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Sample records for optical turbulence forecast

  1. Turbulence forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to forecast turbulence, one needs to have an understanding of the cause of turbulence. Therefore, an attempt is made to show the atmospheric structure that often results when aircraft encounter moderate or greater turbulence. The analysis is based on thousands of hours of observations of flights over the past 39 years of aviation meteorology.

  2. Optical turbulence forecast: ready for an operational application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, E.; Lascaux, F.; Turchi, A.; Fini, L.

    2017-04-01

    One of the main goals of the feasibility study MOSE (MOdelling ESO Sites) is to evaluate the performances of a method conceived to forecast the optical turbulence (OT) above the European Southern Observatory (ESO) sites of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) in Chile. The method implied the use of a dedicated code conceived for the OT called ASTRO-MESO-NH. In this paper, we present results we obtained at conclusion of this project concerning the performances of this method in forecasting the most relevant parameters related to the OT (CN^2, seeing ε, isoplanatic angle θ0 and wavefront coherence time τ0). Numerical predictions related to a very rich statistical sample of nights uniformly distributed along a solar year and belonging to different years have been compared to observations, and different statistical operators have been analysed such as the classical bias, root-mean-squared error, σ and more sophisticated statistical operators derived by the contingency tables that are able to quantify the score of success of a predictive method such as the percentage of correct detection (PC) and the probability to detect a parameter within a specific range of values (POD). The main conclusions of the study tell us that the ASTRO-MESO-NH model provides performances that are already very good to definitely guarantee a not negligible positive impact on the service mode of top-class telescopes and ELTs. A demonstrator for an automatic and operational version of the ASTRO-MESO-NH model will be soon implemented on the sites of VLT and E-ELT.

  3. Forecasting of Optical Turbulence in Support of Realtime Optical Imaging and Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2012-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical and imaging telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of free space optical communication (FSOC) links. Some of the degradation due to optical turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. In addition, clouds, precipitation, and inhomogeneities in atmospheric temperature and moisture all have the potential to disrupt imaging and communications through the atmosphere. However, there are strategies that can be employed to mitigate the atmospheric impacts. These strategies require an accurate characterization of the atmosphere through which the communications links travel. To date these strategies have been to climatological characterize OT and its properties. Recently efforts have been developed to employ a realtime forecasting system which provides planners useful information for maintaining links and link budgets. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. Atmospheric measurements provided by local instrumentation are valuable for link characterization, but provide an incomplete picture of the atmosphere. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). During realtime FSOC demonstrations, in situ measurements are supplemented with NWP simulations, which provide near realtime characterizations and forecasts of the Cn2, the Fried Coherence Length (ro), and time-varying, three-dimensional characterizations of the atmosphere. The three dimensional Weather

  4. Operational optical turbulence forecast for the service mode of top-class ground based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck; Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we present the most relevant results obtained in the context of a feasibility study (MOSE) undertaken for ESO. The principal aim of the project was to quantify the performances of an atmospherical non-hydrostatical mesoscale model (Astro-Meso-NH code) in forecasting all the main atmospherical parameters relevant for the ground-based astronomical observations and the optical turbulence (CN2 and associated integrated astroclimatic parameters) above Cerro Paranal (site of the VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the E-ELT). A detailed analysis on the score of success of the predictive capacities of the system have been carried out for all the astroclimatic as well as for the atmospherical parameters. Considering the excellent results that we obtained, this study proved the opportunity to implement on these two sites an automatic system to be run nightly in an operational configuration to support the scheduling of scientific programs as well as of astronomical facilities (particularly those supported by AO systems) of the VLT and the E-ELT. At the end of 2016 a new project for the implementation of a demonstrator of an operational system to be run on the two ESO's sites will start. The fact that the system can be run simultaneously on the two sites is an ancillary appealing feature of the system. Our team is also responsible for the implementation of a similar automatic system at Mt.Graham, site of the LBT (ALTA Project). Our system/method will permit therefore to make a step ahead in the framework of the Service Mode for new generation telescopes. Among the most exciting achieved results we cite the fact that we proved to be able to forecast CN2 profiles with a vertical resolution as high as 150 m. Such a feature is particularly crucial for all WFAO systems that require such detailed information on the OT vertical stratification on the whole 20 km above the ground. This important achievement tells us that all the WFAO systems can rely on automatic

  5. Environmental forecasting and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    This review describes the fundamental assumptions and current methodologies of the two main kinds of environmental forecast; the first is valid for a limited period of time into the future and over a limited space-time ‘target’, and is largely determined by the initial and preceding state of the environment, such as the weather or pollution levels, up to the time when the forecast is issued and by its state at the edges of the region being considered; the second kind provides statistical information over long periods of time and/or over large space-time targets, so that they only depend on the statistical averages of the initial and ‘edge’ conditions. Environmental forecasts depend on the various ways that models are constructed. These range from those based on the ‘reductionist’ methodology (i.e., the combination of separate, scientifically based, models for the relevant processes) to those based on statistical methodologies, using a mixture of data and scientifically based empirical modeling. These are, as a rule, focused on specific quantities required for the forecast. The persistence and predictability of events associated with environmental and turbulent flows and the reasons for variation in the accuracy of their forecasts (of the first and second kinds) are now better understood and better modeled. This has partly resulted from using analogous results of disordered chaotic systems, and using the techniques of calculating ensembles of realizations, ideally involving several different models, so as to incorporate in the probabilistic forecasts a wider range of possible events. The rationale for such an approach needs to be developed. However, other insights have resulted from the recognition of the ordered, though randomly occurring, nature of the persistent motions in these flows, whose scales range from those of synoptic weather patterns (whether storms or ‘blocked’ anticyclones) to small scale vortices. These eigen states can be predicted

  6. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  7. Modified-Dewan Optical Turbulence Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Kea Observatories on the Island of Hawaii (Businger et al. 2002) by converting standard Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecast model output into...describing optical turbulence. The Dewan parameterization is also being used to forecast optical seeing conditions for ground-based telescopes at the Mauna

  8. MOSE: a feasibility study for optical turbulence forecast with the Meso-Nh mesoscale model to support AO facilities at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck

    2012-07-01

    We present very encouraging preliminary results obtained in the context of the MOSE project, an on-going study aiming at investigating the feasibility of the forecast of the optical turbulence and meteorological parameters (in the free atmosphere as well as in the boundary and surface layer) at Cerro Paranal (site of the Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), both in Chile. The study employs the Meso-Nh atmospheric mesoscale model and aims at supplying a tool for optical turbulence forecasts to support the scheduling of the scientific programs and the use of AO facilities at the VLT and the E-ELT. In this study we take advantage of the huge amount of measurements performed so far at Paranal and Armazones by ESO and the TMT consortium in the context of the site selection for the E-ELT and the TMT to constraint / validate the model. A detailed analysis of the model performances in reproducing the atmospheric parameters (T, V, p, H, ...) near the ground as well as in the free atmosphere, is critical and fundamental because the optical turbulence depends on most of these parameters. This approach permits us to provide an exhaustive and complete analysis of the model performances and to better define the model operational application. This also helps us to identify the sources of discrepancies with optical turbulence measurements (when they appear) and to discriminate between different origins of the problem: model parameterization, initial conditions, ... Preliminary results indicate a great accuracy of the model in reproducing most of the main meteorological parameters in statistical terms as well as in each individual night in the free atmosphere and in proximity of the surface. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF-Arcetri (Italy).

  9. Clear turbulence forecasting - Towards a union of art and science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting over the last several decades is reviewed in the context of empirical and theoretical research into the nature of nonconvective turbulence in the free atmosphere, particularly at jet stream levels. Various qualitative CAT forecasting techniques are examined, and prospects for an effective quantitative index to aid aviation meteorologists in jet stream level turbulence monitoring and forecasting are examined. Finally, the use of on-board sensors for short-term warning is discussed.

  10. Optical Turbulence Forecasting: A Tutorial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-22

    by the term x in Eq. (57) under the integral sign , and x is to be interpreted as the distance from the receiver. In the case where N L<< I (that is...the weighting function W given by W - [L - z] 5/6 (66) This is the physical reason for x 5 / 6 under the integral sign in Eq. (57). 3.3.2 THE "WEAK

  11. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ngari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Yao, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey for astronomical observatories and optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique and atmospheric optical transportation. The numerical approach, by use of meteorological parameters and according to parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as Cn2 profile, coherent length, coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and outer scale of turbulence. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by National Astronomical Observatories of China site survey team imply that the south-west Tibet, Ngari, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm sites. For searching the best site in Ngari area of hundreds of kilometers, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are given by the 1°x1°NCEP Global Final Analysis data. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented. The field investigation for the potential good site are also given.

  12. Optical distortions by compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ali

    Optical distortions induced by refractive index fluctuations in turbulent flows are a serious concern in airborne communication and imaging systems. This project focuses on aero-optical flows in which compressible turbulence is the dominant source of optical distortions. These flows include boundary layers, free shear layers, cavity flows, and wakes typically associated with flight conditions. The present study consists of two theoretical analyses and an extensive numerical investigation of optical distortions by separated shear layers and turbulent wakes. We present an analysis of far-field optical statistics in a general aero-optical framework. Based on this analysis, measures of far-field distortion, such as tilt, spread, and loss of focus-depth, are linked to key flow statistics. By employing these measures, we quantify distortion effects through a set of norms that have provable scaling properties with key optical parameters. The second analysis presents a theoretical estimate of the range of optically important flow scales in an arbitrary aero-optical flowfield. We show that in the limit of high Reynolds numbers, the smallest optically important scale does not depend on the Kolmogorov scale. For a given geometry this length scale depends only on the flow Mach number, freestream refractive index, and the optical wavelength. The provided formula can be used to estimate grid resolution requirements for numerical simulations of aero-optical phenomena. A rough estimate indicates that resolution requirements for accurate prediction of aero-optics is not much higher than typical LES requirements. As a model problem, compressible turbulent flows over a circular cylinder is considered to study the fundamental physics of aero-optical effects. Large-eddy simulation with a high-resolution numerical scheme is employed to compute variations of the refractive index field in the separated shear layers and turbulent wakes in a range of flow Mach numbers (0.2--0.85) and

  13. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  14. Measurements of Turbulent Dissipation During the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-16

    Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment 0601153N 73-6604-03-5 Silvia Matt, Weilin Hou, Sarah Woods, Ewa Jarosz, Wesley Goode and Alan Weidemann Naval...of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment Silvia Matt 1,2, Weilin Hou 2, Sarah Woods 3, Ewa Jarosz 2, Wesley Goode 2...SPEC Inc., Boulder, CO, USA Corresponding author: Silvia Matt: E-mail: silvia.matt.ctr.de@nrlssc.navy.mil Figure 1. Location of stations during BOTEX

  15. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  16. Creation of a Dynamical Stratospheric Turbulence Forecasting and Nowcasting Tool for High Altitude Airships and Other Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-20

    propagation to high altitudes (Broutman et al., 2003, 2006, 2008; Eckermann et al., 2006); 3 3. characterization of the statistical potential for...resolution across the forecasting domain. Examples of the turbulence structures for KHI and GW breaking from which we determine turbulence statistics ...improve. deterministic MW and turbulence forecast statistical convective GW and turbulence forecast statistical jet stream GW and

  17. Measurements of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Woods, Sarah; Jarosz, Ewa; Goode, Wesley; Weidemann, Alan

    2013-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment (BOTEX) was conducted in the summer of 2011 to investigate the impact of turbulence on underwater optical imaging. Underwater optical properties can be affected by turbulence in the water, due to localized changes in the index of refraction. We discuss measurements of current velocity and temperature, made with a Nortek Vector Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and PME Conductivity- Temperature (CT) probe, as well as observations made with a Rockland Oceanographic Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP). The instruments were deployed in close proximity in the field and in the context of measurements of optical target clarity. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKED) and temperature dissipation (TD) rates are calculated from the ADV/CT measurements and compared to TKED and TD estimated from the data collected with the VMP. The results show reasonable agreement between the two methods; differences are attributed to turbulence patchiness and intermittence, as well as sampling challenges. The study also highlights the importance of collecting concurrent data on temperature, current velocity, and current shear to assess the turbulence impact on underwater optical properties.

  18. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  19. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  20. Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX): preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Jorosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser; Nootz, Gero; Woods, Sarah; Weidemann, Alan D.; Goode, Wesley; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Metzger, B.; Ramos, B.

    2012-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) was conducted in the coastal waters of Florida and the Bahamas from June 30 to July 12 2011, onboard the R/V FG Walton Smith. The primary objective of the BOTEX was to obtain field measurements of optical turbulence structures, in order to investigate the impacts of the naturally occurring turbulence on underwater imaging and optical beam propagation. In order to successfully image through optical turbulence structures in the water and examine their impacts on optical transmission, a high speed camera and targets (both active and passive) were mounted on a rigid frame to form the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST). To investigate the impacts on active imaging systems such as the laser line scan (LLS), the Telescoping Rigid Underwater Sensor Structure (TRUSS) was designed and implemented by Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. The experiments were designed to determine the resolution limits of LLS systems as a function of turbulence induced beam wander at the target. The impact of natural turbulence structures on lidar backscatter waveforms was also examined, by means of a telescopic receiver and a short pulse transmitter, co-located, on a vertical profiling frame. To include a wide range of water types in terms of optical and physical conditions, data was collected from four different locations. . Impacts from optical turbulence were observed under both strong and weak physical structures. Turbulence measurements were made by two instruments, the Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP) and a 3D acoustical Doppler velocimeter with fast conductivity and temperature probes, in close proximity in the field. Subsequently these were mounted on the IMAST during moored deployments. The turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate and the temperature dissipation rates were calculated from both setups in order to characterize the physical environments and their impacts. Beam deflection by multiple point

  1. Turbulent Transitions in Optical Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangeli, D.; Di Mei, F.; Di Domenico, G.; Agranat, A. J.; Conti, C.; DelRe, E.

    2016-10-01

    We report the direct observation of the onset of turbulence in propagating one-dimensional optical waves. The transition occurs as the disordered hosting material passes from being linear to one with extreme nonlinearity. As the response grows, increased wave interaction causes a modulational unstable quasihomogeneous flow to be superseded by a chaotic and spatially incoherent one. Statistical analysis of high-resolution wave behavior in the turbulent regime unveils the emergence of concomitant rogue waves. The transition, observed in a photorefractive ferroelectric crystal, introduces a new and rich experimental setting for the study of optical wave turbulence and information transport in conditions dominated by large fluctuations and extreme nonlinearity.

  2. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency.

  3. Impacts of optical turbulence on underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Woods, S.; Goode, W.; Jarosz, E.; Weidemann, A.

    2011-06-01

    Optical signal transmission underwater is of vital interests to both civilian and military applications. The range and signal to noise during the transmission, as a function of system and water optical properties determines the effectiveness of EO technology. These applications include diver visibility, search and rescue, mine detection and identification, and optical communications. The impact of optical turbulence on underwater imaging has been postulated and observed by many researchers. However, no quantative studies have been done until recently, in terms of both the environmental conditions, and impacts on image quality as a function of range and spatial frequencies. Image data collected from field measurements during SOTEX (Skaneateles Optical Turbulence Exercise, July 22-31, 2010) using the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST) are presented. Optical properties of the water column in the field were measured using WETLab's ac-9 and Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometer (LISST, Sequoia Scientific), in coordination with physical properties including CTD (Seabird), dissipation rate of kinetic energy and heat, using both the Vector velocimeter and CT combo (Nortek and PME), and shear probe based Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP, Rockland). The strong stratification structure in the water column provides great opportunity to observe various dissipation strengths throughout the water column, which corresponds directly with image quality as shown. Initial results demonstrate general agreement between data collected and model prediction, while discrepancies between measurements and model suggest higher spatial and temporal observations are needed in the future.

  4. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Moore, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  5. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  6. A Bayesian regularized artificial neural network for adaptive optics forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Li, Xinyang; Qin, Xiaolin; Wang, Huiyong

    2017-01-01

    Real-time adaptive optics is a technology for enhancing the resolution of ground-based optical telescopes and overcoming the disturbance of atmospheric turbulence. The performance of the system is limited by delay errors induced by the servo system and photoelectrons noise of wavefront sensor. In order to cut these delay errors, this paper proposes a novel model to forecast the future control voltages of the deformable mirror. The predictive model is constructed by a multi-layered back propagation network with Bayesian regularization (BRBP). For the purpose of parallel computation and less disturbance, we adopt a number of sub-BP neural networks to substitute the whole network. The Bayesian regularized network assigns a probability to the network weights, allowing the network to automatically and optimally penalize excessively complex models. The simulation results show that the BRBP introduces smaller mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square errors (MSE) than other typical algorithms. Meanwhile, real data analysis results show that the BRBP model has strong generalization capability and parallelism.

  7. Forecasting Fluid Flows Using the Geometry of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Balachandra; Tithof, Jeffrey; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-03-01

    The existence and dynamical role of particular unstable solutions (exact coherent structures) of the Navier-Stokes equation is revealed in laboratory studies of weak turbulence in a thin, electromagnetically driven fluid layer. We find that the dynamics exhibit clear signatures of numerous unstable equilibrium solutions, which are computed using a combination of flow measurements from the experiment and fully resolved numerical simulations. We demonstrate the dynamical importance of these solutions by showing that turbulent flows visit their state space neighborhoods repeatedly. Furthermore, we find that the unstable manifold associated with one such unstable equilibrium predicts the evolution of turbulent flow in both experiment and simulation for a considerable period of time.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  9. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  10. Improved Climatological Characterization of Optical Turbulence for Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2010-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical or other telescopes. In addition, the quality of service of a free space optical communications link may also be impacted. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, particularly for OCONUS locations, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers (MHPCC) Mana cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering several hundreds of kilometers. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro). Nearly two years of simulations have been performed over various regions

  11. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  12. Simple algorithms for calculating optical communication performance through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, J. H.; Harney, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation through turbulence can impose severe limitations on the performance of atmospheric optical communication links. Previous studies have established quantitative results for turbulence-induced beam spread, angular spread, and scintillation. This paper develops communication-theory results for single-bit and message transmission through turbulence. Programmable calculator algorithms for evaluating these results are given, and used to examine system performance in some realistic scenarios. These algorithms make it possible for the uninitiated communication engineer to rapidly assess the effects of turbulence on an atmospheric optical communication link.

  13. Optical properties of a planar turbulent jet.

    PubMed

    Joia, I A; Perkins, R J; Uscinski, B J; Balmer, G; Jordan, D; Jakeman, E

    1995-10-20

    A planar heated air jet was constructed. Its flow properties were characterized and shown to be both reproducible and in good agreement with the results of turbulence theory. The optical properties of the jet were studied with the help of a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser beam. The random phase modulations imposed on the wave front of the beam traversing the jet were measured by interferometric means, and their spectra and variance were determined. The one-dimensional phase fluctuation spectrum obeyed a -8/3 power law as predicted by theory, whereas the phase variance (?(2)) depended on the jet temperature and was studied for values to as high as 0.4 (rad)(2)).

  14. Update of upper level turbulence forecast by reducing unphysical components of topography in the numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hun; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Sharman, Robert D.; Klemp, Joseph B.

    2016-07-01

    On 2 November 2015, unrealistically large areas of light-or-stronger turbulence were predicted by the WRF-RAP (Weather Research and Forecast Rapid Refresh)-based operational turbulence forecast system over the western U.S. mountainous regions, which were not supported by available observations. These areas are reduced by applying additional terrain averaging, which damps out the unphysical components of small-scale (~2Δx) energy aloft induced by unfiltered topography in the initialization of the WRF model. First, a control simulation with the same design of the WRF-RAP model shows that the large-scale atmospheric conditions are well simulated but predict strong turbulence over the western mountainous region. Four experiments with different levels of additional terrain smoothing are applied in the initialization of the model integrations, which significantly reduce spurious mountain-wave-like features, leading to better turbulence forecasts more consistent with the observed data.

  15. Turbulence profiling for adaptive optics tomographic reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidlaw, Douglas J.; Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard W.; Morris, Timothy J.; Butterley, Timothy; Reeves, Andrew P.; Townson, Matthew J.; Gendron, Éric; Vidal, Fabrice; Morel, Carine

    2016-07-01

    To approach optimal performance advanced Adaptive Optics (AO) systems deployed on ground-based telescopes must have accurate knowledge of atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude. Stereo-SCIDAR is a high-resolution stereoscopic instrument dedicated to this measure. Here, its profiles are directly compared to internal AO telemetry atmospheric profiling techniques for CANARY (Vidal et al. 20141), a Multi-Object AO (MOAO) pathfinder on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma. In total twenty datasets are analysed across July and October of 2014. Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithms dubbed Direct Fitting and Learn 2 Step (L2S; Martin 20142) are used in the recovery of profile information via covariance matrices - respectively attaining average Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients with stereo-SCIDAR of 0.2 and 0.74. By excluding the measure of covariance between orthogonal Wavefront Sensor (WFS) slopes these results have revised values of 0.65 and 0.2. A data analysis technique that combines L2S and SLODAR is subsequently introduced that achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  16. Trajectory of an optical vortex in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dipankar, A; Marchiano, R; Sagaut, P

    2009-10-01

    Trajectory of an optical vortex has been identified for its propagation in atmospheric turbulence using numerical simulations. An analytical expression has been found, relating the radial departure of the vortex in plane perpendicular to the direction of propagation, to the refractive index structure function parameter and the inner scale of turbulence. The angular orientation of the vortex in the same transverse plane is found to be related to the anisotropy of the medium. The obtained results provide an alternative way to find turbulent parameters with the help of optical vortices.

  17. Forecast analysis of optical waveguide bus performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledesma, R.; Rourke, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Elements to be considered in the design of a data bus include: architecture; data rate; modulation, encoding, detection; power distribution requirements; protocol, work structure; bus reliability, maintainability; interterminal transmission medium; cost; and others specific to application. Fiber- optic data bus considerations for a 32 port transmissive star architecture, are discussed in a tutorial format. General optical-waveguide bus concepts, are reviewed. The electrical and optical performance of a 32 port transmissive star bus, and the effects of temperature on the performance of optical-waveguide buses are examined. A bibliography of pertinent references and the bus receiver test results are included.

  18. Using the Random Nearest Neighbor Data Mining Method to Extract Maximum Information Content from Weather Forecasts from Multiple Predictors of Weather and One Predictand (Low-Level Turbulence)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-30

    Neighbor, data mining, weather model turbulence , information extraction, forecasting, meteorology, pilot reports 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...data points that are far from the mean contribute according to the square of their error . In the case of turbulence , nearly every turbulent ...weather and one predictand (low-level turbulence ). Links to sections: Executive summary 1) Introduction 2) Data 3) Methodology and implementation

  19. Gauging the Turbulent Mach Numbers in Optically Thick Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, B.; Lazarian, A.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Turbulence is a critical component of the current paradigms of star formation, particle transport, magnetic reconnection and evolution of the ISM. Progress on this difficult subject is made via theoretical predictions, numerical simulations and observational studies. For star forming molecular clouds in particular, turbulence plays a role in supporting clouds from gravitational collapse and dense filamentary structures created by shocks via supersonic turbulence could act as a catalyst for stellar birth. However, diagnosing turbulence in these dense molecular regions is not straightforward, with additional complications including varying optical depth effects and thermal excitation. We study the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of simulations of MHD turbulence with radiative transfer effects included (specifically looking at the 13CO 2-1 transition) in order to gauge whether the sonic Mach number can be determined in optically thick turbulent environments. From the simulations, we create synthetic integrated intensity maps with different sonic Mach numbers and vary optical depth and thermal excitation by changing the average density(ρ) and molecular abundance (X/H2). We show that PDF descriptors such as the moments and the Tsallis distribution are sensitive to the changes in optical depth as well as the sonic Mach number in 13CO 2-1 integrated intensity maps. This opens up avenues for studying the relationship between the compressibility of GMC clouds and star formation using simple statistical methods.

  20. Generalized anisotropic turbulence spectra and applications in the optical waves' propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2015-11-16

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. In this work, two theoretical atmosphere refractive-index fluctuations spectral models are derived for optical waves propagating through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. They consider simultaneously the finite turbulence inner and outer scales and the asymmetric property of turbulence eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path. Two anisotropy factors which parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane, so that the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence eddies in the xy-plane is no longer required. Deviations from the classic 11/3 power law behavior in the spectrum model are also allowed by assuming power law value variations between 3 and 4. Based on the derived anisotropic spectral model and the Rytov approximation theory, expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived spectral models and the variance of AOA fluctuations.

  1. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis Shane

    1999-11-01

    Many creative approaches have been taken in the past for simulating the effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams. Most of the experimental architectures have been complicated and consisted of many optical elements as well as moving components. These techniques have shown a modicum of success; however, they are not completely controllable or predictable. A benchtop technique for experimentally producing one important effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams (phase distortion) is presented here. The system is completely controllable and predictable while accurately representing the statistical nature of the problem. Previous experimentation in optical processing through turbulent media has demonstrated that optical wavefront distortions can be produced via spatial light modulating (SLM) devices, and most turbulence models and experimental results indicate that turbulence can be represented as a phase fluctuation. The amplitude distributions in the resulting far field are primarily due to propagation of the phase. Operating a liquid crystal television (LCTV) in the ``phase- mostly'' mode, a phase fluctuation type model for turbulence is utilized in the present investigation, and a real-time experiment for demonstrating the effects was constructed. For an optical system to simulate optical wavefront distortions due to atmospheric turbulence, the following are required: (1)An optical element that modulates the phasefront of an optical beam (2)A model and a technique for generating spatially correlated turbulence simulating distributions (3)Hardware and software for displaying and manipulating the information addressing the optical phase modulation device The LCTV is ideal for this application. When operated in the ``phase-mostly'' mode some LCTVs can modulate the phasefront of an optical beam by as much as 2π and an algorithm for generating spatially correlated phase screens can be constructed via mathematical modeling software such as

  2. Critical issues encountered in experiments and measurements involving optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.

    2007-02-01

    The successful design and operation of high energy laser (HEL) and laser communication systems require a comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the real turbulent atmosphere coupled with high-fidelity realistic laser beam propagation models. To date, modeling and simulation of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence have relied upon a traditional theoretical basis that assumes the existence of homogeneous, isotropic, stationary, and Kolmogorov turbulence. The real impact of the refractive index structure parameter ( C2 n ) on laser beam propagation including effects of non-classical turbulence as well as inner (l °) and outer scale (L °) effects will be examined. Observations clearly show turbulence is often layered and is produced by wave activity and episodic events such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Other critical turbulence issues involve the relationship between mechanical and optical turbulence and the effect of path variability of turbulence and inner scale on optical turbulence parameters over long paths. These issues will be examined from data obtained from five systems: a) a new measurement platform using a free-flying balloon that lifts a ring with a boom upon which are mounted several fine wire (1-μm diameter) sensors to measure high-speed temperature and velocity fluctuations, b) a new system using a kite/tethered blimp platform that obtains both profile and measurements at a fixed altitude over time, c) a 50 MHz radar at Vandenberg Air Force Base that senses at high temporal and spatial resolution to 20 km ASL, d) an instrumented aircraft system, and e) a suite of optical systems. The first four systems all provide estimates of C2 n , the eddy dissipation rate (\\Vegr), l ° and L °. Methods of calibration and problems of interpreting results from the measurement systems are discussed.

  3. A domain analysis approach to clear-air turbulence forecasting using high-density in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, Jennifer A.

    Pilots' ability to avoid clear-air turbulence (CAT) during flight affects the safety of the millions of people who fly commercial airlines and other aircraft, and turbulence costs millions in injuries and aircraft maintenance every year. Forecasting CAT is not straightforward, however; microscale features like the turbulence eddies that affect aircraft (100m) are below the current resolution of operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and the only evidence of CAT episodes, until recently, has been sparse, subjective reports from pilots known as PIREPs. To forecast CAT, researchers use a simple weighted sum of top-performing turbulence indicators derived from NWP model outputs---termed diagnostics---based on their agreement with current PIREPs. However, a new, quantitative source of observation data---high-density measurements made by sensor equipment and software on aircraft, called in-situ measurements---is now available. The main goal of this thesis is to develop new data analysis and processing techniques to apply to the model and new observation data, in order to improve CAT forecasting accuracy. This thesis shows that using in-situ data improves forecasting accuracy and that automated machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVM), logistic regression, and random forests, can match current performance while eliminating almost all hand-tuning. Feature subset selection is paired with the new algorithms to choose diagnostics that predict well as a group rather than individually. Specializing forecasts and choice of diagnostics by geographic region further improves accuracy because of the geographic variation in turbulence sources. This work uses random forests to find climatologically-relevant regions based on these variations and implements a forecasting system testbed which brings these techniques together to rapidly prototype new, regionalized versions of operational CAT forecasting systems.

  4. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence for optical systems with extended sources.

    PubMed

    Safari, Majid; Hranilovic, Steve

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the method of random wave vectors for simulation of atmospheric turbulence is extended to 2D×2D space to provide spatial degrees of freedom at both input and output planes. The modified technique can thus simultaneously simulate the turbulence-induced log-amplitude and phase distortions for optical systems with extended sources either implemented as a single large aperture or multiple apertures. The reliability of our simulation technique is validated in different conditions and its application is briefly investigated in a multibeam free-space optical communication scenario.

  5. Turbulence Characterization for Ground to Satellite MEMS Based Free Space Optical Communication System in Weak Atmospheric Turbulence Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Agnibesh; Kumar, Vivek; Kaushal, Hemani; Aennam, Harika; Jain, V. K.; Kar, Subrat; Joseph, Joby

    2011-10-01

    The performance of laser communication systems operating in the atmosphere is degraded by atmospheric turbulence effects, which causes irradiance fluctuations in the received signal and result in a random signal fades. We propose to simulate this effect in laboratory using an optical turbulence generator chamber and to measure the level of turbulence using CMOS array.

  6. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence-induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Gregory, Don A.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time liquid crystal television-based technique for simulating optical wavefront distortion due to atmospheric turbulence is presented and demonstrated. A liquid crystal television (LCTV) operating in the "phase mostly" mode was used as an array of spatially correlated phase delays. A movie of the arrays in motion was then generated and displayed on the LCTV. The turbulence simulation system was verified by passing a collimated and doubled diode pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser beam (532 nm) through the transparent LCTV screen. The beam was then passed through a lens and the power spectra of the turbulence information carrying beam was detected as a measure of the far-field distribution. The same collimated laser beam, without the LCTV, was also transmitted down an open-air range and the power spectra detected as a measure of a real far-field distribution. Accepted turbulence parameters were measured for both arrangements and then compared.

  7. Introduction to Wave Turbulence Formalisms for Incoherent Optical Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Antonio; Garnier, Josselin; Xu, Gang; Rica, Sergio

    We provide an introduction to different wave turbulence formalisms describing the propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in nonlinear media. We consider the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model accounting for a nonlocal or a noninstantaneous nonlinearity, as well as higher-order dispersion effects. We discuss the wave turbulence kinetic equation describing, e.g., wave condensation or wave thermalization through supercontinuum generation; the Vlasov formalism describing incoherent modulational instabilities and the formation of large scale incoherent localized structures in analogy with long-range gravitational systems; and the weak Langmuir turbulence formalism describing spectral incoherent solitons, as well as spectral shock or collapse singularities. Finally, recent developments and some open questions are discussed, in particular in relation with a wave turbulence formulation of laser systems and different mechanisms of breakdown of thermalization.

  8. Lidar sounding of the optical parameter of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvich, A. S.; Fortus, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a lidar intended for clear air turbulence (CAT) positioning on the basis of the backscatter enhancement (BSE) effect is analyzed using a turbulence model with a power-law spectrum. Systematic distortions occurring due to a need to regularize the lidar positioning problem solution are estimated. It is shown that the effect of molecular viscosity of air on the positioning result can be neglected if the wave parameter, which characterizes the diffraction manifestation, is higher than 3. This corresponds to sounding ranges of more than 1 km for optical or UV lidars. The analysis results show that the BSE lidar positioning accuracy weakly depends on the exponent in the turbulence spectrum in regions of severe turbulence. The results can justify a physical experiment for the design of an aircraft system for the lidar detection of CAT regions ahead of the flight course.

  9. Optical diagnostics for turbulent and multiphase flows: Particle image velocimetry and photorefractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shagam, R.N.; Blanchat, T.K.; Chu, T.Y.; Tassin-Leger, A.L.; Henderson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ``Optical Diagnostics for Turbulent and Multiphase Flows.`` Advanced optical diagnostics have been investigated and developed for flow field measurements, including capabilities for measurement in turbulent, multiphase, and heated flows. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) includes several techniques for measurement of instantaneous flow field velocities and associated turbulence quantities. Nonlinear photorefractive optical materials have been investigated for the possibility of measuring turbulence quantities (turbulent spectrum) more directly. The two-dimensional PIV techniques developed under this LDRD were shown to work well, and were compared with more traditional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Three-dimensional PIV techniques were developed and tested, but due to several experimental difficulties were not as successful. The photorefractive techniques were tested, and both potential capabilities and possible problem areas were elucidated.

  10. Optical propagation through a homogeneous turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon J.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of organized turbulent structures on the propagation of an optical beam in a homogeneous shear flow were studied. A passive-scalar field in a computed turbulent shear flow is used to represent index-of-refraction fluctuations, and phase errors induced in a coherent optical beam by turbulent fluctuations are computed. The organized vortical structures produce a scalar distribution with elongated regions of intense fluctuations which have an inclination with respect to the mean flow similar to that of the characteristic hairpin eddies. It is found that r.m.s. phase error is minimized by propagating approximately normal to the inclined vortical structures. Two-point correlations of vorticity and scalar fluctuation suggest that the regions of intense scalar fluctuation are produced primarily by the hairpin eddies.

  11. Characterising atmospheric optical turbulence using stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Butterley, Tim; Föhring, Dora; Wilson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereo-SCIDAR (SCIntillation Detection and Ranging) is a development to the well known SCIDAR method for characterisation of the Earth's atmospheric optical turbulence. Here we present some interesting capabilities, comparisons and results from a recent campaign on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma.

  12. Investigation of Outer Length Scale In Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    experimental situations. This thesis investigated three outer scales of turbulence using experimental data from two instruments: microthermal probes...represents the size of the velocity fluctuations and the boundary thermal convective cell size. The microthermal balloon data had excessive scatter...optical structure parameter C than the microthermal balloon data. The separation of daytime convective thermal plumes was found from the acoustic

  13. Geometrical modeling of optical phase difference for analyzing atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Demet; Yuksel, Heba

    2013-09-01

    Ways of calculating phase shifts between laser beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence can give us insight towards the understanding of spatial diversity in Free-Space Optical (FSO) links. We propose a new geometrical model to estimate phase shifts between rays as the laser beam propagates through a simulated turbulent media. Turbulence is simulated by filling the propagation path with spherical bubbles of varying sizes and refractive index discontinuities statistically distributed according to various models. The level of turbulence is increased by elongating the range and/or increasing the number of bubbles that the rays interact with along their path. For each statistical representation of the atmosphere, the trajectories of two parallel rays separated by a particular distance are analyzed and computed simultaneously using geometrical optics. The three-dimensional geometry of the spheres is taken into account in the propagation of the rays. The bubble model is used to calculate the correlation between the two rays as their separation distance changes. The total distance traveled by each ray as both rays travel to the target is computed. The difference in the path length traveled will yield the phase difference between the rays. The mean square phase difference is taken to be the phase structure function which in the literature, for a pair of collimated parallel pencil thin rays, obeys a five-third law assuming weak turbulence. All simulation results will be compared with the predictions of wave theory.

  14. Validation of Optical Turbulence Simulations from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model in Support of Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of air to air laser communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers Jaws cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering the islands of Maui and the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro) between the summits of Haleakala and Mauna Loa. Over six months of simulations have been performed over this area. Simulations indicate that

  15. Measurements of optical underwater turbulence under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Gladysz, S.; Almeida de Sá Barros, R.; Matt, S.; Nootz, G. A.; Josset, D. B.; Hou, W.

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam propagation underwater is becoming an important research topic because of high demand for its potential applications. Namely, ability to image underwater at long distances is highly desired for scientific and military purposes, including submarine awareness, diver visibility, and mine detection. Optical communication in the ocean can provide covert data transmission with much higher rates than that available with acoustic techniques, and it is now desired for certain military and scientific applications that involve sending large quantities of data. Unfortunately underwater environment presents serious challenges for propagation of laser beams. Even in clean ocean water, the extinction due to absorption and scattering theoretically limit the useful range to few attenuation lengths. However, extending the laser light propagation range to the theoretical limit leads to significant beam distortions due to optical underwater turbulence. Experiments show that the magnitude of the distortions that are caused by water temperature and salinity fluctuations can significantly exceed the magnitude of the beam distortions due to atmospheric turbulence even for relatively short propagation distances. We are presenting direct measurements of optical underwater turbulence in controlled conditions of laboratory water tank using two separate techniques involving wavefront sensor and LED array. These independent approaches will enable development of underwater turbulence power spectrum model based directly on the spatial domain measurements and will lead to accurate predictions of underwater beam propagation.

  16. Development of a lidar technique for profiling optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Roberts, David; Stewart, John; Wood, Jack

    2012-10-01

    Many techniques have been proposed for active optical remote sensing of the strength of atmospheric refractive turbulence. The early techniques, based on degradation of laser beams by turbulence, were susceptible to artifacts. In 1999, we began investigating a new idea, based on differential image motion (DIM), which is inherently immune to artifacts. The new lidar technique can be seen as a combination of two astronomical instruments: a laser guide star transmitter/receiver and a DIM monitor. The technique was successfully demonstrated on a horizontal path, with a hard-target analog of a lidar, and then a true lidar was developed. Several investigations were carried out first, including an analysis to predict the system's performance; new hard-target field measurements in the vertical direction; development of a robust inversion technique; and wave optics simulations. A brassboard lidar was then constructed and operated in the field, along with instruments to acquire truth data. The tests revealed many problems and pitfalls that were all solvable with engineering changes, and the results served to verify the new lidar technique for profiling turbulence. The results also enabled accurate performance predictions for future versions of the lidar. A transportable turbulence lidar system is currently being developed to support field tests of high-energy lasers.

  17. Improved solar irradiance forecast with Weather Research and Forecasting model: A Sensitivity test of shallow cumulus clouds to the turbulence process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. K.; Betterton, E. A.; Leuthold, M.; Holmgren, W.; Cronin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of solar irradiance are required for electric utilities to economically integrate substantial amounts of solar power into their power generation portfolios. A common failing of numerical weather models is the prediction of shallow cumulus clouds which are generally difficult to be resolved due to complicated processes in the planetary boundary layer. The present study carried out the sensitivity test of turbulence parameterization for better predicting solar irradiance during the shallow cumulus events near the state of Arizona by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The results from the simulations show that increasing the exchange coefficient leads to enhanced vertical mixing and a deeper mixed layer. At the top of mixed layer, an adiabatically ascending air parcel achieved the water vapour saturation and finally shallow cumulus is generated. A detailed analysis will be discussed in the upcoming conference.

  18. Turbulence profiling methods applied to ESO's adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Javier; Béchet, Clémentine; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Gonté, Frédéric; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; Neichel, Benoît; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-07-01

    Two algorithms were recently studied for C2n profiling from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements on GeMS (Gemini Multi-Conjugate AO system). They both rely on the Slope Detection and Ranging (SLODAR) approach, using spatial covariances of the measurements issued from various wavefront sensors. The first algorithm estimates the C2n profile by applying the truncated least-squares inverse of a matrix modeling the response of slopes covariances to various turbulent layer heights. In the second method, the profile is estimated by deconvolution of these spatial cross-covariances of slopes. We compare these methods in the new configuration of ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), a high-order multiple laser system under integration. For this, we use measurements simulated by the AO cluster of ESO. The impact of the measurement noise and of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. The important influence of the outer scale on the results leads to the development of a new step for outer scale fitting included in each algorithm. This increases the reliability and robustness of the turbulence strength and profile estimations.

  19. Analytic improvements to the atmospheric turbulence optical transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David H.

    2003-09-01

    The standard method used for modeling optical turbulence effects on imaging uses an optical transfer function (OTF). To model this function the short- and long-exposure limiting cases exist. The short-exposure case is handled by modifying the long-exposure case to remove wavefront tilt assessed at the sensor entrance pupil. Then, depending on whether one is in the "near-field" or the "far-field," one of two subcases is used. These evaluations require a model of the refractive index spectrum. Typically this model is assumed to be the Kolmogorov spectrum where an inner scale is set to zero and outer scale is infinite. However, for real atmospheres the inner and outer scales affect turbulence predictions through a modified spectrum. The difficulty using non-limiting values for these parameters is that double integrals must then be assessed. However, in this paper analytic forms are developed to describe the spectrum, permitting analytic solutions to these integrals. The result is that we can express quantities such as the Fried coherence diameter in closed form accounting for both inner and outer scale effects. Also, expressions for the inner and outer scales of turbulence can be written as functions of the atmospheric surface layer stability. Lastly, it is shown that the near/far-field effect does not easily subdivide into two cases. In fact, the distance dependence of the tilt effect is shown to span a range of 107 in the governing dimensionless parameter. To model this continuum a unified treatment is considered.

  20. Characterization of Fibre Channel over Highly Turbulent Optical Wireless Links

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G W; Henderer, B D; Wilburn, J W; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-28

    We report on the performance characterization and issues associated with using Fibre Channel (FC) over a highly turbulent free-space optical (FSO) link. Fibre Channel is a storage area network standard that provides high throughput with low overhead. Extending FC to FSO links would simplify data transfer from existing high-bandwidth sensors such as synthetic aperture radars and hyperspectral imagers. We measured the behavior of FC protocol at 1 Gbps in the presence of synthetic link dropouts that are typical of turbulent FSO links. Results show that an average bit error rate of less than 2 x 10{sup -8} is mandatory for adequate throughput. More importantly, 10 ns dropouts at a 2 Hz rate were sufficient to cause long (25 s) timeouts in the data transfer. Although no data was lost, this behavior is likely to be objectionable for most applications. Prospects for improvements in hardware and software will be discussed.

  1. Whole-Field Measurements of Turbulent Flow for the Study of Aero-optical Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Aerooptical phenomena associated with the propagation of optical beams and imaging through turbulent index-of-refraction fields have been investigated...Using simultaneous imaging of optical -beam distortion and the turbulent index-or-refraction field, we have documented near-field behavior, following...of TECHNOLOGY Pasadena, California 91125 Whole-field measurements of turbulent flow for the study of aero- optical effects Paul E. Dimotakis Air

  2. Coherent optical array receiver for PPM signals under atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Fernandez, Michela

    The performance of a coherent free-space optical communications system operating in the presence of turbulence is investigated. Maximum Likelihood Detection techniques are employed to optimally detect Pulse Position Modulated signals with a focal-plane detector array and to reconstruct the turbulence-degraded signals. Laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are described. The key components include two lasers operating at 1064 nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16 element (4 X 4) InGaAs focal-plane detector array, and a data-acquisition and signal-processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In the first part of the experimental results we show convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The second part of the experimental results shows adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed. The third part of the experimental results, in which the main goal of this thesis is achieved, includes an investigation of the performance of the Coherent Optical Receiver Experiment (CORE) at JPL. Bit Error Rate (BER) results are presented for single and multichannel optical receivers where quasi shot noise-limited performance is achieved under simulated turbulence conditions using noncoherent postdetection processing techniques. Theoretical BER expressions are

  3. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmospheric Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; Quick, C.R.; Jolin, L.J.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmidtt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-07-18

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. Two of these processes are atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. The effects of this phenomenon include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to separately simulate the effects of these two processes. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, the authors briefly review a description of the model including the limitations along with a brief summary of previous simulations of individual effects. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility and limitations of the model. Examples presented include assessing the effects for different array sizes on model limitations and effects of varying propagation step sizes on intensity enhancements and intensity probability distributions in the receiver plane.

  4. Effects of organized turbulence structures on the phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon Joo

    1990-01-01

    Phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow is studied. The instantaneous distribution of the index refraction is represented by a passive-scalar field in a computed homogeneous shear flow. The flow contains organized vortical structures (hairpin eddies), which are characteristic of turbulent shear flows. The phase distortion induced by turbulent fluctuations is calculated from the optical path difference through the flow. A conceptual model is proposed for the distribution of scalar fluctuations produced by the hairpin vortices in the shear flow. It is shown that the phase distortion of an optical beam can be minimized by propagating the beam at an angle approximately normal to the organized vortical structures in a turbulent shear flow.

  5. Closed-Loop Adaptive Optics Control in Strong Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Atmospheric Turbulence Todd M. Venema, B.S.E., M.S.E.E. Lieutenant Colonel, USAF Approved: Dr. Juan Vasquez , (Chairman) Date Maj. Jason Schmidt, PhD (Member...to acknowledge the help of Jason Schmidt and Juan Vasquez , my Air Force Institute of Technology advisors. I would also like to acknowledge the help of...Darryl Sanchez and Denis Oesch from the Air Force’s Starfire Optical Range in helping me study my designs in their Atmospheric Simulation and Adaptive

  6. Interleaved convolutional coding for the turbulent atmospheric optical communication channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Koh, Yutai T.

    1988-09-01

    The coding gain of a constraint-length-three, rate one-half convolutional code over a long clear-air atmospheric direct-detection optical communication channel using binary pulse-position modulation signaling was directly measured as a function of interleaving delay for both hard- and soft-decision Viterbi decoding. Maximum coding gains theoretically possible for this code with perfect interleaving and physically unrealizable perfect-measurement decoding were about 7 dB under conditions of weak clear-air turbulence, and 11 dB at moderate turbulence levels. The time scale of the fading (memory) of the channel was directly measured to be tens to hundreds of milliseconds, depending on turbulence levels. Interleaving delays of 5 ms between transmission of the first and second channel bits output by the encoder yield coding gains within 1.5 dB of theoretical limits with soft-decision Viterbi decoding. Coding gains of 4-5 dB were observed with only 100 microseconds of interleaving delay. Soft-decision Viterbi decoding always yielded 1-2 dB more coding gain than hard-decision Viterbi decoding.

  7. Numerical Simulations of the Wintertime Optical Turbulence in Antarctica with the Mesoscale Model Meso-Nh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaux, F.; Masciadri, E.; Hagelin, S.; Stoesz, J.

    2009-09-01

    Mesoscale model such as Meso-NH have proven to be highly reliable in reproducing 3D maps of optical turbulence (OT).1-3 These last years ground-based astronomy has been looking towards Antarctica, especially its summits and the continental plateau where the OT appears to be confined in a shallow layer close to the surface. However some uncertainties remain. That's why our group is focusing on a detailed study of the atmospheric flow and turbulence in the internal Antarctic Plateau. Our intention in this study is to use the Meso-NH model to do predictions of the atmospheric flow in the internal plateau. The use of this model permits us to have access to informations inside an entire 3D volume, which is not the case with observations only. Two different configurations of the model have been used: one with a low horizontal resolution (ΔX = 100 km) and another one with higher horizontal resolution with the help of the grid-nesting interactive technique (ΔX = 1 km in the innermost domain). The impact of the configuration on the meteorological parameters has already been studied.4 We present here the results obtained with Meso-Nh of forecasted CN2 profiles, surface layer thickness (SLT) and seeing values at Dome C for the 16 winter nights, whose CN2 profiles have been measured by Ref.5.

  8. Robust optical wireless links over turbulent media using diversity solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Hassan

    Free-space optic (FSO) technology, i.e., optical wireless communication (OWC), is widely recognized as superior to radio frequency (RF) in many aspects. Visible and invisible optical wireless links solve first/last mile connectivity problems and provide secure, jam-free communication. FSO is license-free and delivers high-speed data rates in the order of Gigabits. Its advantages have fostered significant research efforts aimed at utilizing optical wireless communication, e.g. visible light communication (VLC), for high-speed, secure, indoor communication under the IEEE 802.15.7 standard. However, conventional optical wireless links demand precise optical alignment and suffer from atmospheric turbulence. When compared with RF, they suffer a low degree of reliability and lack robustness. Pointing errors cause optical transceiver misalignment, adversely affecting system reliability. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence causes irradiance fluctuations and beam broadening of transmitted light. Innovative solutions to overcome limitations on the exploitation of high-speed optical wireless links are greatly needed. Spatial diversity is known to improve RF wireless communication systems. Similar diversity approaches can be adapted for FSO systems to improve its reliability and robustness; however, careful diversity design is needed since FSO apertures typically remain unbalanced as a result of FSO system sensitivity to misalignment. Conventional diversity combining schemes require persistent aperture monitoring and repetitive switching, thus increasing FSO implementation complexities. Furthermore, current RF diversity combining schemes may not be optimized to address the issue of unbalanced FSO receiving apertures. This dissertation investigates two efficient diversity combining schemes for multi-receiving FSO systems: switched diversity combining and generalized selection combining. Both can be exploited to reduce complexity and improve combining efficiency. Unlike maximum

  9. Effects of organized turbulence structures on the phase distortion in a coherent optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon Joo

    1990-05-01

    Effects of organized turbulence structures on the propagation of an optical beam in a turbulent shear flow have been analyzed. An instantaneous passive-scalar field in a computed homogeneous turbulent shear flow is used to represent index-of-refraction fluctuations, and phase distortion induced in a coherent optical beam by turbulent fluctuations is calculated. The organized vortical structures (``hairpin-shaped'' eddies) in the turbulent flow give rise to a scalar distribution with elongated regions of intense fluctuation, which have an inclination (about 30°) with respect to the mean flow, similar to that of the characteristic ``hairpin'' eddies. Two-point correlations of vorticity and scalar fluctuations support a proposed physical model in which the regions of intense scalar fluctuation are produced primarily by hairpin vortices. It is found that the spatial distribution of the phase distortion has a substantial variation with the direction of propagation. A highly localized distribution of intense phase distortions is produced when the optical beam propagates at an angle (45°) close to the inclination of hairpin vortices; at larger angles of propagation the distribution shows an elongated pattern with smaller phase distortions. It is also found that the root-mean-square phase distortion depends significantly on the propagation direction, and the phase distortion can be minimized at an angle of propagation approximately normal to the inclination of hairpin eddies. This study shows how the characteristics of an optical beam propagating through a turbulent shear flow are affected by the geometrical configurations of organized vortical structures.

  10. Measurement of optical blurring in a turbulent cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Corey D.; Ciochetto, David S.; Cantrell, Will H.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2016-10-01

    Earth's atmosphere can significantly impact the propagation of electromagnetic radiation, degrading the performance of imaging systems. Deleterious effects of the atmosphere include turbulence, absorption and scattering by particulates. Turbulence leads to blurring, while absorption attenuates the energy that reaches imaging sensors. The optical properties of aerosols and clouds also impact radiation propagation via scattering, resulting in decorrelation from unscattered light. Models have been proposed for calculating a point spread function (PSF) for aerosol scattering, providing a method for simulating the contrast and spatial detail expected when imaging through atmospheres with significant aerosol optical depth. However, these synthetic images and their predicating theory would benefit from comparison with measurements in a controlled environment. Recently, Michigan Technological University (MTU) has designed a novel laboratory cloud chamber. This multiphase, turbulent "Pi Chamber" is capable of pressures down to 100 hPa and temperatures from -55 to +55°C. Additionally, humidity and aerosol concentrations are controllable. These boundary conditions can be combined to form and sustain clouds in an instrumented laboratory setting for measuring the impact of clouds on radiation propagation. This paper describes an experiment to generate mixing and expansion clouds in supersaturated conditions with salt aerosols, and an example of measured imagery viewed through the generated cloud is shown. Aerosol and cloud droplet distributions measured during the experiment are used to predict scattering PSF and MTF curves, and a methodology for validating existing theory is detailed. Measured atmospheric inputs will be used to simulate aerosol-induced image degradation for comparison with measured imagery taken through actual cloud conditions. The aerosol MTF will be experimentally calculated and compared to theoretical expressions. The key result of this study is the

  11. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  12. Influence of asymmetry turbulence cells on the angle of arrival fluctuations of optical waves in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. Very recent analyses of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations of an optical wave in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence have adopted the assumption that the propagation path was in the z-direction with circular symmetry of turbulence cells maintained in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path, and one single anisotropy factor was adopted in the orthogonal xy-plane to parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions. In this work, the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane is no longer required, and two anisotropy parameters are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane to investigate the AOA fluctuations. In addition, deviations from the classic 11/3 spectral power law behavior for Kolmogorov turbulence are allowed by assuming spectral power law value variations between 3 and 4. With the Rytov approximation theory, new theoretical models for the variance of AOA fluctuations are developed for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. When the two anisotropic parameters are equal to each other, they reduce correctly to the recently published results (the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence cells or eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane was adopted). Furthermore, when these two anisotropic parameters equal one, they reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of optical wave propagation through weak isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  13. The simulation of turbulence effect based on the technology of optical wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongming; Fei, Jindong; Du, Huijie; Yu, Hong; Du, Jian; Hu, Xinqi; Dong, Bing

    2013-09-01

    In the process of high-resolution astronomical observation and space optical mapping, the wavefront aberrations caused by atmosphere turbulence effect lead to reduced resolution of optical imaging sensor. Firstly, on the base of influence of atmosphere turbulence effect for the optical observation system, this paper investigates and analyses the development and technical characteristics of deformable mirror, which is the key device of optical wavefront control technology. In this part, the paper describes the basic principles of wavefront control and measurement using the current production line of deformable mirror, including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror which is one of the most promising technology for wavefront modulation and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Secondly, a new method based on the technology of optical wavefront control and the data of optical path difference (OPD) for simulating the effect of optical transmission induced by turbulence is presented in this paper. The modeling and characteristics of atmosphere turbulence effect applied for optical imagery detector of astronomical observation and space optical mapping has been obtained. Finally, based on the theory model of atmosphere turbulence effects and digital simulation results, a preliminary experiment was done and the results verify the feasibility of the new method. The OPD data corresponding to optical propagation effect through turbulent atmosphere can be achieved by the calculation based on the method of ray-tracing and principle of physical optics. It is a common practice to decompose aberrated wavefronts in series over the Zernike polynomials. These data will be applied to the drive and control of the deformable mirror. This kind of simulation method can be applied to simulate the optical distortions effect, such as the dithering and excursion of light spot, in the space based earth observation with the influence of turbulent atmosphere. With the help of the

  14. Optical turbulence characterization at the SAAO Sutherland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Pickering, T. E.; Wilson, R. W.; Butterley, T.; Shepherd, H. W.; Marang, F.; Matshaya, P.; Fourie, C.

    2013-11-01

    We present results from the first year of a campaign to characterize and monitor the optical turbulence profile at the South African Astronomical Observatory's Sutherland observing station in South Africa. A Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor Differential Image Motion Monitor (MASS-DIMM) was commissioned in 2010 March to provide continuous monitoring of the seeing conditions. Over the first month of the campaign, a Slope Detection And Ranging (SLODAR) from Durham University was also installed, allowing an independent verification of the performance of the MASS-DIMM device. After the first year of data collection, the overall median seeing value is found to be 1.32 arcsec as measured at ground level. The ground layer which includes all layers below 1 km accounts for 84 per cent of the turbulence, while the free atmosphere above 1 km accounts for 16 per cent with a median value of 0.41 arcsec. The median isoplanatic angle value is 1.92 arcsec, which is similar to other major astronomical sites. The median coherence time, calculated from corrected MASS measurements, is 2.85 ms. The seeing conditions at the site do show a strong correlation with wind direction, with bad seeing conditions being associated with winds from the south-east.

  15. The dependence of optical turbulence on thermal and mechanical forces over the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Optical turbulence for over-water conditions was investigated in a long-term experiment over False Bay near Cape Town, South Africa. A sonic anemometer and two boundary-layer scintillometers were deployed to access in-situ turbulence as well as the integrated turbulence over two 1.8 and 8.7 km paths. Statistical analysis reveals spatial temporal variations of the turbulence conditions over False Bay, which might be related to differences in the atmospheric conditions and/or the surface (water) temperatures. An analysis in terms of mechanical and thermal forcing reveals that the latter factor is more dominant in determining the turbulence strength.

  16. Characterization of Gigabit Ethernet Over Highly Turbulent Optical Wireless Links

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G W; Cornish, J P; Wilburn, J W; Young, R A; Ruggiero, A J

    2002-07-01

    We report on the performance characterization and issues associated with using Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) over a highly turbulent (C{sub n}{sup 2} > 10{sup -12}) 1.3 km air-optic lasercom links. Commercial GigE hardware is a cost-effective and scalable physical layer standard that can be applied to air-optic communications. We demonstrate a simple GigE hardware interface to a singlemode fiber-coupled, 1550 nm, WDM air-optic transceiver. TCPAP serves as a robust and universal foundation protocol that has some tolerance of data loss due to atmospheric fading. Challenges include establishing and maintaining a connection with acceptable throughput under poor propagation conditions. The most useful link performance diagnostic is shown to be scintillation index, where a value of 0.2 is the maximum permissible for adequate GigE throughput. Maximum GigE throughput observed was 49.7% of that obtained with a fiber jumper when scintillation index is 0.1. Shortcomings in conventional measurements such as bit error rate are apparent. Prospects for forward mor correction and other link enhancements will be discussed.

  17. Optical wave turbulence: Towards a unified nonequilibrium thermodynamic formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, A.; Garnier, J.; Hansson, T.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Millot, G.; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear propagation of coherent optical fields has been extensively explored in the framework of nonlinear optics, while the linear propagation of incoherent fields has been widely studied in the framework of statistical optics. However, these two fundamental fields of optics have been mostly developed independently of each other, so that a satisfactory understanding of statistical nonlinear optics is still lacking. This article is aimed at reviewing a unified theoretical formulation of statistical nonlinear optics on the basis of the wave turbulence theory, which provides a nonequilibrium thermodynamic description of the system of incoherent nonlinear waves. We consider the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a representative model accounting either for a nonlocal or a noninstantaneous nonlinearity, as well as higher-order dispersion effects. Depending on the amount of nonlocal (noninstantaneous) nonlinear interaction and the amount of inhomogeneous (nonstationary) statistics of the incoherent wave, different types of kinetic equations are derived and discussed. In the spatial domain, when the incoherent wave exhibits inhomogeneous statistical fluctuations, different forms of the (Hamiltonian) Vlasov equation are obtained depending on the amount of nonlocality. This Vlasov approach describes the processes of incoherent modulational instability and localized incoherent soliton structures. In the temporal domain, the causality property inherent to the response function leads to a kinetic formulation analogous to the weak Langmuir turbulence equation, which describes nonlocalized spectral incoherent solitons. In the presence of a highly noninstantaneous response, this formulation reduces to a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations (e.g., Benjamin-Ono equation), which describe incoherent dispersive shock waves. Conversely, a non-stationary statistics leads to a (non-Hamiltonian) long-range Vlasov formulation, whose self-consistent potential is

  18. Impacts of Underwater Turbulence on Acoustical and Optical Signals and Their Linkage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-12

    convected quantities like temperature in turbulence fluid," J. Fluid Mech. 5,113-133(1959). 26. J. W. Goodman , Introduction to Fourier Optics (Roberts...Turbulence on Acoustical and Optical Signals and Their Linkage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0602782N 6...Acoustical and optical signal transmission underwater is of vital interest for both civilian and military applications. The range and signal to noise

  19. Fine Scale Modeling and Forecasts of Upper Atmospheric Turbulence for Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    radiological dispersion. 15. SUBJECT TERMS numerical weather prediction, modeling, atmospheric processes, turbulence, gravity waves, upper troposphere... Weather Center Digital Data Service (ADDS) fhttp://www.aviationweather.gov/adds, http://weather.aero/1 Graphical Turbulence Guidance product, GTG-2.5...wraps up in summary. Supplementary material is located in the appendices. The first-stage of processing takes existing global or regional weather

  20. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  1. Route diversity analyses for free-space optical wireless links within turbulent scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zvanovec, Stanislav; Perez, Joaquin; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Rajbhandari, Sujan; Libich, Jiri

    2013-03-25

    Free-Space Optical (FSO) communications link performance is highly affected when propagating through the time-spatially variable turbulent environment. In order to improve signal reception, several mitigation techniques have been proposed and analytically investigated. This paper presents experimental results for the route diversity technique evaluations for a specific case when several diversity links intersects a common turbulent area and concurrently each passing regions with different turbulence flows.

  2. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  3. Nonlinear random optical waves: Integrable turbulence, rogue waves and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Walczak, Pierre; Onorato, Miguel; Suret, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We examine the general question of statistical changes experienced by ensembles of nonlinear random waves propagating in systems ruled by integrable equations. In our study that enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, we specifically focus on optical fiber systems accurately described by the integrable one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We consider random complex fields having a Gaussian statistics and an infinite extension at initial stage. We use numerical simulations with periodic boundary conditions and optical fiber experiments to investigate spectral and statistical changes experienced by nonlinear waves in focusing and in defocusing propagation regimes. As a result of nonlinear propagation, the power spectrum of the random wave broadens and takes exponential wings both in focusing and in defocusing regimes. Heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in focusing regime while low-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in defocusing regime. After some transient evolution, the wave system is found to exhibit a statistically stationary state in which neither the probability density function of the wave field nor the spectrum changes with the evolution variable. Separating fluctuations of small scale from fluctuations of large scale both in focusing and defocusing regimes, we reveal the phenomenon of intermittency; i.e., small scales are characterized by large heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics, while the large ones are almost Gaussian.

  4. Analysis and modeling of atmospheric turbulence on the high-resolution space optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lili, Jiang; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Modeling and simulation of optical remote sensing system plays an unslightable role in remote sensing mission predictions, imaging system design, image quality assessment. It has already become a hot research topic at home and abroad. Atmospheric turbulence influence on optical systems is attached more and more importance to as technologies of remote sensing are developed. In order to study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on earth observation system, the atmospheric structure parameter was calculated by using the weak atmospheric turbulence model; and the relationship of the atmospheric coherence length and high resolution remote sensing optical system was established; then the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the coefficient r0h of optical remote sensing system of ground resolution was derived; finally different orbit height of high resolution optical system imaging quality affected by atmospheric turbulence was analyzed. Results show that the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the high resolution remote sensing optical system, the resolution of which has reached sub meter level meter or even the 0.5m, 0.35m and even 0.15m ultra in recent years, image quality will be quite serious. In the above situation, the influence of the atmospheric turbulence must be corrected. Simulation algorithms of PSF are presented based on the above results. Experiment and analytical results are posted.

  5. Incoherent shock waves in long-range optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Faccio, D.; Trillo, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Considering the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation as a representative model, we report a unified presentation of different forms of incoherent shock waves that emerge in the long-range interaction regime of a turbulent optical wave system. These incoherent singularities can develop either in the temporal domain through a highly noninstantaneous nonlinear response, or in the spatial domain through a highly nonlocal nonlinearity. In the temporal domain, genuine dispersive shock waves (DSW) develop in the spectral dynamics of the random waves, despite the fact that the causality condition inherent to the response function breaks the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation. Such spectral incoherent DSWs are described in detail by a family of singular integro-differential kinetic equations, e.g. Benjamin-Ono equation, which are derived from a nonequilibrium kinetic formulation based on the weak Langmuir turbulence equation. In the spatial domain, the system is shown to exhibit a large scale global collective behavior, so that it is the fluctuating field as a whole that develops a singularity, which is inherently an incoherent object made of random waves. Despite the Hamiltonian structure of the NLS equation, the regularization of such a collective incoherent shock does not require the formation of a DSW - the regularization is shown to occur by means of a different process of coherence degradation at the shock point. We show that the collective incoherent shock is responsible for an original mechanism of spontaneous nucleation of a phase-space hole in the spectrogram dynamics. The robustness of such a phase-space hole is interpreted in the light of incoherent dark soliton states, whose different exact solutions are derived in the framework of the long-range Vlasov formalism.

  6. Scintillation fluctuations of optical communication lasers in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, Michael G.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Belichki, Sara B.; Splitter, Landon J.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Fountain, Wayne; Tucker, Frank M.

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate scintillation fluctuations on optical communication lasers and evaluate potential system improvements to reduce scintillation effects. This research attempts to experimentally verify mathematical models developed by Andrews and Phillips [1] for scintillation fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence using two different transmitting wavelengths. Propagation range lengths and detector quantities were varied to confirm the theoretical scintillation curve. In order to confirm the range and wavelength dependent scintillation curve, intensity measurements were taken from a 904nm and 1550nm laser source for an assortment of path distances along the 1km laser range at the Townes Laser Institute. The refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data was also taken at various ranges using two commercial scintillometers. This parameter is used to characterize the strength of atmospheric turbulence, which induces scintillation effects on the laser beam, and is a vital input parameter to the mathematical model. Data was taken and analyzed using a 4-detector board array. The material presented in this paper outlines the verification and validation of the theoretical scintillation model, and steps to improve the scintillation fluctuation effects on the laser beam through additional detectors and a longer transmitting wavelength. Experimental data was post processed and analyzed for scintillation fluctuations of the two transmitting wavelengths. The results demonstrate the benefit of additional detectors and validate a mathematical model that can be scaled for use in a variety of communications or defense applications. Scintillation is a problem faced by every free space laser communication system and the verification of an accurate mathematical model to simulate these effects has strong application across the industry.

  7. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    We are developing an integrated rapid environmental assessment capability that will be used to feed an ocean nowcast/forecast system. The goal is to develop a capacity for predicting the dynamics in inherent optical properties in coastal waters. This is being accomplished by developing an integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to calibrate hyperspectral remote sensing sensors in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  8. Turbulent Heating and Wave Pressure in Solar Wind Acceleration Modeling: New Insights to Empirical Forecasting of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of solar wind acceleration has made several important advances recently due to improvements in modeling techniques. Existing code and simulations test the competing theories for coronal heating, which include reconnection/loop-opening (RLO) models and wave/turbulence-driven (WTD) models. In order to compare and contrast the validity of these theories, we need flexible tools that predict the emergent solar wind properties from a wide range of coronal magnetic field structures such as coronal holes, pseudostreamers, and helmet streamers. ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code that includes Alfven wave generation and reflection and the resulting turbulent heating to accelerate solar wind in open flux tubes. We present the ZEPHYR output for a wide range of magnetic field geometries to show the effect of the magnetic field profiles on wind properties. We also investigate the competing acceleration mechanisms found in ZEPHYR to determine the relative importance of increased gas pressure from turbulent heating and the separate pressure source from the Alfven waves. To do so, we developed a code that will become publicly available for solar wind prediction. This code, TEMPEST, provides an outflow solution based on only one input: the magnetic field strength as a function of height above the photosphere. It uses correlations found in ZEPHYR between the magnetic field strength at the source surface and the temperature profile of the outflow solution to compute the wind speed profile based on the increased gas pressure from turbulent heating. With this initial solution, TEMPEST then adds in the Alfven wave pressure term to the modified Parker equation and iterates to find a stable solution for the wind speed. This code, therefore, can make predictions of the wind speeds that will be observed at 1 AU based on extrapolations from magnetogram data, providing a useful tool for empirical forecasting of the sol! ar wind.

  9. Measuring outer scale in atmospheric optical turbulence from the point view of spatial correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Mei, Hai-Ping; Qian, Xian-Mei; Rao, Rui-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    A theory about scales in atmospheric optical turbulence vortex from the point view of spatial correlation function is described. Then an experiment is carried out to prove this theory by the fiber optical turbulence sensor array near the ground. Results show that the outer scale has a mean value of 0.62m and varies from 0.34m to 0.95m by doing a nonlinear fitting on spatial correlation functions. With this method, the value of the outer scale can be given directly without any hypothesis when the optical turbulence is well-developed. A question about how the trend of the spatial correlation function show when the displacement approaches the outer scale is solved. This research can be regarded as a progress about understanding the characters of spatial correlation function in optical turbulence.

  10. Controlled simulation of optical turbulence in a temperature gradient air chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Italo; Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence simulator is built and characterized for in-lab optical wave propagation with controlled strength of the refractive-index fluctuations. The temperature gradients are generated by a sequence of heat guns with controlled individual strengths. The temperature structure functions are measured in two directions transverse to propagation path with the help of a thermocouple array and used for evaluation of the corresponding refractive-index structure functions of optical turbulence.

  11. Average capacity for optical wireless communication systems over exponentiated Weibull distribution non-Kolmogorov turbulent channels.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Zhang, Yixin; Gao, Jie; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-06-20

    We model the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems for cases of weak to strong turbulence channels, using the exponentiation Weibull distribution model. The joint effects of the beam wander and spread, pointing errors, atmospheric attenuation, and the spectral index of non-Kolmogorov turbulence on system performance are included. Our results show that the average capacity decreases steeply as the propagation length L changes from 0 to 200 m and decreases slowly down or tends to a stable value as the propagation length L is greater than 200 m. In the weak turbulence region, by increasing the detection aperture, we can improve the average channel capacity and the atmospheric visibility as an important issue affecting the average channel capacity. In the strong turbulence region, the increase of the radius of the detection aperture cannot reduce the effects of the atmospheric turbulence on the average channel capacity, and the effect of atmospheric visibility on the channel information capacity can be ignored. The effect of the spectral power exponent on the average channel capacity in the strong turbulence region is higher than weak turbulence region. Irrespective of the details determining the turbulent channel, we can say that pointing errors have a significant effect on the average channel capacity of optical wireless communication systems in turbulence channels.

  12. Optical turbulence parameters characterized via optical measurements over a 2.33 km free-space laser path.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Arnold

    2008-09-15

    Optical turbulence research contributes to improved laser communications, adaptive optics, and long-range imaging systems. This paper presents experimental measurements of scintillation and focal spot displacement to obtain optical turbulence information along a near-horizontal 2.33 km free-space laser propagation path. Calculated values for the refractive index structure constant (C(n)(2)) and Fried parameter (r0) are compared to scintillometer-based measurements for several cases in winter and spring. Optical measurements were investigated using two different laser sources for the first and second parts of the experiment. Scintillation index estimates from recorded signal intensities were corrected to account for aperture averaging. As a result, we found that an earlier calculation algorithm based on analysis of log-amplitude intensity variance was the best estimator of optical turbulence parameters over the propagation path considered.

  13. Integrated approach to free space optical communications in strong turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jason A.

    The propagation of a free space optical communication signal through atmospheric turbulence experiences random fluctuations in intensity, including signal fades which negatively impact the communications link performance. This research develops an analytical probability density function (PDF) to model the best case scenario of using multiple independent beams to reduce the intensity fluctuations. The PDF was further developed to account for partially correlated beams, such as would be experienced by beams having finite separation. The PDF was validated with results obtained from digital simulations as well as lab experiments. The research showed that as the number of transmitted beams increases the probability of fade decreases. While fade probability is reduced by adding more beams, using more than four transmitters does little to improve the overall performance. Additionally, the use of pulse position modulation (PPM) provided significant improvement over traditional fixed threshold on/off keying with the impact of signal fading reduced. Combining PPM with multiple transmitters produced the best overall bit error rate results.

  14. Quantification of optical turbulence in the ocean and its effects on beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Nootz, Gero; Jarosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser R; Hou, Weilin

    2016-11-01

    The influence of optically active turbulence on the propagation of laser beams is investigated in clear ocean water over a path length of 8.75 m. The measurement apparatus is described and the effects of optical turbulence on the laser beam are presented. The index of refraction structure constant is extracted from the beam deflection and the results are compared to independently made measures of the turbulence strength (Cn2) by a vertical microstructure profiler. Here we present values of Cn2 taken from aboard the R/V Walton Smith during the Bahamas optical turbulence exercise (BOTEX) in the Tongue of the Ocean between June 30 and July 12, 2011, spanning a range from 10-14 to 10-10  m-2/3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported for the ocean.

  15. THERMOSONDE 2007: In-Situ Measurement of Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-07

    A.N., “The local structure of turbulence in incompressible viscous fluid for very large Reynolds numbers,” Dokl . Akad . Nauk SSSR , Vol. 30, 4, 1941. 4...A.M., “Structure of the temperature field in turbulent flows,” Izvestiya Akademii Nauk SSR, Geogr. and Geophys. Ser., Vol. 13, 58, 1949. 6 Brown, J.H

  16. Validation Test Report for the BioCast Optical Forecast Model Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-09

    support a broad spectrum of naval operations. BioCast ingests satellite surface optical properties and 3D ocean model velocity forecasts and calculates a... satellite images show superior performance over 24-hour persistence of composite satellite data. Future updates include integration of 3D optical property...as initial state and complex bottom sediment models for nephloid layer. 09-04-2015 Memorandum Report Satellite Remote sensing Circulation Numerical

  17. Turbulence-driven coronal heating and improvements to empirical forecasting of the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Woolsey, Lauren N.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting models of the solar wind often rely on simple parameterizations of the magnetic field that ignore the effects of the full magnetic field geometry. In this paper, we present the results of two solar wind prediction models that consider the full magnetic field profile and include the effects of Alfvén waves on coronal heating and wind acceleration. The one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code ZEPHYR self-consistently finds solar wind solutions without the need for empirical heating functions. Another one-dimensional code, introduced in this paper (The Efficient Modified-Parker-Equation-Solving Tool, TEMPEST), can act as a smaller, stand-alone code for use in forecasting pipelines. TEMPEST is written in Python and will become a publicly available library of functions that is easy to adapt and expand. We discuss important relations between the magnetic field profile and properties of the solar wind that can be used to independently validate prediction models. ZEPHYR provides the foundation and calibration for TEMPEST, and ultimately we will use these models to predict observations and explain space weather created by the bulk solar wind. We are able to reproduce with both models the general anticorrelation seen in comparisons of observed wind speed at 1 AU and the flux tube expansion factor. There is significantly less spread than comparing the results of the two models than between ZEPHYR and a traditional flux tube expansion relation. We suggest that the new code, TEMPEST, will become a valuable tool in the forecasting of space weather.

  18. Laser beam propagation through turbulence and adaptive optics for beam delivery improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In particular, we study the statistical variations of the fractional beam energy hitting inside an optical aperture placed at several kilometer distance. The simulations are performed for different turbulence conditions and engagement ranges, with and without the use of turbulence mitigation. Turbulence mitigation is simulated with phase conjugation. The energy fluctuations are deduced from time sequence realizations. It is shown that turbulence mitigation leads to an increase of the mean energy inside the aperture and decrease of the fluctuations even in strong turbulence conditions and long distance engagement. As an example, the results are applied to a high energy laser countermeasure system, where we determine the probability that a single laser pulse, or one of the pulses in a sequence, will provide a lethal energy inside the target aperture. Again, turbulence mitigation contributes to increase the performance of the system at long-distance and for strong turbulence conditions in terms of kill probability. We also discuss a specific case where turbulence contributes to increase the pulse energy within the target aperture. The present analysis can be used to evaluate the performance of a variety of systems, such as directed countermeasures, laser communication, and laser weapons.

  19. Forecasting of Clear Air Turbulence using a Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.; Haines, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of several case studies of Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) using the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) formulation are highlighted. The performance of this technique in resolving regions of documented CAT encounters is encouraging. Its operational adaptability seems particularly attractive in that the input data can be supplied by the currently operational Rawinsonde system. A CAT index is calculated deterministically, sensing synoptic-scale changes in static stability and vertical wind shear conducive for supporting meso-scale CAT layers. This index reveals volumes of the troposphere which act as 'source regions' of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The results suggest that these regions are particularly efficient with respect to the synoptic/meso-scale energetical coupling necessary for supporting significantly turbulent layers. The output highlights specific regions of the atmosphere which can be interpreted operationally in terms of CAT-encounter probabilities.

  20. Fading losses on the LCRD free-space optical link due to channel turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino; Hamkins, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will implement an optical communications link between a pair of Earth terminals via an Earth-orbiting satellite relay. Optical turbulence over the communication paths will cause random uctuations, or fading, in the received signal irradiance. In this paper we characterize losses due to fading caused by optical turbulence. We illustrate the performance of a representative relay link, utilizing a channel interleaver and error-correction-code to mitigate fading, and provide a method to quickly determine the link performance.

  1. Optical and electrical diagnostics for the investigation of edge turbulence in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzana, R.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Cervaro, V.; Lotto, L.; Yagi, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.

    2004-10-01

    A new, two dimensional and fast diagnostic system has been developed for studying the dynamic structure of plasma turbulence; it will be used in the edge of the reversed-field pinch devices TPE-RX and RFX. The system consists of a gas-puffing nozzle, 32 optical channels measuring H{sub {alpha}} emitted from the puffed gas (to study the optical emissivity of turbulent patterns and to analyze structures in two dimensions), and an array of Langmuir probes (to compare the turbulent pattern with the optical method and to measure the local plasma parameters). The signals can be acquired at 10 Msamples/s with 2 MHz band width. The design of the system, calibrations, and tests of the electronic circuitry and the optical sensors are presented.

  2. Analysis of temporal power spectra for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-06-01

    Analytic expressions for the temporal power spectra of irradiance fluctuations and angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. In the derivation, the anisotropic non-Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, which adopts the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path and the same degree of anisotropy along the propagation direction for all the turbulence cells. The final expressions consider simultaneously the anisotropic factor and general spectral power law values. When the anisotropic factor equals one (corresponding to the isotropic turbulence), the derived temporal power spectral models have good consistency with the known results for the isotropic turbulence. Numerical calculations show that the increased anisotropic factor alleviates the atmospheric turbulence's influence on the final expressions.

  3. Optical diagnostics of turbulent mixing in explosively-driven shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Explosively-driven shock tube experiments were performed to investigate the turbulent mixing of explosive product gases and ambient air. A small detonator initiated Al / I2O5 thermite, which produced a shock wave and expanding product gases. Schlieren and imaging spectroscopy were applied simultaneously along a common optical path to identify correlations between turbulent structures and spatially-resolved absorbance. The schlieren imaging identifies flow features including shock waves and turbulent structures while the imaging spectroscopy identifies regions of iodine gas presence in the product gases. Pressure transducers located before and after the optical diagnostic section measure time-resolved pressure. Shock speed is measured from tracking the leading edge of the shockwave in the schlieren images and from the pressure transducers. The turbulent mixing characteristics were determined using digital image processing. Results show changes in shock speed, product gas propagation, and species concentrations for varied explosive charge mass. Funded by DTRA Grant HDTRA1-14-1-0070.

  4. A Microthermal Device for Measuring the Spatial Power Spectrum of Atmospheric Optical Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jonathan; McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Williams, T.; Claver, C.; Krabbendam, V.; Wiecha, O.; Andrew, J.; Warner, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Measurement Astrophysics group at UNM designed and built a novel microthermal device for characterizing atmospheric optical turbulence at astronomical observatories. This instrument is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors. The device makes differential temperature measurements which are directly related to the index of refraction structure constant, Cn2, which quantifies the strength of optical turbulence. The device is designed to work in two modes. In horizontal mode temperature differentials are measured between adjacent sensors. Measurements are combined to recover the differences over all pairwise sensor baselines. These measurements result in a spatial spectrum of turbulence. Measured turbulent spectra are then fit to standard turbulence models which yield estimates of the outer scale of turbulence and the slope of the power spectra. In vertical mode the device operates with pairs of microthermal sensors distributed vertically, each pair being separated horizontally by approximately one meter. Sensor pairs are suspended at multiple heights above the ground allowing measurement of atmospheric turbulence power as a function of altitude. This device was used to monitor optical turbulence during a site testing campaign at the future LSST site on Cerro Pachón. We present preliminary results from operation in both vertical and horizontal modes from October 2008 to December 2009. The microthermal array remains in operation on Cerro Pachón, and continues to produce valuable atmospheric measurements. Our results support the conclusion that Cerro Pachón is an excellent observatory site. The vertical turbulence profile decreases monotonically with height as expected, and the surface layer does not contribute a significant amount to the overall seeing measured at the site. This work was supported by Air Force Grant No. FA9451-04-2-0355. Instrumentation and travel support was provided in part by

  5. Introducing the concept of anisotropy at different scales for modeling optical turbulence.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the concept of anisotropy at different atmospheric turbulence scales is introduced. A power spectrum and its associated structure function with inner and outer scale effects and anisotropy are also shown. The power spectrum includes an effective anisotropic parameter ζ(eff) to describe anisotropy, which is useful for modeling optical turbulence when a non-Kolmogorov power law and anisotropy along the direction of propagation are present.

  6. Atmospheric turbulence-induced signal fades on optical heterodyne communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, K. A.

    1986-06-01

    The three basic atmospheric propagation effects, absorption, scattering, and turbulence, are reviewed. A simulation approach is then developed to determine signal fade probability distributions on heterodyne-detected satellite links which operate through naturally occurring atmospheric turbulence. The calculations are performed on both angle-tracked and nonangle-tracked downlinks, and on uplinks, with and without adaptive optics. Turbulence-induced degradations in communication performance are determined using signal fade probability distributions, and it is shown that the average signal fade can be a poor measure of the performance degradation.

  7. Determination of Flow Orientation of an Optically Active Turbulent Field by Means of a Single Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-18

    optically active turbulent field was determined by Fourier transforming the wander of a laser beam propagating in the ocean. A simple physical model... Fourier transform for the situation depicted on the right and on the left, respectively. July 1, 2013 / Vol. 38, No. 13 / OPTICS LETTERS 2185 0146-9592/13...132185-03$15.00/0 © 2013 Optical Society of America to the flow (see top row of Fig. 3). However, the magni- tude of the Fourier transform, in

  8. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doelman, Niek; Osborn, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Based on an estimate of the power spectral density function, a low order stochastic model to capture the temporal variability of r0 is proposed. The impact of this type of stochastic model on the prediction of the coherence length behaviour is shown.

  9. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  10. Fiber-coupling efficiency for free-space optical communication through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dikmelik, Yamaç; Davidson, Frederic M

    2005-08-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems have recently used fiber-optic components. The received laser beam in such a system must be coupled into a single-mode fiber at the input of the receiver module. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of a laser beam and limits the fiber-coupling efficiency. We numerically evaluate the fiber-coupling efficiency for laser light distorted by atmospheric turbulence. We also investigate the use of a coherent fiber array as a receiver structure and find that a coherent fiber array that consists of seven subapertures would significantly increase the fiber-coupling efficiency.

  11. The effects of atmospheric turbulence on precision optical measurements used for antenna-pointing compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N.

    1989-01-01

    Blind pointing of the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-meter antennas can be improved if distortions of the antenna structure caused by unpredictable environmental loads can be measured in real-time, and the resulting boresight shifts evaluated and incorporated into the pointing control loops. The measurement configuration of a proposed pointing compensation system includes an optical range sensor that measures distances to selected points on the antenna surface. The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the accuracy of optical distance measurements and a method to make in-situ determinations of turbulence-induced measurement errors are discussed.

  12. Aperture averaging and correlation function measurements in strong atmospheric turbulence for optical wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Harris, Joseph; Tang, Yunxin; Gammon, Robert; Davis, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) links in a clear atmosphere is affected by the non-ideal characteristics of the communication channel. Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in the received signal level, which increase the bit errors in a digital communication link. In order to quantify performance limitations, a better understanding of the effect of the intensity fluctuations on the received signal at all turbulence levels is needed. Theory reliably describes the behavior in the weak turbulence regime, but theoretical descriptions in the intermediate and strong turbulence regimes are less well developed. We have developed a flexible empirical approach for characterizing link performance in strong turbulence conditions through image analysis of intensity scintillation patterns coupled with frame aperture averaging on an FSO communication link. These measurements are complemented with direct measurements of temporal and spatial correlation functions. A He-Ne laser beam propagates 106 meters in free-space over flat terrain about a meter above the ground to provide strong atmospheric turbulence conditions. A high performance digital camera with a frame-grabbing computer interface is used to capture received laser intensity distributions at rates up to 30 frames per second and various short shutter speeds, down to 1/16,000s per frame. A scintillometer is used for accurate measurements of the turbulence parameter Cn2. Laboratory measurements use a local strong turbulence generator, which mimics a strong phase screen. Spatial correlation functions are measured using laterally separated point detectors placed in the receiver plane. Correlations and captured image frames are analyzed in Labview to evaluate correlation functions, Cn2, and the aperture averaging factor. The aperture averaging results demonstrate the expected reduction in intensity fluctuations with increasing aperture diameter, and show quantitatively the differences in behavior between

  13. Combining Satellite Ocean Color and Hydrodynamic Model Uncertainties in Bio-Optical Forecasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-03

    time using the current field from the model. Uncertainties in both the satellite chlorophyll values and the currents from the circulation model impact...ensemole techniques to partition the chlorophyll uncertainties into components due to atmospheric correction and bio-optical inversion. By combining...the satellite & model ensemble sets, we produce a final chlorophyll forecast field and associated uncertainty map that includes both sets of

  14. Turbulent single-photon propagation in the Canary optical link

    SciTech Connect

    Capraro, Ivan; Tomaello, Andrea; Dall'Arche, Alberto; Gerlin, Francesca; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Herbst, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert

    2014-12-04

    The role of turbulence for Quantum Communications (QC) has been investigated in a 143 km-long link. The analysis of the received signal temporal domain indicate how to exploit constructively its effects in the case of QC along very long free-space links as well satellite links. Novel applications with relevant background noise may be envisaged.

  15. Characterization of optical turbulence in a jet engine exhaust with Shack-Hartmenn wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deron, R.; Mendez, F.

    2008-10-01

    Airborne laser countermeasure applications (DIRCM) are hampered by the turbulence of jet engine exhaust. The effects of this source of perturbation on optical propagation have still to be documented and analyzed in order to get a better insight into the different mechanisms of the plume perturbations and also to validate CFD/LES codes. For that purpose, wave front sensing has been used as a non-intrusive optical technique to provide unsteady and turbulent optical measurements through a plume of a jet engine installed at a fixed point on the ground. The experiment has been implemented in October 2007 along with other optical measuring techniques at Volvo Aero Corporation (Trollhättan, Sweden). This study is part of a European research programme dealing with DIRCM issues. The Shack- Hartmann (SH) wave front sensing technique was employed. It consisted of 64 x 64 lenslets coupled to a 1024x1024 pixel Dalsa CCD sensor working at a sampling rate of 40 Hz. A 15 ns pulsed laser synchronized with the SH sensor enabled "freezing" turbulence in each SH image. The ability of the technique to substract a reference permitted a simple calibration procedure to ensure accurate and reliable measurements despite vibration environment. Instantaneous phases are reconstructed using Fourier techniques so as to obtain a better spatial resolution against turbulent effects. Under any given plume condition, overall tilt aberration prevails. Phase power spectra derived from phase statistics are drawn according to the plume main axis and to normal axis. They compare favorably well to the decaying Kolmogorov power law on a useful high spatial frequency range. Averaged phases are also decomposed into Zernike polynomials to analyze optical mode behavior according to engine status and to plume abscissa. With overall tilt removed, turbulent DSP's amplitude drops by a factor of 30 to 40 and mean aberrations by a factor of 10 from an abscissa 1 meter to another 3.5 meters away from the engine

  16. Adaptive detection technique for optical wireless communication over strong turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Huang, Dexiu; Xiuhua, Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium, so the atmospheric turbulence effects lead to fading related with signal intensity. The received signal of OWC over strong turbulence channels is assumed to be a mixture of K-distributed fading and Gaussian distributed thermal noise. Second-order spectral analysis is unable to separately estimate the mixed signal. In order to mitigate the fading induced by turbulence, the decision threshold-updating algorithm based on second and higher order cumulants is proposed and is able to operate in an unknown turbulence environment. The performance of the adaptive processing scheme has been evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation results show the improvement of the bit error rate (BER) performance.

  17. The effect of thin turbulent shear layers on the optical quality of imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    A modified C141 transport was outfitted with a 91.5-cm reflector telescope designed to view objects radiating outside the visible window in the infrared range from 1 micron to 1000 microns. The telescope is situated in a cavity which is operated open port. Spoilers were designed which reduce turbulence-induced excitation of the cavity. The aircraft was designed to operate at altitudes up to 15 km to significantly reduce the effect of the H2O and CO2. Furthermore, the optically degrading influence of the large-scale atmospheric turbulence on land-based telescopes is replaced by the effect of the turbulent shear layer resulting from the spoiler upstream of the cavity. A mathematical model was established to describe the effect of turbulent shear layers on imaging systems and to examine the parameters of interest relevant to potential wind-tunnel experimentation.

  18. Experimental demonstration of single-mode fiber coupling over relatively strong turbulence with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Liu, Chao; Xian, Hao

    2015-10-10

    High-speed free-space optical communication systems using fiber-optic components can greatly improve the stability of the system and simplify the structure. However, propagation through atmospheric turbulence degrades the spatial coherence of the signal beam and limits the single-mode fiber (SMF) coupling efficiency. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the SMF coupling efficiency over various turbulences. The results show that the SMF coupling efficiency drops from 81% without phase distortion to 10% when phase root mean square value equals 0.3λ. The simulations of SMF coupling with adaptive optics (AO) indicate that it is inevitable to compensate the high-order aberrations for SMF coupling over relatively strong turbulence. The SMF coupling efficiency experiments, using an AO system with a 137-element deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, obtain average coupling efficiency increasing from 1.3% in open loop to 46.1% in closed loop under a relatively strong turbulence, D/r0=15.1.

  19. Propagation of an optical vortex carried by a partially coherent Laguerre-Gaussian beam in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingjian; Guo, Lixin; Li, Jiangting; Huang, Qingqing; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Dan

    2016-06-10

    The analytical formulas for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode probability density, signal OAM mode detection probability, and spiral spectrum of partially coherent Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with optical vortices propagation in weak horizontal oceanic turbulent channels were developed, based on the Rytov approximation theory. The effect of oceanic turbulence and beam source parameters on the propagation behavior of the optical vortices carried by partially coherent LG beams was investigated in detail. Our results indicated that optical turbulence in an ocean environment produced a much stronger effect on the optical vortex than that in an atmosphere environment; the effective range of the signal OAM mode of LG beams with a smaller ratio of the mode crosstalk was limited to only several tens of meters in turbulent ocean. The existence of oceanic turbulence evidently induced OAM mode crosstalk and spiral spectrum spread. The effects of oceanic turbulence on the OAM mode detection probability increased with the increase of radial and azimuthal mode orders, oceanic turbulent equivalent temperature structure parameter, and temperature-salinity balance parameter. The spatial partial coherence of the beam source would enhance the effect of turbulent aberrations on the signal OAM mode detection probability, and fully coherent vortex beams provided better performance than partially coherent ones. Increasing wavelength of the vortex beams would help improve the performance of this quantum optical communication system. These results might be of interest for the potential application of optical vortices in practical underwater quantum optical communication among divers, submarines, and sensors in the ocean environment.

  20. Limitations of Segmented Wavefront Control Devices in Emulating Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for Adaptive Optics in Vision Science”. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 10(3):629–635, May/Jun 2004. 11. Fernandez , Enrique J...and Pablo Artal. “Membrane Deformable Mirror for Adap- tive Optics: Performance Limits in Visual Optics”. Optics Express, 11(9):1056– 1069, May 2003

  1. Random optical beam propagation in anisotropic turbulence along horizontal links.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-10-17

    Considerable amount of data has been collected in the past asserting that atmospheric turbulence has regions where it exhibits anisotropic statistics. For instance, it is known that the fluctuations in the refractive index within the first meter above the ground are typically stronger in the vertical direction compared with those in the horizontal directions. We have investigated the second-order statistical properties of a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam traversing anisotropic atmospheric turbulence along a horizontal path. Analytical expression is rigorously derived for the cross-spectral density function of a GSM beam. It is shown that the spread of the beam and its coherence properties become different in two transverse directions due to anisotropy. In the limiting case when the source coherence width becomes infinite our results reduce to those for Gaussian beam propagation. Source partial coherence is shown to mitigate anisotropy at sub-kilometer distances.

  2. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  3. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence.

    PubMed

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-12

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  4. Assessment of Optical Turbulence Profiles Derived From Probabilistic Climatology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    IRIA) Center,Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, 1993.10. Jumper G. Y., Roadcap J. R ., Adair S. C., Seeley G. P., and Fairley G. Atmo...three dimensional spatial covariance function describes this correlationwithin a volume of space for a random eld u( R ) = (x; y; z; t). The PSD charac...terizes the statistical distribution of the size and number of turbulent eddies in thevolume. [19] In three dimensions, the spatial variable, R , and the

  5. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  6. Exploring Vertical Turbulence Structure in Neutrally and Stably Stratified Flows Using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Large-Eddy Simulation (WRF-LES) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udina, Mireia; Sun, Jielun; Kosović, Branko; Soler, Maria Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Following Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69(1):338-351, 2012), vertical variations of turbulent mixing in stably stratified and neutral environments as functions of wind speed are investigated using the large-eddy simulation capability in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The simulations with a surface cooling rate for the stable boundary layer (SBL) and a range of geostrophic winds for both stable and neutral boundary layers are compared with observations from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99). To avoid the uncertainty of the subgrid scheme, the investigation focuses on the vertical domain when the ratio between the subgrid and the resolved turbulence is small. The results qualitatively capture the observed dependence of turbulence intensity on wind speed under neutral conditions; however, its vertical variation is affected by the damping layer used in absorbing undesirable numerical waves at the top of the domain as a result of relatively large neutral turbulent eddies. The simulated SBL fails to capture the observed temperature variance with wind speed and the observed transition from the SBL to the near-neutral atmosphere with increasing wind speed, although the vertical temperature profile of the simulated SBL resembles the observed profile. The study suggests that molecular thermal conduction responsible for the thermal coupling between the surface and atmosphere cannot be parameterized through the Monin-Obukhov bulk relation for turbulent heat transfer by applying the surface radiation temperature, as is common practice when modelling air-surface interactions.

  7. Delayed diversity for fade resistance in optical wireless communications through turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisno, Sugianto; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2004-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and phase of the received signal in an optical wireless communication link. These fluctuations, often referred to as scintillation noise, lead to signal fading, which increase bit errors in digital communication links using intensity modulation and direct detection. The performance of an optical link can be improved by the use of a time delayed diversity technique, which takes advantage of the fact that the atmospheric path from transmitter to receiver is statistically independent for time intervals beyond the correlation time of the intensity fluctuations. We have designed and constructed a prototype optical wireless system using this scheme. Bit-error-rate measurements have been used to characterize the link performance for different delay periods under conditions of controlled simulated turbulence. It has been determined that link performance improves significantly, especially in strong turbulence. In addition, we have implemented orthogonal polarization modulation, which works especially well in optical wireless systems. In contrast to fiber optic communications, the polarization state of a laser beam is well preserved on a free space optical path.

  8. Heterodyne efficiency of a coherent free-space optical communication model through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongxiong; Dang, Anhong; Liu, Ling; Guo, Hong

    2012-10-20

    The heterodyne efficiency of a coherent free-space optical (FSO) communication model under the effects of atmospheric turbulence and misalignment is studied in this paper. To be more general, both the transmitted beam and local oscillator beam are assumed to be partially coherent based on the Gaussian Schell model (GSM). By using the derived analytical form of the cross-spectral function of a GSM beam propagating through atmospheric turbulence, a closed-form expression of heterodyne efficiency is derived, assuming that the propagation directions for the transmitted and local oscillator beams are slightly different. Then the impacts of atmospheric turbulence, configuration of the two beams (namely, beam radius and spatial coherence width), detector radius, and misalignment angle over heterodyne efficiency are examined. Numerical results suggest that the beam radius of the two overlapping beams can be optimized to achieve a maximum heterodyne efficiency according to the turbulence conditions and the detector radius. It is also found that atmospheric turbulence conditions will significantly degrade the efficiency of heterodyne detection, and compared to fully coherent beams, partially coherent beams are less sensitive to the changes in turbulence conditions and more robust against misalignment at the receiver.

  9. Atmospheric Turbulence Measurements in Support of Adaptive Optics Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Champagne, F. H., C. A. Friehe, J. C. LaRue, and J. C. Wyngaard. 1977. Flux measurements, flux estimation tecniques , and fine scale turbulence measurements...Dr. C. Giuliano 3011 MaLibu Canyon Road MaLibu, CA 90265 DL-3 Lockheed Missiles and Soace Co. Document Management ATTN: Dr. R. Lytetl 3251 Hanover...Laboratory ATTN: Dr. C. Primmerman P.O. Box 73 Lexington. MA 02173 Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. Document Management L556 Mail Station c/51-40 B586 P.O. Box

  10. Fading Losses on the LCRD Free-Space Optical Link Due to Channel Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino; Hamkins, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will implement an optical communications link between a pair of Earth terminals via an Earth-orbiting satellite relay. Clear air turbulence over the communication paths will cause random fluctuations, or fading, in the received signal irradiance. In this paper we characterize losses due to fading caused by clear air turbulence. We illustrate the performance of a representative relay link, utilizing a channel interleaver and error-correction-code to mitigate fading, and provide a method to quickly determine the link performance.

  11. Propagation of a random electromagnetic beam through a misaligned optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingbin; Zhao, Daomu

    2008-10-01

    On the basis of the generalized diffraction integral formula for misaligned optical systems in the spatial domain, an analytical propagation expression for the elements of the cross-spectral density matrix of a random electromagnetic beam passing through a misaligned optical system in turbulent atmosphere is derived. Some analyses are illustrated by numerical examples relating to changes in the state of polarization of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beam propagating through such an optical system. It is shown that the misalignment has a significant influence on the intensity profile and the state of polarization of the beam, but the influence becomes smaller for the beam propagating in strong turbulent atmosphere. The method in this paper can be applied for sources that are either isotropic or anisotropic. It is shown that the isotropic sources and the anisotropic sources have different polarization properties on beam propagation.

  12. Propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan; Cai, Yangjian; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2012-04-23

    The propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system are derived in turbulent atmosphere, respectively. The average intensity distribution and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters, the topological charge, the transverse coherent lengths, and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are also examined in detail. This research is beneficial to the practical applications in free-space optical communications and the remote sensing of the dark hollow beams.

  13. Underwater optical communication performance for laser beam propagation through weak oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Li, Zan; Liu, Zengji

    2015-02-20

    In clean ocean water, the performance of a underwater optical communication system is limited mainly by oceanic turbulence, which is defined as the fluctuations in the index of refraction resulting from temperature and salinity fluctuations. In this paper, using the refractive index spectrum of oceanic turbulence under weak turbulence conditions, we carry out, for a horizontally propagating plane wave and spherical wave, analysis of the aperture-averaged scintillation index, the associated probability of fade, mean signal-to-noise ratio, and mean bit error rate. Our theoretical results show that for various values of the rate of dissipation of mean squared temperature and the temperature-salinity balance parameter, the large-aperture receiver leads to a remarkable decrease of scintillation and consequently a significant improvement on the system performance. Such an effect is more noticeable in the plane wave case than in the spherical wave case.

  14. Theoretical and experimental studies of polarization fluctuations over atmospheric turbulent channels for wireless optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiankun; Ding, Shengli; Zhai, Huili; Dang, Anhong

    2014-12-29

    In wireless optical communications (WOC), polarization multiplexing systems and coherent polarization systems have excellent performance and wide applications, while its state of polarization affected by atmospheric turbulence is not clearly understood. This paper focuses on the polarization fluctuations caused by atmospheric turbulence in a WOC link. Firstly, the relationship between the polarization fluctuations and the index of refraction structure parameter is introduced and the distribution of received polarization angle is obtained through theoretical derivations. Then, turbulent conditions are adjusted and measured elaborately in a wide range of scintillation indexes (SI). As a result, the root-mean-square (RMS) variation and probability distribution function (PDF) of polarization angle conforms closely to that of theoretical model.

  15. Use of Remotely Sensed Aerosol Optical Depth in Particulate Matter Forecasting for Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, S. L.; Crist, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cincinnati, a large metropolitan area in southwestern Ohio, has been listed as a non-attainment area based on the EPA 1997 PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5μm) standard with a number of unhealthy days reported annually for sensitive groups. AirNow provides air quality index for the city, but its accuracy largely depends on the air quality forecast models used and ground-based monitoring network measurements. These networks are inherently limited by their sparse distribution; nonetheless, they form an integral part of many decision-making structure and epidemiological studies. Remote sensing instruments such as MODIS provide daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) products with almost global spatial coverage, which are available on a near-real-time (NRT) basis. This work aims to show that the NRT AOD product obtained from MODIS can improve the air quality forecast in the Cincinnati area. To achieve this, an evaluation of the correlation of AOD retrievals with ground-based PM2.5 observations is carried out. Further to which, the MODIS AOD data is included as a variable in a statistical model to bolster current PM2.5 forecasting capabilities. Other key input parameters to the multiple linear regression model includes surface and vertical weather patterns, mixing height, local wind patterns, relative humidity and temperature.

  16. Effect of optical turbulence along a downward slant path on probability of laser hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, K. Ove S.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the optical turbulence effect along a slant path downward on probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure level (MPE) from a laser is discussed. The optical turbulence is generated by fluctuations (variations) in refractive index of the atmosphere. These fluctuations are caused in turn by changes in atmospheric temperature and humidity. The structure function of refractive index, Cn2, is the single most important parameter in the description of turbulence effects on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation. In the boundary layer, the lowest part of the atmosphere where the ground directly influence the atmosphere, is the variation of Cn2 in Sweden between about 10-17 and 10-12 m-2/3, see Bergström et al. [5]. Along a horizontal path is the Cn 2 often assumed to be constant. The variation of the Cn2 along a slant path is described by the Tatarski model as function of height to the power of -4/3 or -2/3, depending on day or night conditions. The hazard of laser damage of eye is calculated for a long slant path downward. The probability of exceeding the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) level is given as a function of distance in comparison with nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) for adopted levels of turbulence. Furthermore, calculations are carried out for a laser pointer or a designator laser from a high altitude and long distance down to a ground target. The used example shows that there is an 10% risk of exceeding the MPE at a distance 2 km beyond the NOHD, in this example 48 km, due to turbulence level of 5·10-15 m-2/3 at ground height. The turbulence influence on a laser beam along horizontal path on NOHD have been shown before by Zilberman et al. [4].

  17. Measurement and limitations of optical orbital angular momentum through corrected atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Neo, Richard; Goodwin, Michael; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-02-08

    In recent years, there have been a series of proposals to exploit the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for astronomical applications. The OAM of light potentially represents a new way in which to probe the universe. The study of this property of light entails the development of new instrumentation and problems which must be addressed. One of the key issues is whether we can overcome the loss of the information carried by OAM due to atmospheric turbulence. We experimentally analyze the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the OAM content of a signal over a range of realistic turbulence strengths typical for astronomical observations. With an adaptive optics system we are able to recover up to 89% power in an initial non-zero OAM mode (ℓ = 1) at low turbulence strengths (0.30" FWHM seeing). However, for poorer seeing conditions (1.1" FWHM seeing), the amount of power recovered is significantly lower (5%), showing that for the terrestrial detection of astronomical OAM, a careful design of the adaptive optics system is needed.

  18. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  19. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS STUDIES OF TURBULENCE IN OPTICALLY THICK GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, C.; Medeiros, J. R. De; Lazarian, A.; Burkhart, B.; Pogosyan, D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity of principal component analysis (PCA) to the velocity power spectrum in high-opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic position–position–velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post-processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal −3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of the Lazarian and Pogosyan theory. This makes PCA a potentially valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities, provided that proper gauging of the PCA index is made. However, we found the latter to not be easy, as the PCA results change in an irregular way for data with high sonic Mach numbers. This is in contrast to synthetic Brownian noise data used for velocity and density fields that show monotonic PCA behavior. We attribute this difference to the PCA's sensitivity to Fourier phase information.

  20. Compensating Atmospheric Turbulence Effects at High Zenith Angles with Adaptive Optics Using Advanced Phase Reconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemann, M.; Soehnel, G.; Archer, G.

    Atmospheric turbulence degrades the resolution of images of space objects far beyond that predicted by diffraction alone. Adaptive optics telescopes have been widely used for compensating these effects, but as users seek to extend the envelopes of operation of adaptive optics telescopes to more demanding conditions, such as daylight operation, and operation at low elevation angles, the level of compensation provided will degrade. We have been investigating the use of advanced wave front reconstructors and post detection image reconstruction to overcome the effects of turbulence on imaging systems in these more demanding scenarios. In this paper we show results comparing the optical performance of the exponential reconstructor, the least squares reconstructor, and two versions of a reconstructor based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm in a closed loop adaptive optics system using a conventional continuous facesheet deformable mirror and a Hartmann sensor. The performance of these reconstructors has been evaluated under a range of source visual magnitudes and zenith angles ranging up to 70 degrees. We have also simulated satellite images, and applied speckle imaging, multi-frame blind deconvolution algorithms, and deconvolution algorithms that presume the average point spread function is known to compute object estimates. Our work thus far indicates that the combination of adaptive optics and post detection image processing will extend the useful envelope of the current generation of adaptive optics telescopes.

  1. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  2. First results on the Experiment FESTER on optical turbulence over False Bay South Africa: dependencies and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Sucher, Erik; Eisele, Christian; Seiffer, Dirk; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    The experiment FESTER (First European South African Transmission ExpeRiment) took place in 2015 to investigate the atmospheric influence on electro-optical systems performance across False Bay / South Africa on a long term basis. Several permanent stations for monitoring electro-optical propagation and atmospheric parameters were set up around the Bay. Additional intensive observation periods (IOPs) allowed for boat runs to assess the inhomogeneous atmospheric propagation conditions over water. In this paper we focus on the distribution of optical turbulence over the Bay. The different impact of water masses originating from the Indian Ocean and the Benguela current on the development of optical turbulence is discussed. The seasonal behavior of optical turbulence is presented and its effect on electro-optical system performance examined.

  3. An Optical Spectroscopic Study of HH 110: a Turbulent Mixing Layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, S.; Raga, A. C.; Curiel, S.

    2003-01-01

    The HH 110 jet extends 3 arcmin in length and consists of numerous knots forming the flow. Noriega-Crespo et al. (1996) found that the turbulent optical and near-infrared morphology of the HH 110 jet is consistent with that of a boundary layer. In this work, we have analyzed some line ratios along and across the jet in order to make a quantitative comparison with the line ratios predicted by the current mixing layer models.

  4. Distribution Models for Optical Scintillation Due to Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-12

    beam jitter is found to be a dominant effect when this radius is close to unity, and the relationship between pointing error and scintillation is...phase errors in the near Field of the transmitter. If the optical phase at each point in the transmitter plane is described by the residual, 9, within...is close to unity, and the relationship between pointing error and scintillation is examined in detail. As a result of this work, models for the mean

  5. Optical Turbulence on Underwater Image Degradation in Natural Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    Arlington, VA 22203-1995 ONR Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. It is a well-known fact that the major degradation source on electro ...source on electro -optical (EO) imaging underwater is from scattering by the medium itself and the constituents within, namely particles of various...feet. The same applies to regions of strong re- suspension from the bottom, both in coastal regions as well as in the deep sea. The effects of

  6. Characterization of optical turbulence at the GREGOR solar telescope: temporal and local behavior and its influence on the solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Stein, K.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2016-10-01

    Local atmospheric turbulence at the telescope level is regarded as a major reason for affecting the performance of the adaptive optics systems using wavelengths in the visible and infrared for solar observations. During the day the air masses around the telescope dome are influenced by flow distortions. Additionally heating of the infrastructure close to telescope causes thermal turbulence. Thereby optical turbulence is produced and leads to quality changes in the local seeing throughout the day. Image degradation will be yielded affecting the performance of adaptive optical systems. The spatial resolution of the solar observations will be reduced. For this study measurements of the optical turbulence, represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 were performed on several locations at the GREGOR telescope at the Teide observatory at Tenerife at the Canary Islands / Spain. Since September 2012 measurements of Cn2 were carried out between the towers of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) and of GREGOR with a laser-scintillometer. The horizontal distance of the measurement path was about 75 m. Additional from May 2015 up to March 2016 the optical turbulence was determined at three additional locations close to the solar telescope GREGOR. The optical turbulence is derived from sonic anemometer measurements. Time series of the sonic temperature are analyzed and compared to the direct measurements of the laser scintillometer. Meteorological conditions are investigated, especially the influence of the wind direction. Turbulence of upper atmospheric layers is not regarded. The measured local turbulence is compared to the system performance of the GREGOR telescopes. It appears that the mountain ridge effects on turbulence are more relevant than any local causes of seeing close to the telescope. Results of these analyses and comparison of nearly one year of measurements are presented and discussed.

  7. TODS BioCast User Manual, Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-17

    BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure Version 1.0 Sean Mccarthy Sherwin Ladner JaSon...18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT TODS BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection...defined by the AOPS input file. BioCast is designed to apply a simple advection approach to satellite derived products in order to forecast the

  8. Method of forecasting energy center positions of laser beam spot images using a parallel hierarchical network for optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Leonid I.; Kokryatskaya, Natalia I.; Melnikov, Viktor V.; Kosenko, Galina L.

    2013-05-01

    A forecasting method, based on the parallel-hierarchical (PH) network and hyperbolic smoothing of empirical data, is presented in this paper. Preceding values of the time series, hyperbolic smoothing, and PH network data are used for forecasting. To determine a position of the next route fragment in relation to X and Y axes, hyperbola parameters are sent to the route parameter forecasting system. In the results synchronization block, network-processed data arrive to the database where a sample of most correlated data is drawn using service parameters of the PH network. An average prediction error is 0.55% for the developed method and 1.62% for neural networks. That is why, due to the use of the PH network and hyperbolic smoothing, the developed method is more efficient for real-time systems than traditional neural networks in forecasting energy center positions of laser beam spot images for optical communication systems.

  9. Atmospheric optical turbulence measurements in the LOTIS vacuum chamber and LOTIS collimator jitter analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borota, Stephen A.; Li, Laurence; Cuzner, Gregor; Hutchison, Sheldon B.; Cochrane, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company has completed the Large Optical Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) at its Sunnyvale, CA campus. Central to the LOTIS testing facility is a 6.5-meter diameter optical collimator housed in a large, temperature controlled and vibration isolated high-vacuum chamber. A measurement has been made of the atmospheric turbulence inside the LOTIS vacuum chamber testing environment at ambient pressure and temperature near floor level where distorting turbulence may be most persistent. Turbulence is one of the many components that define the overall LOTIS Collimator optical testing capabilities at ambient air pressure. Experimental measurements have been made with a non-phase-shifting Fizeau interferometer along a 50-foot horizontal propagation path in double pass. Results presented here represent root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error over an 18-inch aperture and the corresponding atmospheric coherence length, ro (Fried's parameter). In addition, an analysis was performed to calculate the optical line-of-sight jitter response of the LOTIS Collimator system and facility due to base-level vibration disturbances. Vibration survey measurements were made using accelerometers mounted to the vacuum chamber foundation to create a Power Spectral Density (PSD) plot of the measured seismic and vacuum chamber mechanically induced vibration disturbances. The measured PSD was used as the base input to a system-level finite element model that included the LOTIS Collimator, the Flat Mirror Positioning structure and a generic Unit Under Test all mounted on the LOTIS Vibration Isolation Bench to assess the whole system jitter response. Results presented here represent the RMS jitter in nanoradians through the optical path of the LOTIS Collimator due to base-level induced seismic and chamber mechanical vibrations.

  10. Investigation of edge turbulence by means of optical and electrical diagnostics in RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarin, Paolo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Serianni, Gianluigi; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Sakakita, Hajime

    2003-10-01

    Electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of RFP is commonly observed with sets of Langmuir probes during low current operation and associated with electrostatic structures. A new diagnostic system is being developed for the investigation of electrostatic turbulence in the edge region of fusion plasmas, at high plasma currents and thermal loads and will be used in the TPE-RX and RFX devices. The system is composed of gas puff nozzle, a double radial array of Langmuir probes and a set of 32 optical chords measuring the HÑ fluctuations. The nozzle will allow the puffing of gas to increase the local optical emissivity; the optical sensors will permit to investigate the optical emissivity turbulent pattern and to perform a two-dimensional analysis of turbulent structures. The Langmuir probes will be used to visualise the floating potential turbulent pattern and to measure the electron density. After assessing the correspondence between the results of the two systems and characterising the properties of the local plasma, the Langmuir probes will be remotely removed and only the optical analysis will be continued at high plasma currents. The gas flow will be characterised so as not to perturb the investigated region, while at the same time increasing the local emissivity. The area of optical view is 60 mm wide (toroidal direction) and 4 mm high (poloidal direction). The fields of view of adjacent chords in the object plane are 5 mm toroidally apart from each other and their diameter is 4 mm. The focus along the line of sight is about 50 mm deep. Each chord views a cone centred on focal point in the outer edge and extending through the plasma. The contributions due to small-scale structures away from the focus will be spatially averaged and so should contribute mainly a constant level to the chord signal. The puffed cloud emission will be collected from 3 optical heads and transferred through 35 m long optical fibres to the detection system, for which standard

  11. Optical turbulence profiling with SloDAR in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Jérôme; Mieda, Etsuko; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard; Graham, James R.; Carlberg, Raymond; Wright, Shelley A.; Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh

    2014-07-01

    The Earth's polar regions offer unique advantages for ground-based astronomical observations with its cold and dry climate, long periods of darkness, and the potential for exquisite image quality. We present preliminary results from a site-testing campaign during nighttime from October to November 2012 at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), on a 610-m high ridge near the Eureka weatherstation on Ellesmere Island, Canada. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was employed, using the Slope Detection and Ranging (SloDAR) method. This instrument (Mieda et al, this conference) was designed to measure the altitude, strength and variability of atmospheric turbulence, in particular for operation under Arctic conditions. First SloDAR optical turbulence profiles above PEARL show roughly half of the optical turbulence confined to the boundary layer, below about 1 km, with the majority of the remainder in one or two thin layers between 2 km and 5 km, or above. The median seeing during this campaign was measured to be 0.65 arcsec.

  12. LOLAS-2: Redesign of an Optical Turbulence Profiler with High Altitude-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R.; Zúñiga, C. A.; Tapia-Rodríguez, J. J.; Sánchez, L. J.; Cruz-González, I.; Avilés, J. L.; Valdés-Hernández, O.; Carrasco, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present the development, tests, and first results of the second-generation LOLAS-2. This instrument constitutes a strongly improved version of the prototype LOLAS, which is aimed at the measurement of optical turbulence profiles close to the ground, with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the generalized Scidar principle that consists of taking double-star scintillation images on a defocused pupil plane and calculating in real time the autocovariance of the scintillation. The main components are an open-truss 40-cm Ritchey-Chrétien telescope, a German-type equatorial mount, an electron-multiplying CCD camera, and a dedicated acquisition and real-time data-processing software. The new optical design of LOLAS-2 is significantly simplified compared to the prototype. The experiments carried out to test the permanence of the image within the useful zone of the detector and the stability of the telescope focus show that LOLAS-2 can function without the use of the autoguiding and autofocus algorithms that were developed for the prototype version. Optical turbulence profiles obtained with the new LOLAS have the best altitude-resolution ever achieved with Scidar-like techniques (6.3 m). The simplification of the optical layout and the improved mechanical properties of the telescope and mount make of LOLAS-2 a more robust instrument.

  13. MIMO free-space optical communication employing coherent BPOLSK modulation in atmospheric optical turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, K.; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2015-05-01

    An optical wireless communication system is an alternative to radio frequency communication, but atmospheric turbulence induced fading and misalignment fading are the main impairments affecting an optical signal when propagating through the turbulence channel. The resultant of misalignment fading is the pointing errors, it degrades the bit error rate (BER) performance of the free space optics (FSO) system. In this paper, we study the BER performance of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system employing coherent binary polarization shift keying (BPOLSK) in gamma-gamma (G-G) channel with pointing errors. The BER performance of the BPOLSK based MIMO FSO system is compared with the single-input single-output (SISO) system. Also, the average BER performance of the systems is analyzed and compared with and without pointing errors. A novel closed form expressions of BER are derived for MIMO FSO system with maximal ratio combining (MRC) and equal gain combining (EGC) diversity techniques. The analytical results show that the pointing errors can severely degrade the performance of the system.

  14. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with <8% of EVM in a turbulent channel. Based on the results, we show that transmitting the LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals.

  15. Turbulence-induced channel crosstalk in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed free-space optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2008-05-01

    A multichannel free-space optical (FSO) communication system based on orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams is studied. We numerically analyze the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the system and find that turbulence induces attenuation and crosstalk among channels. Based on a model in which the constituent channels are binary symmetric and crosstalk is a Gaussian noise source, we find optimal sets of OAM states at each turbulence condition studied and determine the aggregate capacity of the multichannel system at those conditions. OAM-multiplexed FSO systems that operate in the weak turbulence regime are found to offer good performance. We verify that the aggregate capacity decreases as the turbulence increases. A per-channel bit-error rate evaluation is presented to show the uneven effects of crosstalk on the constituent channels.

  16. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors.

  17. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-05-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  18. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  19. Far-field optical degradation due to near-field transmission through a turbulent heated jet.

    PubMed

    Cicchiello, J M; Jumper, E J

    1997-09-01

    When a laser beam traverses an optically active, turbulent flow field, the laser wave front is aberrated by the flow. Density variations in a heated two-dimensional jet, for example, correspond to index-of-refraction variations, and this modulation of the index in the fluid can imprint an optical phase disturbance, or phase error, onto the laser wave front. Adaptive-optic systems seek to correct the phase error of the wave front, and thus restore the integrity of the far-field irradiance pattern. Given a near-field spatial mapping of a phase disturbance, the far-field irradiance pattern of the affected wave front can be calculated with Fourier-optics techniques. A Fourier-optics computer code was used to study the far-field irradiance patterns arising from actual time-varying measurements of a fluid-induced phase error. The time-averaged Strehl ratio was studied to provide insight into the spatial and temporal design requirements for adaptive-optic systems applied to the time series of near-field spatial phase-error maps.

  20. Numerical research of measurements of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor according to the parameters of its optical parts and the intensity of turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleneva, N. V.; Lavrinov, V.; Lavrinova, L. N.

    2015-11-01

    The wavefront sensor of Hartmann type consists of two parts: the optical and algorithmic. The parameters of the optical part of the sensor may vary. Since the time of "frozen" turbulence due to the Fried's length and to the cross wind transport turbulent distortion speed, the measurement Shack-Hartmann sensor depend on the intensity of turbulent distortions. In this paper are presented the results of the analysis of the measurements of the sensor according to the size of lens array and to the intensity of turbulent distortions. The analysis is performed on basis of a numerical model of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and on Kolmogorov's turbulence model.

  1. Propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiuxiang

    2007-12-24

    The propagation of a cosh-Gaussian beam through an arbitrary ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity at any receiver plane are obtained. As an elementary example, the average intensity and its radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens are studied. To show the effects of a lens on the average intensity and the intensity radius of the laser beam in turbulent atmosphere, the properties of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam and a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation in turbulent atmosphere are studied and numerically calculated. The average intensity profiles of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens can have a shape similar to that of the initial beam for a longer propagation distance than that of a collimated cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. With the increment in the propagation distance, the average intensity radius at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a thin lens will be smaller than that at the focal plane of a focused cosh-Gaussian beam for direct propagation. Meanwhile, the intensity distributions at the image plane of a cosh-Gaussian beam through a lens with different w(0) and Omega(0) are also studied.

  2. Turbulent phase noise on asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. Simulations make use of the reciprocity principle to estimate both down and up link performance from wave-optics propagation of descending plane waves. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterising the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock transfer.

  3. Investigation of Hill's optical turbulence model by means of direct numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Muschinski, Andreas; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    For almost four decades, Hill's "Model 4" [J. Fluid Mech. 88, 541 (1978) has played a central role in research and technology of optical turbulence. Based on Batchelor's generalized Obukhov-Corrsin theory of scalar turbulence, Hill's model predicts the dimensionless function h(κl(0), Pr) that appears in Tatarskii's well-known equation for the 3D refractive-index spectrum in the case of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, Φn(κ)=0.033C2(n)κ(-11/3) h(κl(0), Pr). Here we investigate Hill's model by comparing numerical solutions of Hill's differential equation with scalar spectra estimated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) output data. Our DNS solves the Navier-Stokes equation for the 3D velocity field and the transport equation for the scalar field on a numerical grid containing 4096(3) grid points. Two independent DNS runs are analyzed: one with the Prandtl number Pr=0.7 and a second run with Pr=1.0 . We find very good agreement between h(κl(0), Pr) estimated from the DNS output data and h(κl(0), Pr) predicted by the Hill model. We find that the height of the Hill bump is 1.79 Pr(1/3), implying that there is no bump if Pr<0.17 . Both the DNS and the Hill model predict that the viscous-diffusive "tail" of h(κl(0), Pr) is exponential, not Gaussian.

  4. Optical Receiver for Coherently Detected Pulse-Position Modulated Signals in the Presence of Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Fernandez, M.; Vilnrotter, V. A.

    2005-05-01

    Performance analysis and experimental verification of a coherent free-space optical communications receiver in the presence of simulated atmospheric turbulence is presented. Bit-error rate (BER) performance of ideal coherent detection is analyzed in Section II, and the laboratory equipment and experimental setup used to carry out these experiments are described. The key components include two lasers operating at a 1064-nm wavelength for use with coherent detection, a 16-element (4 x 4) focal-plane detector array, and a data acquisition and signal processing assembly needed to sample and collect the data and analyze the results. The detected signals are combined using the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm. In Section III, convergence of the algorithm for experimentally obtained signal tones in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is demonstrated. In Section IV, adaptive combining of experimentally obtained heterodyned pulse-position modulated (PPM) signals with pulse-to-pulse coherence, in the presence of simulated spatial distortions resembling atmospheric turbulence, is demonstrated. The adaptively combined PPM signals are phased up via an LMS algorithm suitably optimized to operate with PPM in the presence of additive shot noise. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented, and results with both computer-simulated and experimentally obtained PPM signals are analyzed.

  5. Effects of atmospheric turbulence and building sway on optical wireless-communication systems.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2003-01-15

    Urban optical wireless communication (UOWC) systems are considered a last-mile technology. UOWC systems use the atmosphere as a propagation medium. To provide a line of sight the transceivers are placed on high-rise building. However, dynamic wind loads, thermal expansion, and weak earthquakes cause buildings to sway. These sways distort the alignment between transmitter and receiver, causing pointing errors, the outcome of which is fading of the received signal. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in both the intensity and the phase of the received signal, resulting in impaired link performance. A bit-error probability (BEP) model is developed that takes into account both building sway and turbulence-induced log amplitude fluctuations (i.e., fading of signal intensity) in the regime in which the receiver aperture, D0, is smaller than the turbulence coherence diameter, d0. It is assumed that the receiver has knowledge about the marginal statistics of the signal fading and the instantaneous signal-fading state.

  6. SKA weak lensing - I. Cosmological forecasts and the power of radio-optical cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Ian; Camera, Stefano; Zuntz, Joe; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-12-01

    We construct forecasts for cosmological parameter constraints from weak gravitational lensing surveys involving the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Considering matter content, dark energy and modified gravity parameters, we show that the first phase of the SKA (SKA1) can be competitive with other Stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey and that the full SKA (SKA2) can potentially form tighter constraints than Stage IV optical weak lensing experiments, such as those that will be conducted with LSST, WFIRST-AFTA or Euclid-like facilities. Using weak lensing alone, going from SKA1 to SKA2 represents improvements by factors of ˜10 in matter, ˜10 in dark energy and ˜5 in modified gravity parameters. We also show, for the first time, the powerful result that comparably tight constraints (within ˜5 per cent) for both Stage III and Stage IV experiments, can be gained from cross-correlating shear maps between the optical and radio wavebands, a process which can also eliminate a number of potential sources of systematic errors which can otherwise limit the utility of weak lensing cosmology.

  7. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    photogrammetry (for model attitude and deformation measurement) are excluded to limit the scope of this report. Other physical probes such as heat flux gauges, total temperature probes are also excluded. We further exclude measurement techniques that require particle seeding though particle based methods may still be useful in many high speed flow applications. This manuscript details some of the more widely used molecular-based measurement techniques for studying transition and turbulence: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), Rayleigh and Raman Scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). These techniques are emphasized, in part, because of the prior experience of the authors. Additional molecular based techniques are described, albeit in less detail. Where possible, an effort is made to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various measurement techniques, although these comparisons can be subjective views of the authors. Finally, the manuscript concludes by evaluating the different measurement techniques in view of the precision requirements described in this chapter. Additional requirements and considerations are discussed to assist with choosing an optical measurement technique for a given application.

  8. An Approach for Quantitative Forecasting of Turbulent Flow over an Urban Area by Coupling Numerical Weather Prediction and Large-Eddy Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemi, T.; Nakayama, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric flows in urban areas are highly turbulent owing not only to meteorological disturbances but also to complex and complicated distribution of roughness obstacles (i.e., buildings). Numerical modeling is an important research tool for this purpose. In previous meteorological models, urban areas are regarded as a very rough surface that has either a large roughness length or a slab of resistant layer. This type of simplified approaches is useful in cases of flows over urban areas with sparsely-distributed, low-rise buildings with uniform heights. However, recent urbanization makes urban surfaces covered with densely-distributed, high-rise buildings with variable heights. In order to numerically examine flows over such highly rough urban surfaces, a large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is promising. Recent studies have demonstrated that a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is capable of performing LESs for turbulent flows in free convective regimes. However, the NWP models cannot easily perform LESs of flows in a neutral or a stable environment. In order to ensure the turbulent nature of flows in urban areas, an LES approach with a proper turbulence-generation technique is necessary. The present study proposes an approach to quantitatively simulate turbulent flows in a densely-built environment with the mixture of high-rise and low-rise buildings by coupling the WRF model and an LES model. The NWP model used here is the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model, while the LES model is based on a filtered Navier-Stokes equation and a filtered continuity equation for incompressible flow without any thermal effects. The subgrid-scale eddy viscosity is parameterized by the standard Smagorinsky model. The LES model incorporates the information of building height over Tokyo as its lower boundary. The buildings are represented as an external forcing. The cases examined here are strong wind events over Tokyo: a

  9. Electro-optic testbed utilizing a dynamic range gated Rayleigh beacon for atmospheric turbulence profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuraski, Steven M.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.; Figlewski, Nathan M.; Schmidt, Jason D.; McCrae, Jack E.

    2016-10-01

    The Photometry Analysis and Optical Tracking and Evaluation System (PANOPTES) Quad Axis Telescope is a unique four axis mount Ritchey-Chretien 24 inch telescope capable of tracking objects through the zenith without axes rotation delay (no Dead Zone). This paper describes enhancement components added to the quad axis mount telescope that will enable measurements supporting novel research and field testing focused on `three-dimensional' characterization of turbulent atmospheres, mitigation techniques, and new sensing modalities. These all support research and operational techniques relating to astronomical imaging and electro-optical propagation though the atmosphere, relative to sub-meter class telescopes in humid, continental environments. This effort will use custom designed and commercial off the shelf hardware; sub-system components discussed will include a wavefront sensor system, a co-aligned beam launch system, and a fiber coupled research laser. The wavefront sensing system has the ability to take measurements from a dynamic altitude adjustable laser beacon scattering spot, a key concept that enables rapid turbulence structure parameter measurements over an altitude varied integrated atmospheric volume. The sub-components are integrated with the overall goal of measuring a height-resolved volumetric profile for the atmospheric turbulence structure parameter at the site, and developing mobile techniques for such measurements. The design concept, part selection optimization, baseline component lab testing, and initial field measurements, will be discussed in the main sections of this paper. This project is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Labs Sensors Directorate and the Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy.

  10. Simulation of turbulences and fog effects on the free space optical link inside of experimental box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hajek, Lukas; Vanderka, Ales; Koudelka, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with problematic of Free Space Optical (FSO) Links. The theoretical part describes the effects of atmospheric transmission environment on these FSO connections. The practical part is focused on the creation of an appropriate experimental workplace for turbulences simulation (mechanical and thermal turbulences), fog effects and subsequent measurement of these effects. For definition how big impact these effects on the FSO system have is used the statistical analysis and simulation software Optiwave. Overall there were tested three optical light sources operating at wavelengths of 632.8 nm, 850 nm and 1550 nm respectively. Influences of simulated atmospheric effects on the signal attenuation were observed. Within the frame of simulation in Optiwave software there were studied influences of attenuation on given wavelengths in form of FSO link transmission parameters degradation. Also for the purposes of real measurements it was necessary to fabricate an experimental box. This box was constructed with sizes of 2.5 and 5 meters and was used for simulation of atmospheric environment.

  11. Characterization of optical turbulence at the solar observatory at the Mount Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Sucher, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Optical turbulence represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 is regarded as one of the chief causes of image degradation of ground-based astronomical telescopes operating in visible or infrared wavebands. Especially, it affects the attainable spatial resolution. Therefore since the middle of September 2012 the optical turbulence has been monitored between two German solar telescopes at the Observatory in Tenerife /Canary Islands /Spain. It comprises the solar telescope GREGOR and the vacuum tower telescope VTT mounted on two 30 m high towers. Between the two towers at the level of the telescopes, Cn2 was measured using a Laser-Scintillometer SLS40 (Scintec, Rottenburg, Germany). The horizontal distance of the measurement path was 75 m. The first results of the measurements starting from the 15th September 2012 up to the end of December 2012 are presented and analyzed using simultaneous measured meteorological data of wind, temperature and humidity. Daily and seasonal variations are shown and discussed.

  12. Effect of deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium on the Goldberg-Unno method. [turbulence effects on optical density in the solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troyan, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth was studied by use of the Goldberg-Unno method, with allowance made for the influence of deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium. It was found that allowance for deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium displaces the curve of dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth along two axes.

  13. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented—up to now—time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal ‘snapshots' of random light using a specially designed ‘time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by ‘breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence. PMID:27713416

  14. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented--up to now--time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal `snapshots' of random light using a specially designed `time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by `breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence.

  15. A statistical model for road surface friction forecasting applying optical road weather measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippi, M.; Juga, I.; Nurmi, P.

    2009-09-01

    Road surface friction is defined as the grip between car tyre and underlying surface. Poor friction often plays a crucial role in wintertime car accidents. Friction can decrease dramatically during snowfall or when wet road surface temperature falls below zero. Even a thin layer of ice or snow can decrease friction substantially increasing the risk of accidents. Many studies have shown that road surface temperature, road conditions and friction can fluctuate dramatically within short distances under specific weather situations. Friction or grip can be improved with road maintenance activities like salting and gritting. Salting will melt the ice or snow layer, whereas gritting will improve the grip. Salting is effective only above -5C temperatures. Light snowfall together with low temperatures can result in very slippery driving conditions. Finnish Road Administration's observing network covers c. 500 road weather stations in Finland. Almost 100 of them are equipped with optical sensors (in winter 2008-2009). The number of optical sensors has increased remarkably during past few years. The optical measuring devices are Vaisala DSC111 sensors which measure the depth of water, snow and ice on the road surface and also produce an estimate of the state of road and prevailing friction. Observation data from road weather stations with optical sensors were collected from winter 2007/08, and a couple of representative (from a weather perspective) stations were selected for detailed statistical analysis. The purpose of the study was to find a statistical relationship between the observed values and, especially, the correlation between friction and other road weather parameters. Consequently, a model based on linear regression was developed. With the model friction being the dependent variable, the independent variables having highest correlations were the composite of ice and snow (water content) on the road, and the road surface temperature. In the case of a wet road

  16. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  17. Performance of an adaptive phase estimator for coherent free-space optical communications over Gamma-Gamma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming; Gao, Chao; Liang, Haodong; Miao, Maoke; Li, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates an adaptive phase estimator for coherent free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. Closed-form solutions for variance of phase errors are derived when the optical beam is subjected to Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence. The adaptive phase estimator has improved upon the phase error performance in comparison to conventional phase estimators. We also demonstrate notable improvement in BER performance when applying our adaptive phase estimator to coherent FSO communication systems.

  18. Acoustic sounder system design for measurement of optical turbulence and wind profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Judith E.; Eaton, Frank D.; Stokes, Sheldon S.

    2000-07-01

    An Acoustic Sounder System has been installed on the side of the cliff at North Oscura Peak, WSMR to provide important refractive index structure parameter, Cn2 data for laser propagation tests. The acoustic sounder system records echo information that is used to provide 3D wind and optical turbulence profiles. The received signal is the product of the interaction of the transmitted acoustic pulse with the small scale atmospheric temperature variations. This information is displayed as a time-height display of the signal intensity. The frequency of the received signals are processed and converted into time histories of the horizontal wind field. The data from the Acoustic Sounder is calibrated with the hot-wire anemometer temperature structure parameter (Ct2) data, and meteorological data measured locally to produce the Cn2 profile. The design and location of the Acoustic Sounder System will be discussed along with the methodology of extracting the turbulence. Many days of data have been collected and representative data will be shown.

  19. Optical soliton in dielectric fibers and self-organization of turbulence in plasmas in magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akira

    2009-01-01

    One important discovery in the twentieth century physics is the natural formation of a coherent or a well-ordered structure in continuous media, in contrary to degradation of the state as predicted earlier from the second law of thermodynamics. Here nonlinearity plays the essential role in its process. The discovery of soliton, a localized stable wave in a nonlinear and dispersive medium and the self-organization of fluid turbulence are of the major examples. A soliton is formed primarily in one-dimensional medium where the dispersion and nonlinearity play the essential role. Here the temporal evolution can be described by an infinite dimensional Hamiltonian system that is integrable. While a self-organization appears in an infinite dimensional non-Hamiltonian (or dissipative) system where more than two conservative quantities exist in the limit of no dissipation. In this manuscript, by showing examples of the optical soliton in dielectric fibers and self-organization of turbulence in a toroidal plasma in a magnetic field, we demonstrate these interesting discoveries. The manuscript is intended to describe these discoveries more on philosophical basis with some sacrifice on mathematical details so that the idea is conveyed to those in the wide area of sciences. PMID:19145067

  20. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1. Wind and Turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; ...

    2015-09-25

    We found that numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed windmore » speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy (e), friction velocity (u* ), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35° and 1.9 m s-1 , respectively. Then, using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model’s MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height (h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.« less

  1. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1. Wind and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; Bieringer, Paul E.; Annunzio, Andrew; Bieberbach, George; Meech, Scott

    2015-09-25

    We found that numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed wind speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy (e), friction velocity (u* ), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35° and 1.9 m s-1 , respectively. Then, using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model’s MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height (h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.

  2. A Case Study of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Applied to the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Field Experiment. Part 1: Wind and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Halverson, Scot A.; Bieringer, Paul E.; Annunzio, Andrew; Bieberbach, George; Meech, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-weather-prediction models are often used to supply the mean wind and turbulence fields for atmospheric transport and dispersion plume models as they provide dense horizontally- and vertically-resolved geographic coverage in comparison to typically sparse monitoring networks. Here, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was run over the month-long period of the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign conducted in Oklahoma City and the simulated fields important to transport and dispersion models were compared to measurements from a number of sodars, tower-based sonic anemometers, and balloon soundings located in the greater metropolitan area. Time histories of computed wind speed, wind direction, turbulent kinetic energy ( e), friction velocity (u_*), and reciprocal Obukhov length (1 / L) were compared to measurements over the 1-month field campaign. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature (θ ), and e were compared during short intensive operating periods. The WRF model was typically able to replicate the measured diurnal variation of the wind fields, but with an average absolute wind direction and speed difference of 35°c and 1.9 m s^{-1}, respectively. Using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) surface-layer scheme, the WRF model was found to generally underpredict surface-layer TKE but overpredict u_* that was observed above a suburban region of Oklahoma City. The TKE-threshold method used by the WRF model's MYJ surface-layer scheme to compute the boundary-layer height ( h) consistently overestimated h derived from a θ gradient method whether using observed or modelled θ profiles.

  3. Study on power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyun; Sheng, Shen; Huang, Zhisong; Zhao, Siqing; Wang, Hua; Sun, Zhenhai; Xu, Xiegu

    2013-02-25

    As a new attractive application of the vortex beams, power coupling of annular vortex beam propagating through a two- Cassegrain-telescope optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. A typical model of annular vortex beam propagating through a two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system is established, the general analytical expression of vortex beams with limited apertures and the analytical formulas for the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane are derived. Under the H-V 5/7 turbulence model, the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane and power coupling efficiency of the optical system are numerically calculated, and the influences of the optical topological charge, the laser wavelength, the propagation path and the receiver apertures on the power coupling efficiency are analyzed. These studies reveal that the average intensity distribution at the receiver plane presents a central dark hollow profile, which is suitable for power coupling by the Cassegrain telescope receiver. In the optical system with optimized parameters, power coupling efficiency can keep in high values with the increase of the propagation distance. Under the atmospheric turbulent conditions, great advantages of vortex beam in power coupling of the two-Cassegrain-telescope optical system are shown in comparison with beam without vortex.

  4. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  5. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kangning; Ma, Jing; Belmonte, Aniceto; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-12-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed turbulence are studied for a multiple-aperture receiver system. Equal gain-combining (EGC) and selection-combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence under thermal-noise-limited conditions. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for on-off keying-modulated direct detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity receptions using analytical results and for EGC diversity receptions through an approximation method. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple-aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of EGC and SC receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic-aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area (same average total incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are also verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  6. Performance analysis of satellite-to-ground downlink coherent optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Li, Kangning; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Cao, Yubin

    2015-09-01

    The performances of satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications over Gamma-Gamma distributed atmospheric turbulence are studied for a coherent detection receiving system with spatial diversity. Maximum ratio combining (MRC) and selection combining (SC) techniques are considered as practical schemes to mitigate the atmospheric turbulence. Bit-error rate (BER) performances for binary phase-shift keying modulated coherent detection and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for SC diversity using analytical results and for MRC diversity through an approximation method with different numbers of receiving aperture each with the same aperture area. To show the net diversity gain of a multiple aperture receiver system, BER performances and outage probabilities of MRC and SC multiple aperture receiver systems are compared with a single monolithic aperture with the same total aperture area (same total average incident optical power) for satellite-to-ground downlink optical communications. All the numerical results are verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  7. Aero-Optical Turbulent Boundary Layer/Shear Layer Experiment On The KC-135 Aircraft Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, James E.; Allen, C.

    1985-06-01

    This paper examines the aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers. The data present comparisons of observed optical performances with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microseconds temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite-aperture, time-averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q-switched Nd:YAG double-pulsed laser and a holographic camera that recorded the random flow field in a double-pass, double-pulse mode. Aero-dynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five-hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theo-retical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered. The results presented represent five flights flown at altitudes from 1.8 km to 10.7 km and at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 0.79. Single-pass phase deviations for the boundary layer were from 0.06 to 0.17 waves (at X = 0.53 ;Am) with piston and tilt components removed. Measured phase deviations for the artificially induced shear flows were from 0.10 to 0.279 waves (at X = 0.53 /um) with piston and tilt components removed. However, when low order aberrations through coma were removed, the remaining deviations were only 0.09 to 0.18 waves. This resulted in a 33 to 250% increase in the Strehl ratio at the 14 cm optical aperture. It was further shown that the low order aberrations corresponded to the longer wavelengths in the random flow, and these waves propagated with a longer characteristic time than the higher order

  8. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-11-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average of 2% precipitation decrease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that, even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  9. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-06-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average 2% precipitation decease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  10. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  11. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to

  12. Temperature rise in objects due to optical focused beam through atmospheric turbulence near ground and ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneback, Matthew; Ishimaru, Akira; Reinhardt, Colin; Kuga, Yasuo

    2013-03-01

    We consider an optical beam propagated through the atmosphere and incident on an object causing a temperature rise. In clear air, the physical characteristics of the optical beam transmitted to the object surface are influenced primarily by the effect of atmospheric turbulence, which can be significant near the ground or ocean surface. We use a statistical model to quantify the expected power transfer through turbulent atmosphere and provide guidance toward the threshold of thermal blooming for the considered scenarios. The bulk thermal characteristics of the materials considered are used in a thermal diffusion model to determine the net temperature rise at the object surface due to the incident optical beam. These results of the study are presented in graphical form and are of particular interest to operators of high power laser systems operating over large distances through the atmosphere. Numerical examples include a CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) with: aperture size of 5 cm, varied pulse duration, and propagation distance of 0.5 km incident on 0.1-mm copper, 10-mm polyimide, 1-mm water, and 10-mm glass/resin composite targets. To assess the effect of near ground/ocean laser propagation, we compare turbulent (of varying degrees) and nonturbulent atmosphere.

  13. Gaseous Laser Targets and Optical Dignostics for Studying Compressible Turbulent Hydrodynamic Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Miles, A R; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Glenzer, S; Edens, A; Dittmire, T

    2005-02-08

    The possibility of studying compressible turbulent flows using gas targets driven by high power lasers and diagnosed with optical techniques is investigated. The potential advantage over typical laser experiments that use solid targets and x-ray diagnostics is more detailed information over a larger range of spatial scales. An experimental system is described to study shock - jet interactions at high Mach number. This consists of a mini-chamber full of nitrogen at a pressure {approx} 1 atms. The mini-chamber is situated inside a much larger vacuum chamber. An intense laser pulse ({approx}100J in {approx} 5ns) is focused on to a thin {approx} 0.3{micro}m thick silicon nitride window at one end of the mini-chamber. The window acts both as a vacuum barrier, and laser entrance hole. The ''explosion'' caused by the deposition of the laser energy just inside the window drives a strong blast wave out into the nitrogen atmosphere. The spherical shock expands and interacts with a jet of xenon introduced though the top of the mini-chamber. The Mach number of the interaction is controlled by the separation of the jet from the explosion. The resulting flow is visualized using an optical schlieren system using a pulsed laser source at a wavelength of 0.53 {micro}m. The technical path leading up to the design of this experiment is presented, and future prospects briefly considered. Lack of laser time in the final year of the project severely limited experimental results obtained using the new apparatus.

  14. General scale-dependent anisotropic turbulence and its impact on free space optical communication system performance.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2015-06-01

    We generalize a recently introduced model for nonclassic turbulent spatial power spectrum involving anisotropy along two mutually orthogonal axes transverse to the direction of beam propagation by including two scale-dependent weighting factors for these directions. Such a turbulent model may be pertinent to atmospheric fluctuations in the refractive index in stratified regions well above the boundary layer and employed for air-air communication channels. When restricting ourselves to an unpolarized, coherent Gaussian beam and a weak turbulence regime, we examine the effects of such a turbulence type on the OOK FSO link performance by including the results on scintillation flux, probability of fade, SNR, and BERs.

  15. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  16. Probing interstellar turbulence in cirrus with deep optical imaging: no sign of energy dissipation at 0.01 pc scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Duc, P.-A.; Marleau, F.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Didelon, P.; Gwyn, S.; Karabal, E.

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse Galactic light has been observed in the optical since the 1930s. We propose that, when observed in the optical with deep imaging surveys, it can be used as a tracer of the turbulent cascade in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), down to scales of about 1 arcsec. Here we present a power spectrum analysis of the dust column density of a diffuse cirrus at high Galactic latitude (l ≈ 198°, b ≈ 32°) as derived from the combination of a MegaCam g-band image, obtained as part of the MATLAS large programme at the CFHT, with Planck radiance and WISE 12 μm data. The combination of these three datasets have allowed us to compute the density power spectrum of the H i over scales of more than three orders of magnitude. We found that the density field is well described by a single power law over scales ranging from 0.01 to 50 pc. The exponent of the power spectrum, γ = -2.9 ± 0.1, is compatible with what is expected for thermally bi-stable and turbulent H i. We did not find any steepening of the power spectrum at small scales indicating that the typical scale at which turbulent energy is dissipated in this medium is smaller than 0.01 pc. The ambipolar diffusion scenario that is usually proposed as the main dissipative agent, is consistent with our data only if the density of the cloud observed is higher than the typical values assumed for the cold neutral medium gas. We discuss the new avenue offered by deep optical imaging surveys for the study of the low density ISM structure and turbulence.

  17. Experimental study for the detection of the laminar/turbulent aerodynamic transition on a wing aircraft, using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, S.; Dolfi, D.; Doisy, M.; Seraudie, A.; Arnal, D.; Coustols, E.; Mandle, J.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of detection of the nature (laminar/turbulent/transitional) of the aerodynamic boundary layer of a profile of a wing aircraft model, using a Distributed FeedBack (DFB) Fiber Laser as optical fiber sensor. Signals to be measured are pressure variations : ΔP~1Pa at few 100Hz in the laminar region and ΔP~10Pa at few kHz in the turbulent region. Intermittent regime occurring in-between these two regions (transition) is characterized by turbulent bursts in laminar flow. Relevant pressure variations have been obtained in a low-speed research-type wind tunnel of ONERA Centre of Toulouse. In order to validate the measurements, a "classical" hot film sensor, the application and use of which have been formerly developed and validated by ONERA, has been placed at the neighborhood of the fiber sensor. The hot film allows measurement of the boundary layer wall shear stress whose characteristics are a well known signature of the boundary layer nature (laminar, intermittent or turbulent) [1]. In the three regimes, signals from the fiber sensor and the hot film sensor are strongly correlated, which allows us to conclude that a DFB fiber laser sensor is a good candidate for detecting the boundary layer nature, and thus for future integration in an aircraft wing. The work presented here has been realized within the framework of "Clean Sky", a Joint Technology Initiative of the European Union.

  18. Employing circle polarization shift keying in free space optical communication with gamma-gamma atmospheric turbulence channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Du, Fan; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying

    2014-12-01

    A novel theoretical model of a circular polarization shift keying (CPolSK) system for free space optical links through an atmospheric turbulence channel, is proposed. Intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation induced in atmospheric turbulence, from weak to strong levels, are specifically researched with respect to circular polarization control error caused by the system design. We derive closed form expressions of the bit error rate (BER) and outage probability for evaluating the BER performance and communication interruption in the Gamma-Gamma distributed channel model. Simulation results show that atmospheric turbulence and circular polarization control error have significant effects on the BER performance and interruption of communication in the CPolSK system. The deterioration in BER performance, caused by intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation, is augmented by the power penalty conditioned by the circular polarization control error. This consequently adds to the demand for emissive power from the CPolSK system. Furthermore, we demonstrate that controlling the circular polarization control error below 8° as well as the normalized threshold within 8 dB, 9 dB and 10 dB in turbulent scenarios from weak to strong levels can significantly reduce the probability of communication interruption occurring. This study provides reference material for further design of the CPolSK system.

  19. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of In situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    integrated observation system that is being coupled to a data assimilative hydrodynamic bio-optical ecosystem model. The system was used adaptively to develop hyperspectral remote sensing techniques in optically complex nearshore coastal waters.

  20. 21St Century Atmospheric Forecasting for Space Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.; Craddock, M.; Kiley, H.; Mason, M.

    2016-09-01

    Many space based applications from imaging to communications are impacted by the atmosphere. Atmospheric impacts such as optical turbulence and clouds are the main drivers for these types of systems. For example, in space based optical communications, clouds will produce channel fades on the order of many hundreds of decibels (dB) thereby breaking the communication link. Optical turbulence can also produce fades but these can be compensated for by adaptive optics. The ability to forecast the current and future location and optical thickness of clouds for space to ground Electro Optical or optical communications is therefore critical in order to achieve a highly reliable system. We have developed an innovative method for producing such forecasts. These forecasts are intended to provide lead times on the order of several hours to days so that communication links can be transferred from a currently loudy ground location to another more desirable ground site. The system uses high resolution Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) along with a variational data assimilation (DA) scheme to improve the initial conditions and forecasts. DA is used to provide an improved estimate of the atmospheric state by combining meteorological observations with NWP products and their respective error statistics. Variational DA accomplishes this through the minimization of a prescribed cost function, whereby differences between the observations and analysis are damped according to their perceived error. The NWP model is a fully three-dimensional (3D) physics-based model of the atmosphere initialized with gridded atmospheric data obtained from a global scale model. The global model input data has a horizontal resolution of approximately 25km, which is insufficient for the desired atmospheric forecasts required at near 1km resolution. Therefore, a variational DA system is used to improve the quality and resolution of the initial conditions first prescribed by the global model. Data used by the

  1. Performance analysis of free space optical system with spatial modulation and diversity combiners over the Gamma Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeyemi, Kehinde O.; Owolawi, Pius A.; Srivastava, Viranjay M.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is a major impairment that degrades the performance of free space optical (FSO) communication systems. Spatial modulation (SM) with receive spatial diversity is considered as a powerful technique to mitigate the fading effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, the performance of free space optical spatial modulation (FSO-SM) system under Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence is presented. We studied the Average Bit Error Rate (ABER) for the system by employing spatial diversity combiners such Maximum Ratio Combining (MRC) and Equal Gain Combining (EGC) at the receiving end. In particular, we provide a theoretical framework for the system error by deriving Average Pairwise Error Probability (APEP) expression using a generalized infinite power series expansion approach and union bounding technique is applied to obtain the ABER for each combiner. Based on this study, it was found that spatial diversity combiner significantly improved the system error rate where MRC outperforms the EGC. The performance of this system is also compared with other well established diversity combiner systems. The proposed system performance is further improved by convolutional coding technique and our analysis confirmed that the system performance of MRC coded system is enhanced by approximately 20 dB while EGC falls within 17 dB.

  2. Real time measurements of PM2.5 concentrations and vertical turbulent fluxes using an optical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco

    In this work the possibility of measuring real-time concentrations of PM2.5 and the corresponding vertical turbulent fluxes using the optical detector Mie pDR-1200, operating synchronously with an ultrasonic anemometer, is investigated. This detector is known to be sensitive to high values of relative humidity (RH) and a new procedure to correct the effect of RH on concentration measurements is presented. Results of optical measurements have been compared with gravimetric detections of PM2.5 and results show a reasonable correlation between them and an improvement of the agreement when RH-correction is used. Results presented have been collected at two measurement sites that can be representative of urban background environments but in one of them was present an industrial area nearby. Post-processing of data has been performed with the eddy-correlation technique that allows evaluation of vertical turbulent fluxes of PM2.5 as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes. The turbulent mass fluxes, together with the analysis of real-time concentrations and their correlation with meteorology proved to be an useful tool to infer details about the local aerosol dynamics helping to interpret traditional gravimetric analysis of aerosol that is usually performed on a 24 h basis. Results show that the methodology can be useful in identifying the contribution of local sources like ground level emissions or industrial plumes with respect to the contribution of sources located far away from the measurement site.

  3. Free space optical communications system performance under atmospheric scattering and turbulence for 850 and 1550  nm operation.

    PubMed

    El-Wakeel, Amr S; Mohammed, Nazmi A; Aly, Moustafa H

    2016-09-10

    In this work, a free space optical communication (FSO) link is proposed and utilized to explore and evaluate the FSO link performance under the joint occurrence of the atmospheric scattering and turbulence phenomena for 850 and 1550 nm operation. Diffraction and nondiffraction-limited systems are presented and evaluated for both wavelengths' operation, considering far-field conditions under different link distances. Bit error rate, pointing error angles, beam divergence angles, and link distance are the main performance indicators that are used to evaluate and compare the link performance under different system configurations and atmospheric phenomena combinations. A detailed study is performed to provide the merits of this work. For both far-field diffraction-limited and nondiffraction-limited systems, it is concluded that 1550 nm system operation is better than 850 nm for the whole presented joint occurrences of atmospheric scattering and turbulence.

  4. TURBULENT CHARACTERISTICS IN THE INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardis, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Foullon, C.

    2012-02-01

    We focus on Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) calcium II H-line observations of a solar quiescent prominence (QP) that exhibits highly variable dynamics suggestive of turbulence. These images capture a sufficient range of scales spatially ({approx}0.1-100 arcsec) and temporally ({approx}16.8 s-4.5 hr) to allow the application of statistical methods used to quantify finite range fluid turbulence. We present the first such application of these techniques to the spatial intensity field of a long-lived solar prominence. Fully evolved inertial range turbulence in an infinite medium exhibits multifractal scale invariance in the statistics of its fluctuations, seen as power-law power spectra and as scaling of the higher order moments (structure functions) of fluctuations which have non-Gaussian statistics; fluctuations {delta}I(r, L) = I(r + L) - I(r) on length scale L along a given direction in observed spatial field I have moments that scale as ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} L{sup {zeta}(p)}. For turbulence in a system that is of finite size, or that is not fully developed, one anticipates a generalized scale invariance or extended self-similarity (ESS) ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} G(L){sup {zeta}(p)}. For these QP intensity measurements we find scaling in the power spectra and ESS. We find that the fluctuation statistics are non-Gaussian and we use ESS to obtain ratios of the scaling exponents {zeta}(p): these are consistent with a multifractal field and show distinct values for directions longitudinal and transverse to the bulk (driving) flow. Thus, the intensity fluctuations of the QP exhibit statistical properties consistent with an underlying turbulent flow.

  5. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions. PMID:28230076

  6. Adaptive free-space optical communications through turbulence using self-healing Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2017-02-01

    We present a scheme to realize obstruction- and turbulence-tolerant free-space orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing link by using self-healing Bessel beams accompanied by adaptive compensation techniques. Compensation of multiple 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) data carrying Bessel beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and obstructions is demonstrated. The obtained experimental results indicate that the compensation scheme can effectively reduce the inter-channel crosstalk, improve the bit-error rate (BER) performance, and recuperate the nondiffracting property of Bessel beams. The proposed scheme might be used in future high-capacity OAM links which are affected by atmospheric turbulence and obstructions.

  7. Blob identification algorithms applied to laser speckle to characterize optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Galen D.; Wayne, David T.

    2015-09-01

    Laser beam speckle resulting from atmospheric turbulence contains information about the propagation channel. The number and size of the speckle cells can be used to infer the spatial coherence and thus the Cn2 along a path. The challenge with this technique is the rapidly evolving speckle pattern and non-uniformity of the speckle cells. In this paper we investigate modern blob counting techniques used in biology, microscopy, and medical imaging. These methods are then applied to turbulent speckle images to estimate the number and size of the speckle cells. Speckle theory is reviewed for different beam types and different regimes of turbulence. Algorithms are generated to calculate path Cn2 from speckle information and path geometry. The algorithms are tested on speckle images from experimental data collected over a turbulent 1km path and compared to Cn2 measurements collected in parallel.

  8. Adaptive selective relaying in cooperative free-space optical systems over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-06-30

    In this paper, a novel adaptive cooperative protocol with multiple relays using detect-and-forward (DF) over atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is proposed. The adaptive DF cooperative protocol here analyzed is based on the selection of the optical path, source-destination or different source-relay links, with a greater value of fading gain or irradiance, maintaining a high diversity order. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are obtained for a cooperative free-space optical (FSO) communication system with Nr relays, when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either a wide range of turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β, or pointing errors, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. A greater robustness for different link distances and pointing errors is corroborated by the obtained results if compared with similar cooperative schemes or equivalent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results.

  9. Local motion compensation in image sequences degraded by atmospheric turbulence: a comparative analysis of optical flow vs. block matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Claudia S.

    2016-10-01

    As a consequence of fluctuations in the index of refraction of the air, atmospheric turbulence causes scintillation, spatial and temporal blurring as well as global and local image motion creating geometric distortions. To mitigate these effects many different methods have been proposed. Global as well as local motion compensation in some form or other constitutes an integral part of many software-based approaches. For the estimation of motion vectors between consecutive frames simple methods like block matching are preferable to more complex algorithms like optical flow, at least when challenged with near real-time requirements. However, the processing power of commercially available computers continues to increase rapidly and the more powerful optical flow methods have the potential to outperform standard block matching methods. Therefore, in this paper three standard optical flow algorithms, namely Horn-Schunck (HS), Lucas-Kanade (LK) and Farnebäck (FB), are tested for their suitability to be employed for local motion compensation as part of a turbulence mitigation system. Their qualitative performance is evaluated and compared with that of three standard block matching methods, namely Exhaustive Search (ES), Adaptive Rood Pattern Search (ARPS) and Correlation based Search (CS).

  10. Forecasting forecast skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, Eugenia; Dalcher, Amnon

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to predict the skill of numerical weather forecasts - a quantity which is variable from day to day and region to region. This has been accomplished using as predictor the dispersion (measured by the average correlation) between members of an ensemble of forecasts started from five different analyses. The analyses had been previously derived for satellite-data-impact studies and included, in the Northern Hemisphere, moderate perturbations associated with the use of different observing systems. When the Northern Hemisphere was used as a verification region, the prediction of skill was rather poor. This is due to the fact that such a large area usually contains regions with excellent forecasts as well as regions with poor forecasts, and does not allow for discrimination between them. However, when regional verifications were used, the ensemble forecast dispersion provided a very good prediction of the quality of the individual forecasts.

  11. Using an artificial neural network approach to estimate surface-layer optical turbulence at Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Basu, Sukanta

    2016-05-15

    In this Letter, an artificial neural network (ANN) approach is proposed for the estimation of optical turbulence (Cn2) in the atmospheric surface layer. Five routinely available meteorological variables are used as the inputs. Observed Cn2 data near the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii are utilized for validation. The proposed approach has demonstrated its prowess by capturing the temporal evolution of Cn2 remarkably well. More interestingly, this ANN approach is found to outperform a widely used similarity theory-based conventional formulation for all the prevalent atmospheric conditions (including strongly stratified conditions).

  12. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    PubMed

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  13. Lidar Measurement of Optical Turbulence: Theory of the Crossed Path Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-08

    17Mathewn, J. and Walker. R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2"d edn., WA. Benjamin, Reading, MA. ’Bracewell, R.N. (1978) The Fourier...Propagation in a Turbulent Medium, McGraw-Hill, New York. 7Mathews, J., and Walker, R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2’ edn., W.A. Ben- jamin

  14. Hybrid pulse position modulation and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation for free space optics in a weak and saturated turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Faridzadeh, Monire; Gholami, Asghar; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Rajbhandari, Sujan

    2012-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid modulation scheme based on pulse position modulation (PPM) and binary phase shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation (BPSK-SIM) schemes for free-space optical communications is proposed. The analytical bit error rate (BER) performance is investigated in weak and saturated turbulence channels and results are verified with the simulation data. Results show that performance of PPM-BPSK-SIM is superior to BPSK-SIM in all turbulence regimes; however, it outperforms 2-PPM for the turbulence variance σ(1)(2)>0.2. PPM-BPSK-SIM offers a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of 50 dB in the saturation regime compared to BPSK at a BER of 10(-6). The SNR gain in comparison to PPM improves as the strength of the turbulence level increases.

  15. Bending and turbulent enhancement phenomena of neutral gas flow containing an atmospheric pressure plasma by applying external electric fields measured by schlieren optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Sakakita, Hajime; Tsunoda, Syuichiro; Kasahara, Jiro; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of turbulent enhancement phenomena of a neutral gas flow containing plasma ejected from the nozzle of plasma equipment, the schlieren optical method was performed to visualize the neutral gas behavior. It was confirmed that the turbulent starting point became closer to the nozzle exit, as the amplitude of discharge voltage (electric field) increased. To study the effect of electric field on turbulent enhancement, two sets of external electrodes were arranged in parallel, and the gas from the nozzle was allowed to flow between the upper and lower electrodes. It was found that the neutral gas flow was bent, and the bending angle increased as the amplitude of the external electric field increased. The results obtained using a simple model analysis roughly coincide with experimental data. These results indicate that momentum transport from drifted ions induced by the electric field to neutral particles is an important factor that enhances turbulence.

  16. Restoring number of suspended particles in ocean using satellite optical images and forecasting particle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.; Arnone, Robert A.; Flynn, Peter; Casey, Brandon; Weidemann, Alan D.; Ko, Dong-Shang

    2007-04-01

    A method to retrieve concentrations of suspended large and small particles in seawater from satellite images is proposed. The method uses as input images of scattering and backscattering coefficients in several satellite channels as well as an image of concentration of chlorophyll. All these three properties are derived using an atmospheric correction algorithm and algorithms to derive inherent optical properties from remote sensing reflectance. The proposed method is based on several approaches developed previously by Twardowski et al, van de Huist, and Evans and Fournier and is based on Mie theory. The proposed method was applied to restore a number of suspended particles and their dynamics in ocean using SeaWIFs satellite optical images.

  17. Instrumental intercomparison investigating vertical profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed in the lower atmospheric boundary layer during frontal passages in northwestern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Detlev; Stein, Karin; Sucher, Erik; Englander, Abraham; Fastig, Salomon; Porat, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The German-Israeli intercomparison experiment on the investigation of vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer from 4th to 7th May 2015 was characterized by frontal activity in the atmosphere. The newly developed remote LIDAR-device of the Soreq institute for the investigation of the vertical wind and turbulence field was compared to the routinely performed measurements at the VerTurM (Vertical Turbulence Measurements) field site in Meppen, Germany. The long-term experiment VerTurM is focused on measurements of the optical turbulence and comprises scintillometer measurements close to the ground (1.15 m height), sonic anemometer measurements on a tall tower at 4 m, 8 m, 32 m, and 64 m and a SODAR-RASS-system. The temporal development of the vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence Cn 2 during the frontal passage is investigated. Additional radiosonde measurements were performed to characterize the boundary layer height during the day.

  18. Forecasting the Ocean’s Optical Environment: Development of the BioCast System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    and is used to render operational products from INTRODUC TION The role of ocean optics in naval warfare dates back to ancient times. In the first...expansion. The ocean color information is overlaid onto a Google Earth image projection. (B) As in (A), but for the Chesapeake Bay and Virginia coastline...in the Pacific Ocean . (top left) A US Navy diver assigned to the Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 at work during operations off the coast of

  19. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  20. Temporal decorrelation of optical turbulence as a function of altitude in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, J. L.; Avila, R.; Carrasco, E.; Sánchez, L. J.; Chun, M.; Butterley, T.; Wilson, R.; Urbiola, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we propose a new method to evaluate the Taylor's frozen-flow hypothesis with the Generalized SCIntillation Detection And Ranging technique (G-SCIDAR). Unlike the work previously reported in the literature, we take into consideration the wind-speed fluctuation effects when examining the spatiotemporal cross-covariance functions computed according to the G-SCIDAR method. We show that under the assumption of having turbulent layers driven by fluctuating wind-velocity vectors, it is correct examining the encircled volume of smeared cross-covariance peaks. The method was used to process 60 spatiotemporal cross-covariance functions of the stellar scintillation patterns retrieved at the 2.2 m telescope of the University of Hawaii along a two hours observation run. We found that most of the time the structure of atmospheric refraction-index inhomogeneities decorrelates linearly with time for individual turbulent layers. Moreover, contrary to the behaviour expected under the assumption of having a slowly evolving structure of turbulent eddies, being translated by a much greater wind-velocity vector, which should strengthen the hypothesis of a frozen flow, we found that the temporal decorrelation of such structure increases as the overall layer displacement velocity increases.

  1. Performance limits of high-rate space-to-ground optical communications through the turbulent atmospheric channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, John E.

    1995-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts both the amplitude and phase of an optical field propagating from space to an earth-based receiver. While aperture averaging can mitigate amplitude scintillation effects, the performance of single spatial-mode receiver systems such as coherent detection or preamplified direction detection can be significantly degraded by the corrupted phase when the ratio of aperture diameter D to atmospheric coherence length r0 exceeds unity. Although adaptive optics may be employed to correct the wavefront, in practice the correction is imperfect and the residual phase errors induce a communications performance loss. That loss is quantified here by Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Single-mode-receiver fade statistics for imperfect phase correction are calculated in terms of the atmospheric Greenwood frequency fg, the adaptive optic servo loop cutoff frequency fc, and the ratio D/r0. From these statistics, link bit-error rate (BER) performance is calculated. The results reveal that conventional performance measures such as Strehl ratio or mean signal-to- noise ratio loss can significantly underestimate receiver BER losses. Only when the ratio fg/fc is 0.1 or less will communications losses be small (about 0.5 dB) over a wide range of D/r0.

  2. Ultrahigh-frame-rate OH fluorescence imaging in turbulent flames using a burst-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail; Meyer, Terrence R; Jiang, Naibo; Lempert, Walter R; Gord, James R

    2009-05-01

    Burst-mode planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical is demonstrated in laminar and turbulent hydrogen-air diffusion flames with pulse repetition rates up to 50 kHz. Nearly 1 mJ/pulse at 313.526 nm is used to probe the OH P(2)(10) rotational transition in the (0,0) band of the A-X system. The UV radiation is generated by a high-speed-tunable, injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator pumped by a frequency-doubled megahertz-rate burst-mode Nd:YAG laser. Preliminary kilohertz-rate wavelength scanning of the temperature-broadened OH transition during PLIF imaging is also presented for the first time (to our knowledge), and possible strategies for spatiotemporally resolved planar OH spectroscopy are discussed.

  3. Analysis of effective capacity for free-space optical communication systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, You-quan; Chi, Xue-fen; Shi, Jia-lin; Zhao, Lin-lin

    2015-05-01

    To facilitate the efficient support of quality-of-service (QoS) for promising free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, it is essential to model and analyze FSO channels in terms of delay QoS. However, most existing works focus on the average capacity and outage capacity for FSO, which are not enough to characterize the effective transmission data rate when delay-sensitive service is applied. In this paper, the effective capacity of FSO communication systems under statistical QoS provisioning constraints is investigated to meet heterogeneous traffic demands. A novel closed-form expression for effective capacity is derived under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence conditions, pointing errors, beam widths, detector sizes and QoS exponents. The obtained results reveal the effects of some significant parameters on effective capacity, which can be used for the design of FSO systems carrying a wide range of services with diverse QoS requirements.

  4. Modeling of power spectral density of modified von Karman atmospheric phase turbulence and acousto-optic chaos using scattered intensity profiles over discrete time intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2014-10-01

    In recent research, propagation of plane electromagnetic (EM) waves through a turbulent medium with modified von Karman phase characteristics was modeled and numerically simulated using transverse planar apertures representing narrow phase turbulence along the propagation path. The case for extended turbulence was also studied by repeating the planar phase screens multiple times over the propagation path and incorporating diffractive effects via a split-step algorithm. The goal of the research reported here is to examine two random phenomena: (a) atmospheric turbulence due to von Karman-type phase fluctuations, and (b) chaos generated in an acousto-optic (A-O) Bragg cell under hybrid feedback. The latter problem has been thoroughly examined for its nonlinear dynamics and applications in secure communications. However, the statistical characteristics (such as the power spectral density (PSD)) of the chaos have not been estimated in recent work. To that end, treating the chaos phenomena as a random process, the time waveforms of the chaos intensity and their spectra are numerically evaluated over a (large) number of time iterations. These spectra are then averaged to derive the equivalent PSD of the A-O chaos. For the turbulence problem, an optical beam passing through an input pinhole is propagated through a random phase screen (placed at different locations) to a desired distance (typically near-field) under different levels of turbulence strength. The resulting spatial intensity profile is then averaged and the process repeated over a (large) number of pre-specified time intervals. From this data, once again, the turbulence PSD is calculated via the Fourier spectra of the average intensity snapshots. The results for the two systems are compared.

  5. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  6. Development of a Numerical System to Improve Particulate Matter Forecasts in South Korea Using Geostationary Satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Data over Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Song, C. H.; Park, R.; Park, M. E.; Han, K. M.; Kim, J.; Choi, M.; Ghim, Y. S.; Woo, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    To improve short-term particulate matter (PM) forecasts in South Korea, the initial distribution of PM composition, particularly over the upwind regions, is primarily important. To prepare the initial PM composition, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from a geostationary equatorial orbit (GEO) satellite sensor, GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) which covers Northeast Asia (113°E-146°E; 25°N-47°N), were used. A spatio-temporal (ST) kriging method was used to better prepare the initial AOD distributions that were converted into the PM composition over Northeast Asia. One of the largest advantages to using the ST-kriging method in this study is that more observed AOD data can be used to prepare the best initial AOD fields. It is demonstrated in this study that the short-term PM forecast system developed with the application of the ST-kriging method can greatly improve PM10 predictions in Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), when evaluated with ground-based observations. For example, errors and biases of PM10 predictions decreased by ~60% and ~70%, respectively, during the first 6 h of short-term PM forecasting, compared with those without the initial PM composition. In addition, The influences of several factors (such as choices of observation operators and control variables) on the performances of the short-term PM forecast were also explored in this study.

  7. Propagation of ring Airy Gaussian beams with optical vortices through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Dong; Tao, Rumao; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Yanxing; Wu, Wuming; Wang, Xiaolin; Si, Lei

    2017-03-01

    A new ring Airy Gaussian (RAiG) vortex beam generation method by coherent combination of Gaussian beam array has been proposed. To validate the feasibility of this method, the propagation properties of the RAiG vortex beam and the coherent combining beam in vacuum have been studied and analyzed. From the comparisons of the intensity distributions and phase patterns along the propagation path, we can conclude that the coherent combining beam has the same properties as those of the ideal RAiG vortex beam. So this method can be used to obtain RAiG vortex beam in practice. Then the general analytical expression of the root-mean-square (RMS) beam width of the RAiG vortex beam, which is appropriately generated by coherent combining method, through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence has been derived. The influence of anisotropic turbulence on RMS beam width of the generated RAiG vortex beam has been numerically calculated. This generation method has good appropriation to the ideal RAiG vortex beam and is very useful for deriving the analytical expression of propagation properties through a random media. The conclusions are useful in practical applications, such as laser communication and remote sensing systems.

  8. Application of Remotely-sensed Aerosol Optical Depth in Characterization and Forecasting of Urban Fine Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Shanique L.

    Emissions from local industries, particularly coal-fired power plants, have been shown to enhance the ambient pollutant budget in the Ohio River Valley (ORV) region. One pollutant that is of interest is PM2.5 due to its established link to respiratory illnesses, cardiopulmonary diseases and mortality. State and local agencies monitor the impact of the local point sources on the ambient concentrations at specific sites; however, the monitors do not provide satisfactory spatial coverage. An important metric for describing ambient particulate pollution is aerosol optical depth (AOD). It is a dimensionless geo-physical product measured remotely using satellites or ground-based light detection ranging instruments. This study focused on assessing the effectiveness of using satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) as an indicator for PM2.5 in the ORV and two cities in Ohio. Three models, multi-linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) -- MLR and neural network, were trained using 40% of the total dataset. The outcome was later tested to minimize error and further validated with another 40% of the dataset not included in the model development phase. Furthermore, to limit the effect of seasonality, four models representing each season were created for each city using meteorological variables known to influence PM2.5 and AOD concentration. GIS spatial analysis tool was employed to visualize and make spatial and temporal comparisons for the ORV region. Comparable spatial distributions were observed. Regression analysis showed that the highest and lowest correlations were in the summer and winter, respectively. Seasonal decomposition methods were used to evaluate trends at local Ohio monitoring stations to identify areas most suitable for improved air quality management. Over the six years of study, Cuyahoga County maintained PM2.5 concentrations above the national standard and in Hamilton County (Cincinnati) PM2.5 levels ranked above the national level for more

  9. Middle atmosphere slant-path optical turbulence conditions derived from very high-frequency radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.; Nastrom, Gregory D.; Hansen, Anthony R.

    1999-02-01

    Slant path calculations are shown of the transverse coherence length (r0), the isoplanatic angle ((theta) 0), and the Rytov variance ((sigma) 2R), using a 6- yr data set of refractive index structure parameter (C2n) from 49.25-MHz radar observations at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The calculations are for a spherical wave condition; a wavelength ((lambda) ) of electromagnetic radiation of 1 micrometers ; four different elevation angles (3, 10, 30, and 60 deg), two path lengths (50 and 150 km); and a platform, such as an aircraft, at 12.5 km MSL (mean sea level). Over 281,000 radar-derived C2n profiles sampled at 3 min intervals with 150-m height resolution are used for the calculations. The approach, an `onion skin' model, assumes horizontal stationarity over each entire propagation path and is consistent with Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that refractivity turbulence effects are greatly reduced for the there propagation parameters (r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R) as the elevation angle increases from 3 to 60 deg. A pronounced seasonal effect is seen on the same parameters, which is consistent with climatological variables and gravity wave activity. Interactions with the enhanced turbulence in the vicinity of the tropopause with the range weighting functions of each propagation parameter is evaluated. Results of a two region model relating r0, (theta) 0, and (sigma) 2R to wind speed at 5.6 km MSL are shown. This statistical model can be understood in terms of upward propagating gravity waves that are launched by strong winds over complex terrain.

  10. Application of optical methods to the study of jet noise and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sava, P. G.; Haertig, J.

    1980-01-01

    Optical methods are generally applied in fluid mechanics for either visualization or measurement. The use of a laser anemometer to study flow velocity in a jet and its relaton to the sound radiated is described. The same acoustic emission phenomenon is also measued by combining the signals from four Schlieren systems with that from an interferometer. The use of an optical Fourier transformation approach with real time analysis to determine the spatio-temporal structure of a field of mass volume such as a waveguide or free jet is also examined.

  11. Effects of beam wander on free-space optical communications through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Effects of beam wander on uncoded bit-error-rate (BER) of direct-detection OOK modulated FSO communication systems using collimated and focused Gaussian beams are studied. Channel fading statistics are obtained from large-scale wave optics simulations and compared with the closed-form log-normal and gamma-gamma models. The avalanche photodiode (APD) is chosen for photodetection. The accurate McIntyre-Conradi APD model is adopted for performance evaluation. Results show that large performance gain (more than 15dB) can be achieved with fast-tracked focused beams. The upper bound of higher-order adaptive optics gain beyond tracking gain is also studied.

  12. Research on characteristics of free-space optical communication link in weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liguo; Hou, Zaihong; Li, Fei

    2013-08-01

    Research on characteristics of atmospheric communication link becomes a subject of current interest, and often mainly focuses on some fading parameters including the probability of fade, the mean fade number and the mean fade time. The contribution of false alarm to bit error rate has been considered, however, the temporal characteristic is rarely mentioned., To make up the deficiency, parameters integrating the influence of false alarm and fading were defined. On one hand, the laser communication link were modeled for Gamma-Gamma distribution of irradiance fluctuation subjected to weak atmospheric turbulence. Accordingly the mathematical expressions of these parameters were deduced. On the other hand, characteristic of the parameters were obtained by numerical simulation with various channel environment parameters, such as mean signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), zenith angle and detection threshold. Compared with other researches on fade characteristic, some different conclusions can be drawn from simulation results. With the same SNR and zenith angle, there is an optimum value of detection threshold corresponding to the minimum mean error number, which deviates obviously from that obtained according to the minimum error probability. Either increasing SNR or decreasing zenith angle can reduce mean error number and the optimum threshold. Different from mean error number, mean error time is slightly influenced with channel environment parameters and constant at the order of milliseconds.

  13. Average BER analysis of SCM-based free-space optical systems by considering the effect of IM3 with OSSB signals under turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wansu; Cho, Tae-Sik; Yun, Changho; Kim, Kiseon

    2009-11-09

    In this paper, we derive the average bit error rate (BER) of subcarrier multiplexing (SCM)-based free space optics (FSO) systems using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DD-MZM) for optical single-sideband (OSSB) signals under atmospheric turbulence channels. In particular, we consider the third-order intermodulation (IM3), a significant performance degradation factor, in the case of high input signal power systems. The derived average BER, as a function of the input signal power and the scintillation index, is employed to determine the optimum number of SCM users upon the designing FSO systems. For instance, when the user number doubles, the input signal power decreases by almost 2 dBm under the log-normal and exponential turbulence channels at a given average BER.

  14. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes–LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  15. Low-noise, high-speed detector development for optical turbulence fluctuation measurements for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbeck, N. L.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Smith, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Winz, G.; Ellington, S. D.; Jaehnig, K.

    2010-10-15

    A new beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is under development. Photon-noise limited measurements of neutral beam emissions are achieved using photoconductive photodiodes with a novel frequency-compensated broadband preamplifier. The new BES system includes a next-generation preamplifier and upgraded optical coupling system. Notable features of the design are surface-mount components, minimized stray capacitance, a wide angular acceptance photodiode, a differential output line driver, reduced input capacitance, doubling of the frequency range, net reduced electronic noise, and elimination of the need for a cryogenic cooling system. The irreducible photon noise dominates the noise up to 800 kHz for a typical input power of 60 nW. This new assembly is being integrated into an upgraded multichannel optical detector assembly for a new BES system on the NSTX experiment.

  16. Laser differential image-motion monitor for characterization of turbulence during free-space optical communication tests.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Juarez, Juan C; Brown, Andrea M

    2013-12-01

    A laser differential image-motion monitor (DIMM) system was designed and constructed as part of a turbulence characterization suite during the DARPA free-space optical experimental network experiment (FOENEX) program. The developed link measurement system measures the atmospheric coherence length (r0), atmospheric scintillation, and power in the bucket for the 1550 nm band. DIMM measurements are made with two separate apertures coupled to a single InGaAs camera. The angle of arrival (AoA) for the wavefront at each aperture can be calculated based on focal spot movements imaged by the camera. By utilizing a single camera for the simultaneous measurement of the focal spots, the correlation of the variance in the AoA allows a straightforward computation of r0 as in traditional DIMM systems. Standard measurements of scintillation and power in the bucket are made with the same apertures by redirecting a percentage of the incoming signals to InGaAs detectors integrated with logarithmic amplifiers for high sensitivity and high dynamic range. By leveraging two, small apertures, the instrument forms a small size and weight configuration for mounting to actively tracking laser communication terminals for characterizing link performance.

  17. ETA-CMAQ MODELING SYSTEM'S CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE PM 2.5 AND AEROSOL OPTICAL THICKNESS FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2003, NOAA and the U.S. EPA signed a Memorandum of Agreement to work together to develop a National Air Quality Forecasting (AQF) capability. To meet this goal, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), the Office of Atmospheric Research (OAR) and the U.S. EPA developed and eval...

  18. The Calern atmospheric turbulence station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabé, Julien; Ziad, Aziz; Fantéï-Caujolle, Yan; Aristidi, Éric; Renaud, Catherine; Blary, Flavien; Marjani, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    From its long expertise in Atmospheric Optics, the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur and the J.L. Lagrange Laboratory have equipped the Calern Observatory with a station of atmospheric turbulence measurement (CATS: Calern Atmospheric Turbulence Station). The CATS station is equipped with a set of complementary instruments for monitoring atmospheric turbulence parameters. These new-generation instruments are autonomous within original techniques for measuring optical turbulence since the first meters above the ground to the borders of the atmosphere. The CATS station is also a support for our training activities as part of our Masters MAUCA and OPTICS, through the organization of on-sky practical works.

  19. Effective capacity of MIMO free-space optical systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the capacity limits of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) free-space optical communication (FSO) system in the presence of quality of service (QoS) requirements. Closed-form expression for the effective capacity of MIMO FSO system with equal gain combining (EGC) is derived. In order to provide insights into the impact of various system parameters, asymptotic expressions are further analyzed in the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. Special cases are provided according to the derived results at the same time. Numerical results are given to validate all the analytical results, and the influences of QoS requirements and MIMO configurations are also illustrated.

  20. Effects of source spatial partial coherence on temporal fade statistics of irradiance flux in free-space optical links through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Weizhi; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Tong, Shoufeng; Wang, Tianshu

    2013-12-02

    The temporal covariance function of irradiance-flux fluctua-tions for Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated by making use of the method of effective beam parameters. Based on this formulation, new expressions for the root-mean-square (RMS) bandwidth of the irradiance-flux temporal spectrum due to GSM beams passing through atmospheric turbulence are derived. With the help of these expressions, the temporal fade statistics of the irradiance flux in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, using spatially partially coherent sources, impaired by atmospheric turbulence are further calculated. Results show that with a given receiver aperture size, the use of a spatially partially coherent source can reduce both the fractional fade time and average fade duration of the received light signal; however, when atmospheric turbulence grows strong, the reduction in the fractional fade time becomes insignificant for both large and small receiver apertures and in the average fade duration turns inconsiderable for small receiver apertures. It is also illustrated that if the receiver aperture size is fixed, changing the transverse correlation length of the source from a larger value to a smaller one can reduce the average fade frequency of the received light signal only when a threshold parameter in decibels greater than the critical threshold level is specified.

  1. Turbulence and heat exchange inside the dome room of lidar station. Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosov, V. V.; Lukin, V. P.; Nosov, E. V.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The structure of air turbulent motion inside the dome room - Primary Mirror (diameter 2.2 m) closed shaft at Siberian Lidar Station of V. E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science has been experimentally and theoretically studied. Research is needed to forecast a laser radiation distortion. Results of experiments performed using the ultrasonic compact portable weather station are presented. The main heat exchange directions of air flows inside the shaft are determined. Theoretical results have been obtained by numerical solving of boundary value problem for Navier-Stokes equations. Solitary large vortices (coherent structures, topological solitons) are observed inside the shaft. Coherent decay of such vortices generates the coherent turbulence. It is determined that inside the primary mirror shaft one may expect the weakening of phase fluctuations of optical radiation, and thus improvement the lidar optical imaging. This increases the efficiency of Lidar Station.

  2. Exact error rate analysis of equal gain and selection diversity for coherent free-space optical systems on strong turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingbo; Cheng, Julian; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2010-06-21

    Exact error rate performances are studied for coherent free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence with diversity reception. Equal gain and selection diversity are considered as practical schemes to mitigate turbulence. The exact bit-error rate for binary phase-shift keying and outage probability are developed for equal gain diversity. Analytical expressions are obtained for the bit-error rate of differential phase-shift keying and asynchronous frequency-shift keying, as well as for outage probability using selection diversity. Furthermore, we provide the closed-form expressions of diversity order and coding gain with both diversity receptions. The analytical results are verified by computer simulations and are suitable for rapid error rates calculation.

  3. Forecasting Skill

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    and in synoptic meteorology, many feel the improvements in forecasting the weather (clouds, winds , precipitation, and obstructions to vision) have...and maximum temperature) are each awarded marks 2, 1, or 0 according to whether the forecast is correct, 8 - *- -**■*- ———"—- - -■ t0m 1 MM—IB I...rate of improve- ment of 10% as roughly comparable to the improvement rate obtained by the numerical models. The following types of forecasts seem to

  4. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  5. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique has been developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  6. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  7. Laser anemometer using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for measuring mean velocity and turbulence intensity along the optical axis in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.; Goldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a small optical axis velocity component in a flow with a large transverse velocity component is presented. Experimental results are given for a subsonic free jet operating in a laboratory environment, and for a 0.508 meter diameter turbine stator cascade. Satisfactory operation of the instrument was demonstrated in the stator cascade facility with an ambient acoustic noise level during operation of about 105 dB. In addition, the turbulence intensity measured with the interferometer was consistent with previous measurements taken with a fringe type laser anemometer.

  8. Forecasting surface-layer atmospheric parameters at the Large Binocular Telescope site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we quantify the performance of an automated weather forecast system implemented on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site at Mt Graham (Arizona) in forecasting the main atmospheric parameters close to the ground. The system employs a mesoscale non-hydrostatic numerical model (Meso-Nh). To validate the model, we compare the forecasts of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and relative humidity close to the ground with the respective values measured by instrumentation installed on the telescope dome. The study is performed over a large sample of nights uniformly distributed over 2 yr. The quantitative analysis is done using classical statistical operators [bias, root-mean-square error (RMSE) and σ] and contingency tables, which allows us to extract complementary key information, such as the percentage of correct detections (PC) and the probability of obtaining a correct detection within a defined interval of values (POD). The results of our study indicate that the model performance in forecasting the atmospheric parameters we have just cited are very good, in some cases excellent: RMSE for temperature is below 1°C, for relative humidity it is 14 per cent and for the wind speed it is around 2.5 m s-1. The relative error of the RMSE for wind direction varies from 9 to 17 per cent depending on the wind speed conditions. This work is performed in the context of the ALTA (Advanced LBT Turbulence and Atmosphere) Center project, whose final goal is to provide forecasts of all the atmospheric parameters and the optical turbulence to support LBT observations, adaptive optics facilities and interferometric facilities.

  9. Analysis of angle of arrival fluctuations for optical waves' propagation through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-03-09

    Analytical expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations based on the Rytov approximation theory are derived for plane and spherical waves' propagation through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence atmosphere. The anisotropic spectrum model based on the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path is adopted and it includes the same degree of anisotropy along the direction of propagation for all the turbulence cells size in the inertial sub-range. The derived expressions consider a single anisotropic coefficient describing the turbulence anisotropic property and a general spectral power law value in the range 3 to 4. They reduce correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of plane and spherical waves' propagation through weak isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence for the special case of anisotropic factor equaling one. To reduce the complexity of the analytical results, the asymptotic-fit expressions are also derived and they fit well with the close-form ones. These results are useful for understanding the potential impact of deviations from the standard isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence atmosphere.

  10. Depth from Optical Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    cess, and often leads to poor image quality. Several works in remote sensing and astronomical imag- ing have focused on image correction through...24] G. Wetzstein, W. Heidrich, and R. Raskar. Hand-held schlieren photography with light field probes. In ICCP, 2011. 2 [25] C. Zhou, O. Cossairt, and

  11. Fishing Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    ROFFS stands for Roffer's Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service, Inc. Roffer combines satellite and computer technology with oceanographic information from several sources to produce frequently updated charts sometimes as often as 30 times a day showing clues to the location of marlin, sailfish, tuna, swordfish and a variety of other types. Also provides customized forecasts for racing boats and the shipping industry along with seasonal forecasts that allow the marine industry to formulate fishing strategies based on foreknowledge of the arrival and departure times of different fish. Roffs service exemplifies the potential for benefits to marine industries from satellite observations. Most notable results are reduced search time and substantial fuel savings.

  12. BER performance of MSK in ground-to-satellite uplink optical communication under the influence of atmospheric turbulence and detector noise.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiachen; Li, Mi; Tang, Minghui; Li, Yan; Song, Yuejiang

    2013-09-15

    Minimum shift keying (MSK) has been widely used in fiber optical communication and free-space optical communication. In order to introduce MSK into satellite laser communication, the bit-error rate (BER) performance of the MSK scheme is investigated in uplink communications under the influence of atmospheric turbulence consisting of weak fluctuation and beam wander. Numerical results indicate that the BER performance of MSK is much better than the performance of on-off keying (OOK). With the laser power being 4 W, the improvement is 5 dB in coherent demodulation and 15 dB in delay coherent demodulation. Furthermore, compared with OOK, optimal values of the divergence angle, receiver diameter, and transmitter beam radius are easier and more practical to achieve in the MSK scheme. The work can benefit ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  13. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean: Adaptive Sampling and Forecasting of Near-Shore In Situ Optical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    of the water conditions in the coastal ocean makes any sampling, optical or otherwise, very time consuming and difficult. However, the focus on...applications. To accurately resolve the non-linear time -dependent ecological and optical processes in a short -term numerical simulation requires a...clarity are clearly required for Mine Warfare (MIW), Mine Counter Measures (MCM), and Naval Special Warfare (NSW), particularly in the Very Shallow

  14. Aero-Optical Wavefront Propagation and Refractive Fluid Interfaces in Large-Reynolds-Number Compressible Turbulent Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-31

    are utilized with the eikonal equation of geometrical optics to propagate computationally the optical wavefronts in the near field. As long as the...aero- optical interactions. In terms of the refractive index field n and the optical path length (OPL), the eikonal equation is: |∇ (OPL)| = n , (9) (e.g...Final Report to the Air Force Office of Scientific Research AFOSR Grant FA9550-04-1-0386, Period: 06-01-2004 to 12-31-2005 Aero- Optical Wavefront

  15. Impact of turbulence on high-precision ground-satellite frequency transfer with two-way coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study the impact of turbulence on coherent detection and the related phase noise that restricts time and frequency transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up- and downlink that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end-to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite kinematics. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterizing the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency and phase noise for different system parameters. We show that tip-tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the downlink and as a pre-compensation of the uplink. Besides, thanks to the large tilt angular correlation, the correction is shown to be efficient on uplink despite the point-ahead angle. Very good two-way compensation of turbulent effects is obtained even with the asymmetries. The two-way differential phase noise is reduced to 1 rad2 , with the best fractional frequency stability below 2 ×10-17 after 1-s averaging time.

  16. Investigation of optical turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer using scintillometer measurements along a slant path and comparison to ultrasonic anemometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Ramkilowan, A.; Griffith, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Optical turbulence represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn 2 is a relevant parameter for the performance of electro-optical systems and characterization of the atmospheric influence on imaging. It was investigated during a field trial above an Highveld grassland in the atmospheric surface layer at the Rietvlei Nature Reserve close to Pretoria in South Africa from 18th June to 30th June 2013. This campaign was performed to compare different measurement techniques analyzing the diurnal formation of the vertical distribution of optical turbulence up to a height of 16 m above ground. The chosen time period was characterized by a pronounced diurnal cycle of the meteorological conditions, i.e. low variations from day to day. Ultra sonic anemometers were used to measure high frequency time series (50 Hz) of temperature at single points. From the statistical analysis of these time series Cn 2 was derived. Three instruments were mounted at a portable mast in the center of slant path measurements over a horizontal distance of 1000 m using large aperture scintillometers (Boundary layer scintillometer BLS 900). Averaging over a time period of 5 minutes, the results of both methods are compared. The agreement in the results of optical turbulence is quite good. Discrepancies and agreement are analyzed with respect to the atmospheric stability and other meteorological parameters. Lowest values of Cn 2 at 4.6 m above ground amount to about 8*10-17 m-2/3, daily maxima to 6*10-13 m-2/3. Additional to the nearly constant meteorological conditions in the diurnal cycle, the uniformity of the terrain let the results of this measurement campaign an ideal data set for investigating methodological questions regarding a comparison of single point measurements with integrated measurements over a horizontal distance. Four stability regimes were identified in the diurnal cycle and investigated. These are convective conditions during the day, neutral

  17. Turbulent scaling in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.; Li, Ning; Chen, Shiyi; Liu, Yuanming

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a study of turbulence in fluids that are subject to different body forces and to external temperature gradients. Our focus was on the recent theoretical prediction that the Kolomogorov picture of turbulence may need to be modified for turbulent flows driven by buoyancy and subject to body forces such as rotational accelerations. Models arising from this research are important in global climate modeling, in turbulent transport problems, and in the fundamental understanding of fluid turbulence. Experimentally, we use (1) precision measurements of heat transport and local temperature; (2) flow visualization using digitally- enhanced optical shadowgraphs, particle-image velocimetry, thermochromic liquid-crystal imaging, laser-doppler velocimetry, and photochromic dye imaging; and (3) advanced image- processing techniques. Our numerical simulations employ standard spectral and novel lattice Boltzmann algorithms implemented on parallel Connection Machine computers to simulate turbulent fluid flow. In laboratory experiments on incompressible fluids, we measure probability distribution functions and two-point spatial correlations of temperature T and velocity V (both T-T and V-T correlations) and determine scaling relations for global heat transport with Rayleigh number. We also explore the mechanism for turbulence in thermal convection and the stability of the thermal boundary layer.

  18. Studies in Forecasting Upper-Level Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Department of Defense or the U.S. Government . 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b...has taken a lead role in providing automated meteorological reports from commercial aircraft to atmospheric researchers and to government ... Pyrenees , Rockies and Sierra Nevada that excite VPWs. Much like that of an ocean wave, the greater the amplitude of the wave the more likely the

  19. Using random forests to diagnose aviation turbulence.

    PubMed

    Williams, John K

    Atmospheric turbulence poses a significant hazard to aviation, with severe encounters costing airlines millions of dollars per year in compensation, aircraft damage, and delays due to required post-event inspections and repairs. Moreover, attempts to avoid turbulent airspace cause flight delays and en route deviations that increase air traffic controller workload, disrupt schedules of air crews and passengers and use extra fuel. For these reasons, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have funded the development of automated turbulence detection, diagnosis and forecasting products. This paper describes a methodology for fusing data from diverse sources and producing a real-time diagnosis of turbulence associated with thunderstorms, a significant cause of weather delays and turbulence encounters that is not well-addressed by current turbulence forecasts. The data fusion algorithm is trained using a retrospective dataset that includes objective turbulence reports from commercial aircraft and collocated predictor data. It is evaluated on an independent test set using several performance metrics including receiver operating characteristic curves, which are used for FAA turbulence product evaluations prior to their deployment. A prototype implementation fuses data from Doppler radar, geostationary satellites, a lightning detection network and a numerical weather prediction model to produce deterministic and probabilistic turbulence assessments suitable for use by air traffic managers, dispatchers and pilots. The algorithm is scheduled to be operationally implemented at the National Weather Service's Aviation Weather Center in 2014.

  20. Impact of turbulent phase noise on frequency transfer with asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end- to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterizing the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show that Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock comparisons.

  1. Investigation on iterative multiuser detection physical layer network coding in two-way relay free-space optical links with turbulences and pointing errors.

    PubMed

    Abu-Almaalie, Zina; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Bhatnagar, Manav R; Le-Minh, Hoa; Aslam, Nauman; Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Lee, It Ee

    2016-11-20

    Physical layer network coding (PNC) improves the throughput in wireless networks by enabling two nodes to exchange information using a minimum number of time slots. The PNC technique is proposed for two-way relay channel free space optical (TWR-FSO) communications with the aim of maximizing the utilization of network resources. The multipair TWR-FSO is considered in this paper, where a single antenna on each pair seeks to communicate via a common receiver aperture at the relay. Therefore, chip interleaving is adopted as a technique to separate the different transmitted signals at the relay node to perform PNC mapping. Accordingly, this scheme relies on the iterative multiuser technique for detection of users at the receiver. The bit error rate (BER) performance of the proposed system is examined under the combined influences of atmospheric loss, turbulence-induced channel fading, and pointing errors (PEs). By adopting the joint PNC mapping with interleaving and multiuser detection techniques, the BER results show that the proposed scheme can achieve a significant performance improvement against the degrading effects of turbulences and PEs. It is also demonstrated that a larger number of simultaneous users can be supported with this new scheme in establishing a communication link between multiple pairs of nodes in two time slots, thereby improving the channel capacity.

  2. Development of Turbulent Biological Closure Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    the role of TIBI term in the ADR equation a simple example, that of upwelling of seed nutrients and phytoplankton into a turbulent optically active...overall role that turbulence plays in determining the mean phytoplankton profile and in contributing to total phytoplankton production . As indicated... nutrients , phytoplankton , and zooplankton embedded in the turbulent field. Contrast the TIBI terms with the biological turbulent flux terms ’ , ’ , ’i

  3. Bit error rate analysis of free-space optical system with spatial diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Prabu; Sriram Kumar, D.

    2014-12-01

    Free-space optical communication (FSO) is emerging as a captivating alternative to work out the hindrances in the connectivity problems. It can be used for transmitting signals over common lands and properties that the sender or receiver may not own. The performance of an FSO system depends on the random environmental conditions. The bit error rate (BER) performance of differential phase shift keying FSO system is investigated. A distributed strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing error is considered for the BER analysis. Here, the system models are developed for single-input, single-output-FSO (SISO-FSO) and single-input, multiple-output-FSO (SIMO-FSO) systems. The closed-form mathematical expressions are derived for the average BER with various combining schemes in terms of the Meijer's G function.

  4. Forecasting Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this video there are scenes of damage from the Northridge Earthquake and interviews with Dr. Andrea Donnelan, Geophysics at JPL, and Dr. Jim Dolan, earthquake geologist from Cal. Tech. The interviews discuss earthquake forecasting by tracking changes in the earth's crust using antenna receiving signals from a series of satellites called the Global Positioning System (GPS).

  5. Reasonable Forecasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a sample legal battle that illustrates school officials' "reasonable forecasts" of substantial disruption in the school environment. In 2006, two students from a Texas high school came to school carrying purses decorated with images of the Confederate flag. The school district has a zero-tolerance policy for…

  6. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  7. Turbulence, Spontaneous Stochasticity and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory

    Turbulence is well-recognized as important in the physics of climate. Turbulent mixing plays a crucial role in the global ocean circulation. Turbulence also provides a natural source of variability, which bedevils our ability to predict climate. I shall review here a recently discovered turbulence phenomenon, called ``spontaneous stochasticity'', which makes classical dynamical systems as intrinsically random as quantum mechanics. Turbulent dissipation and mixing of scalars (passive or active) is now understood to require Lagrangian spontaneous stochasticity, which can be expressed by an exact ``fluctuation-dissipation relation'' for scalar turbulence (joint work with Theo Drivas). Path-integral methods such as developed for quantum mechanics become necessary to the description. There can also be Eulerian spontaneous stochasticity of the flow fields themselves, which is intimately related to the work of Kraichnan and Leith on unpredictability of turbulent flows. This leads to problems similar to those encountered in quantum field theory. To quantify uncertainty in forecasts (or hindcasts), we can borrow from quantum field-theory the concept of ``effective actions'', which characterize climate averages by a variational principle and variances by functional derivatives. I discuss some work with Tom Haine (JHU) and Santha Akella (NASA-Goddard) to make this a practical predictive tool. More ambitious application of the effective action is possible using Rayleigh-Ritz schemes.

  8. E-ELT turbulence profiling with stereo-SCIDAR at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Wilson, Richard; Butterley, Tim; Morris, Tim; Dubbeldam, Marc; Dérie, Frédéric; Sarazin, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  9. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  11. A Review of Recent Developments in X-Ray Diagnostics for Turbulent and Optically Dense Rocket Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Christopher; Halls, Benjamin; Kastengren, Alan; Meyer, Terrence

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient mixing and atomization of fuel and oxidizers is an important factor in many propulsion and power generating applications. To better quantify breakup and mixing in atomizing sprays, several diagnostic techniques have been developed to collect droplet information and spray statistics. Several optical based techniques, such as Ballistic Imaging and SLIPI have previously demonstrated qualitative measurements in optically dense sprays, however these techniques have produced limited quantitative information in the near injector region. To complement to these advances, a recent wave of developments utilizing synchrotron based x-rays have been successful been implemented facilitating the collection of quantitative measurements in optically dense sprays.

  12. Forecaster's dilemma: Extreme events and forecast evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Sebastian; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Ravazzolo, Francesco; Gneiting, Tilmann

    2015-04-01

    In discussions of the quality of forecasts in the media and public, attention often focuses on the predictive performance in the case of extreme events. Intuitively, accurate predictions on the subset of extreme events seem to suggest better predictive ability. However, it can be demonstrated that restricting conventional forecast verification methods to subsets of observations might have unexpected and undesired effects and may discredit even the most skillful forecasters. Hand-picking extreme events is incompatible with the theoretical assumptions of established forecast verification methods, thus confronting forecasters with what we refer to as the forecaster's dilemma. For probabilistic forecasts, weighted proper scoring rules provide suitable alternatives for forecast evaluation with an emphasis on extreme events. Using theoretical arguments, simulation experiments and a case study on probabilistic forecasts of wind speed over Germany, we illustrate the forecaster's dilemma and the use of weighted proper scoring rules.

  13. AIR QUALITY FORECAST VERIFICATION USING SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA 's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) experimental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) forecast guidance issued during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmosp...

  14. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle. Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; L. Larson, E. J.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-04-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  15. Astronomical site survey report on dust measurement, wind profile, optical turbulence, and their correlation with seeing over IAO-Hanle - Astronomical site survey report over IAO-Hanle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S.; Kathiravan, S.; Parihar, P. S.; Larson, E. J. L.; Mohanan, Sharika; Angchuk, Dorje; Jorphel, Sonam; Rangarajan, K. E.; Prabhu, K.

    2017-02-01

    The present work discusses astronomical site survey reports on dust content, vertical distribution of atmospheric turbulence, precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface and upper-air data, and their effects on seeing over the Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) Hanle. Using Laser Particulate Counter, ambient dust measurements at various sizes (0.3 μm to 25 μm) were performed at various locations at the site during November 2015. Estimated volume concentration for the particle size at 0.5 μm was around 10,000 per cubic foot, which is equivalent to ten thousand class of clean room standard protocol. During the measurement, surface wind speed varied from 0-20 m s -1, while estimated aerosol optical depth (AOD) using Sky radiometer (Prede) varied from 0.02-0.04 at 500 nm, which indicates the site is fairly clean. The two independent measurements of dust content and aerosol concentrations at the site agreed well. The turbulence or wind gust at the site was studied with wind profiles at three different heights above the ground. The strength of the wind gust varies with time and altitude. Nocturnal temperature across seasons varied with a moderate at summer (6-8 ∘C) and lower in winter (4-5 ∘C). However, the contrast between the two is significantly small due to cold and extremely dry typical climatic conditions of the site. The present study also examined the effects of surface and upper-air data along with Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) dynamics with seeing measurement over the site. Further, a comparative study of such observed parameters was conducted with other high altitude astronomical observatories across the globe.

  16. Application of the optical flow method for the experimental analysis of turbulent flame propagation in a transparent engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Mario; Lombardi, Simone; Continillo, Gaetano; Sementa, Paolo; Vaglieco, Bianca Maria

    2016-12-01

    This paper illustrates the analysis conducted on high-definition, high sampling rate image sequences collected in experiments with a single spark ignition optically accessible engine. Images are first processed to identify the reaction front, and then analyzed by an optical flow estimation technique. The results show that each velocity component of the estimated flow field has an ECDF very similar to the CDF of a Gaussian distribution, whereas the velocity magnitude has an ECDF well fitted by a Rayleigh probability distribution. The proposed non-intrusive method provides a fast statistical characterization of the flame propagation phenomenon in the engine combustion chamber.

  17. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  18. Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2008-11-01

    The present article reviews the recent developments in the physics of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence (QT) was discovered in superfluid 4He in the 1950s, and the research has tended toward a new direction since the mid 90s. The similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence have become an important area of research. QT is comprised of quantized vortices that are definite topological defects, being expected to yield a model of turbulence that is much simpler than the classical model. The general introduction of the issue and a brief review on classical turbulence are followed by a description of the dynamics of quantized vortices. Then, we discuss the energy spectrum of QT at very low temperatures. At low wavenumbers, the energy is transferred through the Richardson cascade of quantized vortices, and the spectrum obeys the Kolmogorov law, which is the most important statistical law in turbulence; this classical region shows the similarity to conventional turbulence. At higher wavenumbers, the energy is transferred by the Kelvin-wave cascade on each vortex. This quantum regime depends strongly on the nature of each quantized vortex. The possible dissipation mechanism is discussed. Finally, important new experimental studies, which include investigations into temperature-dependent transition to QT, dissipation at very low temperatures, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization of QT, are reviewed. The present article concludes with a brief look at QT in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  19. Super Ensemble-based Aviation Turbulence Guidance (SEATG) for Air Traffic Management (ATM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chan, William; Sridhar, Banavar; Sharman, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Super Ensemble (ensemble of ten turbulence metrics from time-lagged ensemble members of weather forecast data)-based Aviation Turbulence Guidance (SEATG) is developed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and in-situ eddy dissipation rate (EDR) observations equipped on commercial aircraft over the contiguous United States. SEATG is a sequence of five procedures including weather modeling, calculating turbulence metrics, mapping EDR-scale, evaluating metrics, and producing final SEATG forecast. This uses similar methodology to the operational Graphic Turbulence Guidance (GTG) with three major improvements. First, SEATG use a higher resolution (3-km) WRF model to capture cloud-resolving scale phenomena. Second, SEATG computes turbulence metrics for multiple forecasts that are combined at the same valid time resulting in an time-lagged ensemble of multiple turbulence metrics. Third, SEATG provides both deterministic and probabilistic turbulence forecasts to take into account weather uncertainties and user demands. It is found that the SEATG forecasts match well with observed radar reflectivity along a surface front as well as convectively induced turbulence outside the clouds on 7-8 Sep 2012. And, overall performance skill of deterministic SEATG against the observed EDR data during this period is superior to any single turbulence metrics. Finally, probabilistic SEATG is used as an example application of turbulence forecast for air-traffic management. In this study, a simple Wind-Optimal Route (WOR) passing through the potential areas of probabilistic SEATG and Lateral Turbulence Avoidance Route (LTAR) taking into account the SEATG are calculated at z = 35000 ft (z = 12 km) from Los Angeles to John F. Kennedy international airports. As a result, WOR takes total of 239 minutes with 16 minutes of SEATG areas for 40% of moderate turbulence potential, while LTAR takes total of 252 minutes travel time that 5% of fuel would be additionally consumed to entirely

  20. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  1. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  2. Forecast Mekong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil

    2011-01-01

    Forecast Mekong is part of the U.S. Department of State's Lower Mekong Initiative, which was launched in 2009 by Secretary Hillary Clinton and the Foreign Ministers of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam to enhance partnerships between the U.S. and the Lower Mekong River countries in the areas of environment, health, education, and infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working in close cooperation with the U.S. Department of State to use research and data from the Lower Mekong Basin to provide hands-on results that will help decision makers in Lower Mekong River countries in the planning and design for restoration, conservation, and management efforts in the basin.

  3. Future Optical Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Networking Equipment Revenue and Forecast, 2000-2017 Sources: KMI, Infonetics, Ovum -RHK, OIDA member companies, TIA, IDC, CIR, Gartner, Dell’Oro, Aventis...quarter seasonality marks a re- turn to normal, established business patterns. Figure 10: Optical Transport Equipment Market ($M) Source: Ovum ...Goldman Sachs Optical Transceivers Figure 14 shows the optical transceiver market and forecast from 2000 to 2011. Ovum forecasts that Ethernet

  4. Flows, Turbulence, and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex

    2003-07-01

    HST and FUSE spectra of distant UV-bright sources reveal interstellar absorption lines of high stages of ionization {O VI, C IV, N V, Si IV} arising in many different astrophysical environments such as superbubbles, interstellar chimneys, high-velocity clouds, galaxy halos and cosmic filaments. Turbulence, always present in the magnetized ISM, must mix the hot { 10^6 K} gas with cooler gas within "turbulent mixing layers". Present theory, based on 1D steady-state flows, suggest the line ratios in these layers differ significantly from photoionized gas, radiative shocks, cooling zones, or conduction fronts. These models are use to infer mass and energy fluxes important to understanding the ISM. We propose to develop a suite of 3D time-dependent models that properly calculate turbulent mixing. We will produce synthetic UV absorption lines and optical emission lines directly relevant to HST observations that use GHRS, STIS, and eventually, COS. These models will allow us to explore the sensitivity of the spectral diagnostics to magnetic field strength, turbulence intensity, and relative velocity of the hot and cold gas. We will publish the resulting grid of spectral diagnostics and make them available through the Web.

  5. A short-term ensemble wind speed forecasting system for wind power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya Roy, S.; Traiteur, J. J.; Callicutt, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-12-01

    This study develops an adaptive, blended forecasting system to provide accurate wind speed forecasts 1 hour ahead of time for wind power applications. The system consists of an ensemble of 21 forecasts with different configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting Single Column Model (WRFSCM) and a persistence model. The ensemble is calibrated against observations for a 2 month period (June-July, 2008) at a potential wind farm site in Illinois using the Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) technique. The forecasting system is evaluated against observations for August 2008 at the same site. The calibrated ensemble forecasts significantly outperform the forecasts from the uncalibrated ensemble while significantly reducing forecast uncertainty under all environmental stability conditions. The system also generates significantly better forecasts than persistence, autoregressive (AR) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models during the morning transition and the diurnal convective regimes. This forecasting system is computationally more efficient than traditional numerical weather prediction models and can generate a calibrated forecast, including model runs and calibration, in approximately 1 minute. Currently, hour-ahead wind speed forecasts are almost exclusively produced using statistical models. However, numerical models have several distinct advantages over statistical models including the potential to provide turbulence forecasts. Hence, there is an urgent need to explore the role of numerical models in short-term wind speed forecasting. This work is a step in that direction and is likely to trigger a debate within the wind speed forecasting community.

  6. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  7. Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Temperature Variance Dissipation in Laboratory Generated Rayleigh-Benard Turbulence Designed to Study the Distortion of Light by Underwater Microstructure Fluctuations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-11

    turbulence environment allowing the variation of turbulence intensity. Convective turbulence is generated in a large Rayleigh-Bénard type tank (5m by...energy and temperature variance dissipation rates in the tank, for different convective strengths. Optical image degradation in the tank is then...dynamics simulations of convective turbulence emulating the tank environment. These numerical simulations supplement the sparse laboratory measurements

  8. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  9. Quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.

    2011-12-01

    We review physical properties of quantum fluids He II and 3He-B, where quantum turbulence (QT) has been studied experimentally. Basic properties of QT in these working fluids are discussed within the phenomenological two-fluid model introduced by Landau. We consider counterflows in which the normal and superfluid components flow against each other, as well as co-flows in which the direction of the two fluids is the same. We pay special attention to the important case of zero temperature limit, where QT represents an interesting and probably the simplest prototype of three-dimensional turbulence in fluids. Experimental techniques to explore QT such as second sound attenuation, Andreev reflection, NMR, ion propagation are briefly introduced and results of various experiments on so-called Vinen QT and Kolmogorov QT both in He II and 3He are discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences between classical and quantum turbulence.

  10. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  11. GIST-PM-Asia v1: development of a numerical system to improve particulate matter forecasts in South Korea using geostationary satellite-retrieved aerosol optical data over Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Song, C. H.; Park, R. S.; Park, M. E.; Han, K. M.; Kim, J.; Choi, M.; Ghim, Y. S.; Woo, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    To improve short-term particulate matter (PM) forecasts in South Korea, the initial distribution of PM composition, particularly over the upwind regions, is primarily important. To prepare the initial PM composition, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) data retrieved from a geostationary equatorial orbit (GEO) satellite sensor, GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) which covers a part of Northeast Asia (113-146° E; 25-47° N), were used. Although GOCI can provide a higher number of AOD data in a semicontinuous manner than low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite sensors, it still has a serious limitation in that the AOD data are not available at cloud pixels and over high-reflectance areas, such as desert and snow-covered regions. To overcome this limitation, a spatiotemporal-kriging (STK) method was used to better prepare the initial AOD distributions that were converted into the PM composition over Northeast Asia. One of the largest advantages in using the STK method in this study is that more observed AOD data can be used to prepare the best initial AOD fields compared with other methods that use single frame of observation data around the time of initialization. It is demonstrated in this study that the short-term PM forecast system developed with the application of the STK method can greatly improve PM10 predictions in the Seoul metropolitan area (SMA) when evaluated with ground-based observations. For example, errors and biases of PM10 predictions decreased by ˜ 60 and ˜ 70 %, respectively, during the first 6 h of short-term PM forecasting, compared with those without the initial PM composition. In addition, the influences of several factors on the performances of the short-term PM forecast were explored in this study. The influences of the choices of the control variables on the PM chemical composition were also investigated with the composition data measured via PILS-IC (particle-into-liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography) and low air-volume sample

  12. Improved Anvil Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the outcome of Phase 1 of the AMU's Improved Anvil Forecasting task. Forecasters in the 45th Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group have found that anvil forecasting is a difficult task when predicting LCC and FR violations. The purpose of this task is to determine the technical feasibility of creating an anvil-forecasting tool. Work on this study was separated into three steps: literature search, forecaster discussions, and determination of technical feasibility. The literature search revealed no existing anvil-forecasting techniques. However, there appears to be growing interest in anvils in recent years. If this interest continues to grow, more information will be available to aid in developing a reliable anvil-forecasting tool. The forecaster discussion step revealed an array of methods on how better forecasting techniques could be developed. The forecasters have ideas based on sound meteorological principles and personal experience in forecasting and analyzing anvils. Based on the information gathered in the discussions with the forecasters, the conclusion of this report is that it is technically feasible at this time to develop an anvil forecasting technique that will significantly contribute to the confidence in anvil forecasts.

  13. The impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The possible impact of Sun-weather research on forecasting is examined. The type of knowledge of the effect is evaluated to determine if it is in a form that can be used for forecasting purposes. It is concluded that the present understanding of the effect does not lend itself readily to applications for forecast purposes. The limits of present predictive skill are examined and it is found that skill is most lacking for prediction of the smallest scales of atmospheric motion. However, it is not expected that Sun-weather research will have any significant impact on forecasting the smaller scales since predictability at these scales is limited by the finite grid size resolution and the time scales of turbulent diffusion. The predictability limits for the largest scales are on the order of several weeks although presently only a one week forecast is achievable.

  14. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  15. Turbulence Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  16. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  17. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  18. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  19. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Michael; Jenkins, Charles; Lambert, Andrew

    2007-10-29

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  20. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-02-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  1. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    confined plasmas, magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, dynamo; Canonical plasmas: coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere; Physics of atmosphere: environmental fluid dynamics, weather forecasting, turbulent flows in stratified media and atmosphere, non-Boussinesq convection; Geophysics and Earth science: mantle-lithosphere tectonics, oceanography, turbulent convection under rotation, planetary interiors; Combustion: dynamics of flames and fires, deflagration-to-detonation transition, blast waves and explosions, flows with chemical reactions, flows in jet engines; Mathematical aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics: vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness, continuous transports out of thermodynamic equilibrium; Stochastic processes and probabilistic description: long-tail distributions and anomalous diffusion, data assimilation and processing methodologies, error estimate and uncertainty quantification, statistically unsteady processes; Advanced numerical simulations: continuous DNS/LES/RANS, molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo, predictive modeling, validation and verification of numerical models; Experimental diagnostics: model experiments in high energy density and low energy density regimes, plasma diagnostics, fluid flow visualizations and control, opto-fluidics, novel optical methods, holography, advanced technologies. TMB-2009 was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: Snezhana I Abarzhi (chairperson, Chicago, USA) Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) Hiroshi Azechi (Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) Robert Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) Katepalli R Sreenivasan (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) Alexander

  2. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  3. Quantifying Atmospheric Impacts on Space Optical Imaging and Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    2011-09-01

    background (CSB). The CSB represents a recent depiction (one month weighted average) of what the scene looks like, radiometrically, in the absence of clouds so that it can be compared with imagery at the requested analysis time. If the actual imagery compared to the CSB differs by more than a specified threshold then clouds are indicated. Cloud properties such as cloud top heights and bases and optical depths are subsequently derived. The result represents a high spatial and temporal resolution climatology that can be used to derive accurate Cloud Free Line of Sight (CFLOS) statistics in order to quantify atmospheric effects on optical imaging and communication systems. For example, clouds over the State of Hawaii are quite variable in frequency ranging from less than 15% in some of the sheltered coastal waters and local summits to greater than 70% on the mauka (windward) sides of the islands. Vertical optical depths from the summit can range from 0.5dB to greater than 50dB. Optical turbulence is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, it can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). A modified version of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to generate Cn2 throughout the atmospheric column, allowing for ground-to-space seeing estimates of ro. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers (MHPCC) Mana cluster. Detailed results from both the clouds and turbulence simulations will be shown at the conference with specific applications to space imaging and communication systems.

  4. Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Rodriguez- Herrera, Matthew E. Kucas, and James W. E. Darlow, “A Web-based Interactive Interface for Researching and Forecasting Tropical Cyclone ...Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones J. Scott Tyo College of Optical Sciences...an objective and automatic intensity estimator of Tropical Cyclones (TCs) based on satellite infrared (IR) imagery. The proposed methodology analyzes

  5. Stochastic demographic forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lee, R D

    1992-11-01

    "This paper describes a particular approach to stochastic population forecasting, which is implemented for the U.S.A. through 2065. Statistical time series methods are combined with demographic models to produce plausible long run forecasts of vital rates, with probability distributions. The resulting mortality forecasts imply gains in future life expectancy that are roughly twice as large as those forecast by the Office of the Social Security Actuary.... Resulting stochastic forecasts of the elderly population, elderly dependency ratios, and payroll tax rates for health, education and pensions are presented."

  6. Forecast-skill-based simulation of streamflow forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Zhao, Jianshi

    2014-09-01

    Streamflow forecasts are updated periodically in real time, thereby facilitating forecast evolution. This study proposes a forecast-skill-based model of forecast evolution that is able to simulate dynamically updated streamflow forecasts. The proposed model applies stochastic models that deal with streamflow variability to generate streamflow scenarios, which represent cases without forecast skill of future streamflow. The model then employs a coefficient of prediction to determine forecast skill and to quantify the streamflow variability ratio explained by the forecast. By updating the coefficients of prediction periodically, the model efficiently captures the evolution of streamflow forecast. Simulated forecast uncertainty increases with increasing lead time; and simulated uncertainty during a specific future period decreases over time. We combine the statistical model with an optimization model and design a hypothetical case study of reservoir operation. The results indicate the significance of forecast skill in forecast-based reservoir operation. Shortage index reduces as forecast skill increases and ensemble forecast outperforms deterministic forecast at a similar forecast skill level. Moreover, an effective forecast horizon exists beyond which more forecast information does not contribute to reservoir operation and higher forecast skill results in longer effective forecast horizon. The results illustrate that the statistical model is efficient in simulating forecast evolution and facilitates analysis of forecast-based decision making.

  7. Operational aerosol and dust storm forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Liu, M.; Walker, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    The U. S. Navy now conducts operational forecasting of aerosols and dust storms on global and regional scales. The Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) is run four times per day and produces 6-day forecasts of sulfate, smoke, dust and sea salt aerosol concentrations and visibility for the entire globe. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) is run twice daily for Southwest Asia and produces 3-day forecasts of dust, smoke, and visibility. The graphical output from these models is available on the Internet (www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol/). The aerosol optical properties are calculated for each specie for each forecast output time and used for sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval corrections, regional electro-optical (EO) propagation assessments, and the development of satellite algorithms. NAAPS daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are compared with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD values. Visibility forecasts are compared quantitatively with surface synoptic reports.

  8. An Automated System to Quantify Convectively induced Aircraft encounters with Turbulence over Europe and North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneguz, Elena; Turp, Debi; Wells, Helen

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that encounters with moderate or severe turbulence can lead to passenger injuries and incur high costs for airlines from compensation and litigation. As one of two World Area Forecast Centres (WAFCs), the Met Office has responsibility for forecasting en-route weather hazards worldwide for aviation above a height of 10,000 ft. Observations from commercial aircraft provide a basis for gaining a better understanding of turbulence and for improving turbulence forecasts through verification. However there is currently a lack of information regarding the possible cause of the observed turbulence, or whether the turbulence occurred within cloud. Such information would be invaluable for the development of forecasting techniques for particular types of turbulence and for forecast verification. Of all the possible sources of turbulence, convective activity is believed to be a major cause of turbulence. Its relative importance over the Europe and North Atlantic area has not been yet quantified in a systematic way: in this study, a new approach is developed to automate identification of turbulent encounters in the proximity of convective clouds. Observations of convection are provided from two independent sources: a surface based lightning network and satellite imagery. Lightning observations are taken from the Met Office Arrival Time Detections network (ATDnet). ATDnet has been designed to identify cloud-to-ground flashes over Europe but also detects (a smaller fraction of) strikes over the North Atlantic. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite products are used to identify convective clouds by applying a brightness temperature filtering technique. The morphological features of cold cloud tops are also investigated. The system is run for all in situ turbulence reports received from airlines for a total of 12 months during summer 2013 and 2014 for the domain of interest. Results of this preliminary short term climatological study show significant intra

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  10. Meteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear air turbulence sampling missions with an instrument B-57B aircraft. Volume 1: Program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Champine, R. A.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The results of 46 clear air turbulence (CAT) probing missions conducted with an extensively instrumented B-57B aircraft are summarized. Turbulence samples were obtained under diverse conditions including mountain waves, jet streams, upper level fronts and troughs, and low altitude mechanical and thermal turbulence. CAT was encouraged on 20 flights comprising 77 data runs. In all, approximately 4335 km were flown in light turbulence, 1415 km in moderate turbulence, and 255 km in severe turbulence during the program. The flight planning, operations, and turbulence forecasting aspects conducted with the B-57B aircraft are presented.

  11. Range of turbulence-independent propagation and Rayleigh range of partially coherent beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zeng, Shuguang; Hao, Bangyuan; Zhang, Bin

    2010-03-01

    Two characteristic distances for partially coherent beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence have been proposed. The turbulent Rayleigh range is used for characterizing the range over which the beams propagate in turbulence without spreading appreciably; i.e., the concept of the well-known Rayleigh range in free space is extended to the case of turbulence. In this paper the range of turbulence-independent propagation of the beams, in contrast to similar characteristic distances in previous published works, is based on the formula of the beam propagation factor (M(2) factor) and is used for describing the range over which the spatial and angular spreading and the M(2) factor increase due to turbulence are sufficiently small and negligible. Several simple formulas used for calculating the approximate values of these distances are given, and the formulas are applied to Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams and illustrated by examples. Furthermore, as a typical example, the effect of the angular spread of GSM beams in turbulence on a thin-lens optical system is also discussed. We show that the turbulent Rayleigh range depends on the Rayleigh range in free space, the waist width, and the spatial power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuations of the turbulent atmosphere, and that the range of turbulence-independent propagation depends on the waist width, the initial angular spread in the waist plane, and the spatial power spectrum.

  12. Aspects of Turbulent / Non-Turbulent Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, D. K.; Hunt, J. C. R.; Rogers, M. M.; Koen, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A distinct boundary between turbulent and non-turbulent regions in a fluid of otherwise constant properties is found in many laboratory and engineering turbulent flows, including jets, mixing layers, boundary layers and wakes. Generally, the flow has mean shear in at least one direction within t he turbulent zone, but the non-turbulent zones have no shear (adjacent laminar shear is a different case, e.g. transition in a boundary layer). There may be purely passive differences between the turbulent and non-turbulent zones, e.g. small variations in temperature or scalar concentration, for which turbulent mixing is an important issue. The boundary has several major characteristics of interest for the present study. Firstly, the boundary advances into the non-turbulent fluid, or in other words, nonturbulent fluid is entrained. Secondly, the change in turbulence properties across the boundary is remarkably abrupt; strong turbulent motions come close to the nonturbulent fluid, promoting entrainment. Thirdly, the boundary is irregular with a continually changing convoluted shape, which produces statistical intermittency. Its shape is contorted at all scales of the turbulent motion.

  13. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begin with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair release 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until strong-force viscous stresses freeze out turbulent mixing patterns as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered as plasma photon-viscous forces permitting gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales. Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths appear as linear gas-protogalaxy-clusters in the Hubble ultra-deep field at z~7. Protogalaxies fragment into Jeans mass clumps of primordial-gas planets at decoupling: the dark matter of galaxies. Shortly after the plasma-to-gas transition, planet mergers produce stars that explode on overfeeding to fertilize and distribute the first life.

  14. Weather forecasting expert system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Weather forecasting is critical to both the Space Transportation System (STS) ground operations and the launch/landing activities at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The current launch frequency places significant demands on the USAF weather forecasters at the Cape Canaveral Forecasting Facility (CCFF), who currently provide the weather forecasting for all STS operations. As launch frequency increases, KSC's weather forecasting problems will be great magnified. The single most important problem is the shortage of highly skilled forecasting personnel. The development of forecasting expertise is difficult and requires several years of experience. Frequent personnel changes within the forecasting staff jeopardize the accumulation and retention of experience-based weather forecasting expertise. The primary purpose of this project was to assess the feasibility of using Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques to ameliorate this shortage of experts by capturing aria incorporating the forecasting knowledge of current expert forecasters into a Weather Forecasting Expert System (WFES) which would then be made available to less experienced duty forecasters.

  15. A radiosonde thermal sensor technique for measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new system was developed to measure vertical profiles of microthermal turbulence in the free atmosphere. It combines thermal sensor technology with radiosonde balloon systems. The resultant data set from each thermosonde flight is a profile of the strength and distribution of microthermal fluctuations which act as tracers for turbulence. The optical strength of this turbulence is computed and used to predict optical and laser beam propagation statistics. A description of the flight payload, examples of turbulence profiles, and comparison with simultaneous stellar observations are included.

  16. Sources and dynamics of turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Trier, S. B.; Lane, T. P.; Doyle, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    Turbulence is a well-known hazard to aviation that is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and is the underlying cause of many people's fear of air travel. Not only are turbulence encounters a safety issue, they also result in millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines, leading to increased costs passed on to the consumer. For these reasons, pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers attempt to avoid turbulence wherever possible. Accurate forecasting of aviation-scale turbulence has been hampered in part by a lack of understanding of the underlying dynamical processes. However, more precise observations of turbulence encounters together with recent research into turbulence generation processes is helping to elucidate the detailed dynamical processes involved and is laying the foundation for improved turbulence forecasting and avoidance. In this paper we briefly review some of the more important recent observational, theoretical, and modeling results related to turbulence at cruise altitudes for commercial aircraft (i.e., the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere), and their implications for aviation turbulence forecasting.

  17. Future freeze forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Real time GOES thermal data acquisition, an energy balance minimum temperature prediction model and a statistical model are incorporated into a minicomputer system. These components make up the operational "Satellite Freeze Forecast System" being used to aid NOAA, NWS forecasters in developing their freeze forecasts. The general concept of the system is presented in this paper. Specific detailed aspects of the system can be found in the reference cited.

  18. Solar Energy Forecast System Development and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jascourt, S. D.; Kirk-Davidoff, D. B.; Cassidy, C.

    2012-12-01

    Forecast systems for predicting real-time solar energy generation are being developed along similar lines to those of more established wind forecast systems, but the challenges and constraints are different. Clouds and aerosols play a large role, and for tilted photovoltaic panels and solar concentrating plants, the direct beam irradiance, which typically has much larger forecast errors than global horizontal irradiance, must be utilized. At MDA Information Systems, we are developing a forecast system based on first principles, with the well-validated REST2 clear sky model (Gueymard, 2008) at its backbone. In tuning the model and addressing aerosol scattering and surface albedo, etc., we relied upon the wealth of public data sources including AERONET (aerosol optical depth at different wavelengths), Suominet (GPS integrated water vapor), NREL MIDC solar monitoring stations, SURFRAD (includes upwelling shortwave), and MODIS (albedo in different wavelength bands), among others. The forecast itself utilizes a blend of NWP model output, which must be brought down to finer time resolution based on the diurnal cycle rather than simple interpolation. Many models currently do not output the direct beam irradiance, and one that does appears to have a bias relative to its global horizontal irradiance, with equally good performance attained by utilizing REST2 and the model global radiation to estimate the direct component. We will present a detailed assessment of various NWP solar energy products, evaluating forecast skill at a range of photovoltaic installations.

  19. Forecaster priorities for improving probabilistic flood forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterhall, Fredrik; Pappenberger, Florian; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Cloke, Hannah; Thielen, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) have in recent years been increasingly used for the operational forecasting of floods by European hydrometeorological agencies. The most obvious advantage of HEPS is that more of the uncertainty in the modelling system can be assessed. In addition, ensemble prediction systems generally have better skill than deterministic systems both in the terms of the mean forecast performance and the potential forecasting of extreme events. Research efforts have so far mostly been devoted to the improvement of the physical and technical aspects of the model systems, such as increased resolution in time and space and better description of physical processes. Developments like these are certainly needed; however, in this paper we argue that there are other areas of HEPS that need urgent attention. This was also the result from a group exercise and a survey conducted to operational forecasters within the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) to identify the top priorities of improvement regarding their own system. They turned out to span a range of areas, the most popular being to include verification of an assessment of past forecast performance, a multi-model approach for hydrological modelling, to increase the forecast skill on the medium range (>3 days) and more focus on education and training on the interpretation of forecasts. In light of limited resources, we suggest a simple model to classify the identified priorities in terms of their cost and complexity to decide in which order to tackle them. This model is then used to create an action plan of short-, medium- and long-term research priorities with the ultimate goal of an optimal improvement of EFAS in particular and to spur the development of operational HEPS in general.

  20. Review of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Nappo, Carmen J.; Mahrt, Larry; Belušić, Danijel; Grisogono, Branko; Stauffer, David R.; Pulido, Manuel; Staquet, Chantal; Jiang, Qingfang; Pouquet, Annick; Yagüe, Carlos; Galperin, Boris; Smith, Ronald B.; Finnigan, John J.; Mayor, Shane D.; Svensson, Gunilla; Grachev, Andrey A.; Neff, William D.

    2015-09-01

    Flow in a stably stratified environment is characterized by anisotropic and intermittent turbulence and wavelike motions of varying amplitudes and periods. Understanding turbulence intermittency and wave-turbulence interactions in a stably stratified flow remains a challenging issue in geosciences including planetary atmospheres and oceans. The stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) commonly occurs when the ground surface is cooled by longwave radiation emission such as at night over land surfaces, or even daytime over snow and ice surfaces, and when warm air is advected over cold surfaces. Intermittent turbulence intensification in the SABL impacts human activities and weather variability, yet it cannot be generated in state-of-the-art numerical forecast models. This failure is mainly due to a lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms for seemingly random turbulence generation in a stably stratified flow, in which wave-turbulence interaction is a potential mechanism for turbulence intermittency. A workshop on wave-turbulence interactions in the SABL addressed the current understanding and challenges of wave-turbulence interactions and the role of wavelike motions in contributing to anisotropic and intermittent turbulence from the perspectives of theory, observations, and numerical parameterization. There have been a number of reviews on waves, and a few on turbulence in stably stratified flows, but not much on wave-turbulence interactions. This review focuses on the nocturnal SABL; however, the discussions here on intermittent turbulence and wave-turbulence interactions in stably stratified flows underscore important issues in stably stratified geophysical dynamics in general.

  1. Weather assessment and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data management program activities centered around the analyses of selected far-term Office of Applications (OA) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and if so what alternative solutions would be possible. Three far-term (1985 and beyond) OA objectives selected for analyses as having potential significant data problems were large-scale weather forecasting, local weather and severe storms forecasting, and global marine weather forecasting. An overview of general weather forecasting activities and their implications upon the ground based data system is provided. Selected topics were specifically oriented to the use of satellites.

  2. Velocity and turbulence measurements in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Lau, K. Y.; Leung, C. C.

    1983-06-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimeter is used in the measurement of high-temperature gas flows. A two-stage fluidization particle generator provides magnesium oxide particles to serve as optical scattering centers. The one-dimensional dual-beam system is frequency shifted to permit measurements of velocities up to 300 meters per second and turbulence intensities greater than 100 percent. Exiting flows from can-type gas turbine combustors and burners with pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flames are described in terms of the velocity, turbulence intensity, and temperature profiles. The results indicate the influence of the combustion process on turbulence.

  3. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  4. Integrating Ocean Color Observations and Nowcast/Forecast of Bio-Optical Properties into the Naval Research Laboratory Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    Prieur, L., 1977. Analysis of variation in ocean color. Limnology and Oceanography, 22(4): 709-722. Mueller, J.L., 1988. Nimbus -7 CZCS: Electronic...overshoot due to cloud reflectance. Applied Optics, 27: 438 - 440. Nelson, N.B., Siegel, D.A. and Micheals, A.F., 1998. Seasonal dynamics of colored

  5. Quantifying turbulence microstructure for improvement of underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Sarah; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Jarosz, Ewa; Weidemann, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Enhancing visibility through scattering media is important in many fields for gaining information from the scattering medium. In the ocean, in particular, enhancement of imaging and visibility is important for divers, navigation, robotics, and target and mine detection and classification. Light scattering from particulates and turbulence in the ocean strongly affects underwater visibility. The magnitude of this degrading effect depends upon the underwater environment, and can rapidly degrade the quality of underwater imaging under certain conditions. To facilitate study of the impact of turbulence upon underwater imaging and to check against our previously developed model, quantified observation of the image degradation concurrent with characterization of the turbulent flow is necessary, spanning a variety of turbulent strengths. Therefore, we present field measurements of turbulence microstructure from the July 2010 Skaneateles Optical Turbulence Exercise (SOTEX), during which images of a target were collected over a 5 m path length at various depths in the water column, concurrent with profiles of the turbulent strength, optical properties, temperature, and conductivity. Turbulence was characterized by the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKED) and thermal dissipation (TD) rates, which were obtained using both a Rockland Scientific Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP) and a Nortek Vector velocimeter in combination with a PME CT sensor. While the two instrumental setups demonstrate reasonable agreement, some irregularities highlight the spatial and temporal variability of the turbulence field. Supplementary measurements with the Vector/CT in a controlled laboratory convective tank will shed additional light on the quantitative relationship between image degradation and turbulence strength.

  6. Ribbon turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, Antoine; Nadeau, Louis-Philippe; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel with an initial eastward baroclinically unstable jet in the upper layer, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization in the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these results by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the initial eastward jet in the upper layer appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the global distribution of potential vorticity levels. Statistical mechanical theory of the 1 1/2 layer quasi-geostrophic model predicts the formation of two regions of homogenized potential vorticity separated by a minimal interface. We explain that cascade phenomenology leads to the same result. We then show that the dynamics of the ribbons results from a competition between a tendency to reach the equilibrium state and baroclinic instability that induces meanders of the interface. These meanders intermittently break and induce potential vorticity mixing, but the interface remains sharp throughout the flow evolution. We show that for some parameter regimes, the ribbons act as a mixing barrier which prevents relaxation toward equilibrium, favouring the emergence of multiple zonal (eastward) jets.

  7. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  8. Forecasting Future Trends in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo, Andres; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a forecasting model sensitive to the major factors influencing educational outcomes, presents several forecasts based on alternative sets of assumptions, and discusses the implications of these forecasts, including ways to subvert them. (Author/JG)

  9. A controlled laboratory environment to study EO signal degradation due to underwater turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming; Kanaev, Andrey; Restaino, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    Temperature microstructure in the ocean can lead to localized changes in the index of refraction and can distort underwater electro-optical (EO) signal transmission. A similar phenomenon is well-known from atmospheric optics and generally referred to as "optical turbulence". Though turbulent fluctuations in the ocean distort EO signal transmission and can impact various underwater applications, from diver visibility to active and passive remote sensing, there have been few studies investigating the subject. To provide a test bed for the study of impacts from turbulent flows on underwater EO signal transmission, and to examine and mitigate turbulence effects, we set up a laboratory turbulence environment allowing the variation of turbulence intensity. Convective turbulence is generated in a large Rayleigh- Bénard tank and the turbulent flow is quantified using high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers and fast thermistor probes. The turbulence measurements are complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations of convective turbulence emulating the tank environment. These numerical simulations supplement the sparse laboratory measurements. The numerical data compared well to the laboratory data and both conformed to the Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence and the Batchelor spectrum of temperature fluctuations. The controlled turbulence environment can be used to assess optical image degradation in the tank in relation to turbulence intensity, as well as to apply adaptive optics techniques. This innovative approach that combines optical techniques, turbulence measurements and numerical simulations can help understand how to mitigate the effects of turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission, as well as advance optical techniques to probe oceanic processes.

  10. Aviation Forecasting in ICAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, J.

    1972-01-01

    Opinions or plans of qualified experts in the field are used for forecasting future requirements for air navigational facilities and services of international civil aviation. ICAO periodically collects information from Stators and operates on anticipated future operations, consolidates this information, and forecasts the future level of activity at different airports.

  11. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  12. Relationships between stratospheric clear air turbulence and synoptic meteorological parameters over the western United States between 12-20 km altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.; Clark, T. L.; Possiel, N. C.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for forecasting clear air turbulence in the stratosphere over the western United States from rawinsonde data are described and results presented. Approaches taken to relate meteorological parameters to regions of turbulence and nonturbulence encountered by the XB-70 during 46 flights at altitudes between 12-20 km include: empirical probabilities, discriminant function analysis, and mountainwave theory. Results from these techniques were combined into a procedure to forecast regions of clear air turbulence with an accuracy of 70-80 percent. A computer program was developed to provide an objective forecast directly from the rawinsonde sounding data.

  13. Engineering aspects of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Ashby, Dave; Christou, Julian C.; Kern, Jonathan; Lefebvre, Michael; McMahon, Tom J.; Miller, Douglas; Rahmer, Gustavo; Sosa, Richard; Taylor, Gregory; Vogel, Conrad; Zhang, Xianyu

    2016-07-01

    Vertical profiles of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and velocity is of critical importance for simulating, designing, and operating the next generation of instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Many of these instruments are already well into the design phase meaning these profies are required immediately to ensure they are optimised for the unique conditions likely to be observed. Stereo-SCIDAR is a generalised SCIDAR instrument which is used to characterise the profile of the atmospheric optical turbulence strength and wind velocity using triangulation between two optical binary stars. Stereo-SCIDAR has demonstrated the capability to resolve turbulent layers with the required vertical resolution to support wide-field ELT instrument designs. These high resolution atmospheric parameters are critical for design studies and statistical evaluation of on-sky performance under real conditions. Here we report on the new Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed on one of the Auxillary Telescope ports of the Very Large Telescope array at Cerro Paranal. Paranal is located approximately 20 km from Cerro Armazones, the site of the E-ELT. Although the surface layer of the turbulence will be different for the two sites due to local geography, the high-altitude resolution profiles of the free atmosphere from this instrument will be the most accurate available for the E-ELT site. In addition, these unbiased and independent profiles are also used to further characterise the site of the VLT. This enables instrument performance calibration, optimisation and data analysis of, for example, the ESO Adaptive Optics facility and the Next Generation Transit Survey. It will also be used to validate atmospheric models for turbulence forecasting. We show early results from the commissioning and address future implications of the results.

  14. Air Quality Forecast Verification using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, S.; Lee, P.; McQueen, J.; Kittaka, C.; Prados, A.; Ciren, P.; Laszlo, I.; Pierce, R. B.; Hoff, R.; Szykman, J. J.

    2006-05-01

    NOAA's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) developmental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) predictions tested during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation/New England Air Quality Study (ICARTT/NEAQS) field campaign. The forecast period was encompassed by long range transport of smoke from fires burning in Canada and Alaska and a regional-scale sulfate event over the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern United States (U.S). Over the 30-day time period for which daytime hourly forecasts were compared to observations, the categorical (event defined as AOD greater than 0.65) forecast accuracy was between 60% and 99% with a mean of ~80%. Hourly normalized mean bias (forecasts -" observations) ranged between -50% and +50% with forecasts being biased high when observed AODs were small and biased low when observed AODs were high. Normalized Mean Errors are between 50% and 100% with the errors on the lower end during July 18-22, 2004 time period when a regional scale sulfate event occurred. Spatially, the errors are small over the regions where sulfate plumes were present. The correlation coefficient (r) also showed similar features (spatially and temporally) with a peak value of ~0.6 during July 18-22, 2004 time period. The dominance of long-range transport of smoke into the US during the summer of 2004, neglected in the model predictions, skewed the model forecast performance. Enhanced accuracy and reduced normalized mean errors during the time period when a sulfate event prevailed shows that the forecast system is capable of skill in predicting PM2.5 associated with urban/industrial pollution events.

  15. The problem of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.; HILL; MERRYFIELD; GOUGH

    1984-01-01

    All ground-based observations of the solar five-minute oscillations are affected by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere that leads to substantial refractive index variations. The turbulent motions serve to mix an air mass that is thermally stratified in the vertical, thereby producing intermittent thermal fluctuations over a wide range of heights in the atmosphere. These thermal structures yield refractive index changes that deflect the light path in a complicated way, producing intricate variations of amplitude and phase in what might have started out as simple plane waves. Since the fluid turbulence is statistical in nature, so too is the optical turbulence which is an integral measure of the refractive index changes along the light travel path. All of this produces what is usually called atmospheric seeing, which consists of image motion, blurring and distortion across the field of view. The effects of atmospheric seeing upon observations of five-minute oscillations carried out from the ground were assessed. This will help to provide a baseline estimate of the scienctific benefits that might accrue if one were able to observe the same oscillations from a space observatory unfettered by seeing effects.

  16. Geometrical Monte Carlo simulation of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Demet; Yuksel, Heba

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric turbulence has a significant impact on the quality of a laser beam propagating through the atmosphere over long distances. Turbulence causes intensity scintillation and beam wander from propagation through turbulent eddies of varying sizes and refractive index. This can severely impair the operation of target designation and Free-Space Optical (FSO) communications systems. In addition, experimenting on an FSO communication system is rather tedious and difficult. The interferences of plentiful elements affect the result and cause the experimental outcomes to have bigger error variance margins than they are supposed to have. Especially when we go into the stronger turbulence regimes the simulation and analysis of the turbulence induced beams require delicate attention. We propose a new geometrical model to assess the phase shift of a laser beam propagating through turbulence. The atmosphere along the laser beam propagation path will be modeled as a spatial distribution of spherical bubbles with refractive index discontinuity calculated from a Gaussian distribution with the mean value being the index of air. For each statistical representation of the atmosphere, the path of rays will be analyzed using geometrical optics. These Monte Carlo techniques will assess the phase shift as a summation of the phases that arrive at the same point at the receiver. Accordingly, there would be dark and bright spots at the receiver that give an idea regarding the intensity pattern without having to solve the wave equation. The Monte Carlo analysis will be compared with the predictions of wave theory.

  17. Theory and laboratory demonstrations on the use of a nematic liquid-crystal phase modulator for controlled turbulence generation and adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Dayton, D C; Browne, S L; Sandven, S P; Gonglewski, J D; Kudryashov, A V

    1998-08-20

    We discuss the use of liquid-crystal phase modulators (LCPM's) both as a repeatable disturbance test source and as an adaptive optics corrector. LCPM's have the potential to induce controlled, repeatable, dynamic aberrations into optical systems at low cost, low complexity, and high flexibility. Because they are programmable and can be operated as transmissive elements, they can easily be inserted into the optical path of an adaptive optics system and used to generate a disturbance test source. When used as wave-front correctors they act as a piston-only segmented mirror and have a number of advantages. These include low operating power requirements, relatively low cost, and compact size. Laboratory experiments with a Meadowlark LCPM are presented. We first describe use of the LCPM as a repeatable disturbance generator for testing adaptive optics systems. We then describe a closed-loop adaptive optics system using the LCPM as the wave-front corrector. The adaptive optics system includes a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor operated with a zonal control algorithm.

  18. Simultaneous video stabilization and moving object detection in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oreifej, Omar; Li, Xin; Shah, Mubarak

    2013-02-01

    Turbulence mitigation refers to the stabilization of videos with nonuniform deformations due to the influence of optical turbulence. Typical approaches for turbulence mitigation follow averaging or dewarping techniques. Although these methods can reduce the turbulence, they distort the independently moving objects, which can often be of great interest. In this paper, we address the novel problem of simultaneous turbulence mitigation and moving object detection. We propose a novel three-term low-rank matrix decomposition approach in which we decompose the turbulence sequence into three components: the background, the turbulence, and the object. We simplify this extremely difficult problem into a minimization of nuclear norm, Frobenius norm, and l1 norm. Our method is based on two observations: First, the turbulence causes dense and Gaussian noise and therefore can be captured by Frobenius norm, while the moving objects are sparse and thus can be captured by l1 norm. Second, since the object's motion is linear and intrinsically different from the Gaussian-like turbulence, a Gaussian-based turbulence model can be employed to enforce an additional constraint on the search space of the minimization. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach on challenging sequences which are significantly distorted with atmospheric turbulence and include extremely tiny moving objects.

  19. Statistical evaluation of forecasts.

    PubMed

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  20. Statistical evaluation of forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Gluckman, Bruce J.; Timmer, Jens; Schelter, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Reliable forecasts of extreme but rare events, such as earthquakes, financial crashes, and epileptic seizures, would render interventions and precautions possible. Therefore, forecasting methods have been developed which intend to raise an alarm if an extreme event is about to occur. In order to statistically validate the performance of a prediction system, it must be compared to the performance of a random predictor, which raises alarms independent of the events. Such a random predictor can be obtained by bootstrapping or analytically. We propose an analytic statistical framework which, in contrast to conventional methods, allows for validating independently the sensitivity and specificity of a forecasting method. Moreover, our method accounts for the periods during which an event has to remain absent or occur after a respective forecast.

  1. Precipitation and temperature ensemble forecasts from single-value forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaake, J.; Demargne, J.; Hartman, R.; Mullusky, M.; Welles, E.; Wu, L.; Herr, H.; Fan, X.; Seo, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A procedure is presented to construct ensemble forecasts from single-value forecasts of precipitation and temperature. This involves dividing the spatial forecast domain and total forecast period into a number of parts that are treated as separate forecast events. The spatial domain is divided into hydrologic sub-basins. The total forecast period is divided into time periods, one for each model time step. For each event archived values of forecasts and corresponding observations are used to model the joint distribution of forecasts and observations. The conditional distribution of observations for a given single-value forecast is used to represent the corresponding probability distribution of events that may occur for that forecast. This conditional forecast distribution subsequently is used to create ensemble members that vary in space and time using the "Schaake Shuffle" (Clark et al, 2004). The resulting ensemble members have the same space-time patterns as historical observations so that space-time joint relationships between events that have a significant effect on hydrological response tend to be preserved. Forecast uncertainty is space and time-scale dependent. For a given lead time to the beginning of the valid period of an event, forecast uncertainty depends on the length of the forecast valid time period and the spatial area to which the forecast applies. Although the "Schaake Shuffle" procedure, when applied to construct ensemble members from a time-series of single value forecasts, may preserve some of this scale dependency, it may not be sufficient without additional constraint. To account more fully for the time-dependent structure of forecast uncertainty, events for additional "aggregate" forecast periods are defined as accumulations of different "base" forecast periods. The generated ensemble members can be ingested by an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction system to produce ensemble forecasts of streamflow and other hydrological variables that reflect

  2. On the turbulent flow in piston engines: Coupling of statistical theory quantities and instantaneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Baum, Elias; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas; Peterson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tomographic PIV (TPIV) measurements are utilized to analyze turbulent statistical theory quantities and the instantaneous turbulence within a single-cylinder optical engine. Measurements are performed during the intake and mid-compression stroke at 800 and 1500 RPM. TPIV facilitates the evaluation of spatially resolved Reynolds stress tensor (RST) distributions, anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants, and instantaneous turbulent vortical structures. The RST analysis describes distributions of individual velocity fluctuation components that arise from unsteady turbulent flow behavior as well as cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV). A conditional analysis, for which instantaneous PIV images are sampled by their tumble center location, reveals that CCV and turbulence have similar contributions to RST distributions at the mean tumble center, but turbulence is dominant in regions peripheral to the tumble center. Analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants reveals the spatial distribution of axisymmetric expansion, axisymmetric contraction, and 3D isotropy within the cylinder. Findings indicate that the mid-compression flow exhibits a higher tendency toward 3D isotropy than the intake flow. A novel post-processing algorithm is utilized to classify the geometry of instantaneous turbulent vortical structures and evaluate their frequency of occurrence within the cylinder. Findings are coupled with statistical theory quantities to provide a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of turbulent velocity components, the distribution of anisotropic states of turbulence, and compare the turbulent vortical flow distribution that is theoretically expected to what is experimentally observed. The analyses reveal requisites of important turbulent flow quantities and discern their sensitivity to the local flow topography and engine operation.

  3. MISOLFA : a seeing monitor for daytime turbulence parameters measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, R.; Corbard, T.; Irbah, A.; Meftah, M.; Morand, F.; Fodil, M.; Assus, P.; Renaud, C.; Chauvineau, B.; Picard-Sol Team

    2012-06-01

    The Franco-Algerian Monitor of Solar Images (MISOLFA) was developped in order to study the effect of optical turbulence on diameter measurements from ground-based solar observations. Some first results obtained with MISOLFA are presented.

  4. An overview of health forecasting.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    Health forecasting is a novel area of forecasting, and a valuable tool for predicting future health events or situations such as demands for health services and healthcare needs. It facilitates preventive medicine and health care intervention strategies, by pre-informing health service providers to take appropriate mitigating actions to minimize risks and manage demand. Health forecasting requires reliable data, information and appropriate analytical tools for the prediction of specific health conditions or situations. There is no single approach to health forecasting, and so various methods have often been adopted to forecast aggregate or specific health conditions. Meanwhile, there are no defined health forecasting horizons (time frames) to match the choices of health forecasting methods/approaches that are often applied. The key principles of health forecasting have not also been adequately described to guide the process. This paper provides a brief introduction and theoretical analysis of health forecasting. It describes the key issues that are important for health forecasting, including: definitions, principles of health forecasting, and the properties of health data, which influence the choices of health forecasting methods. Other matters related to the value of health forecasting, and the general challenges associated with developing and using health forecasting services are discussed. This overview is a stimulus for further discussions on standardizing health forecasting approaches and methods that will facilitate health care and health services delivery.

  5. Earthquake Forecasting, Validation and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J.; Holliday, J.; Turcotte, D.; Donnellan, A.; Tiampo, K.; Klein, B.

    2009-05-01

    Techniques for earthquake forecasting are in development using both seismicity data mining methods, as well as numerical simulations. The former rely on the development of methods to recognize patterns in data, while the latter rely on the use of dynamical models that attempt to faithfully replicate the actual fault systems. Testing such forecasts is necessary not only to determine forecast quality, but also to improve forecasts. A large number of techniques to validate and verify forecasts have been developed for weather and financial applications. Many of these have been elaborated in public locations, including, for example, the URL as listed below. Typically, the goal is to test for forecast resolution, reliability and sharpness. A good forecast is characterized by consistency, quality and value. Most, if not all of these forecast verification procedures can be readily applied to earthquake forecasts as well. In this talk, we discuss both methods of forecasting, as well as validation and verification using a number of these standard methods. We show how these test methods might be useful for both fault-based forecasting, a group of forecast methods that includes the WGCEP and simulator-based renewal models, and grid-based forecasting, which includes the Relative Intensity, Pattern Informatics, and smoothed seismicity methods. We find that applying these standard methods of forecast verification is straightforward. Judgments about the quality of a given forecast method can often depend on the test applied, as well as on the preconceptions and biases of the persons conducting the tests.

  6. Outer scales of temperature turbulence and dynamic turbulence from the data of acoustic sounding of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2014-11-01

    The outer scale of turbulence plays an important role in the theory of atmospheric turbulence. It specifies the lowfrequency boundary of the inertial subrange of fluctuation spectra of the atmospheric meteorological parameters, is used to construct models of the atmospheric turbulence and to estimate the excess turbulent attenuation of waves in the atmosphere. Outer scales of the wind velocity, temperature, humidity, and ozone concentration were previously determined, in particular, from direct airborne measurements of the spectral power density of these parameters, and their dependences on the altitude above the underlying surface, its properties, and type of the atmospheric stratification were demonstrated. For optical radiation propagating in the surface layer, the outer scale of temperature turbulence was determined from measurements of the variance of phase fluctuations of optical waves propagating along the near-ground paths. Unlike the optical waves, the acoustic wave propagation in the atmospheric boundary layer is influenced simultaneously by the temperature fluctuations caused by thermal convection and by the velocity fluctuations (dynamic turbulence caused by the wind shear). Their relative contributions depend on the ratio of the outer scales of the dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence. In the present work, a method of simultaneous acoustic sounding of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is suggested, and combined influence of these parameters on the acoustic wave propagation is estimated. Temporal dynamics of vertical profiles of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is analyzed. The efficiency of the suggested method is confirmed by the results of comparison with the data of laser sensing of these parameters and their theoretical estimates, which demonstrate their good agreement.

  7. Proceedings: Eleventh forecasting symposium. Forecasting in a competitive electricity market

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, T.; Ignelzi, P.

    1998-10-01

    EPRI`s Eleventh Forecasting Symposium: ``Forecasting in a Competitive Electricity Market`` was held in Arlington, Virginia, in November 1997. This proceedings documents the symposium`s wide variety of topics, ranging from very-short-term operations issues to mid-term market planning issues. Speakers described the forecasting practices of other industries, predicted forecasting directions in the electric power industry; related their experiences with new forecasting approaches; and suggested further enhancements to forecasting methods, tools, and data. The objectives of the symposium were to explore the expanding roles of forecasting in a competitive market, to exchange information about forecasting techniques under development, and to discuss the forecasting techniques currently used by the electric power industry in and outside the US and in other industries. The 30 papers are arranged under the following topical sections: restructuring and regulatory issues--implications for forecasting; forecasting experiences in other industries; operations-related forecasting; data warehousing and database marketing; forecasting and risk management; understanding and predicting market prices; forecasting methods for the new environment; predicting customer response; and symposium wrap-up.

  8. Turbulence-noise in infrared lidar sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdinandov, E. S.; Tsanev, V. I.; Todorov, B. O.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical description of the laser location (lidar) systems for investigation of two-dimensional distributions of the scattering properties of aerosol fields (natural or anthropogenic) in the infrared range has been made on the basis of the heuristic concept for the influence of the atmospheric turbulence (AT) on the transverse spatial structure of optical radiations. It has been shown that the influence of AT on the information carried by the lidar images is negative. It acts along the path "laser-sounded aerosol layer" only, i.e. when there is utter initial transverse coherency of the optical radiation. Explicit results for the stratifications of the coherency radii, the dispersion and contrast of the transverse spatial fluctuations of the intensity, the averaging action of the apertures of matrix photodetector elements on the corresponding radiant fluxes' turbulent fluctuations and the "signal-to-turbulence-noise" ratio have been derived.

  9. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases, 2. Proceedings of the 1988 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the program was on the use of direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow for study of turbulence physics and modeling. A special interest was placed on turbulent mixing layers. The required data for these investigations were generated from four newly developed codes for simulation of time and spatially developing incompressible and compressible mixing layers. Also of interest were the structure of wall bounded turbulent and transitional flows, evaluation of diagnostic techniques for detection of organized motions, energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, optical propagation through turbulent media, and detailed analysis of the interaction of vortical structures.

  10. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Darbieu, Clara; Couvreux, Fleur; Pino, David; Blay, Estel; Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Pietersen, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar; Pardyjak, Eric; Alexander, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Baaserud, Line; Nilsson, Erik; Jimenez, Maria Antonia; Faloona, Ian; Sastre-Marugan, Mariano; Angevine, Wayne M.; Canut, Guylaine; Bazile, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims at better understanding the turbulence processes which occur during the transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null during the transition and the turbulence regime changes from the fully convective regime of turbulence, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward more heterogeneous and intermittent turbulence during its decay. Those issues motivated a field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France in complex terrain and consisted of a range of integrated instrument platforms including: full-size aircraft, Remotely Piloted Airplane Systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers deployed over different surface covers. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to free troposphere was densely probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The field dataset now forms the base of a set of studies utilizing the observations and several types of models including: Large Eddy Simulation, Mesoscale models, forecast models. The presentation will expose an overview of this experiment and of the current observational and modeling studies, with the focus on: the turbulence decay process within the entire boundary layer from surface to the top, the mesoscale forcings of importance during BLLAST, the ability of the forecast models to represent the diurnal cycle, the relevance of the Monin Obukhov similarity theory, and shallow drainage flows. Reference: Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7

  11. Forced unsteady deceleration of a turbulent boundary layer from a temporal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a turbulent boundary layer which has been subjected to a local ramp-like deceleration in the external velocity field, which leads to forced separation, has been studied experimentally. The data of this study are re-interpreted in light of more recent findings concerning the temporal nature of boundary layer turbulence in the presence of forced unsteady shear. In particular, the robustness of the near-wall turbulent motions to organized deformation is recognized. Their resilence during unsteady shearing action promotes continued efficient turbulent mixing and rapid redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy during forced transients. In aerodynamic problems, the rapid nature of the adjustment of the turbulence field to a new temporal boundary condition necessitates equally rapid remedial measures to be taken if means of control/prevention of forced unsteady separation are to be deployed to maximum effect. This requirement suggests exploration of the use of simple, real-time statistical forecasting techniques, based upon time-series analysis of easily-measurable features of the flow, to help assure timely deployment of mechanisms of boundary-layer control. This paper focuses upon the nature of turbulence in boundary layers undergoing forced deceleration which would lead to separation. A preliminary form of a forecasting model is presented and evaluated. Using observations of the previous two large eddies passing a detector, it forecasts the behavior of the future large eddy rather well.

  12. Forced unsteady deceleration of a turbulent boundary layer from a temporal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.

    1992-03-01

    The behavior of a turbulent boundary layer which has been subjected to a local ramp-like deceleration in the external velocity field, which leads to forced separation, has been studied experimentally. The data of this study are re-interpreted in light of more recent findings concerning the temporal nature of boundary layer turbulence in the presence of forced unsteady shear. In particular, the robustness of the near-wall turbulent motions to organized deformation is recognized. Their resilence during unsteady shearing action promotes continued efficient turbulent mixing and rapid redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy during forced transients. In aerodynamic problems, the rapid nature of the adjustment of the turbulence field to a new temporal boundary condition necessitates equally rapid remedial measures to be taken if means of control/prevention of forced unsteady separation are to be deployed to maximum effect. This requirement suggests exploration of the use of simple, real-time statistical forecasting techniques, based upon time-series analysis of easily-measurable features of the flow, to help assure timely deployment of mechanisms of boundary-layer control. This paper focuses upon the nature of turbulence in boundary layers undergoing forced deceleration which would lead to separation. A preliminary form of a forecasting model is presented and evaluated. Using observations of the previous two large eddies passing a detector, it forecasts the behavior of the future large eddy rather well.

  13. Atmospheric Turbulence Simulations with Spatial Light Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, R.; Kanaan, A.; Mello, A. T.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence in the optical path of incoming stellar light transforms a plane wavefront into a distorted wavefront. This leads to loss of resolution achievable in a telescope. The correction of these distortions is the goal of adaptive optics. We are designing an experiment to recreate the effects of turbulence on an optical bench. This experiment aims to reproduce the effects observed in an artificial sodium laser star when viewed by a 30m class telescope. The edge of such large telescopes see the sodium artificial star as an elongated rather than a circle. In the bench experiment the turbulence distortions are achieved by directing the light beam through a glass plate whose surface is etched to imitate the phase distortions caused by the atmosphere, this plate is called a phase screen. Phase screens are made much bigger than the incident beam of light and we move this phase plate to simulate the effect of a changing atmosphere. To test new turbulence patterns one needs several different phase screens, which are expensive and hard to make. Our work involves computing numerical simulations of turbulence and testing algorithms to correct the phase distortion.We would then like to test these algorithms on our bench before testing on the telescope. To make these tests more realistic we would like to apply the same simulated turbulence patterns to our phase screen. This is almost impossible to do with phase screens, therefore we are planning to replace phase screens with spatial phase modulators that can be programmed to introduce a phase shift to the incident light at a time resolution of milliseconds. Integration of spatial phase modulators in optical benches as phase screens will allow for much more flexible experiments permitting a perfect correlation between the numerical simulations and the physical experiments.

  14. Evaluation of Nocturnal Temperature Forecasts Provided by the Weather Research and Forecast Model for Different Stability Regimes and Terrain Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, Adriano; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Costa, Felipe D.; Puhales, Franciano S.; Anabor, Vagner; Degrazia, Gervásio A.

    2017-03-01

    The quality of nocturnal temperature forecasts made by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) numerical model is evaluated. The model was run for all July 2012 nights, and temperature fields compared to hourly observations made at 26 weather stations in southern Brazil. Four different planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes are considered: Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac), Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE), Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ). Additional simulations to assess the role of higher horizontal and vertical resolutions were performed using the MYJ scheme. All schemes, except BouLac, underestimated the 2-m temperature, and in all cases the temperature bias is dependent on wind speed. At high wind speeds, all schemes exhibit a cold bias, which is greater for those that yield lower nocturnal surface-layer turbulent intensity. The elevation difference between each station and the model nearest grid point H_{it{station}} -H_{it{gridpoint}} is highly correlated with the temperature simulation error. We found that a consistent cold bias is restricted to conditions with low-level clouds. We concluded that one possible means of improving nocturnal temperature forecast is to use parametrization schemes that allow for higher turbulent intensity in near-neutral conditions. The results indicate that this improvement would partially counteract the misrepresentation of the low-level cloud cover. In most stable cases, a post-processing algorithm based on terrain characteristics may improve the forecasts.

  15. Evaluation of Nocturnal Temperature Forecasts Provided by the Weather Research and Forecast Model for Different Stability Regimes and Terrain Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, Adriano; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Costa, Felipe D.; Puhales, Franciano S.; Anabor, Vagner; Degrazia, Gervásio A.

    2016-10-01

    The quality of nocturnal temperature forecasts made by the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) numerical model is evaluated. The model was run for all July 2012 nights, and temperature fields compared to hourly observations made at 26 weather stations in southern Brazil. Four different planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes are considered: Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac), Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE), Yonsei University (YSU) and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ). Additional simulations to assess the role of higher horizontal and vertical resolutions were performed using the MYJ scheme. All schemes, except BouLac, underestimated the 2-m temperature, and in all cases the temperature bias is dependent on wind speed. At high wind speeds, all schemes exhibit a cold bias, which is greater for those that yield lower nocturnal surface-layer turbulent intensity. The elevation difference between each station and the model nearest grid point H_{station} -H_{gridpoint} is highly correlated with the temperature simulation error. We found that a consistent cold bias is restricted to conditions with low-level clouds. We concluded that one possible means of improving nocturnal temperature forecast is to use parametrization schemes that allow for higher turbulent intensity in near-neutral conditions. The results indicate that this improvement would partially counteract the misrepresentation of the low-level cloud cover. In most stable cases, a post-processing algorithm based on terrain characteristics may improve the forecasts.

  16. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  17. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  18. Dynamically Resolved Simulation of Atmospheric Features and Turbulence Using Advanced Models and Adaptive Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-30

    the dissipation rate of the variance of potential temperature and e is the dissipat ion rate of the variance of velocity or turbulent kinetic energy ...structure function Cn2, a quantitative measure of atmospheric optical turbulence. These four equations are used to model the turbulence kinetic energy , the...NWP Numerical weather Prediction PBL Planetary boundary layer PPM Piecewise parabolic method SGS Subgrid scale TKE Turbulent kinetic energy UTC

  19. Low-Level Turbulence Forecasts From Fine-Scale Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    WRF parameterizations utilized 4 included Thompson’s microphysics parameterization, the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization, the Rapid Radiative...the model’s native vertical levels. UPP outputs hundreds of possible fields such as temperature, height, humidity, cloud water, rain, snow, wind...below 1220-m AGL. Several observation stations in New Jersey were reporting gusty surface conditions with broken clouds that may have contributed to

  20. Turbulence detection using radiosondes: plugging the gaps in the observation of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlton, Graeme; Harrison, Giles; Williams, Paul; Nicoll, Keri

    2014-05-01

    Turbulence costs the airline industry tens of millions of dollars each year, through damage to aircraft and injury to passengers. Clear-air turbulence (CAT) is particularly problematic, as it cannot be detected using remote sensing methods and we lack consistent observations to validate forecast models. Here we describe two specially adapted meteorological radiosondes that are used to measure turbulence. The first sensor consists of a Hall-effect magnetometer, which uses the Earth's magnetic field as a reference point, allowing the motion of the sonde to be measured. The second consists of an accelerometer that measures the accelerations the balloon encounters. A solar radiation sensor is mounted at the top of the package, to determine whether the sonde is in cloud. Results from multiple flights over Reading, UK in different conditions, show both sensors detecting turbulent regions near jet boundaries and above cloud tops, with the accelerometer recording values in excess of 6g in these regions. Case studies will show how these observations can be used to test the performance of a selection of empirical turbulence diagnostics initialised from ERA-interim data.

  1. Coupling of turbulent and non-turbulent flow regimes within pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim R.; Dufek, Josef; Cronin, Shane J.; Valentine, Greg A.; Moebis, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions are at their most deadly when pyroclastic density currents sweep across landscapes to devastate everything in their path. The internal dynamics underpinning these hazards cannot be directly observed. Here we present a quantitative view inside pyroclastic density currents by synthesizing their natural flow behaviour in large-scale experiments. The experiments trace flow dynamics from initiation to deposition, and can explain the sequence and evolution of real-world deposits. We show that, inside pyroclastic density currents, the long-hypothesized non-turbulent underflow and fully turbulent ash-cloud regions are linked through a hitherto unrecognized middle zone of intermediate turbulence and concentration. Bounded by abrupt jumps in turbulence, the middle zone couples underflow and ash-cloud regions kinematically. Inside this zone, strong feedback between gas and particle phases leads to the formation of mesoscale turbulence clusters. These extremely fast-settling dendritic structures dictate the internal stratification and evolution of pyroclastic density currents and allow the underflows to grow significantly during runout. Our experiments reveal how the underflow and ash-cloud regions are dynamically related--insights that are relevant to the forecasting of pyroclastic density current behaviour in volcanic hazard models.

  2. Oceanic turbulence effects on long-exposure and short-exposure imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Huan; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Based on the power spectrum of oceanic turbulence, the modulation transfer functions and the optical resolution for long-exposure and short-exposure imaging through oceanic turbulence are studied in detail. The analytical formulae for the seeing parameter and the tilt variance in oceanic turbulence are derived, and it is found that the relationship between the seeing parameter and the spatial coherence width in oceanic turbulence is just like that in atmospheric turbulence. Furthermore, the model of underwater imaging shown in this paper considers both temperature and salinity fluctuations for oceanic turbulence. It is found that, compared with the dominating salinity-induced turbulence, the range of angular spatial frequency where oceanic turbulence plays the major role rather than particle scattering is higher for the dominating temperature-induced turbulence.

  3. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  4. Turbulence, Turbulence Control, and Drag Reduction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Onsager (1945) and Weizs~cker (1948). has made remarkable strides in advancing our understanding of turbulent flows. It is this description of turbulent...tujrbuilce Inl thle lar to thle Intermiittenit trans’ition to turbulence lus.t ,iedipen itlik. N\\N.tern onI the other. O pen0 * ~ ~ h 1 ~ kdinition10 po...Some Studies of Non-Simple Pipe Flows K R SREENIVASAN 2.AR’ .\\ variety o phenooena occrs ’.5’, ,sTecla’., f we stray,’ away from straight circ- lar i es a

  5. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    in optical spectra. A determination of the role which changing turbulent parameters might play on optical signatures behind a reflected shock wave should therefore provide a useful tool for the evolution of theoretical models for turbulence.

  6. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from Hα Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The probability density function of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents of the power law with the break in the power law at approximately 2000 km. We hypothesise this to be a result of internal turbulence excited in the prominence by the dynamic flows of the system found at this spatial scale. We found that the scaling exponents of the pth order structure functions for these two regions generally followed the p/ 2 (smaller scales) and p/ 4 (larger scales) laws that are the same as those predicted for weak MHD turbulence and Kraichnan-Iroshnikov turbulence respectively. However, the existence of the p/ 4 scaling at larger scales than the p/ 2 scaling is inconsistent with the increasing nonlinearity expected in MHD turbulence. We also found that as we went to higher order structure functions, the dependence of the scaling exponent on the order p is nonlinear implying that intermittency may be playing an important role in the turbulent cascade. Estimating the heating

  7. Satellite Spots Turbulence Producing Mountain Waves in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Robert Roy

    2002-01-01

    When masses of air flow over massive mountains, invisible waves often roil high into the stratosphere, affecting weather and mixing the chemicals that contribute to ozone depletion. The waves also create turbulence that can be a danger to high-altitude research missions by NASA's lightweight ER-2 aircraft, as well as shuttle flights upon reentry. In Friday's issue of the journal Science, researchers report for the first time a technique that allows them to see temperature signatures from these invisible mountain waves. The method, involving high-resolution, satellite-based measurement of adjacent pockets of the atmosphere, is expected to aid in spotting turbulence and, one day, improve weather forecasts.

  8. Light Propagation through Anisotropic Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Kolmogorov stratospheric turbulence on star image motion,” Proc. SPIE 3126, 113–123 (1997). 5. B. E . Stribling, B. M . Welsh, and M . C. Roggemann...746407 (2009). 10. M . Chang, C. O. Font, F. Santiago, Y. Luna, E . Roura, and S. Restaino, “Marine environment optical propagation measure- ments,” Proc...Anisotropic factor as a function of alpha for several zeta values. Toselli et al. Vol. 28, No. 3 / March 2011 / J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 487 14. M . S

  9. On forecasting mortality.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, S J

    1988-01-01

    Official forecasts of mortality made by the U.S. Office of the Actuary throughout this century have consistently underestimated observed mortality declines. This is due, in part, to their reliance on the static extrapolation of past trends, an atheoretical statistical method that pays scant attention to the behavioral, medical, and social factors contributing to mortality change. A "multiple cause-delay model" more realistically portrays the effects on mortality of the presence of more favorable risk factors at the population level. Such revised assumptions produce large increases in forecasts of the size of the elderly population, and have a dramatic impact on related estimates of population morbidity, disability, and health care costs.

  10. Characterizing the Severe Turbulence Environments Associated With Commercial Aviation Accidents: A Real-Time Turbulence Model (RTTM) Designed for the Operational Prediction of Hazardous Aviation Turbulence Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lux, Kevin M.; Cetola, Jeffrey D.; Huffman, Allan W.; Riordan, Allen J.; Slusser, Sarah W.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Charney, Joseph J.; Waight, Kenneth T.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time prediction of environments predisposed to producing moderate-severe aviation turbulence is studied. We describe the numerical model and its postprocessing system designed for said prediction of environments predisposed to severe aviation turbulence as well as presenting numerous examples of its utility. The numerical model is MASS version 5.13, which is integrated over three different grid matrices in real time on a university work station in support of NASA Langley Research Center s B-757 turbulence research flight missions. The postprocessing system includes several turbulence-related products, including four turbulence forecasting indices, winds, streamlines, turbulence kinetic energy, and Richardson numbers. Additionally, there are convective products including precipitation, cloud height, cloud mass fluxes, lifted index, and K-index. Furthermore, soundings, sounding parameters, and Froude number plots are also provided. The horizontal cross-section plot products are provided from 16 000 to 46 000 ft in 2000-ft intervals. Products are available every 3 hours at the 60- and 30-km grid interval and every 1.5 hours at the 15-km grid interval. The model is initialized from the NWS ETA analyses and integrated two times a day.

  11. Forecasts of the atmospherical parameters close to the ground at the LBT site in the context of the ALTA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Alessio; Masciadri, Elena; Fini, Luca

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study the abilities of an atmospherical mesoscale model in forecasting the classical atmospherical parameters relevant for astronomical applications at the surface layer (wind speed, wind direction, temperature, relative humidity) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site - Mount Graham, Arizona. The study is carried out in the framework of the ALTA project aiming at implementing an automated system for the forecasts of atmospherical parameters (Meso-Nh code) and the optical turbulence (Astro-Meso-Nh code) for the service-mode operation of the LBT. The final goal of such an operational tool is to provide predictions with high time frequency of atmospheric and optical parameters for an optimized planning of the telescope operation (dome thermalization, wind-dependent dome orientation, observation planning based on predicted seeing, adaptive optics optimization, etc...). Numerical simulations are carried out with the Meso-Nh and Astro-Meso-Nh codes, which were proven to give excellent results in previous studies focused on the two ESO sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones (MOSE Project). In this paper we will focus our attention on the comparison of atmospherical parameters forescasted by the model close to the ground with measurements taken by the observatory instrumentations and stored in the LBT telemetry in order to validate the numerical predictions. As previously done for Cerro Paranal (Lascaux et al., 2015), we will also present an analysis of the model performances based on the method of the contingency tables, that allows us to provide complementary key information with the respect to the bias and RMSE (systematic and statistical errors), such as the percentage of correct detection and the probability to obtain a correct detection inside a defined interval of values.

  12. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  13. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  14. Active multi-aperture imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nicholas J.; Widiker, Jeffrey J.; McManamon, Paul F.; Haus, Joseph W.

    2012-06-01

    We describe our Innovative Multi Aperture Gimbaless Electro-Optical (IMAGE) testbed which uses coherent detection of the complex field reflected off a diffuse target with seven hexagonally arranged apertures. The seven measured optical fields are then phased with a digital optimization algorithm to synthesize a composite image whose angular resolution exceeds that of a single aperture. This same post-detection phasing algorithm also corrects aberrations induced by imperfect optics and a turbulent atmospheric path. We present the coherent imaging sub-aperture design used in the IMAGE array as well as the design of a compact range used to perform scaled tests of the IMAGE array. We present some experimental results of imaging diffuse targets in the compact range with two phase screens which simulates a ~7[Km] propagation path through distributed atmospheric turbulence.

  15. Forecasting Methods for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Linda W.; Young, Dean M.

    1988-01-01

    Increasing demands for accurate forecasts in such areas as student enrollment, energy expenditures, and facility capacity are placing new demands on the institutional researcher. A variety of forecasting models and methods are available, all to be used with caution in long-range forecasting. (Author/MSE)

  16. Corporate Forecasting: Promise and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelwright, Steven C.; Clarke, Darral G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a survey of forecast preparers and users in 127 major companies in an attempt to assess underlying problems and identify areas for improvement. Concludes that forecasting responsibilities and tasks must be better defined and that forecast preparers and users must become better informed about one another's roles. (Author/JG)

  17. Federal Forecasters Directory, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This directory lists employees of the federal government who are involved in forecasting for policy formation and trend prediction purposes. Job title, agency, business address, phone or e-mail number, and specialty areas are listed for each employee. Employees are listed for the following agencies: (1) Bureau of the Census; (2) Bureau of Economic…

  18. Developing air quality forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pius; Saylor, Rick; Meagher, James

    2012-05-01

    Third International Workshop on Air Quality Forecasting Research; Potomac, Maryland, 29 November to 1 December 2011 Elevated concentrations of both near-surface ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter have been implicated in increased mortality and other human health impacts. In light of these known influences on human health, many governments around the world have instituted air quality forecasting systems to provide their citizens with advance warning of impending poor air quality so that they can take actions to limit exposure. In an effort to improve the performance of air quality forecasting systems and provide a forum for the exchange of the latest research in air quality modeling, the International Workshop on Air Quality Forecasting Research (IWAQFR) was established in 2009 and is cosponsored by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Environment Canada (EC), and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The steering committee for IWAQFR's establishment was composed of Véronique Bouchet, Mike Howe, and Craig Stoud (EC); Greg Carmichael (University of Iowa); Paula Davidson and Jim Meagher (NOAA); and Liisa Jalkanen (WMO). The most recent workshop took place in Maryland.

  19. Turbulence in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the astrophysical scenarios in which turbulence plays an important role are discussed in view of the comparative advantages of currently available models of turbulence phenomena; attention is given to a specific model that has undergone continuous refinement since 1985. The desideratum in this inquiry is a turbulence model which incorporates the best features of an a priori deterministic model, as well as a redundant set of results from full numerical simulations for a wide variety of turbulent flows; there should also be a simplification of the former, and an enlargement of the complexities of the latter.

  20. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  1. String Theory and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  2. Investigation of turbulent transport in an axisymmetric sudden expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Richard D.; Stevenson, Warren H.; Thompson, H. Doyle

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous two-component laser velocimeter measurements were made in the incompressible turbulent flowfield following an axisymmetric sudden expansion. Mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, and triple products were measured and are presented at axial positions ranging from x/H = 0.2-14. A balance of the turbulent kinetic energy in the flow was performed. The production, convection, and diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy were computed directly from the experimental data using central differencing. A specially designed correction lens was employed to correct for optical aberrations introduced by the circular tube. This lens system allowed the accurate simultaneous measurement of axial and radial velocities in the test section. The experimental measurements were compared to predictions generated by a code that employed the k-epsilon turbulence model. Agreement was good for mean axial velocities, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent shear stresses. However, the modeled turbulent normal stresses where in poor agreement with the measured values. The modeled diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy was underpredicted in the region between the shear layer and the centerline of the flow giving lower values of turbulent kinetic energy downstream of the potential core than measured.

  3. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  4. Aerosol forecast over the Mediterranean area during July 2013 (ADRIMED/CHARMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, L.; Rea, G.; Mailler, S.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Turquety, S.

    2015-07-01

    The ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project was dedicated to study the atmospheric composition during the summer 2013 in the European Mediterranean region. During its campaign experiment part, the WRF (Weather Research and Forecast Model) and CHIMERE models were used in the forecast mode in order to decide whether intensive observation periods should be triggered. Each day, a simulation of 4 days was performed, corresponding to (D-1) to (D+2) forecast leads. The goal of this study was to determine whether the model forecast spread is lower or greater than the model biases compared to observations. It is shown that the differences between observations and the model are always higher than those between the forecasts. Among all forcing types used in the chemistry-transport model, it is shown that the strong bias and other related low forecast scores are mainly due to the forecast accuracy of the wind speed, which is used both for the mineral dust emissions (a threshold process) and for the long-range transport of aerosol: the surface wind speed forecast spread can reach 50%, leading to mineral dust emission forecast spread of up to 30%. These variations are responsible for a moderate forecast spread of the surface PM10 (a few percentage points) and for a large spread (more than 50%) in the mineral dust concentration at higher altitudes, leading to a mean AOD (aerosol optical depth) forecast spread of ±10%.

  5. Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Weather Forecasts in the ECMWF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, A.; Benedetti, A.; Rodwell, M. J.; Bechtold, P.; Remy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth system via direct scattering and absorpiton of short-wave and long-wave radiation and indirect interaction with clouds. Diabatic heating or cooling by aerosols can also modify the vertical stability of the atmosphere and influence weather pattern with potential impact on the skill of global weather prediction models. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) provides operational daily analysis and forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for five aerosol species using a prognostic model which is part of the Integrated Forecasting System of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-IFS). The aerosol component was developed during the research project Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC). Aerosols can have a large impact on the weather forecasts in case of large aerosol concentrations as found during dust storms or strong pollution events. However, due to its computational burden, prognostic aerosols are not yet feasible in the ECMWF operational weather forecasts, and monthly-mean climatological fields are used instead. We revised the aerosol climatology used in the operational ECMWF IFS with one derived from the MACC reanalysis. We analyse the impact of changes in the aerosol radiative effect on the mean model climate and in medium-range weather forecasts, also in comparison with prognostic aerosol fields. The new climatology differs from the previous one by Tegen et al 1997, both in the spatial distribution of the total AOD and the optical properties of each aerosol species. The radiative impact of these changes affects the model mean bias at various spatial and temporal scales. On one hand we report small impacts on measures of large-scale forecast skill but on the other hand details of the regional distribution of aerosol concentration have a large local impact. This is the case for the northern Indian Ocean where the radiative impact of the mineral

  6. Sea Fog Forecasting with Lagrangian Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    In 1913, G. I. Taylor introduced us to a Lagrangian view of sea fog formation. He conducted his study off the coast of Newfoundland in the aftermath of the Titanic disaster. We briefly review Taylor's classic work and then apply these same principles to a case of sea fog formation and dissipation off the coast of California. The resources used in this study consist of: 1) land-based surface and upper-air observations, 2) NDBC (National Data Buoy Center) observations from moored buoys equipped to measure dew point temperature as well as the standard surface observations at sea (wind, sea surface temperature, pressure, and air temperature), 3) satellite observations of cloud, and 4) a one-dimensional (vertically directed) boundary layer model that tracks with the surface air motion and makes use of sophisticated turbulence-radiation parameterizations. Results of the investigation indicate that delicate interplay and interaction between the radiation and turbulence processes makes accurate forecasts of sea fog onset unlikely in the near future. This pessimistic attitude stems from inadequacy of the existing network of observations and uncertainties in modeling dynamical processes within the boundary layer.

  7. Titanic Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    New Detailed VLT Images of Saturn's Largest Moon Optimizing space missions Titan, the largest moon of Saturn was discovered by Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens in 1655 and certainly deserves its name. With a diameter of no less than 5,150 km, it is larger than Mercury and twice as large as Pluto. It is unique in having a hazy atmosphere of nitrogen, methane and oily hydrocarbons. Although it was explored in some detail by the NASA Voyager missions, many aspects of the atmosphere and surface still remain unknown. Thus, the existence of seasonal or diurnal phenomena, the presence of clouds, the surface composition and topography are still under debate. There have even been speculations that some kind of primitive life (now possibly extinct) may be found on Titan. Titan is the main target of the NASA/ESA Cassini/Huygens mission, launched in 1997 and scheduled to arrive at Saturn on July 1, 2004. The ESA Huygens probe is designed to enter the atmosphere of Titan, and to descend by parachute to the surface. Ground-based observations are essential to optimize the return of this space mission, because they will complement the information gained from space and add confidence to the interpretation of the data. Hence, the advent of the adaptive optics system NAOS-CONICA (NACO) [1] in combination with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile now offers a unique opportunity to study the resolved disc of Titan with high sensitivity and increased spatial resolution. Adaptive Optics (AO) systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a special camera at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second (see e.g. ESO Press Release 25/01 , ESO PR Photos 04a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 19a-c/02, ESO PR Photos 21a-c/02, ESO Press Release 17/02, and ESO Press Release 26/03 for earlier NACO

  8. The Mauna Kea Weather Center: Custom Atmospheric Forecasting Support for Mauna Kea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Businger, Steven

    2011-03-01

    The success of operations at Mauna Kea Observatories is strongly influenced by weather conditions. The Mauna Kea Weather Center, an interdisciplinary research program, was established in 1999 to develop and provide custom weather support for Mauna Kea Observatories. The operational forecasting goals of the program are to facilitate the best possible use of favorable atmospheric conditions for scientific benefit and to ensure operational safety. During persistent clear periods, astronomical observing quality varies substantially due to changes in the vertical profiles of temperature, wind, moisture, and turbulence. Cloud and storm systems occasionally cause adverse or even hazardous conditions. A dedicated, daily, real-time mesoscale numerical modeling effort provides crucial forecast guidance in both cases. Several key atmospheric variables are forecast with sufficient skill to be of operational and scientific benefit to the telescopes on Mauna Kea. Summit temperature forecasts allow mirrors to be set to the ambient temperature to reduce image distortion. Precipitable water forecasts allow infrared observations to be prioritized according to atmospheric opacity. Forecasts of adverse and hazardous conditions protect the safety of personnel and allow for scheduling of maintenance when observing is impaired by cloud. The research component of the project continues to improve the accuracy and content of the forecasts. In particular, case studies have resulted in operational forecasts of astronomical observing quality, or seeing.

  9. MHD turbulent processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    Three areas of study in MHD turbulence are considered. These are the turbulent relaxation of the toroidal Z pinch, density fluctuations in MHD fluids, and MHD cellular automata. A Boolean computer game that updates a cellular representation in parallel and that has macroscopic averages converging to solutions of the two-dimensional MHD equations is discussed.

  10. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N.; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called “maximum drag reduction” asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  11. MHD turbulent mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Benjamin, R.A.; Cho, J.; Leitner, S.N.

    2005-09-28

    Turbulent mixing layers have been proposed to explain observations of line ratios of highly ionized elements in the interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of numerical simulations of turbulent mixing layers in a magnetized medium. We developed a MHD code with radiative cooling. The magnetic field is expected to be a controlling factor by suppressing instabilities that lead to the turbulent mixing. Our results suggest that the difference in turbulent mixing in the unmagnetized case as compared to the case of a weak magnetic field, {beta} = Pgas/Pmag {approx} 10, is insignificant. With a more thorough exploration of parameter space, this work will provide more reliable diagnostics of turbulent mixing layers than those available today.

  12. Nonstationary multiscale turbulence simulation based on local PCA.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Alessandro; Cenedese, Angelo; Masiero, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Turbulence simulation methods are of fundamental importance for evaluating the performance of control strategies for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. In order to obtain a reliable evaluation of the performance a statistically accurate turbulence simulation method has to be used. This work generalizes a previously proposed method for turbulence simulation based on the use of a multiscale stochastic model. The main contributions of this work are: first, a multiresolution local PCA representation is considered. In typical operating conditions, the computational load for turbulence simulation is reduced approximately by a factor of 4, with respect to the previously proposed method, by means of this PCA representation. Second, thanks to a different low resolution method, based on a moving average model, the wind velocity can be in any direction (not necessarily that of the spatial axes). Finally, this paper extends the simulation procedure to generate, if needed, turbulence samples by using a more general model than that of the frozen flow hypothesis.

  13. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy.

  14. Forecasting potential crises

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, W.P.

    1984-04-01

    Recently, the Trend Analysis Program (TAP) of the American Council of Life Insurance commissioned the Futures Group of Glastonbury, Connecticut, to examine the potential for large-scale catastrophic events in the near future. TAP was specifically concerned with five potential crises: the warming of the earth's atmosphere, the water shortage, the collapse of the physical infrastructure, the global financial crisis, and the threat of nuclear war. We are often unprepared to take action; in these cases, we lose an advantage we might have otherwise had. This is the whole idea behind forecasting: to foresee possibilities and to project how we can respond. If we are able to create forecasts against which we can test policy options and choices, we may have the luxury of adopting policies ahead of events. Rather than simply fighting fires, we have the option of creating a future more to our choosing. Short descriptions of these five potential crises and, in some cases, possible solutions are presented.

  15. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  16. Uranium price forecasting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, D.M.

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews a number of forecasting methods that have been applied to uranium prices and compares their relative strengths and weaknesses. The methods reviewed are: (1) judgemental methods, (2) technical analysis, (3) time-series methods, (4) fundamental analysis, and (5) econometric methods. Historically, none of these methods has performed very well, but a well-thought-out model is still useful as a basis from which to adjust to new circumstances and try again.

  17. Frost Forecasting for Fruitgrowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D.; Chen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in forecasting from satellite data reviewed. University study found data from satellites displayed in color and used to predict frost are valuable aid to agriculture. Study evaluated scheme to use Earth-temperature data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite in computer model that determines when and where freezing temperatures endanger developing fruit crops, such as apples, peaches and cherries in spring and citrus crops in winter.

  18. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  19. Categorization of Atmospheric Turbulence in Terms of Aircraft Response for Use in Turbulence Reports and Forecasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    052 .055 .0M8 .062 .067 .072 .079 .0I2 .OM3 .061 .0M 1400. .026 .034 .041 .048 .051 .0Ga .Og6 g 043 .aml .074 .077 .oat .0ŗ .a6m ISO *0. .027 .032...jil0 0, FEET CAL-78RATED AiRSPEED (KNOTS CAS) WEIGHT lo. 14. 136. " Ŝ. ISO - 3500. .034 .038 .042 .045 .049 4000. .031 .034 .037 .041 .044 4500...34 .03.’ .010 .040 .404,3 .044 .0n4 24000 7 , .. 024 .02-1 .fl4 .03r .- 13 .070 .035 .017 .4 .040 .06 .04" .043 26000 . .021 .025 .021 .026 .033 .032 .033

  20. Land-Breeze Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The nocturnal land breeze at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) is both operationally significant and challenging to forecast. The occurrence and timing of land breezes impact low-level winds, atmospheric stability, low temperatures, and fog development. Accurate predictions of the land breeze are critical for toxic material dispersion forecasts associated with space launch missions, since wind direction and low-level stability can change noticeably with the onset of a land breeze. This report presents a seven-year observational study of land breezes over east-central Florida from 1995 to 2001. This comprehensive analysis was enabled by the high-resolution tower observations over KSC/CCAFS. Five-minute observations of winds, temperature, and moisture along with 9 15-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler data were used to analyze specific land-breeze cases, while the tower data were used to construct a composite climatology. Utilities derived from this climatology were developed to assist forecasters in determining the land-breeze occurrence, timing, and movement based on predicted meteorological conditions.

  1. Sparse spectrum model for a turbulent phase.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2013-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of phase front perturbations by atmospheric turbulence finds numerous applications for design and modeling of the adaptive optics systems, laser beam propagation simulations, and evaluating the performance of the various optical systems operating in the open air environment. Accurate generation of two-dimensional random fields of turbulent phase is complicated by the enormous diversity of scales that can reach five orders of magnitude in each coordinate. In addition there is a need for generation of the long "ribbons" of turbulent phase that are used to represent the time evolution of the wave front. This makes it unfeasible to use the standard discrete Fourier transform-based technique as a basis for the MC simulation algorithm. We propose a new model for turbulent phase: the sparse spectrum (SS) random field. The principal assumption of the SS model is that each realization of the random field has a discrete random spectral support. Statistics of the random amplitudes and wave vectors of the SS model are arranged to provide the required spectral and correlation properties of the random field. The SS-based MC model offers substantial reduction of computer costs for simulation of the wide-band random fields and processes, and is capable of generating long aperiodic phase "ribbons." We report the results of model trials that determine the number of sparse components, and the range of wavenumbers that is necessary to accurately reproduce the random field with a power-law spectrum.

  2. Turbulence control on an airborne laser platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, Mohamed

    1987-01-01

    An active flow control device to generate large-scale, periodic structures in a turbulent shear flow is developed. Together with adaptive optics, the device may be used on airborne laser platforms to reduce or eliminate optical distortion caused by the turbulence in the aircraft's boundary layer. A cyclic jet issuing from a spanwise slot is used to collect the turbulent boundary layer for a finite time and then release all of the flow instantaneously in one large eddy that convects downstream. Flow visualization and hot-film probe measurements are used together with pattern recognition algorithms to demonstrate the viability of the flow control method. A flat plate towed in a water channel is used as a test bed. The instantaneous velocity signal is used to compute important statistical quantities of the random velocity field, such as the mean, the root-mean-square, the spectral distribution, and the probability density function. When optimized for a given boundary layer, it is shown that the cyclic jet will produce periodic structures that are similar to the random, naturally occurring ones. These structures seem to trigger the onset of bursting events near the wall of the plate. Thus, the present device generates periodic structures in both the outer and inner regions of a turbulent boundary layer.

  3. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering.

    PubMed

    Zunino, Luciano; Gulich, Damián; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  4. Setting up a liquid crystal phase screen to simulate atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Michael K.; Seward, Anthony J.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Rha, Jungtae; Jimenez, Ray

    2000-11-01

    Phase screens are often used to simulate atmospheric turbulence in systems designed to test adaptive optics techniques. This paper presents the design and implementation of a dynamic phase screen using a simple and inexpensive twisted nematic liquid crystal display taken from a video projector and placed in a pupil plane. The details of the optical system layout, the system alignment procedure, and the operating parameters of the liquid crystal display are discussed. Examples of turbulence (having strength and statistics similar to measured values of atmospheric turbulence in a variety of scenarios) are written to the phase screen, and the effects of the turbulence on image quality are measured and presented.

  5. Dynamic simulation for distortion image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huijie; Fei, Jindong; Qing, Duzheng; Zhao, Hongming; Yu, Hong; Cheng, Chen

    2013-09-01

    The imaging through atmospheric turbulence is an inevitable problem encountered by infrared imaging sensors working in the turbulence atmospheric environment. Before light-rays enter the window of the imaging sensors, the atmospheric turbulence will randomly interfere with the transmission of the light waves came from the objects, causing the distribution of image intensity values on the focal plane to diffuse, the peak value to decrease, the image to get blurred, and the pixels to deviate, and making image identification very difficult. Owing to the fact of the long processing time and that the atmospheric turbulent flow field is unknown and hard to be described by mathematical models, dynamic simulation for distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects is much more difficult and challenging in the world. This paper discusses the dynamic simulation for distortion Image of turbulence atmospheric transmission effect. First of all, with the data and the optical transmission model of the turbulence atmospheric, the ray-tracing method is applied to obtain the propagation path of optical ray which propagates through the high-speed turbulent flow field, and then to calculate the OPD from the reference wave to the reconverted wave front and obtain the point spread function (PSF). Secondly, infrared characteristics models of typical scene were established according to the theory of infrared physics and heat conduction, and then the dynamic infrared image was generated by OpenGL. The last step is to obtain the distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects .With the data of atmospheric transmission computation, infrared simulation image of every frame was processed according to the theory of image processing and the real-time image simulation, and then the dynamic distortion simulation images with effects of blurring, jitter and shifting were obtained. Above-mentioned simulation method can provide the theoretical bases for recovering

  6. Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    1 Augmentation of Early Intensity Forecasting in Tropical Cyclones J . Scott Tyo College of Optical Sciences University of Arizona Tucson, AZ...at the University of Arizona is composed of the following members (italicized members are no longer working on the project):  J . Scott Tyo, PI

  7. EU pharmaceutical expenditure forecast

    PubMed Central

    Urbinati, Duccio; Rémuzat, Cécile; Kornfeld, Åsa; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Cetinsoy, Laurent; Aballéa, Samuel; Mzoughi, Olfa; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives With constant incentives for healthcare payers to contain their pharmaceutical budgets, forecasting has become critically important. Some countries have, for instance, developed pharmaceutical horizon scanning units. The objective of this project was to build a model to assess the net effect of the entrance of new patented medicinal products versus medicinal products going off-patent, with a defined forecast horizon, on selected European Union (EU) Member States’ pharmaceutical budgets. This model took into account population ageing, as well as current and future country-specific pricing, reimbursement, and market access policies (the project was performed for the European Commission; see http://ec.europa.eu/health/healthcare/key_documents/index_en.htm). Method In order to have a representative heterogeneity of EU Member States, the following countries were selected for the analysis: France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. A forecasting period of 5 years (2012–2016) was chosen to assess the net pharmaceutical budget impact. A model for generics and biosimilars was developed for each country. The model estimated a separate and combined effect of the direct and indirect impacts of the patent cliff. A second model, estimating the sales development and the risk of development failure, was developed for new drugs. New drugs were reviewed individually to assess their clinical potential and translate it into commercial potential. The forecast was carried out according to three perspectives (healthcare public payer, society, and manufacturer), and several types of distribution chains (retail, hospital, and combined retail and hospital). Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results According to the model, all countries experienced drug budget reductions except Poland (+€41 million). Savings were expected to be the highest in the United Kingdom (−€9,367 million), France

  8. Optics Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Introduction vii Reports on Optics Research xi Organization xv I. LASER TECHNOLOGY AND PROPAGATION 1 A. CW Theory 1 1. Laser Propagation Through a...show that CW thermal bloom- ing can be considerably reduced by an initial phase correction of the laser beam. Several experiments were performed to...Teoste, R. Zimmerman, M. D. I. LASER TECHNOLOGY AND PROPAGATION A. CW THEORY 1. Laser Propagation Through a Turbulent Medium In

  9. Ocean Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    sensing and lidar , through measurements and models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Remote sensing , ocean optics, lidar , underwater imaging, underwater turbulence...scanning system taking advantage of compressive sensing imaging techniques (B. O^ang et al.). Modeling is key in system design and performance...effect has been simulated using a fvlonte Carlo method (Z. Xu and D. K. P. Yue). Active sensing by the means of lidar eliminates many of the issues

  10. Lidar system for atmospheric turbulence measurement with Mersen telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu.; Konyaev, M. A.; Trilis, A. V.

    2006-02-01

    In this work the lidar system for measurements of atmospheric turbulence structural function C n2 are presented. Method of such measurements is based on increasing of focal spot on the receiver after beam pass through turbulent atmosphere. In this work the receiving-transmission system on the base of Mersen telescope with main mirror diameter 0.5m is used. Features connected with optical system aberrations are considered. The results of experimental investigation are presented.

  11. Turbulence and atomic physics in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Nace, N.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.; Valentinuzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    An overview of issues related to the interplay between atomic process and turbulence in the peripheral regions of magnetically confined fusion devices is presented. Both atomic processes and turbulence play key roles for fusion, but have most of the time been treated separately. The effects of fluctuations on the time averaged ionization balance, on the transport of neutral particles (atoms and molecules) are discussed, using stochastic models to generate fluctuations with statistically relevant properties. Then applications to optical diagnostics of turbulence, namely gas puff imaging and beam emission spectroscopy are discussed.

  12. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  13. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  14. Classical Vs. Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, P.-E.

    2008-11-01

    Thanks to a zero-viscosity, superfluids offer a unique testing ground for hydrodynamic models, in particular for turbulence ones. In Kolmogorov's turbulence model, viscosity is well known to damp the kinetic energy of the smallest eddies, and thus to introduce a cut-off at one end of the turbulent cascade. Significant differences between this ``classical'' turbulence and the turbulence of a superfluid are therefore expected, but --surprisingly- most experiments rather evidenced strong similarities. We will give an overview of a set of experiments designed to compare in details the classical versus superfluid turbulences, up to a record mass flow of superfluid (700g/s of He @ 1.6K). Then, we will focus on some unexpected vorticity measurements, which can be interpreted assuming that the superfluid vortices are passively advected by the largest scales of the flow, in contrast with the ``classical'' turbulence counterpart. Numerical simulations -based on regular DNS- will be presented to complete this interpretation. In collaboration with C. Barenghi, University of Newcastle; B. Castaing and E. Levèque, ENSL, Lyon; S. David, IEF, CNRS, Orsay; B. Rousset, SBT/CEA, Grenoble; and P. Tabeling, H. Willaime MMN, ESPCI, Paris.

  15. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  16. Characterization of a liquid-filled turbulence simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Christopher C.; Zhang, Yimin; Plett, Mark L.; Polak-Dingels, Penelope; Barbier, Pierre R.; Rush, David W.

    1998-10-01

    The development of high performance line-of-sight optical communication links through the turbulent atmosphere is facilitated by laboratory tests of schemes involving adaptive optics, beam tracking, modulation and coding, aperture averaging, fading statistics, and transmitter/receiver diversity. A water-filled turbulence tube has been implemented to simulate, in some respects, the effects produced on a laser beam when it propagates several kilometers through the air. This tube is being used to investigate on a laboratory scale: aperture averaging, fluctuation statistics, optical path difference, high data rate modulation, and various coding schemes. The liquid- filled turbulence tube causes fluctuations on a slower time scale than does the atmosphere. At low turbulence levels it produces log-normal fluctuation statistics, causes tip-tilt errors similar to those previously observed for atmospheric paths, and has already allowed evaluation of aperture averaging and fade statistics. It also allows the testing of various technological schemes to deal with atmospheric turbulence effects without any specific assumptions, such as weak Kolmogorov turbulence, being built into the model.

  17. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  18. Local flood forecasting - From data collection to communicating forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. J.; Beven, K.

    2013-12-01

    An important aspect of improving resilience to flooding is the provision of timely warnings to flood sensitive locations thus allowing mitigating measures to be implemented. For specific locations such small communities (often in head water catchments) or river side factories the ability of traditional centralised forecasting systems to provide timely & accurate forecasts may be challenged. This is due in part to the finite resources of monitoring agencies which results in courser spatial scales of model and data collection then may be required for the generation of accurate forecasts. One strategy to improve flood resilience at such locations is to develop automated location specific forecasts. In this presentation we outline a methodology to achieve this based on the installation of adequate telemetered monitoring equipment; generally a water level sensor and a rain gauge. This allows the construction of a local flood forecasting model which may be coupled with available precipitation forecasts. The construction of the hydrological forecasting model consists of a guided process which incorporates both data assimilation and the representation of the forecast uncertainty based on post processing. The guided process requires the modeller to make only a few choices thus allowing rapid model deployment and revision. To be of use the derived forecasts must be made available in real time and updated frequently; maybe every five minutes. Traditional practices in issuing warnings dependent on expert interpretation must therefore be altered so that those at the site of interest become their own `experts'. To aid this appropriate presentation of both the predictions and past performance of the model, designed to encourage realistic interpretation of the forecasts and their uncertainties is considered. The resulting forecast chain is demonstrated on UK case studies.

  19. Hydrologic Forecasting and Hydropower Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigmosta, M. S.; Voisin, N.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Coleman, A.; Mishra, V.; Schaner, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    Hydroelectric power production is one of many competing demands for available water along with other priority uses such as irrigation, thermoelectric cooling, municipal, recreation, and environmental performance. Increasingly, hydroelectric generation is being used to offset the intermittent nature of some renewable energy sources such as wind-generated power. An accurate forecast of the magnitude and timing of water supply assists managers in integrated planning and operations to balance competing water uses against current and future supply while protecting against the possibility of water or energy shortages and excesses with real-time actions. We present a medium-range to seasonal ensemble streamflow forecasting system where uncertainty in forecasts is addressed explicitly. The integrated forecast system makes use of remotely-sensed data and automated spatial and temporal data assimilation. Remotely-sensed snow cover, observed snow water equivalent, and observed streamflow data are used to update the hydrologic model state prior to the forecast. In forecast mode, the hydrology model is forced by calibrated ensemble weather/climate forecasts. This system will be fully integrated into a water optimization toolset to inform reservoir and power operations, and guide environmental performance decision making. This flow forecast system development is carried out in agreement with the National Weather Service so that the system can later be incorporated into the NOAA eXperimental Ensemble Forecast Service (XEFS).

  20. Forecasting droughts in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, E.; Wetterhall, F.; Dutra, E.; Di Giuseppe, F.; Pappenberger, F.

    2014-02-01

    The humanitarian crises caused by the recent droughts (2008-2009 and 2010-2011) in East Africa have illustrated that the ability to make accurate drought forecasts with sufficient lead time is essential. The use of dynamical model precipitation forecasts in combination with drought indices, such as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), can potentially lead to a better description of drought duration, magnitude and spatial extent. This study evaluates the use of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) products in forecasting droughts in East Africa. ECMWF seasonal precipitation shows significant skill for March-May and October-December rain seasons when evaluated against measurements from the available in situ stations from East Africa. The forecast for October-December rain season has higher skill than for the March-May season. ECMWF forecasts add value to the consensus forecasts produced during the Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forum (GHACOF), which is the present operational product for precipitation forecast over East Africa. Complementing the original ECMWF precipitation forecasts with SPI provides additional information on the spatial extent and intensity of the drought event.

  1. Solar Indices Forecasting Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, Carl John; Shurkin, Kathleen; Arge, Charles; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Progress to forecast key space weather parameters using SIFT (Solar Indices Forecasting Tool) with the ADAPT (Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport) model is highlighted in this presentation. Using a magnetic flux transport model, ADAPT, we estimate the solar near-side field distribution that is used as input into empirical models for predicting F10.7(solar 10.7 cm, 2.8 GHz, radio flux), the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, and selected bands of solar far ultraviolet (FUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance. Input to the ADAPT model includes the inferred photospheric magnetic field from the NISP ground-based instruments, GONG & VSM. Besides a status update regarding ADAPT and SIFT models, we will summarize the findings that: 1) the sum of the absolute value of strong magnetic fields, associated with sunspots, is shown to correlate well with the observed daily F10.7 variability (Henney et al. 2012); and 2) the sum of the absolute value of weak magnetic fields, associated with plage regions, is shown to correlate well with EUV and FUV irradiance variability (Henney et al. 2015). This work utilizes data produced collaboratively between Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the National Solar Observatory (NSO). The ADAPT model development is supported by AFRL. The input data utilized by ADAPT is obtained by NISP (NSO Integrated Synoptic Program). NSO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The 10.7 cm solar radio flux data service, utilized by the ADAPT/SIFT F10.7 forecasting model, is operated by the National Research Council of Canada and National Resources Canada, with the support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  2. Weather Forecasting Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Weather forecasters are usually very precise in reporting such conditions as temperature, wind velocity and humidity. They also provide exact information on barometric pressure at a given moment, and whether the barometer is "rising" or "falling"- but not how rapidly or how slowly it is rising or falling. Until now, there has not been available an instrument which measures precisely the current rate of change of barometric pressure. A meteorological instrument called a barograph traces the historical ups and downs of barometric pressure and plots a rising or falling curve, but, updated every three hours, it is only momentarily accurate at each updating.

  3. Operational Geomagnetic Forecast Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniv, O.; Polonska, A.; Parnowski, A.

    2014-12-01

    The operational forecasting service for real-time geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp was described. The warning time for the Earth to the intersection of the Dst index is 1-4 hours, for the Kp index - 3 hours. The skillscore parameter, which is defined as a decrease of the relative mean square error with respect to the trivial model, was approximately 40% for Dst and 15% for Kp. The service works on-line freely available through STAFF http://www.staff.oma.be/ browser.

  4. Handbook of Forecasting Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    SOCIAL POLICYISTANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE POLICY RESEARCH, ,R6156T 10 SRI Project VMO-U3738 ~: .. ~ BURNHAM H. DODGE DAVID C. MILLER PETER SCHWARTZ...G.IKruzic, David C.IMillvr DACW 31l75-C-RM7 ~0 IltLATI~ililON NliikAilMMIE AOADORD S0I 0N( LMETPET TASKC Center for the Study of Social Policy A R, I I...methods suitable for a wide range of technological, economic, social , and environmetntal forecasting are selected and discussed. Procedures for using each

  5. Forecasting in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Graves, W. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Complex nonlinear systems are typically characterized by many degrees of freedom, as well as interactions between the elements. Interesting examples can be found in the areas of earthquakes and finance. In these two systems, fat tails play an important role in the statistical dynamics. For earthquake systems, the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-frequency is applicable, whereas for daily returns for the securities in the financial markets are known to be characterized by leptokurtotic statistics in which the tails are power law. Very large fluctuations are present in both systems. In earthquake systems, one has the example of great earthquakes such as the M9.1, March 11, 2011 Tohoku event. In financial systems, one has the example of the market crash of October 19, 1987. Both were largely unexpected events that severely impacted the earth and financial systems systemically. Other examples include the M9.3 Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004, and the Great Recession which began with the fall of Lehman Brothers investment bank on September 12, 2013. Forecasting the occurrence of these damaging events has great societal importance. In recent years, national funding agencies in a variety of countries have emphasized the importance of societal relevance in research, and in particular, the goal of improved forecasting technology. Previous work has shown that both earthquakes and financial crashes can be described by a common Landau-Ginzburg-type free energy model. These metastable systems are characterized by fat tail statistics near the classical spinodal. Correlations in these systems can grow and recede, but do not imply causation, a common source of misunderstanding. In both systems, a common set of techniques can be used to compute the probabilities of future earthquakes or crashes. In this talk, we describe the basic phenomenology of these systems and emphasize their similarities and differences. We also consider the problem of forecast validation and verification

  6. Forecast Mekong: 2011 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary R. Clinton joined with the Foreign Ministers of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam in launching the Lower Mekong Initiative to enhance U.S. engagement with the Lower Mekong countries in the areas of environment, health, education, and infrastructure. Part of the Lower Mekong Initiative, the U.S. Geological Survey's Forecast Mekong project is engaging the United States in scientific research relevant to environmental issues in the Lower Mekong River countries and is staying the course in support of the Mekong Nations with a suite of new projects for 2011.

  7. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  8. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  9. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  10. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  11. Interactive Forecasting with the National Weather Service River Forecast System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, George F.; Page, Donna

    1993-01-01

    The National Weather Service River Forecast System (NWSRFS) consists of several major hydrometeorologic subcomponents to model the physics of the flow of water through the hydrologic cycle. The entire NWSRFS currently runs in both mainframe and minicomputer environments, using command oriented text input to control the system computations. As computationally powerful and graphically sophisticated scientific workstations became available, the National Weather Service (NWS) recognized that a graphically based, interactive environment would enhance the accuracy and timeliness of NWS river and flood forecasts. Consequently, the operational forecasting portion of the NWSRFS has been ported to run under a UNIX operating system, with X windows as the display environment on a system of networked scientific workstations. In addition, the NWSRFS Interactive Forecast Program was developed to provide a graphical user interface to allow the forecaster to control NWSRFS program flow and to make adjustments to forecasts as necessary. The potential market for water resources forecasting is immense and largely untapped. Any private company able to market the river forecasting technologies currently developed by the NWS Office of Hydrology could provide benefits to many information users and profit from providing these services.

  12. Turbulence in quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews briefly the recent important developments in the physics of quantum turbulence (QT) in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). After giving the basics of quantum hydrodynamics, we discuss energy spectrum, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization among the topics on superfluid helium. For atomic BECs we review three-dimensional QT, two-component BECs, and spin turbulence in spinor BECs. The last part is devoted to some perspectives of this issue.

  13. Turbulence mitigation methods for sea scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijk, Judith; Schutte, Klamer; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P. J.

    2016-10-01

    Visual and infrared imagery is degraded by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Because the degradation gets worse for longer distances, turbulence especially hampers long range observation. At sea this turbulence affects classification and identification of ships and other objects. State of the art software based processing algorithms assuming a static background assumption will fail in such conditions because of the non-static sea background. Therefore, we propose an adapted processing chain aiming to provide optimal turbulence correction for ships seen in the camera view. First we propose to use standard object detection and tracking methods for an indication of the location of the ship. Subsequently, image registration is performed within the ship's region of interest, covering only the ship of interest. After this region of interest registration, standard turbulence mitigation software can be applied to the region of interest. For ships with other movement than translation only we propose a two-step motion estimation using local optical flow. In this paper we show results of this processing chain for sea scenarios using our TNO turbulence mitigation method. Ship data is processed using the algorithm proposed above and the results are analyzed by both human observation and by image analysis. The improvement of the imagery is qualitatively shown by examining details which cannot be seen without processing and can be seen with processing. Quantitatively, the improvement is related to the energy per spatial frequency in the original and processed images and the signal to noise improvement. This provides a model for the improvement of the results, and is related to the improvement of the classification and identification range. The results show that with this novel approach the classification and identification range of ships is improved.

  14. Perturbing turbulence beyond collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Scarselli, Davide; Hof, Björn; Nonlinear Dynamics; Turbulence Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are considered to be in principle stable against perturbations and persist as long as the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. We show for the example of pipe flow that a specific perturbation of the turbulent flow field disrupts the genesis of new turbulence at the wall. This leads to an immediate collapse of the turbulent flow and causes complete relaminarisation further downstream. The annihilation of turbulence is effected by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component only, greatly simplifying control efforts which usually require knowledge of the highly complex three dimensional and time dependent velocity fields. We present several different control schemes from laboratory experiments which achieve the required perturbation of the flow for total relaminarisation. Transient growth, a linear amplification mechanism measuring the efficiency of eddies in redistributing shear that quantifies the maximum perturbation energy amplification achievable over a finite time in a linearized framework, is shown to set a clear-cut threshold below which turbulence is impeded in its formation and thus permanently annihilated.

  15. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  16. Characterizing glottal jet turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2006-02-01

    Air pressure associated with airflow from the lungs drives the vocal folds into oscillation and allows the air to exit the glottis as a turbulent jet, even though laminar flow may enter the glottis from the trachea. The separation of the turbulence from the deterministic portion of the glottal jet was investigated in the excised canine larynx model. The present study is methodological in that the main goal was to examine three methods of obtaining reasonable representations of both the deterministic signal and the residual turbulence portion: (a) smoothing, (b) wavelet denoising, and (c) ensemble averaging. Ensemble averaging resulted in a deterministic signal that disregarded gross cyclic alterations while exaggerating the turbulence intensity. Wavelet denoising can perform an excellent analysis and synthesis of the glottal velocity, but was problematic in determining which levels of analysis to choose to represent both the deterministic and turbulence appropriately. Smoothing appeared to be the most appropriate for phonation velocities because it preserved gross cyclic variations important to perturbations and modulations, while extracting turbulence at what appears to be reasonable levels.

  17. Operational monitoring and forecasting in the Aegean Sea: system limitations and forecasting skill evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nittis, K; Zervakis, V; Perivoliotis, L; Papadopoulos, A; Chronis, G

    2001-01-01

    The POSEIDON system, based on a network of 11 oceanographic buoys and a system of atmospheric/oceanic models, provides real-time observations and forecasts of the marine environmental conditions in the Aegean Sea. The buoy network collects meteorological, sea state and upper-ocean physical and biochemical data. The efficiency and functionality of the various system components are being evaluated during the present pre-operational phase and discussed in this paper. The problem of bio-fouling on optical and chemical sensors is found to be a main limitation factor on the quality of data. Possible solutions to this problem as well as quality control methods that are being developed are also described. Finally, an evaluation of the numerical models is presented through the estimation of their forecasting skill for selected periods.

  18. Social Indicators and Social Forecasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Denis F.

    The paper identifies major types of social indicators and explains how they can be used in social forecasting. Social indicators are defined as statistical measures relating to major areas of social concern and/or individual well being. Examples of social indicators are projections, forecasts, outlook statements, time-series statistics, and…

  19. Now, Here's the Weather Forecast...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    The Met Office has a long history of weather forecasting, creating tailored weather forecasts for customers across the world. Based in Exeter, the Met Office is also home to the Met Office Hadley Centre, a world-leading centre for the study of climate change and its potential impacts. Climate information from the Met Office Hadley Centre is used…

  20. The pioneers of weather forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In The Weather Experiment author Peter Moore takes us on a compelling journey through the early history of weather forecasting, bringing to life the personalities, lives and achievements of the men who put in place the building blocks required for forecasts to be possible.

  1. Regional-seasonal weather forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Abarbanel, H.; Foley, H.; MacDonald, G.; Rothaus, O.; Rudermann, M.; Vesecky, J.

    1980-08-01

    In the interest of allocating heating fuels optimally, the state-of-the-art for seasonal weather forecasting is reviewed. A model using an enormous data base of past weather data is contemplated to improve seasonal forecasts, but present skills do not make that practicable. 90 references. (PSB)

  2. Evolution of branch points for a laser beam propagating through an uplink turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Cheng-Shan

    2014-03-24

    Evolution of branch points in the distorted optical field is studied when a laser beam propagates through turbulent atmosphere along an uplink path. Two categories of propagation events are mainly explored for the same propagation height: fixed wavelength with change of the turbulence strength and fixed turbulence strength with change of the wavelength. It is shown that, when the beam propagates to a certain height, the density of the branch-points reaches its maximum and such a height changes with the turbulence strength but nearly remains constant with different wavelengths. The relationship between the density of branch-points and the Rytov number is also given. A fitted formula describing the relationship between the density of branch-points and propagation height with different turbulence strength and wavelength is found out. Interestingly, this formula is very similar to the formula used for describing the Blackbody radiation in physics. The results obtained may be helpful for atmospheric optics, astronomy and optical communication.

  3. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  4. Weather Forecasting Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John (Inventor); MacKenzie, Wayne M., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, John Robert (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A weather forecasting system has weather forecasting logic that receives raw image data from a satellite. The raw image data has values indicative of light and radiance data from the Earth as measured by the satellite, and the weather forecasting logic processes such data to identify cumulus clouds within the satellite images. For each identified cumulus cloud, the weather forecasting logic applies interest field tests to determine a score indicating the likelihood of the cumulus cloud forming precipitation and/or lightning in the future within a certain time period. Based on such scores, the weather forecasting logic predicts in which geographic regions the identified cumulus clouds will produce precipitation and/or lighting within during the time period. Such predictions may then be used to provide a weather map thereby providing users with a graphical illustration of the areas predicted to be affected by precipitation within the time period.

  5. Unsteady turbulence cascades.

    PubMed

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J C

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5/3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  6. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  7. The Aeroacoustics of Turbulent Coanda Wall Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubert, Caroline; Fox, Jason

    2007-11-01

    Turbulent Coanda wall jets have become increasingly widely used in a variety of industrial applications in recent years, due to the substantial flow deflection that they afford. A related characteristic is the enhanced turbulence levels and entrainment they offer, compared with conventional jet flows. This characteristic is, however, generally accompanied by a significant increase in the noise levels associated with devices employing this effect. As a consequence, the potential offered by Coanda devices is yet to be fully realized. This problem provides the impetus for the research detailed in this poster. To date, some work has been done on developing a mathematical model of the Turbulent Mixing Noise emitted by such a device, assuming that the surface adjoining the turbulent flow was essentially 2-D. This poster extends this fundamental model, through a combination of mathematical modeling and acoustical and optical experiments. The effect of a variety of parameters, including nozzle configuration and jet exit velocity will be discussed, and ways of reducing or attenuating the noise generated by such flow, whilst still maintaining the crucial flow characteristics, will be presented.

  8. Turbulence measurements in curved wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, L. C.; Wood, N. J.; Roberts, L.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate turbulence measurements taken in wall jet flows are difficult to obtain, due to high intensity turbulence and problems in achieving two-dimensionality. The problem is compounded when streamwise curvature of the flow is introduced, since the jet entrainment and turbulence levels are greatly increased over the equivalent planar values. In this experiment, two-dimensional plane and curved wall jet flows are simulated by having a jet blow axially over a cylinder. In the plane case the cylinder has constant transverse radius, and in the curved cases the cylinder has a varying transverse radius. Although the wall jet in these cases is axisymmetric, adequate 'two-dimensional' flow can be obtained as long as the ratio of the jet width to the cylinder radius is small. The annular wall jet has several advantages over wall jets issuing from finite rectangular slots. Since the slot has no ends, three-dimensional effects caused by the finite length of the slot and side wall interference are eliminated. Also, the transverse curvature of the wall allows close optical access to the surface using a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. Hot wire measurements and some LDV measurements are presented for plane and curved wall jet flows. An integral analysis is used to assess the effects of transverse curvature on the turbulent shear stress. The analysis and the data show that the effects of transverse curvature on both the mean flow and the shear stress are small enough for two-dimensional flow to be approximately satisfactorily.

  9. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, A.; Massart, S.; Chevallier, F.; Boussetta, S.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Ciais, P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Engelen, R.; Jones, L.; Kivi, R.; Paris, J.-D.; Peuch, V.-H.; Sherlock, V.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2014-11-01

    A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 products retrieved from satellite measurements and

  10. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, A.; Massart, S.; Chevallier, F.; Boussetta, S.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Ciais, P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Engelen, R.; Jones, L.; Kivi, R.; Paris, J.-D.; Peuch, V.-H.; Sherlock, V.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2014-05-01

    A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they become available in

  11. Forecasting geomagnetic activities from the Boyle Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Boyle Index (BI), Φ =10-4}( {v{2}/{km/sec) + 11.7({(B)/(nT)})sin 3}{(θ /2) kV, has been successful in predicting the geomagnetic activity since its inception in October 2003. It is available in near-real-time from http://space.rice.edu/ISTP/wind.html and provides space weather predictions of geomagnetic indices (Kp, Dst and the AE) in real time through neural network algorithms. In addition, it provides free email alerts to its 700+ subscribers whenever the magnetospheric activity levels exceed certain pre-defined thresholds. We are constantly improving our algorithms, in the interest of either including more data or improving the accuracy and lead-time of forecasts. For example, with the inclusion of two more years of data (2008 and 2009) in the training, we have the advantage of modeling one of the deepest solar minimums, which has been exceptionally low in terms of the activity level. Our algorithms have been successful in capturing the effects of ``preconditioning" and the non-linearity in the solar wind parameters (for example, see figure 1). This paper presents our new attempts to include the effects of solar turbulence by incorporating the standard deviations in the solar wind parameters along with the BI, for greater the turbulence the higher the energy input into the magnetosphere as some of the previous studies have shown. Furthermore, we will also present how 3-hour averaged 1-hour sliding window scheme have improved our predictions with lead times of 3 hours or longer. Our predictions from a recent activity, 03 August 2010.

  12. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  13. GALE improves snow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientific results from an intensive study of winter storms on the U.S. East Coast last year contributed to improved weather forecasts of two successive snowstorms that virtually closed down Washington, D.C., for several days in January 1987.In the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) field project, scientists took detailed measurements simultaneously from the atmosphere and the ocean to study how these features interact at various stages of an East Coast winter storm, according to project director Richard Dirks, who is with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo. “It's interesting that we actually had four storms [in the GALE study] that were of similar intensity to the two East Coast storms” in January 1987, Dirks said. “However, last year the temperatures were warmer, and the storm tracks were located somewhat further offshore and therefore did not significantly affect the northeast corridor with heavy snows.”

  14. Tropical forecasting - Predictability perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of classical predictability studies and forecast experiments with observed initial conditions to show the nature of initial error growth and final error equilibration for the tropics and midlatitudes, separately. It is found that the theoretical upper limit of tropical circulation predictability is far less than for midlatitudes. The error growth for a complete general circulation model is compared to a dry version of the same model in which there is no prognostic equation for moisture, and diabatic heat sources are prescribed. It is found that the growth rate of synoptic-scale errors for the dry model is significantly smaller than for the moist model, suggesting that the interactions between dynamics and moist processes are among the important causes of atmospheric flow predictability degradation. Results are then presented of numerical experiments showing that correct specification of the slowly varying boundary condition of SST produces significant improvement in the prediction of time-averaged circulation and rainfall over the tropics.

  15. Optical communications receiver array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Jonathan M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Koshinz, Dennis G.; Wilcken, Stephen K.; Soreide, David C.; Joshi, Atul; Durmus, Hakan

    2010-04-01

    One of the major challenges to free space laser communications and ladar is the impact of turbulence on beam propagation, one example of which is signal fading. These impacts can be exacerbated on airborne platforms by turbulence in the vicinity of the laser system aperture and the platform wake. There are a number of strategies to mitigate this, including adaptive optics, active flow control, and various dimensions of diversity: wavelength, polarization, temporal, and spatial diversity. In this paper we will discuss spatial diversity implemented in the focal region of optical telescopes. We will briefly compare this with other methods, describe results of requirements analysis of array features and optical configurations for various atmospheric turbulence states, and suggest several attractive configurations. We will also report on the design and test of one configuration, implemented in a prototype, and tested for noise performance, optical transmission, modulation bandwidth, and BER performance with our dynamic turbulence simulator. Early evidence shows significant BER improvements of several orders of magnitude at high turbulence fluctuation frequencies using this technique.

  16. Impacts of Optical Turbulence on Underwtaer Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    water column in the field were measured using WETLab’s ac-9 and Laser In Situ Scattering and Transinissometer (LISST, Sequoia Scientific), in...the water column in the field were measured using WETLab’s ac-9 and Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometer (LISST, Sequoia Scientific), in...LISST, Sequoia Scientific). We notice that the water in the top part of the water column, just above the sharp thermocline is rather clear, with beam

  17. Multifractal energy exchange between gravity waves and turbulence in an upper tropospheric front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Intermittent generation of strong turbulence measured by reconnaissance aircraft occurred in association with a wide spectrum of upward propagating gravity waves above the core of an upper level jet stream. The turbulence generation process could be described as an energy cascade process, initiated as gravity-inertia waves were produced in a region of diagnosed unbalanced upper-level frontogenesis near a tropopause fold. High resolution numerical weather prediction model forecasts produced bimodal waves with dominant wavelengths of 120-216 km and 1-20 km, the latter of which perturbed the atmosphere to create conditions conducive to turbulence generation. Cross spectral, wavelet transformation, and polarization analysis of the in situ aircraft data allowed unambiguous determination of the presence of the spectrum of gravity waves, reconstruction of the waves' evolving character, and identification of intermittent wave packets. Introduction of wavelet cross spectrum into the Stokes parameter theory shed light on how turbulence production was intimately related to increasing levels of polarization, only to be followed by sudden reduction of polarization as turbulence arose. Wavelet and structure function analysis indicated that episodes of high turbulent kinetic energy were the result of upscale feedback effects ("inverse energy cascade" processes linked to wave breaking). The bi-fractal nature of the gravity waves and turbulence suggest new approaches for parameterizing sub grid-scale effects caused by the interaction of waves and turbulence in numerical models.

  18. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  19. Gyrokinetic turbulent heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F. L.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-10-15

    Expressions for particle and energy fluxes and heating rates due to turbulence are derived. These fluxes and heating rates are identified from moments of an extended drift-kinetic equation for the equilibrium distribution function. These include neoclassical as well as turbulent diffusion and heating. Phase-space conservation is demonstrated, allowing the drift-kinetic equation to be expressed in conservative form. This facilitates taking moments with few approximations, mainly those consistent with drift kinetics for the equilibrium distribution function and the relative smallness of the fluctuations. The turbulent heating is uniquely defined by choosing the standard gyrokinetic definition for the energy flux. With this definition, most of the heating can be expressed in the form of ohmic heating from turbulent parallel and perpendicular current density perturbations. The latter current is identified with grad-B and curvature drifts, plus terms involving magnetic perturbations (which are smaller for low beta). A small contribution to the heating comes from the divergence of an energy flux that is dependent on the finite gyroradius of the ions. The fluxes and heating rates are expressed in a form that can be easily evaluated from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

  20. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  1. Turbulence and fossil turbulence in oceans and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Pak Tao; Gibson, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the intertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-tubulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  2. Atmospheric turbulence induced synthetic aperture lidar phase error compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tian-an; Li, Hong-ping

    2016-12-01

    The resolution of a conventional optical imaging radar system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope's aperture. The combination of lidar and synthetic aperture processing techniques can overcome the diffraction limit and provide a higher resolution air borne remote sensor. Atmospheric turbulence is an important factor affecting lidar imaging, and the phase screen simulation method is an effective method to simulate the degradation of laser signal propagating through turbulent atmosphere. By using Monte-Carlo random factor, the randomness of phase screens can be improved. The lidar imaging with different turbulence intensity is also calculated in this paper, then the improved rank one phase estimation autofocus method is used to compensate the imaging phase errors. The results show that the method of generating phase screen is consistent with the statistics of atmospheric turbulence, which can well simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on synthetic aperture lidar, and the influence on synthetic aperture lidar azimuth resolution is greater when atmospheric turbulence is stronger. Improved rank one phase estimation algorithm has good autofocus effect, which can effectively compensate the phase errors and enhance the image quality degraded by turbulence.

  3. Forecasting droughts in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, Emmah; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Dutra, Emanuel; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Pappenberger, Florian

    2014-05-01

    The humanitarian crisis caused by the recent droughts (2008-2009 and 2010-2011) in East Africa have illustrated that the ability to make accurate drought predictions with sufficient lead time is essential. The use of dynamical model forecasts in combination with drought indices, such as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), can potentially to lead to a better description of drought duration, magnitude and spatial extent. This study evaluates the use of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) products in forecasting droughts in East Africa. ECMWF seasonal precipitation shows significant skill for both rain seasons when evaluated against measurements from the available in-situ stations from East Africa. The forecast for October-December rain season has higher skill than for the March-May season. ECMWF forecasts add value to the statistical forecasts produced during the Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forums (GHACOF), which is the present operational product. Complementing the raw precipitation forecasts with SPI provides additional information on the spatial extent and intensity of the drought event.

  4. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  5. Bacterial turbulence in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Smriga, Steven; Stocker, Roman; Secchi, Eleonora; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Piazza, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Dense suspensions of motile bacteria exhibit collective dynamics akin to those observed in classic, high Reynolds number turbulence, yet this analogy has remained largely qualitative. Here we present experiments in which a dense suspension of Bacillus subtilis bacteria was flown through narrow microchannels and the velocity statistics of the flowing suspension were accurately quantified with a recently developed velocimetry technique. This revealed a robust intermittency phenomenon, whereby the average velocity profile of the flowing suspension oscillated between a plug-like flow and a parabolic flow. This intermittency is a hallmark of classic turbulence and was associated with the presence of collective structures in the suspension. Furthermore, quantification of the Reynolds stress profile revealed a direct link between the turbulent nature of the suspension and its anomalous viscosity.

  6. Estimation of propagation losses for infrared laser beam in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaponov, A. E.; Sakharov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    In present work, the radiation propagation in atmosphere from laser source to the receiver is considered by taking into account deviations of optical beam due to turbulence. The photon flux density on the receiver has been evaluated.

  7. Twelve mortal sins of the turbulence propagation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2011-09-01

    In this review paper we discuss a series of typical mistakes and omissions that are made by engineers and scientists involved in the theoretical research and modeling of the optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence. We show how the use of the oversimplified Gaussian spectral model of turbulence delivers the completely erroneous results for the beam wander. We address a series of common omissions related to calculations of the average beam intensity: unnecessary use of the approximations when rigorous result is available, invalid application of the RMS beam size to the turbulence-distorted beams, overlooking the simple theoretical result - average beam intensity is a convolution with the turbulent Point Spread Function (PSF). We discuss the meaning and potential dangers of the use of the quadratic structure function for modeling of the turbulent perturbations. We will also address the issues related to the energy conservation principle and reciprocity that have very important consequences for the turbulence propagation, but are frequently overlooked in the current literature. We discuss a series of misconceptions that very common in of the Scintillation Index (SI) calculations. We will clarify the infamous misunderstanding of the Rytov's approximation: vanishing scintillation at the beam focus, and show the correct weak and strong scintillation solutions for the SI at the beam focus. We discuss the flaws of the Fried model of the short-term PSF, and direct to the more accurate PSF model. We will briefly review the propagation of the polarized optical waves through turbulence and discuss the inadequacy of the recently published calculations of the electromagnetic beams calculations. We discuss some common errors in representation of the calculation results for the non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  8. Joint Agency Turbulence Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-21

    Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data For Penetration 1 on 1 July 1981 63 C5. Time Series of Turbulence Severity Estimates Derived From 400 m...spectral analysis of aircraft longitudinal gust data is shown in Figure B1. Figure B2 shows a modeled turbulence field. The model displays the expected...centered about Location C o %-. -. °,4 0- S E - oo -12 -4 - to 20 so O so s 7D -U. TIME (sec) Figure C4. Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data

  9. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  10. Turbulence in Reynolds' flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbus, Rory; Liu, Chien-Chia; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Osborne Reynolds' seminal work from 1883 revealed that the transition from quiescent, laminar flow to a turbulent pipe filled with roiling eddies is mediated by localized flashes of fluctuations. Later work has unveiled many features of these flashes: they proliferate or fade away, maintain their shape or continually expand. The nature of the fluctuations in the flashes, however, has remained mysterious. Here, using measures traditionally attributed to high Reynolds number (Re) flows, we present experimental results on the fluctuations of the flashes. Our results suggest that the transition to turbulence is the low Re limit of the high Re, fully developed flow. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  11. Application of quantitative precipitation forecasting and precipitation ensemble prediction for hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, P.; Tie-Yuan, S.; Zhi-Yuan, Y.; Jun-Chao, W.

    2015-05-01

    The precipitation in the forecast period influences flood forecasting precision, due to the uncertainty of the input to the hydrological model. Taking the ZhangHe basin as the example, the research adopts the precipitation forecast and ensemble precipitation forecast product of the AREM model, uses the Xin Anjiang hydrological model, and tests the flood forecasts. The results show that the flood forecast result can be clearly improved when considering precipitation during the forecast period. Hydrological forecast based on Ensemble Precipitation prediction gives better hydrological forecast information, better satisfying the need for risk information for flood prevention and disaster reduction, and has broad development opportunities.

  12. The Barcelona Dust Forecast Center: The first WMO regional meteorological center specialized on atmospheric sand and dust forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Terradellas, Enric; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Benincasa, Francesco; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (WMO SDS-WAS, http://sds-was.aemet.es/) project has the mission to enhance the ability of countries to deliver timely and quality sand and dust storm forecasts, observations, information and knowledge to users through an international partnership of research and operational communities. The good results obtained by the SDS-WAS Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe (NAMEE) Regional Center and the demand of many national meteorological services led to the deployment of operational dust forecast services. On June 2014, the first WMO Regional Meteorological Center Specialized on Atmospheric Sand and Dust Forecast, the Barcelona Dust Forecast Center (BDFC; http://dust.aemet.es/), was publicly presented. The Center operationally generates and distributes predictions for the NAMEE region. The dust forecasts are based on the NMMB/BSC-Dust model developed at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS). The present contribution will describe the main objectives and capabilities of BDFC. One of the activities performed by the BDFC is to establish a protocol to routinely exchange products from dust forecast models as dust load, dust optical depth (AOD), surface concentration, surface extinction and deposition. An important step in dust forecasting is the evaluation of the results that have been generated. This process consists of the comparison of the model results with multiple kinds of observations (i.e. AERONET and MODIS) and is aimed to facilitate the understanding of the model capabilities, limitations, and appropriateness for the purpose for which it was designed. The aim of this work is to present different evaluation approaches and to test the use of different observational products in the evaluation system.

  13. Description of Mixed-Phase Clouds in Weather Forecast and Climate Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Description of Mixed-Phase Clouds in Weather Forecast and...Develop a process-level understanding on why so-called mixed-phase stratocumulus are so common, by far the most common type of clouds in the Arctic...all scales, ranging from long range transport to turbulent motions, and cloud micro-physics. APPROACH Developing new parameterizations is a

  14. A microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor: Turbulence measurement and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Olsen, Michael G.; Fox, Rodney O.

    2009-05-01

    Microscale reactors capable of generating turbulent flow are used in Flash NanoPrecipitation, an approach to produce functional nanoparticles with unique optical, mechanical and chemical properties. Microreactor design and optimization could be greatly enhanced by developing reliable computational models of the nanoprecipitation process. A microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor was investigated using microscopic particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics. Velocity data such as the mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy displayed good agreement between experiment and simulation over flow conditions ranging from fully laminar to turbulent, demonstrating the accuracy of the simulation model over the entire turbulent transition range.

  15. Propagation properties of Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model beam in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Yangsheng; Qu, Jun; Huang, Wei

    2016-05-16

    Analytical formulas are derived for the average intensity, the root-mean-square (rms) angular width, and the M2-factor of Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model (LGCSM) beam propagating in non-Kolmogorov turbulence. The influence of the beam and turbulence parameters on the LGCSM beam is numerically calculated. It is shown that the quality of the LGCSM beam can be improved by choosing appropriate beam or turbulence parameter values. It is also found that the LGCSM beam has advantage over the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam for reducing the turbulence-induced degradation. Our results will have some theoretical reference value for optical communications.

  16. Value of Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.

    2011-04-01

    This study, building on the extensive models developed for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), uses these WECC models to evaluate the operating cost impacts of improved day-ahead wind forecasts.

  17. Method Forecasts Global Energy Substitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a model developed to forecast energy demands and determine trends in demand for primary fuels. The energy model essentially considers primary energy sources as competing commodities in a market. (MLH)

  18. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct simulation. The spot area is divided into two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. It is found that the flow structures inside the turbulent area have strong resemblance to those found in the fully-developed turbulent channel flow. A suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The rms fluctuations and Reynolds stress are found to be higher in that area, and the shear-layer structures are similar to those observed in the secondary instability of two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves.

  19. Forecast of solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasotkin, Serge; Shmorgilov, Feodor

    The revised method of equal phase averaging was used to predict the main features of the solar cycle 25. The forecast of Wolf number values was obtained not only for solar cycle maximum but for 16 phases of the cycle. The double-peak structure of the cycle maximum phase is well seen. The problems of the long- and superlong-term forecasts of solar activity are discussed.

  20. Preparing for an Uncertain Forecast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Navigating the world of government relations and public policy can be a little like predicting the weather. One can't always be sure what's in store or how it will affect him/her down the road. But there are common patterns and a few basic steps that can help one best prepare for a change in the forecast. Though the forecast is uncertain, early…

  1. Forecasting Thermosphere Density: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge of the thermosphere has improved considerably since 2000 thanks to the availability of high-resolution accelerometer inferred densities. Consequently, precision and shortcomings of thermosphere models are better known. Thermosphere density forecast accuracy is limited by: 1) the accuracy of the thermosphere model 2) the solar and geomagnetic activity forecast 3) the quality of the data assimilation system. The precision of semi-empirical thermosphere models is 10-25%. Solar activity forecasts can be accurate up to 5 days. They become less accurate with time, but some proxies are more forecastable than others. Geomagnetic activity forecasting is more problematic, since in most cases storm events cannot be predicted on any time scale. The forecast accuracy is ultimately bounded by the thermosphere model precision and the (varying) degree to which mainly the solar proxy represents EUV heating of the atmosphere. Both errors can be corrected for by means of near real time (nrt) assimilation of satellite drag data, provided that the data is of high quality. At present, only the classified High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model of the Air Force has that capability operationally, even if other prototype nrt models have been developed. Data assimilation significantly improves density forecasts up to 72-hours out; there is no gain for longer periods due to the short memory of the thermosphere system. Only physical models, e.g. TIMEGCM and CTIPe, can in principle reproduce the dynamic changes in density for example during geomagnetic storms. However, accurate information on atmospheric heating is often missing, or not used. When it is, observed and modeled Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances are very similar. Nonmigrating tides and waves propagating from the lower atmosphere cause longitudinal density variations; sources of geophysical noise for semi-empirical models, they can be predicted qualitatively and sometimes quantitatively with physical models. This

  2. Survey of air cargo forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthan, A. R.; Vermuri, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Forecasting techniques currently in use in estimating or predicting the demand for air cargo in various markets are discussed with emphasis on the fundamentals of the different forecasting approaches. References to specific studies are cited when appropriate. The effectiveness of current methods is evaluated and several prospects for future activities or approaches are suggested. Appendices contain summary type analyses of about 50 specific publications on forecasting, and selected bibliographies on air cargo forecasting, air passenger demand forecasting, and general demand and modalsplit modeling.

  3. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  4. Chemically Reacting Turbulent Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-14

    two stages of gen I tubes equipped with P-47 phosphor screens The detector chosen for the camera was a Reticon RL128S* line detectoI- .,hich consists...the Stud’, of Turbulent Mixing," William M. Pitts, Nuclear Engineering Seminar of the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of

  5. Dissipation in unsteady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Wouter J. T.; Rubinstein, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that unsteady turbulent flows display a universal behavior at short and intermediate times, different from classical scaling relations. The origin of these observations is explained using a nonequilibrium correction to Kolmogorov's energy spectrum, and the exact form of the observed universal scaling is derived.

  6. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tziperman, E.

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  7. Spirituality in Turbulent Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of spiritual leadership in turbulent, uncertain times. Describes several spiritual principles--for example, life is cyclical; all life is interconnected. Offers six suggestions for personal health: Start day peacefully, learn to be mindful, slow things down, create own measures, expect surprise, practice gratefulness. (PKP)

  8. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  9. The Theories of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J; Agostini, L

    1955-01-01

    The theory of turbulence reached its full growth at the end of the 19th century as a result of the work by Boussinesq and Reynolds. It then underwent a long period of stagnation which ended under the impulse given to it by the development of wind tunnels caused by the needs of aviation. Numerous researchers, attempted to put Reynolds' elementary statistical theory into a more precise form. During the war, some isolated scientists - von Weizsacker and Heisenberg in Germany, Kolmogoroff in Russia, Onsager in the U.S.A. - started a program of research. By a system of assumptions which make it possible to approach the structure of turbulence in well-defined limiting conditions quantitatively, they obtained a certain number of laws on the correlations and the spectrum. Since the late reports have improved the mathematical language of turbulence, it was deemed advisable to start with a detailed account of the mathematical methods applicable to turbulence, inspired at first by the work of the French school, above all for the basic principles, then the work of the foreigners, above all for the theory of the spectrum.

  10. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  11. Forecasting droughts in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwangi, E.; Wetterhall, F.; Dutra, E.; Di Giuseppe, F.; Pappenberger, F.

    2013-08-01

    The humanitarian crisis caused by the recent droughts (2008-2009 and 2010-2011) in the East African region have illustrated that the ability to make accurate drought predictions with adequate lead time is essential. The use of dynamical model forecasts and drought indices, such as Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), promises to lead to a better description of drought duration, magnitude and spatial extent. This study evaluates the use of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) products in forecasting droughts in East Africa. ECMWF seasonal precipitation shows significant skill for both rain seasons when evaluated against measurements from the available in-situ stations from East Africa. The October-December rain season has higher skill that the March-May season. ECMWF forecasts add value to the statistical forecasts produced during the Greater Horn of Africa Climate Outlook Forums (GHACOF) which is the present operational product. Complementing the raw precipitation forecasts with SPI provides additional information on the spatial extend and intensity of the drought event.

  12. Practical Meteor Stream Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by the recent Leonid meteor storms, researchers have made great strides in our ability to predict enhanced meteor activity. However, the necessary calibration of the meteor stream models with Earth-based ZHRs (Zenith Hourly Rates) has placed emphasis on the terran observer and meteor activity predictions are published in such a manner to reflect this emphasis. As a consequence, many predictions are often unusable by the satellite community, which has the most at stake and the greatest interest in meteor forecasting. This paper suggests that stream modelers need to pay more attention to the needs of this community and publish not just durations and times of maxima for Earth, but everything needed to characterize the meteor stream in and out of the plane of the ecliptic, which, at a minimum, consists of the location of maximum stream density (ZHR) and the functional form of the density decay with distance from this point. It is also suggested that some of the terminology associated with meteor showers may need to be more strictly defined in order to eliminate the perception of crying wolf by meteor scientists. An outburst is especially problematic, as it usually denotes an enhancement by a factor of 2 or more to researchers, but conveys the notion of a sky filled with meteors to satellite operators and the public. Experience has also taught that predicted ZHRs often lead to public disappointment, as these values vastly overestimate what is seen.

  13. Clear air turbulence avoidance using an airborne microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The avoidance of Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) is theoretically possible by selecting flight levels that are a safe distance from the tropopause and inversion layers. These favored sites for CAT generation can be located by an 'airborne microwave radiometer' (AMR) passive sensor system that measures altitude temperature profiles. A flight evaluation of the AMR sensor shows that most CAT could be avoided by following sensor-based advisories. Some limitations still exist for any hypothetical use of the sensor. The principal need is to augment the sensor's 'where' advisories to include useful 'when' forecasts.

  14. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow.

  15. Aircraft Dynamic Modeling in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunninham, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A method for accurately identifying aircraft dynamic models in turbulence was developed and demonstrated. The method uses orthogonal optimized multisine excitation inputs and an analytic method for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic modeling in turbulence. A turbulence metric was developed to accurately characterize the turbulence level using flight measurements. The modeling technique was demonstrated in simulation, then applied to a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft in flight. Comparisons of modeling results obtained in turbulent air to results obtained in smooth air were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  16. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  17. IACATS AIV: AIV process for a versatile turbulence simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Belenguer-Dávila, Tomás; Pastor Santos, Carmen; Sánchez Rodríguez, Antonio; Moreno Raso, Javier; Argelaguet, Heribert; Serrano, Javier

    2010-07-01

    IACATS is an atmospheric turbulence, stars and telescope simulator for the evaluation of on ground telescopes instrumentation developed by INTA (optics) and LIDAX (opto-mechanics) for the IAC (Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias). Three telescopes have been simulated, matching the f number, focal plane, and optical interface of the actual telescopes. An optical breadboard was designed and built containing the required opto-mechanics for simulating the telescopes, and various levels of turbulence required. In addition to the telescope simulator optics, a set of three phase plates have been procured and conveniently combined in order to reproduce the atmospheric turbulence required by the IAC. A wave front sensor has been also included in order to evaluate the deformation that the phase plates, or the simulated turbulence, produce in the wave front coming from the illumination system and star simulator. Finally, a specific illumination system was developed including different working wavelengths in order to fulfil the requirements. The description of the illumination system itself has been done in a separate publication.. In the following lines, the characteristics of the IACATS instrument as well as the results obtained from the AIV (Assembly and Integration Verification) process are reported on.

  18. Wave propagation in turbulent media: use of convergence acceleration methods.

    PubMed

    Baram, A; Tsadka, S; Azar, Z; Tur, M

    1988-06-01

    We propose the use of convergence acceleration methods for the evaluation of integral expressions of an oscillatory nature, often encountered in the study of optical wave propagation in the turbulent atmosphere. These techniques offer substantial savings in computation time with appreciable gain in accuracy. As an example, we apply the Levin u acceleration scheme to the problem of remote sensing of transversal wind profiles.

  19. Propagation of Multiwavelength Laser Radiation through Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    be applied. The fundamental determining factor in data spread is shown to be the two-point correlation of he microthermal envelope fluctuations...Engineer li / Jt M^ ^^w Summary This report reviews in detail our progress on understanding the short-term statistics of microthermal turbulence...fluctuations and optical/ infrared scintillations, and their interrelationship. A complete analytical understanding of microthermal and scintillation

  20. ECRH microwave beam broadening in the edge turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, E. V.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.; Silva, F. da; Heuraux, S.

    2014-02-12

    The influence of turbulent plasma density fluctuations on angular and spatial beam width is treated analytically in the framework of WKB based eikonal method. Reasonable agreement of analytical and numerical treatment results is demonstrated within the domain of quasi-optical approximation validity. Significant broadening of microwave beams is predicted for future ECRH experiments at ITER.