, J. H.; Harney, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation through turbulence can impose severe limitations on the performance of atmospheric optical communication links. Previous studies have established quantitative results for turbulence-induced beam spread, angular spread, and scintillation. This paper develops communication-theory results for single-bit and message transmission through turbulence. Programmable calculator algorithms for evaluating these results are given, and used to examine system performance in some realistic scenarios. These algorithms make it possible for the uninitiated communication engineer to rapidly assess the effects of turbulence on an atmospheric optical communication link.

  5. Optical properties of a planar turbulent jet.

    PubMed

    Joia, I A; Perkins, R J; Uscinski, B J; Balmer, G; Jordan, D; Jakeman, E

    1995-10-20

    A planar heated air jet was constructed. Its flow properties were characterized and shown to be both reproducible and in good agreement with the results of turbulence theory. The optical properties of the jet were studied with the help of a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser beam. The random phase modulations imposed on the wave front of the beam traversing the jet were measured by interferometric means, and their spectra and variance were determined. The one-dimensional phase fluctuation spectrum obeyed a -8/3 power law as predicted by theory, whereas the phase variance (?(2)) depended on the jet temperature and was studied for values to as high as 0.4 (rad)(2)).

  6. Statistics of optical vortex wander on propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yalong

    2013-04-01

    The transverse position of an optical vortex on propagation through atmospheric turbulence is studied. The probability density of the optical vortex position on a transverse plane in the atmosphere is formulated in weak turbulence by using the Born approximation. With these formulas, the effect of aperture averaging on topological charge detection is investigated. These results provide quantitative guidelines for the design of an optimal detector of topological charge, which has potential application in optical vortex communication systems.

  7. Atmospheric Turbulence Measurements in Support of Adaptive Optics Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    RADC D. Stebbins Optical Cn2 profile#2 AFGL E. Murphy Optical scintillometer (r0 ) NPS D. Walter Optical scintillometer (80 ) AFWL J. Davidson - 9...stratosphere ( Walters and Kunkel, 1981). The ALLCAT (i.e., HICAT, MEDCAT, etc.) program of the late 1960’s focused primarily on large scale turbulence...radar", C.W. Fairall, RISO National Laboratory (Denmark), Aug. 6, 1986. "Turbulence measurements with Doppler profilers", D.W. Thomson, Naval

  8. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-05

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  9. Characterizing inertial and convective optical turbulence by detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funes, Gustavo; Figueroa, Eduardo; Gulich, Damián.; Zunino, Luciano; Pérez, Darío. G.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is usually simulated at the laboratory by generating convective free flows with hot surfaces, or heaters. It is tacitly assumed that propagation experiments in this environment are comparable to those usually found outdoors. Nevertheless, it is unclear under which conditions the analogy between convective and isotropic turbulence is valid; that is, obeying Kolmogorov isotropic models. For instance, near-ground-level turbulence often is driven by shear ratchets deviating from established inertial models. In this case, a value for the structure constant can be obtained but it would be unable to distinguish between both classes of turbulence. We have performed a conceptually simple experiment of laser beam propagation through two types of artificial turbulence: isotropic turbulence generated by a turbulator [Proc. SPIE 8535, 853508 (2012)], and convective turbulence by controlling the temperature of electric heaters. In both cases, a thin laser beam propagates across the turbulent path, and its wandering is registered by a position sensor detector. The strength of the optical turbulence, in terms of the structure constant, is obtained from the wandering variance. It is expressed as a function of the temperature difference between cold and hot sources in each setup. We compare the time series behaviour for each turbulence with increasing turbulence strength by estimating the Hurst exponent, H, through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Refractive index fluctuations are inherently fractal; this characteristic is reflected in their spectra power-law dependence—in the inertial range. This fractal behaviour is inherited by time series of optical quantities, such as the wandering, by the occurrence of long-range correlations. By analyzing the wandering time series with this technique, we are able to correlate the turbulence strength to the value of the Hurt exponent. Ultimately, we characterize both types of turbulence.

  10. Turbulence profiling for adaptive optics tomographic reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidlaw, Douglas J.; Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard W.; Morris, Timothy J.; Butterley, Timothy; Reeves, Andrew P.; Townson, Matthew J.; Gendron, Éric; Vidal, Fabrice; Morel, Carine

    2016-07-01

    To approach optimal performance advanced Adaptive Optics (AO) systems deployed on ground-based telescopes must have accurate knowledge of atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude. Stereo-SCIDAR is a high-resolution stereoscopic instrument dedicated to this measure. Here, its profiles are directly compared to internal AO telemetry atmospheric profiling techniques for CANARY (Vidal et al. 20141), a Multi-Object AO (MOAO) pathfinder on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma. In total twenty datasets are analysed across July and October of 2014. Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithms dubbed Direct Fitting and Learn 2 Step (L2S; Martin 20142) are used in the recovery of profile information via covariance matrices - respectively attaining average Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients with stereo-SCIDAR of 0.2 and 0.74. By excluding the measure of covariance between orthogonal Wavefront Sensor (WFS) slopes these results have revised values of 0.65 and 0.2. A data analysis technique that combines L2S and SLODAR is subsequently introduced that achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  11. Trajectory of an optical vortex in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dipankar, A; Marchiano, R; Sagaut, P

    2009-10-01

    Trajectory of an optical vortex has been identified for its propagation in atmospheric turbulence using numerical simulations. An analytical expression has been found, relating the radial departure of the vortex in plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation, to the refractive index structure function parameter and the inner scale of turbulence. The angular orientation of the vortex in the same transverse plane is found to be related to the anisotropy of the medium. The obtained results provide an alternative way to find turbulent parameters with the help of optical vortices.

  12. Beam wander due to optical turbulence in water (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nootz, Gero A.; Matt, Silvia C.; Kanaev, Andrey V.; Jarosz, Ewa; Hou, Weilin W.

    2017-05-01

    Optical methods to communicate or sense in the ocean environment can be effected inhomogeneities in the index of refraction called optical turbulence. Beam wander introduced by optical turbulence is of particular interest for optical means relying on the propagation of a well-defined laser beam such as free space communication and laser line scan. Here we present a comprehensive study of beam propagation simulations, lab experiments, and field measurements of laser beams propagating through varying degrees of optical turbulence. For the computational part of the investigation a true end to end simulation was performed. Starting with a CFD simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection the temperature fields where converted to index of refraction phase screens which then where used to simulate the propagation of a focused Gaussian laser beam via the split-step Fourier method. Lab experiments where conducted using the same parameters as in the simulation using a good quality TEM00 beam and a CCD camera to record data. For the field experiments a Telescoping Ridged Underwater Sensor Structure (TRUSS) was equipped with a transmitter and a receiver capable of analyzing a multitude of laser beams simultaneously. The TRUSS was deployed in the Bahamas to record beam wander under weak optical turbulence conditions above and stronger optical turbulence conditions inside the thermocline. The data from the experimental and lab experiments are compared and the strength of the optical turbulence in terms of the structure parameter Cn2 are extracted. We also extract Cn2 from the TRUSS experiments and in doing so provide, for the first time, a quantitative estimate for the strength of optical turbulence in the ocean.

  13. Update of upper level turbulence forecast by reducing unphysical components of topography in the numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hun; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Sharman, Robert D.; Klemp, Joseph B.

    2016-07-01

    On 2 November 2015, unrealistically large areas of light-or-stronger turbulence were predicted by the WRF-RAP (Weather Research and Forecast Rapid Refresh)-based operational turbulence forecast system over the western U.S. mountainous regions, which were not supported by available observations. These areas are reduced by applying additional terrain averaging, which damps out the unphysical components of small-scale (~2Δx) energy aloft induced by unfiltered topography in the initialization of the WRF model. First, a control simulation with the same design of the WRF-RAP model shows that the large-scale atmospheric conditions are well simulated but predict strong turbulence over the western mountainous region. Four experiments with different levels of additional terrain smoothing are applied in the initialization of the model integrations, which significantly reduce spurious mountain-wave-like features, leading to better turbulence forecasts more consistent with the observed data.

  14. Hot-air turbulence generator for multiconjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Onur; Jolissaint, Laurent; Bradley, Colin; Dost, Sadik; Sharf, Inna

    2003-12-01

    In this article, a simple low-cost, statistically repeatable, hot air optical turbulence generator based on the mixing of two air flows with different temperatures is described. Characterization results show that it is possible to create any turbulence strength up to CN2Δh ≍ 6 x 10-10 m1/3, allowing Fried's parameter as small as r0 ≍ 1.7 mm for one crossing through the turbulator or r0 ≍ 1.1 mm for two crossings. Outer scale of (L0 ≍ 133 +/- 60 mm) is found to be compatible to the turbulator chamber size (170 mm), and inner scale (l0 ≍ 7.6 mm +/- 3.8 mm) compatible with usual values measured by other authors for the free atmosphere. Power spectrum analysis of the centroid of the focused image shows a perfect and accurate agreement with Kolmogorov's theory, allowing to conclude that this device can be used with confidence to emulate good and easily controllable turbulence. In particular, this turbulator will be used with the MCAO test bench developed at the University of Victoria. By allowing two passes of the optical beam through the turbulator, without overlapping, two independent turbulent layers, set at equivalent altitudes of 5 and 15 km above the telescope entrance pupil, will be generated.

  15. Forecast analysis of optical waveguide bus performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledesma, R.; Rourke, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Elements to be considered in the design of a data bus include: architecture; data rate; modulation, encoding, detection; power distribution requirements; protocol, work structure; bus reliability, maintainability; interterminal transmission medium; cost; and others specific to application. Fiber- optic data bus considerations for a 32 port transmissive star architecture, are discussed in a tutorial format. General optical-waveguide bus concepts, are reviewed. The electrical and optical performance of a 32 port transmissive star bus, and the effects of temperature on the performance of optical-waveguide buses are examined. A bibliography of pertinent references and the bus receiver test results are included.

  16. Gauging the Turbulent Mach Numbers in Optically Thick Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, B.; Lazarian, A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Turbulence is a critical component of the current paradigms of star formation, particle transport, magnetic reconnection and evolution of the ISM. Progress on this difficult subject is made via theoretical predictions, numerical simulations and observational studies. For star forming molecular clouds in particular, turbulence plays a role in supporting clouds from gravitational collapse and dense filamentary structures created by shocks via supersonic turbulence could act as a catalyst for stellar birth. However, diagnosing turbulence in these dense molecular regions is not straightforward, with additional complications including varying optical depth effects and thermal excitation. We study the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of simulations of MHD turbulence with radiative transfer effects included (specifically looking at the 13CO 2-1 transition) in order to gauge whether the sonic Mach number can be determined in optically thick turbulent environments. From the simulations, we create synthetic integrated intensity maps with different sonic Mach numbers and vary optical depth and thermal excitation by changing the average density(ρ) and molecular abundance (X/H2). We show that PDF descriptors such as the moments and the Tsallis distribution are sensitive to the changes in optical depth as well as the sonic Mach number in 13CO 2-1 integrated intensity maps. This opens up avenues for studying the relationship between the compressibility of GMC clouds and star formation using simple statistical methods.

  17. Generalized anisotropic turbulence spectra and applications in the optical waves' propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2015-11-16

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. In this work, two theoretical atmosphere refractive-index fluctuations spectral models are derived for optical waves propagating through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. They consider simultaneously the finite turbulence inner and outer scales and the asymmetric property of turbulence eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path. Two anisotropy factors which parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane, so that the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence eddies in the xy-plane is no longer required. Deviations from the classic 11/3 power law behavior in the spectrum model are also allowed by assuming power law value variations between 3 and 4. Based on the derived anisotropic spectral model and the Rytov approximation theory, expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived spectral models and the variance of AOA fluctuations.

  18. The impact of optical turbulence on particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Nootz, Gero; Hellman, Samuel; Hou, Weilin

    2017-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a well-established tool to collect high-resolution velocity and turbulence data in the laboratory. PIV measurements are based on using a laser sheet to illuminate a flow seeded with small particles and taking quick successive images or image pairs of the illuminated particle field with a CCD or CMOS camera. The movement of the particles between images can be used to infer flow field velocities over an image area. During experiments at the Simulated Turbulence and Turbidity Environment (SiTTE) laboratory tank, we observed a marked influence of optical turbulence, i.e. strong temperature gradients leading to changes in the index of refraction, on particle imaging in PIV. The particles look blurred and have a "shooting star" appearance. PIV is routinely used in flows with very high temperature gradients, such as nuclear reactor cooling rods, but the optical path length is typically very short (on the order of cm), and no such effect is generally considered for measurements in liquids. We investigated the effect of optical turbulence on PIV imaging for various optical path lengths (0.5m to 2m) and turbulence strengths. Velocities from the PIV measurements were calculated using the algorithms provided within Dantec's Dynamic Studio and compared to velocities from concurrent velocity point measurements with a Laser Doppler Velocimetry system. The results indicate that optical turbulence can affect PIV measurements in liquids, and that depending on the strength of the optical turbulence and path length, care needs to be taken to mediate this effect using appropriate post-processing techniques when inferring velocities from PIV data.

  19. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis Shane

    1999-11-01

    Many creative approaches have been taken in the past for simulating the effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams. Most of the experimental architectures have been complicated and consisted of many optical elements as well as moving components. These techniques have shown a modicum of success; however, they are not completely controllable or predictable. A benchtop technique for experimentally producing one important effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams (phase distortion) is presented here. The system is completely controllable and predictable while accurately representing the statistical nature of the problem. Previous experimentation in optical processing through turbulent media has demonstrated that optical wavefront distortions can be produced via spatial light modulating (SLM) devices, and most turbulence models and experimental results indicate that turbulence can be represented as a phase fluctuation. The amplitude distributions in the resulting far field are primarily due to propagation of the phase. Operating a liquid crystal television (LCTV) in the ``phase- mostly'' mode, a phase fluctuation type model for turbulence is utilized in the present investigation, and a real-time experiment for demonstrating the effects was constructed. For an optical system to simulate optical wavefront distortions due to atmospheric turbulence, the following are required: (1)An optical element that modulates the phasefront of an optical beam (2)A model and a technique for generating spatially correlated turbulence simulating distributions (3)Hardware and software for displaying and manipulating the information addressing the optical phase modulation device The LCTV is ideal for this application. When operated in the ``phase-mostly'' mode some LCTVs can modulate the phasefront of an optical beam by as much as 2π and an algorithm for generating spatially correlated phase screens can be constructed via mathematical modeling software such as

  20. Critical issues encountered in experiments and measurements involving optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.

    2007-02-01

    The successful design and operation of high energy laser (HEL) and laser communication systems require a comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the real turbulent atmosphere coupled with high-fidelity realistic laser beam propagation models. To date, modeling and simulation of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence have relied upon a traditional theoretical basis that assumes the existence of homogeneous, isotropic, stationary, and Kolmogorov turbulence. The real impact of the refractive index structure parameter ( C2 n ) on laser beam propagation including effects of non-classical turbulence as well as inner (l °) and outer scale (L °) effects will be examined. Observations clearly show turbulence is often layered and is produced by wave activity and episodic events such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Other critical turbulence issues involve the relationship between mechanical and optical turbulence and the effect of path variability of turbulence and inner scale on optical turbulence parameters over long paths. These issues will be examined from data obtained from five systems: a) a new measurement platform using a free-flying balloon that lifts a ring with a boom upon which are mounted several fine wire (1-μm diameter) sensors to measure high-speed temperature and velocity fluctuations, b) a new system using a kite/tethered blimp platform that obtains both profile and measurements at a fixed altitude over time, c) a 50 MHz radar at Vandenberg Air Force Base that senses at high temporal and spatial resolution to 20 km ASL, d) an instrumented aircraft system, and e) a suite of optical systems. The first four systems all provide estimates of C2 n , the eddy dissipation rate (\\Vegr), l ° and L °. Methods of calibration and problems of interpreting results from the measurement systems are discussed.

  1. A domain analysis approach to clear-air turbulence forecasting using high-density in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, Jennifer A.

    Pilots' ability to avoid clear-air turbulence (CAT) during flight affects the safety of the millions of people who fly commercial airlines and other aircraft, and turbulence costs millions in injuries and aircraft maintenance every year. Forecasting CAT is not straightforward, however; microscale features like the turbulence eddies that affect aircraft (100m) are below the current resolution of operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and the only evidence of CAT episodes, until recently, has been sparse, subjective reports from pilots known as PIREPs. To forecast CAT, researchers use a simple weighted sum of top-performing turbulence indicators derived from NWP model outputs---termed diagnostics---based on their agreement with current PIREPs. However, a new, quantitative source of observation data---high-density measurements made by sensor equipment and software on aircraft, called in-situ measurements---is now available. The main goal of this thesis is to develop new data analysis and processing techniques to apply to the model and new observation data, in order to improve CAT forecasting accuracy. This thesis shows that using in-situ data improves forecasting accuracy and that automated machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVM), logistic regression, and random forests, can match current performance while eliminating almost all hand-tuning. Feature subset selection is paired with the new algorithms to choose diagnostics that predict well as a group rather than individually. Specializing forecasts and choice of diagnostics by geographic region further improves accuracy because of the geographic variation in turbulence sources. This work uses random forests to find climatologically-relevant regions based on these variations and implements a forecasting system testbed which brings these techniques together to rapidly prototype new, regionalized versions of operational CAT forecasting systems.

  2. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence for optical systems with extended sources.

    PubMed

    Safari, Majid; Hranilovic, Steve

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the method of random wave vectors for simulation of atmospheric turbulence is extended to 2D×2D space to provide spatial degrees of freedom at both input and output planes. The modified technique can thus simultaneously simulate the turbulence-induced log-amplitude and phase distortions for optical systems with extended sources either implemented as a single large aperture or multiple apertures. The reliability of our simulation technique is validated in different conditions and its application is briefly investigated in a multibeam free-space optical communication scenario.

  3. Turbulence Characterization for Ground to Satellite MEMS Based Free Space Optical Communication System in Weak Atmospheric Turbulence Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Agnibesh; Kumar, Vivek; Kaushal, Hemani; Aennam, Harika; Jain, V. K.; Kar, Subrat; Joseph, Joby

    2011-10-01

    The performance of laser communication systems operating in the atmosphere is degraded by atmospheric turbulence effects, which causes irradiance fluctuations in the received signal and result in a random signal fades. We propose to simulate this effect in laboratory using an optical turbulence generator chamber and to measure the level of turbulence using CMOS array.

  4. Lidar sounding of the optical parameter of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvich, A. S.; Fortus, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a lidar intended for clear air turbulence (CAT) positioning on the basis of the backscatter enhancement (BSE) effect is analyzed using a turbulence model with a power-law spectrum. Systematic distortions occurring due to a need to regularize the lidar positioning problem solution are estimated. It is shown that the effect of molecular viscosity of air on the positioning result can be neglected if the wave parameter, which characterizes the diffraction manifestation, is higher than 3. This corresponds to sounding ranges of more than 1 km for optical or UV lidars. The analysis results show that the BSE lidar positioning accuracy weakly depends on the exponent in the turbulence spectrum in regions of severe turbulence. The results can justify a physical experiment for the design of an aircraft system for the lidar detection of CAT regions ahead of the flight course.

  5. Introduction to Wave Turbulence Formalisms for Incoherent Optical Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Antonio; Garnier, Josselin; Xu, Gang; Rica, Sergio

    We provide an introduction to different wave turbulence formalisms describing the propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in nonlinear media. We consider the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model accounting for a nonlocal or a noninstantaneous nonlinearity, as well as higher-order dispersion effects. We discuss the wave turbulence kinetic equation describing, e.g., wave condensation or wave thermalization through supercontinuum generation; the Vlasov formalism describing incoherent modulational instabilities and the formation of large scale incoherent localized structures in analogy with long-range gravitational systems; and the weak Langmuir turbulence formalism describing spectral incoherent solitons, as well as spectral shock or collapse singularities. Finally, recent developments and some open questions are discussed, in particular in relation with a wave turbulence formulation of laser systems and different mechanisms of breakdown of thermalization.

  6. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence-induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Gregory, Don A.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time liquid crystal television-based technique for simulating optical wavefront distortion due to atmospheric turbulence is presented and demonstrated. A liquid crystal television (LCTV) operating in the "phase mostly" mode was used as an array of spatially correlated phase delays. A movie of the arrays in motion was then generated and displayed on the LCTV. The turbulence simulation system was verified by passing a collimated and doubled diode pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser beam (532 nm) through the transparent LCTV screen. The beam was then passed through a lens and the power spectra of the turbulence information carrying beam was detected as a measure of the far-field distribution. The same collimated laser beam, without the LCTV, was also transmitted down an open-air range and the power spectra detected as a measure of a real far-field distribution. Accepted turbulence parameters were measured for both arrangements and then compared.

  7. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  8. Aero-optical interaction mechanisms and resolution robustness in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Fazlul Rahim

    Turbulence is a fundamental phenomena found is a wide variety of large Reynolds number flows with many practical and theoretical applications. This dissertation will outline studies done on turbulent free shear layers in order to gain a greater fundamental understanding of more complex turbulent flow fields. This study will focus on directed energy propagation through turbulence, imaging and image resolution robustness of turbulence, and the multi-fractal nature of turbulent scalar interfaces. In the first part of this study, aero-optical interactions along laser beam propagation paths in turbulent compressible separated shear layers are examined on the basis of combined experiments and computations of the aero-optical phenomena. We introduce the idea of the interaction optical path difference (IOPD), and its associated r.m.s. value (IOPD rms), and we investigate these quantities as functions of the laser beam propagation distance throughout the flow and also as functions of the laser aperture size. Evidence of non-monotonic behavior of the IOPDrms , shown by partial reductions in the aperture-averaged laser aberrations, as a function of propagation distance in the flow is observed for individual realizations. The extent of this non-monotonic behavior depends on the orientation of, and gradients across, the refractive turbulent interfaces. These observations of non-monotonic behavior suggest the presence of a fundamental turbulence-induced self-correction mechanism, determined by the geometrical and physical properties of the high-gradient refractive interfaces, that can be utilized to optimize aero-optical effects in airborne directed energy applications. In addition, this work investigates the extent of aero-optical resolution robustness, i.e. the effects of resolution reduction on the aero-optical interactions, using combined experiments and computations. High-resolution images of the refractive index field in turbulent compressible separated shear layers at

  9. Investigation of Outer Length Scale In Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    experimental situations. This thesis investigated three outer scales of turbulence using experimental data from two instruments: microthermal probes...represents the size of the velocity fluctuations and the boundary thermal convective cell size. The microthermal balloon data had excessive scatter...optical structure parameter C than the microthermal balloon data. The separation of daytime convective thermal plumes was found from the acoustic

  10. Characterising atmospheric optical turbulence using stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Butterley, Tim; Föhring, Dora; Wilson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereo-SCIDAR (SCIntillation Detection and Ranging) is a development to the well known SCIDAR method for characterisation of the Earth's atmospheric optical turbulence. Here we present some interesting capabilities, comparisons and results from a recent campaign on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma.

  11. Validation of Optical Turbulence Simulations from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model in Support of Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of air to air laser communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers Jaws cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering the islands of Maui and the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro) between the summits of Haleakala and Mauna Loa. Over six months of simulations have been performed over this area. Simulations indicate that

  12. Measurements of optical underwater turbulence under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Gladysz, S.; Almeida de Sá Barros, R.; Matt, S.; Nootz, G. A.; Josset, D. B.; Hou, W.

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam propagation underwater is becoming an important research topic because of high demand for its potential applications. Namely, ability to image underwater at long distances is highly desired for scientific and military purposes, including submarine awareness, diver visibility, and mine detection. Optical communication in the ocean can provide covert data transmission with much higher rates than that available with acoustic techniques, and it is now desired for certain military and scientific applications that involve sending large quantities of data. Unfortunately underwater environment presents serious challenges for propagation of laser beams. Even in clean ocean water, the extinction due to absorption and scattering theoretically limit the useful range to few attenuation lengths. However, extending the laser light propagation range to the theoretical limit leads to significant beam distortions due to optical underwater turbulence. Experiments show that the magnitude of the distortions that are caused by water temperature and salinity fluctuations can significantly exceed the magnitude of the beam distortions due to atmospheric turbulence even for relatively short propagation distances. We are presenting direct measurements of optical underwater turbulence in controlled conditions of laboratory water tank using two separate techniques involving wavefront sensor and LED array. These independent approaches will enable development of underwater turbulence power spectrum model based directly on the spatial domain measurements and will lead to accurate predictions of underwater beam propagation.

  13. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. Development of a lidar technique for profiling optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Roberts, David; Stewart, John; Wood, Jack

    2012-10-01

    Many techniques have been proposed for active optical remote sensing of the strength of atmospheric refractive turbulence. The early techniques, based on degradation of laser beams by turbulence, were susceptible to artifacts. In 1999, we began investigating a new idea, based on differential image motion (DIM), which is inherently immune to artifacts. The new lidar technique can be seen as a combination of two astronomical instruments: a laser guide star transmitter/receiver and a DIM monitor. The technique was successfully demonstrated on a horizontal path, with a hard-target analog of a lidar, and then a true lidar was developed. Several investigations were carried out first, including an analysis to predict the system's performance; new hard-target field measurements in the vertical direction; development of a robust inversion technique; and wave optics simulations. A brassboard lidar was then constructed and operated in the field, along with instruments to acquire truth data. The tests revealed many problems and pitfalls that were all solvable with engineering changes, and the results served to verify the new lidar technique for profiling turbulence. The results also enabled accurate performance predictions for future versions of the lidar. A transportable turbulence lidar system is currently being developed to support field tests of high-energy lasers.

  15. First results from optical turbulence measurements at Cerro Las Campanas in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdja, A.; Prieto, G.; Thomas-Osip, J. E.

    2011-09-01

    We report preliminary results from optical turbulence measurements carried out in 2010 at Cerro Las Campanas, the future site for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). The instruments involved are MooSci, a lunar scintillometer for the near-ground optical turbulence profile, Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) for the whole atmosphere total seeing, and MASS Multiple Aperture Scintillation Sensor (MASS) for high-altitude optical turbulence estimation. The main purpose of these measurements is to anticipate the optical turbulence strength above the future GMT enclosure, and to provide a means to model the future adaptive optics performance. We also discuss the significance of such a combination of instruments and some hypothetical limitations.

  16. Analytic improvements to the atmospheric turbulence optical transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David H.

    2003-09-01

    The standard method used for modeling optical turbulence effects on imaging uses an optical transfer function (OTF). To model this function the short- and long-exposure limiting cases exist. The short-exposure case is handled by modifying the long-exposure case to remove wavefront tilt assessed at the sensor entrance pupil. Then, depending on whether one is in the "near-field" or the "far-field," one of two subcases is used. These evaluations require a model of the refractive index spectrum. Typically this model is assumed to be the Kolmogorov spectrum where an inner scale is set to zero and outer scale is infinite. However, for real atmospheres the inner and outer scales affect turbulence predictions through a modified spectrum. The difficulty using non-limiting values for these parameters is that double integrals must then be assessed. However, in this paper analytic forms are developed to describe the spectrum, permitting analytic solutions to these integrals. The result is that we can express quantities such as the Fried coherence diameter in closed form accounting for both inner and outer scale effects. Also, expressions for the inner and outer scales of turbulence can be written as functions of the atmospheric surface layer stability. Lastly, it is shown that the near/far-field effect does not easily subdivide into two cases. In fact, the distance dependence of the tilt effect is shown to span a range of 107 in the governing dimensionless parameter. To model this continuum a unified treatment is considered.

  17. Turbulence profiling methods applied to ESO's adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Javier; Béchet, Clémentine; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Gonté, Frédéric; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; Neichel, Benoît; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-07-01

    Two algorithms were recently studied for C2n profiling from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements on GeMS (Gemini Multi-Conjugate AO system). They both rely on the Slope Detection and Ranging (SLODAR) approach, using spatial covariances of the measurements issued from various wavefront sensors. The first algorithm estimates the C2n profile by applying the truncated least-squares inverse of a matrix modeling the response of slopes covariances to various turbulent layer heights. In the second method, the profile is estimated by deconvolution of these spatial cross-covariances of slopes. We compare these methods in the new configuration of ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), a high-order multiple laser system under integration. For this, we use measurements simulated by the AO cluster of ESO. The impact of the measurement noise and of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. The important influence of the outer scale on the results leads to the development of a new step for outer scale fitting included in each algorithm. This increases the reliability and robustness of the turbulence strength and profile estimations.

  18. Characterization of Fibre Channel over Highly Turbulent Optical Wireless Links

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G W; Henderer, B D; Wilburn, J W; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-28

    We report on the performance characterization and issues associated with using Fibre Channel (FC) over a highly turbulent free-space optical (FSO) link. Fibre Channel is a storage area network standard that provides high throughput with low overhead. Extending FC to FSO links would simplify data transfer from existing high-bandwidth sensors such as synthetic aperture radars and hyperspectral imagers. We measured the behavior of FC protocol at 1 Gbps in the presence of synthetic link dropouts that are typical of turbulent FSO links. Results show that an average bit error rate of less than 2 x 10{sup -8} is mandatory for adequate throughput. More importantly, 10 ns dropouts at a 2 Hz rate were sufficient to cause long (25 s) timeouts in the data transfer. Although no data was lost, this behavior is likely to be objectionable for most applications. Prospects for improvements in hardware and software will be discussed.

  19. Whole-Field Measurements of Turbulent Flow for the Study of Aero-optical Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Aerooptical phenomena associated with the propagation of optical beams and imaging through turbulent index-of-refraction fields have been investigated...Using simultaneous imaging of optical -beam distortion and the turbulent index-or-refraction field, we have documented near-field behavior, following...of TECHNOLOGY Pasadena, California 91125 Whole-field measurements of turbulent flow for the study of aero- optical effects Paul E. Dimotakis Air

  20. Improved solar irradiance forecast with Weather Research and Forecasting model: A Sensitivity test of shallow cumulus clouds to the turbulence process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. K.; Betterton, E. A.; Leuthold, M.; Holmgren, W.; Cronin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of solar irradiance are required for electric utilities to economically integrate substantial amounts of solar power into their power generation portfolios. A common failing of numerical weather models is the prediction of shallow cumulus clouds which are generally difficult to be resolved due to complicated processes in the planetary boundary layer. The present study carried out the sensitivity test of turbulence parameterization for better predicting solar irradiance during the shallow cumulus events near the state of Arizona by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The results from the simulations show that increasing the exchange coefficient leads to enhanced vertical mixing and a deeper mixed layer. At the top of mixed layer, an adiabatically ascending air parcel achieved the water vapour saturation and finally shallow cumulus is generated. A detailed analysis will be discussed in the upcoming conference.

  1. Coherent optical array receiver for PPM signals under atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Fernandez, Michela

    The performance of a coherent free-space optical communications system operating in the presence of turbulence is investigated. Maximum Likelihood Detection techniques are employed to optimally detect Pulse Position Modulated signals with a focal-plane detector array and to reconstruct the turbulence-degraded signals. Laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are described. The key components include two lasers operating at 1064 nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16 element (4 X 4) InGaAs focal-plane detector array, and a data-acquisition and signal-processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In the first part of the experimental results we show convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The second part of the experimental results shows adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed. The third part of the experimental results, in which the main goal of this thesis is achieved, includes an investigation of the performance of the Coherent Optical Receiver Experiment (CORE) at JPL. Bit Error Rate (BER) results are presented for single and multichannel optical receivers where quasi shot noise-limited performance is achieved under simulated turbulence conditions using noncoherent postdetection processing techniques. Theoretical BER expressions are

  2. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmospheric Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; Quick, C.R.; Jolin, L.J.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmidtt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-07-18

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. Two of these processes are atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. The effects of this phenomenon include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to separately simulate the effects of these two processes. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, the authors briefly review a description of the model including the limitations along with a brief summary of previous simulations of individual effects. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility and limitations of the model. Examples presented include assessing the effects for different array sizes on model limitations and effects of varying propagation step sizes on intensity enhancements and intensity probability distributions in the receiver plane.

  3. Effects of organized turbulence structures on the phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon Joo

    1990-01-01

    Phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow is studied. The instantaneous distribution of the index refraction is represented by a passive-scalar field in a computed homogeneous shear flow. The flow contains organized vortical structures (hairpin eddies), which are characteristic of turbulent shear flows. The phase distortion induced by turbulent fluctuations is calculated from the optical path difference through the flow. A conceptual model is proposed for the distribution of scalar fluctuations produced by the hairpin vortices in the shear flow. It is shown that the phase distortion of an optical beam can be minimized by propagating the beam at an angle approximately normal to the organized vortical structures in a turbulent shear flow.

  4. Hot-air optical turbulence generator for the testing of adaptive optics systems: principles and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Onur; Jolissaint, Laurent; Bradley, Colin

    2006-07-01

    A statistically repeatable, hot-air optical turbulence generator, based on the forced mixing of two air flows with different temperatures, is described. Characterization results show that it is possible to generate any turbulence strength up to CN2 Δh≈6×10-10m1/3, allowing a ratio of beam diameter to Fried's parameter as large as D/r0≈25 for one crossing through the turbulator or D/r0≈38 for two crossings. The outer scale (L0≈133±60 mm) is found to be compatible with the turbulator mixing chamber size (170 mm), and the inner scale (l0≈7.6±3.8 mm) is compatible with the values in the literature for the free atmosphere. The temporal power spectrum analysis of the centroid of the focused image shows good agreement with Kolmogorov's theory. Therefore the device can be used with confidence to emulate realistic turbulence in a controlled manner. A calibrated CN2 profile, both in layer altitude and strength, is necessary for the testing of off-axis adaptive optics correction (multiconjugate adaptive optics). Testing was done to calibrate the CN2 profile using the slope detection and ranging technique. The first results, with only one layer, show the validity of the approach and indicate that a multiple-pass scheme is viable with a few modifications of the current setup.

  5. Hot-air optical turbulence generator for the testing of adaptive optics systems: principles and characterization.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Onur; Jolissaint, Laurent; Bradley, Colin

    2006-07-10

    A statistically repeatable, hot-air optical turbulence generator, based on the forced mixing of two air flows with different temperatures, is described. Characterization results show that it is possible to generate any turbulence strength up to CN2 Dh approximately 6 x 10(-10) m1/3, allowing a ratio of beam diameter to Fried's parameter as large as D/r0 approximately 25 for one crossing through the turbulator or D/r0 approximately 38 for two crossings. The outer scale (L0 approximately 133 +/- 60 mm) is found to be compatible with the turbulator mixing chamber size (170 mm), and the inner scale (l0 approximately 7.6 +/- 3.8 mm) is compatible with the values in the literature for the free atmosphere. The temporal power spectrum analysis of the centroid of the focused image shows good agreement with Kolmogorov's theory. Therefore the device can be used with confidence to emulate realistic turbulence in a controlled manner. A calibrated CN2 profile, both in layer altitude and strength, is necessary for the testing of off-axis adaptive optics correction (multiconjugate adaptive optics). Testing was done to calibrate the CN2 profile using the slope detection and ranging technique. The first results, with only one layer, show the validity of the approach and indicate that a multiple-pass scheme is viable with a few modifications of the current setup.

  6. Closed-Loop Adaptive Optics Control in Strong Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Atmospheric Turbulence Todd M. Venema, B.S.E., M.S.E.E. Lieutenant Colonel, USAF Approved: Dr. Juan Vasquez , (Chairman) Date Maj. Jason Schmidt, PhD (Member...to acknowledge the help of Jason Schmidt and Juan Vasquez , my Air Force Institute of Technology advisors. I would also like to acknowledge the help of...Darryl Sanchez and Denis Oesch from the Air Force’s Starfire Optical Range in helping me study my designs in their Atmospheric Simulation and Adaptive

  7. Interleaved convolutional coding for the turbulent atmospheric optical communication channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Koh, Yutai T.

    1988-09-01

    The coding gain of a constraint-length-three, rate one-half convolutional code over a long clear-air atmospheric direct-detection optical communication channel using binary pulse-position modulation signaling was directly measured as a function of interleaving delay for both hard- and soft-decision Viterbi decoding. Maximum coding gains theoretically possible for this code with perfect interleaving and physically unrealizable perfect-measurement decoding were about 7 dB under conditions of weak clear-air turbulence, and 11 dB at moderate turbulence levels. The time scale of the fading (memory) of the channel was directly measured to be tens to hundreds of milliseconds, depending on turbulence levels. Interleaving delays of 5 ms between transmission of the first and second channel bits output by the encoder yield coding gains within 1.5 dB of theoretical limits with soft-decision Viterbi decoding. Coding gains of 4-5 dB were observed with only 100 microseconds of interleaving delay. Soft-decision Viterbi decoding always yielded 1-2 dB more coding gain than hard-decision Viterbi decoding.

  8. Robust optical wireless links over turbulent media using diversity solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Hassan

    Free-space optic (FSO) technology, i.e., optical wireless communication (OWC), is widely recognized as superior to radio frequency (RF) in many aspects. Visible and invisible optical wireless links solve first/last mile connectivity problems and provide secure, jam-free communication. FSO is license-free and delivers high-speed data rates in the order of Gigabits. Its advantages have fostered significant research efforts aimed at utilizing optical wireless communication, e.g. visible light communication (VLC), for high-speed, secure, indoor communication under the IEEE 802.15.7 standard. However, conventional optical wireless links demand precise optical alignment and suffer from atmospheric turbulence. When compared with RF, they suffer a low degree of reliability and lack robustness. Pointing errors cause optical transceiver misalignment, adversely affecting system reliability. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence causes irradiance fluctuations and beam broadening of transmitted light. Innovative solutions to overcome limitations on the exploitation of high-speed optical wireless links are greatly needed. Spatial diversity is known to improve RF wireless communication systems. Similar diversity approaches can be adapted for FSO systems to improve its reliability and robustness; however, careful diversity design is needed since FSO apertures typically remain unbalanced as a result of FSO system sensitivity to misalignment. Conventional diversity combining schemes require persistent aperture monitoring and repetitive switching, thus increasing FSO implementation complexities. Furthermore, current RF diversity combining schemes may not be optimized to address the issue of unbalanced FSO receiving apertures. This dissertation investigates two efficient diversity combining schemes for multi-receiving FSO systems: switched diversity combining and generalized selection combining. Both can be exploited to reduce complexity and improve combining efficiency. Unlike maximum

  9. Numerical Simulations of the Wintertime Optical Turbulence in Antarctica with the Mesoscale Model Meso-Nh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaux, F.; Masciadri, E.; Hagelin, S.; Stoesz, J.

    2009-09-01

    Mesoscale model such as Meso-NH have proven to be highly reliable in reproducing 3D maps of optical turbulence (OT).1-3 These last years ground-based astronomy has been looking towards Antarctica, especially its summits and the continental plateau where the OT appears to be confined in a shallow layer close to the surface. However some uncertainties remain. That's why our group is focusing on a detailed study of the atmospheric flow and turbulence in the internal Antarctic Plateau. Our intention in this study is to use the Meso-NH model to do predictions of the atmospheric flow in the internal plateau. The use of this model permits us to have access to informations inside an entire 3D volume, which is not the case with observations only. Two different configurations of the model have been used: one with a low horizontal resolution (ΔX = 100 km) and another one with higher horizontal resolution with the help of the grid-nesting interactive technique (ΔX = 1 km in the innermost domain). The impact of the configuration on the meteorological parameters has already been studied.4 We present here the results obtained with Meso-Nh of forecasted CN2 profiles, surface layer thickness (SLT) and seeing values at Dome C for the 16 winter nights, whose CN2 profiles have been measured by Ref.5.

  10. Effects of organized turbulence structures on the phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon Joo

    1990-05-01

    Effects of organized turbulence structures on the propagation of an optical beam in a turbulent shear flow have been analyzed. An instantaneous passive-scalar field in a computed homogeneous turbulent shear flow is used to represent index-of-refraction fluctuations, and phase distortion induced in a coherent optical beam by turbulent fluctuations is calculated. The organized vortical structures (``hairpin-shaped'' eddies) in the turbulent flow give rise to a scalar distribution with elongated regions of intense fluctuation, which have an inclination (about 30°) with respect to the mean flow, similar to that of the characteristic ``hairpin'' eddies. Two-point correlations of vorticity and scalar fluctuations support a proposed physical model in which the regions of intense scalar fluctuation are produced primarily by hairpin vortices. It is found that the spatial distribution of the phase distortion has a substantial variation with the direction of propagation. A highly localized distribution of intense phase distortions is produced when the optical beam propagates at an angle (45°) close to the inclination of hairpin vortices; at larger angles of propagation the distribution shows an elongated pattern with smaller phase distortions. It is also found that the root-mean-square phase distortion depends significantly on the propagation direction, and the phase distortion can be minimized at an angle of propagation approximately normal to the inclination of hairpin eddies. This study shows how the characteristics of an optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow are affected by the geometrical configurations of organized vortical structures.

  11. Measurement of optical blurring in a turbulent cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Corey D.; Ciochetto, David S.; Cantrell, Will H.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2016-10-01

    Earth's atmosphere can significantly impact the propagation of electromagnetic radiation, degrading the performance of imaging systems. Deleterious effects of the atmosphere include turbulence, absorption and scattering by particulates. Turbulence leads to blurring, while absorption attenuates the energy that reaches imaging sensors. The optical properties of aerosols and clouds also impact radiation propagation via scattering, resulting in decorrelation from unscattered light. Models have been proposed for calculating a point spread function (PSF) for aerosol scattering, providing a method for simulating the contrast and spatial detail expected when imaging through atmospheres with significant aerosol optical depth. However, these synthetic images and their predicating theory would benefit from comparison with measurements in a controlled environment. Recently, Michigan Technological University (MTU) has designed a novel laboratory cloud chamber. This multiphase, turbulent "Pi Chamber" is capable of pressures down to 100 hPa and temperatures from -55 to +55°C. Additionally, humidity and aerosol concentrations are controllable. These boundary conditions can be combined to form and sustain clouds in an instrumented laboratory setting for measuring the impact of clouds on radiation propagation. This paper describes an experiment to generate mixing and expansion clouds in supersaturated conditions with salt aerosols, and an example of measured imagery viewed through the generated cloud is shown. Aerosol and cloud droplet distributions measured during the experiment are used to predict scattering PSF and MTF curves, and a methodology for validating existing theory is detailed. Measured atmospheric inputs will be used to simulate aerosol-induced image degradation for comparison with measured imagery taken through actual cloud conditions. The aerosol MTF will be experimentally calculated and compared to theoretical expressions. The key result of this study is the

  12. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  13. Influence of asymmetry turbulence cells on the angle of arrival fluctuations of optical waves in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. Very recent analyses of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations of an optical wave in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence have adopted the assumption that the propagation path was in the z-direction with circular symmetry of turbulence cells maintained in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path, and one single anisotropy factor was adopted in the orthogonal xy-plane to parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions. In this work, the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane is no longer required, and two anisotropy parameters are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane to investigate the AOA fluctuations. In addition, deviations from the classic 11/3 spectral power law behavior for Kolmogorov turbulence are allowed by assuming spectral power law value variations between 3 and 4. With the Rytov approximation theory, new theoretical models for the variance of AOA fluctuations are developed for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. When the two anisotropic parameters are equal to each other, they reduce correctly to the recently published results (the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane was adopted). Furthermore, when these two anisotropic parameters equal one, they reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of optical wave propagation through weak isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  14. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement: a case report and review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Linshen; Shang, Yang; Fu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    When videogammetry (optical measurement) was carried outdoor or under cruel indoor circumstance, the results would be inevitably affected by the atmosphere turbulence. As a result, the precision of surveying was destroyed. The field of air turbulence's impact on optical measurement was neglected by scholars for a long time, the achievements massed about laser optics and optical communications. The mostly adapted method was noise filtration when the pixel wandering could not be rejected in engineering application, which got little improvement on usual conditions. The principle of influence under atmospheric turbulence on optical measurement is presented in this paper. And experiments data and applications are carried out to announce the impact of atmospheric turbulence. Combining with relevant researches, some essential issues and expectations of the atmospheric turbulence research are proposed.

  15. The simulation of turbulence effect based on the technology of optical wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongming; Fei, Jindong; Du, Huijie; Yu, Hong; Du, Jian; Hu, Xinqi; Dong, Bing

    2013-09-01

    In the process of high-resolution astronomical observation and space optical mapping, the wavefront aberrations caused by atmosphere turbulence effect lead to reduced resolution of optical imaging sensor. Firstly, on the base of influence of atmosphere turbulence effect for the optical observation system, this paper investigates and analyses the development and technical characteristics of deformable mirror, which is the key device of optical wavefront control technology. In this part, the paper describes the basic principles of wavefront control and measurement using the current production line of deformable mirror, including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror which is one of the most promising technology for wavefront modulation and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Secondly, a new method based on the technology of optical wavefront control and the data of optical path difference (OPD) for simulating the effect of optical transmission induced by turbulence is presented in this paper. The modeling and characteristics of atmosphere turbulence effect applied for optical imagery detector of astronomical observation and space optical mapping has been obtained. Finally, based on the theory model of atmosphere turbulence effects and digital simulation results, a preliminary experiment was done and the results verify the feasibility of the new method. The OPD data corresponding to optical propagation effect through turbulent atmosphere can be achieved by the calculation based on the method of ray-tracing and principle of physical optics. It is a common practice to decompose aberrated wavefronts in series over the Zernike polynomials. These data will be applied to the drive and control of the deformable mirror. This kind of simulation method can be applied to simulate the optical distortions effect, such as the dithering and excursion of light spot, in the space based earth observation with the influence of turbulent atmosphere. With the help of the

  16. The dependence of optical turbulence on thermal and mechanical forces over the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Optical turbulence for over-water conditions was investigated in a long-term experiment over False Bay near Cape Town, South Africa. A sonic anemometer and two boundary-layer scintillometers were deployed to access in-situ turbulence as well as the integrated turbulence over two 1.8 and 8.7 km paths. Statistical analysis reveals spatial temporal variations of the turbulence conditions over False Bay, which might be related to differences in the atmospheric conditions and/or the surface (water) temperatures. An analysis in terms of mechanical and thermal forcing reveals that the latter factor is more dominant in determining the turbulence strength.

  17. Optical turbulence characterization at the SAAO Sutherland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Pickering, T. E.; Wilson, R. W.; Butterley, T.; Shepherd, H. W.; Marang, F.; Matshaya, P.; Fourie, C.

    2013-11-01

    We present results from the first year of a campaign to characterize and monitor the optical turbulence profile at the South African Astronomical Observatory's Sutherland observing station in South Africa. A Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor Differential Image Motion Monitor (MASS-DIMM) was commissioned in 2010 March to provide continuous monitoring of the seeing conditions. Over the first month of the campaign, a Slope Detection And Ranging (SLODAR) from Durham University was also installed, allowing an independent verification of the performance of the MASS-DIMM device. After the first year of data collection, the overall median seeing value is found to be 1.32 arcsec as measured at ground level. The ground layer which includes all layers below 1 km accounts for 84 per cent of the turbulence, while the free atmosphere above 1 km accounts for 16 per cent with a median value of 0.41 arcsec. The median isoplanatic angle value is 1.92 arcsec, which is similar to other major astronomical sites. The median coherence time, calculated from corrected MASS measurements, is 2.85 ms. The seeing conditions at the site do show a strong correlation with wind direction, with bad seeing conditions being associated with winds from the south-east.

  18. Antenna gain of actively compensated free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Juan C; Brown, David M; Young, David W

    2014-05-19

    Current Strehl ratio models for actively compensated free-space optical communications terminals do not accurately predict system performance under strong turbulence conditions as they are based on weak turbulence theory. For evaluation of compensated systems, we present an approach for simulating the Strehl ratio with both low-order (tip/tilt) and higher-order (adaptive optics) correction. Our simulation results are then compared to the published models and their range of turbulence validity is assessed. Finally, we propose a new Strehl ratio model and antenna gain equation that are valid for general turbulence conditions independent of the degree of compensation.

  19. Characterization of Gigabit Ethernet Over Highly Turbulent Optical Wireless Links

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G W; Cornish, J P; Wilburn, J W; Young, R A; Ruggiero, A J

    2002-07-01

    We report on the performance characterization and issues associated with using Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) over a highly turbulent (C{sub n}{sup 2} > 10{sup -12}) 1.3 km air-optic lasercom links. Commercial GigE hardware is a cost-effective and scalable physical layer standard that can be applied to air-optic communications. We demonstrate a simple GigE hardware interface to a singlemode fiber-coupled, 1550 nm, WDM air-optic transceiver. TCPAP serves as a robust and universal foundation protocol that has some tolerance of data loss due to atmospheric fading. Challenges include establishing and maintaining a connection with acceptable throughput under poor propagation conditions. The most useful link performance diagnostic is shown to be scintillation index, where a value of 0.2 is the maximum permissible for adequate GigE throughput. Maximum GigE throughput observed was 49.7% of that obtained with a fiber jumper when scintillation index is 0.1. Shortcomings in conventional measurements such as bit error rate are apparent. Prospects for forward mor correction and other link enhancements will be discussed.

  20. Optical wave turbulence: Towards a unified nonequilibrium thermodynamic formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, A.; Garnier, J.; Hansson, T.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Millot, G.; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of coherent optical fields has been extensively explored in the framework of nonlinear optics, while the linear propagation of incoherent fields has been widely studied in the framework of statistical optics. However, these two fundamental fields of optics have been mostly developed independently of each other, so that a satisfactory understanding of statistical nonlinear optics is still lacking. This article is aimed at reviewing a unified theoretical formulation of statistical nonlinear optics on the basis of the wave turbulence theory, which provides a nonequilibrium thermodynamic description of the system of incoherent nonlinear waves. We consider the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model accounting either for a nonlocal or a noninstantaneous nonlinearity, as well as higher-order dispersion effects. Depending on the amount of nonlocal (noninstantaneous) nonlinear interaction and the amount of inhomogeneous (nonstationary) statistics of the incoherent wave, different types of kinetic equations are derived and discussed. In the spatial domain, when the incoherent wave exhibits inhomogeneous statistical fluctuations, different forms of the (Hamiltonian) Vlasov equation are obtained depending on the amount of nonlocality. This Vlasov approach describes the processes of incoherent modulational instability and localized incoherent soliton structures. In the temporal domain, the causality property inherent to the response function leads to a kinetic formulation analogous to the weak Langmuir turbulence equation, which describes nonlocalized spectral incoherent solitons. In the presence of a highly noninstantaneous response, this formulation reduces to a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations (e.g., Benjamin-Ono equation), which describe incoherent dispersive shock waves. Conversely, a non-stationary statistics leads to a (non-Hamiltonian) long-range Vlasov formulation, whose self-consistent potential is

  1. Impacts of Underwater Turbulence on Acoustical and Optical Signals and Their Linkage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-12

    convected quantities like temperature in turbulence fluid," J. Fluid Mech. 5,113-133(1959). 26. J. W. Goodman , Introduction to Fourier Optics (Roberts...Turbulence on Acoustical and Optical Signals and Their Linkage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0602782N 6...Acoustical and optical signal transmission underwater is of vital interest for both civilian and military applications. The range and signal to noise

  2. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  3. Route diversity analyses for free-space optical wireless links within turbulent scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zvanovec, Stanislav; Perez, Joaquin; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Rajbhandari, Sujan; Libich, Jiri

    2013-03-25

    Free-Space Optical (FSO) communications link performance is highly affected when propagating through the time-spatially variable turbulent environment. In order to improve signal reception, several mitigation techniques have been proposed and analytically investigated. This paper presents experimental results for the route diversity technique evaluations for a specific case when several diversity links intersects a common turbulent area and concurrently each passing regions with different turbulence flows.

  4. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  5. Nonlinear random optical waves: Integrable turbulence, rogue waves and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Walczak, Pierre; Onorato, Miguel; Suret, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We examine the general question of statistical changes experienced by ensembles of nonlinear random waves propagating in systems ruled by integrable equations. In our study that enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, we specifically focus on optical fiber systems accurately described by the integrable one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We consider random complex fields having a Gaussian statistics and an infinite extension at initial stage. We use numerical simulations with periodic boundary conditions and optical fiber experiments to investigate spectral and statistical changes experienced by nonlinear waves in focusing and in defocusing propagation regimes. As a result of nonlinear propagation, the power spectrum of the random wave broadens and takes exponential wings both in focusing and in defocusing regimes. Heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in focusing regime while low-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in defocusing regime. After some transient evolution, the wave system is found to exhibit a statistically stationary state in which neither the probability density function of the wave field nor the spectrum changes with the evolution variable. Separating fluctuations of small scale from fluctuations of large scale both in focusing and defocusing regimes, we reveal the phenomenon of intermittency; i.e., small scales are characterized by large heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics, while the large ones are almost Gaussian.

  6. Analysis and modeling of atmospheric turbulence on the high-resolution space optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lili, Jiang; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Modeling and simulation of optical remote sensing system plays an unslightable role in remote sensing mission predictions, imaging system design, image quality assessment. It has already become a hot research topic at home and abroad. Atmospheric turbulence influence on optical systems is attached more and more importance to as technologies of remote sensing are developed. In order to study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on earth observation system, the atmospheric structure parameter was calculated by using the weak atmospheric turbulence model; and the relationship of the atmospheric coherence length and high resolution remote sensing optical system was established; then the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the coefficient r0h of optical remote sensing system of ground resolution was derived; finally different orbit height of high resolution optical system imaging quality affected by atmospheric turbulence was analyzed. Results show that the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the high resolution remote sensing optical system, the resolution of which has reached sub meter level meter or even the 0.5m, 0.35m and even 0.15m ultra in recent years, image quality will be quite serious. In the above situation, the influence of the atmospheric turbulence must be corrected. Simulation algorithms of PSF are presented based on the above results. Experiment and analytical results are posted.

  7. Incoherent shock waves in long-range optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Faccio, D.; Trillo, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Considering the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation as a representative model, we report a unified presentation of different forms of incoherent shock waves that emerge in the long-range interaction regime of a turbulent optical wave system. These incoherent singularities can develop either in the temporal domain through a highly noninstantaneous nonlinear response, or in the spatial domain through a highly nonlocal nonlinearity. In the temporal domain, genuine dispersive shock waves (DSW) develop in the spectral dynamics of the random waves, despite the fact that the causality condition inherent to the response function breaks the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation. Such spectral incoherent DSWs are described in detail by a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations, e.g. Benjamin-Ono equation, which are derived from a nonequilibrium kinetic formulation based on the weak Langmuir turbulence equation. In the spatial domain, the system is shown to exhibit a large scale global collective behavior, so that it is the fluctuating field as a whole that develops a singularity, which is inherently an incoherent object made of random waves. Despite the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation, the regularization of such a collective incoherent shock does not require the formation of a DSW - the regularization is shown to occur by means of a different process of coherence degradation at the shock point. We show that the collective incoherent shock is responsible for an original mechanism of spontaneous nucleation of a phase-space hole in the spectrogram dynamics. The robustness of such a phase-space hole is interpreted in the light of incoherent dark soliton states, whose different exact solutions are derived in the framework of the long-range Vlasov formalism.

  8. Scintillation fluctuations of optical communication lasers in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, Michael G.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Belichki, Sara B.; Splitter, Landon J.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Fountain, Wayne; Tucker, Frank M.

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate scintillation fluctuations on optical communication lasers and evaluate potential system improvements to reduce scintillation effects. This research attempts to experimentally verify mathematical models developed by Andrews and Phillips [1] for scintillation fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence using two different transmitting wavelengths. Propagation range lengths and detector quantities were varied to confirm the theoretical scintillation curve. In order to confirm the range and wavelength dependent scintillation curve, intensity measurements were taken from a 904nm and 1550nm laser source for an assortment of path distances along the 1km laser range at the Townes Laser Institute. The refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data was also taken at various ranges using two commercial scintillometers. This parameter is used to characterize the strength of atmospheric turbulence, which induces scintillation effects on the laser beam, and is a vital input parameter to the mathematical model. Data was taken and analyzed using a 4-detector board array. The material presented in this paper outlines the verification and validation of the theoretical scintillation model, and steps to improve the scintillation fluctuation effects on the laser beam through additional detectors and a longer transmitting wavelength. Experimental data was post processed and analyzed for scintillation fluctuations of the two transmitting wavelengths. The results demonstrate the benefit of additional detectors and validate a mathematical model that can be scaled for use in a variety of communications or defense applications. Scintillation is a problem faced by every free space laser communication system and the verification of an accurate mathematical model to simulate these effects has strong application across the industry.

  9. Multi-instrument characterization of optical turbulence at the Ali observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.-Y.; Yao, Y.-Q.; Vernin, J.; Wang, H.-S.; Yin, J.; Qian, X.

    2015-04-01

    In order to characterize the atmospheric optical turbulence at Ali observatory, we have deployed multi-instruments, which are able to continuously monitor the optical turbulence for site evaluation. These instruments include the DIMM, MASS, Single Star SCIDAR and Polaris seeing monitor, and we also plan to install SNODAR and Micro-thermal sensors for the turbulence on surface layer by the end of this year. This configuration allows us to collect a substantial database and make cross-comparison of the results. We have successfully obtained the profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed with Single Star SCIDAR, as well as the key parameters for adaptive optics application, such as seeing, coherence time, and isoplanatic angle. The DIMM seeing measurements are also carried out simultaneously. The median seeing measured by the DIMM and SSS in 2013 is 0.69 and 0.79 arcsec, respectively.

  10. Measuring outer scale in atmospheric optical turbulence from the point view of spatial correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Mei, Hai-Ping; Qian, Xian-Mei; Rao, Rui-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    A theory about scales in atmospheric optical turbulence vortex from the point view of spatial correlation function is described. Then an experiment is carried out to prove this theory by the fiber optical turbulence sensor array near the ground. Results show that the outer scale has a mean value of 0.62m and varies from 0.34m to 0.95m by doing a nonlinear fitting on spatial correlation functions. With this method, the value of the outer scale can be given directly without any hypothesis when the optical turbulence is well-developed. A question about how the trend of the spatial correlation function show when the displacement approaches the outer scale is solved. This research can be regarded as a progress about understanding the characters of spatial correlation function in optical turbulence.

  11. Measuring horizontal atmospheric turbulence at ground level from optical turbulence generator (OTG) using a 1D sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tíjaro Rojas, Omar J.; Torres Moreno, Yezid; Rhodes, William T.

    2017-06-01

    Different theories including Kolmogorov have been valid to explain and model physic phenomenal like vertical atmospheric turbulence. In horizontal path, we still have many questions, due to weather problems and consequences that it generates. To emulate some conditions of environment, we built an Optical Turbulence Generator (OTG) having spatial, humidity and temperature, measurements that were captured in the same time from optical synchronization. This development was made using digital modules as ADC (Analog to Digital Converters) and communications protocol as SPI. We all made from microcontrollers. On the other hand, to measure optical signal, we used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) where captured the intensity of fringes that shifted with a known frequency. Outcomes show temporal shift and phase drive from dependent samples (in time domain) that correspond with frozen turbulence given by Taylor theory. Parameters studied were C2n, scintillation and inner scale in temporal patterns and analysis of their relationship with the physical associated variables. These patterns were taken from Young Interferometer in laboratory room scale. In the future, we hope with these studies, we will can implement an experiment to characterize atmospheric turbulence in a long distance, placed in the equatorial weather zone.

  12. Controlled simulation of optical turbulence in a temperature gradient air chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Italo; Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence simulator is built and characterized for in-lab optical wave propagation with controlled strength of the refractive-index fluctuations. The temperature gradients are generated by a sequence of heat guns with controlled individual strengths. The temperature structure functions are measured in two directions transverse to propagation path with the help of a thermocouple array and used for evaluation of the corresponding refractive-index structure functions of optical turbulence.

  13. Turbulent Heating and Wave Pressure in Solar Wind Acceleration Modeling: New Insights to Empirical Forecasting of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of solar wind acceleration has made several important advances recently due to improvements in modeling techniques. Existing code and simulations test the competing theories for coronal heating, which include reconnection/loop-opening (RLO) models and wave/turbulence-driven (WTD) models. In order to compare and contrast the validity of these theories, we need flexible tools that predict the emergent solar wind properties from a wide range of coronal magnetic field structures such as coronal holes, pseudostreamers, and helmet streamers. ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code that includes Alfven wave generation and reflection and the resulting turbulent heating to accelerate solar wind in open flux tubes. We present the ZEPHYR output for a wide range of magnetic field geometries to show the effect of the magnetic field profiles on wind properties. We also investigate the competing acceleration mechanisms found in ZEPHYR to determine the relative importance of increased gas pressure from turbulent heating and the separate pressure source from the Alfven waves. To do so, we developed a code that will become publicly available for solar wind prediction. This code, TEMPEST, provides an outflow solution based on only one input: the magnetic field strength as a function of height above the photosphere. It uses correlations found in ZEPHYR between the magnetic field strength at the source surface and the temperature profile of the outflow solution to compute the wind speed profile based on the increased gas pressure from turbulent heating. With this initial solution, TEMPEST then adds in the Alfven wave pressure term to the modified Parker equation and iterates to find a stable solution for the wind speed. This code, therefore, can make predictions of the wind speeds that will be observed at 1 AU based on extrapolations from magnetogram data, providing a useful tool for empirical forecasting of the sol! ar wind.

  14. Forecasting, Forecasting

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fosberg

    1987-01-01

    Future improvements in the meteorological forecasts used in fire management will come from improvements in three areas: observational systems, forecast techniques, and postprocessing of forecasts and better integration of this information into the fire management process.

  15. Average capacity for optical wireless communication systems over exponentiated Weibull distribution non-Kolmogorov turbulent channels.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Zhang, Yixin; Gao, Jie; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-06-20

    We model the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems for cases of weak to strong turbulence channels, using the exponentiation Weibull distribution model. The joint effects of the beam wander and spread, pointing errors, atmospheric attenuation, and the spectral index of non-Kolmogorov turbulence on system performance are included. Our results show that the average capacity decreases steeply as the propagation length L changes from 0 to 200 m and decreases slowly down or tends to a stable value as the propagation length L is greater than 200 m. In the weak turbulence region, by increasing the detection aperture, we can improve the average channel capacity and the atmospheric visibility as an important issue affecting the average channel capacity. In the strong turbulence region, the increase of the radius of the detection aperture cannot reduce the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the average channel capacity, and the effect of atmospheric visibility on the channel information capacity can be ignored. The effect of the spectral power exponent on the average channel capacity in the strong turbulence region is higher than weak turbulence region. Irrespective of the details determining the turbulent channel, we can say that pointing errors have a significant effect on the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems in turbulence channels.

  16. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    We are developing an integrated rapid environmental assessment capability that will be used to feed an ocean nowcast/forecast system. The goal is to develop a capacity for predicting the dynamics in inherent optical properties in coastal waters. This is being accomplished by developing an integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to calibrate hyperspectral remote sensing sensors in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  17. Optical turbulence parameters characterized via optical measurements over a 2.33 km free-space laser path.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Arnold

    2008-09-15

    Optical turbulence research contributes to improved laser communications, adaptive optics, and long-range imaging systems. This paper presents experimental measurements of scintillation and focal spot displacement to obtain optical turbulence information along a near-horizontal 2.33 km free-space laser propagation path. Calculated values for the refractive index structure constant (C(n)(2)) and Fried parameter (r0) are compared to scintillometer-based measurements for several cases in winter and spring. Optical measurements were investigated using two different laser sources for the first and second parts of the experiment. Scintillation index estimates from recorded signal intensities were corrected to account for aperture averaging. As a result, we found that an earlier calculation algorithm based on analysis of log-amplitude intensity variance was the best estimator of optical turbulence parameters over the propagation path considered.

  18. Integrated approach to free space optical communications in strong turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jason A.

    The propagation of a free space optical communication signal through atmospheric turbulence experiences random fluctuations in intensity, including signal fades which negatively impact the communications link performance. This research develops an analytical probability density function (PDF) to model the best case scenario of using multiple independent beams to reduce the intensity fluctuations. The PDF was further developed to account for partially correlated beams, such as would be experienced by beams having finite separation. The PDF was validated with results obtained from digital simulations as well as lab experiments. The research showed that as the number of transmitted beams increases the probability of fade decreases. While fade probability is reduced by adding more beams, using more than four transmitters does little to improve the overall performance. Additionally, the use of pulse position modulation (PPM) provided significant improvement over traditional fixed threshold on/off keying with the impact of signal fading reduced. Combining PPM with multiple transmitters produced the best overall bit error rate results.

  19. Quantification of optical turbulence in the ocean and its effects on beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Nootz, Gero; Jarosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser R; Hou, Weilin

    2016-11-01

    The influence of optically active turbulence on the propagation of laser beams is investigated in clear ocean water over a path length of 8.75 m. The measurement apparatus is described and the effects of optical turbulence on the laser beam are presented. The index of refraction structure constant is extracted from the beam deflection and the results are compared to independently made measures of the turbulence strength (Cn2) by a vertical microstructure profiler. Here we present values of Cn2 taken from aboard the R/V Walton Smith during the Bahamas optical turbulence exercise (BOTEX) in the Tongue of the Ocean between June 30 and July 12, 2011, spanning a range from 10-14 to 10-10  m-2/3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported for the ocean.

  20. Aero-optic characteristics of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckham, Christopher Mark

    This dissertation presents a detailed study of the aberrating effect on a plane incident wavefront of light due to its passage through a turbulent, compressible boundary layer. This aberration has important implications for the design of airborne optical systems for imaging, communications, or projection. A Shack-Hartmann sensor and associated data analysis software suite were developed and validated for the high resolution measurement of two dimensional wavefront phase. Significant improvements in wavefront reconstruction were achieved by using the calculated centroid uncertainties to weight the least squares fitting of the phase surface. Using the Shack-Hartmann sensor in a high speed, one dimensional mode, individual structures are observed propagating past the sensor in a transonic flow. The uncertainties on the reconstructed phase in this mode are very high, however. In a two dimensional mode the uncertainties are greatly reduced and a large database of individual, uncorrelated wavefronts was collected, allowing statistics to be calculated such as the rms wavefront height and the Strehl ratio. Data were collected at transonic and hypersonic speeds and with no injection or with helium or nitrogen injection into the boundary layer. In all cases except the hypersonic helium injection case, the time averaged wavefronts reveal no features in the boundary layer which are steady in time. In the hypersonic helium injection case, however, steady, longitudinal features are observed, in agreement with previous observations. When helium is injected for window cooling at high speeds, the results show there may be an opportunity to reduce the resulting distortion by taking advantage of the stable structures that form in the boundary layer by using a low bandwidth adaptive optic system. A new scaling argument is also presented to allow the prediction and comparison of wavefront data for different compressible boundary layer flow conditions. The proposed formula gives

  1. Combining Satellite Ocean Color Imagery and Circulation Modeling to Forecast Bio-Optical Properties: Comparison of Models and Advection Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Remote sensing of ocean color provides synoptic surface ocean bio -optical properties but is limited to real-time or climatological applications. Many...this, we couple satellite imagery with numerical circulation models to provide short-term (24-48 hr) forecasts of bio -optical properties. These are...physical processes control the bio -optical distribution patterns. We compare optical forecast results from three Navy models and two advection

  2. Scaling forecast models for wind turbulence and wind turbine power intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran Medina, Olmo; Schmitt, Francois G.; Calif, Rudy

    2017-04-01

    The intermittency of the wind turbine power remains an important issue for the massive development of this renewable energy. The energy peaks injected in the electric grid produce difficulties in the energy distribution management. Hence, a correct forecast of the wind power in the short and middle term is needed due to the high unpredictability of the intermittency phenomenon. We consider a statistical approach through the analysis and characterization of stochastic fluctuations. The theoretical framework is the multifractal modelisation of wind velocity fluctuations. Here, we consider three wind turbine data where two possess a direct drive technology. Those turbines are producing energy in real exploitation conditions and allow to test our forecast models of power production at a different time horizons. Two forecast models were developed based on two physical principles observed in the wind and the power time series: the scaling properties on the one hand and the intermittency in the wind power increments on the other. The first tool is related to the intermittency through a multifractal lognormal fit of the power fluctuations. The second tool is based on an analogy of the power scaling properties with a fractional brownian motion. Indeed, an inner long-term memory is found in both time series. Both models show encouraging results since a correct tendency of the signal is respected over different time scales. Those tools are first steps to a search of efficient forecasting approaches for grid adaptation facing the wind energy fluctuations.

  3. Laser beam propagation through turbulence and adaptive optics for beam delivery improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In particular, we study the statistical variations of the fractional beam energy hitting inside an optical aperture placed at several kilometer distance. The simulations are performed for different turbulence conditions and engagement ranges, with and without the use of turbulence mitigation. Turbulence mitigation is simulated with phase conjugation. The energy fluctuations are deduced from time sequence realizations. It is shown that turbulence mitigation leads to an increase of the mean energy inside the aperture and decrease of the fluctuations even in strong turbulence conditions and long distance engagement. As an example, the results are applied to a high energy laser countermeasure system, where we determine the probability that a single laser pulse, or one of the pulses in a sequence, will provide a lethal energy inside the target aperture. Again, turbulence mitigation contributes to increase the performance of the system at long-distance and for strong turbulence conditions in terms of kill probability. We also discuss a specific case where turbulence contributes to increase the pulse energy within the target aperture. The present analysis can be used to evaluate the performance of a variety of systems, such as directed countermeasures, laser communication, and laser weapons.

  4. Fading losses on the LCRD free-space optical link due to channel turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino; Hamkins, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will implement an optical communications link between a pair of Earth terminals via an Earth-orbiting satellite relay. Optical turbulence over the communication paths will cause random uctuations, or fading, in the received signal irradiance. In this paper we characterize losses due to fading caused by optical turbulence. We illustrate the performance of a representative relay link, utilizing a channel interleaver and error-correction-code to mitigate fading, and provide a method to quickly determine the link performance.

  5. Optical and electrical diagnostics for the investigation of edge turbulence in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzana, R.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Cervaro, V.; Lotto, L.; Yagi, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.

    2004-10-01

    A new, two dimensional and fast diagnostic system has been developed for studying the dynamic structure of plasma turbulence; it will be used in the edge of the reversed-field pinch devices TPE-RX and RFX. The system consists of a gas-puffing nozzle, 32 optical channels measuring H{sub {alpha}} emitted from the puffed gas (to study the optical emissivity of turbulent patterns and to analyze structures in two dimensions), and an array of Langmuir probes (to compare the turbulent pattern with the optical method and to measure the local plasma parameters). The signals can be acquired at 10 Msamples/s with 2 MHz band width. The design of the system, calibrations, and tests of the electronic circuitry and the optical sensors are presented.

  6. Analysis of temporal power spectra for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-06-01

    Analytic expressions for the temporal power spectra of irradiance fluctuations and angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. In the derivation, the anisotropic non-Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, which adopts the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path and the same degree of anisotropy along the propagation direction for all the turbulence cells. The final expressions consider simultaneously the anisotropic factor and general spectral power law values. When the anisotropic factor equals one (corresponding to the isotropic turbulence), the derived temporal power spectral models have good consistency with the known results for the isotropic turbulence. Numerical calculations show that the increased anisotropic factor alleviates the atmospheric turbulence's influence on the final expressions.

  7. Forecasting of Clear Air Turbulence using a Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.; Haines, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of several case studies of Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) using the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) formulation are highlighted. The performance of this technique in resolving regions of documented CAT encounters is encouraging. Its operational adaptability seems particularly attractive in that the input data can be supplied by the currently operational Rawinsonde system. A CAT index is calculated deterministically, sensing synoptic-scale changes in static stability and vertical wind shear conducive for supporting meso-scale CAT layers. This index reveals volumes of the troposphere which act as 'source regions' of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The results suggest that these regions are particularly efficient with respect to the synoptic/meso-scale energetical coupling necessary for supporting significantly turbulent layers. The output highlights specific regions of the atmosphere which can be interpreted operationally in terms of CAT-encounter probabilities.

  8. Turbulence-driven coronal heating and improvements to empirical forecasting of the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Woolsey, Lauren N.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting models of the solar wind often rely on simple parameterizations of the magnetic field that ignore the effects of the full magnetic field geometry. In this paper, we present the results of two solar wind prediction models that consider the full magnetic field profile and include the effects of Alfvén waves on coronal heating and wind acceleration. The one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code ZEPHYR self-consistently finds solar wind solutions without the need for empirical heating functions. Another one-dimensional code, introduced in this paper (The Efficient Modified-Parker-Equation-Solving Tool, TEMPEST), can act as a smaller, stand-alone code for use in forecasting pipelines. TEMPEST is written in Python and will become a publicly available library of functions that is easy to adapt and expand. We discuss important relations between the magnetic field profile and properties of the solar wind that can be used to independently validate prediction models. ZEPHYR provides the foundation and calibration for TEMPEST, and ultimately we will use these models to predict observations and explain space weather created by the bulk solar wind. We are able to reproduce with both models the general anticorrelation seen in comparisons of observed wind speed at 1 AU and the flux tube expansion factor. There is significantly less spread than comparing the results of the two models than between ZEPHYR and a traditional flux tube expansion relation. We suggest that the new code, TEMPEST, will become a valuable tool in the forecasting of space weather.

  9. Optical diagnostics of turbulent mixing in explosively-driven shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Explosively-driven shock tube experiments were performed to investigate the turbulent mixing of explosive product gases and ambient air. A small detonator initiated Al / I2O5 thermite, which produced a shock wave and expanding product gases. Schlieren and imaging spectroscopy were applied simultaneously along a common optical path to identify correlations between turbulent structures and spatially-resolved absorbance. The schlieren imaging identifies flow features including shock waves and turbulent structures while the imaging spectroscopy identifies regions of iodine gas presence in the product gases. Pressure transducers located before and after the optical diagnostic section measure time-resolved pressure. Shock speed is measured from tracking the leading edge of the shockwave in the schlieren images and from the pressure transducers. The turbulent mixing characteristics were determined using digital image processing. Results show changes in shock speed, product gas propagation, and species concentrations for varied explosive charge mass. Funded by DTRA Grant HDTRA1-14-1-0070.

  10. Objective detection and forecasting of Clear-Air Turbulence (CAT): A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Clear-air turbulence has become the largest single cause of weather-related injuries occurring in commercial carriers at cruising altitudes. A technique for objective operational CAT detection (the SCATR index) has been formulated. Its physical basis ties CAT to total energy dissipation as a response to meso- and synoptic-scale dynamical processes associated with upper-level jet stream/frontal zones. Early case studies using properly analyzed routine RAOB rawinsonde sounding data have shown promise.

  11. A Microthermal Device for Measuring the Spatial Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Optical Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jonathan; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Williams, T.; Claver, C.; Krabbendam, V.; Wiecha, O.; Andrew, J.; Warner, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Measurement Astrophysics group at UNM designed and built a novel microthermal device for characterizing atmospheric optical turbulence at astronomical observatories. This instrument is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors. The device makes differential temperature measurements which are directly related to the index of refraction structure constant, Cn2, which quantifies the strength of optical turbulence. The device is designed to work in two modes. In horizontal mode temperature differentials are measured between adjacent sensors. Measurements are combined to recover the differences over all pairwise sensor baselines. These measurements result in a spatial spectrum of turbulence. Measured turbulent spectra are then fit to standard turbulence models which yield estimates of the outer scale of turbulence and the slope of the power spectra. In vertical mode the device operates with pairs of microthermal sensors distributed vertically, each pair being separated horizontally by approximately one meter. Sensor pairs are suspended at multiple heights above the ground allowing measurement of atmospheric turbulence power as a function of altitude. This device was used to monitor optical turbulence during a site testing campaign at the future LSST site on Cerro Pachón. We present preliminary results from operation in both vertical and horizontal modes from October 2008 to December 2009. The microthermal array remains in operation on Cerro Pachón, and continues to produce valuable atmospheric measurements. Our results support the conclusion that Cerro Pachón is an excellent observatory site. The vertical turbulence profile decreases monotonically with height as expected, and the surface layer does not contribute a significant amount to the overall seeing measured at the site. This work was supported by Air Force Grant No. FA9451-04-2-0355. Instrumentation and travel support was provided in part by

  12. Introducing the concept of anisotropy at different scales for modeling optical turbulence.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the concept of anisotropy at different atmospheric turbulence scales is introduced. A power spectrum and its associated structure function with inner and outer scale effects and anisotropy are also shown. The power spectrum includes an effective anisotropic parameter ζ(eff) to describe anisotropy, which is useful for modeling optical turbulence when a non-Kolmogorov power law and anisotropy along the direction of propagation are present.

  13. Atmospheric turbulence-induced signal fades on optical heterodyne communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, K. A.

    1986-06-01

    The three basic atmospheric propagation effects, absorption, scattering, and turbulence, are reviewed. A simulation approach is then developed to determine signal fade probability distributions on heterodyne-detected satellite links which operate through naturally occurring atmospheric turbulence. The calculations are performed on both angle-tracked and nonangle-tracked downlinks, and on uplinks, with and without adaptive optics. Turbulence-induced degradations in communication performance are determined using signal fade probability distributions, and it is shown that the average signal fade can be a poor measure of the performance degradation.

  14. Bit error rate performance of free-space optical link under effect of plasma sheath turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangting; Yang, Shaofei; Guo, Lixin; Cheng, Mingjian; Gong, Teng

    2017-08-01

    Based on the power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuation in the plasma sheath turbulence, the expressions for wave structure functions and scintillation index of optical wave propagating in a turbulent plasma sheath are derived. The effect of the turbulence microstructure on the propagation characteristics of optical waves are simulated and analyzed. Finally, the bit error performance of a free-space optical (FSO) link is investigated under the effect of plasma sheath turbulence. The results indicate that the spherical waves have a better communication performance in the FSO link. In addition, a greater variance of the refractive index fluctuation causes a more severe fluctuation in electron density, temperature, and collision frequency inside the plasma sheath. However, when the outer scale is close to the thickness of the plasma sheath, the turbulence eddies have almost no influence on the wave propagation. Therefore, the bit error rate (BER) obviously increases with the increase in variance of the refractive index fluctuation and the decrease in the outer scale. These results are fundamental for evaluating the performance of the FSO link under the effect of plasma sheath turbulence.

  15. Determination of Flow Orientation of an Optically Active Turbulent Field by Means of a Single Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-18

    optically active turbulent field was determined by Fourier transforming the wander of a laser beam propagating in the ocean. A simple physical model... Fourier transform for the situation depicted on the right and on the left, respectively. July 1, 2013 / Vol. 38, No. 13 / OPTICS LETTERS 2185 0146-9592/13...132185-03$15.00/0 © 2013 Optical Society of America to the flow (see top row of Fig. 3). However, the magni- tude of the Fourier transform, in

  16. Measurements of indoor/outdoor atmospheric turbulence through optical triangulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Gúbio; Silva, Vinicius N. H.; Barbero, Andrés P. L.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.; Coelho, Thiago V. N.; Bessa dos Santos, A.

    2017-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the performance of wireless optical communication links. This phenomenon distorts the light wave-front, and changes the spatial optical power distribution, spread and wander of the beam on the receiver plane. In this paper we present measurements of indoor and outdoor atmospheric turbulence taken using a simple and low-cost device based on an optical triangulation method. The device tracks a Gaussian beam due to the beam wander effect and measures the effective Gaussian width due to beam spread in order to calculate the refractive index structure constant in real time. Thus, the device operation principle, the outdoor/indoor turbulence profile during the day, the hotspot dispersion and the beam width variation are shown.

  17. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doelman, Niek; Osborn, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Based on an estimate of the power spectral density function, a low order stochastic model to capture the temporal variability of r0 is proposed. The impact of this type of stochastic model on the prediction of the coherence length behaviour is shown.

  18. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  19. The effects of atmospheric turbulence on precision optical measurements used for antenna-pointing compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N.

    1989-01-01

    Blind pointing of the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-meter antennas can be improved if distortions of the antenna structure caused by unpredictable environmental loads can be measured in real-time, and the resulting boresight shifts evaluated and incorporated into the pointing control loops. The measurement configuration of a proposed pointing compensation system includes an optical range sensor that measures distances to selected points on the antenna surface. The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the accuracy of optical distance measurements and a method to make in-situ determinations of turbulence-induced measurement errors are discussed.

  20. Remote probing of the optical strength of atmospheric turbulence and of wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    A procedure for determining the optical strength of turbulence of the atmosphere and the wind velocity at various altitudes by measuring the spatial and temporal covariance of scintillation is developed. Emphasis is placed on the development of the formal relationships that have to be inverted to obtain the desired results. For determination of optical strength of turbulence, it is a linear integral equation that is developed. However, for determination of remote wind velocity, a nonlinear integral equation is obtained. A computer approach for solving each of the equations is suggested. The configuration and performance requirements of the measurement apparatus are discussed.

  1. Fiber-coupling efficiency for free-space optical communication through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dikmelik, Yamaç; Davidson, Frederic M

    2005-08-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems have recently used fiber-optic components. The received laser beam in such a system must be coupled into a single-mode fiber at the input of the receiver module. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of a laser beam and limits the fiber-coupling efficiency. We numerically evaluate the fiber-coupling efficiency for laser light distorted by atmospheric turbulence. We also investigate the use of a coherent fiber array as a receiver structure and find that a coherent fiber array that consists of seven subapertures would significantly increase the fiber-coupling efficiency.

  2. Prediction of optical propagation losses through turbulent boundary/shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, A.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified mathematical model was developed which predicts the optical propagation losses which occur when an optical beam of given wave length passes through a turbulent boundary layer or shear layer. The optical losses are predicted in terms of line spread function (or Strehl ratio) and modulation transfer function by using experimentally determined values of layer thickness, streamwise, lateral and beamwise density fluctuation length scales, and distribution of the standard deviation of the density fluctuations through the turbulent layer. The prediction model was applied to the analysis of a number of selected cases of interest from the aerodynamic-optical interaction wind-tunnel investigation conducted in the NASA-Ames 1.83 x 1.83 meter (6 x 6 ft) wind tunnel. Direct optical measurements are compared with the results predicted by the aerodynamic analysis.

  3. Aperture averaging and correlation function measurements in strong atmospheric turbulence for optical wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Harris, Joseph; Tang, Yunxin; Gammon, Robert; Davis, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) links in a clear atmosphere is affected by the non-ideal characteristics of the communication channel. Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in the received signal level, which increase the bit errors in a digital communication link. In order to quantify performance limitations, a better understanding of the effect of the intensity fluctuations on the received signal at all turbulence levels is needed. Theory reliably describes the behavior in the weak turbulence regime, but theoretical descriptions in the intermediate and strong turbulence regimes are less well developed. We have developed a flexible empirical approach for characterizing link performance in strong turbulence conditions through image analysis of intensity scintillation patterns coupled with frame aperture averaging on an FSO communication link. These measurements are complemented with direct measurements of temporal and spatial correlation functions. A He-Ne laser beam propagates 106 meters in free-space over flat terrain about a meter above the ground to provide strong atmospheric turbulence conditions. A high performance digital camera with a frame-grabbing computer interface is used to capture received laser intensity distributions at rates up to 30 frames per second and various short shutter speeds, down to 1/16,000s per frame. A scintillometer is used for accurate measurements of the turbulence parameter Cn2. Laboratory measurements use a local strong turbulence generator, which mimics a strong phase screen. Spatial correlation functions are measured using laterally separated point detectors placed in the receiver plane. Correlations and captured image frames are analyzed in Labview to evaluate correlation functions, Cn2, and the aperture averaging factor. The aperture averaging results demonstrate the expected reduction in intensity fluctuations with increasing aperture diameter, and show quantitatively the differences in behavior between

  4. Turbulent single-photon propagation in the Canary optical link

    SciTech Connect

    Capraro, Ivan; Tomaello, Andrea; Dall'Arche, Alberto; Gerlin, Francesca; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Herbst, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert

    2014-12-04

    The role of turbulence for Quantum Communications (QC) has been investigated in a 143 km-long link. The analysis of the received signal temporal domain indicate how to exploit constructively its effects in the case of QC along very long free-space links as well satellite links. Novel applications with relevant background noise may be envisaged.

  5. Optical key distribution system using atmospheric turbulence as the randomness generating function: classical optical protocol for information assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Marvin D.; Bas, Christophe F.; Gervais, David; Renda, Priscilla F.; Townsend, Daniel; Rushanan, Joseph J.; Francoeur, Joe; Donnangelo, Nick; Stenner, Michael D.

    2013-05-01

    We describe an experimental laboratory system that generates and distributes random binary sequence bit streams between two optical terminals (labeled Alice and Bob). The random binary sequence is generated through probing the optical channel of a turbulent atmosphere between the two terminals with coincident laser beams. The two laser beams experience differential phase delays while propagating through the atmospheric optical channel. The differential phase delays are detected and sampled at each terminal to yield raw random bit streams. The random bit streams are processed to remove bit errors and, through privacy amplification, to yield a bit stream known only to Alice and Bob. The same chaotic physical mechanism that provides randomness also provides confidentiality. The laboratory system yielded secret key bit rates of a few bits/second. For external optical channels over longer channel lengths with atmospheric turbulence levels, secret bit rates of 10 s of bits/second are predicted.

  6. Characterization of optical turbulence in a jet engine exhaust with Shack-Hartmenn wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deron, R.; Mendez, F.

    2008-10-01

    Airborne laser countermeasure applications (DIRCM) are hampered by the turbulence of jet engine exhaust. The effects of this source of perturbation on optical propagation have still to be documented and analyzed in order to get a better insight into the different mechanisms of the plume perturbations and also to validate CFD/LES codes. For that purpose, wave front sensing has been used as a non-intrusive optical technique to provide unsteady and turbulent optical measurements through a plume of a jet engine installed at a fixed point on the ground. The experiment has been implemented in October 2007 along with other optical measuring techniques at Volvo Aero Corporation (Trollhättan, Sweden). This study is part of a European research programme dealing with DIRCM issues. The Shack- Hartmann (SH) wave front sensing technique was employed. It consisted of 64 x 64 lenslets coupled to a 1024x1024 pixel Dalsa CCD sensor working at a sampling rate of 40 Hz. A 15 ns pulsed laser synchronized with the SH sensor enabled "freezing" turbulence in each SH image. The ability of the technique to substract a reference permitted a simple calibration procedure to ensure accurate and reliable measurements despite vibration environment. Instantaneous phases are reconstructed using Fourier techniques so as to obtain a better spatial resolution against turbulent effects. Under any given plume condition, overall tilt aberration prevails. Phase power spectra derived from phase statistics are drawn according to the plume main axis and to normal axis. They compare favorably well to the decaying Kolmogorov power law on a useful high spatial frequency range. Averaged phases are also decomposed into Zernike polynomials to analyze optical mode behavior according to engine status and to plume abscissa. With overall tilt removed, turbulent DSP's amplitude drops by a factor of 30 to 40 and mean aberrations by a factor of 10 from an abscissa 1 meter to another 3.5 meters away from the engine

  7. Adaptive detection technique for optical wireless communication over strong turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Huang, Dexiu; Xiuhua, Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium, so the atmospheric turbulence effects lead to fading related with signal intensity. The received signal of OWC over strong turbulence channels is assumed to be a mixture of K-distributed fading and Gaussian distributed thermal noise. Second-order spectral analysis is unable to separately estimate the mixed signal. In order to mitigate the fading induced by turbulence, the decision threshold-updating algorithm based on second and higher order cumulants is proposed and is able to operate in an unknown turbulence environment. The performance of the adaptive processing scheme has been evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation results show the improvement of the bit error rate (BER) performance.

  8. The effect of thin turbulent shear layers on the optical quality of imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    A modified C141 transport was outfitted with a 91.5-cm reflector telescope designed to view objects radiating outside the visible window in the infrared range from 1 micron to 1000 microns. The telescope is situated in a cavity which is operated open port. Spoilers were designed which reduce turbulence-induced excitation of the cavity. The aircraft was designed to operate at altitudes up to 15 km to significantly reduce the effect of the H2O and CO2. Furthermore, the optically degrading influence of the large-scale atmospheric turbulence on land-based telescopes is replaced by the effect of the turbulent shear layer resulting from the spoiler upstream of the cavity. A mathematical model was established to describe the effect of turbulent shear layers on imaging systems and to examine the parameters of interest relevant to potential wind-tunnel experimentation.

  9. Experimental demonstration of single-mode fiber coupling over relatively strong turbulence with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Liu, Chao; Xian, Hao

    2015-10-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems using fiber-optic components can greatly improve the stability of the system and simplify the structure. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of the signal beam and limits the single-mode fiber (SMF) coupling efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the SMF coupling efficiency over various turbulences. The results show that the SMF coupling efficiency drops from 81% without phase distortion to 10% when phase root mean square value equals 0.3λ. The simulations of SMF coupling with adaptive optics (AO) indicate that it is inevitable to compensate the high-order aberrations for SMF coupling over relatively strong turbulence. The SMF coupling efficiency experiments, using an AO system with a 137-element deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, obtain average coupling efficiency increasing from 1.3% in open loop to 46.1% in closed loop under a relatively strong turbulence, D/r0=15.1.

  10. Propagation of an optical vortex carried by a partially coherent Laguerre-Gaussian beam in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Huang, Qingqing; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Dan

    2016-06-10

    The analytical formulas for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode probability density, signal OAM mode detection probability, and spiral spectrum of partially coherent Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with optical vortices propagation in weak horizontal oceanic turbulent channels were developed, based on the Rytov approximation theory. The effect of oceanic turbulence and beam source parameters on the propagation behavior of the optical vortices carried by partially coherent LG beams was investigated in detail. Our results indicated that optical turbulence in an ocean environment produced a much stronger effect on the optical vortex than that in an atmosphere environment; the effective range of the signal OAM mode of LG beams with a smaller ratio of the mode crosstalk was limited to only several tens of meters in turbulent ocean. The existence of oceanic turbulence evidently induced OAM mode crosstalk and spiral spectrum spread. The effects of oceanic turbulence on the OAM mode detection probability increased with the increase of radial and azimuthal mode orders, oceanic turbulent equivalent temperature structure parameter, and temperature-salinity balance parameter. The spatial partial coherence of the beam source would enhance the effect of turbulent aberrations on the signal OAM mode detection probability, and fully coherent vortex beams provided better performance than partially coherent ones. Increasing wavelength of the vortex beams would help improve the performance of this quantum optical communication system. These results might be of interest for the potential application of optical vortices in practical underwater quantum optical communication among divers, submarines, and sensors in the ocean environment.

  11. Limitations of Segmented Wavefront Control Devices in Emulating Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for Adaptive Optics in Vision Science”. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 10(3):629–635, May/Jun 2004. 11. Fernandez , Enrique J...and Pablo Artal. “Membrane Deformable Mirror for Adap- tive Optics: Performance Limits in Visual Optics”. Optics Express, 11(9):1056– 1069, May 2003

  12. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  13. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  14. Random optical beam propagation in anisotropic turbulence along horizontal links.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-10-17

    Considerable amount of data has been collected in the past asserting that atmospheric turbulence has regions where it exhibits anisotropic statistics. For instance, it is known that the fluctuations in the refractive index within the first meter above the ground are typically stronger in the vertical direction compared with those in the horizontal directions. We have investigated the second-order statistical properties of a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam traversing anisotropic atmospheric turbulence along a horizontal path. Analytical expression is rigorously derived for the cross-spectral density function of a GSM beam. It is shown that the spread of the beam and its coherence properties become different in two transverse directions due to anisotropy. In the limiting case when the source coherence width becomes infinite our results reduce to those for Gaussian beam propagation. Source partial coherence is shown to mitigate anisotropy at sub-kilometer distances.

  15. Characterization of the horizontal optical turbulence (C{/n 2}) data measured at Kongju and Cheonan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeong Kim, Bo; Lee, Jun Ho; Soo Choi, Young

    2015-06-01

    When light from an object or an astronomical star propagates in the earth's atmosphere, atmospheric turbulence can distort and move the image in various ways. A quantitative measure of the intensity of optical turbulence with a refractive index structure parameter, C {/n 2}, is widely used in the statistical characterization of the random refractive index fluctuations generally referred to as optical turbulence. I this study, we investigated the horizontal optical turbulence in the near infrared region (850nm) at two sites in South Korea (Kongju and Cheonan) by using a scintillometer. The scintillometer measured the refractive index structure parameter C {/n 2} over 2.1- and 0.4-km paths, respectively, in Kongju and Cheonan. The first path was over an urban area characterized by a complicated land-use mix (residential houses, a river, bare ground, etc.) whereas the second path was a building-to-building path at a 15-m height on a university campus. In addition to the scintillometer, an independent weather station recorded meteorological conditions such as wind speed, relative humidity, and temperature. Study results indicate the general patterns of the optical turbulence at both sites agree with previous-reported diurnal patterns; they have two dips in C2n, one at around sunrise and the other at sunset, but the night profiles varied strongly depending on the atmospheric conditions. The average values of C {/n 2} for the measurement period were × 10-15 and 2.90 × 10-14 m-2/3 in Kongju and Cheonan, espectively, thus confirming that the optical field is clearer in the former. In addition, the average values of the Fried parameter, r0, were accordingly estimated to be 8.0 and 2.5 cm over a 2-km optical distance at Kongju and Cheonan, respectively.

  16. Assessment of Optical Turbulence Profiles Derived From Probabilistic Climatology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    IRIA) Center,Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, 1993.10. Jumper G. Y., Roadcap J. R ., Adair S. C., Seeley G. P., and Fairley G. Atmo...three dimensional spatial covariance function describes this correlationwithin a volume of space for a random eld u( R ) = (x; y; z; t). The PSD charac...terizes the statistical distribution of the size and number of turbulent eddies in thevolume. [19] In three dimensions, the spatial variable, R , and the

  17. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  18. Delayed diversity for fade resistance in optical wireless communications through turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisno, Sugianto; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2004-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and phase of the received signal in an optical wireless communication link. These fluctuations, often referred to as scintillation noise, lead to signal fading, which increase bit errors in digital communication links using intensity modulation and direct detection. The performance of an optical link can be improved by the use of a time delayed diversity technique, which takes advantage of the fact that the atmospheric path from transmitter to receiver is statistically independent for time intervals beyond the correlation time of the intensity fluctuations. We have designed and constructed a prototype optical wireless system using this scheme. Bit-error-rate measurements have been used to characterize the link performance for different delay periods under conditions of controlled simulated turbulence. It has been determined that link performance improves significantly, especially in strong turbulence. In addition, we have implemented orthogonal polarization modulation, which works especially well in optical wireless systems. In contrast to fiber optic communications, the polarization state of a laser beam is well preserved on a free space optical path.

  19. Propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan; Cai, Yangjian; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2012-04-23

    The propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system are derived in turbulent atmosphere, respectively. The average intensity distribution and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters, the topological charge, the transverse coherent lengths, and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are also examined in detail. This research is beneficial to the practical applications in free-space optical communications and the remote sensing of the dark hollow beams. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  20. Forecast of wheat yield throughout the agricultural season using optical and radar satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieuzal, R.; Baup, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the capabilities of forecasting the yield of wheat using an artificial neural network combined with multi-temporal satellite data acquired at high spatial resolution throughout the agricultural season in the optical and/or microwave domains. Reflectance (acquired by Formosat-2, and Spot 4-5 in the green, red, and near infrared wavelength) and multi-configuration backscattering coefficients (acquired by TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 in the X- and C-bands, at co- (abbreviated HH and VV) and cross-polarization states (abbreviated HV and VH)) constitute the input variable of the artificial neural networks, which are trained and validated on the successively acquired images, providing yield forecast in near real-time conditions. The study is based on data collected over 32 fields of wheat distributed over a study area located in southwestern France, near Toulouse. Among the tested sensor configurations, several satellite data appear useful for the yield forecasting throughout the agricultural season (showing coefficient of determination (R2) larger than 0.60 and a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 9.1 quintals by hectare (q ha-1)): CVH, CHV, or the combined used of XHH and CHH, CHH and CHV, or green reflectance and CHH. Nevertheless, the best accurate forecast (R2 = 0.76 and RMSE = 7.0 q ha-1) is obtained longtime before the harvest (on day 98, during the elongation of stems) using the combination of co- and cross-polarized backscattering coefficients acquired in the C-band (CVV and CVH). These results highlight the high interest of using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data instead of optical ones to early forecast the yield before the harvest of wheat.

  1. Heterodyne efficiency of a coherent free-space optical communication model through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongxiong; Dang, Anhong; Liu, Ling; Guo, Hong

    2012-10-20

    The heterodyne efficiency of a coherent free-space optical (FSO) communication model under the effects of atmospheric turbulence and misalignment is studied in this paper. To be more general, both the transmitted beam and local oscillator beam are assumed to be partially coherent based on the Gaussian Schell model (GSM). By using the derived analytical form of the cross-spectral function of a GSM beam propagating through atmospheric turbulence, a closed-form expression of heterodyne efficiency is derived, assuming that the propagation directions for the transmitted and local oscillator beams are slightly different. Then the impacts of atmospheric turbulence, configuration of the two beams (namely, beam radius and spatial coherence width), detector radius, and misalignment angle over heterodyne efficiency are examined. Numerical results suggest that the beam radius of the two overlapping beams can be optimized to achieve a maximum heterodyne efficiency according to the turbulence conditions and the detector radius. It is also found that atmospheric turbulence conditions will significantly degrade the efficiency of heterodyne detection, and compared to fully coherent beams, partially coherent beams are less sensitive to the changes in turbulence conditions and more robust against misalignment at the receiver.

  2. Exploring Vertical Turbulence Structure in Neutrally and Stably Stratified Flows Using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Large-Eddy Simulation (WRF-LES) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udina, Mireia; Sun, Jielun; Kosović, Branko; Soler, Maria Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Following Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69(1):338-351, 2012), vertical variations of turbulent mixing in stably stratified and neutral environments as functions of wind speed are investigated using the large-eddy simulation capability in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The simulations with a surface cooling rate for the stable boundary layer (SBL) and a range of geostrophic winds for both stable and neutral boundary layers are compared with observations from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99). To avoid the uncertainty of the subgrid scheme, the investigation focuses on the vertical domain when the ratio between the subgrid and the resolved turbulence is small. The results qualitatively capture the observed dependence of turbulence intensity on wind speed under neutral conditions; however, its vertical variation is affected by the damping layer used in absorbing undesirable numerical waves at the top of the domain as a result of relatively large neutral turbulent eddies. The simulated SBL fails to capture the observed temperature variance with wind speed and the observed transition from the SBL to the near-neutral atmosphere with increasing wind speed, although the vertical temperature profile of the simulated SBL resembles the observed profile. The study suggests that molecular thermal conduction responsible for the thermal coupling between the surface and atmosphere cannot be parameterized through the Monin-Obukhov bulk relation for turbulent heat transfer by applying the surface radiation temperature, as is common practice when modelling air-surface interactions.

  3. Fading Losses on the LCRD Free-Space Optical Link Due to Channel Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino; Hamkins, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will implement an optical communications link between a pair of Earth terminals via an Earth-orbiting satellite relay. Clear air turbulence over the communication paths will cause random fluctuations, or fading, in the received signal irradiance. In this paper we characterize losses due to fading caused by clear air turbulence. We illustrate the performance of a representative relay link, utilizing a channel interleaver and error-correction-code to mitigate fading, and provide a method to quickly determine the link performance.

  4. Fading Losses on the LCRD Free-Space Optical Link Due to Channel Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino; Hamkins, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will implement an optical communications link between a pair of Earth terminals via an Earth-orbiting satellite relay. Clear air turbulence over the communication paths will cause random fluctuations, or fading, in the received signal irradiance. In this paper we characterize losses due to fading caused by clear air turbulence. We illustrate the performance of a representative relay link, utilizing a channel interleaver and error-correction-code to mitigate fading, and provide a method to quickly determine the link performance.

  5. Propagation of a random electromagnetic beam through a misaligned optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingbin; Zhao, Daomu

    2008-10-01

    On the basis of the generalized diffraction integral formula for misaligned optical systems in the spatial domain, an analytical propagation expression for the elements of the cross-spectral density matrix of a random electromagnetic beam passing through a misaligned optical system in turbulent atmosphere is derived. Some analyses are illustrated by numerical examples relating to changes in the state of polarization of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beam propagating through such an optical system. It is shown that the misalignment has a significant influence on the intensity profile and the state of polarization of the beam, but the influence becomes smaller for the beam propagating in strong turbulent atmosphere. The method in this paper can be applied for sources that are either isotropic or anisotropic. It is shown that the isotropic sources and the anisotropic sources have different polarization properties on beam propagation.

  6. Assessing the ability of WRF-Chem to forecast aerosol optical depth over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Małgorzata; Kryza, Maciej; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol particles affect Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by altering cloud properties and also influence weather and air quality. The ability of models to describe aerosol optical properties is relevant to reduce uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing and further improve forecasts of meteorology and air quality. Here we evaluate the performance of high-resolution simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) in capturing temporal distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm) over Poland. The simulations are run operationally for this area to forecast air quality since June 2016. The model is run with two domains - mother domain over Europe at 12 km x 12 km and inner domain over Poland at 4 km x 4 km. The model results were compared with ground-based observations from 2 stations from Aerosol Research Network Poland-AOD. The results show that the model can reproduce the variability of observed AOD, however in general overestimates measured values.

  7. Imaging through turbulence with a quadrature-phase optical interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kern, Brian; Dimotakis, Paul E; Martin, Chris; Lang, Daniel B; Thessin, Rachel N

    2005-12-01

    We present an improved technique for imaging through turbulence at visible wavelengths using a rotation shearing pupil-plane interferometer, intended for astronomical and terrestrial imaging applications. While previous astronomical rotation shearing interferometers have made only visibility modulus measurements, this interferometer makes four simultaneous measurements on each interferometric baseline, with phase differences of pi/2 between each measurement, allowing complex visibility measurements (modulus and phase) across the entire input pupil in a single exposure. This technique offers excellent wavefront resolution, allowing operation at visible wavelengths on large apertures, is potentially immune to amplitude fluctuations (scintillation), and may offer superior calibration capabilities to other imaging techniques. The interferometer has been tested in the laboratory under weakly aberrating conditions and at Palomar Observatory under ordinary astronomical observing conditions. This research is based partly on observations obtained at the Hale Telescope.

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of polarization fluctuations over atmospheric turbulent channels for wireless optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankun; Ding, Shengli; Zhai, Huili; Dang, Anhong

    2014-12-29

    In wireless optical communications (WOC), polarization multiplexing systems and coherent polarization systems have excellent performance and wide applications, while its state of polarization affected by atmospheric turbulence is not clearly understood. This paper focuses on the polarization fluctuations caused by atmospheric turbulence in a WOC link. Firstly, the relationship between the polarization fluctuations and the index of refraction structure parameter is introduced and the distribution of received polarization angle is obtained through theoretical derivations. Then, turbulent conditions are adjusted and measured elaborately in a wide range of scintillation indexes (SI). As a result, the root-mean-square (RMS) variation and probability distribution function (PDF) of polarization angle conforms closely to that of theoretical model.

  9. Underwater optical communication performance for laser beam propagation through weak oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Li, Zan; Liu, Zengji

    2015-02-20

    In clean ocean water, the performance of a underwater optical communication system is limited mainly by oceanic turbulence, which is defined as the fluctuations in the index of refraction resulting from temperature and salinity fluctuations. In this paper, using the refractive index spectrum of oceanic turbulence under weak turbulence conditions, we carry out, for a horizontally propagating plane wave and spherical wave, analysis of the aperture-averaged scintillation index, the associated probability of fade, mean signal-to-noise ratio, and mean bit error rate. Our theoretical results show that for various values of the rate of dissipation of mean squared temperature and the temperature-salinity balance parameter, the large-aperture receiver leads to a remarkable decrease of scintillation and consequently a significant improvement on the system performance. Such an effect is more noticeable in the plane wave case than in the spherical wave case.

  10. Effect of optical turbulence along a downward slant path on probability of laser hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, K. Ove S.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the optical turbulence effect along a slant path downward on probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure level (MPE) from a laser is discussed. The optical turbulence is generated by fluctuations (variations) in refractive index of the atmosphere. These fluctuations are caused in turn by changes in atmospheric temperature and humidity. The structure function of refractive index, Cn2, is the single most important parameter in the description of turbulence effects on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation. In the boundary layer, the lowest part of the atmosphere where the ground directly influence the atmosphere, is the variation of Cn2 in Sweden between about 10-17 and 10-12 m-2/3, see Bergström et al. [5]. Along a horizontal path is the Cn 2 often assumed to be constant. The variation of the Cn2 along a slant path is described by the Tatarski model as function of height to the power of -4/3 or -2/3, depending on day or night conditions. The hazard of laser damage of eye is calculated for a long slant path downward. The probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) level is given as a function of distance in comparison with nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) for adopted levels of turbulence. Furthermore, calculations are carried out for a laser pointer or a designator laser from a high altitude and long distance down to a ground target. The used example shows that there is an 10% risk of exceeding the MPE at a distance 2 km beyond the NOHD, in this example 48 km, due to turbulence level of 5·10-15 m-2/3 at ground height. The turbulence influence on a laser beam along horizontal path on NOHD have been shown before by Zilberman et al. [4].

  11. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    LONG-TERM GOAL. Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological...develop the bio -optical model component of the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS); ii) to apply the bio -optical model to the study of real ocean...dynamical processes which govern the variability of bio -optical properties and associated effects on biogeochemical and ecosystem dynamical processes; iii

  12. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    LONG-TERM GOAL. Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological...prove such models, focusing specifically on the bio -optical component. Ultimately, this research is directed towards the understanding of optical and...technical objectives of this project are i) to develop the bio -optical model component of the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS); ii) to apply the bio

  13. Simulation of anisoplanatism of adaptive optical system in inhomogeneous turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, M.; Koriabin, A. V.; Shmalhausen, V. I.

    2005-12-01

    The software is presented for simulation of anisoplanatic effect and its influence on performance of adaptive optical phase conjugation system in inhomogeneous turbulent atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence was simulated with the help of a set of moving random phase screens with arbitrary statistics. Both reference and target are supposed to be the point light sources. To simulate atmospheric turbulence we applied the concept of a number of moving random phase screens with Kolmogorov spectrum. In our investigations we used the model of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the ideal model of wavefront adaptive mirror that is assumed to reproduce a given number of Zernike polynomials without time delays. The designed software allows to calculate instantaneous and average values of phase correction errors at a different angle between a reference beacon and target source. Simulations can be made with a broad range of parameters of adaptive system and atmospheric turbulence. The approach enables us to estimate residual aberrations as well as to calculate instant parameters of system performance - point spread function (PSF), optical transfer function (OTF) - and system isoplanatic angle. The model of system allows to change the control algorithm of phase corresction. Both common phase conjugation and weighted phase conjugation algorithm have been tested.

  14. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-08

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed.

  15. Dember effect photodetectors and the effects of turbulence on free-space optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmelik, Yamac

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems have recently utilized components that have been developed for fiber-optic communication systems. The received laser beam in such a system must be coupled into a single-mode fiber at the input of a commercially available receiver module or a wavelength division demultiplexer. However, one effect of propagation through atmospheric turbulence is that the spatial coherence of a laser beam is degraded and the percentage of the available power that can be coupled into the single-mode fiber is limited. This dissertation presents a numerical evaluation of fiber coupling efficiency for laser light distorted by atmospheric turbulence. The results for weak fluctuation conditions provide the level of coupling efficiency that can be expected for a given turbulence strength. In addition, the results show that the link distance must be limited to 400 m under moderate turbulence conditions if the link budget requires a coupling efficiency of 0.1. We also investigate the use of a coherent fiber array as a receiver structure to improve the fiber coupling efficiency of a free-space optical communication system. Our numerical results show that a coherent fiber array that consists of seven subapertures would increase fiber coupling efficiency by a significant amount for representative turbulence conditions and link distances. The use of photo-emf detectors as elements of a wavefront sensor for an adaptive optics system is also considered as an alternative method of reducing the effects of turbulence on a free-space optical communication system. Dember and photo-emf currents are investigated in silicon photoconductive detectors both theoretically and experimentally. Our results show that Dember photocurrents dominate the response of high-purity silicon samples with top surface electrodes to a moving interference pattern. The use of surface electrodes leads to shadowed regions beneath the electrodes and Dember photocurrents appear

  16. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  17. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS STUDIES OF TURBULENCE IN OPTICALLY THICK GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, C.; Medeiros, J. R. De; Lazarian, A.; Burkhart, B.; Pogosyan, D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity of principal component analysis (PCA) to the velocity power spectrum in high-opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic position–position–velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post-processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal −3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of the Lazarian and Pogosyan theory. This makes PCA a potentially valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities, provided that proper gauging of the PCA index is made. However, we found the latter to not be easy, as the PCA results change in an irregular way for data with high sonic Mach numbers. This is in contrast to synthetic Brownian noise data used for velocity and density fields that show monotonic PCA behavior. We attribute this difference to the PCA's sensitivity to Fourier phase information.

  18. Compensating Atmospheric Turbulence Effects at High Zenith Angles with Adaptive Optics Using Advanced Phase Reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemann, M.; Soehnel, G.; Archer, G.

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the resolution of images of space objects far beyond that predicted by diffraction alone. Adaptive optics telescopes have been widely used for compensating these effects, but as users seek to extend the envelopes of operation of adaptive optics telescopes to more demanding conditions, such as daylight operation, and operation at low elevation angles, the level of compensation provided will degrade. We have been investigating the use of advanced wave front reconstructors and post detection image reconstruction to overcome the effects of turbulence on imaging systems in these more demanding scenarios. In this paper we show results comparing the optical performance of the exponential reconstructor, the least squares reconstructor, and two versions of a reconstructor based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm in a closed loop adaptive optics system using a conventional continuous facesheet deformable mirror and a Hartmann sensor. The performance of these reconstructors has been evaluated under a range of source visual magnitudes and zenith angles ranging up to 70 degrees. We have also simulated satellite images, and applied speckle imaging, multi-frame blind deconvolution algorithms, and deconvolution algorithms that presume the average point spread function is known to compute object estimates. Our work thus far indicates that the combination of adaptive optics and post detection image processing will extend the useful envelope of the current generation of adaptive optics telescopes.

  19. Research on diversity receive technology for wireless optical communication using PPM in weak turbulence atmosphere channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Guo-an

    2014-09-01

    In order to mitigate atmospheric turbulence, the free space optical (FSO) system model with spatial diversity is analyzed based on intensity detection pulse position modulation (PPM) in the weak turbulence atmosphere. The slot error rate (SER) calculating formula of the system without diversity is derived under pulse position modulation firstly. Then as a benchmark, independent of identical distribution, the average slot error rates of the three linear combining technologies, which are the maximal ratio combining (MRC), equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SelC), are compared. Simulation results show that the performance of system is the best improved by MRC, followed by EGC, and is poor by SelC, but SelC is simpler and more convenient. Spatial diversity is efficient to improve the performance and has strong ability on resistance to atmospheric channel decline. The above scheme is more suitable for optical wireless communication systems.

  20. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  1. Second moments of optical degradation due to a thin turbulent layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the thin turbulent layers, including boundary layers and shear layers, on light propagation is examined from a theoretical point of view. In particular, a mathematical model is developed to describe the interaction between the aerodynamic or, more precisely, the density fluctuations and the electromagnetic field. It is assumed that the turbulence induces a normally distributed phase aberration which is a homogenous random function in the plane of the aperture. The optical degradation is described in terms of the optical transfer function and the Strehl ratio which are random. Expressions for the first and second moments of these two parameters are developed from the definitions. Asymptotic (large aperture) approximations to these expressions are derived and discussed. Finally, the exact approximate results are compared for several typical values of the ratios of aperture diameter to scale of density fluctuations and rms phase aberration to wave length respectively.

  2. First results on the Experiment FESTER on optical turbulence over False Bay South Africa: dependencies and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The experiment FESTER (First European South African Transmission ExpeRiment) took place in 2015 to investigate the atmospheric influence on electro-optical systems performance across False Bay / South Africa on a long term basis. Several permanent stations for monitoring electro-optical propagation and atmospheric parameters were set up around the Bay. Additional intensive observation periods (IOPs) allowed for boat runs to assess the inhomogeneous atmospheric propagation conditions over water. In this paper we focus on the distribution of optical turbulence over the Bay. The different impact of water masses originating from the Indian Ocean and the Benguela current on the development of optical turbulence is discussed. The seasonal behavior of optical turbulence is presented and its effect on electro-optical system performance examined.

  3. The Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on an Air-To-Air Optical Communication Link.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Among some of the statistical distributions that have been considered are the Rayleigh , Rice- Nakagami , and K distributions. 19 0 ./ S...muste be at least 10 - 5 . Substituting Eq. (31) into Eq. (30) and rewriting gives 10- ( Q k+ Q (A -k) 10O = Q ( M (32) If, for example Q (x) 10 5 Then x...Lfl Q THE EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE ON AN AIR-TO-AIR OPTICAL COMMUNICATION LINK THESIS JAY N. KANAVOS

  4. An Optical Spectroscopic Study of HH 110: a Turbulent Mixing Layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, S.; Raga, A. C.; Curiel, S.

    2003-01-01

    The HH 110 jet extends 3 arcmin in length and consists of numerous knots forming the flow. Noriega-Crespo et al. (1996) found that the turbulent optical and near-infrared morphology of the HH 110 jet is consistent with that of a boundary layer. In this work, we have analyzed some line ratios along and across the jet in order to make a quantitative comparison with the line ratios predicted by the current mixing layer models.

  5. Optical Turbulence on Underwater Image Degradation in Natural Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    Arlington, VA 22203-1995 ONR Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. It is a well-known fact that the major degradation source on electro ...source on electro -optical (EO) imaging underwater is from scattering by the medium itself and the constituents within, namely particles of various...feet. The same applies to regions of strong re- suspension from the bottom, both in coastal regions as well as in the deep sea. The effects of

  6. Distribution Models for Optical Scintillation Due to Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-12

    beam jitter is found to be a dominant effect when this radius is close to unity, and the relationship between pointing error and scintillation is...phase errors in the near Field of the transmitter. If the optical phase at each point in the transmitter plane is described by the residual, 9, within...is close to unity, and the relationship between pointing error and scintillation is examined in detail. As a result of this work, models for the mean

  7. Bio-optical Dynamics and the Forecasting of Bio-optical Variability in the Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Research on oceanic bio -optical processes and the prediction of ocean bio -optical properties requires coupled physical-biological- chemical models...with the capability of real data initialization and assimilation. The goal is to develop and prove such models, focusing specifically on the bio -optical...their response and sensitivities to local and remote forcings. The scientific/technical objectives of this project are (1) to develop the bio -optical

  8. Use of Remotely Sensed Aerosol Optical Depth in Particulate Matter Forecasting for Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, S. L.; Crist, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cincinnati, a large metropolitan area in southwestern Ohio, has been listed as a non-attainment area based on the EPA 1997 PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5μm) standard with a number of unhealthy days reported annually for sensitive groups. AirNow provides air quality index for the city, but its accuracy largely depends on the air quality forecast models used and ground-based monitoring network measurements. These networks are inherently limited by their sparse distribution; nonetheless, they form an integral part of many decision-making structure and epidemiological studies. Remote sensing instruments such as MODIS provide daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) products with almost global spatial coverage, which are available on a near-real-time (NRT) basis. This work aims to show that the NRT AOD product obtained from MODIS can improve the air quality forecast in the Cincinnati area. To achieve this, an evaluation of the correlation of AOD retrievals with ground-based PM2.5 observations is carried out. Further to which, the MODIS AOD data is included as a variable in a statistical model to bolster current PM2.5 forecasting capabilities. Other key input parameters to the multiple linear regression model includes surface and vertical weather patterns, mixing height, local wind patterns, relative humidity and temperature.

  9. Characterization of optical turbulence at the GREGOR solar telescope: temporal and local behavior and its influence on the solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Stein, K.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2016-10-01

    Local atmospheric turbulence at the telescope level is regarded as a major reason for affecting the performance of the adaptive optics systems using wavelengths in the visible and infrared for solar observations. During the day the air masses around the telescope dome are influenced by flow distortions. Additionally heating of the infrastructure close to telescope causes thermal turbulence. Thereby optical turbulence is produced and leads to quality changes in the local seeing throughout the day. Image degradation will be yielded affecting the performance of adaptive optical systems. The spatial resolution of the solar observations will be reduced. For this study measurements of the optical turbulence, represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 were performed on several locations at the GREGOR telescope at the Teide observatory at Tenerife at the Canary Islands / Spain. Since September 2012 measurements of Cn2 were carried out between the towers of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) and of GREGOR with a laser-scintillometer. The horizontal distance of the measurement path was about 75 m. Additional from May 2015 up to March 2016 the optical turbulence was determined at three additional locations close to the solar telescope GREGOR. The optical turbulence is derived from sonic anemometer measurements. Time series of the sonic temperature are analyzed and compared to the direct measurements of the laser scintillometer. Meteorological conditions are investigated, especially the influence of the wind direction. Turbulence of upper atmospheric layers is not regarded. The measured local turbulence is compared to the system performance of the GREGOR telescopes. It appears that the mountain ridge effects on turbulence are more relevant than any local causes of seeing close to the telescope. Results of these analyses and comparison of nearly one year of measurements are presented and discussed.

  10. Optical distortions by compressible turbulence: distortion measures and importance of small-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ali

    2010-11-01

    This study is focused on aero-optics, which investigates optical distortions due to the compressibility mechanism, rather than entropy fluctuations. In particular, distortion effects by separated shear layers and turbulent wakes are considered. Typically, wavefront aberrations by these flows are larger than the optical wavelength; therefore, traditional measures (i.e. the Strehl ratio) would be inaccurate if used for quantifying optical distortions. Through statistical analysis of highly aberrated waves we introduce alternative measures with provable scaling properties. These norms, provide explicit relations between far-field optical statistics and statistics of the distorting media. We also present results of our study on the optical importance of small-scale flow structures. Using Kolmogorov hypothesis, a relation is derived to estimate the smallest optically-important length scale in a general aero-optical framework. This length is typically in the inertial range and the developed criterion is shown to reasonably predict the resolution requirements for simulations. This analysis can also be used to estimate frequency requirements for adaptive-optics.

  11. Atmospheric optical turbulence measurements in the LOTIS vacuum chamber and LOTIS collimator jitter analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borota, Stephen A.; Li, Laurence; Cuzner, Gregor; Hutchison, Sheldon B.; Cochrane, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company has completed the Large Optical Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) at its Sunnyvale, CA campus. Central to the LOTIS testing facility is a 6.5-meter diameter optical collimator housed in a large, temperature controlled and vibration isolated high-vacuum chamber. A measurement has been made of the atmospheric turbulence inside the LOTIS vacuum chamber testing environment at ambient pressure and temperature near floor level where distorting turbulence may be most persistent. Turbulence is one of the many components that define the overall LOTIS Collimator optical testing capabilities at ambient air pressure. Experimental measurements have been made with a non-phase-shifting Fizeau interferometer along a 50-foot horizontal propagation path in double pass. Results presented here represent root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error over an 18-inch aperture and the corresponding atmospheric coherence length, ro (Fried's parameter). In addition, an analysis was performed to calculate the optical line-of-sight jitter response of the LOTIS Collimator system and facility due to base-level vibration disturbances. Vibration survey measurements were made using accelerometers mounted to the vacuum chamber foundation to create a Power Spectral Density (PSD) plot of the measured seismic and vacuum chamber mechanically induced vibration disturbances. The measured PSD was used as the base input to a system-level finite element model that included the LOTIS Collimator, the Flat Mirror Positioning structure and a generic Unit Under Test all mounted on the LOTIS Vibration Isolation Bench to assess the whole system jitter response. Results presented here represent the RMS jitter in nanoradians through the optical path of the LOTIS Collimator due to base-level induced seismic and chamber mechanical vibrations.

  12. Investigation of edge turbulence by means of optical and electrical diagnostics in RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarin, Paolo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Serianni, Gianluigi; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Sakakita, Hajime

    2003-10-01

    Electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of RFP is commonly observed with sets of Langmuir probes during low current operation and associated with electrostatic structures. A new diagnostic system is being developed for the investigation of electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of fusion plasmas, at high plasma currents and thermal loads and will be used in the TPE-RX and RFX devices. The system is composed of gas puff nozzle, a double radial array of Langmuir probes and a set of 32 optical chords measuring the HÑ fluctuations. The nozzle will allow the puffing of gas to increase the local optical emissivity; the optical sensors will permit to investigate the optical emissivity turbulent pattern and to perform a two-dimensional analysis of turbulent structures. The Langmuir probes will be used to visualise the floating potential turbulent pattern and to measure the electron density. After assessing the correspondence between the results of the two systems and characterising the properties of the local plasma, the Langmuir probes will be remotely removed and only the optical analysis will be continued at high plasma currents. The gas flow will be characterised so as not to perturb the investigated region, while at the same time increasing the local emissivity. The area of optical view is 60 mm wide (toroidal direction) and 4 mm high (poloidal direction). The fields of view of adjacent chords in the object plane are 5 mm toroidally apart from each other and their diameter is 4 mm. The focus along the line of sight is about 50 mm deep. Each chord views a cone centred on focal point in the outer edge and extending through the plasma. The contributions due to small-scale structures away from the focus will be spatially averaged and so should contribute mainly a constant level to the chord signal. The puffed cloud emission will be collected from 3 optical heads and transferred through 35 m long optical fibres to the detection system, for which standard

  13. Study of turbulence effects for a free-space optical link over water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Ruth; Chen, Mingzhou; Lambert, Andrew; Mackey, David; Goncharov, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we report on measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects arising from water air interaction. The aim of this study is to aid in the design of a free-space optical relay system to facilitate longer line-of-sight distances between relay buoys in a large expanse of water. Analysis of turbulence statistics will provide the basis for adaptive optics solutions to improve the relay signal strength affected by scintillation and beam wander. We report on experiments determining the isokinetic angle using an array of broadband incoherent sources of variable angular separation on the order of 0.1 mrad to 2.8 mrad. The experimental setup consists of a 5 inch telescope with high speed CMOS camera observing over a distance of 300 m close at a height of 1.5 m above the water surface. As part of the turbulence characterisation we experimentally estimate the relative image motion of angle-ofarrival fluctuations and perform other time series analysis. Analysis of the image motion requires new techniques due to the extended nature of the source. We explore different centroiding algorithms and surface fitting techniques.

  14. Optical turbulence profiling with SloDAR in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Jérôme; Mieda, Etsuko; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard; Graham, James R.; Carlberg, Raymond; Wright, Shelley A.; Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh

    2014-07-01

    The Earth's polar regions offer unique advantages for ground-based astronomical observations with its cold and dry climate, long periods of darkness, and the potential for exquisite image quality. We present preliminary results from a site-testing campaign during nighttime from October to November 2012 at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), on a 610-m high ridge near the Eureka weatherstation on Ellesmere Island, Canada. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was employed, using the Slope Detection and Ranging (SloDAR) method. This instrument (Mieda et al, this conference) was designed to measure the altitude, strength and variability of atmospheric turbulence, in particular for operation under Arctic conditions. First SloDAR optical turbulence profiles above PEARL show roughly half of the optical turbulence confined to the boundary layer, below about 1 km, with the majority of the remainder in one or two thin layers between 2 km and 5 km, or above. The median seeing during this campaign was measured to be 0.65 arcsec.

  15. LOLAS-2: Redesign of an Optical Turbulence Profiler with High Altitude-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R.; Zúñiga, C. A.; Tapia-Rodríguez, J. J.; Sánchez, L. J.; Cruz-González, I.; Avilés, J. L.; Valdés-Hernández, O.; Carrasco, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present the development, tests, and first results of the second-generation LOLAS-2. This instrument constitutes a strongly improved version of the prototype LOLAS, which is aimed at the measurement of optical turbulence profiles close to the ground, with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the generalized Scidar principle that consists of taking double-star scintillation images on a defocused pupil plane and calculating in real time the autocovariance of the scintillation. The main components are an open-truss 40-cm Ritchey-Chrétien telescope, a German-type equatorial mount, an electron-multiplying CCD camera, and a dedicated acquisition and real-time data-processing software. The new optical design of LOLAS-2 is significantly simplified compared to the prototype. The experiments carried out to test the permanence of the image within the useful zone of the detector and the stability of the telescope focus show that LOLAS-2 can function without the use of the autoguiding and autofocus algorithms that were developed for the prototype version. Optical turbulence profiles obtained with the new LOLAS have the best altitude-resolution ever achieved with Scidar-like techniques (6.3 m). The simplification of the optical layout and the improved mechanical properties of the telescope and mount make of LOLAS-2 a more robust instrument.

  16. An atmospheric turbulence generator for dynamic tests with LINC-NIRVANA's adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschke, D.; Bizenberger, P.; Gaessler, W.; Zhang, X.; Mohr, L.; Baumeister, H.; Diolaiti, E.

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA[1] (LN) is an instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope[2] (LBT). Its purpose is to combine the light coming from the two primary mirrors in a Fizeau-type interferometer. In order to compensate turbulence-induced dynamic aberrations, the layer oriented adaptive optics system of LN[3] consists of two major subsystems for each side: the Ground-Layer-Wavefront sensor (GLWS) and the Mid- and High-Layer Wavefront sensor (MHLWS). The MHLWS is currently set up in a laboratory at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. To test the multi-conjugate AO with multiple simulated stars in the laboratory and to develop the necessary control software, a dedicated light source is needed. For this reason, we designed an optical system, operating in visible as well as in infrared light, which imitates the telescope's optical train (f-ratio, pupil position and size, field curvature). By inserting rotating surface etched glass phase screens, artificial aberrations corresponding to the atmospheric turbulence are introduced. In addition, different turbulence altitudes can be simulated depending on the position of these screens along the optical axis. In this way, it is possible to comprehensively test the complete system, including electronics and software, in the laboratory before integration into the final LINC-NIRVANA setup. Combined with an atmospheric piston simulator, also this effect can be taken into account. Since we are building two identical sets, it is possible to feed the complete instrument with light for the interferometric combination during the assembly phase in the integration laboratory.

  17. Optical turbulence and transverse rogue waves in a cavity with triple-quantum-dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, M.; Khanmohammadi, M.; Kheradmand, R.; Oppo, G.-L.

    2017-09-01

    We show that optical turbulence extreme events can exist in the transverse dynamics of a cavity containing molecules of triple quantum dots under conditions close to tunneling-induced transparency. These nanostructures, when coupled via tunneling, form a four-level configuration with tunable energy-level separations. We show that such a system exhibits multistability and bistability of Turing structures in instability domains with different critical wave vectors. By numerical simulation of the mean-field equation that describes the transverse dynamics of the system, we show that the simultaneous presence of two transverse solutions with opposite nonlinearities gives rise to a series of turbulent structures with the capability of generating two-dimensional rogue waves.

  18. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with <8% of EVM in a turbulent channel. Based on the results, we show that transmitting the LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals.

  19. MIMO free-space optical communication employing coherent BPOLSK modulation in atmospheric optical turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, K.; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2015-05-01

    An optical wireless communication system is an alternative to radio frequency communication, but atmospheric turbulence induced fading and misalignment fading are the main impairments affecting an optical signal when propagating through the turbulence channel. The resultant of misalignment fading is the pointing errors, it degrades the bit error rate (BER) performance of the free space optics (FSO) system. In this paper, we study the BER performance of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system employing coherent binary polarization shift keying (BPOLSK) in gamma-gamma (G-G) channel with pointing errors. The BER performance of the BPOLSK based MIMO FSO system is compared with the single-input single-output (SISO) system. Also, the average BER performance of the systems is analyzed and compared with and without pointing errors. A novel closed form expressions of BER are derived for MIMO FSO system with maximal ratio combining (MRC) and equal gain combining (EGC) diversity techniques. The analytical results show that the pointing errors can severely degrade the performance of the system.

  20. Method of forecasting energy center positions of laser beam spot images using a parallel hierarchical network for optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Leonid I.; Kokryatskaya, Natalia I.; Melnikov, Viktor V.; Kosenko, Galina L.

    2013-05-01

    A forecasting method, based on the parallel-hierarchical (PH) network and hyperbolic smoothing of empirical data, is presented in this paper. Preceding values of the time series, hyperbolic smoothing, and PH network data are used for forecasting. To determine a position of the next route fragment in relation to X and Y axes, hyperbola parameters are sent to the route parameter forecasting system. In the results synchronization block, network-processed data arrive to the database where a sample of most correlated data is drawn using service parameters of the PH network. An average prediction error is 0.55% for the developed method and 1.62% for neural networks. That is why, due to the use of the PH network and hyperbolic smoothing, the developed method is more efficient for real-time systems than traditional neural networks in forecasting energy center positions of laser beam spot images for optical communication systems.

  1. Turbulence-induced channel crosstalk in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed free-space optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2008-05-01

    A multichannel free-space optical (FSO) communication system based on orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams is studied. We numerically analyze the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the system and find that turbulence induces attenuation and crosstalk among channels. Based on a model in which the constituent channels are binary symmetric and crosstalk is a Gaussian noise source, we find optimal sets of OAM states at each turbulence condition studied and determine the aggregate capacity of the multichannel system at those conditions. OAM-multiplexed FSO systems that operate in the weak turbulence regime are found to offer good performance. We verify that the aggregate capacity decreases as the turbulence increases. A per-channel bit-error rate evaluation is presented to show the uneven effects of crosstalk on the constituent channels.

  2. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors.

  3. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-05-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  4. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  5. Far-field optical degradation due to near-field transmission through a turbulent heated jet.

    PubMed

    Cicchiello, J M; Jumper, E J

    1997-09-01

    When a laser beam traverses an optically active, turbulent flow field, the laser wave front is aberrated by the flow. Density variations in a heated two-dimensional jet, for example, correspond to index-of-refraction variations, and this modulation of the index in the fluid can imprint an optical phase disturbance, or phase error, onto the laser wave front. Adaptive-optic systems seek to correct the phase error of the wave front, and thus restore the integrity of the far-field irradiance pattern. Given a near-field spatial mapping of a phase disturbance, the far-field irradiance pattern of the affected wave front can be calculated with Fourier-optics techniques. A Fourier-optics computer code was used to study the far-field irradiance patterns arising from actual time-varying measurements of a fluid-induced phase error. The time-averaged Strehl ratio was studied to provide insight into the spatial and temporal design requirements for adaptive-optic systems applied to the time series of near-field spatial phase-error maps.

  6. Numerical research of measurements of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor according to the parameters of its optical parts and the intensity of turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleneva, N. V.; Lavrinov, V.; Lavrinova, L. N.

    2015-11-01

    The wavefront sensor of Hartmann type consists of two parts: the optical and algorithmic. The parameters of the optical part of the sensor may vary. Since the time of "frozen" turbulence due to the Fried's length and to the cross wind transport turbulent distortion speed, the measurement Shack-Hartmann sensor depend on the intensity of turbulent distortions. In this paper are presented the results of the analysis of the measurements of the sensor according to the size of lens array and to the intensity of turbulent distortions. The analysis is performed on basis of a numerical model of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and on Kolmogorov's turbulence model.

  7. Effects of atmospheric turbulence and building sway on optical wireless-communication systems.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2003-01-15

    Urban optical wireless communication (UOWC) systems are considered a last-mile technology. UOWC systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. To provide a line of sight the transceivers are placed on high-rise building. However, dynamic wind loads, thermal expansion, and weak earthquakes cause buildings to sway. These sways distort the alignment between transmitter and receiver, causing pointing errors, the outcome of which is fading of the received signal. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, resulting in impaired link performance. A bit-error probability (BEP) model is developed that takes into account both building sway and turbulence-induced log amplitude fluctuations (i.e., fading of signal intensity) in the regime in which the receiver aperture, D0, is smaller than the turbulence coherence diameter, d0. It is assumed that the receiver has knowledge about the marginal statistics of the signal fading and the instantaneous signal-fading state.

  8. Investigation of Hill's optical turbulence model by means of direct numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Muschinski, Andreas; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    For almost four decades, Hill's "Model 4" [J. Fluid Mech. 88, 541 (1978) has played a central role in research and technology of optical turbulence. Based on Batchelor's generalized Obukhov-Corrsin theory of scalar turbulence, Hill's model predicts the dimensionless function h(κl(0), Pr) that appears in Tatarskii's well-known equation for the 3D refractive-index spectrum in the case of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, Φn(κ)=0.033C2(n)κ(-11/3) h(κl(0), Pr). Here we investigate Hill's model by comparing numerical solutions of Hill's differential equation with scalar spectra estimated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) output data. Our DNS solves the Navier-Stokes equation for the 3D velocity field and the transport equation for the scalar field on a numerical grid containing 4096(3) grid points. Two independent DNS runs are analyzed: one with the Prandtl number Pr=0.7 and a second run with Pr=1.0 . We find very good agreement between h(κl(0), Pr) estimated from the DNS output data and h(κl(0), Pr) predicted by the Hill model. We find that the height of the Hill bump is 1.79 Pr(1/3), implying that there is no bump if Pr<0.17 . Both the DNS and the Hill model predict that the viscous-diffusive "tail" of h(κl(0), Pr) is exponential, not Gaussian.

  9. Turbulent phase noise on asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. Simulations make use of the reciprocity principle to estimate both down and up link performance from wave-optics propagation of descending plane waves. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterising the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock transfer.

  10. Optical Receiver for Coherently Detected Pulse-Position Modulated Signals in the Presence of Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Fernandez, M.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    2005-05-01

    Performance analysis and experimental verification of a coherent free-space optical communications receiver in the presence of simulated atmospheric turbulence is presented. Bit-error rate (BER) performance of ideal coherent detection is analyzed in Section II, and the laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments are described. The key components include two lasers operating at a 1064-nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16-element (4 x 4) focal-plane detector array, and a data acquisition and signal processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In Section III, convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is demonstrated. In Section IV, adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse-position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence, in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence, is demonstrated. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed.

  11. Propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiuxiang

    2007-12-24

    The propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an arbitrary ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity at any receiver plane are obtained. As an elementary example, the average intensity and its radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens are studied. To show the effects of a lens on the average intensity and the intensity radius of the laser beam in turbulent atmosphere, the properties of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam and a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation in turbulent atmosphere are studied and numerically calculated. The average intensity profiles of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens can have a shape similar to that of the initial beam for a longer propagation distance than that of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. With the increment in the propagation distance, the average intensity radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens will be smaller than that at the focal plane of a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. Meanwhile, the intensity distributions at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens with different w(0) and Omega(0) are also studied.

  12. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    photogrammetry (for model attitude and deformation measurement) are excluded to limit the scope of this report. Other physical probes such as heat flux gauges, total temperature probes are also excluded. We further exclude measurement techniques that require particle seeding though particle based methods may still be useful in many high speed flow applications. This manuscript details some of the more widely used molecular-based measurement techniques for studying transition and turbulence: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Rayleigh and Raman Scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). These techniques are emphasized, in part, because of the prior experience of the authors. Additional molecular based techniques are described, albeit in less detail. Where possible, an effort is made to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various measurement techniques, although these comparisons can be subjective views of the authors. Finally, the manuscript concludes by evaluating the different measurement techniques in view of the precision requirements described in this chapter. Additional requirements and considerations are discussed to assist with choosing an optical measurement technique for a given application.

  13. Numerical simulation of aero-optical distortions by turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Wang, Meng

    2009-11-01

    Compressible large-eddy simulations are carried out to study the aero-optical distortions caused by flat-plate turbulent boundary layers at Reθ= 1400 and 2800 and M=0.5. The fluctuating index-of-refraction field is calculated from the density field, and ray tracing is employed to compute the optical path differences (OPD). It is found that optical wavefront distortions are predominantly caused by the logarithmic layer and wake region. Consistent with previous experimental findings, the distortion magnitude is dependent on the direction of propagation due to anisotropy of the boundary-layer vortical structures. An optical beam is distorted more severely when it is tilted toward downstream than upstream. This is explained by a correlation analysis of the fluctuating density field, which shows that the correlation length is larger along downstream-tilted optical paths than upstream-tilted ones. The predicted OPD magnitude and structure at both Reynolds numbers are compared to clarify the Reynolds number dependence and effect of small flow scales.

  14. Electro-optic testbed utilizing a dynamic range gated Rayleigh beacon for atmospheric turbulence profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuraski, Steven M.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.; Figlewski, Nathan M.; Schmidt, Jason D.; McCrae, Jack E.

    2016-10-01

    The Photometry Analysis and Optical Tracking and Evaluation System (PANOPTES) Quad Axis Telescope is a unique four axis mount Ritchey-Chretien 24 inch telescope capable of tracking objects through the zenith without axes rotation delay (no Dead Zone). This paper describes enhancement components added to the quad axis mount telescope that will enable measurements supporting novel research and field testing focused on `three-dimensional' characterization of turbulent atmospheres, mitigation techniques, and new sensing modalities. These all support research and operational techniques relating to astronomical imaging and electro-optical propagation though the atmosphere, relative to sub-meter class telescopes in humid, continental environments. This effort will use custom designed and commercial off the shelf hardware; sub-system components discussed will include a wavefront sensor system, a co-aligned beam launch system, and a fiber coupled research laser. The wavefront sensing system has the ability to take measurements from a dynamic altitude adjustable laser beacon scattering spot, a key concept that enables rapid turbulence structure parameter measurements over an altitude varied integrated atmospheric volume. The sub-components are integrated with the overall goal of measuring a height-resolved volumetric profile for the atmospheric turbulence structure parameter at the site, and developing mobile techniques for such measurements. The design concept, part selection optimization, baseline component lab testing, and initial field measurements, will be discussed in the main sections of this paper. This project is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Labs Sensors Directorate and the Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy.

  15. Simulation of turbulences and fog effects on the free space optical link inside of experimental box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hajek, Lukas; Vanderka, Ales; Koudelka, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with problematic of Free Space Optical (FSO) Links. The theoretical part describes the effects of atmospheric transmission environment on these FSO connections. The practical part is focused on the creation of an appropriate experimental workplace for turbulences simulation (mechanical and thermal turbulences), fog effects and subsequent measurement of these effects. For definition how big impact these effects on the FSO system have is used the statistical analysis and simulation software Optiwave. Overall there were tested three optical light sources operating at wavelengths of 632.8 nm, 850 nm and 1550 nm respectively. Influences of simulated atmospheric effects on the signal attenuation were observed. Within the frame of simulation in Optiwave software there were studied influences of attenuation on given wavelengths in form of FSO link transmission parameters degradation. Also for the purposes of real measurements it was necessary to fabricate an experimental box. This box was constructed with sizes of 2.5 and 5 meters and was used for simulation of atmospheric environment.

  16. Characterization of optical turbulence at the solar observatory at the Mount Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Optical turbulence represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 is regarded as one of the chief causes of image degradation of ground-based astronomical telescopes operating in visible or infrared wavebands. Especially, it affects the attainable spatial resolution. Therefore since the middle of September 2012 the optical turbulence has been monitored between two German solar telescopes at the Observatory in Tenerife /Canary Islands /Spain. It comprises the solar telescope GREGOR and the vacuum tower telescope VTT mounted on two 30 m high towers. Between the two towers at the level of the telescopes, Cn2 was measured using a Laser-Scintillometer SLS40 (Scintec, Rottenburg, Germany). The horizontal distance of the measurement path was 75 m. The first results of the measurements starting from the 15th September 2012 up to the end of December 2012 are presented and analyzed using simultaneous measured meteorological data of wind, temperature and humidity. Daily and seasonal variations are shown and discussed.

  17. SKA weak lensing - I. Cosmological forecasts and the power of radio-optical cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian; Camera, Stefano; Zuntz, Joe; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-12-01

    We construct forecasts for cosmological parameter constraints from weak gravitational lensing surveys involving the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Considering matter content, dark energy and modified gravity parameters, we show that the first phase of the SKA (SKA1) can be competitive with other Stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey and that the full SKA (SKA2) can potentially form tighter constraints than Stage IV optical weak lensing experiments, such as those that will be conducted with LSST, WFIRST-AFTA or Euclid-like facilities. Using weak lensing alone, going from SKA1 to SKA2 represents improvements by factors of ˜10 in matter, ˜10 in dark energy and ˜5 in modified gravity parameters. We also show, for the first time, the powerful result that comparably tight constraints (within ˜5 per cent) for both Stage III and Stage IV experiments, can be gained from cross-correlating shear maps between the optical and radio wavebands, a process which can also eliminate a number of potential sources of systematic errors which can otherwise limit the utility of weak lensing cosmology.

  18. Effect of deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium on the Goldberg-Unno method. [turbulence effects on optical density in the solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troyan, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth was studied by use of the Goldberg-Unno method, with allowance made for the influence of deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium. It was found that allowance for deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium displaces the curve of dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth along two axes.

  19. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented--up to now--time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal `snapshots' of random light using a specially designed `time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by `breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence.

  20. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented—up to now—time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal ‘snapshots' of random light using a specially designed ‘time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by ‘breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence. PMID:27713416

  1. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-07

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented-up to now-time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal 'snapshots' of random light using a specially designed 'time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by 'breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence.

  2. Toward Precision LSST Weak-Lensing Measurement. I. Impacts of Atmospheric Turbulence and Optical Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony

    2011-05-01

    The weak-lensing science of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project drives the need to carefully model and separate the instrumental artifacts from the intrinsic shear signal caused by gravitational lensing. The dominant source of the systematics for all ground-based telescopes is the spatial correlation of the point-spread function (PSF) modulated by both atmospheric turbulence and optical aberrations in the telescope and camera system. In this article, we present a full field-of-view simulation of the LSST images by modeling both the atmosphere and the system optics with the most current data for the telescope and camera specifications and the environment. To simulate the effects of atmospheric turbulence, we generated six-layer Kolmogorov/von Kármán phase screens with the parameters estimated from the on-site measurements. LSST will continuously sample the wavefront, correcting the optics alignment and focus. For the optics, we combined the ray-tracing tool ZEMAX and our simulated focal-plane data to introduce realistic residual aberrations and focal-plane height variations. Although this expected focal-plane flatness deviation for LSST is small compared with that of other existing cameras, the fast focal ratio of the LSST optics cause this focal-plane flatness variation and the resulting PSF discontinuities across the CCD boundaries to be significant challenges in our removal of the PSF-induced systematics. We resolve this complication by performing principal component analysis (PCA) CCD by CCD and by interpolating the basis functions derived from the analysis using conventional polynomials. We demonstrate that this PSF correction scheme reduces the residual PSF ellipticity correlation below 10-7 over the cosmologically interesting (dark-matter-dominated) scale 10‧-3°. From a null test using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Ultra Deep Field (UDF) galaxy images without input shear, we verify that the amplitude of the galaxy ellipticity

  3. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmosphere Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Quick, C.R.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-03-23

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these process: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, we briefly review a description of our model including the limitations along with previous simulation s of individual effects. The performance of our modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, advanced studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility of our model in assessing the effects for different lidar geometries on RMS noise and correlation ''size'' in the receiver plane.

  4. Huygens-Fresnel wave-optics simulation of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle in CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.; Petrin, R.; MacKerrow, E.; Schmitt, M.; Foy, B.; Koskelo, A.; McVey, B.; Quick, C.; Porch, W.; Fite, C.; Archuleta, F.; Whitehead, M.; Tiee, J.; Walters, D.

    1999-04-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these processes: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements. The limitations of the model are also discussed. In addition, studies have been performed to determine the importance of key parameters in the simulation. The results of these studies and their impact on the overall results will be presented.

  5. Simulation of anisoplanatic imaging through optical turbulence using numerical wave propagation with new validation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Russell C.; Power, Jonathan D.; LeMaster, Daniel A.; Droege, Douglas R.; Gladysz, Szymon; Bose-Pillai, Santasri

    2017-07-01

    We present a numerical wave propagation method for simulating imaging of an extended scene under anisoplanatic conditions. While isoplanatic simulation is relatively common, few tools are specifically designed for simulating the imaging of extended scenes under anisoplanatic conditions. We provide a complete description of the proposed simulation tool, including the wave propagation method used. Our approach computes an array of point spread functions (PSFs) for a two-dimensional grid on the object plane. The PSFs are then used in a spatially varying weighted sum operation, with an ideal image, to produce a simulated image with realistic optical turbulence degradation. The degradation includes spatially varying warping and blurring. To produce the PSF array, we generate a series of extended phase screens. Simulated point sources are numerically propagated from an array of positions on the object plane, through the phase screens, and ultimately to the focal plane of the simulated camera. Note that the optical path for each PSF will be different, and thus, pass through a different portion of the extended phase screens. These different paths give rise to a spatially varying PSF to produce anisoplanatic effects. We use a method for defining the individual phase screen statistics that we have not seen used in previous anisoplanatic simulations. We also present a validation analysis. In particular, we compare simulated outputs with the theoretical anisoplanatic tilt correlation and a derived differential tilt variance statistic. This is in addition to comparing the long- and short-exposure PSFs and isoplanatic angle. We believe this analysis represents the most thorough validation of an anisoplanatic simulation to date. The current work is also unique that we simulate and validate both constant and varying Cn2(z) profiles. Furthermore, we simulate sequences with both temporally independent and temporally correlated turbulence effects. Temporal correlation is introduced

  6. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  7. Performance of an adaptive phase estimator for coherent free-space optical communications over Gamma-Gamma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming; Gao, Chao; Liang, Haodong; Miao, Maoke; Li, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive phase estimator for coherent free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. Closed-form solutions for variance of phase errors are derived when the optical beam is subjected to Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence. The adaptive phase estimator has improved upon the phase error performance in comparison to conventional phase estimators. We also demonstrate notable improvement in BER performance when applying our adaptive phase estimator to coherent FSO communication systems.

  8. On the simulation and mitigation of anisoplanatic optical turbulence for long range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Russell C.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a numerical wave propagation method for simulating long range imaging of an extended scene under anisoplanatic conditions. Our approach computes an array of point spread functions (PSFs) for a 2D grid on the object plane. The PSFs are then used in a spatially varying weighted sum operation, with an ideal image, to produce a simulated image with realistic optical turbulence degradation. To validate the simulation we compare simulated outputs with the theoretical anisoplanatic tilt correlation and differential tilt variance. This is in addition to comparing the long- and short-exposure PSFs, and isoplanatic angle. Our validation analysis shows an excellent match between the simulation statistics and the theoretical predictions. The simulation tool is also used here to quantitatively evaluate a recently proposed block- matching and Wiener filtering (BMWF) method for turbulence mitigation. In this method block-matching registration algorithm is used to provide geometric correction for each of the individual input frames. The registered frames are then averaged and processed with a Wiener filter for restoration. A novel aspect of the proposed BMWF method is that the PSF model used for restoration takes into account the level of geometric correction achieved during image registration. This way, the Wiener filter is able fully exploit the reduced blurring achieved by registration. The BMWF method is relatively simple computationally, and yet, has excellent performance in comparison to state-of-the-art benchmark methods.

  9. Optical soliton in dielectric fibers and self-organization of turbulence in plasmas in magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akira

    2009-01-01

    One important discovery in the twentieth century physics is the natural formation of a coherent or a well-ordered structure in continuous media, in contrary to degradation of the state as predicted earlier from the second law of thermodynamics. Here nonlinearity plays the essential role in its process. The discovery of soliton, a localized stable wave in a nonlinear and dispersive medium and the self-organization of fluid turbulence are of the major examples. A soliton is formed primarily in one-dimensional medium where the dispersion and nonlinearity play the essential role. Here the temporal evolution can be described by an infinite dimensional Hamiltonian system that is integrable. While a self-organization appears in an infinite dimensional non-Hamiltonian (or dissipative) system where more than two conservative quantities exist in the limit of no dissipation. In this manuscript, by showing examples of the optical soliton in dielectric fibers and self-organization of turbulence in a toroidal plasma in a magnetic field, we demonstrate these interesting discoveries. The manuscript is intended to describe these discoveries more on philosophical basis with some sacrifice on mathematical details so that the idea is conveyed to those in the wide area of sciences. PMID:19145067

  10. Mesoscale modeling of optical turbulence (C2n) utilizing a novel physically-based parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Basu, Sukanta

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel parameterization for optical turbulence (C2n) simulations in the atmosphere. In this approach, C2n is calculated from the output of atmospheric models using a high-order turbulence closure scheme. An important feature of this parameterization is that, in the free atmosphere (i.e., above the boundary layer), it is consistent with a well-established C2n formulation by Tatarskii. Furthermore, it approaches a Monin-Obukhov similarity-based relationship in the surface layer. To test the performance of the proposed parameterization, we conduct mesoscale modeling and compare the simulated C2n values with those measured during two field campaigns over the Hawaii island. A popular regression-based approach proposed by Trinquet and Vernin (2007) is also used for comparison. The predicted C2n values, obtained from both the physically and statistically-based parameterizations, agree reasonably well with the observational data. However, in the presence of a large-scale atmospheric phenomenon (a breaking mountain wave), the physically-based parameterization outperforms the statistically-based one.

  11. Acoustic sounder system design for measurement of optical turbulence and wind profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Judith E.; Eaton, Frank D.; Stokes, Sheldon S.

    2000-07-01

    An Acoustic Sounder System has been installed on the side of the cliff at North Oscura Peak, WSMR to provide important refractive index structure parameter, Cn2 data for laser propagation tests. The acoustic sounder system records echo information that is used to provide 3D wind and optical turbulence profiles. The received signal is the product of the interaction of the transmitted acoustic pulse with the small scale atmospheric temperature variations. This information is displayed as a time-height display of the signal intensity. The frequency of the received signals are processed and converted into time histories of the horizontal wind field. The data from the Acoustic Sounder is calibrated with the hot-wire anemometer temperature structure parameter (Ct2) data, and meteorological data measured locally to produce the Cn2 profile. The design and location of the Acoustic Sounder System will be discussed along with the methodology of extracting the turbulence. Many days of data have been collected and representative data will be shown.

  12. A statistical model for road surface friction forecasting applying optical road weather measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippi, M.; Juga, I.; Nurmi, P.

    2009-09-01

    Road surface friction is defined as the grip between car tyre and underlying surface. Poor friction often plays a crucial role in wintertime car accidents. Friction can decrease dramatically during snowfall or when wet road surface temperature falls below zero. Even a thin layer of ice or snow can decrease friction substantially increasing the risk of accidents. Many studies have shown that road surface temperature, road conditions and friction can fluctuate dramatically within short distances under specific weather situations. Friction or grip can be improved with road maintenance activities like salting and gritting. Salting will melt the ice or snow layer, whereas gritting will improve the grip. Salting is effective only above -5C temperatures. Light snowfall together with low temperatures can result in very slippery driving conditions. Finnish Road Administration's observing network covers c. 500 road weather stations in Finland. Almost 100 of them are equipped with optical sensors (in winter 2008-2009). The number of optical sensors has increased remarkably during past few years. The optical measuring devices are Vaisala DSC111 sensors which measure the depth of water, snow and ice on the road surface and also produce an estimate of the state of road and prevailing friction. Observation data from road weather stations with optical sensors were collected from winter 2007/08, and a couple of representative (from a weather perspective) stations were selected for detailed statistical analysis. The purpose of the study was to find a statistical relationship between the observed values and, especially, the correlation between friction and other road weather parameters. Consequently, a model based on linear regression was developed. With the model friction being the dependent variable, the independent variables having highest correlations were the composite of ice and snow (water content) on the road, and the road surface temperature. In the case of a wet road

  13. Study on power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyun; Sheng, Shen; Huang, Zhisong; Zhao, Siqing; Wang, Hua; Sun, Zhenhai; Xu, Xiegu

    2013-02-25

    As a new attractive application of the vortex beams, power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two- Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. A typical model of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system is established, the general analytical expression of vortex beams with limited apertures and the analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane are derived. Under the H-V 5/7 turbulence model, the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane and power coupling efficiency of the optical system are numerically calculated, and the influences of the optical topological charge, the laser wavelength, the propagation path and the receiver apertures on the power coupling efficiency are analyzed. These studies reveal that the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane presents a central dark hollow profile, which is suitable for power coupling by the Cassegrain telescope receiver. In the optical system with optimized parameters, power coupling efficiency can keep in high values with the increase of the propagation distance. Under the atmospheric turbulent conditions, great advantages of vortex beam in power coupling of the two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system are shown in comparison with beam without vortex.

  14. Adaptive optics compensation of atmospheric turbulence: the past, the present, and the promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    1994-06-01

    An overview of adaptive optics systems development is presented with emphasis on its power to compensate for atmospheric turbulence in imaging and laser propagation. A brief history from the conceptual thinking in the 1950s through laboratory implementation in the 1970s to practical reality in the 1990s will be covered. With ongoing research to solve the problem of atmospheric anisoplanatism, the use of artificial guide stars has become as a prominent point of discussion. The understanding of the artificial guide star phenomena and advances in laser technology are bringing systems from the research and technology development mode into systems with scientific utility. Conflicting technical limitations of guide star brightness, laser psoower, and compensation spatial frequency are traded to achieve the most scientific benefit with the least cost. a summary ore recent results from operating adaptive optics systems in observatories around the world will be followed by a brief look at the future promise of adaptive optics in the commercia sector, including requirements of mass market systems for the amateur astronomer.

  15. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  16. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1: Wind and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; Bieringer, Paul E.; Annunzio, Andrew; Bieberbach, George; Meech, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed wind speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy ( e), friction velocity (u_*), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35°c and 1.9 m s^{-1}, respectively. Using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u_* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model's MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height ( h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.

  17. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1. Wind and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; Bieringer, Paul E.; Annunzio, Andrew; Bieberbach, George; Meech, Scott

    2015-09-25

    We found that numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed wind speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy (e), friction velocity (u* ), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35° and 1.9 m s-1 , respectively. Then, using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model’s MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height (h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.

  18. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1. Wind and Turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; ...

    2015-09-25

    We found that numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed windmore » speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy (e), friction velocity (u* ), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35° and 1.9 m s-1 , respectively. Then, using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model’s MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height (h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.« less

  19. Performance analysis of dual-hop optical wireless communication systems over k-distribution turbulence channel with pointing error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Neha; Sriram Kumar, D.; Jha, Pranav Kumar

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of the dual-hop free space optical (FSO) communication systems under the effect of strong atmospheric turbulence together with misalignment effects (pointing error). We consider a relay assisted link using decode and forward (DF) relaying protocol between source and destination with the assumption that Channel State Information is available at both transmitting and receiving terminals. The atmospheric turbulence channels are modeled by k-distribution with pointing error impairment. The exact closed form expression is derived for outage probability and bit error rate and illustrated through numerical plots. Further BER results are compared for the different modulation schemes.

  20. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kangning; Ma, Jing; Belmonte, Aniceto; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-12-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence are studied for a multiple-aperture receiver system. Equal gain-combining (EGC) and selection-combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence under thermal-noise-limited conditions. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for on-off keying-modulated direct detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity receptions using analytical results and for EGC diversity receptions through an approximation method. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple-aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of EGC and SC receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic-aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area (same average total incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are also verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  1. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink coherent optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Li, Kangning; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Cao, Yubin

    2015-09-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed atmospheric turbulence are studied for a coherent detection receiving system with spatial diversity. Maximum ratio combining (MRC) and selection combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for binary phase-shift keying modulated coherent detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity using analytical results and for MRC diversity through an approximation method with different numbers of receiving aperture each with the same aperture area. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of MRC and SC multiple aperture receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic aperture with the same total aperture area (same total average incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  2. Aero-Optical Turbulent Boundary Layer/Shear Layer Experiment On The KC-135 Aircraft Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, James E.; Allen, C.

    1985-06-01

    This paper examines the aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers. The data present comparisons of observed optical performances with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microseconds temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite-aperture, time-averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q-switched Nd:YAG double-pulsed laser and a holographic camera that recorded the random flow field in a double-pass, double-pulse mode. Aero-dynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five-hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theo-retical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered. The results presented represent five flights flown at altitudes from 1.8 km to 10.7 km and at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 0.79. Single-pass phase deviations for the boundary layer were from 0.06 to 0.17 waves (at X = 0.53 ;Am) with piston and tilt components removed. Measured phase deviations for the artificially induced shear flows were from 0.10 to 0.279 waves (at X = 0.53 /um) with piston and tilt components removed. However, when low order aberrations through coma were removed, the remaining deviations were only 0.09 to 0.18 waves. This resulted in a 33 to 250% increase in the Strehl ratio at the 14 cm optical aperture. It was further shown that the low order aberrations corresponded to the longer wavelengths in the random flow, and these waves propagated with a longer characteristic time than the higher order

  3. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  4. Validation Test Report for the BioCast Optical Forecast Model Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-09

    Report D NRL PubiiC&IIon This publlcation~(does) contain military CtltiCIII technology D DIVISION HEAD NAME(~ (::5 SIGNATURE Other (Spccoly): RUTH...transported within the model. This may lead to spurious results in the forecast cycle. This is the Garbage In – Garbage Out (GIGO) principle. The user is...International Symposium on Technology and the Mine Problem, may 17 – 20 Monterey, CA, 2010 Jolliff J., Biological/chemical Forecasting System for Efficient

  5. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-11-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average of 2% precipitation decrease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that, even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  6. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-06-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average 2% precipitation decease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  7. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to

  8. Temperature rise in objects due to optical focused beam through atmospheric turbulence near ground and ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneback, Matthew; Ishimaru, Akira; Reinhardt, Colin; Kuga, Yasuo

    2013-03-01

    We consider an optical beam propagated through the atmosphere and incident on an object causing a temperature rise. In clear air, the physical characteristics of the optical beam transmitted to the object surface are influenced primarily by the effect of atmospheric turbulence, which can be significant near the ground or ocean surface. We use a statistical model to quantify the expected power transfer through turbulent atmosphere and provide guidance toward the threshold of thermal blooming for the considered scenarios. The bulk thermal characteristics of the materials considered are used in a thermal diffusion model to determine the net temperature rise at the object surface due to the incident optical beam. These results of the study are presented in graphical form and are of particular interest to operators of high power laser systems operating over large distances through the atmosphere. Numerical examples include a CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) with: aperture size of 5 cm, varied pulse duration, and propagation distance of 0.5 km incident on 0.1-mm copper, 10-mm polyimide, 1-mm water, and 10-mm glass/resin composite targets. To assess the effect of near ground/ocean laser propagation, we compare turbulent (of varying degrees) and nonturbulent atmosphere.

  9. Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Dignostics for Studying Compressible Turbulent Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Miles, A R; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Glenzer, S; Edens, A; Dittmire, T

    2005-02-08

    The possibility of studying compressible turbulent flows using gas targets driven by high power lasers and diagnosed with optical techniques is investigated. The potential advantage over typical laser experiments that use solid targets and x-ray diagnostics is more detailed information over a larger range of spatial scales. An experimental system is described to study shock - jet interactions at high Mach number. This consists of a mini-chamber full of nitrogen at a pressure {approx} 1 atms. The mini-chamber is situated inside a much larger vacuum chamber. An intense laser pulse ({approx}100J in {approx} 5ns) is focused on to a thin {approx} 0.3{micro}m thick silicon nitride window at one end of the mini-chamber. The window acts both as a vacuum barrier, and laser entrance hole. The ''explosion'' caused by the deposition of the laser energy just inside the window drives a strong blast wave out into the nitrogen atmosphere. The spherical shock expands and interacts with a jet of xenon introduced though the top of the mini-chamber. The Mach number of the interaction is controlled by the separation of the jet from the explosion. The resulting flow is visualized using an optical schlieren system using a pulsed laser source at a wavelength of 0.53 {micro}m. The technical path leading up to the design of this experiment is presented, and future prospects briefly considered. Lack of laser time in the final year of the project severely limited experimental results obtained using the new apparatus.

  10. Joint optimization of a partially coherent Gaussian beam for free-space optical communication over turbulent channels with pointing errors.

    PubMed

    Lee, It Ee; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Ng, Wai Pang; Khalighi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-02-01

    Joint beam width and spatial coherence length optimization is proposed to maximize the average capacity in partially coherent free-space optical links, under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors. An optimization metric is introduced to enable feasible translation of the joint optimal transmitter beam parameters into an analogous level of divergence of the received optical beam. Results show that near-ideal average capacity is best achieved through the introduction of a larger receiver aperture and the joint optimization technique.

  11. High Resolution Trajectory-Based Smoke Forecasts Using VIIRS Aerosol Optical Depth and NUCAPS Carbon Monoxide Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Smith, N.; Barnet, C.; Barnet, C. D.; Kondragunta, S.; Davies, J. E.; Strabala, K.

    2016-12-01

    We use Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and combined Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) NOAA-Unique CrIS-ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) carbon monoxide (CO) retrievals to initialize trajectory-based, high spatial resolution North American smoke dispersion forecasts during the May 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire in northern Alberta and the July 2016 Soberanes Fire in Northern California. These two case studies illustrate how long range transport of wild fire smoke can adversely impact surface air quality thousands of kilometers downwind and how local topographic flow can lead to complex transport patterns near the wildfire source region. The NUCAPS CO retrievals are shown to complement the high resolution VIIRS AOD retrievals by providing retrievals in partially cloudy scenes and also providing information on the vertical distribution of the wildfire smoke. This work addresses the need for low latency, web-based, high resolution forecasts of smoke dispersion for use by NWS Incident Meteorologists (IMET) to support on-site decision support services for fire incident management teams. The primary user community for the IDEA-I smoke forecasts is the Western regions of the NWS and US EPA due to the significant impacts of wildfires in these regions. Secondary users include Alaskan NWS offices and Western State and Local air quality management agencies such as the Western Regional Air Partnership (WRAP).

  12. General scale-dependent anisotropic turbulence and its impact on free space optical communication system performance.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2015-06-01

    We generalize a recently introduced model for nonclassic turbulent spatial power spectrum involving anisotropy along two mutually orthogonal axes transverse to the direction of beam propagation by including two scale-dependent weighting factors for these directions. Such a turbulent model may be pertinent to atmospheric fluctuations in the refractive index in stratified regions well above the boundary layer and employed for air-air communication channels. When restricting ourselves to an unpolarized, coherent Gaussian beam and a weak turbulence regime, we examine the effects of such a turbulence type on the OOK FSO link performance by including the results on scintillation flux, probability of fade, SNR, and BERs.

  13. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  14. Probing interstellar turbulence in cirrus with deep optical imaging: no sign of energy dissipation at 0.01 pc scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Duc, P.-A.; Marleau, F.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Didelon, P.; Gwyn, S.; Karabal, E.

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse Galactic light has been observed in the optical since the 1930s. We propose that, when observed in the optical with deep imaging surveys, it can be used as a tracer of the turbulent cascade in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), down to scales of about 1 arcsec. Here we present a power spectrum analysis of the dust column density of a diffuse cirrus at high Galactic latitude (l ≈ 198°, b ≈ 32°) as derived from the combination of a MegaCam g-band image, obtained as part of the MATLAS large programme at the CFHT, with Planck radiance and WISE 12 μm data. The combination of these three datasets have allowed us to compute the density power spectrum of the H i over scales of more than three orders of magnitude. We found that the density field is well described by a single power law over scales ranging from 0.01 to 50 pc. The exponent of the power spectrum, γ = -2.9 ± 0.1, is compatible with what is expected for thermally bi-stable and turbulent H i. We did not find any steepening of the power spectrum at small scales indicating that the typical scale at which turbulent energy is dissipated in this medium is smaller than 0.01 pc. The ambipolar diffusion scenario that is usually proposed as the main dissipative agent, is consistent with our data only if the density of the cloud observed is higher than the typical values assumed for the cold neutral medium gas. We discuss the new avenue offered by deep optical imaging surveys for the study of the low density ISM structure and turbulence.

  15. Capacity of MIMO free space optical communications using multiple partially coherent beams propagation through non-Kolmogorov strong turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Peng; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Liu, Zhiwen; Zhou, Zhou; Yuan, Xiuhua

    2013-07-01

    We study the average capacity performance for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) free-space optical (FSO) communication systems using multiple partially coherent beams propagating through non-Kolmogorov strong turbulence, assuming equal gain combining diversity configuration and the sum of multiple gamma-gamma random variables for multiple independent partially coherent beams. The closed-form expressions of scintillation and average capacity are derived and then used to analyze the dependence on the number of independent diversity branches, power law α, refractive-index structure parameter, propagation distance and spatial coherence length of source beams. Obtained results show that, the average capacity increases more significantly with the increase in the rank of MIMO channel matrix compared with the diversity order. The effect of the diversity order on the average capacity is independent of the power law, turbulence strength parameter and spatial coherence length, whereas these effects on average capacity are gradually mitigated as the diversity order increases. The average capacity increases and saturates with the decreasing spatial coherence length, at rates depending on the diversity order, power law and turbulence strength. There exist optimal values of the spatial coherence length and diversity configuration for maximizing the average capacity of MIMO FSO links over a variety of atmospheric turbulence conditions.

  16. Experimental study for the detection of the laminar/turbulent aerodynamic transition on a wing aircraft, using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, S.; Dolfi, D.; Doisy, M.; Seraudie, A.; Arnal, D.; Coustols, E.; Mandle, J.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of detection of the nature (laminar/turbulent/transitional) of the aerodynamic boundary layer of a profile of a wing aircraft model, using a Distributed FeedBack (DFB) Fiber Laser as optical fiber sensor. Signals to be measured are pressure variations : ΔP~1Pa at few 100Hz in the laminar region and ΔP~10Pa at few kHz in the turbulent region. Intermittent regime occurring in-between these two regions (transition) is characterized by turbulent bursts in laminar flow. Relevant pressure variations have been obtained in a low-speed research-type wind tunnel of ONERA Centre of Toulouse. In order to validate the measurements, a "classical" hot film sensor, the application and use of which have been formerly developed and validated by ONERA, has been placed at the neighborhood of the fiber sensor. The hot film allows measurement of the boundary layer wall shear stress whose characteristics are a well known signature of the boundary layer nature (laminar, intermittent or turbulent) [1]. In the three regimes, signals from the fiber sensor and the hot film sensor are strongly correlated, which allows us to conclude that a DFB fiber laser sensor is a good candidate for detecting the boundary layer nature, and thus for future integration in an aircraft wing. The work presented here has been realized within the framework of "Clean Sky", a Joint Technology Initiative of the European Union.

  17. Employing circle polarization shift keying in free space optical communication with gamma-gamma atmospheric turbulence channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Du, Fan; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying

    2014-12-01

    A novel theoretical model of a circular polarization shift keying (CPolSK) system for free space optical links through an atmospheric turbulence channel, is proposed. Intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation induced in atmospheric turbulence, from weak to strong levels, are specifically researched with respect to circular polarization control error caused by the system design. We derive closed form expressions of the bit error rate (BER) and outage probability for evaluating the BER performance and communication interruption in the Gamma-Gamma distributed channel model. Simulation results show that atmospheric turbulence and circular polarization control error have significant effects on the BER performance and interruption of communication in the CPolSK system. The deterioration in BER performance, caused by intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation, is augmented by the power penalty conditioned by the circular polarization control error. This consequently adds to the demand for emissive power from the CPolSK system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that controlling the circular polarization control error below 8° as well as the normalized threshold within 8 dB, 9 dB and 10 dB in turbulent scenarios from weak to strong levels can significantly reduce the probability of communication interruption occurring. This study provides reference material for further design of the CPolSK system.

  18. Real time measurements of PM2.5 concentrations and vertical turbulent fluxes using an optical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco

    In this work the possibility of measuring real-time concentrations of PM2.5 and the corresponding vertical turbulent fluxes using the optical detector Mie pDR-1200, operating synchronously with an ultrasonic anemometer, is investigated. This detector is known to be sensitive to high values of relative humidity (RH) and a new procedure to correct the effect of RH on concentration measurements is presented. Results of optical measurements have been compared with gravimetric detections of PM2.5 and results show a reasonable correlation between them and an improvement of the agreement when RH-correction is used. Results presented have been collected at two measurement sites that can be representative of urban background environments but in one of them was present an industrial area nearby. Post-processing of data has been performed with the eddy-correlation technique that allows evaluation of vertical turbulent fluxes of PM2.5 as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes. The turbulent mass fluxes, together with the analysis of real-time concentrations and their correlation with meteorology proved to be an useful tool to infer details about the local aerosol dynamics helping to interpret traditional gravimetric analysis of aerosol that is usually performed on a 24 h basis. Results show that the methodology can be useful in identifying the contribution of local sources like ground level emissions or industrial plumes with respect to the contribution of sources located far away from the measurement site.

  19. Performance analysis of free space optical system with spatial modulation and diversity combiners over the Gamma Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeyemi, Kehinde O.; Owolawi, Pius A.; Srivastava, Viranjay M.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is a major impairment that degrades the performance of free space optical (FSO) communication systems. Spatial modulation (SM) with receive spatial diversity is considered as a powerful technique to mitigate the fading effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, the performance of free space optical spatial modulation (FSO-SM) system under Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence is presented. We studied the Average Bit Error Rate (ABER) for the system by employing spatial diversity combiners such Maximum Ratio Combining (MRC) and Equal Gain Combining (EGC) at the receiving end. In particular, we provide a theoretical framework for the system error by deriving Average Pairwise Error Probability (APEP) expression using a generalized infinite power series expansion approach and union bounding technique is applied to obtain the ABER for each combiner. Based on this study, it was found that spatial diversity combiner significantly improved the system error rate where MRC outperforms the EGC. The performance of this system is also compared with other well established diversity combiner systems. The proposed system performance is further improved by convolutional coding technique and our analysis confirmed that the system performance of MRC coded system is enhanced by approximately 20 dB while EGC falls within 17 dB.

  20. Free space optical communications system performance under atmospheric scattering and turbulence for 850 and 1550  nm operation.

    PubMed

    El-Wakeel, Amr S; Mohammed, Nazmi A; Aly, Moustafa H

    2016-09-10

    In this work, a free space optical communication (FSO) link is proposed and utilized to explore and evaluate the FSO link performance under the joint occurrence of the atmospheric scattering and turbulence phenomena for 850 and 1550 nm operation. Diffraction and nondiffraction-limited systems are presented and evaluated for both wavelengths' operation, considering far-field conditions under different link distances. Bit error rate, pointing error angles, beam divergence angles, and link distance are the main performance indicators that are used to evaluate and compare the link performance under different system configurations and atmospheric phenomena combinations. A detailed study is performed to provide the merits of this work. For both far-field diffraction-limited and nondiffraction-limited systems, it is concluded that 1550 nm system operation is better than 850 nm for the whole presented joint occurrences of atmospheric scattering and turbulence.

  1. Free space optical system performance for laser beam propagation through non Kolmogorov turbulence for uplink and downlink paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Italo; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Ferrero, Valter

    2007-09-01

    It is well known that free space laser system performance is limited by atmospheric turbulence. Most theoretical treatments have been described for many years by Kolmogorov's power spectral density model because of its simplicity. Unfortunately several experiments have been reported recently that show the Kolmogorov theory is sometimes incomplete to describe atmospheric statistics properly, in particular, in portions of the troposphere and stratosphere. In this paper, using a non Kolmogorov spectrum and following same procedure already used for horizontal path analysis, we extend free space optical system performance analysis to uplink and downlink paths. Our non Kolmogorov spectrum uses a generalized exponent instead of constant standard exponent value 11/3 and a generalized amplitude factor instead of constant value 0.033. Therefore, in non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence, we carry out, for a uplink and a downlink paths, analysis of Long Term Beam Spread, Scintillation index, Probability of fade, mean SNR and mean BER as variation of the spectrum exponent.

  2. TURBULENT CHARACTERISTICS IN THE INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardis, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Foullon, C.

    2012-02-01

    We focus on Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) calcium II H-line observations of a solar quiescent prominence (QP) that exhibits highly variable dynamics suggestive of turbulence. These images capture a sufficient range of scales spatially ({approx}0.1-100 arcsec) and temporally ({approx}16.8 s-4.5 hr) to allow the application of statistical methods used to quantify finite range fluid turbulence. We present the first such application of these techniques to the spatial intensity field of a long-lived solar prominence. Fully evolved inertial range turbulence in an infinite medium exhibits multifractal scale invariance in the statistics of its fluctuations, seen as power-law power spectra and as scaling of the higher order moments (structure functions) of fluctuations which have non-Gaussian statistics; fluctuations {delta}I(r, L) = I(r + L) - I(r) on length scale L along a given direction in observed spatial field I have moments that scale as ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} L{sup {zeta}(p)}. For turbulence in a system that is of finite size, or that is not fully developed, one anticipates a generalized scale invariance or extended self-similarity (ESS) ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} G(L){sup {zeta}(p)}. For these QP intensity measurements we find scaling in the power spectra and ESS. We find that the fluctuation statistics are non-Gaussian and we use ESS to obtain ratios of the scaling exponents {zeta}(p): these are consistent with a multifractal field and show distinct values for directions longitudinal and transverse to the bulk (driving) flow. Thus, the intensity fluctuations of the QP exhibit statistical properties consistent with an underlying turbulent flow.

  3. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions. PMID:28230076

  4. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-02-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions.

  5. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-02-23

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions.

  6. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to develop hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  7. 21St Century Atmospheric Forecasting for Space Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.; Craddock, M.; Kiley, H.; Mason, M.

    2016-09-01

    Many space based applications from imaging to communications are impacted by the atmosphere. Atmospheric impacts such as optical turbulence and clouds are the main drivers for these types of systems. For example, in space based optical communications, clouds will produce channel fades on the order of many hundreds of decibels (dB) thereby breaking the communication link. Optical turbulence can also produce fades but these can be compensated for by adaptive optics. The ability to forecast the current and future location and optical thickness of clouds for space to ground Electro Optical or optical communications is therefore critical in order to achieve a highly reliable system. We have developed an innovative method for producing such forecasts. These forecasts are intended to provide lead times on the order of several hours to days so that communication links can be transferred from a currently loudy ground location to another more desirable ground site. The system uses high resolution Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) along with a variational data assimilation (DA) scheme to improve the initial conditions and forecasts. DA is used to provide an improved estimate of the atmospheric state by combining meteorological observations with NWP products and their respective error statistics. Variational DA accomplishes this through the minimization of a prescribed cost function, whereby differences between the observations and analysis are damped according to their perceived error. The NWP model is a fully three-dimensional (3D) physics-based model of the atmosphere initialized with gridded atmospheric data obtained from a global scale model. The global model input data has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25km, which is insufficient for the desired atmospheric forecasts required at near 1km resolution. Therefore, a variational DA system is used to improve the quality and resolution of the initial conditions first prescribed by the global model. Data used by the

  8. Blob identification algorithms applied to laser speckle to characterize optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Galen D.; Wayne, David T.

    2015-09-01

    Laser beam speckle resulting from atmospheric turbulence contains information about the propagation channel. The number and size of the speckle cells can be used to infer the spatial coherence and thus the Cn2 along a path. The challenge with this technique is the rapidly evolving speckle pattern and non-uniformity of the speckle cells. In this paper we investigate modern blob counting techniques used in biology, microscopy, and medical imaging. These methods are then applied to turbulent speckle images to estimate the number and size of the speckle cells. Speckle theory is reviewed for different beam types and different regimes of turbulence. Algorithms are generated to calculate path Cn2 from speckle information and path geometry. The algorithms are tested on speckle images from experimental data collected over a turbulent 1km path and compared to Cn2 measurements collected in parallel.

  9. Adaptive selective relaying in cooperative free-space optical systems over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-06-30

    In this paper, a novel adaptive cooperative protocol with multiple relays using detect-and-forward (DF) over atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is proposed. The adaptive DF cooperative protocol here analyzed is based on the selection of the optical path, source-destination or different source-relay links, with a greater value of fading gain or irradiance, maintaining a high diversity order. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are obtained for a cooperative free-space optical (FSO) communication system with Nr relays, when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either a wide range of turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β, or pointing errors, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. A greater robustness for different link distances and pointing errors is corroborated by the obtained results if compared with similar cooperative schemes or equivalent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results.

  10. Local motion compensation in image sequences degraded by atmospheric turbulence: a comparative analysis of optical flow vs. block matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Claudia S.

    2016-10-01

    As a consequence of fluctuations in the index of refraction of the air, atmospheric turbulence causes scintillation, spatial and temporal blurring as well as global and local image motion creating geometric distortions. To mitigate these effects many different methods have been proposed. Global as well as local motion compensation in some form or other constitutes an integral part of many software-based approaches. For the estimation of motion vectors between consecutive frames simple methods like block matching are preferable to more complex algorithms like optical flow, at least when challenged with near real-time requirements. However, the processing power of commercially available computers continues to increase rapidly and the more powerful optical flow methods have the potential to outperform standard block matching methods. Therefore, in this paper three standard optical flow algorithms, namely Horn-Schunck (HS), Lucas-Kanade (LK) and Farnebäck (FB), are tested for their suitability to be employed for local motion compensation as part of a turbulence mitigation system. Their qualitative performance is evaluated and compared with that of three standard block matching methods, namely Exhaustive Search (ES), Adaptive Rood Pattern Search (ARPS) and Correlation based Search (CS).

  11. On the determination of the position of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Maslov, A. A.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    As a rule, aerodynamic studies at hypersonic flow velocities are carried out in short-duration wind-tunnel facilities. For such facilities, optical diagnostic methods are most preferable. In the present study, we give for the first time a comparison of two methods for determining the end of laminar-turbulent transition: from the distribution of heat fluxes and from schlieren visualization data for the boundary-layer flow. Parametric data on the position of the transition are obtained. These data can be used in the future as reference ones while calibrating semi-empirical calculation models for the transition.

  12. Using an artificial neural network approach to estimate surface-layer optical turbulence at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Basu, Sukanta

    2016-05-15

    In this Letter, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach is proposed for the estimation of optical turbulence (Cn2) in the atmospheric surface layer. Five routinely available meteorological variables are used as the inputs. Observed Cn2 data near the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are utilized for validation. The proposed approach has demonstrated its prowess by capturing the temporal evolution of Cn2 remarkably well. More interestingly, this ANN approach is found to outperform a widely used similarity theory-based conventional formulation for all the prevalent atmospheric conditions (including strongly stratified conditions).

  13. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    PubMed

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  14. Global Turbulence Decision Support for Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.; Sharman, R.; Kessinger, C.; Feltz, W.; Wimmers, A.

    2009-09-01

    Turbulence is widely recognized as the leading cause of injuries to flight attendants and passengers on commercial air carriers, yet legacy decision support products such as SIGMETs and SIGWX charts provide relatively low spatial- and temporal-resolution assessments and forecasts of turbulence, with limited usefulness for strategic planning and tactical turbulence avoidance. A new effort is underway to develop an automated, rapid-update, gridded global turbulence diagnosis and forecast system that addresses upper-level clear-air turbulence, mountain-wave turbulence, and convectively-induced turbulence. This NASA-funded effort, modeled on the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration's Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG) and GTG Nowcast systems, employs NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) model output and data from NASA and operational satellites to produce quantitative turbulence nowcasts and forecasts. A convective nowcast element based on GFS forecasts and satellite data provides a basis for diagnosing convective turbulence. An operational prototype "Global GTG” system has been running in real-time at the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research since the spring of 2009. Initial verification based on data from TRMM, Cloudsat and MODIS (for the convection nowcasting) and AIREPs and AMDAR data (for turbulence) are presented. This product aims to provide the "single authoritative source” for global turbulence information for the U.S. Next Generation Air Transportation System.

  15. Forecasting forecast skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, Eugenia; Dalcher, Amnon

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to predict the skill of numerical weather forecasts - a quantity which is variable from day to day and region to region. This has been accomplished using as predictor the dispersion (measured by the average correlation) between members of an ensemble of forecasts started from five different analyses. The analyses had been previously derived for satellite-data-impact studies and included, in the Northern Hemisphere, moderate perturbations associated with the use of different observing systems. When the Northern Hemisphere was used as a verification region, the prediction of skill was rather poor. This is due to the fact that such a large area usually contains regions with excellent forecasts as well as regions with poor forecasts, and does not allow for discrimination between them. However, when regional verifications were used, the ensemble forecast dispersion provided a very good prediction of the quality of the individual forecasts.

  16. Forecasting forecast skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, Eugenia; Dalcher, Amnon

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to predict the skill of numerical weather forecasts - a quantity which is variable from day to day and region to region. This has been accomplished using as predictor the dispersion (measured by the average correlation) between members of an ensemble of forecasts started from five different analyses. The analyses had been previously derived for satellite-data-impact studies and included, in the Northern Hemisphere, moderate perturbations associated with the use of different observing systems. When the Northern Hemisphere was used as a verification region, the prediction of skill was rather poor. This is due to the fact that such a large area usually contains regions with excellent forecasts as well as regions with poor forecasts, and does not allow for discrimination between them. However, when regional verifications were used, the ensemble forecast dispersion provided a very good prediction of the quality of the individual forecasts.

  17. Assessing EO Image Degradation from Underwater Optical Turbulence in Natural Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the Secchi disk disappear? An imaging perspective," Opt. Express, 15(6), 2791-2802 (2007). [4] P. C. Chang, J. C. Flitton, K. I. Hopcraft et al...Finger Lakes, with an average Secchi depth near 8 m (Effler et al. 2007), thus allowing for imaging under varied turbulent strength, but with little

  18. Nonintrusive optical measurements of turbulence and mixing in a stably stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Todd Kent

    1989-12-01

    The decay of turbulence generated by a biplanar grid towed horizontally through a stably stratified fluid was studied for three different constant density gradients. Experiments were performed in a closed rectangular test section. Two solutes (MgSO4 and sucrose) were used to allow for the creation of a solution with mean density gradients but uniform index of refraction. Fluid velocities are measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Density was measured by adding a florescent dye to the working fluid in such a way that the light florescent by the dye when excited by a laser was proportional to the local density of the solution. Simultaneous single-point measurements of the vertical velocity, the horizontal velocity in the direction of grid motion, and the density were obtained at a fixed point in the center of the test section. Density profiles of the quiescent fluid before and after the grid was towed through the test section were measured. Instantaneous measurements of tile density field in a two-dimensional plane were also obtained. Immediately behind the grid the turbulence was unaffected by the stable stratifications. Measurements of the convective mass flux indicate that the vertical transport of mass due to turbulence was significantly reduced by buoyancy forces, while integral estimates of the mixing indicate that the ability of the turbulent eddies to homogenize the stratified fluid decreases significantly with increasing density gradients.

  19. Lidar Measurement of Optical Turbulence: Theory of the Crossed Path Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-08

    17Mathewn, J. and Walker. R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2"d edn., WA. Benjamin, Reading, MA. ’Bracewell, R.N. (1978) The Fourier...Propagation in a Turbulent Medium, McGraw-Hill, New York. 7Mathews, J., and Walker, R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2’ edn., W.A. Ben- jamin

  20. Bending and turbulent enhancement phenomena of neutral gas flow containing an atmospheric pressure plasma by applying external electric fields measured by schlieren optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Sakakita, Hajime; Tsunoda, Syuichiro; Kasahara, Jiro; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of turbulent enhancement phenomena of a neutral gas flow containing plasma ejected from the nozzle of plasma equipment, the schlieren optical method was performed to visualize the neutral gas behavior. It was confirmed that the turbulent starting point became closer to the nozzle exit, as the amplitude of discharge voltage (electric field) increased. To study the effect of electric field on turbulent enhancement, two sets of external electrodes were arranged in parallel, and the gas from the nozzle was allowed to flow between the upper and lower electrodes. It was found that the neutral gas flow was bent, and the bending angle increased as the amplitude of the external electric field increased. The results obtained using a simple model analysis roughly coincide with experimental data. These results indicate that momentum transport from drifted ions induced by the electric field to neutral particles is an important factor that enhances turbulence.

  1. Hybrid pulse position modulation and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation for free space optics in a weak and saturated turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Faridzadeh, Monire; Gholami, Asghar; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Rajbhandari, Sujan

    2012-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid modulation scheme based on pulse position modulation (PPM) and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation (BPSK-SIM) schemes for free-space optical communications is proposed. The analytical bit error rate (BER) performance is investigated in weak and saturated turbulence channels and results are verified with the simulation data. Results show that performance of PPM-BPSK-SIM is superior to BPSK-SIM in all turbulence regimes; however, it outperforms 2-PPM for the turbulence variance σ(1)(2)>0.2. PPM-BPSK-SIM offers a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of 50 dB in the saturation regime compared to BPSK at a BER of 10(-6). The SNR gain in comparison to PPM improves as the strength of the turbulence level increases.

  2. Acquisition probability analysis of ultra-wide FOV acquisition scheme in optical links under impact of atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bo; Liu, Lu; Liu, Yihui; Jin, Ye; Tang, Junxiong

    2013-05-10

    Reliable data transmission in optical wireless communication is on the premise of the successful establishment of the optical link. In this paper, we propose an ultra-wide field-of-view (FOV) acquisition scheme, which combines the fisheye lens and Voigt anomalous dispersion optical filter (VADOF) to achieve rapid establishment of wireless optical links. Furthermore, the ultra-wide FOV signal-receiving model for this acquisition scheme is presented to analyze the receiving performance. This acquisition scheme utilizes the fisheye lens to obtain the ultra-wide FOV, not only simplifying the system architecture of the spatial acquisition, but also reducing the acquisition time; a VADOF with ultra-narrow-pass bandwidth is adopted to resist the strong background radiation induced by the ultra-wide FOV. For this ultra-wide FOV acquisition scheme, the mathematical model of long-term average acquisition probability (LTAAP) is derived based on the gamma-gamma (GG) distribution. In an atmospheric turbulence environment, the average signal count and the acquisition probability are both random variables; therefore, the probability density of the average signal count needs to be considered and LTAAP can be calculated based on the GG distribution. Comprehensive analysis and numerical results of the key parameters of this ultra-wide FOV acquisition scheme, such as LTAAP, false-alarm probability, signal-to-noise ratio, incident angle of beam, scintillation index, and acquisition threshold, provide an advantageous basis for the actual spatial acquisition system.

  3. Instrumental intercomparison investigating vertical profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed in the lower atmospheric boundary layer during frontal passages in northwestern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Stein, Karin; Sucher, Erik; Englander, Abraham; Fastig, Salomon; Porat, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The German-Israeli intercomparison experiment on the investigation of vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer from 4th to 7th May 2015 was characterized by frontal activity in the atmosphere. The newly developed remote LIDAR-device of the Soreq institute for the investigation of the vertical wind and turbulence field was compared to the routinely performed measurements at the VerTurM (Vertical Turbulence Measurements) field site in Meppen, Germany. The long-term experiment VerTurM is focused on measurements of the optical turbulence and comprises scintillometer measurements close to the ground (1.15 m height), sonic anemometer measurements on a tall tower at 4 m, 8 m, 32 m, and 64 m and a SODAR-RASS-system. The temporal development of the vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence Cn 2 during the frontal passage is investigated. Additional radiosonde measurements were performed to characterize the boundary layer height during the day.

  4. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  5. Free space optical system performance for laser beam propagation through non-Kolmogorov turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Italo; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Ferrero, Valter

    2007-02-01

    Free space laser system performance is limited by atmospheric turbulence that has been described for many years by Kolmogorov's power spectral density model because of its simplicity. Unfortunately several experiments have been reported recently that show Kolmogorov theory is sometimes incomplete to describe atmospheric statistics properly, in particular in portions of the troposphere and stratosphere. In this paper we present a Non-Kolmogorov power spectrum which uses a generalized exponent instead of constant standard exponent value 11/3 and a generalized amplitude factor instead of constant value 0.033. Using this new spectrum in weak turbulence, we carry out, for horizontal path, analysis of Long Term Beam Spread, Scintillation index, Probability of fade, mean SNR and mean BER as variation of the spectrum exponent.

  6. Temporal decorrelation of optical turbulence as a function of altitude in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, J. L.; Avila, R.; Carrasco, E.; Sánchez, L. J.; Chun, M.; Butterley, T.; Wilson, R.; Urbiola, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose a new method to evaluate the Taylor's frozen-flow hypothesis with the Generalized SCIntillation Detection And Ranging technique (G-SCIDAR). Unlike the work previously reported in the literature, we take into consideration the wind-speed fluctuation effects when examining the spatiotemporal cross-covariance functions computed according to the G-SCIDAR method. We show that under the assumption of having turbulent layers driven by fluctuating wind-velocity vectors, it is correct examining the encircled volume of smeared cross-covariance peaks. The method was used to process 60 spatiotemporal cross-covariance functions of the stellar scintillation patterns retrieved at the 2.2 m telescope of the University of Hawaii along a two hours observation run. We found that most of the time the structure of atmospheric refraction-index inhomogeneities decorrelates linearly with time for individual turbulent layers. Moreover, contrary to the behaviour expected under the assumption of having a slowly evolving structure of turbulent eddies, being translated by a much greater wind-velocity vector, which should strengthen the hypothesis of a frozen flow, we found that the temporal decorrelation of such structure increases as the overall layer displacement velocity increases.

  7. Restoring number of suspended particles in ocean using satellite optical images and forecasting particle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.; Arnone, Robert A.; Flynn, Peter; Casey, Brandon; Weidemann, Alan D.; Ko, Dong-Shang

    2007-04-01

    A method to retrieve concentrations of suspended large and small particles in seawater from satellite images is proposed. The method uses as input images of scattering and backscattering coefficients in several satellite channels as well as an image of concentration of chlorophyll. All these three properties are derived using an atmospheric correction algorithm and algorithms to derive inherent optical properties from remote sensing reflectance. The proposed method is based on several approaches developed previously by Twardowski et al, van de Huist, and Evans and Fournier and is based on Mie theory. The proposed method was applied to restore a number of suspended particles and their dynamics in ocean using SeaWIFs satellite optical images.

  8. Performance limits of high-rate space-to-ground optical communications through the turbulent atmospheric channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, John E.

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts both the amplitude and phase of an optical field propagating from space to an earth-based receiver. While aperture averaging can mitigate amplitude scintillation effects, the performance of single spatial-mode receiver systems such as coherent detection or preamplified direction detection can be significantly degraded by the corrupted phase when the ratio of aperture diameter D to atmospheric coherence length r0 exceeds unity. Although adaptive optics may be employed to correct the wavefront, in practice the correction is imperfect and the residual phase errors induce a communications performance loss. That loss is quantified here by Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Single-mode-receiver fade statistics for imperfect phase correction are calculated in terms of the atmospheric Greenwood frequency fg, the adaptive optic servo loop cutoff frequency fc, and the ratio D/r0. From these statistics, link bit-error rate (BER) performance is calculated. The results reveal that conventional performance measures such as Strehl ratio or mean signal-to- noise ratio loss can significantly underestimate receiver BER losses. Only when the ratio fg/fc is 0.1 or less will communications losses be small (about 0.5 dB) over a wide range of D/r0.

  9. Analysis of effective capacity for free-space optical communication systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, You-quan; Chi, Xue-fen; Shi, Jia-lin; Zhao, Lin-lin

    2015-05-01

    To facilitate the efficient support of quality-of-service (QoS) for promising free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, it is essential to model and analyze FSO channels in terms of delay QoS. However, most existing works focus on the average capacity and outage capacity for FSO, which are not enough to characterize the effective transmission data rate when delay-sensitive service is applied. In this paper, the effective capacity of FSO communication systems under statistical QoS provisioning constraints is investigated to meet heterogeneous traffic demands. A novel closed-form expression for effective capacity is derived under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence conditions, pointing errors, beam widths, detector sizes and QoS exponents. The obtained results reveal the effects of some significant parameters on effective capacity, which can be used for the design of FSO systems carrying a wide range of services with diverse QoS requirements.

  10. Ultrahigh-frame-rate OH fluorescence imaging in turbulent flames using a burst-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail; Meyer, Terrence R; Jiang, Naibo; Lempert, Walter R; Gord, James R

    2009-05-01

    Burst-mode planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical is demonstrated in laminar and turbulent hydrogen-air diffusion flames with pulse repetition rates up to 50 kHz. Nearly 1 mJ/pulse at 313.526 nm is used to probe the OH P(2)(10) rotational transition in the (0,0) band of the A-X system. The UV radiation is generated by a high-speed-tunable, injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator pumped by a frequency-doubled megahertz-rate burst-mode Nd:YAG laser. Preliminary kilohertz-rate wavelength scanning of the temperature-broadened OH transition during PLIF imaging is also presented for the first time (to our knowledge), and possible strategies for spatiotemporally resolved planar OH spectroscopy are discussed.

  11. Operational condition for direct single-mode-fiber coupled free-space optical terminal under strong atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori

    2012-03-01

    The author describes the key design feature of a newly developed compact free-space optical terminal, which can achieve robust direct single-mode-fiber-coupling with advanced bidirectional beacon tracking system and excellent operational performance under various adverse weather conditions, such as strong atmospheric turbulences and rain/snow falls. The author found that there is a good correlation between the scintillation index of beacon/signal receiving intensities and the signal fading depth. Therefore, the signal link quality can be predicted from the beacon scintillation index using the classical Rytov theory. According to the outdoor experimental results, it can be concluded that the scintillation index of the beacon beam should be less than 0.1 for stable and reliable communication links.

  12. Modeling of power spectral density of modified von Karman atmospheric phase turbulence and acousto-optic chaos using scattered intensity profiles over discrete time intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2014-10-01

    In recent research, propagation of plane electromagnetic (EM) waves through a turbulent medium with modified von Karman phase characteristics was modeled and numerically simulated using transverse planar apertures representing narrow phase turbulence along the propagation path. The case for extended turbulence was also studied by repeating the planar phase screens multiple times over the propagation path and incorporating diffractive effects via a split-step algorithm. The goal of the research reported here is to examine two random phenomena: (a) atmospheric turbulence due to von Karman-type phase fluctuations, and (b) chaos generated in an acousto-optic (A-O) Bragg cell under hybrid feedback. The latter problem has been thoroughly examined for its nonlinear dynamics and applications in secure communications. However, the statistical characteristics (such as the power spectral density (PSD)) of the chaos have not been estimated in recent work. To that end, treating the chaos phenomena as a random process, the time waveforms of the chaos intensity and their spectra are numerically evaluated over a (large) number of time iterations. These spectra are then averaged to derive the equivalent PSD of the A-O chaos. For the turbulence problem, an optical beam passing through an input pinhole is propagated through a random phase screen (placed at different locations) to a desired distance (typically near-field) under different levels of turbulence strength. The resulting spatial intensity profile is then averaged and the process repeated over a (large) number of pre-specified time intervals. From this data, once again, the turbulence PSD is calculated via the Fourier spectra of the average intensity snapshots. The results for the two systems are compared.

  13. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  14. Propagation of ring Airy Gaussian beams with optical vortices through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Dong; Tao, Rumao; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Yanxing; Wu, Wuming; Wang, Xiaolin; Si, Lei

    2017-03-01

    A new ring Airy Gaussian (RAiG) vortex beam generation method by coherent combination of Gaussian beam array has been proposed. To validate the feasibility of this method, the propagation properties of the RAiG vortex beam and the coherent combining beam in vacuum have been studied and analyzed. From the comparisons of the intensity distributions and phase patterns along the propagation path, we can conclude that the coherent combining beam has the same properties as those of the ideal RAiG vortex beam. So this method can be used to obtain RAiG vortex beam in practice. Then the general analytical expression of the root-mean-square (RMS) beam width of the RAiG vortex beam, which is appropriately generated by coherent combining method, through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence has been derived. The influence of anisotropic turbulence on RMS beam width of the generated RAiG vortex beam has been numerically calculated. This generation method has good appropriation to the ideal RAiG vortex beam and is very useful for deriving the analytical expression of propagation properties through a random media. The conclusions are useful in practical applications, such as laser communication and remote sensing systems.

  15. Fiber-coupling efficiency of Gaussian Schell model for optical communication through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Li, Mengnan; Yang, Qingbo; Ma, Jing

    2015-03-20

    In practice, due to the laser device and the inevitable error of the processing technique, the laser source emitted from the communication terminal is partially coherent, and is represented as a Gaussian Schell model (GSM). The cross-spectral density function based on the Gaussian model in previous research is replaced by the GSM. Thus the fiber-coupling efficiency equation of the GSM laser source through atmospheric turbulence is deduced. The GSM equation presents the effect of the source coherent parameter ζ on the fiber-coupling efficiency, which was not included previously. The effects of the source coherent parameter ζ on the spatial coherent radius and the fiber-coupling efficiency through atmospheric turbulence are numerically simulated and analyzed. The result manifests that the fiber-coupling efficiency invariably degrades with increasing ζ. The work in this paper is aimed to improve the redundancy design of fiber-coupling receiver systems by analyzing the fiber-coupling efficiency with the source coherent parameters.

  16. EOSTAR: an electro-optical sensor performance model for predicting atmospheric refraction, turbulence, and transmission in the marine surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Gerard J.; Moerman, Marcel M.; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Doss-Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitri

    2004-02-01

    A first version of the integrated model EOSTAR (Electro-Optical Signal Transmission and Ranging) to predict the performance of electro-optical (EO) sensor systems in the marine atmospheric surface layer has been developed. The model allows the user to define camera systems, atmospheric conditions and target characteristics, and it uses standard (shipboard) meteorological data to calculate atmospheric effects such as refraction, turbulence, spectrally resolved transmission, path- and background radiation. Alternatively, the user may specify vertical profiles of meteorological parameters and/or profiles of atmospheric refraction, either interactively or in data files with a flexible format. Atmospheric effects can be presented both numerically and graphically as distorted images of synthetically generated targets with spatially distributed emission properties. EOSTAR is a completely mouse-driven PC Windows program with a user-friendly interface and extended help files. Most calculations are performed in real-time, although spectral transmission and background radiation calculations take up to a few seconds for each new meteorological condition. The program can be used in a wide range of applications, e.g., for operational planning and instruction.

  17. Development of a Numerical System to Improve Particulate Matter Forecasts in South Korea Using Geostationary Satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Data over Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Song, C. H.; Park, R.; Park, M. E.; Han, K. M.; Kim, J.; Choi, M.; Ghim, Y. S.; Woo, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    To improve short-term particulate matter (PM) forecasts in South Korea, the initial distribution of PM composition, particularly over the upwind regions, is primarily important. To prepare the initial PM composition, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from a geostationary equatorial orbit (GEO) satellite sensor, GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) which covers Northeast Asia (113°E-146°E; 25°N-47°N), were used. A spatio-temporal (ST) kriging method was used to better prepare the initial AOD distributions that were converted into the PM composition over Northeast Asia. One of the largest advantages to using the ST-kriging method in this study is that more observed AOD data can be used to prepare the best initial AOD fields. It is demonstrated in this study that the short-term PM forecast system developed with the application of the ST-kriging method can greatly improve PM10 predictions in Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), when evaluated with ground-based observations. For example, errors and biases of PM10 predictions decreased by ~60% and ~70%, respectively, during the first 6 h of short-term PM forecasting, compared with those without the initial PM composition. In addition, The influences of several factors (such as choices of observation operators and control variables) on the performances of the short-term PM forecast were also explored in this study.

  18. Atmospheric turbulence mitigation in an OAM-based MIMO free-space optical link using spatial diversity combined with MIMO equalization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongxiong; Wang, Zhe; Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Willner, Asher J; Cao, Yinwen; Zhao, Zhe; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Ashrafi, Nima; Ashrafi, Solyman; Bock, Robert; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E

    2016-06-01

    We explore the mitigation of atmospheric turbulence effects for orbital angular momentum (OAM)-based free-space optical (FSO) communications with multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) architecture. Such a system employs multiple spatially separated aperture elements at the transmitter/receiver, and each transmitter aperture contains multiplexed data-carrying OAM beams. We propose to use spatial diversity combined with MIMO equalization to mitigate both weak and strong turbulence distortions. In a 2×2 FSO link with each transmitter aperture containing two multiplexed OAM modes of ℓ=+1 and ℓ=+3, we experimentally show that at least two OAM data channels could be recovered under both weak and strong turbulence distortions using selection diversity assisted with MIMO equalization.

  19. Middle atmosphere slant-path optical turbulence conditions derived from very high-frequency radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.; Nastrom, Gregory D.; Hansen, Anthony R.

    1999-02-01

    Slant path calculations are shown of the transverse coherence length (r0), the isoplanatic angle ((theta) 0), and the Rytov variance ((sigma) 2R), using a 6- yr data set of refractive index structure parameter (C2n) from 49.25-MHz radar observations at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The calculations are for a spherical wave condition; a wavelength ((lambda) ) of electromagnetic radiation of 1 micrometers ; four different elevation angles (3, 10, 30, and 60 deg), two path lengths (50 and 150 km); and a platform, such as an aircraft, at 12.5 km MSL (mean sea level). Over 281,000 radar-derived C2n profiles sampled at 3 min intervals with 150-m height resolution are used for the calculations. The approach, an `onion skin' model, assumes horizontal stationarity over each entire propagation path and is consistent with Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that refractivity turbulence effects are greatly reduced for the there propagation parameters (r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R) as the elevation angle increases from 3 to 60 deg. A pronounced seasonal effect is seen on the same parameters, which is consistent with climatological variables and gravity wave activity. Interactions with the enhanced turbulence in the vicinity of the tropopause with the range weighting functions of each propagation parameter is evaluated. Results of a two region model relating r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R to wind speed at 5.6 km MSL are shown. This statistical model can be understood in terms of upward propagating gravity waves that are launched by strong winds over complex terrain.

  20. Estimation of the variability of dust aerosol optical depth over several European regions based on the forecast model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandija, Florian; Chávez Pérez, Victor; Gimeno Presa, Luis; Nieto, Raquel; Añel Cabanelas, Juan Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to determine the patterns of the variability of dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the European continent for a 9-years period. This aerosol parameter is an important indicator of the presence of dust plumes over the investigated area. Saharan and Arabic deserts are the two major dust sources which affect the European continent. The model used in this study is BSC-DREAM8b_v2.0 (Atmospheric Dust Forecast System), which provided AOD550 data from January 2006 up to December 2014. The investigation of the dust event climatology was realized dividing the affected area (European continent) and dust source area (two main deserts) into several distinct sectors. The European continent is divided into 8 sectors and the two deserts are divided into 4 sectors. The threshold of sector-averaged AOD550 in the cases of dust events is chosen 0.10. Overall results indicate that the dust events affect more the three southern sectors, especially the central one. Meanwhile, the two northern sectors are less affected. It was observed also a dependence of AOD also on the longitude. Central sectors have higher average AOD, while the west ones have the lowest. Highest AOD are observed during late spring and early summer at central and eastern sectors, and during summer at western sector. More than 67% of all daily-averaged AOD data, which overpass the threshold, at all sectors, are lower than 0.2. Sector-averaged AOD at three southern sectors was 0.02-0.04, while at the northern sectors this value falls down to 0.002-0.001. Moreover, no clear inter-annual trends are identified. The yearly cycles of AOD over the European sectors were more evident at southern sectors, especially at the regions of Apennine and Balkan peninsulas.

  1. Application of optical methods to the study of jet noise and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sava, P. G.; Haertig, J.

    1980-01-01

    Optical methods are generally applied in fluid mechanics for either visualization or measurement. The use of a laser anemometer to study flow velocity in a jet and its relaton to the sound radiated is described. The same acoustic emission phenomenon is also measued by combining the signals from four Schlieren systems with that from an interferometer. The use of an optical Fourier transformation approach with real time analysis to determine the spatio-temporal structure of a field of mass volume such as a waveguide or free jet is also examined.

  2. Effects of beam wander on free-space optical communications through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Effects of beam wander on uncoded bit-error-rate (BER) of direct-detection OOK modulated FSO communication systems using collimated and focused Gaussian beams are studied. Channel fading statistics are obtained from large-scale wave optics simulations and compared with the closed-form log-normal and gamma-gamma models. The avalanche photodiode (APD) is chosen for photodetection. The accurate McIntyre-Conradi APD model is adopted for performance evaluation. Results show that large performance gain (more than 15dB) can be achieved with fast-tracked focused beams. The upper bound of higher-order adaptive optics gain beyond tracking gain is also studied.

  3. Application of Remotely-sensed Aerosol Optical Depth in Characterization and Forecasting of Urban Fine Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Shanique L.

    Emissions from local industries, particularly coal-fired power plants, have been shown to enhance the ambient pollutant budget in the Ohio River Valley (ORV) region. One pollutant that is of interest is PM2.5 due to its established link to respiratory illnesses, cardiopulmonary diseases and mortality. State and local agencies monitor the impact of the local point sources on the ambient concentrations at specific sites; however, the monitors do not provide satisfactory spatial coverage. An important metric for describing ambient particulate pollution is aerosol optical depth (AOD). It is a dimensionless geo-physical product measured remotely using satellites or ground-based light detection ranging instruments. This study focused on assessing the effectiveness of using satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) as an indicator for PM2.5 in the ORV and two cities in Ohio. Three models, multi-linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) -- MLR and neural network, were trained using 40% of the total dataset. The outcome was later tested to minimize error and further validated with another 40% of the dataset not included in the model development phase. Furthermore, to limit the effect of seasonality, four models representing each season were created for each city using meteorological variables known to influence PM2.5 and AOD concentration. GIS spatial analysis tool was employed to visualize and make spatial and temporal comparisons for the ORV region. Comparable spatial distributions were observed. Regression analysis showed that the highest and lowest correlations were in the summer and winter, respectively. Seasonal decomposition methods were used to evaluate trends at local Ohio monitoring stations to identify areas most suitable for improved air quality management. Over the six years of study, Cuyahoga County maintained PM2.5 concentrations above the national standard and in Hamilton County (Cincinnati) PM2.5 levels ranked above the national level for more

  4. Research on characteristics of free-space optical communication link in weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liguo; Hou, Zaihong; Li, Fei

    2013-08-01

    Research on characteristics of atmospheric communication link becomes a subject of current interest, and often mainly focuses on some fading parameters including the probability of fade, the mean fade number and the mean fade time. The contribution of false alarm to bit error rate has been considered, however, the temporal characteristic is rarely mentioned., To make up the deficiency, parameters integrating the influence of false alarm and fading were defined. On one hand, the laser communication link were modeled for Gamma-Gamma distribution of irradiance fluctuation subjected to weak atmospheric turbulence. Accordingly the mathematical expressions of these parameters were deduced. On the other hand, characteristic of the parameters were obtained by numerical simulation with various channel environment parameters, such as mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), zenith angle and detection threshold. Compared with other researches on fade characteristic, some different conclusions can be drawn from simulation results. With the same SNR and zenith angle, there is an optimum value of detection threshold corresponding to the minimum mean error number, which deviates obviously from that obtained according to the minimum error probability. Either increasing SNR or decreasing zenith angle can reduce mean error number and the optimum threshold. Different from mean error number, mean error time is slightly influenced with channel environment parameters and constant at the order of milliseconds.

  5. Average BER analysis of SCM-based free-space optical systems by considering the effect of IM3 with OSSB signals under turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wansu; Cho, Tae-Sik; Yun, Changho; Kim, Kiseon

    2009-11-09

    In this paper, we derive the average bit error rate (BER) of subcarrier multiplexing (SCM)-based free space optics (FSO) systems using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DD-MZM) for optical single-sideband (OSSB) signals under atmospheric turbulence channels. In particular, we consider the third-order intermodulation (IM3), a significant performance degradation factor, in the case of high input signal power systems. The derived average BER, as a function of the input signal power and the scintillation index, is employed to determine the optimum number of SCM users upon the designing FSO systems. For instance, when the user number doubles, the input signal power decreases by almost 2 dBm under the log-normal and exponential turbulence channels at a given average BER.

  6. Low-noise, high-speed detector development for optical turbulence fluctuation measurements for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Smith, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Winz, G.; Ellington, S. D.; Jaehnig, K.

    2010-10-15

    A new beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is under development. Photon-noise limited measurements of neutral beam emissions are achieved using photoconductive photodiodes with a novel frequency-compensated broadband preamplifier. The new BES system includes a next-generation preamplifier and upgraded optical coupling system. Notable features of the design are surface-mount components, minimized stray capacitance, a wide angular acceptance photodiode, a differential output line driver, reduced input capacitance, doubling of the frequency range, net reduced electronic noise, and elimination of the need for a cryogenic cooling system. The irreducible photon noise dominates the noise up to 800 kHz for a typical input power of 60 nW. This new assembly is being integrated into an upgraded multichannel optical detector assembly for a new BES system on the NSTX experiment.

  7. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes-LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  8. Laser differential image-motion monitor for characterization of turbulence during free-space optical communication tests.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Juarez, Juan C; Brown, Andrea M

    2013-12-01

    A laser differential image-motion monitor (DIMM) system was designed and constructed as part of a turbulence characterization suite during the DARPA free-space optical experimental network experiment (FOENEX) program. The developed link measurement system measures the atmospheric coherence length (r0), atmospheric scintillation, and power in the bucket for the 1550 nm band. DIMM measurements are made with two separate apertures coupled to a single InGaAs camera. The angle of arrival (AoA) for the wavefront at each aperture can be calculated based on focal spot movements imaged by the camera. By utilizing a single camera for the simultaneous measurement of the focal spots, the correlation of the variance in the AoA allows a straightforward computation of r0 as in traditional DIMM systems. Standard measurements of scintillation and power in the bucket are made with the same apertures by redirecting a percentage of the incoming signals to InGaAs detectors integrated with logarithmic amplifiers for high sensitivity and high dynamic range. By leveraging two, small apertures, the instrument forms a small size and weight configuration for mounting to actively tracking laser communication terminals for characterizing link performance.

  9. Optical fiber-based laser remote sensor for airborne measurement of wind velocity and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Spuler, Scott M; Richter, Dirk; Spowart, Michael P; Rieken, Kathrin

    2011-02-20

    We discuss an optical fiber-based continuous-wave coherent laser system for measuring the wind speed in undisturbed air ahead of an aircraft. The operational principles of the instrument are described, and estimates of performance are presented. The instrument is demonstrated as a single line of sight, and data from the inaugural test flight of August 2010 is presented. The system was successfully operated under various atmospheric conditions, including cloud and clear air up to 12 km (40,300 ft).

  10. Measuring non-Kolmogorov turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysz, Szymon; Stein, Karin; Sucher, Erik; Sprung, Detlev

    2013-10-01

    We have performed a series of experiments aiming at understanding the statistics of deep turbulence over cities. The experimental setup consisted of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and an imaging camera that simultaneously recorded wavefront-, and focal-plane data, respectively. At the same time, measurements of deep optical turbulence were performed at the urban area of interest using two large-aperture scintillometer systems to get an impression of the strength of Cn2 above the rooftops of Ettlingen. Our focus is "urban" turbulence because we are interested in the usefulness of adaptive optics for free-space optical communications over urban areas. We discuss methods of determining departure from Kolmogorov turbulence. Our "last mile problem" is that urban turbulence can be significantly stronger, in the sense of flatter power spectrum, compared to the classic Kolmogorov turbulence. This could pose a significant challenge for adaptive optics systems.

  11. The Calern atmospheric turbulence station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabé, Julien; Ziad, Aziz; Fantéï-Caujolle, Yan; Aristidi, Éric; Renaud, Catherine; Blary, Flavien; Marjani, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    From its long expertise in Atmospheric Optics, the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur and the J.L. Lagrange Laboratory have equipped the Calern Observatory with a station of atmospheric turbulence measurement (CATS: Calern Atmospheric Turbulence Station). The CATS station is equipped with a set of complementary instruments for monitoring atmospheric turbulence parameters. These new-generation instruments are autonomous within original techniques for measuring optical turbulence since the first meters above the ground to the borders of the atmosphere. The CATS station is also a support for our training activities as part of our Masters MAUCA and OPTICS, through the organization of on-sky practical works.

  12. Effective capacity of MIMO free-space optical systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the capacity limits of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) free-space optical communication (FSO) system in the presence of quality of service (QoS) requirements. Closed-form expression for the effective capacity of MIMO FSO system with equal gain combining (EGC) is derived. In order to provide insights into the impact of various system parameters, asymptotic expressions are further analyzed in the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. Special cases are provided according to the derived results at the same time. Numerical results are given to validate all the analytical results, and the influences of QoS requirements and MIMO configurations are also illustrated.

  13. Effects of source spatial partial coherence on temporal fade statistics of irradiance flux in free-space optical links through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Weizhi; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Tong, Shoufeng; Wang, Tianshu

    2013-12-02

    The temporal covariance function of irradiance-flux fluctua-tions for Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated by making use of the method of effective beam parameters. Based on this formulation, new expressions for the root-mean-square (RMS) bandwidth of the irradiance-flux temporal spectrum due to GSM beams passing through atmospheric turbulence are derived. With the help of these expressions, the temporal fade statistics of the irradiance flux in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, using spatially partially coherent sources, impaired by atmospheric turbulence are further calculated. Results show that with a given receiver aperture size, the use of a spatially partially coherent source can reduce both the fractional fade time and average fade duration of the received light signal; however, when atmospheric turbulence grows strong, the reduction in the fractional fade time becomes insignificant for both large and small receiver apertures and in the average fade duration turns inconsiderable for small receiver apertures. It is also illustrated that if the receiver aperture size is fixed, changing the transverse correlation length of the source from a larger value to a smaller one can reduce the average fade frequency of the received light signal only when a threshold parameter in decibels greater than the critical threshold level is specified.

  14. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Effects of Turbulent Aberrations on Probability Distribution of Orbital Angular Momentum for Optical Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Cang, Ji

    2009-07-01

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence tilt, defocus, astigmatism and coma aberrations on the orbital angular momentum measurement probability of photons propagating in weak turbulent regime are modeled with Rytov approximation. By considering the resulting wave as a superposition of angular momentum eigenstates, the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of the transmitted digit are presented. Our results show that the effect of turbulent tilt aberration on the orbital angular momentum measurement probabilities of photons is the maximum among these four kinds of aberrations. As the aberration order increases, the effects of turbulence aberrations on the measurement probabilities of orbital angular momentum generally decrease, whereas the effect of turbulence defocus can be ignored. For tilt aberration, as the difference between the measured orbital angular momentum and the original orbital angular momentum increases, the orbital angular momentum measurement probability decreases.

  15. Atmospheric Cloud Forecasting in Support of Space Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R. J.; Felton, B.; Apling, D.

    2013-09-01

    Many space based applications from imaging to communications are impacted by the atmosphere. Atmospheric impacts such as optical turbulence and clouds are the main drivers for these types of systems. For example, in space based optical communications, clouds will produce channel fades on the order of many hundreds of decibels (dB) thereby breaking the communication link. Optical turbulence can also produce fades but can be compensated for by adaptive optics. The ability to forecast the current and future location and optical thickness of clouds for spaced based to ground optical communications is therefore critical in order to achieve a highly reliable system. We have developed an innovative method for producing such forecasts. These forecasts are intended to provide lead times on the order of several hours so that communication links can be transferred from a current clear ground location to another more desirable ground site. The system is referred to as the Cloud Propagator Forecast (CPF) and it operates on successive, satellite remotely sensed, cloud analyses to produce reliable probability forecasts of future cloud cover conditions at each point location or for the expectation of the amount of skycover in a local skydome about each point location. The forecasting algorithm is a combination of empirical Lagrangian and Eulerian regression over multiple spatial scales, but treats time auto-regressively. Input cloud masks are transformed into proxies first. A cloud cover proxy is a variable which has a more Gaussian distribution than literal cloud cover. For a given pixel, the cloud cover proxy is computed first by determining whether at the initialization time the pixel was clear or cloudy. Clear pixels will be assigned only positive proxies; cloudy pixels will be given only negative proxies. The degree the assigned proxy is different than zero depends on the fraction of pixels in a small neighboring space which have similar cloudy/clearness. The neighboring

  16. ETA-CMAQ MODELING SYSTEM'S CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE PM 2.5 AND AEROSOL OPTICAL THICKNESS FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2003, NOAA and the U.S. EPA signed a Memorandum of Agreement to work together to develop a National Air Quality Forecasting (AQF) capability. To meet this goal, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), the Office of Atmospheric Research (OAR) and the U.S. EPA developed and eval...

  17. ETA-CMAQ MODELING SYSTEM'S CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE PM 2.5 AND AEROSOL OPTICAL THICKNESS FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2003, NOAA and the U.S. EPA signed a Memorandum of Agreement to work together to develop a National Air Quality Forecasting (AQF) capability. To meet this goal, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), the Office of Atmospheric Research (OAR) and the U.S. EPA developed and eval...

  18. Exact error rate analysis of equal gain and selection diversity for coherent free-space optical systems on strong turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingbo; Cheng, Julian; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2010-06-21

    Exact error rate performances are studied for coherent free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence with diversity reception. Equal gain and selection diversity are considered as practical schemes to mitigate turbulence. The exact bit-error rate for binary phase-shift keying and outage probability are developed for equal gain diversity. Analytical expressions are obtained for the bit-error rate of differential phase-shift keying and asynchronous frequency-shift keying, as well as for outage probability using selection diversity. Furthermore, we provide the closed-form expressions of diversity order and coding gain with both diversity receptions. The analytical results are verified by computer simulations and are suitable for rapid error rates calculation.

  19. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  20. Turbulence and heat exchange inside the dome room of lidar station. Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosov, V. V.; Lukin, V. P.; Nosov, E. V.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of air turbulent motion inside the dome room - Primary Mirror (diameter 2.2 m) closed shaft at Siberian Lidar Station of V. E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science has been experimentally and theoretically studied. Research is needed to forecast a laser radiation distortion. Results of experiments performed using the ultrasonic compact portable weather station are presented. The main heat exchange directions of air flows inside the shaft are determined. Theoretical results have been obtained by numerical solving of boundary value problem for Navier-Stokes equations. Solitary large vortices (coherent structures, topological solitons) are observed inside the shaft. Coherent decay of such vortices generates the coherent turbulence. It is determined that inside the primary mirror shaft one may expect the weakening of phase fluctuations of optical radiation, and thus improvement the lidar optical imaging. This increases the efficiency of Lidar Station.

  1. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  2. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique has been developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  3. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  4. Laser anemometer using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for measuring mean velocity and turbulence intensity along the optical axis in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.; Goldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a small optical axis velocity component in a flow with a large transverse velocity component is presented. Experimental results are given for a subsonic free jet operating in a laboratory environment, and for a 0.508 meter diameter turbine stator cascade. Satisfactory operation of the instrument was demonstrated in the stator cascade facility with an ambient acoustic noise level during operation of about 105 dB. In addition, the turbulence intensity measured with the interferometer was consistent with previous measurements taken with a fringe type laser anemometer.

  5. Forecasting Skill

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    and in synoptic meteorology, many feel the improvements in forecasting the weather (clouds, winds , precipitation, and obstructions to vision) have...and maximum temperature) are each awarded marks 2, 1, or 0 according to whether the forecast is correct, 8 - *- -**■*- ———"—- - -■ t0m 1 MM—IB I...rate of improve- ment of 10% as roughly comparable to the improvement rate obtained by the numerical models. The following types of forecasts seem to

  6. Analysis of angle of arrival fluctuations for optical waves' propagation through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-03-09

    Analytical expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations based on the Rytov approximation theory are derived for plane and spherical waves' propagation through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence atmosphere. The anisotropic spectrum model based on the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path is adopted and it includes the same degree of anisotropy along the direction of propagation for all the turbulence cells size in the inertial sub-range. The derived expressions consider a single anisotropic coefficient describing the turbulence anisotropic property and a general spectral power law value in the range 3 to 4. They reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of plane and spherical waves' propagation through weak isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence for the special case of anisotropic factor equaling one. To reduce the complexity of the analytical results, the asymptotic-fit expressions are also derived and they fit well with the close-form ones. These results are useful for understanding the potential impact of deviations from the standard isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence atmosphere.

  7. Depth from Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    cess, and often leads to poor image quality. Several works in remote sensing and astronomical imag- ing have focused on image correction through...24] G. Wetzstein, W. Heidrich, and R. Raskar. Hand-held schlieren photography with light field probes. In ICCP, 2011. 2 [25] C. Zhou, O. Cossairt, and

  8. LASER BEAMS: Fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of a laser beam, carrying an optical vortex, in the turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Pogutsa, Ch E.

    2008-04-01

    The evolution of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a Laguerre—Gaussian beam interacting with turbulent inhomogeneities of the atmosphere is studied theoretically. The integral representations are obtained for the OAM in terms of the distributions of the random intensity and random field of the permittivity of the medium, and also for OAM statistical characteristics in terms of corresponding correlation functions. It is found that the average OAM value is preserved during the propagation of the laser beam in a random medium. The dependence of the dispersion of OAM fluctuations on the atmospheric turbulence and beam parameters is calculated. It is shown that the dependence of the OAM dispersion on the initial angular momentum of the laser beam disappears in the case of very strong turbulence.

  9. Fluctuations of the orbital angular momentum of a laser beam, carrying an optical vortex, in the turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, V P; Pogutsa, Ch E

    2008-04-30

    The evolution of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam interacting with turbulent inhomogeneities of the atmosphere is studied theoretically. The integral representations are obtained for the OAM in terms of the distributions of the random intensity and random field of the permittivity of the medium, and also for OAM statistical characteristics in terms of corresponding correlation functions. It is found that the average OAM value is preserved during the propagation of the laser beam in a random medium. The dependence of the dispersion of OAM fluctuations on the atmospheric turbulence and beam parameters is calculated. It is shown that the dependence of the OAM dispersion on the initial angular momentum of the laser beam disappears in the case of very strong turbulence. (laser beams)

  10. BER performance of MSK in ground-to-satellite uplink optical communication under the influence of atmospheric turbulence and detector noise.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiachen; Li, Mi; Tang, Minghui; Li, Yan; Song, Yuejiang

    2013-09-15

    Minimum shift keying (MSK) has been widely used in fiber optical communication and free-space optical communication. In order to introduce MSK into satellite laser communication, the bit-error rate (BER) performance of the MSK scheme is investigated in uplink communications under the influence of atmospheric turbulence consisting of weak fluctuation and beam wander. Numerical results indicate that the BER performance of MSK is much better than the performance of on-off keying (OOK). With the laser power being 4 W, the improvement is 5 dB in coherent demodulation and 15 dB in delay coherent demodulation. Furthermore, compared with OOK, optimal values of the divergence angle, receiver diameter, and transmitter beam radius are easier and more practical to achieve in the MSK scheme. The work can benefit ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  11. Forecasting surface-layer atmospheric parameters at the Large Binocular Telescope site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we quantify the performance of an automated weather forecast system implemented on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site at Mt Graham (Arizona) in forecasting the main atmospheric parameters close to the ground. The system employs a mesoscale non-hydrostatic numerical model (Meso-Nh). To validate the model, we compare the forecasts of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity close to the ground with the respective values measured by instrumentation installed on the telescope dome. The study is performed over a large sample of nights uniformly distributed over 2 yr. The quantitative analysis is done using classical statistical operators [bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE) and σ] and contingency tables, which allows us to extract complementary key information, such as the percentage of correct detections (PC) and the probability of obtaining a correct detection within a defined interval of values (POD). The results of our study indicate that the model performance in forecasting the atmospheric parameters we have just cited are very good, in some cases excellent: RMSE for temperature is below 1°C, for relative humidity it is 14 per cent and for the wind speed it is around 2.5 m s-1. The relative error of the RMSE for wind direction varies from 9 to 17 per cent depending on the wind speed conditions. This work is performed in the context of the ALTA (Advanced LBT Turbulence and Atmosphere) Center project, whose final goal is to provide forecasts of all the atmospheric parameters and the optical turbulence to support LBT observations, adaptive optics facilities and interferometric facilities.

  12. Aero-Optical Wavefront Propagation and Refractive Fluid Interfaces in Large-Reynolds-Number Compressible Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-31

    are utilized with the eikonal equation of geometrical optics to propagate computationally the optical wavefronts in the near field. As long as the...aero- optical interactions. In terms of the refractive index field n and the optical path length (OPL), the eikonal equation is: |∇ (OPL)| = n , (9) (e.g...Final Report to the Air Force Office of Scientific Research AFOSR Grant FA9550-04-1-0386, Period: 06-01-2004 to 12-31-2005 Aero- Optical Wavefront

  13. Impact of turbulence on high-precision ground-satellite frequency transfer with two-way coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study the impact of turbulence on coherent detection and the related phase noise that restricts time and frequency transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up- and downlink that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite kinematics. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterizing the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency and phase noise for different system parameters. We show that tip-tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the downlink and as a pre-compensation of the uplink. Besides, thanks to the large tilt angular correlation, the correction is shown to be efficient on uplink despite the point-ahead angle. Very good two-way compensation of turbulent effects is obtained even with the asymmetries. The two-way differential phase noise is reduced to 1 rad2 , with the best fractional frequency stability below 2 ×10-17 after 1-s averaging time.

  14. Optimization criterion for initial coherence degree of lasers in free-space optical links through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Feng, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2009-02-15

    Partially coherent beams can be used to reduce the turbulence-induced scintillation; however, the partial coherence induces the decrease of the mean received irradiance. An optimization criterion for the initial coherence degree of lasers is proposed. This criterion maximizes the received irradiance that occurs with the highest probability. A method for adaptive initial coherence was given to use the criterion in practical applications.

  15. Investigation of optical turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer using scintillometer measurements along a slant path and comparison to ultrasonic anemometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Ramkilowan, A.; Griffith, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Optical turbulence represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn 2 is a relevant parameter for the performance of electro-optical systems and characterization of the atmospheric influence on imaging. It was investigated during a field trial above an Highveld grassland in the atmospheric surface layer at the Rietvlei Nature Reserve close to Pretoria in South Africa from 18th June to 30th June 2013. This campaign was performed to compare different measurement techniques analyzing the diurnal formation of the vertical distribution of optical turbulence up to a height of 16 m above ground. The chosen time period was characterized by a pronounced diurnal cycle of the meteorological conditions, i.e. low variations from day to day. Ultra sonic anemometers were used to measure high frequency time series (50 Hz) of temperature at single points. From the statistical analysis of these time series Cn 2 was derived. Three instruments were mounted at a portable mast in the center of slant path measurements over a horizontal distance of 1000 m using large aperture scintillometers (Boundary layer scintillometer BLS 900). Averaging over a time period of 5 minutes, the results of both methods are compared. The agreement in the results of optical turbulence is quite good. Discrepancies and agreement are analyzed with respect to the atmospheric stability and other meteorological parameters. Lowest values of Cn 2 at 4.6 m above ground amount to about 8*10-17 m-2/3, daily maxima to 6*10-13 m-2/3. Additional to the nearly constant meteorological conditions in the diurnal cycle, the uniformity of the terrain let the results of this measurement campaign an ideal data set for investigating methodological questions regarding a comparison of single point measurements with integrated measurements over a horizontal distance. Four stability regimes were identified in the diurnal cycle and investigated. These are convective conditions during the day, neutral

  16. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of Near-Shore In Situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    of the water conditions in the coastal ocean makes any sampling, optical or otherwise, very time consuming and difficult. However, the focus on...applications. To accurately resolve the non-linear time -dependent ecological and optical processes in a short -term numerical simulation requires a...clarity are clearly required for Mine Warfare (MIW), Mine Counter Measures (MCM), and Naval Special Warfare (NSW), particularly in the Very Shallow

  17. Turbulent scaling in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.; Li, Ning; Chen, Shiyi; Liu, Yuanming

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a study of turbulence in fluids that are subject to different body forces and to external temperature gradients. Our focus was on the recent theoretical prediction that the Kolomogorov picture of turbulence may need to be modified for turbulent flows driven by buoyancy and subject to body forces such as rotational accelerations. Models arising from this research are important in global climate modeling, in turbulent transport problems, and in the fundamental understanding of fluid turbulence. Experimentally, we use (1) precision measurements of heat transport and local temperature; (2) flow visualization using digitally- enhanced optical shadowgraphs, particle-image velocimetry, thermochromic liquid-crystal imaging, laser-doppler velocimetry, and photochromic dye imaging; and (3) advanced image- processing techniques. Our numerical simulations employ standard spectral and novel lattice Boltzmann algorithms implemented on parallel Connection Machine computers to simulate turbulent fluid flow. In laboratory experiments on incompressible fluids, we measure probability distribution functions and two-point spatial correlations of temperature T and velocity V (both T-T and V-T correlations) and determine scaling relations for global heat transport with Rayleigh number. We also explore the mechanism for turbulence in thermal convection and the stability of the thermal boundary layer.

  18. Fishing Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ROFFS stands for Roffer's Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service, Inc. Roffer combines satellite and computer technology with oceanographic information from several sources to produce frequently updated charts sometimes as often as 30 times a day showing clues to the location of marlin, sailfish, tuna, swordfish and a variety of other types. Also provides customized forecasts for racing boats and the shipping industry along with seasonal forecasts that allow the marine industry to formulate fishing strategies based on foreknowledge of the arrival and departure times of different fish. Roffs service exemplifies the potential for benefits to marine industries from satellite observations. Most notable results are reduced search time and substantial fuel savings.

  19. Horizontal atmospheric turbulence, beam propagation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Santiago, Freddie; Martinez, Ty; Judd, K. Peter; Restaino, Sergio R.

    2017-05-01

    The turbulent effect from the Earth's atmosphere degrades the performance of an optical imaging system. Many studies have been conducted in the study of beam propagation in a turbulent medium. Horizontal beam propagation and correction presents many challenges when compared to vertical due to the far harsher turbulent conditions and increased complexity it induces. We investigate the collection of beam propagation data, analysis, and use for building a mathematical model of the horizontal turbulent path and the plans for an adaptive optical system to use this information to correct for horizontal path atmospheric turbulence.

  20. Impact of turbulent phase noise on frequency transfer with asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end- to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterizing the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show that Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock comparisons.

  1. Using random forests to diagnose aviation turbulence.

    PubMed

    Williams, John K

    Atmospheric turbulence poses a significant hazard to aviation, with severe encounters costing airlines millions of dollars per year in compensation, aircraft damage, and delays due to required post-event inspections and repairs. Moreover, attempts to avoid turbulent airspace cause flight delays and en route deviations that increase air traffic controller workload, disrupt schedules of air crews and passengers and use extra fuel. For these reasons, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have funded the development of automated turbulence detection, diagnosis and forecasting products. This paper describes a methodology for fusing data from diverse sources and producing a real-time diagnosis of turbulence associated with thunderstorms, a significant cause of weather delays and turbulence encounters that is not well-addressed by current turbulence forecasts. The data fusion algorithm is trained using a retrospective dataset that includes objective turbulence reports from commercial aircraft and collocated predictor data. It is evaluated on an independent test set using several performance metrics including receiver operating characteristic curves, which are used for FAA turbulence product evaluations prior to their deployment. A prototype implementation fuses data from Doppler radar, geostationary satellites, a lightning detection network and a numerical weather prediction model to produce deterministic and probabilistic turbulence assessments suitable for use by air traffic managers, dispatchers and pilots. The algorithm is scheduled to be operationally implemented at the National Weather Service's Aviation Weather Center in 2014.

  2. Investigation on iterative multiuser detection physical layer network coding in two-way relay free-space optical links with turbulences and pointing errors.

    PubMed

    Abu-Almaalie, Zina; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Bhatnagar, Manav R; Le-Minh, Hoa; Aslam, Nauman; Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Lee, It Ee

    2016-11-20

    Physical layer network coding (PNC) improves the throughput in wireless networks by enabling two nodes to exchange information using a minimum number of time slots. The PNC technique is proposed for two-way relay channel free space optical (TWR-FSO) communications with the aim of maximizing the utilization of network resources. The multipair TWR-FSO is considered in this paper, where a single antenna on each pair seeks to communicate via a common receiver aperture at the relay. Therefore, chip interleaving is adopted as a technique to separate the different transmitted signals at the relay node to perform PNC mapping. Accordingly, this scheme relies on the iterative multiuser technique for detection of users at the receiver. The bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed system is examined under the combined influences of atmospheric loss, turbulence-induced channel fading, and pointing errors (PEs). By adopting the joint PNC mapping with interleaving and multiuser detection techniques, the BER results show that the proposed scheme can achieve a significant performance improvement against the degrading effects of turbulences and PEs. It is also demonstrated that a larger number of simultaneous users can be supported with this new scheme in establishing a communication link between multiple pairs of nodes in two time slots, thereby improving the channel capacity.

  3. Development of Turbulent Biological Closure Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    the role of TIBI term in the ADR equation a simple example, that of upwelling of seed nutrients and phytoplankton into a turbulent optically active...overall role that turbulence plays in determining the mean phytoplankton profile and in contributing to total phytoplankton production . As indicated... nutrients , phytoplankton , and zooplankton embedded in the turbulent field. Contrast the TIBI terms with the biological turbulent flux terms ’ , ’ , ’i

  4. CAT (Clear Air Turbulence) Forecasting Using Transilient Turbulence Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-20

    theorie des eaux courantes. Mem. pres. par div. savants a l’Academnie Sci., Paris, 23, 1-680. Errico , R., and D . Baumhefner, 1987: Predictability...AVAILABILITY OF REPORT I Approved for public release; . b. DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE disrbion te d PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...April to 0000 UTC 25 April, 198 1, prepared by NCAR, see Errico and Baumhefner, 1987). This data set represents a spring-time frontal situation in which

  5. Studies in Forecasting Upper-Level Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Department of Defense or the U.S. Government . 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b...has taken a lead role in providing automated meteorological reports from commercial aircraft to atmospheric researchers and to government ... Pyrenees , Rockies and Sierra Nevada that excite VPWs. Much like that of an ocean wave, the greater the amplitude of the wave the more likely the

  6. Bit error rate analysis of free-space optical system with spatial diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Prabu; Sriram Kumar, D.

    2014-12-01

    Free-space optical communication (FSO) is emerging as a captivating alternative to work out the hindrances in the connectivity problems. It can be used for transmitting signals over common lands and properties that the sender or receiver may not own. The performance of an FSO system depends on the random environmental conditions. The bit error rate (BER) performance of differential phase shift keying FSO system is investigated. A distributed strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing error is considered for the BER analysis. Here, the system models are developed for single-input, single-output-FSO (SISO-FSO) and single-input, multiple-output-FSO (SIMO-FSO) systems. The closed-form mathematical expressions are derived for the average BER with various combining schemes in terms of the Meijer's G function.

  7. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  8. Turbulence, Spontaneous Stochasticity and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory

    Turbulence is well-recognized as important in the physics of climate. Turbulent mixing plays a crucial role in the global ocean circulation. Turbulence also provides a natural source of variability, which bedevils our ability to predict climate. I shall review here a recently discovered turbulence phenomenon, called ``spontaneous stochasticity'', which makes classical dynamical systems as intrinsically random as quantum mechanics. Turbulent dissipation and mixing of scalars (passive or active) is now understood to require Lagrangian spontaneous stochasticity, which can be expressed by an exact ``fluctuation-dissipation relation'' for scalar turbulence (joint work with Theo Drivas). Path-integral methods such as developed for quantum mechanics become necessary to the description. There can also be Eulerian spontaneous stochasticity of the flow fields themselves, which is intimately related to the work of Kraichnan and Leith on unpredictability of turbulent flows. This leads to problems similar to those encountered in quantum field theory. To quantify uncertainty in forecasts (or hindcasts), we can borrow from quantum field-theory the concept of ``effective actions'', which characterize climate averages by a variational principle and variances by functional derivatives. I discuss some work with Tom Haine (JHU) and Santha Akella (NASA-Goddard) to make this a practical predictive tool. More ambitious application of the effective action is possible using Rayleigh-Ritz schemes.

  9. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Forecasting Future Social Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Clark C.

    1971-01-01

    Describes briefly why social forecasting is easier than technological forecasting, offers four approaches to social forecasting (judgment, extrapolation, speculation, analysis), and suggests a procedure recommended for social forecasting. (CJ)

  11. E-ELT turbulence profiling with stereo-SCIDAR at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard; Butterley, Tim; Morris, Tim; Dubbeldam, Marc; Dérie, Frédéric; Sarazin, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  12. A Review of Recent Developments in X-Ray Diagnostics for Turbulent and Optically Dense Rocket Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Christopher; Halls, Benjamin; Kastengren, Alan; Meyer, Terrence

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient mixing and atomization of fuel and oxidizers is an important factor in many propulsion and power generating applications. To better quantify breakup and mixing in atomizing sprays, several diagnostic techniques have been developed to collect droplet information and spray statistics. Several optical based techniques, such as Ballistic Imaging and SLIPI have previously demonstrated qualitative measurements in optically dense sprays, however these techniques have produced limited quantitative information in the near injector region. To complement to these advances, a recent wave of developments utilizing synchrotron based x-rays have been successful been implemented facilitating the collection of quantitative measurements in optically dense sprays.

  13. Characterization of High Altitude Turbulence for Air Force Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    depicted the fact that optical turbulence laser to wander, spread, and scintillate which will degrade and mechanical turbulence do not necessarily... troposphere : Analysis of aircraft the next generation of optical turbulence prediction for the measurements." J Atmos. Sci., 2007 (in press). ABL. a) b

  14. Turbulence Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SONAR SIGNALS, *UNDERWATER SOUND SIGNALS, SHOCK WAVES, TURBULENCE, WAVE PROPAGATION, SOUND TRANSMISSION, ACOUSTIC ATTENUATION, AMPLITUDE, UNDERWATER EXPLOSIONS, ACOUSTIC REFLECTION, SOUND RANGING, BOTTOM LOSS, BOTTOM BOUNCE .

  15. Information Forecasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanneman, Gerhard J.

    Information forecasting provides a means of anticipating future message needs of a society or predicting the necessary types of information that will allow smooth social functioning. Periods of unrest and uncertainty in societies contribute to "societal information overload," whereby an abundance of information channels can create communication…

  16. Reasonable Forecasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a sample legal battle that illustrates school officials' "reasonable forecasts" of substantial disruption in the school environment. In 2006, two students from a Texas high school came to school carrying purses decorated with images of the Confederate flag. The school district has a zero-tolerance policy for…

  17. Reasonable Forecasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a sample legal battle that illustrates school officials' "reasonable forecasts" of substantial disruption in the school environment. In 2006, two students from a Texas high school came to school carrying purses decorated with images of the Confederate flag. The school district has a zero-tolerance policy for…

  18. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle. Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; L. Larson, E. J.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-04-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  19. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle - Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; Larson, E. J. L.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-02-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  20. Application of the optical flow method for the experimental analysis of turbulent flame propagation in a transparent engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Mario; Lombardi, Simone; Continillo, Gaetano; Sementa, Paolo; Vaglieco, Bianca Maria

    2016-12-01

    This paper illustrates the analysis conducted on high-definition, high sampling rate image sequences collected in experiments with a single spark ignition optically accessible engine. Images are first processed to identify the reaction front, and then analyzed by an optical flow estimation technique. The results show that each velocity component of the estimated flow field has an ECDF very similar to the CDF of a Gaussian distribution, whereas the velocity magnitude has an ECDF well fitted by a Rayleigh probability distribution. The proposed non-intrusive method provides a fast statistical characterization of the flame propagation phenomenon in the engine combustion chamber.

  1. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  2. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  3. AIR QUALITY FORECAST VERIFICATION USING SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA 's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) experimental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) forecast guidance issued during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmosp...

  4. AIR QUALITY FORECAST VERIFICATION USING SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA 's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) experimental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) forecast guidance issued during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmosp...

  5. Forecaster's dilemma: Extreme events and forecast evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Sebastian; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Ravazzolo, Francesco; Gneiting, Tilmann

    2015-04-01

    In discussions of the quality of forecasts in the media and public, attention often focuses on the predictive performance in the case of extreme events. Intuitively, accurate predictions on the subset of extreme events seem to suggest better predictive ability. However, it can be demonstrated that restricting conventional forecast verification methods to subsets of observations might have unexpected and undesired effects and may discredit even the most skillful forecasters. Hand-picking extreme events is incompatible with the theoretical assumptions of established forecast verification methods, thus confronting forecasters with what we refer to as the forecaster's dilemma. For probabilistic forecasts, weighted proper scoring rules provide suitable alternatives for forecast evaluation with an emphasis on extreme events. Using theoretical arguments, simulation experiments and a case study on probabilistic forecasts of wind speed over Germany, we illustrate the forecaster's dilemma and the use of weighted proper scoring rules.

  6. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  7. Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2008-11-01

    The present article reviews the recent developments in the physics of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence (QT) was discovered in superfluid 4He in the 1950s, and the research has tended toward a new direction since the mid 90s. The similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence have become an important area of research. QT is comprised of quantized vortices that are definite topological defects, being expected to yield a model of turbulence that is much simpler than the classical model. The general introduction of the issue and a brief review on classical turbulence are followed by a description of the dynamics of quantized vortices. Then, we discuss the energy spectrum of QT at very low temperatures. At low wavenumbers, the energy is transferred through the Richardson cascade of quantized vortices, and the spectrum obeys the Kolmogorov law, which is the most important statistical law in turbulence; this classical region shows the similarity to conventional turbulence. At higher wavenumbers, the energy is transferred by the Kelvin-wave cascade on each vortex. This quantum regime depends strongly on the nature of each quantized vortex. The possible dissipation mechanism is discussed. Finally, important new experimental studies, which include investigations into temperature-dependent transition to QT, dissipation at very low temperatures, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization of QT, are reviewed. The present article concludes with a brief look at QT in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Demonstration and Verification of a Broad Spectrum Anomalous Dispersion Effects Tool for Index of Refraction and Optical Turbulence Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    mixes the cream in your coffee and the clouds in the sky, is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations… (Bradshaw, 1996).” The highly complex...water vapor and moist air in the atmospheric window at 10μm”, showing refractivity versus wavelength with absorption lines for eight molecules taken...Mathar, R. J. (2004). Calculated refractivity of water vapor and moist air in the atmospheric window at 10 micrometers. Applied Optics, 43(4), 928

  9. TODS BioCast User Manual, Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-17

    results in the forecast cycle. This is the Garbage In – Garbage Out (GIGO) principle. The user is responsible for cognizance of the GIGO principle and...9th International Symposium on Technology and the Mine Problem, may 17 – 20 Monterey, CA, 2010 Jolliff J., Biological/chemical Forecasting System for...on Technology of the Mine Problems, Proceedings, 2008. Martin, P. J., Description of the Navy Coastal Ocean Model Version 1.0, NRL Report #NRL/FR

  10. Super Ensemble-based Aviation Turbulence Guidance (SEATG) for Air Traffic Management (ATM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chan, William; Sridhar, Banavar; Sharman, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Super Ensemble (ensemble of ten turbulence metrics from time-lagged ensemble members of weather forecast data)-based Aviation Turbulence Guidance (SEATG) is developed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and in-situ eddy dissipation rate (EDR) observations equipped on commercial aircraft over the contiguous United States. SEATG is a sequence of five procedures including weather modeling, calculating turbulence metrics, mapping EDR-scale, evaluating metrics, and producing final SEATG forecast. This uses similar methodology to the operational Graphic Turbulence Guidance (GTG) with three major improvements. First, SEATG use a higher resolution (3-km) WRF model to capture cloud-resolving scale phenomena. Second, SEATG computes turbulence metrics for multiple forecasts that are combined at the same valid time resulting in an time-lagged ensemble of multiple turbulence metrics. Third, SEATG provides both deterministic and probabilistic turbulence forecasts to take into account weather uncertainties and user demands. It is found that the SEATG forecasts match well with observed radar reflectivity along a surface front as well as convectively induced turbulence outside the clouds on 7-8 Sep 2012. And, overall performance skill of deterministic SEATG against the observed EDR data during this period is superior to any single turbulence metrics. Finally, probabilistic SEATG is used as an example application of turbulence forecast for air-traffic management. In this study, a simple Wind-Optimal Route (WOR) passing through the potential areas of probabilistic SEATG and Lateral Turbulence Avoidance Route (LTAR) taking into account the SEATG are calculated at z = 35000 ft (z = 12 km) from Los Angeles to John F. Kennedy international airports. As a result, WOR takes total of 239 minutes with 16 minutes of SEATG areas for 40% of moderate turbulence potential, while LTAR takes total of 252 minutes travel time that 5% of fuel would be additionally consumed to entirely

  11. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Orbital Angular Momentum Measurements for Turbulence Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Sun, W.; MacDonnell, D.; Weimer, C. S.; Hou, W.; Josset, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in cloud-climate feedback is the primary source of uncertainty in climate sensitivity. Turbulence plays important role in cloud life cycle, but it has never been measured globally. Here we introduce an innovative turbulence characterization technique through orbital angular momentum (OAM) measurements. OAM is sensitive to turbulence. OAM is a new research area in optical communication community to increase bandwidth of free space communication. Turbulence is their problem since it causes changes in OAM and a lot of studies are carried out by that community. There are simple relations between turbulence intensity and OAM change for both weak and strong turbulence (Rodenburg et al., 2012). OAM can be measured using the photon sieve technique developed at NASA Langley Research center (MacDonnell 2016; Sun et al., 2016). This study will lead to a space-based OAM measurement concept for turbulence characterization, which will help improve cloud and climate modeling.

  14. Flows, Turbulence, and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex

    2003-07-01

    HST and FUSE spectra of distant UV-bright sources reveal interstellar absorption lines of high stages of ionization {O VI, C IV, N V, Si IV} arising in many different astrophysical environments such as superbubbles, interstellar chimneys, high-velocity clouds, galaxy halos and cosmic filaments. Turbulence, always present in the magnetized ISM, must mix the hot { 10^6 K} gas with cooler gas within "turbulent mixing layers". Present theory, based on 1D steady-state flows, suggest the line ratios in these layers differ significantly from photoionized gas, radiative shocks, cooling zones, or conduction fronts. These models are use to infer mass and energy fluxes important to understanding the ISM. We propose to develop a suite of 3D time-dependent models that properly calculate turbulent mixing. We will produce synthetic UV absorption lines and optical emission lines directly relevant to HST observations that use GHRS, STIS, and eventually, COS. These models will allow us to explore the sensitivity of the spectral diagnostics to magnetic field strength, turbulence intensity, and relative velocity of the hot and cold gas. We will publish the resulting grid of spectral diagnostics and make them available through the Web.

  15. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  16. Comparison of turbulence mitigation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen T.; Paolini, Aaron; Sherman, Ariel; Bonnett, James; Kelmelis, Eric

    2017-07-01

    When capturing imagery over long distances, atmospheric turbulence often degrades the data, especially when observation paths are close to the ground or in hot environments. These issues manifest as time-varying scintillation and warping effects that decrease the effective resolution of the sensor and reduce actionable intelligence. In recent years, several image processing approaches to turbulence mitigation have shown promise. Each of these algorithms has different computational requirements, usability demands, and degrees of independence from camera sensors. They also produce different degrees of enhancement when applied to turbulent imagery. Additionally, some of these algorithms are applicable to real-time operational scenarios while others may only be suitable for postprocessing workflows. EM Photonics has been developing image-processing-based turbulence mitigation technology since 2005. We will compare techniques from the literature with our commercially available, real-time, GPU-accelerated turbulence mitigation software. These comparisons will be made using real (not synthetic), experimentally obtained data for a variety of conditions, including varying optical hardware, imaging range, subjects, and turbulence conditions. Comparison metrics will include image quality, video latency, computational complexity, and potential for real-time operation. Additionally, we will present a technique for quantitatively comparing turbulence mitigation algorithms using real images of radial resolution targets.

  17. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  18. Forecast Mekong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil

    2011-01-01

    Forecast Mekong is part of the U.S. Department of State's Lower Mekong Initiative, which was launched in 2009 by Secretary Hillary Clinton and the Foreign Ministers of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam to enhance partnerships between the U.S. and the Lower Mekong River countries in the areas of environment, health, education, and infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working in close cooperation with the U.S. Department of State to use research and data from the Lower Mekong Basin to provide hands-on results that will help decision makers in Lower Mekong River countries in the planning and design for restoration, conservation, and management efforts in the basin.

  19. Quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.

    2011-12-01

    We review physical properties of quantum fluids He II and 3He-B, where quantum turbulence (QT) has been studied experimentally. Basic properties of QT in these working fluids are discussed within the phenomenological two-fluid model introduced by Landau. We consider counterflows in which the normal and superfluid components flow against each other, as well as co-flows in which the direction of the two fluids is the same. We pay special attention to the important case of zero temperature limit, where QT represents an interesting and probably the simplest prototype of three-dimensional turbulence in fluids. Experimental techniques to explore QT such as second sound attenuation, Andreev reflection, NMR, ion propagation are briefly introduced and results of various experiments on so-called Vinen QT and Kolmogorov QT both in He II and 3He are discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences between classical and quantum turbulence.

  20. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  1. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  2. Cloud Forecast Simulation Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    forecasts is described in terms of their "skill." The skill of weather forecasts varies according to the type of forecast being made (e.g., tornado warnings...are more difficult to make than cloud forecasts) and according to the location and time-of-year (because clima - tology exerts such a strong influence

  3. A short-term ensemble wind speed forecasting system for wind power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya Roy, S.; Traiteur, J. J.; Callicutt, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-12-01

    This study develops an adaptive, blended forecasting system to provide accurate wind speed forecasts 1 hour ahead of time for wind power applications. The system consists of an ensemble of 21 forecasts with different configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting Single Column Model (WRFSCM) and a persistence model. The ensemble is calibrated against observations for a 2 month period (June-July, 2008) at a potential wind farm site in Illinois using the Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) technique. The forecasting system is evaluated against observations for August 2008 at the same site. The calibrated ensemble forecasts significantly outperform the forecasts from the uncalibrated ensemble while significantly reducing forecast uncertainty under all environmental stability conditions. The system also generates significantly better forecasts than persistence, autoregressive (AR) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models during the morning transition and the diurnal convective regimes. This forecasting system is computationally more efficient than traditional numerical weather prediction models and can generate a calibrated forecast, including model runs and calibration, in approximately 1 minute. Currently, hour-ahead wind speed forecasts are almost exclusively produced using statistical models. However, numerical models have several distinct advantages over statistical models including the potential to provide turbulence forecasts. Hence, there is an urgent need to explore the role of numerical models in short-term wind speed forecasting. This work is a step in that direction and is likely to trigger a debate within the wind speed forecasting community.

  4. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  5. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  6. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  7. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Michael; Jenkins, Charles; Lambert, Andrew

    2007-10-29

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  8. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  9. Exposure Forecaster

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Exposure Forecaster Database (ExpoCastDB) is EPA's database for aggregating chemical exposure information and can be used to help with chemical exposure predictions. The database currently includes biomonitoring exposure data from three studies: the American Healthy Homes Survey, the First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers and the Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants study. Data include the amounts of chemicals found in food, drinking water, air, dust indoor surfaces and urine. The database will eventually include high-throughput exposure predictions for thousands of chemicals based on manufacture and use information. EPA researchers developed high-throughput exposure models to predict exposures for 1,763 chemicals using production volume, environmental fate and transport models, and a simple indicator of consumer product use.The model is being improved by adding more refined indoor and consumer use information since these are also large determinants of exposure. As these models are refined and more exposure data is collected, it will be added to ExpoCastDB.

  10. GIST-PM-Asia v1: development of a numerical system to improve particulate matter forecasts in South Korea using geostationary satellite-retrieved aerosol optical data over Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Song, C. H.; Park, R. S.; Park, M. E.; Han, K. M.; Kim, J.; Choi, M.; Ghim, Y. S.; Woo, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    To improve short-term particulate matter (PM) forecasts in South Korea, the initial distribution of PM composition, particularly over the upwind regions, is primarily important. To prepare the initial PM composition, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from a geostationary equatorial orbit (GEO) satellite sensor, GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) which covers a part of Northeast Asia (113-146° E; 25-47° N), were used. Although GOCI can provide a higher number of AOD data in a semicontinuous manner than low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite sensors, it still has a serious limitation in that the AOD data are not available at cloud pixels and over high-reflectance areas, such as desert and snow-covered regions. To overcome this limitation, a spatiotemporal-kriging (STK) method was used to better prepare the initial AOD distributions that were converted into the PM composition over Northeast Asia. One of the largest advantages in using the STK method in this study is that more observed AOD data can be used to prepare the best initial AOD fields compared with other methods that use single frame of observation data around the time of initialization. It is demonstrated in this study that the short-term PM forecast system developed with the application of the STK method can greatly improve PM10 predictions in the Seoul metropolitan area (SMA) when evaluated with ground-based observations. For example, errors and biases of PM10 predictions decreased by ˜ 60 and ˜ 70 %, respectively, during the first 6 h of short-term PM forecasting, compared with those without the initial PM composition. In addition, the influences of several factors on the performances of the short-term PM forecast were explored in this study. The influences of the choices of the control variables on the PM chemical composition were also investigated with the composition data measured via PILS-IC (particle-into-liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography) and low air-volume sample

  11. Improved Anvil Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the outcome of Phase 1 of the AMU's Improved Anvil Forecasting task. Forecasters in the 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group have found that anvil forecasting is a difficult task when predicting LCC and FR violations. The purpose of this task is to determine the technical feasibility of creating an anvil-forecasting tool. Work on this study was separated into three steps: literature search, forecaster discussions, and determination of technical feasibility. The literature search revealed no existing anvil-forecasting techniques. However, there appears to be growing interest in anvils in recent years. If this interest continues to grow, more information will be available to aid in developing a reliable anvil-forecasting tool. The forecaster discussion step revealed an array of methods on how better forecasting techniques could be developed. The forecasters have ideas based on sound meteorological principles and personal experience in forecasting and analyzing anvils. Based on the information gathered in the discussions with the forecasters, the conclusion of this report is that it is technically feasible at this time to develop an anvil forecasting technique that will significantly contribute to the confidence in anvil forecasts.

  12. The impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The possible impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting is examined. The type of knowledge of the effect is evaluated to determine if it is in a form that can be used for forecasting purposes. It is concluded that the present understanding of the effect does not lend itself readily to applications for forecast purposes. The limits of present predictive skill are examined and it is found that skill is most lacking for prediction of the smallest scales of atmospheric motion. However, it is not expected that Sun-weather research will have any significant impact on forecasting the smaller scales since predictability at these scales is limited by the finite grid size resolution and the time scales of turbulent diffusion. The predictability limits for the largest scales are on the order of several weeks although presently only a one week forecast is achievable.

  13. The impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The possible impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting is examined. The type of knowledge of the effect is evaluated to determine if it is in a form that can be used for forecasting purposes. It is concluded that the present understanding of the effect does not lend itself readily to applications for forecast purposes. The limits of present predictive skill are examined and it is found that skill is most lacking for prediction of the smallest scales of atmospheric motion. However, it is not expected that Sun-weather research will have any significant impact on forecasting the smaller scales since predictability at these scales is limited by the finite grid size resolution and the time scales of turbulent diffusion. The predictability limits for the largest scales are on the order of several weeks although presently only a one week forecast is achievable.

  14. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    confined plasmas, magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, dynamo; Canonical plasmas: coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere; Physics of atmosphere: environmental fluid dynamics, weather forecasting, turbulent flows in stratified media and atmosphere, non-Boussinesq convection; Geophysics and Earth science: mantle-lithosphere tectonics, oceanography, turbulent convection under rotation, planetary interiors; Combustion: dynamics of flames and fires, deflagration-to-detonation transition, blast waves and explosions, flows with chemical reactions, flows in jet engines; Mathematical aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics: vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness, continuous transports out of thermodynamic equilibrium; Stochastic processes and probabilistic description: long-tail distributions and anomalous diffusion, data assimilation and processing methodologies, error estimate and uncertainty quantification, statistically unsteady processes; Advanced numerical simulations: continuous DNS/LES/RANS, molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo, predictive modeling, validation and verification of numerical models; Experimental diagnostics: model experiments in high energy density and low energy density regimes, plasma diagnostics, fluid flow visualizations and control, opto-fluidics, novel optical methods, holography, advanced technologies. TMB-2009 was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: Snezhana I Abarzhi (chairperson, Chicago, USA) Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) Hiroshi Azechi (Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) Robert Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) Katepalli R Sreenivasan (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) Alexander

  15. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  16. Filament turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2010-03-01

    How much information do you need to distinguish between different mechanisms for spatiotemporal chaos in three-dimensions? In this talk, I will show that the observation of the dynamics on the surface of a medium can be sufficient. Studying mechanisms for filament turbulence in the context of reaction-diffusion media, we found numerically that two major classes of instabilities leave a very different signature on what can be observed on the surface of a three-dimensional medium. These results are of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death. While it has been proposed that the three-dimensional structure of the heart plays an important role in this type of filament turbulence, only the surface of the heart is currently accessible to experimental observation preventing the study of the full dynamics. Our results suggest that such observations might be sufficient.

  17. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  18. Quantifying Atmospheric Impacts on Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2011-09-01

    background (CSB). The CSB represents a recent depiction (one month weighted average) of what the scene looks like, radiometrically, in the absence of clouds so that it can be compared with imagery at the requested analysis time. If the actual imagery compared to the CSB differs by more than a specified threshold then clouds are indicated. Cloud properties such as cloud top heights and bases and optical depths are subsequently derived. The result represents a high spatial and temporal resolution climatology that can be used to derive accurate Cloud Free Line of Sight (CFLOS) statistics in order to quantify atmospheric effects on optical imaging and communication systems. For example, clouds over the State of Hawaii are quite variable in frequency ranging from less than 15% in some of the sheltered coastal waters and local summits to greater than 70% on the mauka (windward) sides of the islands. Vertical optical depths from the summit can range from 0.5dB to greater than 50dB. Optical turbulence is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, it can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). A modified version of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to generate Cn2 throughout the atmospheric column, allowing for ground-to-space seeing estimates of ro. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers (MHPCC) Mana cluster. Detailed results from both the clouds and turbulence simulations will be shown at the conference with specific applications to space imaging and communication systems.

  19. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-06-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  20. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-02-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  1. An Automated System to Quantify Convectively induced Aircraft encounters with Turbulence over Europe and North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneguz, Elena; Turp, Debi; Wells, Helen

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that encounters with moderate or severe turbulence can lead to passenger injuries and incur high costs for airlines from compensation and litigation. As one of two World Area Forecast Centres (WAFCs), the Met Office has responsibility for forecasting en-route weather hazards worldwide for aviation above a height of 10,000 ft. Observations from commercial aircraft provide a basis for gaining a better understanding of turbulence and for improving turbulence forecasts through verification. However there is currently a lack of information regarding the possible cause of the observed turbulence, or whether the turbulence occurred within cloud. Such information would be invaluable for the development of forecasting techniques for particular types of turbulence and for forecast verification. Of all the possible sources of turbulence, convective activity is believed to be a major cause of turbulence. Its relative importance over the Europe and North Atlantic area has not been yet quantified in a systematic way: in this study, a new approach is developed to automate identification of turbulent encounters in the proximity of convective clouds. Observations of convection are provided from two independent sources: a surface based lightning network and satellite imagery. Lightning observations are taken from the Met Office Arrival Time Detections network (ATDnet). ATDnet has been designed to identify cloud-to-ground flashes over Europe but also detects (a smaller fraction of) strikes over the North Atlantic. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite products are used to identify convective clouds by applying a brightness temperature filtering technique. The morphological features of cold cloud tops are also investigated. The system is run for all in situ turbulence reports received from airlines for a total of 12 months during summer 2013 and 2014 for the domain of interest. Results of this preliminary short term climatological study show significant intra

  2. Forecasting Artificial Intelligence Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, David R.; Shelley, Charles

    1986-03-01

    Forecasts are major components of the decision analysis process. When accurate, estimates of future economic activity associated with specific courses of action can correctly set corporate strategy in an uncertain environment. When inaccurate, they can lead to bankruptcy. The basic trouble with most forecasts is that they are not made by forecasters.

  3. Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Like weather forecasting, solar flare forecasting (or forecasting solar activity in general) is motivated by pragmatic needs. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar winds and other solar activity intimately influence the near-Earth space environment. All kinds of spacecraft including weather and communication satellites are orbiting Earth, and their performance and lifetimes are greatly infl...

  4. Forecasts of land uses

    Treesearch

    David N. Wear

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsBetween 30 million and 43 million acres of land in the South are forecasted to be developed for urban uses by 2060 from a base of 30 million acres in 1997. These forecasts are based on a continuation of historical development intensities.From 1997 to 2060, the South is forecasted to lose between 11 million acres (7...

  5. Turbulence Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    system of codes for missile detection, the SPIRITS system of codes for aircraft/helicopter detection, the HSCT system of codes (MICOM) NSWC, etc) for...Academic Press, N.Y. 1974. Cebeci, T. and Smith, A.M.O., "Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers", Series in A01jed Mathematics and MW1WiG Vol. XV ...647-6, (Naval Ordnance Lab Research Rpt. 280), Jan. 1964. Dash, S.M., et. al., "Computer Code for HSCT Exhaust Flowfield Simulation and Observations

  6. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  7. Verification of FLYSAFE Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) objects against aircraft turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunnon, R.; Gill, P.; Reid, L.; Mirza, A.

    2009-09-01

    Prediction of gridded CAT fields The main causes of CAT are (a) Vertical wind shear - low Richardson Number (b) Mountain waves (c) Convection. All three causes contribute roughly equally to CAT occurrences, globally Prediction of shear induced CAT The predictions of shear induced CAT has a longer history than either mountain-wave induced CAT or convectively induced CAT. Both Global Aviation Forecasting Centres are currently using the Ellrod TI1 algorithm (Ellrod and Knapp, 1992). This predictor is the scalar product of deformation [akm1]and vertical wind shear. More sophisticated algorithms can amplify errors in non-linear, differentiated quantities so it is very likely that Ellrod will out-perform other algorithms when verified globally. Prediction of mountain wave CAT The Global Aviation Forecasting Centre in the UK has been generating automated forecasts of mountain wave CAT since the late 1990s, based on the diagnosis of gravity wave drag. Generation of CAT objects In the FLYSAFE project it was decided at an early stage that short range forecasts of meteorological hazards, i.e. icing, Clear Air Turbulence, Cumulonimbus Clouds, should be represented as weather objects, that is, descriptions of individual hazardous volumes of airspace. For CAT, the forecast information on which the weather objects were based was gridded, that comprised a representation of a hazard level for all points in a pre-defined 3-D grid, for a range of forecast times. A "grid-to-objects" capability was generated. This is discussed further in Mirza and Drouin (this conference). Verification of CAT forecasts Verification was performed using digital accelerometer data from aircraft in the British Airways Boeing 747 fleet. A preliminary processing of the aircraft data were performed to generate a truth field on a scale similar to that used to provide gridded forecasts to airlines. This truth field was binary, i.e. each flight segment was characterised as being either "turbulent" or "benign". A

  8. Operational aerosol and dust storm forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Liu, M.; Walker, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    The U. S. Navy now conducts operational forecasting of aerosols and dust storms on global and regional scales. The Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) is run four times per day and produces 6-day forecasts of sulfate, smoke, dust and sea salt aerosol concentrations and visibility for the entire globe. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) is run twice daily for Southwest Asia and produces 3-day forecasts of dust, smoke, and visibility. The graphical output from these models is available on the Internet (www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol/). The aerosol optical properties are calculated for each specie for each forecast output time and used for sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval corrections, regional electro-optical (EO) propagation assessments, and the development of satellite algorithms. NAAPS daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are compared with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD values. Visibility forecasts are compared quantitatively with surface synoptic reports.

  9. Range of turbulence-independent propagation and Rayleigh range of partially coherent beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zeng, Shuguang; Hao, Bangyuan; Zhang, Bin

    2010-03-01

    Two characteristic distances for partially coherent beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence have been proposed. The turbulent Rayleigh range is used for characterizing the range over which the beams propagate in turbulence without spreading appreciably; i.e., the concept of the well-known Rayleigh range in free space is extended to the case of turbulence. In this paper the range of turbulence-independent propagation of the beams, in contrast to similar characteristic distances in previous published works, is based on the formula of the beam propagation factor (M(2) factor) and is used for describing the range over which the spatial and angular spreading and the M(2) factor increase due to turbulence are sufficiently small and negligible. Several simple formulas used for calculating the approximate values of these distances are given, and the formulas are applied to Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams and illustrated by examples. Furthermore, as a typical example, the effect of the angular spread of GSM beams in turbulence on a thin-lens optical system is also discussed. We show that the turbulent Rayleigh range depends on the Rayleigh range in free space, the waist width, and the spatial power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuations of the turbulent atmosphere, and that the range of turbulence-independent propagation depends on the waist width, the initial angular spread in the waist plane, and the spatial power spectrum.

  10. Line Transport in Turbulent Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    The spectral line transfer in turbulent atmospheres with a spatially correlated velocity field is examined. Both the finite and semi-infinite media are treated. In finding the observed intensities we first deal with the problem for determining the mean intensity of radiation emerging from the medium for a fixed value of turbulent velocity at its boundary. A new approach proposed for solving this problem is based on the invariant imbedding technique which yields the solution of the proper problems for a family of media of different optical thicknesses and allows tackling different kinds of inhomogeneous problems. The dependence of the line profile, integral intensity, and the line width on the mean correlation length and the average value of the hydrodynamic velocity is studied. It is shown that the transition from a micro-turbulent regime to a macro-turbulence occurs within a comparatively narrow range of variation in the correlation length . Ambartsumian's principle of invariance is used to solve the problem of diffuse reflection of the line radiation from a one-dimensional semi-infinite turbulent atmosphere. In addition to the observed spectral line profile, statistical averages describing the diffusion process in the atmosphere (mean number of scattering events, average time spent by a diffusing photon in the medium) are determined. The dependence of these quantities on the average hydrodynamic velocity and correlation coefficient is studied.

  11. Stochastic demographic forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lee, R D

    1992-11-01

    "This paper describes a particular approach to stochastic population forecasting, which is implemented for the U.S.A. through 2065. Statistical time series methods are combined with demographic models to produce plausible long run forecasts of vital rates, with probability distributions. The resulting mortality forecasts imply gains in future life expectancy that are roughly twice as large as those forecast by the Office of the Social Security Actuary.... Resulting stochastic forecasts of the elderly population, elderly dependency ratios, and payroll tax rates for health, education and pensions are presented."

  12. Forecast-skill-based simulation of streamflow forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Zhao, Jianshi

    2014-09-01

    Streamflow forecasts are updated periodically in real time, thereby facilitating forecast evolution. This study proposes a forecast-skill-based model of forecast evolution that is able to simulate dynamically updated streamflow forecasts. The proposed model applies stochastic models that deal with streamflow variability to generate streamflow scenarios, which represent cases without forecast skill of future streamflow. The model then employs a coefficient of prediction to determine forecast skill and to quantify the streamflow variability ratio explained by the forecast. By updating the coefficients of prediction periodically, the model efficiently captures the evolution of streamflow forecast. Simulated forecast uncertainty increases with increasing lead time; and simulated uncertainty during a specific future period decreases over time. We combine the statistical model with an optimization model and design a hypothetical case study of reservoir operation. The results indicate the significance of forecast skill in forecast-based reservoir operation. Shortage index reduces as forecast skill increases and ensemble forecast outperforms deterministic forecast at a similar forecast skill level. Moreover, an effective forecast horizon exists beyond which more forecast information does not contribute to reservoir operation and higher forecast skill results in longer effective forecast horizon. The results illustrate that the statistical model is efficient in simulating forecast evolution and facilitates analysis of forecast-based decision making.

  13. Aspects of Turbulent / Non-Turbulent Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, D. K.; Hunt, J. C. R.; Rogers, M. M.; Koen, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A distinct boundary between turbulent and non-turbulent regions in a fluid of otherwise constant properties is found in many laboratory and engineering turbulent flows, including jets, mixing layers, boundary layers and wakes. Generally, the flow has mean shear in at least one direction within t he turbulent zone, but the non-turbulent zones have no shear (adjacent laminar shear is a different case, e.g. transition in a boundary layer). There may be purely passive differences between the turbulent and non-turbulent zones, e.g. small variations in temperature or scalar concentration, for which turbulent mixing is an important issue. The boundary has several major characteristics of interest for the present study. Firstly, the boundary advances into the non-turbulent fluid, or in other words, nonturbulent fluid is entrained. Secondly, the change in turbulence properties across the boundary is remarkably abrupt; strong turbulent motions come close to the nonturbulent fluid, promoting entrainment. Thirdly, the boundary is irregular with a continually changing convoluted shape, which produces statistical intermittency. Its shape is contorted at all scales of the turbulent motion.

  14. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begin with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair release 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until strong-force viscous stresses freeze out turbulent mixing patterns as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered as plasma photon-viscous forces permitting gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales. Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths appear as linear gas-protogalaxy-clusters in the Hubble ultra-deep field at z~7. Protogalaxies fragment into Jeans mass clumps of primordial-gas planets at decoupling: the dark matter of galaxies. Shortly after the plasma-to-gas transition, planet mergers produce stars that explode on overfeeding to fertilize and distribute the first life.

  15. Meteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear air turbulence sampling missions with an instrument B-57B aircraft. Volume 1: Program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Champine, R. A.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The results of 46 clear air turbulence (CAT) probing missions conducted with an extensively instrumented B-57B aircraft are summarized. Turbulence samples were obtained under diverse conditions including mountain waves, jet streams, upper level fronts and troughs, and low altitude mechanical and thermal turbulence. CAT was encouraged on 20 flights comprising 77 data runs. In all, approximately 4335 km were flown in light turbulence, 1415 km in moderate turbulence, and 255 km in severe turbulence during the program. The flight planning, operations, and turbulence forecasting aspects conducted with the B-57B aircraft are presented.

  16. A radiosonde thermal sensor technique for measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new system was developed to measure vertical profiles of microthermal turbulence in the free atmosphere. It combines thermal sensor technology with radiosonde balloon systems. The resultant data set from each thermosonde flight is a profile of the strength and distribution of microthermal fluctuations which act as tracers for turbulence. The optical strength of this turbulence is computed and used to predict optical and laser beam propagation statistics. A description of the flight payload, examples of turbulence profiles, and comparison with simultaneous stellar observations are included.

  17. Sources and dynamics of turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Trier, S. B.; Lane, T. P.; Doyle, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    Turbulence is a well-known hazard to aviation that is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and is the underlying cause of many people's fear of air travel. Not only are turbulence encounters a safety issue, they also result in millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines, leading to increased costs passed on to the consumer. For these reasons, pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers attempt to avoid turbulence wherever possible. Accurate forecasting of aviation-scale turbulence has been hampered in part by a lack of understanding of the underlying dynamical processes. However, more precise observations of turbulence encounters together with recent research into turbulence generation processes is helping to elucidate the detailed dynamical processes involved and is laying the foundation for improved turbulence forecasting and avoidance. In this paper we briefly review some of the more important recent observational, theoretical, and modeling results related to turbulence at cruise altitudes for commercial aircraft (i.e., the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere), and their implications for aviation turbulence forecasting.

  18. Review of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Nappo, Carmen J.; Mahrt, Larry; Belušić, Danijel; Grisogono, Branko; Stauffer, David R.; Pulido, Manuel; Staquet, Chantal; Jiang, Qingfang; Pouquet, Annick; Yagüe, Carlos; Galperin, Boris; Smith, Ronald B.; Finnigan, John J.; Mayor, Shane D.; Svensson, Gunilla; Grachev, Andrey A.; Neff, William D.

    2015-09-01

    Flow in a stably stratified environment is characterized by anisotropic and intermittent turbulence and wavelike motions of varying amplitudes and periods. Understanding turbulence intermittency and wave-turbulence interactions in a stably stratified flow remains a challenging issue in geosciences including planetary atmospheres and oceans. The stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) commonly occurs when the ground surface is cooled by longwave radiation emission such as at night over land surfaces, or even daytime over snow and ice surfaces, and when warm air is advected over cold surfaces. Intermittent turbulence intensification in the SABL impacts human activities and weather variability, yet it cannot be generated in state-of-the-art numerical forecast models. This failure is mainly due to a lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms for seemingly random turbulence generation in a stably stratified flow, in which wave-turbulence interaction is a potential mechanism for turbulence intermittency. A workshop on wave-turbulence interactions in the SABL addressed the current understanding and challenges of wave-turbulence interactions and the role of wavelike motions in contributing to anisotropic and intermittent turbulence from the perspectives of theory, observations, and numerical parameterization. There have been a number of reviews on waves, and a few on turbulence in stably stratified flows, but not much on wave-turbulence interactions. This review focuses on the nocturnal SABL; however, the discussions here on intermittent turbulence and wave-turbulence interactions in stably stratified flows underscore important issues in stably stratified geophysical dynamics in general.

  19. Velocity and turbulence measurements in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Lau, K. Y.; Leung, C. C.

    1983-06-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimeter is used in the measurement of high-temperature gas flows. A two-stage fluidization particle generator provides magnesium oxide particles to serve as optical scattering centers. The one-dimensional dual-beam system is frequency shifted to permit measurements of velocities up to 300 meters per second and turbulence intensities greater than 100 percent. Exiting flows from can-type gas turbine combustors and burners with pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flames are described in terms of the velocity, turbulence intensity, and temperature profiles. The results indicate the influence of the combustion process on turbulence.

  20. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  1. Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-12-15

    Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

  2. Quantifying turbulence microstructure for improvement of underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Sarah; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Jarosz, Ewa; Weidemann, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Enhancing visibility through scattering media is important in many fields for gaining information from the scattering medium. In the ocean, in particular, enhancement of imaging and visibility is important for divers, navigation, robotics, and target and mine detection and classification. Light scattering from particulates and turbulence in the ocean strongly affects underwater visibility. The magnitude of this degrading effect depends upon the underwater environment, and can rapidly degrade the quality of underwater imaging under certain conditions. To facilitate study of the impact of turbulence upon underwater imaging and to check against our previously developed model, quantified observation of the image degradation concurrent with characterization of the turbulent flow is necessary, spanning a variety of turbulent strengths. Therefore, we present field measurements of turbulence microstructure from the July 2010 Skaneateles Optical Turbulence Exercise (SOTEX), during which images of a target were collected over a 5 m path length at various depths in the water column, concurrent with profiles of the turbulent strength, optical properties, temperature, and conductivity. Turbulence was characterized by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKED) and thermal dissipation (TD) rates, which were obtained using both a Rockland Scientific Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP) and a Nortek Vector velocimeter in combination with a PME CT sensor. While the two instrumental setups demonstrate reasonable agreement, some irregularities highlight the spatial and temporal variability of the turbulence field. Supplementary measurements with the Vector/CT in a controlled laboratory convective tank will shed additional light on the quantitative relationship between image degradation and turbulence strength.

  3. Ribbon turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, Antoine; Nadeau, Louis-Philippe; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel with an initial eastward baroclinically unstable jet in the upper layer, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization in the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these results by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the initial eastward jet in the upper layer appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the global distribution of potential vorticity levels. Statistical mechanical theory of the 1 1/2 layer quasi-geostrophic model predicts the formation of two regions of homogenized potential vorticity separated by a minimal interface. We explain that cascade phenomenology leads to the same result. We then show that the dynamics of the ribbons results from a competition between a tendency to reach the equilibrium state and baroclinic instability that induces meanders of the interface. These meanders intermittently break and induce potential vorticity mixing, but the interface remains sharp throughout the flow evolution. We show that for some parameter regimes, the ribbons act as a mixing barrier which prevents relaxation toward equilibrium, favouring the emergence of multiple zonal (eastward) jets.

  4. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  5. A monthly forecast experiment: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyakoda, K.; Sirutis, J.; Ploshay, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment on monthly forecasts with eight winter cases is being carried out, using a 1980 general circulation model (GCM), which incorporates a set of dubgrid-scale physics characterized by the Mellon-Yamada turbulence closure (hierarchy level 2.5), the Monin-Obukhov parameterization for the layer next to the ground surface, Manabe's cumulus parameterization, and the soil heat conduction. The sample cases adopted are for the month of January in the years from 1977 to 1983, which include the extraordinarily severe winter of 1977 and the most pronounced E1 Nino year of 1983. Each case is predicted by prescribing the climatologically normal sea surface temperature as the lower boundary conditions and by using an ensemble means of three individual integrations. These integrations start with three different initial conditions based on the Level data generated separately at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the National Meteorological Center, and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts.

  6. A controlled laboratory environment to study EO signal degradation due to underwater turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming; Kanaev, Andrey; Restaino, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Temperature microstructure in the ocean can lead to localized changes in the index of refraction and can distort underwater electro-optical (EO) signal transmission. A similar phenomenon is well-known from atmospheric optics and generally referred to as "optical turbulence". Though turbulent fluctuations in the ocean distort EO signal transmission and can impact various underwater applications, from diver visibility to active and passive remote sensing, there have been few studies investigating the subject. To provide a test bed for the study of impacts from turbulent flows on underwater EO signal transmission, and to examine and mitigate turbulence effects, we set up a laboratory turbulence environment allowing the variation of turbulence intensity. Convective turbulence is generated in a large Rayleigh- Bénard tank and the turbulent flow is quantified using high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers and fast thermistor probes. The turbulence measurements are complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations of convective turbulence emulating the tank environment. These numerical simulations supplement the sparse laboratory measurements. The numerical data compared well to the laboratory data and both conformed to the Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence and the Batchelor spectrum of temperature fluctuations. The controlled turbulence environment can be used to assess optical image degradation in the tank in relation to turbulence intensity, as well as to apply adaptive optics techniques. This innovative approach that combines optical techniques, turbulence measurements and numerical simulations can help understand how to mitigate the effects of turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission, as well as advance optical techniques to probe oceanic processes.

  7. Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Temperature Variance Dissipation in Laboratory Generated Rayleigh-Benard Turbulence Designed to Study the Distortion of Light by Underwater Microstructure Fluctuations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-11

    PREVIOUS VERSIONS I Turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance dissipation in laboratory generated Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence designed to... energy and temperature variance dissipation rates in the tank, for different convective strengths. Optical image degradation in the tank is then...dynamics simulations of convective turbulence emulating the tank environment. These numerical simulations supplement the sparse laboratory measurements

  8. Weather forecasting expert system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Weather forecasting is critical to both the Space Transportation System (STS) ground operations and the launch/landing activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The current launch frequency places significant demands on the USAF weather forecasters at the Cape Canaveral Forecasting Facility (CCFF), who currently provide the weather forecasting for all STS operations. As launch frequency increases, KSC's weather forecasting problems will be great magnified. The single most important problem is the shortage of highly skilled forecasting personnel. The development of forecasting expertise is difficult and requires several years of experience. Frequent personnel changes within the forecasting staff jeopardize the accumulation and retention of experience-based weather forecasting expertise. The primary purpose of this project was to assess the feasibility of using Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques to ameliorate this shortage of experts by capturing aria incorporating the forecasting knowledge of current expert forecasters into a Weather Forecasting Expert System (WFES) which would then be made available to less experienced duty forecasters.

  9. Atmospheric turbulence monitoring at DLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Florian

    2004-11-01

    Research activities at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) concerning optical free-space communications have focussed on coherent communication systems for inter-satellite link (ISL) applications for a long time. Under DLR contract Tesat Spacecom has developed the DLR-LCT (laser communications terminal) which relies on coherent technology. This terminal will be verified in space as secondary payload onboard the earth observation satellite TerraSAR-X, to be launched in 2006. In a first step, downlink experiments will be carried out. The DLR Institute of Communications and Navigation is involved in this ambitious project by assessing the feasibility of the downlink experiment through atmospheric turbulence and by conducting channel measurements. An initial feasibility study shall theoretically investigate the influence of atmospheric turbulence on coherent optical transmission and assess the success probabilities of the particular experiment with regard to the specific ground station conditions. Since theory is always based on arbitrary assumptions on the composition and structure of the atmosphere, measurements at the specific ground station shall be carried out. Measurement results shall enable a refinement of disturbance models in order to predict the condition during the downlink experiments. Relevant atmospheric parameters, such as scintillations, phase-front distortions, atmospheric seeing, angle-of-arrival fluctuations, attenuation, Cn2- and wind profiles will have to be recorded. To carry out these measurements, DLR will develop an "Atmospheric Turbulence Monitor" (ATM). The ATM mainly consists of a 16-inch telescope and a number of instruments for various measurements. These instruments are based on astronomical devices for use with stars, however have to be modified to be suited for measurements with close objects such as LEO or GEO satellites. The ATM will as well comprise a tracking system, that allows for measurements with LEO satellites such as Terra

  10. Timing jitter's influence on the symbol error rate performance of the L-ary pulse position modulation free-space optical link in atmospheric turbulent channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yatian; Geng, Tianwen; Ma, Shuang; Gao, Shijie; Gao, Huibin

    2017-03-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to evaluate the impact of timing jitter on the error performance of the L-ary pulse position modulation (L-PPM) free-space optical (FSO) link, under the gamma-gamma (ΓΓ) turbulence with pointing errors. The expression of the conditional symbol error rate (SER) for a certain timing jitter is developed while the Gaussian-Hermite polynomial approximation is utilized to derive the closed-form expression of the average SER by the jitter's variance. It is discovered that the timing jitter contributes to an error floor on the SER in both Monte-Carlo simulations and the theoretical results. Also, the jitter with small variance could be tolerable. What is more, the PPM system with lower order is more sensitive to the timing jitter than the higher ones.

  11. Solar Energy Forecast System Development and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jascourt, S. D.; Kirk-Davidoff, D. B.; Cassidy, C.

    2012-12-01

    Forecast systems for predicting real-time solar energy generation are being developed along similar lines to those of more established wind forecast systems, but the challenges and constraints are different. Clouds and aerosols play a large role, and for tilted photovoltaic panels and solar concentrating plants, the direct beam irradiance, which typically has much larger forecast errors than global horizontal irradiance, must be utilized. At MDA Information Systems, we are developing a forecast system based on first principles, with the well-validated REST2 clear sky model (Gueymard, 2008) at its backbone. In tuning the model and addressing aerosol scattering and surface albedo, etc., we relied upon the wealth of public data sources including AERONET (aerosol optical depth at different wavelengths), Suominet (GPS integrated water vapor), NREL MIDC solar monitoring stations, SURFRAD (includes upwelling shortwave), and MODIS (albedo in different wavelength bands), among others. The forecast itself utilizes a blend of NWP model output, which must be brought down to finer time resolution based on the diurnal cycle rather than simple interpolation. Many models currently do not output the direct beam irradiance, and one that does appears to have a bias relative to its global horizontal irradiance, with equally good performance attained by utilizing REST2 and the model global radiation to estimate the direct component. We will present a detailed assessment of various NWP solar energy products, evaluating forecast skill at a range of photovoltaic installations.

  12. Integrating Ocean Color Observations and Nowcast/Forecast of Bio-Optical Properties into the Naval Research Laboratory Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    Prieur, L., 1977. Analysis of variation in ocean color. Limnology and Oceanography, 22(4): 709-722. Mueller, J.L., 1988. Nimbus -7 CZCS: Electronic...overshoot due to cloud reflectance. Applied Optics, 27: 438 - 440. Nelson, N.B., Siegel, D.A. and Micheals, A.F., 1998. Seasonal dynamics of colored

  13. Future freeze forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Real time GOES thermal data acquisition, an energy balance minimum temperature prediction model and a statistical model are incorporated into a minicomputer system. These components make up the operational "Satellite Freeze Forecast System" being used to aid NOAA, NWS forecasters in developing their freeze forecasts. The general concept of the system is presented in this paper. Specific detailed aspects of the system can be found in the reference cited.

  14. Forecaster priorities for improving probabilistic flood forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterhall, Fredrik; Pappenberger, Florian; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Cloke, Hannah; Thielen, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) have in recent years been increasingly used for the operational forecasting of floods by European hydrometeorological agencies. The most obvious advantage of HEPS is that more of the uncertainty in the modelling system can be assessed. In addition, ensemble prediction systems generally have better skill than deterministic systems both in the terms of the mean forecast performance and the potential forecasting of extreme events. Research efforts have so far mostly been devoted to the improvement of the physical and technical aspects of the model systems, such as increased resolution in time and space and better description of physical processes. Developments like these are certainly needed; however, in this paper we argue that there are other areas of HEPS that need urgent attention. This was also the result from a group exercise and a survey conducted to operational forecasters within the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) to identify the top priorities of improvement regarding their own system. They turned out to span a range of areas, the most popular being to include verification of an assessment of past forecast performance, a multi-model approach for hydrological modelling, to increase the forecast skill on the medium range (>3 days) and more focus on education and training on the interpretation of forecasts. In light of limited resources, we suggest a simple model to classify the identified priorities in terms of their cost and complexity to decide in which order to tackle them. This model is then used to create an action plan of short-, medium- and long-term research priorities with the ultimate goal of an optimal improvement of EFAS in particular and to spur the development of operational HEPS in general.

  15. Weather assessment and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data management program activities centered around the analyses of selected far-term Office of Applications (OA) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and if so what alternative solutions would be possible. Three far-term (1985 and beyond) OA objectives selected for analyses as having potential significant data problems were large-scale weather forecasting, local weather and severe storms forecasting, and global marine weather forecasting. An overview of general weather forecasting activities and their implications upon the ground based data system is provided. Selected topics were specifically oriented to the use of satellites.

  16. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  17. Seamless Probabilistic Forecasting of Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, G. C.

    2009-04-01

    Different methods are used to provide forecasts of precipitation with different lead times, and a major challenge is to provide seamless forecasts across the range of times of interest to a decision maker. Firstly, the detailed precipitation map obtained from Radar can be extrapolated into the future by advecting the precipitation pattern ("Nowcasting"), although the forecast quality degrades rapidly in the first hours because the dynamics of the storm are not accurately represented. At longer lead times numerical weather prediction ("NWP") is superior since it includes dynamical effects, but cannot match the skill of nowcasting in the first few hours due to the difficulty of assimilating precipitation observations. A seamless combination of these methods requires knowledge of their errors, and is difficult because the predictability depends strongly on the meteorological situation. However it is now becoming possible with the availability of probabilistic predictions from ensembles of high resolution forecasts. These concepts will be illustrated using ensemble forecasts of convective events with the 2.8 km resolution COSMO-DE model nested within different forecasts from the COSMO-LEPS ensemble. Probabilistic nowcasts are produced using the Cb-TRAM system that tracks convective a convective cloud field using an optical flow method. The images are then extrapolated forward in time and probabilistic forecasts are generated using the local Lagrangian method. Examples will be shown to illustrate how the forecast skill of the two methods is influenced by the inherent predictability of the meteorological situation, in particular the degree of control of convective by the synoptic flow.

  18. The problem of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.; HILL; MERRYFIELD; GOUGH

    1984-01-01

    All ground-based observations of the solar five-minute oscillations are affected by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere that leads to substantial refractive index variations. The turbulent motions serve to mix an air mass that is thermally stratified in the vertical, thereby producing intermittent thermal fluctuations over a wide range of heights in the atmosphere. These thermal structures yield refractive index changes that deflect the light path in a complicated way, producing intricate variations of amplitude and phase in what might have started out as simple plane waves. Since the fluid turbulence is statistical in nature, so too is the optical turbulence which is an integral measure of the refractive index changes along the light travel path. All of this produces what is usually called atmospheric seeing, which consists of image motion, blurring and distortion across the field of view. The effects of atmospheric seeing upon observations of five-minute oscillations carried out from the ground were assessed. This will help to provide a baseline estimate of the scienctific benefits that might accrue if one were able to observe the same oscillations from a space observatory unfettered by seeing effects.

  19. Forecasting Future Trends in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo, Andres; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a forecasting model sensitive to the major factors influencing educational outcomes, presents several forecasts based on alternative sets of assumptions, and discusses the implications of these forecasts, including ways to subvert them. (Author/JG)

  20. Geometrical Monte Carlo simulation of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Demet; Yuksel, Heba

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric turbulence has a significant impact on the quality of a laser beam propagating through the atmosphere over long distances. Turbulence causes intensity scintillation and beam wander from propagation through turbulent eddies of varying sizes and refractive index. This can severely impair the operation of target designation and Free-Space Optical (FSO) communications systems. In addition, experimenting on an FSO communication system is rather tedious and difficult. The interferences of plentiful elements affect the result and cause the experimental outcomes to have bigger error variance margins than they are supposed to have. Especially when we go into the stronger turbulence regimes the simulation and analysis of the turbulence induced beams require delicate attention. We propose a new geometrical model to assess the phase shift of a laser beam propagating through turbulence. The atmosphere along the laser beam propagation path will be modeled as a spatial distribution of spherical bubbles with refractive index discontinuity calculated from a Gaussian distribution with the mean value being the index of air. For each statistical representation of the atmosphere, the path of rays will be analyzed using geometrical optics. These Monte Carlo techniques will assess the phase shift as a summation of the phases that arrive at the same point at the receiver. Accordingly, there would be dark and bright spots at the receiver that give an idea regarding the intensity pattern without having to solve the wave equation. The Monte Carlo analysis will be compared with the predictions of wave theory.

  1. Engineering aspects of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Ashby, Dave; Christou, Julian C.; Kern, Jonathan; Lefebvre, Michael; McMahon, Tom J.; Miller, Douglas; Rahmer, Gustavo; Sosa, Richard; Taylor, Gregory; Vogel, Conrad; Zhang, Xianyu

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  2. Relationships between stratospheric clear air turbulence and synoptic meteorological parameters over the western United States between 12-20 km altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Clark, T. L.; Possiel, N. C.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for forecasting clear air turbulence in the stratosphere over the western United States from rawinsonde data are described and results presented. Approaches taken to relate meteorological parameters to regions of turbulence and nonturbulence encountered by the XB-70 during 46 flights at altitudes between 12-20 km include: empirical probabilities, discriminant function analysis, and mountainwave theory. Results from these techniques were combined into a procedure to forecast regions of clear air turbulence with an accuracy of 70-80 percent. A computer program was developed to provide an objective forecast directly from the rawinsonde sounding data.

  3. Forecasts of forest conditions

    Treesearch

    Robert Huggett; David N. Wear; Ruhong Li; John Coulston; Shan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsAmong the five forest management types, only planted pine is expected to increase in area. In 2010 planted pine comprised 19 percent of southern forests. By 2060, planted pine is forecasted to comprise somewhere between 24 and 36 percent of forest area.Although predicted rates of change vary, all forecasts reveal...

  4. Tornado forecasting: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doswell, Charles A., III; Weiss, Steven J.; Johns, Robert H.

    Present-day operational tornado forecasting can be thought of in two parts: anticipation of tornadic potential in the storm environment and recognition of tornadic storms once they develop. The former is a forecasting issue, while the latter is associated with warnings (or so-called nowcasting). This paper focuses on the forecasting aspect of tornadoes by dealing primarily with the relationship between the tornadic storm and its environment (Recognition and detection issues are treated by Burgess et al. [this volume]). We begin with a short history of tornado forecasting and related research in section 2; in section 3 we provide an overview of current tornado forecasting procedures within the Severe Local Storms (SELS) Unit at the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC). In section 4 we give a short summary of 35 years of SELS tornado and severe thunderstorm forecast verification. In section 5 we describe our current understanding of the connection between tornadoes and their environment. We conclude in section 6 with our thoughts about the future of tornado forecasting.

  5. Aviation Forecasting in ICAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, J.

    1972-01-01

    Opinions or plans of qualified experts in the field are used for forecasting future requirements for air navigational facilities and services of international civil aviation. ICAO periodically collects information from Stators and operates on anticipated future operations, consolidates this information, and forecasts the future level of activity at different airports.

  6. Theory and laboratory demonstrations on the use of a nematic liquid-crystal phase modulator for controlled turbulence generation and adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Dayton, D C; Browne, S L; Sandven, S P; Gonglewski, J D; Kudryashov, A V

    1998-08-20

    We discuss the use of liquid-crystal phase modulators (LCPM's) both as a repeatable disturbance test source and as an adaptive optics corrector. LCPM's have the potential to induce controlled, repeatable, dynamic aberrations into optical systems at low cost, low complexity, and high flexibility. Because they are programmable and can be operated as transmissive elements, they can easily be inserted into the optical path of an adaptive optics system and used to generate a disturbance test source. When used as wave-front correctors they act as a piston-only segmented mirror and have a number of advantages. These include low operating power requirements, relatively low cost, and compact size. Laboratory experiments with a Meadowlark LCPM are presented. We first describe use of the LCPM as a repeatable disturbance generator for testing adaptive optics systems. We then describe a closed-loop adaptive optics system using the LCPM as the wave-front corrector. The adaptive optics system includes a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor operated with a zonal control algorithm.

  7. Simultaneous video stabilization and moving object detection in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oreifej, Omar; Li, Xin; Shah, Mubarak

    2013-02-01

    Turbulence mitigation refers to the stabilization of videos with nonuniform deformations due to the influence of optical turbulence. Typical approaches for turbulence mitigation follow averaging or dewarping techniques. Although these methods can reduce the turbulence, they distort the independently moving objects, which can often be of great interest. In this paper, we address the novel problem of simultaneous turbulence mitigation and moving object detection. We propose a novel three-term low-rank matrix decomposition approach in which we decompose the turbulence sequence into three components: the background, the turbulence, and the object. We simplify this extremely difficult problem into a minimization of nuclear norm, Frobenius norm, and l1 norm. Our method is based on two observations: First, the turbulence causes dense and Gaussian noise and therefore can be captured by Frobenius norm, while the moving objects are sparse and thus can be captured by l1 norm. Second, since the object's motion is linear and intrinsically different from the Gaussian-like turbulence, a Gaussian-based turbulence model can be employed to enforce an additional constraint on the search space of the minimization. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach on challenging sequences which are significantly distorted with atmospheric turbulence and include extremely tiny moving objects.

  8. Modelling end Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence over Land

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    v 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... ! 2.0 OPTICAL ...The performance of electro- optical systems used for surveillance and target detection can be degraded due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence...measured simultaneously at two points. This quantity, along with the turbu- lence inner scale t0 , are sufficient to calculate the optical effects of

  9. On the turbulent flow in piston engines: Coupling of statistical theory quantities and instantaneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Baum, Elias; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas; Peterson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tomographic PIV (TPIV) measurements are utilized to analyze turbulent statistical theory quantities and the instantaneous turbulence within a single-cylinder optical engine. Measurements are performed during the intake and mid-compression stroke at 800 and 1500 RPM. TPIV facilitates the evaluation of spatially resolved Reynolds stress tensor (RST) distributions, anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants, and instantaneous turbulent vortical structures. The RST analysis describes distributions of individual velocity fluctuation components that arise from unsteady turbulent flow behavior as well as cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV). A conditional analysis, for which instantaneous PIV images are sampled by their tumble center location, reveals that CCV and turbulence have similar contributions to RST distributions at the mean tumble center, but turbulence is dominant in regions peripheral to the tumble center. Analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants reveals the spatial distribution of axisymmetric expansion, axisymmetric contraction, and 3D isotropy within the cylinder. Findings indicate that the mid-compression flow exhibits a higher tendency toward 3D isotropy than the intake flow. A novel post-processing algorithm is utilized to classify the geometry of instantaneous turbulent vortical structures and evaluate their frequency of occurrence within the cylinder. Findings are coupled with statistical theory quantities to provide a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of turbulent velocity components, the distribution of anisotropic states of turbulence, and compare the turbulent vortical flow distribution that is theoretically expected to what is experimentally observed. The analyses reveal requisites of important turbulent flow quantities and discern their sensitivity to the local flow topography and engine operation.

  10. On the turbulent flow in piston engines: Coupling of statistical theory quantities and instantaneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zentgraf, Florian; Baum, Elias; Dreizler, Andreas; Böhm, Benjamin; Peterson, Brian

    2016-04-15

    Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tomographic PIV (TPIV) measurements are utilized to analyze turbulent statistical theory quantities and the instantaneous turbulence within a single-cylinder optical engine. Measurements are performed during the intake and mid-compression stroke at 800 and 1500 RPM. TPIV facilitates the evaluation of spatially resolved Reynolds stress tensor (RST) distributions, anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants, and instantaneous turbulent vortical structures. The RST analysis describes distributions of individual velocity fluctuation components that arise from unsteady turbulent flow behavior as well as cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV). A conditional analysis, for which instantaneous PIV images are sampled by their tumble center location, reveals that CCV and turbulence have similar contributions to RST distributions at the mean tumble center, but turbulence is dominant in regions peripheral to the tumble center. Analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants reveals the spatial distribution of axisymmetric expansion, axisymmetric contraction, and 3D isotropy within the cylinder. Findings indicate that the mid-compression flow exhibits a higher tendency toward 3D isotropy than the intake flow. A novel post-processing algorithm is utilized to classify the geometry of instantaneous turbulent vortical structures and evaluate their frequency of occurrence within the cylinder. Findings are coupled with statistical theory quantities to provide a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of turbulent velocity components, the distribution of anisotropic states of turbulence, and compare the turbulent vortical flow distribution that is theoretically expected to what is experimentally observed. The analyses reveal requisites of important turbulent flow quantities and discern their sensitivity to the local flow topography and engine operation.

  11. MISOLFA : a seeing monitor for daytime turbulence parameters measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, R.; Corbard, T.; Irbah, A.; Meftah, M.; Morand, F.; Fodil, M.; Assus, P.; Renaud, C.; Chauvineau, B.; Picard-Sol Team

    2012-06-01

    The Franco-Algerian Monitor of Solar Images (MISOLFA) was developped in order to study the effect of optical turbulence on diameter measurements from ground-based solar observations. Some first results obtained with MISOLFA are presented.

  12. Outer scales of temperature turbulence and dynamic turbulence from the data of acoustic sounding of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2014-11-01

    The outer scale of turbulence plays an important role in the theory of atmospheric turbulence. It specifies the lowfrequency boundary of the inertial subrange of fluctuation spectra of the atmospheric meteorological parameters, is used to construct models of the atmospheric turbulence and to estimate the excess turbulent attenuation of waves in the atmosphere. Outer scales of the wind velocity, temperature, humidity, and ozone concentration were previously determined, in particular, from direct airborne measurements of the spectral power density of these parameters, and their dependences on the altitude above the underlying surface, its properties, and type of the atmospheric stratification were demonstrated. For optical radiation propagating in the surface layer, the outer scale of temperature turbulence was determined from measurements of the variance of phase fluctuations of optical waves propagating along the near-ground paths. Unlike the optical waves, the acoustic wave propagation in the atmospheric boundary layer is influenced simultaneously by the temperature fluctuations caused by thermal convection and by the velocity fluctuations (dynamic turbulence caused by the wind shear). Their relative contributions depend on the ratio of the outer scales of the dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence. In the present work, a method of simultaneous acoustic sounding of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is suggested, and combined influence of these parameters on the acoustic wave propagation is estimated. Temporal dynamics of vertical profiles of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is analyzed. The efficiency of the suggested method is confirmed by the results of comparison with the data of laser sensing of these parameters and their theoretical estimates, which demonstrate their good agreement.

  13. Block matching and Wiener filtering approach to optical turbulence mitigation and its application to simulated and real imagery with quantitative error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Russell C.; Rucci, Michael A.; Dapore, Alexander J.; Karch, Barry K.

    2017-07-01

    We present a block-matching and Wiener filtering approach to atmospheric turbulence mitigation for long-range imaging of extended scenes. We evaluate the proposed method, along with some benchmark methods, using simulated and real-image sequences. The simulated data are generated with a simulation tool developed by one of the authors. These data provide objective truth and allow for quantitative error analysis. The proposed turbulence mitigation method takes a sequence of short-exposure frames of a static scene and outputs a single restored image. A block-matching registration algorithm is used to provide geometric correction for each of the individual input frames. The registered frames are then averaged, and the average image is processed with a Wiener filter to provide deconvolution. An important aspect of the proposed method lies in how we model the degradation point spread function (PSF) for the purposes of Wiener filtering. We use a parametric model that takes into account the level of geometric correction achieved during image registration. This is unlike any method we are aware of in the literature. By matching the PSF to the level of registration in this way, the Wiener filter is able to fully exploit the reduced blurring achieved by registration. We also describe a method for estimating the atmospheric coherence diameter (or Fried parameter) from the estimated motion vectors. We provide a detailed performance analysis that illustrates how the key tuning parameters impact system performance. The proposed method is relatively simple computationally, yet it has excellent performance in comparison with state-of-the-art benchmark methods in our study.

  14. Turbulence-noise in infrared lidar sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdinandov, E. S.; Tsanev, V. I.; Todorov, B. O.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical description of the laser location (lidar) systems for investigation of two-dimensional distributions of the scattering properties of aerosol fields (natural or anthropogenic) in the infrared range has been made on the basis of the heuristic concept for the influence of the atmospheric turbulence (AT) on the transverse spatial structure of optical radiations. It has been shown that the influence of AT on the information carried by the lidar images is negative. It acts along the path "laser-sounded aerosol layer" only, i.e. when there is utter initial transverse coherency of the optical radiation. Explicit results for the stratifications of the coherency radii, the dispersion and contrast of the transverse spatial fluctuations of the intensity, the averaging action of the apertures of matrix photodetector elements on the corresponding radiant fluxes' turbulent fluctuations and the "signal-to-turbulence-noise" ratio have been derived.

  15. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases, 2. Proceedings of the 1988 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the program was on the use of direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow for study of turbulence physics and modeling. A special interest was placed on turbulent mixing layers. The required data for these investigations were generated from four newly developed codes for simulation of time and spatially developing incompressible and compressible mixing layers. Also of interest were the structure of wall bounded turbulent and transitional flows, evaluation of diagnostic techniques for detection of organized motions, energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, optical propagation through turbulent media, and detailed analysis of the interaction of vortical structures.

  16. Air Quality Forecast Verification using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, S.; Lee, P.; McQueen, J.; Kittaka, C.; Prados, A.; Ciren, P.; Laszlo, I.; Pierce, R. B.; Hoff, R.; Szykman, J. J.

    2006-05-01

    NOAA's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) developmental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) predictions tested during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation/New England Air Quality Study (ICARTT/NEAQS) field campaign. The forecast period was encompassed by long range transport of smoke from fires burning in Canada and Alaska and a regional-scale sulfate event over the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern United States (U.S). Over the 30-day time period for which daytime hourly forecasts were compared to observations, the categorical (event defined as AOD greater than 0.65) forecast accuracy was between 60% and 99% with a mean of ~80%. Hourly normalized mean bias (forecasts -" observations) ranged between -50% and +50% with forecasts being biased high when observed AODs were small and biased low when observed AODs were high. Normalized Mean Errors are between 50% and 100% with the errors on the lower end during July 18-22, 2004 time period when a regional scale sulfate event occurred. Spatially, the errors are small over the regions where sulfate plumes were present. The correlation coefficient (r) also showed similar features (spatially and temporally) with a peak value of ~0.6 during July 18-22, 2004 time period. The dominance of long-range transport of smoke into the US during the summer of 2004, neglected in the model predictions, skewed the model forecast performance. Enhanced accuracy and reduced normalized mean errors during the time period when a sulfate event prevailed shows that the forecast system is capable of skill in predicting PM2.5 associated with urban/industrial pollution events.

  17. Emulating bulk turbulence with a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jason D.; Goda, Matthew E.; Duncan, Bradley D.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a novel system that emulates the optical effects of bulk atmospheric turbulence in a dynamic, repeatable, and accurate way without moving parts. Such turbulence-emulating systems (TES) are necessary for testing laser systems including laser weapons, free-space optical communications, and atmospheric imaging systems. Most current TESs utilize the layered turbulence model with static phase plates or diffractive optics acting as the turbulent layers. Until now, the only way to emulate bulk turbulence in a laboratory has been by creating real turbulence with a heating element and a fan contained in a miniature wind tunnel. In contrast, the TES that we developed uses phase retrieval-based wavefront control to shape a laser beam into a turbulence-distorted beam. Several important properties of the measured irradiance patterns have shown good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  18. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  19. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  20. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Darbieu, Clara; Couvreux, Fleur; Pino, David; Blay, Estel; Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Pietersen, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar; Pardyjak, Eric; Alexander, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Baaserud, Line; Nilsson, Erik; Jimenez, Maria Antonia; Faloona, Ian; Sastre-Marugan, Mariano; Angevine, Wayne M.; Canut, Guylaine; Bazile, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims at better understanding the turbulence processes which occur during the transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null during the transition and the turbulence regime changes from the fully convective regime of turbulence, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward more heterogeneous and intermittent turbulence during its decay. Those issues motivated a field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France in complex terrain and consisted of a range of integrated instrument platforms including: full-size aircraft, Remotely Piloted Airplane Systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers deployed over different surface covers. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to free troposphere was densely probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The field dataset now forms the base of a set of studies utilizing the observations and several types of models including: Large Eddy Simulation, Mesoscale models, forecast models. The presentation will expose an overview of this experiment and of the current observational and modeling studies, with the focus on: the turbulence decay process within the entire boundary layer from surface to the top, the mesoscale forcings of importance during BLLAST, the ability of the forecast models to represent the diurnal cycle, the relevance of the Monin Obukhov similarity theory, and shallow drainage flows. Reference: Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7

  1. Scintillation from Turbulence in the Stratosphere for Middle-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, C.; Conan, J.; Michau, V.

    Atmospheric turbulence in the sense of disturbances of the speed field masses of air is much weaker in the stratosphere than in the troposphere. However, strong gradients of density mainly due to temperature fluctuations cause optical turbulence. Recent experiments highlight the composite feature of turbulence in the stratosphere. We present a model of scintillation based on a 3D model of anisotropic and isotropic turbulence.

  2. Dynamically Resolved Simulation of Atmospheric Features and Turbulence Using Advanced Models and Adaptive Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-30

    the dissipation rate of the variance of potential temperature and e is the dissipat ion rate of the variance of velocity or turbulent kinetic energy ...structure function Cn2, a quantitative measure of atmospheric optical turbulence. These four equations are used to model the turbulence kinetic energy , the...NWP Numerical weather Prediction PBL Planetary boundary layer PPM Piecewise parabolic method SGS Subgrid scale TKE Turbulent kinetic energy UTC

  3. Forced unsteady deceleration of a turbulent boundary layer from a temporal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a turbulent boundary layer which has been subjected to a local ramp-like deceleration in the external velocity field, which leads to forced separation, has been studied experimentally. The data of this study are re-interpreted in light of more recent findings concerning the temporal nature of boundary layer turbulence in the presence of forced unsteady shear. In particular, the robustness of the near-wall turbulent motions to organized deformation is recognized. Their resilence during unsteady shearing action promotes continued efficient turbulent mixing and rapid redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy during forced transients. In aerodynamic problems, the rapid nature of the adjustment of the turbulence field to a new temporal boundary condition necessitates equally rapid remedial measures to be taken if means of control/prevention of forced unsteady separation are to be deployed to maximum effect. This requirement suggests exploration of the use of simple, real-time statistical forecasting techniques, based upon time-series analysis of easily-measurable features of the flow, to help assure timely deployment of mechanisms of boundary-layer control. This paper focuses upon the nature of turbulence in boundary layers undergoing forced deceleration which would lead to separation. A preliminary form of a forecasting model is presented and evaluated. Using observations of the previous two large eddies passing a detector, it forecasts the behavior of the future large eddy rather well.

  4. Forced unsteady deceleration of a turbulent boundary layer from a temporal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.

    1992-03-01

    The behavior of a turbulent boundary layer which has been subjected to a local ramp-like deceleration in the external velocity field, which leads to forced separation, has been studied experimentally. The data of this study are re-interpreted in light of more recent findings concerning the temporal nature of boundary layer turbulence in the presence of forced unsteady shear. In particular, the robustness of the near-wall turbulent motions to organized deformation is recognized. Their resilence during unsteady shearing action promotes continued efficient turbulent mixing and rapid redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy during forced transients. In aerodynamic problems, the rapid nature of the adjustment of the turbulence field to a new temporal boundary condition necessitates equally rapid remedial measures to be taken if means of control/prevention of forced unsteady separation are to be deployed to maximum effect. This requirement suggests exploration of the use of simple, real-time statistical forecasting techniques, based upon time-series analysis of easily-measurable features of the flow, to help assure timely deployment of mechanisms of boundary-layer control. This paper focuses upon the nature of turbulence in boundary layers undergoing forced deceleration which would lead to separation. A preliminary form of a forecasting model is presented and evaluated. Using observations of the previous two large eddies passing a detector, it forecasts the behavior of the future large eddy rather well.

  5. Oceanic turbulence effects on long-exposure and short-exposure imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Huan; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Based on the power spectrum of oceanic turbulence, the modulation transfer functions and the optical resolution for long-exposure and short-exposure imaging through oceanic turbulence are studied in detail. The analytical formulae for the seeing parameter and the tilt variance in oceanic turbulence are derived, and it is found that the relationship between the seeing parameter and the spatial coherence width in oceanic turbulence is just like that in atmospheric turbulence. Furthermore, the model of underwater imaging shown in this paper considers both temperature and salinity fluctuations for oceanic turbulence. It is found that, compared with the dominating salinity-induced turbulence, the range of angular spatial frequency where oceanic turbulence plays the major role rather than particle scattering is higher for the dominating temperature-induced turbulence.

  6. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  7. Turbulence detection using radiosondes: plugging the gaps in the observation of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme; Harrison, Giles; Williams, Paul; Nicoll, Keri

    2014-05-01

    Turbulence costs the airline industry tens of millions of dollars each year, through damage to aircraft and injury to passengers. Clear-air turbulence (CAT) is particularly problematic, as it cannot be detected using remote sensing methods and we lack consistent observations to validate forecast models. Here we describe two specially adapted meteorological radiosondes that are used to measure turbulence. The first sensor consists of a Hall-effect magnetometer, which uses the Earth's magnetic field as a reference point, allowing the motion of the sonde to be measured. The second consists of an accelerometer that measures the accelerations the balloon encounters. A solar radiation sensor is mounted at the top of the package, to determine whether the sonde is in cloud. Results from multiple flights over Reading, UK in different conditions, show both sensors detecting turbulent regions near jet boundaries and above cloud tops, with the accelerometer recording values in excess of 6g in these regions. Case studies will show how these observations can be used to test the performance of a selection of empirical turbulence diagnostics initialised from ERA-interim data.

  8. Coupling of turbulent and non-turbulent flow regimes within pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim R.; Dufek, Josef; Cronin, Shane J.; Valentine, Greg A.; Moebis, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions are at their most deadly when pyroclastic density currents sweep across landscapes to devastate everything in their path. The internal dynamics underpinning these hazards cannot be directly observed. Here we present a quantitative view inside pyroclastic density currents by synthesizing their natural flow behaviour in large-scale experiments. The experiments trace flow dynamics from initiation to deposition, and can explain the sequence and evolution of real-world deposits. We show that, inside pyroclastic density currents, the long-hypothesized non-turbulent underflow and fully turbulent ash-cloud regions are linked through a hitherto unrecognized middle zone of intermediate turbulence and concentration. Bounded by abrupt jumps in turbulence, the middle zone couples underflow and ash-cloud regions kinematically. Inside this zone, strong feedback between gas and particle phases leads to the formation of mesoscale turbulence clusters. These extremely fast-settling dendritic structures dictate the internal stratification and evolution of pyroclastic density currents and allow the underflows to grow significantly during runout. Our experiments reveal how the underflow and ash-cloud regions are dynamically related--insights that are relevant to the forecasting of pyroclastic density current behaviour in volcanic hazard models.

  9. Statistical evaluation of forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J.; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  10. Statistical evaluation of forecasts.

    PubMed

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  11. Turbulence, Turbulence Control, and Drag Reduction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Onsager (1945) and Weizs~cker (1948). has made remarkable strides in advancing our understanding of turbulent flows. It is this description of turbulent...tujrbuilce Inl thle lar to thle Intermiittenit trans’ition to turbulence lus.t ,iedipen itlik. N\\N.tern onI the other. O pen0 * ~ ~ h 1 ~ kdinition10 po...Some Studies of Non-Simple Pipe Flows K R SREENIVASAN 2.AR’ .\\ variety o phenooena occrs ’.5’, ,sTecla’., f we stray,’ away from straight circ- lar i es a

  12. Precipitation and temperature ensemble forecasts from single-value forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaake, J.; Demargne, J.; Hartman, R.; Mullusky, M.; Welles, E.; Wu, L.; Herr, H.; Fan, X.; Seo, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A procedure is presented to construct ensemble forecasts from single-value forecasts of precipitation and temperature. This involves dividing the spatial forecast domain and total forecast period into a number of parts that are treated as separate forecast events. The spatial domain is divided into hydrologic sub-basins. The total forecast period is divided into time periods, one for each model time step. For each event archived values of forecasts and corresponding observations are used to model the joint distribution of forecasts and observations. The conditional distribution of observations for a given single-value forecast is used to represent the corresponding probability distribution of events that may occur for that forecast. This conditional forecast distribution subsequently is used to create ensemble members that vary in space and time using the "Schaake Shuffle" (Clark et al, 2004). The resulting ensemble members have the same space-time patterns as historical observations so that space-time joint relationships between events that have a significant effect on hydrological response tend to be preserved. Forecast uncertainty is space and time-scale dependent. For a given lead time to the beginning of the valid period of an event, forecast uncertainty depends on the length of the forecast valid time period and the spatial area to which the forecast applies. Although the "Schaake Shuffle" procedure, when applied to construct ensemble members from a time-series of single value forecasts, may preserve some of this scale dependency, it may not be sufficient without additional constraint. To account more fully for the time-dependent structure of forecast uncertainty, events for additional "aggregate" forecast periods are defined as accumulations of different "base" forecast periods. The generated ensemble members can be ingested by an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction system to produce ensemble forecasts of streamflow and other hydrological variables that reflect

  13. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    in optical spectra. A determination of the role which changing turbulent parameters might play on optical signatures behind a reflected shock wave should therefore provide a useful tool for the evolution of theoretical models for turbulence.

  14. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    in optical spectra. A determination of the role which changing turbulent parameters might play on optical signatures behind a reflected shock wave should therefore provide a useful tool for the evolution of theoretical models for turbulence.

  15. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from Hα Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The probability density function of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents of the power law with the break in the power law at approximately 2000 km. We hypothesise this to be a result of internal turbulence excited in the prominence by the dynamic flows of the system found at this spatial scale. We found that the scaling exponents of the pth order structure functions for these two regions generally followed the p/ 2 (smaller scales) and p/ 4 (larger scales) laws that are the same as those predicted for weak MHD turbulence and Kraichnan-Iroshnikov turbulence respectively. However, the existence of the p/ 4 scaling at larger scales than the p/ 2 scaling is inconsistent with the increasing nonlinearity expected in MHD turbulence. We also found that as we went to higher order structure functions, the dependence of the scaling exponent on the order p is nonlinear implying that intermittency may be playing an important role in the turbulent cascade. Estimating the heating

  16. Earthquake Forecasting, Validation and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J.; Holliday, J.; Turcotte, D.; Donnellan, A.; Tiampo, K.; Klein, B.

    2009-05-01

    Techniques for earthquake forecasting are in development using both seismicity data mining methods, as well as numerical simulations. The former rely on the development of methods to recognize patterns in data, while the latter rely on the use of dynamical models that attempt to faithfully replicate the actual fault systems. Testing such forecasts is necessary not only to determine forecast quality, but also to improve forecasts. A large number of techniques to validate and verify forecasts have been developed for weather and financial applications. Many of these have been elaborated in public locations, including, for example, the URL as listed below. Typically, the goal is to test for forecast resolution, reliability and sharpness. A good forecast is characterized by consistency, quality and value. Most, if not all of these forecast verification procedures can be readily applied to earthquake forecasts as well. In this talk, we discuss both methods of forecasting, as well as validation and verification using a number of these standard methods. We show how these test methods might be useful for both fault-based forecasting, a group of forecast methods that includes the WGCEP and simulator-based renewal models, and grid-based forecasting, which includes the Relative Intensity, Pattern Informatics, and smoothed seismicity methods. We find that applying these standard methods of forecast verification is straightforward. Judgments about the quality of a given forecast method can often depend on the test applied, as well as on the preconceptions and biases of the persons conducting the tests.

  17. An overview of health forecasting.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    Health forecasting is a novel area of forecasting, and a valuable tool for predicting future health events or situations such as demands for health services and healthcare needs. It facilitates preventive medicine and health care intervention strategies, by pre-informing health service providers to take appropriate mitigating actions to minimize risks and manage demand. Health forecasting requires reliable data, information and appropriate analytical tools for the prediction of specific health conditions or situations. There is no single approach to health forecasting, and so various methods have often been adopted to forecast aggregate or specific health conditions. Meanwhile, there are no defined health forecasting horizons (time frames) to match the choices of health forecasting methods/approaches that are often applied. The key principles of health forecasting have not also been adequately described to guide the process. This paper provides a brief introduction and theoretical analysis of health forecasting. It describes the key issues that are important for health forecasting, including: definitions, principles of health forecasting, and the properties of health data, which influence the choices of health forecasting methods. Other matters related to the value of health forecasting, and the general challenges associated with developing and using health forecasting services are discussed. This overview is a stimulus for further discussions on standardizing health forecasting approaches and methods that will facilitate health care and health services delivery.

  18. Low-Level Turbulence Forecasts From Fine-Scale Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    WRF parameterizations utilized 4 included Thompson’s microphysics parameterization, the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization, the Rapid Radiative...the model’s native vertical levels. UPP outputs hundreds of possible fields such as temperature, height, humidity, cloud water, rain, snow, wind...below 1220-m AGL. Several observation stations in New Jersey were reporting gusty surface conditions with broken clouds that may have contributed to

  19. Strong turbulence of plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work related to modulational instability and wave envelope self-focusing in dynamical and statistical systems. After introductory remarks pertinent to nonlinear optics realizations of these effects, the author summarizes the status of the subject in plasma physics, where it has come to be called 'strong Langmuir turbulence'. The paper treats the historical development of pertinent concepts, analytical theory, numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and spacecraft observations. The role of self-similar self-focusing Langmuir envelope wave packets is emphasized, both in the Zakharov equation model for the wave dynamics and in a statistical theory based on this dynamical model.

  20. Light Propagation through Anisotropic Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Kolmogorov stratospheric turbulence on star image motion,” Proc. SPIE 3126, 113–123 (1997). 5. B. E . Stribling, B. M . Welsh, and M . C. Roggemann...746407 (2009). 10. M . Chang, C. O. Font, F. Santiago, Y. Luna, E . Roura, and S. Restaino, “Marine environment optical propagation measure- ments,” Proc...Anisotropic factor as a function of alpha for several zeta values. Toselli et al. Vol. 28, No. 3 / March 2011 / J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 487 14. M . S

  1. Proceedings: Eleventh forecasting symposium. Forecasting in a competitive electricity market

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, T.; Ignelzi, P.

    1998-10-01

    EPRI`s Eleventh Forecasting Symposium: ``Forecasting in a Competitive Electricity Market`` was held in Arlington, Virginia, in November 1997. This proceedings documents the symposium`s wide variety of topics, ranging from very-short-term operations issues to mid-term market planning issues. Speakers described the forecasting practices of other industries, predicted forecasting directions in the electric power industry; related their experiences with new forecasting approaches; and suggested further enhancements to forecasting methods, tools, and data. The objectives of the symposium were to explore the expanding roles of forecasting in a competitive market, to exchange information about forecasting techniques under development, and to discuss the forecasting techniques currently used by the electric power industry in and outside the US and in other industries. The 30 papers are arranged under the following topical sections: restructuring and regulatory issues--implications for forecasting; forecasting experiences in other industries; operations-related forecasting; data warehousing and database marketing; forecasting and risk management; understanding and predicting market prices; forecasting methods for the new environment; predicting customer response; and symposium wrap-up.

  2. Satellite Spots Turbulence Producing Mountain Waves in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Robert Roy

    2002-01-01

    When masses of air flow over massive mountains, invisible waves often roil high into the stratosphere, affecting weather and mixing the chemicals that contribute to ozone depletion. The waves also create turbulence that can be a danger to high-altitude research missions by NASA's lightweight ER-2 aircraft, as well as shuttle flights upon reentry. In Friday's issue of the journal Science, researchers report for the first time a technique that allows them to see temperature signatures from these invisible mountain waves. The method, involving high-resolution, satellite-based measurement of adjacent pockets of the atmosphere, is expected to aid in spotting turbulence and, one day, improve weather forecasts.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Statistical Turbulence Effects on Beam Propagation through 2-D Shear Mixing Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF STATISTICAL TURBULENCE EFFECTS ON BEAM PROPAGATION THROUGH 2-D SHEAR MIXING LAYER THESIS James C. Bowers, Captain, USAF...STATISTICAL TURBULENCE EFFECTS ON BEAM PROPAGATION THROUGH 2-D SHEAR MIXING LAYER THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics...robust method for calculating atmospheric turbulence effects on optical beam propagation, which could simplify similar approaches to chaotic aero-optical

  4. Evaluation of Nocturnal Temperature Forecasts Provided by the Weather Research and Forecast Model for Different Stability Regimes and Terrain Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, Adriano; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Costa, Felipe D.; Puhales, Franciano S.; Anabor, Vagner; Degrazia, Gervásio A.

    2017-03-01

    The quality of nocturnal temperature forecasts made by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) numerical model is evaluated. The model was run for all July 2012 nights, and temperature fields compared to hourly observations made at 26 weather stations in southern Brazil. Four different planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes are considered: Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac), Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE), Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ). Additional simulations to assess the role of higher horizontal and vertical resolutions were performed using the MYJ scheme. All schemes, except BouLac, underestimated the 2-m temperature, and in all cases the temperature bias is dependent on wind speed. At high wind speeds, all schemes exhibit a cold bias, which is greater for those that yield lower nocturnal surface-layer turbulent intensity. The elevation difference between each station and the model nearest grid point H_{it{station}} -H_{it{gridpoint}} is highly correlated with the temperature simulation error. We found that a consistent cold bias is restricted to conditions with low-level clouds. We concluded that one possible means of improving nocturnal temperature forecast is to use parametrization schemes that allow for higher turbulent intensity in near-neutral conditions. The results indicate that this improvement would partially counteract the misrepresentation of the low-level cloud cover. In most stable cases, a post-processing algorithm based on terrain characteristics may improve the forecasts.

  5. Evaluation of Nocturnal Temperature Forecasts Provided by the Weather Research and Forecast Model for Different Stability Regimes and Terrain Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, Adriano; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Costa, Felipe D.; Puhales, Franciano S.; Anabor, Vagner; Degrazia, Gervásio A.

    2016-10-01

    The quality of nocturnal temperature forecasts made by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) numerical model is evaluated. The model was run for all July 2012 nights, and temperature fields compared to hourly observations made at 26 weather stations in southern Brazil. Four different planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes are considered: Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac), Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE), Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ). Additional simulations to assess the role of higher horizontal and vertical resolutions were performed using the MYJ scheme. All schemes, except BouLac, underestimated the 2-m temperature, and in all cases the temperature bias is dependent on wind speed. At high wind speeds, all schemes exhibit a cold bias, which is greater for those that yield lower nocturnal surface-layer turbulent intensity. The elevation difference between each station and the model nearest grid point H_{station} -H_{gridpoint} is highly correlated with the temperature simulation error. We found that a consistent cold bias is restricted to conditions with low-level clouds. We concluded that one possible means of improving nocturnal temperature forecast is to use parametrization schemes that allow for higher turbulent intensity in near-neutral conditions. The results indicate that this improvement would partially counteract the misrepresentation of the low-level cloud cover. In most stable cases, a post-processing algorithm based on terrain characteristics may improve the forecasts.

  6. Seasonal Verification of Dust Forecast over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Hashmi; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.; Basu, Swati

    2017-07-01

    The medium-range forecast of the dust aerosols over Indian region produced by the NCMRWF numerical weather prediction model with mineral dust scheme from May 2013 to May 2014 is examined in this study. Coarse mode aerosol observations are only used for comparison with dust forecast with the assumption that coarse mode aerosol over Indian region largely represents dust aerosol, especially over the areas of high dust load. Accuracy and trends of the day-to-day dust forecast are studied at three AERONET locations in Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) using surface and MODIS satellite retrievals of coarse mode aerosol optical depth for entire one year (May 2013-May 2014). Seasonal mean geographical distribution of the medium-range forecast of dust by the model over Indian region is validated with different satellite retrievals for all four seasons. Availability of suitable observations is one of the limiting factors and big challenges for the validation of the dust forecast. The main focus of this study is to assess dust forecast by the model over Indian region for all seasons, to know the biases and errors of the model forecast for its optimal use. The study finds that model dust forecast is comparable to AERONET observations over three locations for all seasons except monsoon season.

  7. Characterizing the Severe Turbulence Environments Associated With Commercial Aviation Accidents: A Real-Time Turbulence Model (RTTM) Designed for the Operational Prediction of Hazardous Aviation Turbulence Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lux, Kevin M.; Cetola, Jeffrey D.; Huffman, Allan W.; Riordan, Allen J.; Slusser, Sarah W.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Charney, Joseph J.; Waight, Kenneth T.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time prediction of environments predisposed to producing moderate-severe aviation turbulence is studied. We describe the numerical model and its postprocessing system designed for said prediction of environments predisposed to severe aviation turbulence as well as presenting numerous examples of its utility. The numerical model is MASS version 5.13, which is integrated over three different grid matrices in real time on a university work station in support of NASA Langley Research Center s B-757 turbulence research flight missions. The postprocessing system includes several turbulence-related products, including four turbulence forecasting indices, winds, streamlines, turbulence kinetic energy, and Richardson numbers. Additionally, there are convective products including precipitation, cloud height, cloud mass fluxes, lifted index, and K-index. Furthermore, soundings, sounding parameters, and Froude number plots are also provided. The horizontal cross-section plot products are provided from 16 000 to 46 000 ft in 2000-ft intervals. Products are available every 3 hours at the 60- and 30-km grid interval and every 1.5 hours at the 15-km grid interval. The model is initialized from the NWS ETA analyses and integrated two times a day.

  8. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  9. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  10. Active multi-aperture imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nicholas J.; Widiker, Jeffrey J.; McManamon, Paul F.; Haus, Joseph W.

    2012-06-01

    We describe our Innovative Multi Aperture Gimbaless Electro-Optical (IMAGE) testbed which uses coherent detection of the complex field reflected off a diffuse target with seven hexagonally arranged apertures. The seven measured optical fields are then phased with a digital optimization algorithm to synthesize a composite image whose angular resolution exceeds that of a single aperture. This same post-detection phasing algorithm also corrects aberrations induced by imperfect optics and a turbulent atmospheric path. We present the coherent imaging sub-aperture design used in the IMAGE array as well as the design of a compact range used to perform scaled tests of the IMAGE array. We present some experimental results of imaging diffuse targets in the compact range with two phase screens which simulates a ~7[Km] propagation path through distributed atmospheric turbulence.

  11. Using a balloon-borne accelerometer to improve understanding of the turbulent structure of the atmosphere for aviation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme; Harrison, Giles; Nicoll, Keri; Williams, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This work describes the instrument development, characterisation and data analysis from 51 radiosondes specially equipped with accelerometers to measure atmospheric turbulence. Turbulence is hazardous to aircraft as it cannot be observed in advance. It is estimated that turbulence costs the airline industry millions of US dollars a year through damage to aircraft and injuries to passengers and crew. To avoid turbulence pilots and passengers rely on Clear Air Turbulence forecasts, which have limited skill. One limitation in this area is lack of quantitative unbiased observations. The main source of turbulence observations is from commercial airline pilot reports, which are subjective, biased by the size of aircraft and pilot experience. This work seeks to improve understanding of turbulence through a standardised method of turbulence observations amenable throughout the troposphere. A sensing package has been developed to measure the acceleration of the radiosonde as it swings in response to turbulent agitation of its carrier balloon. The accelerometer radiosonde has been compared against multiple turbulence remote sensing methods to characterise its measurements including calibration with Doppler lidar eddy dissipation rate in the boundary layer. A further relationship has been found by comparison with the spectral width of a Mesospheric, Stratospheric and Tropospheric (MST) radar. From the full dataset of accelerometer sonde ascents a standard deviation of 5 m s-2 is defined as a threshold for significant turbulence. The dataset spans turbulence generated in meteorological phenomena such as jet streams, clouds and in the presence of convection. The analysis revealed that 77% of observed turbulence could be explained by the aforementioned phenomena. In jet streams, turbulence generation was often caused by horizontal processes such as deformation. In convection, turbulence is found to form when CAPE >150 J kg-1. Deeper clouds were found to be more turbulent due to

  12. Earthquake Prediction and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David D.

    Prospects for earthquake prediction and forecasting, and even their definitions, are actively debated. Here, "forecasting" means estimating the future earthquake rate as a function of location, time, and magnitude. Forecasting becomes "prediction" when we identify special conditions that make the immediate probability much higher than usual and high enough to justify exceptional action. Proposed precursors run from aeronomy to zoology, but no identified phenomenon consistently precedes earthquakes. The reported prediction of the 1975 Haicheng, China earthquake is often proclaimed as the most successful, but the success is questionable. An earthquake predicted to occur near Parkfield, California in 1988±5 years has not happened. Why is prediction so hard? Earthquakes start in a tiny volume deep within an opaque medium; we do not know their boundary conditions, initial conditions, or material properties well; and earthquake precursors, if any, hide amongst unrelated anomalies. Earthquakes cluster in space and time, and following a quake earthquake probability spikes. Aftershocks illustrate this clustering, and later earthquakes may even surpass earlier ones in size. However, the main shock in a cluster usually comes first and causes the most damage. Specific models help reveal the physics and allow intelligent disaster response. Modeling stresses from past earthquakes may improve forecasts, but this approach has not yet been validated prospectively. Reliable prediction of individual quakes is not realistic in the foreseeable future, but probabilistic forecasting provides valuable information for reducing risk. Recent studies are also leading to exciting discoveries about earthquakes.

  13. String Theory and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  14. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  15. Lagged average forecasting, an alternative to Monte Carlo forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. N.; Kalnay, E.

    1983-01-01

    A 'lagged average forecast' (LAF) model is developed for stochastic dynamic weather forecasting and used for predictions in comparison with the results of a Monte Carlo forecast (MCF). The technique involves the calculation of sample statistics from an ensemble of forecasts, with each ensemble member being an ordinary dynamical forecast (ODF). Initial conditions at a time lagging the start of the forecast period are used, with varying amounts of time for the lags. Forcing by asymmetric Newtonian heating of the lower layer is used in a two-layer, f-plane, highly truncated spectral model in a test forecasting run. Both the LAF and MCF are found to be more accurate than the ODF due to ensemble averaging with the MCF and the LAF. When a regression filter is introduced, all models become more accurate, with the LAF model giving the best results. The possibility of generating monthly or seasonal forecasts with the LAF is discussed.

  16. Investigation of turbulent transport in an axisymmetric sudden expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Richard D.; Stevenson, Warren H.; Thompson, H. Doyle

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous two-component laser velocimeter measurements were made in the incompressible turbulent flowfield following an axisymmetric sudden expansion. Mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, and triple products were measured and are presented at axial positions ranging from x/H = 0.2-14. A balance of the turbulent kinetic energy in the flow was performed. The production, convection, and diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy were computed directly from the experimental data using central differencing. A specially designed correction lens was employed to correct for optical aberrations introduced by the circular tube. This lens system allowed the accurate simultaneous measurement of axial and radial velocities in the test section. The experimental measurements were compared to predictions generated by a code that employed the k-epsilon turbulence model. Agreement was good for mean axial velocities, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent shear stresses. However, the modeled turbulent normal stresses where in poor agreement with the measured values. The modeled diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy was underpredicted in the region between the shear layer and the centerline of the flow giving lower values of turbulent kinetic energy downstream of the potential core than measured.

  17. Forecasts of the atmospherical parameters close to the ground at the LBT site in the context of the ALTA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study the abilities of an atmospherical mesoscale model in forecasting the classical atmospherical parameters relevant for astronomical applications at the surface layer (wind speed, wind direction, temperature, relative humidity) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site - Mount Graham, Arizona. The study is carried out in the framework of the ALTA project aiming at implementing an automated system for the forecasts of atmospherical parameters (Meso-Nh code) and the optical turbulence (Astro-Meso-Nh code) for the service-mode operation of the LBT. The final goal of such an operational tool is to provide predictions with high time frequency of atmospheric and optical parameters for an optimized planning of the telescope operation (dome thermalization, wind-dependent dome orientation, observation planning based on predicted seeing, adaptive optics optimization, etc...). Numerical simulations are carried out with the Meso-Nh and Astro-Meso-Nh codes, which were proven to give excellent results in previous studies focused on the two ESO sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones (MOSE Project). In this paper we will focus our attention on the comparison of atmospherical parameters forescasted by the model close to the ground with measurements taken by the observatory instrumentations and stored in the LBT telemetry in order to validate the numerical predictions. As previously done for Cerro Paranal (Lascaux et al., 2015), we will also present an analysis of the model performances based on the method of the contingency tables, that allows us to provide complementary key information with the respect to the bias and RMSE (systematic and statistical errors), such as the percentage of correct detection and the probability to obtain a correct detection inside a defined interval of values.

  18. Experimental measurements of surface turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexey L.; Rostov, Andrey P.; Shefer, Nadezhda A.

    2014-11-01

    Results of processing data obtained with the help of multi-parameter meter of turbulent micropulsation of wind speed components, temperature, humidity, pressure, and concentration of aerosol particles are discussed. The results of statistical processing of experimental time series of the aerosol scattering coefficient (nephelometer), wind speed components and temperature (ultrasonic anemometer-thermometer), are presented. Registration of the relative and absolute humidity, incoming and outgoing radiation was carried out in parallel. On the basis of the pulsation method of observations from the obtained data, dispersion of fluctuations of optical and meteorological parameters; auto-spectra fluctuations of wind speed, temperature, humidity and scattering coefficient; turbulent flows of momentum, heat and aerosol particles; the spectra of turbulent flows were calculated.

  19. Diffusion of Radiation in Inhomogeneous Turbulent Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    The model problem of the formation of spectral lines in an absorbing and scattering atmosphere of finite optical depth with developed turbulence is stated and solved. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the influence of different kinds of spatial correlated nonthermal motions on observed line profiles. The method of invariant imbedding is used; it enables solution of this problem under rather general assumptions about the character of the turbulence, as well as about elementary scattering events and the distribution of energy sources in the medium. Special attention is devoted to the limits of macro- and microturbulence. It is shown that in the case of microturbulence, the reflectivity of the medium and its opacity are greater over the entire frequency range. It is also found that the dependence of the observed characteristics on the correlation length is stronger when medium is thicker and the average velocity of the turbulent motions is higher.

  20. Forecasters of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximova, Lyudmila

    1987-07-01

    For the first time Soviet scientists have set up a bioseismological proving ground which will stage a systematic extensive experiment of using birds, ants, mountain rodents including marmots, which can dig holes in the Earth's interior to a depth of 50 meters, for the purpose of earthquake forecasting. Biologists have accumulated extensive experimental data on the impact of various electromagnetic fields, including fields of weak intensity, on living organisms. As far as mammals are concerned, electromagnetic waves with frequencies close to the brain's biorhythms have the strongest effect. How these observations can be used to forecast earthquakes is discussed.