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Sample records for optimal art adherence

  1. Barriers to ART adherence & follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, N; Paranjape, R; Jain, R; Rahane, G; Potdar, R; Reddy, K S; Sahay, S

    2011-12-01

    Adherence to ART is a patient specific issue influenced by a variety of situations that a patient may encounter, especially in resource-limited settings. A study was conducted to understand factors and influencers of adherence to ART and their follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India. Between January and March 2009, barriers to ART adherence among 32 patients at three selected ART centres functioning under national ART roll-out programme in Maharashtra, India, were studied using qualitative methods. Consenting patients were interviewed to assess barriers to ART adherence. Constant comparison method was used to identify grounded codes. Patients reported multiple barriers to ART adherence and follow up as (i) Financial barriers where the contributing factors were unemployment, economic dependency, and debt, (ii) social norm of attending family rituals, and fulfilling social obligations emerged as socio-cultural barriers, (iii) patients' belief, attitude and behaviour towards medication and self-perceived stigma were the reasons for sub-optimal adherence, and (iv) long waiting period, doctor-patient relationship and less time devoted in counselling at the center contributed to missed visits. Mainstreaming ART can facilitate access and address 'missed doses' due to travel and migration. A 'morning' and 'evening' ART centre/s hours may reduce work absenteeism and help in time management. Proactive 'adherence probing' and probing on internalized stigma might optimize adherence. Adherence probing to prevent transitioning to suboptimal adherence among patients stable on ART is recommended.

  2. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  3. Differential predictors of ART adherence among HIV-monoinfected versus HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Shuper, Paul A; Joharchi, Narges; Irving, Hyacinth; Fletcher, David; Kovacs, Colin; Loutfy, Mona; Walmsley, Sharon L; Wong, David K H; Rehm, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Although adherence is an important key to the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy (ART), many people living with HIV (PLWH) fail to maintain optimal levels of ART adherence over time. PLWH with the added burden of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection possess unique challenges that potentially impact their motivation and ability to adhere to ART. The present investigation sought to (1) compare ART adherence levels among a sample of HIV/HCV-coinfected versus HIV-monoinfected patients, and (2) identify whether ART-related clinical and psychosocial correlates differ by HCV status. PLWH receiving ART (N = 215: 105 HIV/HCV-coinfected, 110 HIV-monoinfected) completed a comprehensive survey assessing ART adherence and its potential correlates. Medical chart extraction identified clinical factors, including liver enzymes. Results demonstrated that ART adherence did not differ by HCV status, with 83.7% of coinfected patients and 82.4% of monoinfected patients reporting optimal (i.e., ≥95%) adherence during a four-day recall period (p = .809). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that regardless of HCV status, optimal ART adherence was associated with experiencing fewer adherence-related behavioral skills barriers (AOR = 0.56; 95%CI = 0.43-0.73), lower likelihood of problematic drinking (AOR = 0.15; 95%CI = 0.04-0.67), and lower likelihood of methamphetamine use (AOR = 0.14; 95%CI = 0.03-0.69). However, among HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, optimal adherence was additionally associated with experiencing fewer ART adherence-related motivational barriers (AOR = 0.23; 95%CI = 0.08-0.62) and lower likelihood of depression (AOR = 0.06; 95%CI = 0.00-0.84). Findings suggest that although HIV/HCV-coinfected patients may face additional, distinct barriers to ART adherence, levels of adherence commensurate with those demonstrated by HIV-monoinfected patients might be achievable if these barriers are addressed.

  4. Association of knowledge on ART line of treatment, scarcity of treatment options and adherence.

    PubMed

    Ramadhani, Habib O; Muiruri, Charles; Maro, Venance P; Omondi, Michael; Mushi, Julian B; Lirhunde, Eileen S; Bartlett, John A

    2016-07-15

    Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is critical piece in the management of HIV infected patients. Despite the benefits of ART, non-adherence to ART persists. This study explores association between patient's knowledge of the ART line of treatment, availability of future treatment options and adherence. A cross sectional survey of HIV infected adolescent and adults was conducted. Cumulative optimal and sub-optimal adherence was defined as percentage adherence of ≥ 95 % and < 95 %, respectively. Binomial regression models were used to assess the association of patient's knowledge of the ART line of treatment, availability of future treatment options and adherence. Of the 402 patients reviewed, 101 (25.1 %) patients knew their ART line of treatment and were aware that future treatment options are limited. Compared to those who were not aware of the ART line of treatment and/or scarcity of future treatment options, those who were aware were more likely to be adherent (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR], 1.1; 95 % CI, 1.0-1.3). The study reports knowledge of patient's ART line of treatment and future treatment options is important indicator of adherence to ART. Although majority of the patients did not have the knowledge, those who had the knowledge demonstrated to be more adherent. It is critical for the physicians/health care providers in these settings to clearly educate patients about ART line of treatment and limited availability of future treatment options as such information is likely to influence individual behavior and improve patient's adherence to ART.

  5. Hunger, waiting time and transport costs: time to confront challenges to ART adherence in Africa.

    PubMed

    Hardon, A P; Akurut, D; Comoro, C; Ekezie, C; Irunde, H F; Gerrits, T; Kglatwane, J; Kinsman, J; Kwasa, R; Maridadi, J; Moroka, T M; Moyo, S; Nakiyemba, A; Nsimba, S; Ogenyi, R; Oyabba, T; Temu, F; Laing, R

    2007-05-01

    Adherence levels in Africa have been found to be better than those in the US. However around one out of four ART users fail to achieve optimal adherence, risking drug resistance and negative treatment outcomes. A high demand for 2nd line treatments (currently ten times more expensive than 1st line ART) undermines the sustainability of African ART programs. There is an urgent need to identify context-specific constraints to adherence and implement interventions to address them. We used rapid appraisals (involving mainly qualitative methods) to find out why and when people do not adhere to ART in Uganda, Tanzania and Botswana. Multidisciplinary teams of researchers and local health professionals conducted the studies, involving a total of 54 semi-structured interviews with health workers, 73 semi-structured interviews with ARTusers and other key informants, 34 focus group discussions, and 218 exit interviews with ART users. All the facilities studied in Botswana, Tanzania and Uganda provide ARVs free of charge, but ART users report other related costs (e.g. transport expenditures, registration and user fees at the private health facilities, and lost wages due to long waiting times) as main obstacles to optimal adherence. Side effects and hunger in the initial treatment phase are an added concern. We further found that ART users find it hard to take their drugs when they are among people to whom they have not disclosed their HIV status, such as co-workers and friends. The research teams recommend that (i) health care workers inform patients better about adverse effects; (ii) ART programmes provide transport and food support to patients who are too poor to pay; (iii) recurrent costs to users be reduced by providing three-months, rather than the one-month refills once optimal adherence levels have been achieved; and (iv) pharmacists play an important role in this follow-up care.

  6. Interpersonal and intrapersonal factors as parallel independent mediators in the association between internalized HIV stigma and ART adherence

    PubMed Central

    Seghatol-Eslami, Victoria C.; Dark, Heather; Raper, James L.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Turan, Janet M.; Turan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People living with HIV (PLWH) need to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to achieve optimal health. One reason for ART non-adherence is HIV-related stigma. Objectives We aimed to examine whether HIV treatment self-efficacy (an intrapersonal mechanism) mediates the stigma – adherence association. We also examined whether self-efficacy and the concern about being seen while taking HIV medication (an interpersonal mechanism) are parallel mediators independent of each other. Methods 180 PLWH self-reported internalized HIV stigma, ART adherence, HIV treatment self-efficacy, and concerns about being seen while taking HIV medication. We calculated bias-corrected 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for indirect effects using bootstrapping to conduct mediation analyses. Results Adherence self-efficacy mediated the relationship between internalized stigma and ART adherence. Additionally, self-efficacy and concern about being seen while taking HIV medication uniquely mediated and explained almost all of the stigma – adherence association in independent paths (parallel mediation). Conclusion These results can inform intervention strategies to promote ART adherence. PMID:27926668

  7. Universal test and treat is not associated with sub-optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural South Africa: the ANRS 12249 TasP trial.

    PubMed

    Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Calmy, Alexandra; Dabis, Francois; Pillay, Deenan; Newell, Marie-Louise; Baisley, Kathy; Porter, Kholoud

    2018-06-01

    HIV treatment guidelines now recommend antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation regardless of CD4 count to maximize benefit both for the individual and society. It is unknown whether the initiation of ART at higher CD4 counts would affect adherence levels. We investigated whether initiating ART at higher CD4 counts was associated with sub-optimal adherence (<95%) during the first 12 months of ART. A prospective cohort study nested within a two-arm cluster-randomized trial of universal test and treat was implemented from March 2012 to June 2016 to measure the impact of ART on HIV incidence in rural KwaZulu-Natal. ART was initiated regardless of CD4 count in the intervention arm and according to national guidelines in the control arm. ART adherence was measured monthly using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and pill counts (PC). HIV viral load was measured at ART initiation, three and six months, and six-monthly thereafter. We pooled data from participants in both arms and used random-effects logistic regression models to examine the association between CD4 count at ART initiation and sub-optimal adherence, and assessed if adherence levels were associated with virological suppression. Among 900 individuals who initiated ART ≥12 months before study end, median (IQR) CD4 at ART initiation was 350 cells/mm 3 (234, 503); median age was 34.6 years (IQR 27.4 to 46.4) and 71.7% were female. Adherence was sub-optimal in 14.7% of visits as measured by VAS and 20.7% by PC. In both the crude analyses and after adjusting for potential confounders, adherence was not significantly associated with CD4 count at ART initiation (adjusted OR for linear trend in sub-optimal adherence with every 100 cells/mm 3 increase in CD4 count: 1.00, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.05, for VAS, and 1.03, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.07, for PC). Virological suppression at 12 months was 97%. Optimal adherence by both measures was significantly associated with virological suppression (p < 0.001 for VAS; p = 0.006 for PC

  8. Influence of Side Effects on ART Adherence Among PLWH in China: The Moderator Role of ART-Related Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Zhou, Yuejiao

    2018-03-01

    Despite the medical advancements in HIV treatment, realities of side effects are faced by people living with HIV (PLWH) who receive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Mixed findings have been reported on the association between side effects and ART adherence. However, few studies have explored the combined side effects and behavior-related information on medication adherence. The aim of the current study is to examine moderator role of ART-related knowledge between side effects and ART adherence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 2987 PLWH from October 2012 to August 2013 in China. Of the total sample, 2095 patients had received ART and provided ART adherence. Side effects, ART-related knowledge, and ART adherence, as well as potential covariates were assessed. The results revealed that there was a negative relationship of side effects and ART adherence existed among low and medium levels of ART-related knowledge, but not among high level of knowledge. Future interventions to promote HIV medication adherence should focus on providing behavior-related information education among PLWH.

  9. Optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence as evaluated by CASE index score tool is associated with virological suppression in HIV-infected adults in Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Byabene, A K; Fortes-Déguénonvo, L; Niang, K; Manga, M N; Bulabula, A N H; Nachega, J B; Seydi, M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological failure (VLF) among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the national ART programme at the teaching hospital of Fann, Dakar, Senegal. Cross-sectional study from 1 September 2013 to 30 January 2014. (1) optimal ART adherence by the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) Index Score (>10) and (2) VLF (HIV RNA > 1000 copies/ml). Diagnostic accuracy of CASE Index Score assessed using sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with optimal adherence and VLF. Of 98 HIV-infected patients on ART, 68% were female. The median (IQR) age was 42 (20-50) years. A total of 57 of 98 (60%) were on ART more than 3 years, and majority (88%) were on NNRTI-based first-line ART regimen. A total of 79 of 98 (80%) patients reported optimal ART adherence, and only five of 84 (5.9%) had documented VLF. Patients with VLF were significantly more likely to have suboptimal ART adherence (17.7% vs. 2.9%; P = 0.02). CASE Index Score showed the best trade-off in Se (78.9%, 95% CI: 54.4-93.9%), Sp (20.0%, 95% CI: 11.1-31.7), PPV (22.4, 95% CI: 13.1-34.2%) and NPV (76.5%, 95% CI: 50.1-93.2), when used VLF threshold of HIV RNA >50 copies/ml. Factors independently associated with VLF were CASE Index Score <10 ([aOR] = 13.0, 95% CI: 1.1-147.9; P = 0.04) and being a boosted PI-based ART regimen ([aOR] = 27.0, 95% CI: 2.4-309.4; P = 0.008). Optimal ART adherence is achievable in a high proportion of HIV-infected adults in this study population. CASE Index Score was independently associated with virological outcomes, supporting usefulness of this low-cost ART adherence monitoring tool in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fonsah, Julius Y.; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Kouanfack, Charles; Qiu, Fang; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Tagny, Claude T.; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Heaton, Robert; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2017-01-01

    Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (p<0.05). Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that subjects with opportunistic infections (on antibiotics) had 2.42-times higher odds of having been non-adherent (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis controlling for ART regimen, age, gender, and education showed that subjects with opportunistic infections had 3.1-times higher odds of having been non-adherent (p<0.0003), with significantly longer periods of non-adherence, compared to subjects without opportunistic infections (p = 0.02). We further showed that compared to younger subjects (≤40 years), older subjects (>40 years) were less likely to be non-adherent (p<0.01) and had shorter non-adherent periods (p<0.0001). The presence of depression symptoms correlated with non-adherence to ART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04), and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p

  11. A Longitudinal Analysis of Daily Pill Burden and Likelihood of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among People Living With HIV Who Use Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mohd Salleh, Nur Afiqah; Richardson, Lindsey; Kerr, Thomas; Shoveller, Jean; Montaner, Julio; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Milloy, M-J

    2018-03-07

    Among people living with HIV (PLWH), high levels of adherence to prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. However, little is known about the effects of daily pill burden on adherence amongst PLWH who use drugs. We sought to investigate the association between daily pill burden and adherence to ART among members of this key population in Vancouver, Canada. We used data from the AIDS Care Cohort to Evaluate Exposure to Survival Services study, a long-running community-recruited cohort of PLWH who use illicit drugs linked to comprehensive HIV clinical records. The longitudinal relationship between daily pill burden and the odds of ≥95% adherence to ART among ART-exposed individuals was analyzed using multivariable generalized linear mixed-effects modeling, adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioural, and structural factors linked to adherence. Between December 2005 and May 2014, the study enrolled 770 ART-exposed participants, including 257 (34%) women, with a median age of 43 years. At baseline, 437 (56.7%) participants achieved ≥95% adherence in the previous 180 days. Among all interview periods, the median adherence was 100% (interquartile range 71%-100%). In a multivariable model, a greater number of pills per day was negatively associated with ≥95% adherence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.87 per pill, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.91). Further analysis showed that once-a-day ART regimens were positively associated with optimal adherence (AOR 1.39, 95% CI 1.07-1.80). In conclusion, simpler dosing demands (ie, fewer pills and once-a-day single tablet regimens) promoted optimal adherence among PLWH who use drugs. Our findings highlight the need for simpler dosing to be encouraged explicitly for PWUD with multiple adherence barriers.

  12. Adherence to Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) During Muslim Ramadan Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Habib, A. G.; Shepherd, J. C.; Eng, M. K. L.; Babashani, M.; Jumare, J.; Yakubu, U.; Gebi, U. I.; Saad, M.; Ibrahim, H.; Blattner, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual fasting during the month of Ramadan is observed in Muslim countries, some of which have widespread HIV infection. We studied treatment adherence and customary practices among 142 fasting `FT' and 101 non-fasting `NFT' patients on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. Adherence on ART among FT and NFT patients was similar during Ramadan, 96% and 98%, and ever since commencement of ART, 80% and 88%, respectively. FT patients altered their typical daily behaviors by advancing morning and delaying evening doses thereby prolonging dosing intervals, eating heavier meals pre-dawn and on breakfast at sunset (78%), and changing or reducing their sleeping and waking times (40%). This preliminary study suggests that adherence and drug taking frequency appear uncompromised in FT HIV infected patients on ARVs. PMID:18521736

  13. The Information–Motivation–Behavioral Skills Model of ART Adherence in a Deep South HIV+ Clinic Sample

    PubMed Central

    Amico, K. Rivet; Barta, William; Konkle-Parker, Deborah J.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Shuper, Paul A.; Fisher, William A.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are critical to the management of HIV, yet many people living with HIV do not achieve these levels. There is a substantial body of literature regarding correlates of adherence to ART, and theory-based multivariate models of ART adherence are emerging. The current study assessed the determinants of adherence behavior postulated by the Information–Motivation–Behavioral Skills model of ART adherence in a sample of 149 HIV-positive patients in Mississippi. Structural equation modeling indicated that ART-related information correlated with personal and social motivation, and the two sub-areas of motivation were not intercorrelated. In this Deep South sample, being better informed, socially supported, and perceiving fewer negative consequences of adherence were independently related to stronger behavioral skills for taking medications, which in turn associated with self-reported adherence. The IMB model of ART adherence appeared to well characterize the complexities of adherence for this sample. PMID:17876697

  14. Factors associated with adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) among adult people living with HIV and attending their clinical care, Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Letta, Shiferaw; Demissie, Asrat; Oljira, Lemessa; Dessie, Yadeta

    2015-12-28

    To attain a successful treatment outcome, Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) treatment for people living with HIV requires more than 95% adherence level. The adherence level varies depending on different population contexts. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate ART adherence level among HIV positive patients attending their clinical care in public health facilities in Harar and Dire Dawa, Eastern Ethiopia. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 626 ART attendees. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire with a face-to-face interview. ART adherence was considered when taking all antiretroviral treatment in a correctly prescribed doses at a right time (no dose missed or delayed for greater than or equal to 90 min) in the week prior to the study. Multivariable logistic analysis was applied to examine the association between the dependent and independent variables. Statistical significance was set at p-value <0.05. The level of ART adherence was 85%. Adherence was more likely among patients of 35-44 years (AOR = 2.39; 95% CI = 1.15-5.01), had monthly income of 501.00-999.00 Ethiopian Birr (ETB) (AOR = 6.73; 95% CI = 2.71-16.75), no history of opportunistic infection (AOR = 2.81; 95% CI = 1.47-5.36), and had good family support (AOR = 2.61; 95% CI = 1.45-4.72). However, those who did not disclose their sero-status (AOR = 0.45; 95% CI = 0.21-0.97) and did experience depression (AOR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.21-0.61) were less likely adherent than their counter parts. The level of ART adherence was sub-optimal. Concerted and collaborative efforts through effective and efficient interventions are needed in view of the identified factors in order to improve the adherence level.

  15. Impact of food, housing, and transportation insecurity on ART adherence: a hierarchical resources approach.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Talea; Jones, Maranda; Merly, Cynthia; Welles, Brandi; Kalichman, Moira O; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV into a manageable illness. However, high levels of adherence must be maintained. Lack of access to basic resources (food, transportation, and housing) has been consistently associated with suboptimal ART adherence. Moving beyond such direct effects, this study takes a hierarchical resources approach in which the effects of access to basic resources on ART adherence are mediated through interpersonal resources (social support and care services) and personal resources (self-efficacy). Participants were 915 HIV-positive men and women living in Atlanta, GA, recruited from community centers and infectious disease clinics. Participants answered baseline questionnaires, and provided prospective data on ART adherence. Across a series of nested models, a consistent pattern emerged whereby lack of access to basic resources had indirect, negative effects on adherence, mediated through both lack of access to social support and services, and through lower treatment self-efficacy. There was also a significant direct effect of lack of access to transportation on adherence. Lack of access to basic resources negatively impacts ART adherence. Effects for housing instability and food insecurity were fully mediated through social support, access to services, and self-efficacy, highlighting these as important targets for intervention. Targeting service supports could be especially beneficial due to the potential to both promote adherence and to link clients with other services to supplement food, housing, and transportation. Inability to access transportation had a direct negative effect on adherence, suggesting that free or reduced cost transportation could positively impact ART adherence among disadvantaged populations.

  16. Multiple ART Programs Create a Dilemma for Providers to Monitor ARV Adherence in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Obua, Celestino; Gusdal, Annelie; Waako, Paul; Chalker, John C; Tomson, Goran; Wahlström, Rolf; Team, The Inrud-Iaa

    2011-01-01

    Increased availability and accessibility of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has improved the length and quality of life amongst people living with HIV/AIDS. This has changed the landscape for care from episodic to long-term care that requires more monitoring of adherence. This has led to increased demand on human resources, a major problem for most ART programs. This paper presents experiences and perspectives of providers in ART facilities, exploring the organizational factors affecting their capacity to monitor adherence to ARVs. From an earlier survey to test adherence indicators and rank facilities as good, medium or poor adherence performances, six facilities were randomly selected, two from each rank. Observations on facility set-up, provider-patient interactions and key informant interviews were carried out. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats identified by health workers as facilitators or barriers to their capacity to monitor adherence to ARVs were explored during group discussions. Findings show that the performance levels of the facilities were characterized by four different organizational ART programs operating in Uganda, with apparent lack of integration and coordination at the facilities. Of the six facilities studied, the two high adherence performing facilities were Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) programs, while facilities with dual organizational programs (Governmental/NGO) performed poorly. Working conditions, record keeping and the duality of programs underscored the providers' capacity to monitor adherence. Overall 70% of the observed provider-patient interactions were conducted in environments that ensured privacy of the patient. The mean performance for record keeping was 79% and 50% in the high and low performing facilities respectively. Providers often found it difficult to monitor adherence due to the conflicting demands from the different organizational ART programs. Organizational duality at facilities is a major

  17. Optimal treatment adherence counseling outcomes for people living with HIV and limited health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Pellowski, Jennifer A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Grebler, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Limited health literacy has been shown to contribute to poor health, including poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in people living with HIV/AIDS, over and above other indicators of social disadvantage and poverty. Given the mixed results of previous interventions for people with HIV and low health literacy, investigating possible targets for improved adherence is warranted. The present study aims to identify the correlates of optimal and suboptimal outcomes among participants of a recent skills-based medication adherence intervention (Kalichman et al., 2013). Participants included in this secondary analysis were 188 men and women living with HIV who had low health literacy as determined by scoring ≤90% on a test of health literacy and had complete viral load data for baseline and follow-up. Participants completed physical, psychosocial and literacy measures using computerized interviews. Adherence was assessed by unannounced pill count and follow-up viral loads were assessed by blood draw. Results showed that higher levels of health literacy and lower levels of alcohol use were the strongest predictors of achieving HIV viral load optimal outcomes. The interplay between lower health literacy and alcohol use on adherence should be the focus of future research. PMID:25211524

  18. Network support, technology use, depression, and ART adherence among HIV-positive MSM of color.

    PubMed

    Holloway, I W; Tan, D; Dunlap, S L; Palmer, L; Beougher, S; Cederbaum, J A

    2017-09-01

    Depression is associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. This relationship may be moderated by an individual's social network characteristics. Our study sought to examine social network correlates of treatment adherence among HIV-positive men recruited from social service agencies throughout Los Angeles County (N = 150) to inform technology-driven social support interventions for this population. We administered egocentric social network and computer-assisted survey interviews focused on demographic characteristics, health history, depressive symptoms, and ART adherence, where adherence was assessed by the number of reasons participants missed taking their medication, if ever. Significant univariate correlates of adherence were included in a multivariable regression analysis, where the moderating effect of having a network member who reminds participants to take their HIV medication on the relationship between depression and adherence was tested. Over 60% of participants reported clinically significant depressive symptoms; this was significantly associated with lower adherence among those without someone in their social network to remind them about taking their HIV medication, even after adjusting for covariates in an ordinary least squares regression (adjusted mean difference b = -1.61, SE = 0.42, p = 0.0003). Having a network member who reminds participants to take their ART medication significantly ameliorated the negative association between depression and treatment adherence, especially for those reporting greater depressive symptoms (p = 0.0394). Additionally, participants demonstrated high rates of technology use to communicate with social network members. In order to achieve the aims of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, innovative interventions addressing mental health to improve ART adherence are needed. Network strategies that leverage technology may be helpful for improving ART

  19. Cost Effectiveness of Potential ART Adherence Monitoring Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew N; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Sow, Papa Salif; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Ford, Deborah; Mugurungi, Owen; Apollo, Tsitsi; Murungu, Joseph; Bangsberg, David R; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interventions based around objective measurement of adherence to antiretroviral drugs for HIV have potential to improve adherence and to enable differentiation of care such that clinical visits are reduced in those with high adherence. It would be useful to understand the approximate upper limit of cost that could be considered for such interventions of a given effectiveness in order to be cost effective. Such information can guide whether to implement an intervention in the light of a trial showing a certain effectiveness and cost. An individual-based model, calibrated to Zimbabwe, which incorporates effects of adherence and resistance to antiretroviral therapy, was used to model the potential impact of adherence monitoring-based interventions on viral suppression, death rates, disability adjusted life years and costs. Potential component effects of the intervention were: enhanced average adherence when on ART, reduced risk of ART discontinuation, and reduced risk of resistance acquisition. We considered a situation in which viral load monitoring is not available and one in which it is. In the former case, it was assumed that care would be differentiated based on the adherence level, with fewer clinic visits in those demonstrated to have high adherence. In the latter case, care was assumed to be primarily differentiated according to viral load level. The maximum intervention cost required to be cost effective was calculated based on a cost effectiveness threshold of $500 per DALY averted. In the absence of viral load monitoring, an adherence monitoring-based intervention which results in a durable 6% increase in the proportion of ART experienced people with viral load < 1000 cps/mL was cost effective if it cost up to $50 per person-year on ART, mainly driven by the cost savings of differentiation of care. In the presence of viral load monitoring availability, an intervention with a similar effect on viral load suppression was cost-effective when costing $23

  20. Cost Effectiveness of Potential ART Adherence Monitoring Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Sow, Papa Salif; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Ford, Deborah; Mugurungi, Owen; Apollo, Tsitsi; Murungu, Joseph; Bangsberg, David R.; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions based around objective measurement of adherence to antiretroviral drugs for HIV have potential to improve adherence and to enable differentiation of care such that clinical visits are reduced in those with high adherence. It would be useful to understand the approximate upper limit of cost that could be considered for such interventions of a given effectiveness in order to be cost effective. Such information can guide whether to implement an intervention in the light of a trial showing a certain effectiveness and cost. Methods An individual-based model, calibrated to Zimbabwe, which incorporates effects of adherence and resistance to antiretroviral therapy, was used to model the potential impact of adherence monitoring-based interventions on viral suppression, death rates, disability adjusted life years and costs. Potential component effects of the intervention were: enhanced average adherence when on ART, reduced risk of ART discontinuation, and reduced risk of resistance acquisition. We considered a situation in which viral load monitoring is not available and one in which it is. In the former case, it was assumed that care would be differentiated based on the adherence level, with fewer clinic visits in those demonstrated to have high adherence. In the latter case, care was assumed to be primarily differentiated according to viral load level. The maximum intervention cost required to be cost effective was calculated based on a cost effectiveness threshold of $500 per DALY averted. Findings In the absence of viral load monitoring, an adherence monitoring-based intervention which results in a durable 6% increase in the proportion of ART experienced people with viral load < 1000 cps/mL was cost effective if it cost up to $50 per person-year on ART, mainly driven by the cost savings of differentiation of care. In the presence of viral load monitoring availability, an intervention with a similar effect on viral load suppression was cost

  1. Depressive symptoms, lifestyle structure, and ART adherence among HIV-infected individuals: a longitudinal mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A; Wagner, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented relationship between depression and antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence, few studies have identified explanatory pathways through which depression affects adherence. The current study tested lifestyle structure-the degree of organization and routinization of daily activities-as a mediator of this relationship, given previous evidence of lifestyle structure being associated with both depression and ART nonadherence. HIV-infected individuals starting or re-starting ART in the California Collaborative Treatment Group 578 study (n = 199) were assessed over 48 weeks. Adherence was measured using electronic monitoring caps to determine dose timing and doses taken, and viral load was assessed. The mediating role of lifestyle structure was tested using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrapping. Lifestyle significantly mediated the relationship between depression and both measures of ART adherence behavior. Interventions that minimize disruptions to lifestyle structure and link adherence to daily activities may be useful for individuals with depression and ART nonadherence.

  2. Structural barriers to ART adherence in Southern Africa: challenges and potential ways forward

    PubMed Central

    KAGEE, A.; REMIEN, R.H.; BERKMAN, A.; HOFFMAN, S.; CAMPOS, L.; SWARTZ, L.

    2010-01-01

    Structural barriers to antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence are economic, institutional, political and cultural factors, that collectively influence the extent to which persons living with HIV follow their medication regimens. We identify three sets of structural barriers to ART adherence that are salient in Southern Africa: poverty-related, institutional, and political and cultural. Examples of poverty-related barriers are competing demands in the context of resource-constrained settings, the lack of transport infrastructure, food insecurity, the role of disability grants and poor social support. Examples of institutional factors are logistical barriers, overburdened health care facilities, limited access to mental health services and difficulties in ensuring adequate counseling. Examples of political and cultural barriers are controversies in the provision of treatment for AIDS, migration, traditional beliefs about HIV and AIDS, poor health literacy and gender inequalities. In forging a way forward, we identify ways in which individuals, communities and health care systems may overcome some of these structural barriers. Finally, we make recommendations for further research on structural barriers to ART adherence. In all likelihood, enhancing adherence to ART requires the efforts of a variety of disciplines, including public health, psychology, anthropology, sociology and medicine. PMID:20509066

  3. ART adherence, demographic variables and CD4 outcome among HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Safren, S A; Kumarasamy, N; James, R; Raminani, S; Solomon, S; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2005-10-01

    This is an analysis of available chart data recorded by HIV counselors and physicians on patient adherence and CD4 count in 304 patients with HIV who were prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Chennai, India. HIV counselors had categorized the majority of patients' adherence as 'regular' (74.3%), with a significant minority being categorized as 'irregular' (17.8%), or 'recently missed some doses' (6.9%). Those categorized as 'irregular' had significantly lower CD4 counts than those classified as 'regular'. Adherence was not associated with any demographic variable; however, it was associated with current CD4 and with change in CD4 since initiation of ART. This association was significant over and above the effects of time on ART. The most common reason for non-adherence was cost (32%), followed by the inability to return for a refill (i.e., patients who were unable or refused to obtain medicines elsewhere) (7.5%). These data suggest that although most patients in this Indian cohort reported regular adherence to ART, a subset admitted to less than regular adherence to ART, and those who admitted to less than regular adherence had worse CD4 outcomes. These data do not support concerns about adherence as a reason to withhold ART in developing countries, nor do they support claims that patients in India who struggle with adherence would be unwilling or unable to admit to non-adherence to health care professionals.

  4. Role of male partner involvement in ART retention and adherence in Malawi's Option B+ program.

    PubMed

    Wesevich, Austin; Mtande, Tiwonge; Saidi, Friday; Cromwell, Elizabeth; Tweya, Hannock; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Hoffman, Irving; Miller, William C; Rosenberg, Nora E

    2017-11-01

    Malawi's Option B+ program provides all HIV-infected pregnant women free lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), but challenges remain regarding retention and ART adherence, potentially due to male partner barriers. We explored relationships between male partner involvement and Option B+ retention and adherence. In 2014, a randomized controlled trial in Malawi compared male recruitment strategies for couple HIV testing and counseling (cHTC) at an antenatal clinic. This secondary analysis was conducted among the entire cohort (N = 200) of women, irrespective of randomization status. We assessed whether cHTC attendance, early disclosure of HIV-positive status, and partner ART reminders were associated with retention and adherence at one month after starting treatment. Retention was defined as attending HIV clinic follow-up within one day of running out of pills. Adherence was defined as taking ≥95% of ARTs by pill count. We used binomial regression to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median female age was 26 years. Most women (79%) were retained; of these, 68% were adherent. Receiving cHTC was associated with improved retention (aRR 1.33, 95% CI 1.12, 1.59). Receiving male partner ART reminders was weakly associated with retention (aRR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96, 1.39). Disclosure within one day was not associated with retention (aRR 1.08, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.28). Among those who were retained, these three behaviors were not associated with improved 95% adherence. CHTC could play an important role in improving Option B+ retention. Increasing cHTC participation and enhancing adherence-related messages within cHTC are important.

  5. Patient communication tools to enhance ART adherence counseling in low and high resource settings.

    PubMed

    Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Catley, Delwyn; Thomson, Domonique; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Goggin, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    Few articles have examined specific counseling tools used to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We present communication tools used in the context of Project MOTIV8, a randomized clinical trial. We developed, piloted, and evaluated pictorial images to communicate the importance of consistent dose timing and the concept of drug resistance. Electronic drug monitoring (EDM) review was also used to provide visual feedback and facilitate problem solving discussions. Adherence knowledge of all participants (n=204) was assessed at baseline and 48 weeks. Participant satisfaction with counseling was also assessed. Adherence knowledge did not differ at baseline, however, at 48 weeks, intervention participants demonstrated significantly increased knowledge compared to controls F(1, 172)=10.76, p=0.001 (12.4% increase among intervention participants and 1.8% decrease among controls). Counselors reported that the tools were well-received, and 80% of participants felt the counseling helped them adhere to their medications. Counseling tools were both positively received and effective in increasing ART adherence knowledge among a diverse population. While developed for research, these counseling tools can be implemented into clinical practice to help patients; particularly those with lower levels of education or limited abstract thinking skills to understand medical concepts related to ART adherence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Post-ART Symptoms Were Not the Problem: A Qualitative Study on Adherence to ART in HIV-Infected Patients in a Mozambican Rural Hospital.

    PubMed

    Maixenchs, Maria; Boene, Helena; Anselmo, Rui; Mindu, Carolina; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Macete, Eusébio; Pool, Robert; Letang, Emílio; Naniche, Denise; Munguambe, Khátia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to explore how clinical symptoms may affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV patients, and to explore factors, perceptions and attitudes related to adherence to therapy. A qualitative study was carried out in the context of the prospective cohort study "Evaluation of Immune Reconstitution Following Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in Manhiça, Mozambique". In-depth Interviews were conducted twice in a sub-sample of the study cohort (51 participants), at six-month intervals. Most participants (73%) knew that AIDS is a chronic disease and that ART does not cure it. Nine participants (18%) were non-adherent at some point and two (4%) abandoned ART. All participants but five reported having symptoms after starting ART, mainly attributed to pills needing time to act and body's reaction to the treatment. In spite of the perceived severity of the symptoms, only two people reported they discontinued the treatment due to symptoms. Almost all participants reported feeling comfortable with the HIV clinic organization and procedures, but afraid of staff being hostile if they did not follow the rules or if the health worker visited their home. Family was one of the most important source of support according participants. Almost all participants with children said that a decisive factor to follow the treatment was the desire to be able to look after them. Experiencing symptoms after starting treatment was not a barrier to adherence to ART. Factors related to adherence included control measures set up by the health facility (exhaustive follow up, support, information) and family and community support. Indirect ART-related expenses did jeopardise adherence.

  7. Adherence to Anti-Retroviral Therapy in North Central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Avong, Yohanna Kambai; van Wyk, Brian; Njab, Jean; Abimiku, Alash'le G; Ndembi, Nicaise; Okuma, James; Ogbanufe, Obinna; Ekong, Ernest; Dakum, Patrick; Blattner, William A

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria bears nearly 10% of the global burden of HIV/AIDS. Most of the AIDS patients dwell in the part of Nigeria known as the "North Central" geopolitical region. Sustaining HIV patients in this high risk region is critical for the overall success of the ART program in Nigeria. We assessed the level of adherence to ART and adherence determinants among participants who had been on ART for an average of three and half years. Eligible study participants initiated HAART between 2004 and 2010. HAART regimens contained AZT/3TC +NVP or EFV; AZT/3TC/NVP; 3TC/NVP/d4T; TDF/FTC +EFV or NVP and TDF+3TC+LPV/r. A composite adherence measure defined as not missing a dose and taking the correct dose and adhering to the correct frequency and correct schedule of drug administration was used to assess self-reported adherence over a period of three days. Selfreported adherence was validated with viral load test. Base line adherence was fixed at ≥95% adherence level. Significant test was fixed at p<0.05. We included 502 participants in the analysis. Median age for men was 42 years (IQR: 38 - 44 years) and women, 36 years (IQR: 30-40 years). Mean duration of therapy was 43 (16-70) months. Effective self-reported adherence was 97.3%. Only age and virologic suppression were significantly associated with adherence to ART. Forgetfullness (43%) was the major reason for non-adherence, while improvement in health condition (40%) was the main facilitator of adherence to the medications. Most participants achieved optimal adherence (≥95%) with high virologic suppression. Strategies to sustain optimal adherence, e.g., the use of fixed dose combinations (FDCs) and comprehensive adherence counselling should be maintained.

  8. A qualitative approach to understand antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence for refugees living in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in Uganda.

    PubMed

    O'Laughlin, Kelli N; Rouhani, Shada A; Kasozi, Julius; Greenwald, Kelsy E; Perkons, Nicholas R; Faustin, Zikama M; Bassett, Ingrid V; Ware, Norma C

    2018-01-01

    Refugees living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa suffer unique hardships that may increase their vulnerability to interruptions in antiretroviral therapy (ART). To investigate refugees' experiences adhering to ART, we conducted inperson interviews with refugees on ART ( n  = 73) and HIV clinic staff ( n  = 4) in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in southwest Uganda from March to July 2011. Three analysts used a conventional content analysis approach to evaluate these data. Refugees described profound motivation to adhere to ART and employed adherence strategies to facilitate success despite the austere setting. However, refugees spoke of specific hardships living in Nakivale that served as barriers to ART adherence, including difficulty accessing clinic when ill, food insecurity, drug stockouts, and violence and unrest in the settlement. For some refugees, need for ART inextricably linked them to the HIV clinic and prevented them from transitioning permanently away from the settlement. By learning about refugees' experiences we can design informed interventions to enhance ART adherence, thus minimizing morbidity and mortality, preventing transmission of HIV, and supporting refugees' abilities to move freely toward repatriation, resettlement or integration in their host country.

  9. Longitudinal Analysis of Adherence to First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence of Treatment Sustainability from an Indian HIV Cohort.

    PubMed

    Shet, Anita; Kumarasamy, N; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; Rewari, Bharath B; Arumugam, Karthika; Antony, Jimmy; De Costa, Ayesha; D'Souza, George

    2016-01-01

    Given the chronic nature of HIV infection and the need for life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART), maintaining long-term optimal adherence is an important strategy for maximizing treatment success. In order to understand better the dynamic nature of adherence behaviors in India where complex cultural and logistic features prevail, we assessed the patterns, trajectories and time-dependent predictors of adherence levels in relation to virological failure among individuals initiating first-line ART in India. Between July 2010 and August 2013, eligible ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals newly initiating first-line ART within the national program at three sites in southern India were enrolled and monitored for two years. ART included zidovudine/stavudine/tenofovir plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. Patients were assessed using clinical, laboratory and adherence parameters. Every three months, medication adherence was measured using pill count, and a structured questionnaire on adherence barriers was administered. Optimal adherence was defined as mean adherence ≥95%. Statistical analysis was performed using a bivariate and a multivariate model of all identified covariates. Adherence trends and determinants were modeled as rate ratios using generalized estimating equation analysis in a Poisson distribution. A total of 599 eligible ART-naïve patients participated in the study, and contributed a total of 921 person-years of observation time. Women constituted 43% and mean CD4 count prior to initiating ART was 192 cells/mm3. Overall mean adherence among all patients was 95.4%. The proportion of patients optimally adherent was 75.6%. Predictors of optimal adherence included older age (≥40 years), high school-level education and beyond, lower drug toxicity-related ART interruption, full disclosure, sense of satisfaction with one's own health and patient's perception of having good access to health-care services. Adherence was inversely proportional to virological

  10. Achieving equity in HIV-treatment outcomes: can social protection improve adolescent ART-adherence in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cluver, L D; Toska, E; Orkin, F M; Meinck, F; Hodes, R; Yakubovich, A R; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Low ART-adherence amongst adolescents is associated with morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. Reviews find no effective adolescent adherence-promoting interventions. Social protection has demonstrated benefits for adolescents, and could potentially improve ART-adherence. This study examines associations of 10 social protection provisions with adherence in a large community-based sample of HIV-positive adolescents. All 10-19-year-olds ever ART-initiated in 53 government healthcare facilities in a health district of South Africa's Eastern Cape were traced and interviewed in 2014-2015 (n = 1175 eligible). About 90% of the eligible sample was included (n = 1059). Social protection provisions were "cash/cash in kind": government cash transfers, food security, school fees/materials, school feeding, clothing; and "care": HIV support group, sports groups, choir/art groups, positive parenting and parental supervision/monitoring. Analyses used multivariate regression, interaction and marginal effects models in SPSS and STATA, controlling for socio-demographic, HIV and healthcare-related covariates. Findings showed 36% self-reported past-week ART non-adherence (<95%). Non-adherence was associated with increased opportunistic infections (p = .005, B .269, SD .09), and increased likelihood of detectable viral load at last test (>75 copies/ml) (aOR 1.98, CI 1.1-3.45). Independent of covariates, three social protection provisions were associated with reduced non-adherence: food provision (aOR .57, CI .42-.76, p < .001); HIV support group attendance (aOR .60, CI .40-.91, p < .02), and high parental/caregiver supervision (aOR .56, CI .43-.73, p < .001). Combination social protection showed additive benefits. With no social protection, non-adherence was 54%, with any one protection 39-41%, with any two social protections, 27-28% and with all three social protections, 18%. These results demonstrate that social protection provisions, particularly combinations of "cash

  11. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV (PLHIV): a cross-sectional survey to measure in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Hansana, Visanou; Sanchaisuriya, Pattara; Durham, Jo; Sychareun, Vanphanom; Chaleunvong, Kongmany; Boonyaleepun, Suwanna; Schelp, Frank Peter

    2013-06-28

    Since 2001, antiretroviral therapy (ART) for people living with HIV (PLHIV) has been available in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). A key factor in the effectiveness of ART is good adherence to the prescribed regimen for both individual well-being and public health. Poor adherence can contribute to the emergence of drug resistant strains of the virus and transmission during risky behaviors. Increased access to ART in low-income country settings has contributed to an interest in treatment adherence in resource-poor contexts. This study aims to investigate the proportion of adherence to ART and identify possible factors related to non-adherence to ART among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Lao PDR. A cross-sectional study was conducted with adults living with HIV receiving free ART at Setthathirath hospital in the capital Vientiane and Savannakhet provincial hospitals from June to November 2011. Three hundred and forty six PLHIV were interviewed using an anonymous questionnaire. The estimation of the adherence rate was based on the information provided by the PLHIV about the intake of medicine during the previous three days. The statistical software Epidata 3.1 and Stata 10.1 were used for data analysis. Frequencies and distribution of each variable were calculated by conventional statistical methods. The chi square test, Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression were used for bivariate analyses. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the predictors of non-adherence to ART. A p-value < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Of a total of 346 patients, 60% reported more than 95% adherence to ART. Reasons for not taking medicine as required were being busy (97.0%), and being forgetful (62.2%). In the multivariate analysis, educational level at secondary school (OR=3.7, 95% CI:1.3-10.1, p=0.012); illicit drug use (OR=16.1, 95% CI:1.9-128.3, p=0.011); dislike exercise (OR=0.6, 95% CI:0.4-0.9, p=0.028), and

  12. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Turkey: Results from the ACTHIV-IST Study Group.

    PubMed

    Yildiz Sevgi, Dilek; Gunduz, Alper; Altuntas Aydin, Ozlem; Mete, Bilgul; Sargin, Fatma; Kumbasar Karaosmanoglu, Hayat; Uzun, Nuray; Yemisen, Mucahit; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Tabak, Fehmi

    2017-12-01

    Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for optimizing the management of HIV infection. The aim of this study is to explore ART adherence rates in Turkey. Included in this study were a total of 263 HIV-infected patients followed up by the ACTHIV-IST (ACTion against HIV in Istanbul) Study Group affiliated with four tertiary hospitals. The study population included patients 18 years of age or older who were on ART for over 12 months. Adherence was assessed by the medication possession ratio (MPR) calculated for each patient using data (a list of all drugs dispensed within the previous year for that patient) obtained from pharmacy medication records. In addition, patients completed a self-report questionnaire addressing missed doses and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) adherence questionnaire. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty. Patient ages ranged from 19 to 71 years. Two hundred and thirty-one patients were male (88%). Two hundred and twenty-four patients (85%) had optimal adherence (MPR ≥95%). During the course of ART, 236 patients (90%) reported no missed doses in the past 4 days of their treatment, whereas 206 patients (78%) reported no missed doses in the past month. Simply forgetting was the most common reason for nonadherence. MPR was associated with virologic rebound. Major factors affecting adherence were being female, taking antituberculosis drugs, having an opportunistic infection, being able to take all or most of the medication as directed, and being aware of the need to take medication exactly as instructed to prevent the development of drug resistance. Adherence to ART measured by MPR and self-report surveys is relatively high in Turkey when compared with other countries, which probably led to high ART success rates.

  13. Feasibility, Acceptability and Preliminary Efficacy of an Online Peer-to-Peer Social Support ART Adherence Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Keith J.; Oakes, J. Michael; Rosser, B.R. Simon; Danilenko, Gene; Vezina, Heather; Amico, K. Rivet; Williams, Mark L.; Simoni, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the results of an online social support intervention, called “Thrive With Me” (TWM), to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. HIV-positive gay or bisexually-identified men self-reporting imperfect ART adherence in the past month were randomized to receive usual care (n=57) or the eight-week TWM intervention (n=67). Self-reported ART outcome measures (0–100% in the past month) were collected at baseline, post-intervention, and 1-month follow-up. Follow-up assessment completion rate was 90%. Participants rated (1–7 scale) the intervention high in information and system quality and overall satisfaction (Means≥5.0). The intervention showed modest effects for the overall sample. However, among current drug-using participants, the TWM (v. Control) group reported significantly higher overall ART adherence (90.1% v. 57.5% at follow-up; difference=31.1, p=.02) and ART taken correctly with food (81.6% v. 55.7% at follow-up; difference=47.9, p=.01). The TWM intervention appeared feasible to implement, acceptable to users, and demonstrated greatest benefits for current drug users. PMID:23553347

  14. Interventions for Enhancing Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART): A Systematic Review of High Quality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramalingam, Bhairavi; Navarro, Tamara; Hobson, Nicholas; Keepanasseril, Arun; Wilczynski, Nancy J.; Haynes, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to review the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) from studies included in a recent Cochrane review that reported a clinical and an adherence outcome, with at least 80% follow-up for 6 months or more. Data were extracted independently and in duplicate, with an adjudicator for disagreements. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Of 182 relevant studies in the Cochrane review, 49 were related to ART. Statistical pooling was not warranted due to heterogeneity in interventions, participants, treatments, adherence measures and outcomes. Many studies had high risk of bias in elements of design and outcome ascertainment. Only 10 studies improved both adherence and clinical outcomes. These used the following interventions: adherence counselling (two studies); a once-daily regimen (compared to twice daily); text messaging; web-based cognitive behavioral intervention; face-to-face multi-session intensive behavioral interventions (two studies); contingency management; modified directly observed therapy; and nurse-delivered home visits combined with telephone calls. Patient-related adherence interventions were the most frequently tested. Uniform adherence measures and higher quality studies of younger populations are encouraged. PMID:25825938

  15. Alcohol Use Disorders Negatively Influence Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Enrico G.; Weikum, Damian; Vagenas, Panagiotis; Copenhaver, Michael M.; Gonzales, Pedro; Peinado, Jesus; Lama, Javier R.; Sanchez, Jorge; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective As international guidelines increase access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally, ART adherence becomes increasingly important to achieve HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) goals. In the concentrated HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgendered women (TGW) in Lima, Peru, the independent correlates of ART non-adherence were examined to inform treatment intervention priorities. Design Cross sectional survey of HIV-infected MSM and TGW who are engaged in clinical care in Lima, Peru. Methods From June to August 2012, 302 HIV-infected Peruvian MSM/TGW from three clinical care sites were recruited using convenience sampling to participate in a cross-sectional computer-assisted adherence survey. Several standardized screening measures associated with ART non-adherence were examined in order to determine the independent correlates of optimal (≥90%) and perfect (100%) adherence, which were assessed using logistic regression. Results Of the 302 participants recruited, 263 (87.1%) were prescribed ART. Among those prescribed ART, 229 (87.1%) reported optimal and 146 (55.5%) reported perfect adherence. The prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD; 43.2%), alcohol dependence (5.3%), recent drug use (6.0%) and depression (44.5%) was high and most participants had some evidence of neurocognitive impairment. Meeting criteria for having an AUD and depression were collinear (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, having an AUD was inversely related and the only independent correlate of optimal (AOR=0.427; 95% CI=0.187–0.976) and perfect (AOR=0.552; 95% CI=0.327–0.930) ART adherence. Conclusions AUDs are highly prevalent among Peruvian HIV-infected MSM and contribute significantly to ART non-adherence. These findings support the need for screening and treating underlying AUDs. In order to meet HIV TasP goals, evidence-based strategies targeting AUDs are likely to directly improve ART adherence and indirectly improve overall individual health

  16. Pilot RCT of bidirectional text messaging for ART adherence among nonurban substance users with HIV.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Dillingham, Rebecca A; Hettema, Jennifer E; Conaway, Mark; Freeman, Jason; Reynolds, George; Hosseinbor, Sharzad

    2015-12-01

    This pilot study tested the preliminary efficacy of a theory-based bidirectional text messaging intervention (TEXT) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence, missed care visits, and substance use among people with HIV. Participants with recent substance use and ART nonadherence from 2 nonurban HIV clinics were randomized to TEXT or to usual care (UC). The TEXT intervention included daily queries of ART adherence, mood, and substance use. The system sent contingent intervention messages created by participants for reports of adherence/nonadherence, good mood/poor mood, and no substance use/use. Assessments were at preintervention, postintervention, and 3-month postintervention follow-up. Objective primary outcomes were adherence, measured by past 3-month pharmacy refill rate, and proportion of missed visits (PMV), measured by medical records. The rate of substance-using days from the timeline follow-back was a secondary outcome. Sixty-three patients participated, with 33 randomized to TEXT and 30 to UC. At preintervention, adherence was 64.0%, PMV was 26.9%, and proportion of days using substances was 53.0%. At postintervention, adherence in the TEXT condition improved from 66% to 85%, compared with 62% to 71% in UC participants (p = .04). PMV improved from 23% to 9% for TEXT participants and 31% to 28% in UC participants (p = .12). There were no significant differences between conditions in substance-using days at postintervention. At 3-month follow-up, differences were not significant. Personalized bidirectional text messaging improved adherence and shows promise to improve visit attendance, but did not reduce substance using days. This intervention merits further testing and may be cost-efficient given its automation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Creating Effective Mobile Phone Apps to Optimize Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: Perspectives From Stimulant-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Dawit; Danh, Thu; Baker, Jason V; Carrico, Adam W

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of stimulant drugs among men who have sex with men (MSM) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with decreased odds of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and elevated risk of forward HIV transmission. Advancing tailored and innovative mobile phone–based ART adherence app interventions for stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM requires greater understanding of their needs and preferences in this emerging area. Objective The purpose of this study is to (1) assess reasons that stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM download and sustain their use of mobile phone apps in general, and (2) obtain feedback on features and functions that these men prefer in a mobile phone app to optimize their ART adherence. Methods Focus groups were conducted with stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM (24-57 years of age; mostly non-Hispanic white; 42% once a week or more frequent stimulant drug use) in San Francisco and Minneapolis. Our aim was to explore the mobile phone app features and functions that they considered when deciding to download and sustain their use of general apps over time, as well as specific features and functions that they would like to see incorporated into an ART adherence mobile app. Focus groups were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied to transcripts using line-by-line open coding and organizing codes into meaningful themes. Results Men reported that they currently had a variety of health and wellness, social media and networking, gaming and entertainment, and utility apps on their mobile phones. Downloading apps to their mobile phones was influenced by the cost of the app, recommendations by a trusted source, and the time it takes to download. In addition, downloading and sustained use of apps was more likely to occur when men had control over most features of the app and apps were perceived to be useful, engaging, secure, and credible. Participants suggested that ART adherence mobile phone apps include

  18. Creating Effective Mobile Phone Apps to Optimize Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: Perspectives From Stimulant-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith J; Alemu, Dawit; Danh, Thu; Baker, Jason V; Carrico, Adam W

    2016-04-15

    The use of stimulant drugs among men who have sex with men (MSM) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with decreased odds of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and elevated risk of forward HIV transmission. Advancing tailored and innovative mobile phone-based ART adherence app interventions for stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM requires greater understanding of their needs and preferences in this emerging area. The purpose of this study is to (1) assess reasons that stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM download and sustain their use of mobile phone apps in general, and (2) obtain feedback on features and functions that these men prefer in a mobile phone app to optimize their ART adherence. Focus groups were conducted with stimulant-using HIV-positive MSM (24-57 years of age; mostly non-Hispanic white; 42% once a week or more frequent stimulant drug use) in San Francisco and Minneapolis. Our aim was to explore the mobile phone app features and functions that they considered when deciding to download and sustain their use of general apps over time, as well as specific features and functions that they would like to see incorporated into an ART adherence mobile app. Focus groups were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied to transcripts using line-by-line open coding and organizing codes into meaningful themes. Men reported that they currently had a variety of health and wellness, social media and networking, gaming and entertainment, and utility apps on their mobile phones. Downloading apps to their mobile phones was influenced by the cost of the app, recommendations by a trusted source, and the time it takes to download. In addition, downloading and sustained use of apps was more likely to occur when men had control over most features of the app and apps were perceived to be useful, engaging, secure, and credible. Participants suggested that ART adherence mobile phone apps include social networking features, connections

  19. Mechanism of Change in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Body Image and Self-Care on ART Adherence Among Sexual Minority Men Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Kalina M; Nogg, Kelsey A; Safren, Steven A; Blashill, Aaron J

    2018-05-11

    Body image disturbance is a common problem reported among sexual minority men living with HIV, and is associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Recently, a novel integrated intervention (cognitive behavioral therapy for body image and self-care; CBT-BISC) was developed and pilot tested to simultaneously improve body image and ART adherence in this population. Although CBT-BISC has demonstrated preliminary efficacy in improving ART adherence, the mechanisms of change are unknown. Utilizing data from a two-armed randomized controlled trial (N = 44 sexual minority men living with HIV), comparing CBT-BISC to an enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) condition, sequential process mediation via latent difference scores was assessed, with changes in body image disturbance entered as the mechanism between treatment condition and changes in ART adherence. Participants assigned to CBT-BISC reported statistically significant reductions in body image disturbance post-intervention, which subsequently predicted changes in ART adherence from post-intervention to long term follow-up (b = 20.01, SE = 9.11, t = 2.19, p = 0.028). One pathway in which CBT-BISC positively impacts ART adherence is through reductions in body image disturbance. Body image disturbance represents one, of likely several, mechanism that prospectively predicts ART adherence among sexual minority men living with HIV.

  20. Doing patient-centredness versus achieving public health targets: A critical review of interactional dilemmas in ART adherence support.

    PubMed

    de Kok, B C; Widdicombe, S; Pilnick, A; Laurier, E

    2018-05-01

    Anti-retroviral Therapy (ART) transformed HIV into a chronic disease but its individual and public health benefits depend on high levels of adherence. The large and rising number of people on ART, now also used as prevention, puts considerable strain on health systems and providers in low and middle as well as high-income countries, which are our focus here. Delivering effective adherence support is thus crucial but challenging, especially given the promotion of patient-centredness and shared decision making in HIV care. To illuminate the complexities of ART adherence support delivered in and through clinical encounters, we conducted a multi-disciplinary interpretative literature review. We reviewed and synthesized 82 papers published post 1997 (when ART was introduced) belonging to three bodies of literature: public health and psychological studies of ART communication; anthropological and sociological studies of ART; and conversation analytic studies of patient-centredness and shared decision-making. We propose three inter-related tensions which make patient-centredness particularly complex in this infectious disease context: achieving trust versus probing about adherence; patient-centredness versus reaching public health targets; and empowerment versus responsibilisation as 'therapeutic citizens'. However, there is a dearth of evidence concerning how precisely ART providers implement patient-centredness, shared-decision making in practice, and enact trust and therapeutic citizenship. We show how conversation analysis could lead to new, actionable insights in this respect. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Depression Alleviation on ART Adherence and HIV Clinic Attendance in Uganda, and the Mediating Roles of Self-Efficacy and Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Glenn J.; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie; Robinson, Eric; Ngo, Victoria K.; Glick, Peter; Mukasa, Barbara; Musisi, Seggane; Akena, Dickens

    2016-01-01

    With depression known to impede HIV care adherence and retention, we examined whether depression alleviation improves these disease management behaviors. A sample of 1028 depressed HIV clients in Uganda enrolled in a cluster randomized controlled trial of two depression care models, and were surveyed over 12 months. Serial regression analyses examined whether depression alleviation was associated with self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and clinic attendance at month 12, and whether these relationships were mediated by self-efficacy and motivation. Among those with major depression, depression alleviation was associated with better ART adherence and clinic attendance at month 12; these relationships were fully mediated by self-efficacy at month 12, while adherence motivation partially mediated the relationship between depression alleviation and ART adherence. When both mediators were entered simultaneously, only self-efficacy was a significant predictor and still fully mediated the relationship between depression alleviation and adherence. These findings suggest that depression alleviation benefits both ART adherence and clinic attendance, in large part through improved confidence and motivation to engage in these disease management behaviors. PMID:27438460

  2. Effects of Depression Alleviation on ART Adherence and HIV Clinic Attendance in Uganda, and the Mediating Roles of Self-Efficacy and Motivation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn J; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie; Robinson, Eric; Ngo, Victoria K; Glick, Peter; Mukasa, Barbara; Musisi, Seggane; Akena, Dickens

    2017-06-01

    With depression known to impede HIV care adherence and retention, we examined whether depression alleviation improves these disease management behaviors. A sample of 1028 depressed HIV clients in Uganda enrolled in a cluster randomized controlled trial of two depression care models, and were surveyed over 12 months. Serial regression analyses examined whether depression alleviation was associated with self-reported antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and clinic attendance at month 12, and whether these relationships were mediated by self-efficacy and motivation. Among those with major depression, depression alleviation was associated with better ART adherence and clinic attendance at month 12; these relationships were fully mediated by self-efficacy at month 12, while adherence motivation partially mediated the relationship between depression alleviation and ART adherence. When both mediators were entered simultaneously, only self-efficacy was a significant predictor and still fully mediated the relationship between depression alleviation and adherence. These findings suggest that depression alleviation benefits both ART adherence and clinic attendance, in large part through improved confidence and motivation to engage in these disease management behaviors.

  3. Concomitant herbal medicine and Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) use among HIV patients in Western Uganda: a cross-sectional analysis of magnitude and patterns of use, associated factors and impact on ART adherence.

    PubMed

    Lubinga, S J; Kintu, A; Atuhaire, J; Asiimwe, S

    2012-01-01

    Use of herbal medicines among patients receiving Anti-retroviral Therapy (ART) remains by far an uncharacterised phenomenon in Africa and Uganda specifically. We evaluated the use of herbal medicines among patients on ART at the HIV clinic of Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH), examined factors associated with their concomitant use and their impact on ART adherence. This was a cross-sectional study among 334 systematically sampled patients receiving ART at the HIV clinic of MRRH from February to April 2010. We collected data on patient demographics, clinical characteristics, perceptions of quality of care received, self-perceived health status, information on ART received, herbal medicines use and ART adherence. Study outcomes were concomitant herbal medicine and ART use, and ART adherence. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were conducted using Stata10.0. Close to half, 155 (46.4%) reported concomitant herbal medicines and ART use, with 133 (39.8%) using herbal medicines at least once daily. Most (71.6%) used herbal medicines to treat HIV-related symptoms. A majority (92.3%) reported that the doctors were unaware of their use of herbal medicines, 68.5% citing its minimal importance to the attending physician. Most frequently used herbs were Aloe vera (25%) and Vernonia amygdalina (21%). Time since start of ART (OR 1.14 95% CI: 1.01-1.28, for each one year increase), number of ART side effects reported (≥3 vs.≤1, OR 2.20 95% CI 1.13-4.26) and self-perceived health status (Good vs. Poor, OR 0.31 95% CI 0.12-0.79) were independently associated with concomitant herbal medicine and ART use. Concomitant herbal medicine and ART use was not associated with poor ART adherence (OR 0.85 95% CI 0.47-1.53). There is widespread concomitant herbal medicines and ART use among our patients, with no association to poor ART adherence. Patients appear to use these therapies to complement as opposed to substituting ART.

  4. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia: influence of demographic characteristics and social surroundings of patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around 70% of those living with HIV in need of treatment accessed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia by 2009. However, sustaining high levels of adherence to ART is a challenge. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors associated with ART adherence during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia. Methods This is a field based observational longitudinal study in Mumbwa district, which is located 150 km west of Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. Treatment naive patients aged over 15 years, who initiated treatment during September-November 2010, were enrolled. Patients were interviewed at the initiation and six weeks later. The treatment adherence was measured according to self-reporting by the patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictive factors associated with the adherence. Results Of 157 patients, 59.9% were fully adherent to the treatment six weeks after starting ART. According to the multivariable analysis, full adherence was associated with being female [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 3.3; 95% Confidence interval (CI), 1.2-8.9], having a spouse who were also on ART (AOR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.5-13.1), and experience of food insufficiency in the previous 30 days (AOR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.8-13.8). Some of the most common reasons for missed doses were long distance to health facilities (n = 21, 53.8%), food insufficiency (n = 20, 51.3%), and being busy with other activities such as work (n = 15, 38.5%). Conclusions The treatment adherence continues to be a significant challenge in rural Zambia. Social supports from spouses and people on ART could facilitate their treatment adherence. This is likely to require attention by ART services in the future, focusing on different social influences on male and female in rural Zambia. In addition, poverty reduction strategies may help to reinforce adherence to ART and could mitigate the influence of HIV infection for poor patients and those who fall into poverty after

  5. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors.

  6. Preliminary Findings on the Association Between Symptoms of Depression and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Individuals Born Inside Versus Outside of Canada.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena; Coroiu, Adina; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Alexandrov, Eugene; Lafreniere, Kathryn D

    2016-01-01

    For optimal health, people living with HIV (PLWH) need to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored the relationship between symptoms of depression and ART adherence for PLWH born inside versus outside of Canada. PLWH taking ART (N = 57) completed self-assessments of depression and adherence to ART. Adherence rates did not differ significantly for PLWH who were born outside (66.7% were ≥95% adherent) versus inside Canada (51.6% were ≥95% adherent), but the relationship between symptoms of depression and ART adherence depended on the country of birth: for individuals born in Canada, depression was associated with lower ART adherence (β = -.21, p = .005, 95% confidence interval -.35 to -.07); for PLWH born outside of Canada there was no association between symptoms of depression and ART adherence. Symptoms of depression may not universally affect ART adherence; country of birth may be one critical variable impacting this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression longitudinally mediates the association of appearance concerns to ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2014-02-01

    Appearance concerns are common among HIV-infected individuals, and previous cross-sectional and longitudinal data indicate that these concerns are associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) non-adherence. However, to date, no known prospective data have explored the mechanism behind this relationship. Thus, the aim of the current study was to test depression severity as a prospective mediator of the relationship between appearance concerns and ART non-adherence in HIV-infected individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals with a history of IDU who participated in a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence. Clinician-administered measures of depression severity and appearance concerns, along with electronic monitoring of ART non-adherence were included. Data were analyzed using longitudinal linear mixed-level modeling, and mediation was tested via the Monte Carlo Method of Assessing Mediation. Appearance concerns were predictive of depression severity, γ = .31, SE = .076, 95 % CI [.16, .46], t = 4.1, p = .0001, and depression severity was predictive of ART non-adherence, γ = 3.3, SE = 1.3, 95 % CI [.8, 5.8], t = 2.6, p = .01. The effect of appearance concerns on ART non-adherence, however, was significantly mediated by depression severity, γ = 1.02, 95 % CI [.21, 2.1]. Appearance concerns are associated with depression severity, which in turn is associated with ART non-adherence. Integrative interventions addressing appearance concerns, depression and ART adherence are needed, as this is one potential pathway towards worse health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals.

  8. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence.

  9. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Wasti, Sharada P; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = <0.001), being female (OR = 6.91, p = 0.001), being illiterate (OR = 4.58, p = 0.015), side-effects (OR = 6.04, p = 0.025), ART started ≤24 months (OR = 3.18, p = 0.009), travel time to hospital >1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens

  10. Substance use and adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS receiving cART in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    De Boni, Raquel B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Cesar, Carina; Cortés, Claudia; Padgett, Denis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Duda, Stephany N.; McGowan, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study describes substance use prevalence and its association with cART adherence among 3343 individuals receiving care at HIV clinics in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru. A rapid screening tool evaluated self-reported 7-day recall of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine use, and missed cART doses. Overall, 29.3% individuals reported having ≥ 1 alcoholic drinks, 5.0% reported any illicit drug use and 17.0% reported missed cART doses. In the logistic regression model, compared to no substance use, alcohol use (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–3.05), illicit drug use (AOR=3.57, 95% CI: 2.02–6.30), and using both alcohol and illicit drugs (AOR=4.98, 95% CI: 3.19–7.79) were associated with missed cART doses. The associations between substance use and likelihood of missing cART doses point to the need of targeting alcohol and illicit drug use to improve adherence among people living with HIV in Latin America. PMID:27091028

  11. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among children living with HIV in South India

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, K; Ekstrand, ML; Heylen, E; Sanjeeva, GN; Shet, A

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to ART, fundamental to treatment success, has been poorly studied in India. Caregivers of children attending HIV clinics in southern India were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Adherence was assessed using a visual analogue scale representing past-month adherence and treatment interruptions >48 hours during the past 3 months. Clinical features, correlates of adherence and HIV-1 viral-load were documented. Based on caregiver reports, 90.9% of the children were optimally adherent. In multivariable analysis, experiencing ART-related adverse effects was significantly associated with suboptimal adherence (p=0.01). The proportion of children who experienced virological failure was 16.5%. Virological failure was not linked to suboptimal adherence. Factors influencing virological failure included running out of medications (p=0.002) and the child refusing to take medications (p=0.01). Inclusion of drugs with better safety profiles and improved access to care could further enhance outcomes. PMID:26443264

  12. Knowledge, perception about antiretroviral therapy (ART) and prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) and adherence to ART among HIV positive women in the Ashanti Region, Ghana: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Daniel; Kwapong, Golda Dokuaa; Agyei-Baffour, Peter

    2013-01-22

    Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT) has been identified as the greatest means of HIV infection among children. Adherence to antiretroviral drugs is necessary to prevent drug resistance and MTCT of HIV among HIV positive women. However, there is a gap in clients' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission (PMTCT) which influence their decision to adhere to ART. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional employing both qualitative and quantitative methods. The study involved 229 HIV positive women in reproductive age (18 - 49 years) and had been on ART for at least six months. Fourteen health workers were also included in the qualitative study. Respondents were selected from three ART centers in the Kumasi Metropolis through systematic random sampling from August to November 2011. HIV positive women who had consistently missed two or more ART appointments within the previous two months were classified as defaulters. Data was analyzed with SPSS 19 and STATA 11. Logistic regression was run to assess the odds ratios at 95% confidence level. The ART defaulter rate was 27% and clients had good knowledge about ART and PMTCT. More than 90% of the HIV positive women had inadequate knowledge about ART and PMTCT and these women were more likely to default ART (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.89, 6.21). The educational background of HIV positive women did not have significant influence on their knowledge of ART and PMTCT. Mothers, knowledge and understanding of ART and PMTCT could influence their adherence to ART. Educational interventions which target the understanding of both the literate and illiterate women in society are necessary to develop positive behaviors and enhance adherence to ART.

  13. Non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected adults in Mon State of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Aye, Win Lei; Puckpinyo, Apa; Peltzer, Karl

    2017-05-05

    The provision of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) was started in Myanmar in 2005 in collaboration with the National AIDS Program and the private sector. Successful clinical management of HIV-infected patients is subject to optimal adherence. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of adherence to ART and identify factors associated with non-adherence to ART among HIV infected adults registered in a private sector setting in Mon State, Myanmar. This cross-sectional study was conducted with adults living with HIV receiving ART at an HIV outpatient clinic between April and May 2016. A total of three hundred People Living with HIV(PLHIV) were interviewed using a pretested and structured questionnaire. The 30 days Visual Analog Scale (VAS) adherence instrument was used to assess the level of adherence. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence to ART. Among 300 patients (male 37.7% and female 62.3%, with a mean age of 41.3 years, standard deviation 8.7), 84% reported ≥95% adherence to ART in the past month. Among 16% of those reporting non-adherence, major reasons for skipping the medication were being busy (23%), being away from home (17.7%) and being forgetful (12.3%). In multivariable logistic rgeression, low behavioural skills on ART adherence (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.94), tobacco use (OR = 3.22, 95% CI:1.28-8.12), having disclosed their HIV status (OR = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01-0.69), having a partner who was not on ART (OR = 4.25, 95% CI: 1.70-10.64) and among men, having erectile dysfunction (OR = 15.14, 95% CI: 1.41-162.66) were significant associated with ART non-adherence. Non-adherence to ART was associated with individual moderating factors and behavioral skills. Priority measures such as addressing risk behaviour and behavioural change communication tailored to individual patients' lifestyles requires comprehensive interventions to improve adherence.

  14. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p =  0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = <0.001), being female (OR = 6.91, p = 0.001), being illiterate (OR = 4.58, p = 0.015), side-effects (OR = 6.04, p = 0.025), ART started ≤24 months (OR = 3.18, p = 0.009), travel time to hospital >1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Conclusion Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear

  15. Incomplete adherence among treatment-experienced adults on antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A.; Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Menten, Joris; Torpey, Kwasi; van Praag, Eric; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Colebunders, Robert; Auld, Andrew F.; Agolory, Simon; Kaplan, Jonathan E.; Mulenga, Modest; Kwesigabo, Gideon P.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Bangsberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence across different programmes and examine the relationship between individual and programme characteristics and incomplete adherence among ART clients in sub-Saharan Africa. Design A cross-sectional study. Methods Systematically selected ART clients (≥18 years; on ART ≥6 months) attending 18 facilities in three countries (250 clients/facility) were interviewed. Client self-reports (3-day, 30-day, Case Index ≥48 consecutive hours of missed ART), healthcare provider estimates and the pharmacy medication possession ratio (MPR) were used to estimate ART adherence. Participants from two facilities per country underwent HIV RNA testing. Optimal adherence measures were selected on the basis of degree of association with concurrent HIV RNA dichotomized at less than or greater/equal to 1000 copies/ml. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for site-level clustering, assessed associations between incomplete adherence and individual and programme factors. Results A total of 4489 participants were included, of whom 1498 underwent HIV RNA testing. Nonadherence ranged from 3.2% missing at least 48 consecutive hours to 40.1% having an MPR of less than 90%. The percentage with HIV RNA at least 1000 copies/ml ranged from 7.2 to 17.2% across study sites (mean = 9.9%). Having at least 48 consecutive hours of missed ART was the adherence measure most strongly related to virologic failure. Factors significantly related to incomplete adherence included visiting a traditional healer, screening positive for alcohol abuse, experiencing more HIV symptoms, having an ART regimen without nevirapine and greater levels of internalized stigma. Conclusion Results support more in-depth investigations of the role of traditional healers, and the development of interventions to address alcohol abuse and internalized stigma among treatment-experienced adult ART patients. PMID:25686684

  16. Association of Depressive Symptoms with Lapses in Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among People Living with HIV: A Test of an Indirect Pathway.

    PubMed

    Babowitch, Jacklyn D; Sheinfil, Alan Z; Woolf-King, Sarah E; Vanable, Peter A; Sweeney, Shannon M

    2018-03-23

    Viral suppression, a critical component of HIV care, is more likely when individuals initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) early in disease progression and maintain optimal levels of adherence to ART regimens. Although several studies have documented the negative association of depressive symptoms with ART adherence, less is known about how depressed mood relates to intentional versus unintentional lapses in adherence as well as the mechanisms underlying this association. The purpose of the current study was to examine the association of depressive symptoms with ART adherence, assessed as a multidimensional construct. Secondarily, this study conducted preliminary indirect path models to determine if medication self-efficacy could explain the depressed mood-adherence relationship. Depressive symptoms were not associated with 95% ART taken, self-reported viral load, deliberate adjustments to ART regimens or skipped ART doses. However, the indirect association of depressive symptoms via decrements in medication self-efficacy was significant for 95% ART taken, self-reported viral load and skipped ART doses, but not deliberate changes to ART regimens. In this sample of HIV-positive outpatients, there is evidence to support medication self-efficacy as a potential mechanism underlying the association between depressive symptoms and ART adherence. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to formally examine medication taking self-efficacy as a mediator.

  17. Association between Perceived Discrimination in Healthcare Settings and HIV Medication Adherence: Mediating Psychosocial Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent; Rogers, Anna Joy; Rice, Whitney S; Atkins, Ghislaine C; Cohen, Mardge H; Wilson, Tracey E; Adimora, Adaora A; Merenstein, Daniel; Adedimeji, Adebola; Wentz, Eryka L; Ofotokun, Igho; Metsch, Lisa; Tien, Phyllis C; Johnson, Mallory O; Turan, Janet M; Weiser, Sheri D

    2017-12-01

    There is insufficient research on the impact of perceived discrimination in healthcare settings on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly among women living with HIV, and even less is known about psychosocial mechanisms that may mediate this association. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted in a sample of 1356 diverse women living with HIV enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a multi-center cohort study. Indirect effects analysis with bootstrapping was used to examine the potential mediating roles of internalized stigma and depressive symptoms in the association between perceived discrimination in healthcare settings and ART adherence. Perceived discrimination in healthcare settings was negatively associated with optimal (95% or better) ART adherence (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.81, p = 0.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.68, 0.97]). Furthermore, internalization of stigma and depressive symptoms mediated the perceived discrimination-adherence association: Serial mediation analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of perceived discrimination in healthcare settings on ART adherence, first through internalized HIV stigma, and then through depressive symptoms (B = - 0.08, SE = 0.02, 95% CI [- 0.12, - 0.04]). Perceiving discrimination in healthcare settings may contribute to internalization of HIV-related stigma, which in turn may lead to depressive symptoms, with downstream adverse effects on ART adherence among women. These findings can guide the design of interventions to reduce discrimination in healthcare settings, as well as interventions targeting psychosocial mechanisms that may impact the ability of women living with HIV to adhere to ART regimens.

  18. The Role of HIV Stigma in ART Adherence and Quality of Life Among Rural Women Living with HIV in India.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Maria L; Heylen, Elsa; Mazur, Amanda; Steward, Wayne T; Carpenter, Catherine; Yadav, Kartik; Sinha, Sanjeev; Nyamathi, Adey

    2018-05-22

    HIV stigma continues to be a barrier to physical and mental health among people living with HIV globally, especially in vulnerable populations. We examined how stigma is associated with health outcomes and quality of life among rural women living with HIV in South India (N = 600). Interviewer-administered measures assessed multiple dimensions of stigma, as well as loneliness, social support, ART adherence, time since diagnosis, and quality of life. Internalized stigma and a lack of social support were associated with a lower quality of life, while the association between internalized stigma and adherence was mediated by the use of stigma-avoidant coping strategies, suggesting that keeping one's diagnosis a secret may make it more difficult to take one's medications. These findings suggest that these women constitute a vulnerable population who need additional services to optimize their health and who might benefit from peer support interventions and stigma-reduction programs for family and community members.

  19. Preliminary Evidence for Feasibility, Use, and Acceptability of Individualized Texting for Adherence Building for Antiretroviral Adherence and Substance Use Assessment among HIV-Infected Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Montoya, Jessica L.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Depp, Colin A.; Atkinson, J. Hampton; TMARC Group, The

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility, use, and acceptability of text messages to track methamphetamine use and promote antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence among HIV-infected methamphetamine users was examined. From an ongoing randomized controlled trial, 30-day text response rates of participants assigned to the intervention (individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB), n = 20) were compared to those in the active comparison condition (n = 9). Both groups received daily texts assessing methamphetamine use, and the iTAB group additionally received personalized daily ART adherence reminder texts. Response rate for methamphetamine use texts was 72.9% with methamphetamine use endorsed 14.7% of the time. Text-derived methamphetamine use data was correlated with data from a structured substance use interview covering the same time period (P < 0.05). The iTAB group responded to 69.0% of adherence reminder texts; among those responses, 81.8% endorsed taking ART medication. Standardized feedback questionnaire responses indicated little difficulty with the texts, satisfaction with the study, and beliefs that future text-based interventions would be helpful. Moreover, most participants believed the intervention reduced methamphetamine use and improved adherence. Qualitative feedback regarding the intervention was positive. Future studies will refine and improve iTAB for optimal acceptability and efficacy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01317277. PMID:24078868

  20. Examining the interplay between depression, motivation, and antiretroviral therapy adherence: a social cognitive approach.

    PubMed

    Tatum, A K; Houston, E

    2017-03-01

    A large body of research identifies depressive symptoms as a barrier to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, whereas treatment motivation has been characterized as a facilitator. There is evidence, however, that these patterns may not hold for some ART patients despite the widespread use of motivational techniques aimed at promoting adherence. Little is known about how the interplay between different levels of depressive symptoms and variations in the types and levels of motivation may influence ART adherence. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms, two types of motivation, and adherence, with self-efficacy as a mediator. The sample consisted of 121 ART patients who reported various levels of depressive symptoms (mean age = 41 years; 84% African-American; and 68% female). Path analysis revealed that self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between the three predictor variables (depressive symptoms, intrinsic motivation, and extrinsic motivation) and adherence, χ 2 (3, N = 121) = .78, RMSEA = .00, SRMR = .02, CFI = 1.00, NNFI = 1.06. Findings suggest that interventions using motivational techniques to build adherence among patients with varying levels of depressive symptoms should address the role of treatment self-efficacy to improve their effectiveness.

  1. Adherence to Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Results From HPTN 052, a Phase III, Multinational Randomized Trial of ART to Prevent HIV-1 Sexual Transmission in Serodiscordant Couples.

    PubMed

    Safren, Steven A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Ou, San-San; McCauley, Marybeth; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Gamble, Theresa; Hoffman, Irving; Celentano, David; Chen, Ying Qing; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-06-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1-infected individuals prevents sexual transmission if viral load is suppressed. Participants were HIV-1-infected partners randomized to early ART (CD4 350-550) in HPTN052 (n = 886, median follow-up = 2.1 years), a clinical trial of early ART to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples at 13 sites in 9 countries. Adherence was assessed through pill count (dichotomized at <95%) and through self-report items. Predictors of adherence were mental health and general health perceptions, substance use, binge drinking, social support, sexual behaviors, and demographics. Viral suppression was defined as HIV plasma viral load <400 copies per milliliter. Adherence counseling and couples' counseling about safer sex were provided. Logistic and linear regression models using generalized estimating equation for repeated measurements were used. Through pill count, 82% of participants were adherent at 1 month and 83.3% at 1 year. Mental health was the only psychosocial variable associated with adherence [pill count, odds ratios (OR) = 1.05, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.00 to 1.11; self-report parameter estimate, OR = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04], although regional differences emerged. Pill count (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.30) and self-report (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.77) adherence were associated with viral suppression. Although adherence was high among individuals in stable relationships taking ART for prevention, mental health and adherence covaried. Assessing and intervening on mental health in the context of promoting adherence to ART as prevention should be explored. Adherence and couples' counseling, feedback about viral suppression, and/or altruism may also help explain the magnitude of adherence observed.

  2. Mobile phone reminders and peer counseling improve adherence and treatment outcomes of patients on ART in Malaysia: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Surajudeen Abiola; Rampal, Lekhraj; Ibrahim, Faisal; Radhakrishnan, Anuradha P; Kadir Shahar, Hayati; Othman, Norlijah

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to treatment remains the cornerstone of long term viral suppression and successful treatment outcomes among patients receiving Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phone reminders and peer counseling in improving adherence and treatment outcomes among HIV positive patients on ART in Malaysia. A single-blind, parallel group RCT conducted in Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia in which 242 adult Malaysian patients were randomized to intervention or control groups. Intervention consisted of a reminder module delivered through SMS and telephone call reminders by trained research assistants for 24 consecutive weeks (starting from date of ART initiation), in addition to adherence counseling at every clinic visit. The length of intended follow up for each patient was 6 months. Data on adherence behavior of patients was collected using specialized, pre-validated Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG) adherence questionnaires. Data on weight, clinical symptoms, CD4 count and viral load tests were also collected. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 22 and R software. Repeated measures ANOVA, Friedman's ANOVA and Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate efficacy of the intervention. The response rate after 6 months follow up was 93%. There were no significant differences at baseline in gender, employment status, income distribution and residential location of respondents between the intervention and control group. After 6 months follow up, the mean adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (95.7; 95% CI: 94.39-96.97) as compared to the control group (87.5; 95% CI: 86.14-88.81). The proportion of respondents who had Good (>95%) adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (92.2%) compared to the control group (54.6%). A significantly lower frequency in missed appointments (14.0% vs 35.5%) (p = 0.001), lower viral load (p = 0.001), higher rise in CD4 count (p = 0.017), lower incidence of

  3. Mobile phone reminders and peer counseling improve adherence and treatment outcomes of patients on ART in Malaysia: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rampal, Lekhraj; Ibrahim, Faisal; Radhakrishnan, Anuradha P.; Kadir Shahar, Hayati; Othman, Norlijah

    2017-01-01

    Background Adherence to treatment remains the cornerstone of long term viral suppression and successful treatment outcomes among patients receiving Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Objective(s) Evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phone reminders and peer counseling in improving adherence and treatment outcomes among HIV positive patients on ART in Malaysia. Methods A single-blind, parallel group RCT conducted in Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia in which 242 adult Malaysian patients were randomized to intervention or control groups. Intervention consisted of a reminder module delivered through SMS and telephone call reminders by trained research assistants for 24 consecutive weeks (starting from date of ART initiation), in addition to adherence counseling at every clinic visit. The length of intended follow up for each patient was 6 months. Data on adherence behavior of patients was collected using specialized, pre-validated Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG) adherence questionnaires. Data on weight, clinical symptoms, CD4 count and viral load tests were also collected. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 22 and R software. Repeated measures ANOVA, Friedman’s ANOVA and Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate efficacy of the intervention. Results The response rate after 6 months follow up was 93%. There were no significant differences at baseline in gender, employment status, income distribution and residential location of respondents between the intervention and control group. After 6 months follow up, the mean adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (95.7; 95% CI: 94.39–96.97) as compared to the control group (87.5; 95% CI: 86.14–88.81). The proportion of respondents who had Good (>95%) adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (92.2%) compared to the control group (54.6%). A significantly lower frequency in missed appointments (14.0% vs 35.5%) (p = 0.001), lower viral load (p = 0.001), higher rise in CD

  4. Perceived effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy, self-rated health and treatment adherence among HIV-positive people who inject drugs in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pui Y; Joseph, Michael A; Des Jarlais, Don C; Uusküla, Anneli

    2018-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in Estonia affects the population of people who inject drugs (PWID) the most, but factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among PWID have not been thoroughly examined in Estonia, with particularly limited data regarding beliefs and attitudes of PWID. The objective of this study was to explore the association between ART adherence and individual beliefs, perceived effectiveness of ART, and self-rated health in particular, in this specific population. The study used baseline survey data from a longitudinal intervention study of HIV prevention among PWID in Estonia, in which 107 HIV-infected participants reported current use of ART. Current adherence was measured through the use of a visual analog scale. Approximately half (49%) of the participants reported optimal (≥95%) adherence. The vast majority (81%) believed in the effectiveness of ART. Less than a quarter of the participants (22%) rated their health as good or very good, and a half (52%) reported average health. Individual beliefs and self-reported health were not associated with ART adherence in both bivariate and multivariable analyses. Participants with problem drinking reported significant suboptimal adherence to ART (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.42, 95% CI 0.19-0.97). Daily injection drug use was also associated with suboptimal adherence (AOR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.91). Problem drinking has not been commonly reported as a factor of suboptimal ART adherence among PWID; further research would be useful to identify the pathways that might be involved.

  5. Understanding Patterns of Social Support and Their Relationship to an ART Adherence Intervention Among Adults in Rural Southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atukunda, Esther C; Musiimenta, Angella; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Wyatt, Monique A; Ashaba, Justus; Ware, Norma C; Haberer, Jessica E

    2017-02-01

    SMS is a widely used technology globally and may also improve ART adherence, yet SMS notifications to social supporters following real-time detection of missed doses showed no clear benefit in a recent pilot trial. We examine the demographic and social-cultural dynamics that may explain this finding. In the trial, 63 HIV-positive individuals initiating ART received a real-time adherence monitor and were randomized to two types of SMS reminder interventions versus a control (no SMS). SMS notifications were also sent to 45 patient-identified social supporters for sustained adherence lapses. Like participants, social supporters were interviewed at enrollment, following their matched participant's adherence lapse and at exit. Social supporters with regular income (RR = 0.27, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with fewer adherence lapses. Instrumental support was associated with fewer adherence lapses only among social supporters who were food secure (RR = 0.58, P = 0.003). Qualitative interview data revealed diverse and complex economic and relationship dynamics, affecting social support. Resource availability in emotionally positive relationships seemingly facilitated helpful support, while limited resources prevented active provision of support for many. Effective social support appeared subject to social supporters' food security, economic stability and a well-functioning social network dependent on trust and supportive disclosure.

  6. The effects of optimism and gratitude on adherence, functioning and mental health following an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Millstein, Rachel A; Celano, Christopher M; Beale, Eleanor E; Beach, Scott R; Suarez, Laura; Belcher, Arianna M; Januzzi, James L; Huffman, Jeff C

    This study examined the effects of optimism and gratitude on self-reported health behavior adherence, physical functioning and emotional well-being after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Among 156 patients, we examined associations between optimism and gratitude measured 2 weeks post-ACS and 6-month outcomes: adherence to medical recommendations, mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL), physical functioning, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Multivariable linear regression models were used, controlling for increasing levels of adjustment. Optimism [β=.11, standard error (S.E.)=.05, P=.038] and gratitude (β=.10, S.E.=.05, P=.027) at 2 weeks were associated with subsequent self-reported adherence to medical recommendations (diet, exercise, medication adherence, stress reduction) at 6 months in fully adjusted models. Two-week optimism and gratitude were associated with improvements in mental HRQoL (optimism: β=.44, S.E.=.13, P=.001; gratitude: β=.33, S.E.=.12, P=.005) and reductions in symptoms of depression (optimism: β=-.11, S.E.=.05, P=.039; gratitude: β=-.10, S.E.=.05, P=.028) and anxiety (optimism: β=-.15, S.E.=.05, P=.004; gratitude: β=-.10, S.E.=.05, P=.034) at 6 months. Optimism and gratitude at 2 weeks post-ACS were associated with higher self-reported adherence and improved emotional well-being 6 months later, independent of negative emotional states. Optimism and gratitude may help recovery from an ACS. Interventions promoting these positive constructs could help improve adherence and well-being. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Barriers and Facilitators of Adherence to Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and Retention in Care among Adult HIV-Positive Patients: A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Bimirew, Mekides A.; Kassie, Desalew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country’s ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Results Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Conclusions Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes

  8. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) <100% and (ii) <95%. Follow-up time started from ART initiation and was censored at 24 months, loss to follow-up, death, treatment switch, or treatment cessation for >14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported <100% adherence and 17% ever reported <95%. Defining the outcome as SubAdh <100%, the rates of SubAdh for the four time intervals were 26%, 17%, 12% and 10%. Sites with an average of >2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence

  9. Where we are now and how we can improve: a qualitative study of practitioners' perspectives on providing ART adherence support in Romania.

    PubMed

    Dima, Alexandra Lelia; Linn, Annemiek J; Schweitzer, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Supporting medication adherence is a priority in HIV care worldwide as low adherence threatens the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment (ART). While evidence on adherence causes and consequences has steadily accumulated, investigating current practice and relevant determinants of practitioners' behaviors has only recently been highlighted as essential for developing effective and sustainable interventions. In Romania, ART adherence is low despite universal access to HIV care, and improving support services is a priority. We report a qualitative exploration of practitioners' experiences and views on ART adherence support, guided by current behavioral theory. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 10 practitioners from six HIV centers, aiming for maximum variation sampling on professional experience, location, and organization type. Questions addressed practitioners' views and experiences on assessing patients' adherence behaviors and determinants, content and format of adherence support, and perceived influences on their capacity to deliver support. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed via template analysis. Results show that adherence support is provided in Romania by trained psychologists in multidisciplinary teams that operate flexibly and perform multiple HIV care activities. Assessment of adherence behaviors and determinants is primarily interview-based, and practitioners use mostly psychotherapeutic techniques and theories with a degree of intervention tailoring. Practitioners' descriptions covered a broad range of common determinants and behavior change techniques, but showed limited use of behavioral theory. Participants also described difficulties to cope with limited resources, and lack of support for managing practical and emotional challenges. Several opportunities for improvement were identified, such as standardizing patient profiling and intervention delivery, conceptualizing and recording active intervention content based on behavioral

  10. Adherence to On-Time ART Drug Pick-Up and Its Association with CD4 Changes and Clinical Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Adults on First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Nigerian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oladele, Edward A; Badru, Titilope; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Oqua, Dorothy; Khamofu, Hadiza; Adebayo, Olufunso; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto Nzapfurundi

    2017-02-01

    Medication adherence is a major determinant of antiretroviral treatment (ART) success. Promptness in medication refill pick-ups may give an indication of medication adherence. This study determined medication refill adherence among HIV positive patients on ART and its association with treatment outcomes in HIV treatment centers in Nigeria. This retrospective multi-center cohort study involved a review of ART refill records for 3534 HIV-positive patients aged 18-60 years who initiated first-line ART between January 2008 and December 2009 and were on therapy for ≥18 months after ART initiation. Drug refill records of these patients for 10 consecutive refill visits after ART initiation were analyzed. The first ten consecutive refill appointment-keeping rates after ART initiation ranged from 64.3 % to 76.1 % which decreased with successive visits. Altogether, 743 (21.1 %) patients were deemed adherent, meaning they picked up their drugs within 7 days of the drug refill appointment date on at least nine out of ten refill visits. The adherent group of patients had a mean CD4 cells increase of 206 ± 6.1 cells/dl after 12 months of ART compared to 186 ± 7.1 cells/dl reported among the nonadherent group (p = 0.0145). The proportion of patients in the adherent category who showed no OIs after 12 months on ART (81 %) was significantly higher when compared to the proportion in the non-adherent category (23.5 %), (p = 0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that the odds of being adherent was 2-3 times more in patients who had a baseline CD4 count of less than 200 cells/dl compared to those with a baseline CD4 of >350 cells/dl. (AOR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.62-3.66). In addition, for patients with baseline CD4 cell count of 201-350 cells/dl, the odds of being adherent was found to be 1.9 compared to those with baseline CD4 of greater than 350 cells/dl (AOR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.27-2.94). Pharmacy refill data can serve as an adherence measure. Adherence to on-time drug

  11. Improving antiretroviral therapy adherence in resource-limited settings at scale: a discussion of interventions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Sabin, Lora; Amico, K Rivet; Orrell, Catherine; Galárraga, Omar; Tsai, Alexander C; Vreeman, Rachel C; Wilson, Ira; Sam-Agudu, Nadia A; Blaschke, Terrence F; Vrijens, Bernard; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Weiser, Sheri D; Lowenthal, Elizabeth; Stirratt, Michael J; Sow, Papa Salif; Thomas, Bruce; Ford, Nathan; Mills, Edward; Lester, Richard; Nachega, Jean B; Bwana, Bosco Mwebesa; Ssewamala, Fred; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Munderi, Paula; Geng, Elvin; Bangsberg, David R

    2017-01-01

    infrastructure and leverage available resources. Those most widely studied and implemented to date involve peer counselling, adherence clubs, and short message service (SMS). Many additional interventions could have an important impact on ART adherence with further development, including standardized counselling through multi-media technology, electronic dose monitoring, decentralized and differentiated models of care, and livelihood interventions. Optimal targeting and tailoring of interventions will require improved adherence measurement. Conclusions : The opportunity exists today to address and resolve many of the challenges to effective ART adherence, so that they do not limit the potential of ART to help bring about the end of AIDS.

  12. Predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV and AIDS at the regional hospital of Sokodé, Togo.

    PubMed

    Yaya, Issifou; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Saka, Bayaki; Patchali, P'Niwè Massoubayo; Wasswa, Peter; Aboubakari, Abdoul-Samadou; N'Dri, Mathias Kouamé; Patassi, Akouda Akessiwe; Kombaté, Koussake; Pitche, Palokinam

    2014-12-19

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is beneficial in reducing the risk of emergence of HIV resistant strains. Adherence to ART among Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is influenced by several factors related to the patient, the medication, and health facilities. In Togo, previous studies on adherence to ART have reported good adherence to ART during the first year of follow-up. However these may hide many disparities dues to cultural specificities which may differ across geographic areas of the country. We sought to determine the level of adherence to ART and document the associated factors among PLWHA at the regional hospital of Sokodé, Togo. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted from May to July 2013 at the regional hospital of Sokodé among 291 PLWHA who had been on ART for at least three months before the study. A total of 291 PLWHA on ART were enrolled in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 37.3 ± 9.3 years and the sex ratio (Male/Female) was 0.4. Among them, 195 (67.0%) were living with their partners and 210 (72.2%) had formal education. Two-thirds (194/291; 66.7%) of the PLWHA interviewed lived in urban areas. The global adherence to ART was 78.4%; the factors associated with ART adherence were: level of education (aOR = 3.54; p = 0.027), alcohol consumption (aOR = 0.43; p = 0.033), ART perception (aOR = 2.90; p = 0.026) and HIV status disclosure to sexual partner (aOR = 7.19; p ≤ 0.001). Although the level of adherence to ART in this study was higher than those reported in some studies in Sub-Saharan Africa, it remains sub-optimal and needs improvement. This may therefore hinder the implementation of efficient interventions related to access to ART services.

  13. Adherence to Drug-Refill Is a Useful Early Warning Indicator of Virologic and Immunologic Failure among HIV Patients on First-Line ART in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    El-Khatib, Ziad; Katzenstein, David; Marrone, Gaetano; Laher, Fatima; Mohapi, Lerato; Petzold, Max; Morris, Lynn; Ekström, Anna Mia

    2011-01-01

    Background Affordable strategies to prevent treatment failure on first-line regimens among HIV patients are essential for the long-term success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. WHO recommends using routinely collected data such as adherence to drug-refill visits as early warning indicators. We examined the association between adherence to drug-refill visits and long-term virologic and immunologic failure among non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) recipients in South Africa. Methods In 2008, 456 patients on NNRTI-based ART for a median of 44 months (range 12–99 months; 1,510 person-years) were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study in Soweto. Charts were reviewed for clinical characteristics before and during ART. Multivariable logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis assessed associations with virologic (two repeated VL>50 copies/ml) and immunologic failure (as defined by WHO). Results After a median of 15 months on ART, 19% (n = 88) and 19% (n = 87) had failed virologically and immunologically respectively. A cumulative adherence of <95% to drug-refill visits was significantly associated with both virologic and immunologic failure (p<0.01). In the final multivariable model, risk factors for virologic failure were incomplete adherence (OR 2.8, 95%CI 1.2–6.7), and previous exposure to single-dose nevirapine or any other antiretrovirals (adj. OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.2–3.9), adjusted for age and sex. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, the virologic failure rate by month 48 was 19% vs. 37% among adherent and non-adherent patients respectively (logrank p value = 0.02). Conclusion One in five failed virologically after a median of 15 months on ART. Adherence to drug-refill visits works as an early warning indicator for both virologic and immunologic failure. PMID:21408071

  14. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Acerini, Carlo L; Wac, Katarzyna; Bang, Peter; Lehwalder, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The "360° GH in Europe" meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany), examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled " Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral ," " Optimizing Patient Management ," and " Managing Transition ," each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient's journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on-going need for innovations.

  15. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nabzdyk, Christoph S; Chun, Maggie; Pradhan, Leena; Logerfo, Frank W

    2011-04-25

    siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96 well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM), or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM) using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell) and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19). Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs.

  16. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). Methods AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM), or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM) using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. Results After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell) and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19). Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. Conclusion This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs. PMID:21518450

  17. In what ways do communities support optimal antiretroviral treatment in Zimbabwe?

    PubMed

    Scott, K; Campbell, C; Madanhire, C; Skovdal, M; Nyamukapa, C; Gregson, S

    2014-12-01

    Little research has been conducted on how pre-existing indigenous community resources, especially social networks, affect the success of externally imposed HIV interventions. Antiretroviral treatment (ART), an externally initiated biomedical intervention, is being rolled out across sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the ways in which community networks are working to facilitate optimal ART access and adherence will enable policymakers to better engage with and bolster these pre-existing resources. We conducted 67 interviews and eight focus group discussions with 127 people from three key population groups in Manicaland, eastern Zimbabwe: healthcare workers, adults on ART and carers of children on ART. We also observed over 100 h of HIV treatment sites at local clinics and hospitals. Our research sought to determine how indigenous resources were enabling people to achieve optimal ART access and adherence. We analysed data transcripts using thematic network technique, coding references to supportive community networks that enable local people to achieve ART access and adherence. People on ART or carers of children on ART in Zimbabwe report drawing support from a variety of social networks that enable them to overcome many obstacles to adherence. Key support networks include: HIV groups; food and income support networks; home-based care, church and women's groups; family networks; and relationships with healthcare providers. More attention to the community context in which HIV initiatives occur will help ensure that interventions work with and benefit from pre-existing social capital. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. In what ways do communities support optimal antiretroviral treatment in Zimbabwe?

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K.; Campbell, C.; Madanhire, C.; Skovdal, M.; Nyamukapa, C.; Gregson, S.

    2014-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on how pre-existing indigenous community resources, especially social networks, affect the success of externally imposed HIV interventions. Antiretroviral treatment (ART), an externally initiated biomedical intervention, is being rolled out across sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the ways in which community networks are working to facilitate optimal ART access and adherence will enable policymakers to better engage with and bolster these pre-existing resources. We conducted 67 interviews and eight focus group discussions with 127 people from three key population groups in Manicaland, eastern Zimbabwe: healthcare workers, adults on ART and carers of children on ART. We also observed over 100 h of HIV treatment sites at local clinics and hospitals. Our research sought to determine how indigenous resources were enabling people to achieve optimal ART access and adherence. We analysed data transcripts using thematic network technique, coding references to supportive community networks that enable local people to achieve ART access and adherence. People on ART or carers of children on ART in Zimbabwe report drawing support from a variety of social networks that enable them to overcome many obstacles to adherence. Key support networks include: HIV groups; food and income support networks; home-based care, church and women's groups; family networks; and relationships with healthcare providers. More attention to the community context in which HIV initiatives occur will help ensure that interventions work with and benefit from pre-existing social capital. PMID:23503291

  19. Factors affecting antiretroviral treatment adherence among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Basti, Bharatesh D; Mahesh, Venkatesha; Bant, Dattatreya D; Bathija, Geeta V

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral adherence is the second strongest predictor of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death, after CD4 count. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been strongly correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral suppression, reduced rates of resistance, an increase in survival, and improved quality of life. To determine the adherence rates and factors affecting adherence to ART among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A Prospective study for 1 year was conducted among PLWHA, aged between 15 and 49 years, visiting ART center. 242 PLWHAs were included in the study. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data on sociodemographic profile, factors affecting adherence. Adherence was assessed through self-reports, routine and random pill counts, and assessment of medical records. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and Chi-square tests were computed using Epi Info 7 version CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Adherence to ART was finally assessed on 242 PLWHAs. Mean age of subjects was 35 ± 7.8 years. One hundred percent adherence rate (consistent adherers) for the whole 6 month period was seen only in 31.6% patients. Lower 6 month averages of 95-100%, 80-95%, and <80% were noted in 49.8%, 9.1%, and 9.5% patients, thus resulting in optimal adherence rate of >95% in 81.4%. Earning member (odds ratio [OR] =0.404) and weight difference (OR = 0.818) were most associated with the adherent individuals. Most common psychological reason was forgetfulness in 44.9%. Adherence rate was poor among PLWHA and economic factors play an important role in adherence.

  20. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-05-13

    In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for improving ART adherence among YMSM. This study used a multiphase, iterative development process to create an ART adherence app for YMSM. The three-phase development process included: (1) theory-based concept development jointly by public health researchers and the technology team, (2) assessment of the target population's ART adherence needs and app preferences and development and testing of a clickable app prototype, and (3) development and usability testing of the final app prototype. The initial theory-based app concept developed in Phase One included medication reminders, daily ART adherence tracking and visualization, ART educational modules, limited virtual interactions with other app users, and gamification elements. In Phase Two, adherence needs, including those related to information, motivation, and behavioral skills, were identified. Participants expressed preferences for an ART adherence app that was informational, interactive, social, and customizable. Based on the findings from Phase Two, additional gaming features were added in Phase Three, including an interactive battle, superhero app theme, and app storyline. Other features were modified to increase interactivity and customization options and integrate the game theme. During usability testing of the final prototype, participants were able to understand and navigate the app successfully and rated the app favorably. An iterative development process was critical for the development of an ART adherence game app that was viewed

  1. Epic Allies: Development of a Gaming App to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Young HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn Elizabeth; McNulty, Tobias; Soni, Karina; Knudtson, Kelly; Lemann, Alex; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionately affects young men who have sex with men (YMSM). For HIV-positive individuals, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for achieving optimal health outcomes and reducing secondary transmission of HIV. However, YMSM often struggle with ART adherence. Novel mobile phone apps that incorporate game-based mechanics and social networking elements represent a promising intervention approach for improving ART adherence among YMSM. Objective This study used a multiphase, iterative development process to create an ART adherence app for YMSM. Methods The three-phase development process included: (1) theory-based concept development jointly by public health researchers and the technology team, (2) assessment of the target population’s ART adherence needs and app preferences and development and testing of a clickable app prototype, and (3) development and usability testing of the final app prototype. Results The initial theory-based app concept developed in Phase One included medication reminders, daily ART adherence tracking and visualization, ART educational modules, limited virtual interactions with other app users, and gamification elements. In Phase Two, adherence needs, including those related to information, motivation, and behavioral skills, were identified. Participants expressed preferences for an ART adherence app that was informational, interactive, social, and customizable. Based on the findings from Phase Two, additional gaming features were added in Phase Three, including an interactive battle, superhero app theme, and app storyline. Other features were modified to increase interactivity and customization options and integrate the game theme. During usability testing of the final prototype, participants were able to understand and navigate the app successfully and rated the app favorably. Conclusions An iterative development process was critical for the

  2. Which adherence measure - self-report, clinician recorded or pharmacy refill - is best able to predict detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring?

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2016-07-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses viral replication to an undetectable level if a sufficiently high level of adherence is achieved. We investigated which adherence measurement best distinguishes between patients with and without detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring. We randomly selected 870 patients who started cART between May 2009 and April 2012 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Six hundred and sixty-four (76.3%) patients who were retained in HIV care and were receiving cART for at least 6 months were included and 642 had their plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration measured. Patients' adherence to cART was assessed according to self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill measures. Multivariate logistic regression model was fitted to identify the predictors of detectable viremia. Model accuracy was evaluated by computing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 9.2% and 5.5% of the 642 patients had a detectable viral load of ≥40 and ≥400 RNA copies/ml, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, younger age, lower CD4 cell count at cART initiation, being illiterate and widowed, and each of the adherence measures were significantly and independently predictive of having ≥400 RNA copies/ml. The ROC curve showed that these variables altogether had a likelihood of more than 80% to distinguish patients with a plasma viral load of ≥400 RNA copies/ml from those without. Adherence to cART was remarkably high. Self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill non-adherence were all significantly predictive of detectable viremia. The choice for one of these methods to detect non-adherence and predict a detectable viral load can therefore be based on what is most practical in a particular setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Role of Self-Efficacy in HIV Treatment Adherence: Validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Dilworth, Samantha; Morin, Stephen F.; Remien, Robert H.; Chesney, Margaret A.

    2008-01-01

    Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. This paper describes the validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES) with two samples of HIV+ adults on ART. Factor analyses support subscales measuring Adherence Integration (eigenvalue = 6.12) and Adherence Perseverance (eigenvalue = 1.16), accounting for 61% of the variance in scale items. The HIV-ASES demonstrates robust internal consistency (ρs > .90) and 3-month (rs > .70) and 15-month (rs > .40) test-retest reliability. Concurrent validity analyses revealed relationships with psychosocial measures, ART adherence, clinical status, and healthcare utilization. Findings support the use of the HIV-ASES and provide guidance for further investigation of adherence self-efficacy in the context of treatment for HIV and other diseases. PMID:17588200

  4. Focus Group Evaluation of the LIVE Network—An Audio Music Program to Promote ART Adherence Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; Baumann, Maya; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Logwood, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of 3 focus groups conducted to assess the utility, appeal, and feasibility of the LIVE Network (LN), a 70-minute audio music program developed to educate and motivate HIV-infected persons to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and self-manage medication-related side effects. Participants included 15 African American, 2 caucasian, and 1 race unknown HIV-infected persons who had been taking ART for at least 6 months. In general, the LN was well liked, relevant, educational, and motivational. It empowered and motivated participants to be responsible for their adherence self-care. One of the more surprising findings was how freely focus group participants shared the program with family and friends as a means of education and also as a means of disclosure. Moreover, the positive reception of the LN by individuals outside of the focus groups, especially children and adolescents, speaks well for the potential broad appeal of this type of program. PMID:24013689

  5. Space Art "Wheel of Optimism"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-14

    Artist EV Day visited the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to learn about the Mars Exploration Rovers. She so intrigued the Mars scientists that she was given a sample rover wheel to work with in creating a piece of art titled "Wheel of Optimism" for NASA. Day took the wheel and created a Martian world within it complete with organic plantlife, rocks and a Martian landscape in the background. Day poetically grapples with the age old question of whether life on Mars exists or whether it is just an figment of our science fiction imaginations. Rover Tire, mixed media, 9-1/4 (diameter)x8 (depth). 2006. Copyrighted: For more information contact Curator, NASA Art Program.

  6. It's Not Just the Pills: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis of HIV Antiretroviral Adherence Research.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Julie; Leblanc, Natalie M; Flores, Dalmacio

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health and longevity of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and also prevents transmission of the virus. Yet, lack of adherence to ART regimens has been a persistent problem, even with simpler regimens. Guidelines that deal with ART adherence are based almost solely on quantitative studies; this focus ignores the context and complexity of patients' lives. Guidelines are also focused on the individual. We argue that the solution is to include the broader communities in which patients live, and to deal with systemic disparities that persist worldwide; this can be done in part through demedicalizing HIV care for healthy PLWH. We present findings from a qualitative meta-synthesis of 127 studies conducted around the world on the last two pillars of the HIV treatment cascade: starting and remaining on ART until optimal viral suppression is achieved. We use Maslow's hierarchy of needs to frame our findings. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increase in single-tablet regimen use and associated improvements in adherence-related outcomes in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Hanna, David B; Hessol, Nancy A; Golub, Elizabeth T; Cocohoba, Jennifer M; Cohen, Mardge H; Levine, Alexandra M; Wilson, Tracey E; Young, Mary; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaplan, Robert C

    2014-04-15

    The use of single-tablet antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens and its implications on adherence among HIV-infected women have not been well described. Participants were enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study, a longitudinal study of HIV infection in US women. We examined semiannual trends in single-tablet regimen use and ART adherence, defined as self-reported 95% adherence in the past 6 months, during 2006-2013. In a nested cohort study, we assessed the comparative effectiveness of a single-tablet versus a multiple-tablet regimen with respect to adherence, virologic suppression, quality of life, and AIDS-defining events, using propensity score matching to account for demographic, behavioral, and clinical confounders. We also examined these outcomes in a subset of women switching from a multiple- to single-tablet regimen using a case-crossover design. We included 15,523 person-visits, representing 1727 women (53% black, 29% Hispanic, 25% IDU, median age 47). Use of single-tablet regimens among ART users increased from 7% in 2006% to 27% in 2013; adherence increased from 78% to 85% during the same period (both P < 0.001). Single-tablet regimen use was significantly associated with increased adherence (adjusted risk ratio: 1.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.03 to 1.08) and virologic suppression (risk ratio: 1.06; 95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 1.11), while associations with improved quality of life and fewer AIDS-defining events did not achieve statistical significance. Similar findings were observed among the subset of switchers. Single-tablet regimen use was associated with increased adherence and virologic suppression. Despite this, 15% of women prescribed ART were still not optimally adherent; additional interventions are needed to maximize therapeutic benefits.

  8. The differences between medical trust and mistrust and their respective influences on medication beliefs and ART adherence among African-Americans living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Pellowski, Jennifer A; Price, Devon M; Allen, Aerielle M; Eaton, Lisa A; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between medical mistrust and trust and to determine if these measures differentially predict antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence for African-American adults living with HIV. A total of 458 HIV positive African-Americans completed a cross-sectional survey. Self-reported ART adherence was collected using the visual-analog scale. The Beliefs About Medicines Questionnaire was used to assess medication necessity and concern beliefs. All measures of medical mistrust and trust were significantly negatively correlated, ranging from r = -.339 to -.504. Race-based medical mistrust significantly predicted medication necessity and concern beliefs, whereas general medical mistrust only significantly predicted medication concerns. Both measures of trust significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs and medication concerns. Higher levels of race-based medical mistrust predicted lower medication adherence, whereas, neither trust in own physician nor trust in health care provider significantly predicted medication adherence. However, trust in own physician significantly predicted medication necessity beliefs, which predicted medication adherence. Trust and mistrust are not simply opposites of one another. These findings provide evidence for the complexity of understanding the relationship between health care trust, mistrust and patient-related health beliefs and behaviours.

  9. "That is why I stopped the ART": patients' & providers' perspectives on barriers to and enablers of HIV treatment adherence in a South African workplace programme.

    PubMed

    Dahab, Mison; Charalambous, Salome; Hamilton, Robin; Fielding, Katherine; Kielmann, Karina; Churchyard, Gavin J; Grant, Alison D

    2008-02-18

    As ART programmes in African settings expand beyond the pilot stages, adherence to treatment may become an increasing challenge. This qualitative study examines potential barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to ART in a workplace programme in South Africa. We conducted key informant interviews with 12 participants: six ART patients, five health service providers (HSPs) and one human resources manager. The main reported barriers were denial of existence of HIV or of one's own positive status, use of traditional medicines, speaking a different language from the HSP, alcohol use, being away from home, perceived severity of side-effects, feeling better on treatment and long waiting times at the clinic. The key facilitators were social support, belief in the value of treatment, belief in the importance of one's own life to the survival of one's family, and the ability to fit ART into daily life schedules. Given the reported uncertainty about the existence of HIV disease and the use of traditional medicines while on ART, despite a programme emphasising ART counselling, there is a need to find effective ways to support adherence to ART even if the individual does not accept biomedical concepts of HIV disease or decides to use traditional medicines. Additionally, providers should identify ways to minimize barriers in communication with patients with whom they have no common language. Finally, dissatisfaction with clinical services, due to long waiting times, should be addressed.

  10. Masivukeni: Development of a Multimedia Based Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Intervention for Counselors and Patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Remien, Robert H; Mellins, Claude A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Kelsey, Ryan; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Chowdhury, Jenifar; Lalkhen, Nuruneesa; Hoppe, Lara; Abrams, Elaine J.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.

    2013-01-01

    Effective medical treatment for HIV/AIDS requires patients’ optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In resource-constrained settings, lack of adequate standardized counseling for patients on ART remains a significant barrier to adherence. Masivukeni (“Lets Wake Up” in Xhosa) is an innovative multimedia-based intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve and maintain high levels of ART adherence. Adapted from a couples-based intervention tested in the United States (US), Masivukeni was developed through community-based participatory research with US and South African partners and informed by Ewart’s Social Action Theory. Innovative computer-based multimedia strategies were used to translate a labor- and training-intensive intervention into one that could be readily and widely used by lay counselors with relatively little training with low-literacy patients. In this paper, we describe the foundations of this new intervention, the process of its development, and the evidence of its high acceptability and feasibility. PMID:23468079

  11. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in

  12. Exploring 'generative mechanisms' of the antiretroviral adherence club intervention using the realist approach: a scoping review of research-based antiretroviral treatment adherence theories.

    PubMed

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2017-05-04

    Poor retention in care and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) continue to undermine the success of HIV treatment and care programmes across the world. There is a growing recognition that multifaceted interventions - application of two or more adherence-enhancing strategies - may be useful to improve ART adherence and retention in care among people living with HIV/AIDS. Empirical evidence shows that multifaceted interventions produce better results than interventions based on a singular perspective. Nevertheless, the bundle of mechanisms by which multifaceted interventions promote ART adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we reviewed theories on ART adherence to identify candidate/potential mechanisms by which the adherence club intervention works. We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES and Google Scholar) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. A manual search of citations from the reference list of the studies identified from the electronic databases was also done. Twenty-six articles that adopted a theory-guided inquiry of antiretroviral adherence behaviour were included for the review. Eleven cognitive and behavioural theories underpinning these studies were explored. We examined each theory for possible 'generative causality' using the realist evaluation heuristic (Context-Mechanism-Outcome) configuration, then, we selected candidate mechanisms thematically. We identified three major sets of theories: Information-Motivation-Behaviour, Social Action Theory and Health Behaviour Model, which explain ART adherence. Although they show potential in explaining adherence bebahiours, they fall short in explaining exactly why and how the various elements they outline combine to explain positive or negative outcomes. Candidate mechanisms indentified were motivation, self-efficacy, perceived social support, empowerment, perceived threat, perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Although these candidate

  13. Allopurinol Medication Adherence as a Mediator of Optimal Outcomes in Gout Management.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Brian W; Bendlin, Kayli A; Sayles, Harlan; Meza, Jane; Russell, Cynthia L; Mikuls, Ted R

    2017-09-01

    Patient and provider factors, including allopurinol medication adherence, affect gout treatment outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine associations of patient and provider factors with optimal gout management. Linking longitudinal health and pharmacy dispensing records to questionnaire data, we assessed patient and provider factors among 612 patients with gout receiving allopurinol during a recent 1-year period. Associations of patient (medication adherence and patient activation) and provider factors (dose escalation, low-dose initiation, and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis) with serum urate (SU) goal achievement of less than 6.0 mg/dL were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Medication adherence was assessed as a mediator of these factors with goal achievement. A majority of patients (63%) were adherent, whereas a minority received dose escalation (31%). Medication adherence was associated with initiation of daily allopurinol doses of 100 mg/d or less (odds ratio [OR], 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-2.76). In adjusted models, adherence (OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68) and dose escalation (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 2.48-4.25) were strongly associated with SU goal attainment. Low starting allopurinol dose was positively associated with SU goal attainment (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.20) indirectly through early adherence, but also had a negative direct association with SU goal attainment (OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.12-0.37). Medication adherence and low starting dose combined with dose escalation represent promising targets for future gout quality improvement efforts. Low starting dose is associated with better SU goal attainment through increased medication adherence, but may be beneficial only in settings where appropriate dose escalation is implemented.

  14. Phone-delivered mindfulness training to promote medication adherence and reduce sexual risk behavior among persons living with HIV: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Rich, Carla; Rosen, Rochelle K; Dunsiger, Shira; Rana, Aadia; Carey, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Two-thirds of people living with HIV (PLWH) show sub-optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and one-third engages in risky sex. Both non-adherence and risky sex have been associated with emotional distress and impulsivity. To allay distress and lessen impulsivity, mindfulness training (MT) can be helpful. In this trial, we will investigate the utility of phone-delivered MT for PWLH. The primary outcomes comprise feasibility and acceptability of phone-delivery; secondary outcomes are estimates of efficacy of MT on adherence to ART and safer sexual practices as well as on their hypothesized antecedents. Fifty participants will be enrolled in this parallel-group randomized clinical trial (RCT). Outpatients recruited from an HIV treatment clinic will be randomized (1:1 ratio) to either MT or to an attention-control intervention; both interventions will be administered during 8 weekly phone calls. ART adherence (self-reported measure and unannounced phone pill counts), sexual behavior (self-reports and biomarkers), mindfulness, depression, stress, and impulsivity will be measured at baseline, post-intervention, and 3months post-intervention. MT has great potential to help PLWH to manage stress, depressive symptoms, and impulsivity. Positive changes in these antecedents are expected to improve safer sex practices and ART adherence. If results from this exploratory trial support our hypotheses, we will conduct a large RCT to test (a) the efficacy of MT on ART adherence and safer sex practices and (b) the hypothesis that improved ART adherence and safer sex will reduce viral load, and decrease the incidence of sexually transmitted infections, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gender Differences in Adherence and Response to Antiretroviral Treatment in the Stratall Trial in Rural District Hospitals in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Boullé, Charlotte; Kouanfack, Charles; Laborde-Balen, Gabrièle; Boyer, Sylvie; Aghokeng, Avelin F; Carrieri, Maria P; Kazé, Serge; Dontsop, Marlise; Mben, Jean-Marc; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Peytavin, Gilles; Spire, Bruno; Delaporte, Eric; Laurent, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Evidence of gender differences in antiretroviral treatment (ART) outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa is conflicting. Our objective was to assess gender differences in (1) adherence to ART and (2) virologic failure, immune reconstitution, mortality, and disease progression adjusting for adherence. Cohort study among 459 ART-naive patients followed up 24 months after initiation in 2006-2010 in 9 rural district hospitals. Adherence to ART was assessed using (1) a validated tool based on multiple patient self-reports and (2) antiretroviral plasma concentrations. The associations between gender and the outcomes were assessed using multivariate mixed models or accelerated time failure models. One hundred thirty-five patients (29.4%) were men. At baseline, men were older, had higher body mass index and hemoglobin level, and received more frequently efavirenz than women. Gender was not associated with self-reported adherence (P = 0.872, 0.169, and 0.867 for moderate adherence, low adherence, and treatment interruption, respectively) or with antiretroviral plasma concentrations (P = 0.549 for nevirapine/efavirenz). In contrast, male gender was associated with virologic failure [odds ratio: 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31 to 3.62, P = 0.003], lower immunologic reconstitution (coefficient: -58.7 at month 24, 95% CI: -100.8 to -16.6, P = 0.006), and faster progression to death (time ratio: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.78, P = 0.014) and/or to World Health Organization stage 4 event (time ratio: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.79, P = 0.017). Our study provides important evidence that African men are more vulnerable to ART failure than women and that the male vulnerability extends beyond adherence issues. Additional studies are needed to determine the causes for this vulnerability to optimize HIV care. However, personalized adherence support remains crucial.

  16. Exploring factors associated with ART adherence and retention in care under Option B+ strategy in Malawi: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Katy; Tweya, Hannock; Phiri, Sam; Sande, Odala; Sikwese, Pascal; Chikonda, Janet; O’Malley, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Although several studies have documented challenges related to inadequate adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and high loss to follow-up (LTFU) among Option B+ women, there is limited understanding of why these challenges occur and how to address them. This qualitative study examines women’s experiences with ART adherence and retention in care. Between July and October 2015, in-depth interviews were conducted with 39 pregnant and lactating women who initiated ART at Bwaila Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. Study participants included 14 in care and 25 out of care women, according to facility records. Data were analyzed using an inductive, open-coding approach to thematic analysis. Ten of the respondents (7 out of care, 3 in-care) had stopped and re-started treatment before the interview date. One of the most important factors influencing adherence and retention was the strength of women’s support systems. In contrast to women in-care, most out-of-care women lacked emotional and financial support from male partners, received minimal counseling from providers at initiation, lacked designated guardians to assist with medication refills or clinic appointments, and were highly mobile. Mobility led to difficulties in accessing treatment in new settings. The most common reasons women re-started treatment following interruptions were due to providers’ counseling and encouragement and the mother’s desire to be healthy. Improved counseling at initiation, active follow-up counseling, women’s economic empowerment interventions, promotion of peer counseling schemes and meaningful engagement of male partners can help in addressing the identified barriers and promoting sustained retention of Option B+ women. PMID:28636669

  17. Exploring factors associated with ART adherence and retention in care under Option B+ strategy in Malawi: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gugsa, Salem; Potter, Katy; Tweya, Hannock; Phiri, Sam; Sande, Odala; Sikwese, Pascal; Chikonda, Janet; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Although several studies have documented challenges related to inadequate adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and high loss to follow-up (LTFU) among Option B+ women, there is limited understanding of why these challenges occur and how to address them. This qualitative study examines women's experiences with ART adherence and retention in care. Between July and October 2015, in-depth interviews were conducted with 39 pregnant and lactating women who initiated ART at Bwaila Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. Study participants included 14 in care and 25 out of care women, according to facility records. Data were analyzed using an inductive, open-coding approach to thematic analysis. Ten of the respondents (7 out of care, 3 in-care) had stopped and re-started treatment before the interview date. One of the most important factors influencing adherence and retention was the strength of women's support systems. In contrast to women in-care, most out-of-care women lacked emotional and financial support from male partners, received minimal counseling from providers at initiation, lacked designated guardians to assist with medication refills or clinic appointments, and were highly mobile. Mobility led to difficulties in accessing treatment in new settings. The most common reasons women re-started treatment following interruptions were due to providers' counseling and encouragement and the mother's desire to be healthy. Improved counseling at initiation, active follow-up counseling, women's economic empowerment interventions, promotion of peer counseling schemes and meaningful engagement of male partners can help in addressing the identified barriers and promoting sustained retention of Option B+ women.

  18. Examining the relationship between psychological distress and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among Ugandan adolescents living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mutumba, Massy; Musiime, Victor; Lepkwoski, James M; Harper, Gary W; Snow, Rachel C; Resnicow, Ken; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress is common among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) worldwide, and has been associated with non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART), leading to poor virologic suppression, drug resistance, and increased risk for AIDS morbidity and mortality. However, only a few studies have explored the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper examines the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence, and effect of psychosocial resources on ART adherence. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 464 ALHIV (aged 12-19; 53% female) seeking HIV care at a large HIV treatment center in Kampala, Uganda. ALHIV were recruited during routine clinic visits. Three self-reported binary adherence measures were utilized: missed pills in the past three days, non-adherence to the prescribed medical regimen, and self-rated adherence assessed using a visual analog scale. Psychological distress was measured as a continuous variable, and computed as the mean score on a locally developed and validated 25-item symptom checklist for Ugandan ALHIV. Psychosocial resources included spirituality, religiosity, optimism, social support, and coping strategies. After adjusting for respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial resources, a unit increase in psychological distress was associated with increased odds of missing pills in past 3 days (Odds Ratio(OR) = 1.75; Confidence Interval (CI): 1.04-2.95), not following the prescribed regimen (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.08-2.46), and lower self-rated adherence (OR = 1.79; CI: 1.19-2.69). Psychosocial resources were associated with lower odds for non-adherence on all three self-report measures. There is a need to strengthen the psychosocial aspects of adolescent HIV care by developing interventions to identify and prevent psychological distress among Ugandan ALHIV.

  19. INCREASE IN SINGLE-TABLET REGIMEN USE AND ASSOCIATED IMPROVEMENTS IN ADHERENCE-RELATED OUTCOMES IN HIV-INFECTED WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    HANNA, DAVID B.; HESSOL, NANCY A.; GOLUB, ELIZABETH T.; COCOHOBA, JENNIFER M.; COHEN, MARDGE H.; LEVINE, ALEXANDRA M.; WILSON, TRACEY E.; YOUNG, MARY; ANASTOS, KATHRYN; KAPLAN, ROBERT C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of single-tablet ART regimens and its implications on adherence among HIV-infected women have not been well-described. Methods Participants were enrolled in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a longitudinal study of HIV infection in U.S. women. We examined semiannual trends in single-tablet regimen use and ART adherence, defined as self-reported 95% adherence in the past 6 months, during 2006–2013. In a nested cohort study, we assessed the comparative effectiveness of a single-tablet versus a multiple-tablet regimen with respect to adherence, virologic suppression, quality of life, and AIDS-defining events, using propensity score matching to account for demographic, behavioral, and clinical confounders. We also examined these outcomes in a subset of women switching from a multiple- to single-tablet regimen, using a case-crossover design. Results 15,523 person-visits, representing 1,727 women (53% black, 29% Hispanic, 25% IDU, median age 47), were included. Use of single-tablet regimens among ART users increased from 7% in 2006 to 27% in 2013; adherence increased from 78% to 85% during the same period (both p<0.001). Single-tablet regimen use was significantly associated with increased adherence (adjusted RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03–1.08) and virologic suppression (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01–1.11), while associations with improved quality of life and fewer AIDS-defining events did not achieve statistical significance. Similar findings were observed among the subset of switchers. Conclusion Single-tablet regimen use was associated with increased adherence and virologic suppression. Despite this, 15% of women prescribed ART were still not optimally adherent; additional interventions are needed to maximize therapeutic benefits. PMID:24326606

  20. Correlates of Adherence among Rural Indian Women Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Ernst, E J; Keenan, Colleen; Suresh, P; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Liu, Yihang

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, correlates of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) were assessed using a baseline questionnaire among 68 rural women living with AIDS (WLA) in India. Unadjusted analyses revealed positive relationships of ART adherence with Hindu religion, and support from spouses and parents, whereas negative associations were found with depression, poor quality of life, and having ten or more HIV symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis also revealed that WLA who were Hindu, not depressed, had ART support from spouses and parents, and perceived some benefit from ART were more adherent to ART than their respective counterparts. This study reveals the unique challenges which rural WLA experience and the need to mitigate these challenges early in ART treatment. Further, the findings enable the refinement of an intervention program which will focus on strengthening ART adherence among rural WLA.

  1. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  2. The Combined Roles of Nonsomatic Depressive Symptomatology, Neurocognitive Function, and Current Substance Use in Medication Adherence in Adults Living With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, Travis M; Byrd, Desiree; Arce Rentería, Miguel; Coulehan, Kelly; Miranda, Caitlin; Fuentes, Armando; Rivera Mindt, Monica

    Depression, global neurocognitive (GNC) function, and substance use disorders (SUDs) are each associated with medication adherence in persons living with HIV (PLWH). Because somatic symptoms can inflate depression scores in PLWH, the role of nonsomatic depressive symptomatology (NSDS) should be considered in adherence. However, the combined roles of NSDS, GNC function, and current SUDs in predicting combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence remain poorly understood. Forty PLWH (70% Latina/o; 30% non-Hispanic White) completed psychiatric/SUD, neurocognitive, and self-report cART adherence evaluations. Higher NSDS was associated with suboptimal adherence (p < .01), but optimal and suboptimal adherers did not differ in GNC function or current SUDs. Only NSDS was associated with suboptimal adherence, after accounting for GNC function and SUDs (p = .01). NSDS uniquely predicted self-reported adherence, beyond GNC function and current SUDs among ethnically diverse PLWH. Methodological issues between present and prior studies should also be considered. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of ART centres in India: client perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sogarwal, Ruchi; Bachani, Damodar

    2009-05-01

    Drug adherence and quality of antiretroviral therapy (ART) services are the keys for the successful ART programme. Hence, an attempt has been made to assess ART centres in India from client perspectives that are receiving services from the centres. Data were gathered through exit interviews with 1366 clients from 27 ART centres that were selected on the basis of drug adherence and client load. Analyses revealed that more than 80 per cent of the clients reported overall satisfaction with the services availed from the centre and 60 per cent reported that the quality of life has improved to a great extent after getting ART. Most of the clients strongly demanded to open ART centre in each district for better access as that will increase drug adherence and eventually control the HIV progression. It has been found that as many as 14% of respondents, ever been on ART, reported non-adherence and 70% of them cited distance and economic factors as the reasons for non-adherence. Study concludes that while majority of the clients were satisfied with ART services, shortage of staff, high level of non-drug adherence, long distances and poor referring system are the weak areas requiring attention.

  4. Longitudinal antiretroviral adherence in HIV+ Ugandan parents and their children initiating HAART in the MTCT-Plus family treatment model: role of depression in declining adherence over time.

    PubMed

    Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne; Crane, Johanna; Oyugi, Jessica H; Ragland, Kathleen; Kawuma, Annet; Musoke, Philippa; Bangsberg, David R

    2009-06-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of family-based treatment on adherence amongst HIV-infected parents and their HIV-infected children attending the Mother-To-Child-Transmission Plus program in Kampala, Uganda. Adherence was assessed using home-based pill counts and self-report. Mean adherence was over 94%. Depression was associated with incomplete adherence on multivariable analysis. Adherence declined over time. Qualitative interviews revealed lack of transportation money, stigma, clinical response to therapy, drug packaging, and cost of therapy may impact adherence. Our results indicate that providing ART to all eligible HIV-infected members in a household is associated with excellent adherence in both parents and children. Adherence to ART among new parents declines over time, even when patients receive treatment at no cost. Depression should be addressed as a potential barrier to adherence. Further study is necessary to assess the long-term impact of this family treatment model on adherence to ART in resource-limited settings.

  5. Impact of a massive earthquake on adherence to antiretroviral therapy, mental health, and treatment failure among people living with HIV in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Minato; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Bastola, Anup; Kameoka, Masanori

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The April 2015 Nepal earthquake resulted in more than 8,700 deaths and 22,000 casualties including damage to health facilities. The impact of this situation on chronic conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) may become a long-lasting public health threat. Therefore, the objectives of this study were i) to assess the association of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence with mental health problems, and social behaviors, ii) to examine factors affecting treatment failure, and iii) to investigate changes in ART adherence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among people living with HIV 6 and 12 months after the disaster. Methods Study was conducted 6 months after the earthquake in 2015 with a sample size of 305 earthquake victims with HIV and followed after 12 months of the earthquake. A logistic regression analysis was used to examine relationships, while a paired t-test analysis was conducted to assess changes in adherence to ART and PTSD level at 6 months and 12 months after earthquake. Results In the earthquake, 5.2% of the participants lost their family member. Approximately 44% of participants had earthquake-PTSD symptoms and 50% experienced HIV stigma. PTSD and HIV status disclosure were significantly associated with adherence to ART, while HIV stigma and religion were associated with treatment failure. PTSD and adherence levels to ART were significantly improved over the 6-month period. Conclusion Awareness programs for general public to eliminate HIV stigma; promote psychosocial counseling to earthquake victims living with HIV in order to reduce PTSD will contribute to maintaining optimal ART adherence and to prevent treatment failure. PMID:29889840

  6. [Costs and adherence to antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Ventura-Cerdá, J M; Ayago-Flores, D; Vicente-Escrig, E; Mollá-Cantavella, S; Alós-Almiñana, M

    2010-01-01

    To develop a system of data management that allows us to estimate the comparative effectiveness of the various antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens. Retrospective observational study in patients infected with HIV with stable ART. Adherence to treatment and unit cost for each patient's treatment was determined. The cost/patient/day was calculated and, multiplying by an adherence factor (fADH), the (cost/patient/day)(ADH). The comparison of both allowed us to obtain the Δcost/patient, which estimates the additional costs caused by lack of adherence. The incremental cost-effectiveness (iCER), grouping the results by the various coformulated drugs ("combos"). A study of the budgetary impact of these combos was carried out. 468 patients were evaluated (62% adherent). Average adherence was 88±18%. The average value of (cost/patient/day) (ADH) was significantly higher than the cost/patient/day (27.3±9.8€ compared to 24.3±7.6€. p<0.001). Just as with the f(ADH), no differences were found in the Δcost/patient between the different ART combinations. The combo with the least deviation from the cost/patient/day due to lack of adherence was that composed of abacavir/zedovudine/lamivudine (ABC/AZT/3TC,Δcost/patient=8.72±14.18%), and that with the greatest deviation AZT/3TC (Δcost/patient=13.52±17.68%). No significant differences were found in the iCER calculated for any combo. The ART that included abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) obtained the least budgetary impact. The greatest cost and percentage of adherent patients associated with the combos composed of Tenovovir/Emtricitabine(TDF/FTC) and ABC/3TC, and the least cost and effectiveness of those composed of AZT/#TC and ABC/AZT/3TC, does not allow us to identify any option as significantly dominant. The regimens with ABC/3TC were shown to be the most favourable from the combined point of view of cost and adherence. Copyright © 2009 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Programs to optimize adherence in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kowing, Dianne; Messer, Dawn; Slagle, Scott; Wasik, Alyon

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to raise awareness of the materials, devices, and Internet resources available to improve adherence to use of medications for the treatment of glaucoma and to review new devices under development. A review of current indexed literature and Internet resources was conducted. A variety of educational brochures, pamphlets, and fact sheets promoting adherence to ocular hypotensive medications are available through multiple organizations and are easily accessed and ordered on the Internet. Video and Web-based patient educational tools have been designed to support patient adherence to glaucoma management plans and promote open dialogue between patients and providers. Reminder and recall systems that integrate with office software can be sent to cell phones as well as e-mails and personal digital assistant (PDAs), alerting patients to upcoming appointments and reminding them to instill their drops. Bottle devices with dosing support (timers with audible and visual signals and dispensing aids) and electronic monitoring have been shown to promote adherence. New products currently under development to improve the delivery of medications include nanoparticles, punctal plugs, and contact lenses that release glaucoma medications. Many educational materials, services, Internet resources, and devices are available to optometrists to encourage patient adherence to glaucoma treatment and management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Acceptability of obtaining hair samples for assessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) exposure amongst alcohol drinking ART recipients in Tshwane, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kekwaletswe, C T; Nkosi, S; Kitleli, N B; Myers, B; Shuper, P; Parry, C D H; Morojele, N K

    2018-05-20

    To achieve the maximal therapeutic benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), high adherence is required. In South Africa, ART recipients are usually counselled by their health care providers to stop drinking alcohol, as heavy alcohol use compromises ART adherence. Patients who continue drinking alcohol tend to hide their alcohol-related adherence challenges from their health care providers. Objective measures of ART adherence/exposure may help to better identify drinkers who could benefit from ART adherence enhancement interventions. To evaluate the acceptability of collecting hair samples to objectively assess ART exposure among alcohol drinkers, we conducted four mixed-gender focus group discussions (FGDs) with alcohol drinking ART recipients at two ART sites in Tshwane, South Africa. Data were analysed using content analysis. ART recipients found hair sample testing for ART exposure to be novel and therefore expected that some ART recipients would initially be hesitant to provide a sample. Participants thought that the acceptability of hair sample collection could be enhanced by providing a full explanation of how the hair sample would be obtained and what the testing would entail. Participants also viewed hair sample testing as a viable and desirable alternative to blood sample testing for ART exposure. Some worries about the possible use of hair samples for witchcraft and the symbolic nature of hair were brought up, but these were not seen as insurmountable concerns. In conclusion, hair sample testing is a potentially acceptable method of assessing ART exposure amongst ART recipients who drink alcohol.

  9. Impact of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence: systematic review and meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T; Ryu, Annemarie E; Onuegbu, Afiachukwu G; Psaros, Christina; Weiser, Sheri D; Bangsberg, David R; Tsai, Alexander C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a critical determinant of HIV-1 RNA viral suppression and health outcomes. It is generally accepted that HIV-related stigma is correlated with factors that may undermine ART adherence, but its relationship with ART adherence itself is not well established. We therefore undertook this review to systematically assess the relationship between HIV-related stigma and ART adherence. Methods We searched nine electronic databases for published and unpublished literature, with no language restrictions. First we screened the titles and abstracts for studies that potentially contained data on ART adherence. Then we reviewed the full text of these studies to identify articles that reported data on the relationship between ART adherence and either HIV-related stigma or serostatus disclosure. We used the method of meta-synthesis to summarize the findings from the qualitative studies. Results Our search protocol yielded 14,854 initial records. After eliminating duplicates and screening the titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 960 journal articles, dissertations and unpublished conference abstracts for review. We included 75 studies conducted among 26,715 HIV-positive persons living in 32 countries worldwide, with less representation of work from Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Among the 34 qualitative studies, our meta-synthesis identified five distinct third-order labels through an inductive process that we categorized as themes and organized in a conceptual model spanning intrapersonal, interpersonal and structural levels. HIV-related stigma undermined ART adherence by compromising general psychological processes, such as adaptive coping and social support. We also identified psychological processes specific to HIV-positive persons driven by predominant stigmatizing attitudes and which undermined adherence, such as internalized stigma and concealment. Adaptive coping and social support were critical

  10. Association between antiretroviral therapy adherence and employment status: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nachega, Jean B; Uthman, Olalekan A; Peltzer, Karl; Richardson, Lindsey A; Mills, Edward J; Amekudzi, Kofi; Ouédraogo, Alice

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between the employment status of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for studies reporting ART adherence and employment status published between January 1980 and September 2014. Information from a wide range of other sources, including the grey literature, was also analysed. Two independent reviewers extracted data on treatment adherence and study characteristics. Study data on the association between being employed and adhering to ART were pooled using a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity and sources of bias were evaluated. The meta-analysis included 28 studies published between 1996 and 2014 that together involved 8743 HIV-infected individuals from 14 countries. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) for the association between being employed and adhering to ART was 1.27 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.04-1.55). The association was significant for studies from low-income countries (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.58-2.18) and high-income countries (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.02-1.74) but not middle-income countries (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.62-1.42). In addition, studies published after 2011 and larger studies showed less association between employment and adherence than earlier and small studies, respectively. Employed HIV-infected individuals, particularly those in low- and high-income countries, were more likely to adhere to ART than unemployed individuals. Further research is needed on the mechanisms by which employment and ART adherence affect each other and on whether employment-creation interventions can positively influence ART adherence, HIV disease progression and quality of life.

  11. Understanding Specific Contexts of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Rural South Africa: A Thematic Analysis of Digital Stories from a Community with High HIV Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Treffry-Goatley, Astrid; Lessells, Richard; Sykes, Pam; Bärnighausen, Till; de Oliveira, Tulio; Moletsane, Relebohile; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Near-perfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is required to achieve the best possible prevention and treatment outcomes. Yet, there have been particular concerns about the challenges of adherence among patients living in resource-limited settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The primary objective of this study was to explore adherence in a low-resourced, rural community of high HIV prevalence in South Africa and to identify specific individual and structural factors that can either challenge or support adherence in this context. We applied digital stories as a qualitative research tool to gain insights into personal contexts of HIV and ART adherence. Through an inductive thematic analysis of twenty story texts, soundtracks and drawings, we explored experiences, understandings, and contexts of the participants and identified potential barriers and facilitators for those on lifelong treatment. We found that many of the stories reflected a growing confidence in the effectiveness of ART, which should be viewed as a key facilitator to successful adherence since this attitude can promote disclosure and boost access to social support. Nevertheless, stories also highlighted the complexity of the issues that individuals and households face as they deal with HIV and ART in this setting and it is clear that an overburdened local healthcare system has often struggled to meet the demands of a rapidly expanding epidemic and to provide the necessary medical and emotional support. Our analysis suggests several opportunities for further research and the design of novel health interventions to support optimal adherence. Firstly, future health promotion campaigns should encourage individuals to test together, or at least accompany each other for testing, to encourage social support from the outset. Additionally, home-based testing and ART club interventions might be recommended to make it easier for individuals to adhere to their treatment regimens and to provide a sense of

  12. Factors that influence adherence to antiretroviral treatment in an urban population, Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Emma Rosamond Nony; Pane, Masdalina; Wandra, Toni; Windiyaningsih, Cicilia; Herlina; Samaan, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of people receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesia has increased in recent years, little is known about the specific characteristics affecting adherence in this population. Indonesia is different from most of its neighbors given that it is a geographically and culturally diverse country, with a large Muslim population. We aimed to identify the current rate of adherence and explore factors that influence ART adherence. Data were collected from ART-prescribed outpatients on an HIV registry at a North Jakarta hospital in 2012. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics were explored as factors associated with adherence using logistics regression analyses. Chi squared test was used to compare the difference between proportions. Reasons for missing medication were analyzed descriptively. Two hundred and sixty-one patients participated, of whom 77% reported ART adherence in the last 3 months. The level of social support experienced was independently associated with adherence where some social support (p = 0.018) and good social support (p = 0.039) improved adherence compared to poor social support. Frequently cited reasons for not taking ART medication included forgetting to take medication (67%), busy with something else (63%) and asleep at medication time (60%). This study identified that an increase in the level of social support experienced by ART-prescribed patients was positively associated with adherence. Social support may minimize the impact of stigma among ART prescribed patients. Based on these findings, if social support is not available, alternative support through community-based organizations is recommended to maximize treatment success.

  13. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts.

    PubMed

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sim, Benedict Lh; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke De Wit, Tobias F; Sohn, Annette H; Hamers, Raph L

    2017-03-03

    Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a bi-regional cohort in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This multicentre prospective study of adults starting first-line ART assessed patient-reported adherence at follow-up clinic visits using a 30-day visual analogue scale. Determinants of suboptimal adherence (<95%) were assessed for six-month intervals, using generalized estimating equations multivariable logistic regression with multiple imputations. Region of residence (Africa vs. Asia) was assessed as a potential effect modifier. Of 13,001 adherence assessments in 3934 participants during the first 24 months of ART, 6.4% (837) were suboptimal, with 7.3% (619/8484) in the African cohort versus 4.8% (218/4517) in the Asian cohort ( p  < 0.001). In the African cohort, determinants of suboptimal adherence were male sex (odds ratio (OR) 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.53; p  = 0.009), younger age (OR 0.8 per 10 year increase; 0.8-0.9; p  = 0.003), use of concomitant medication (OR 1.8, 1.0-3.2; p  = 0.044) and attending a public facility (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.7; p  = 0.004). In the Asian cohort, adherence was higher in men who have sex with men (OR for suboptimal adherence 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9; p  = 0.029) and lower in injecting drug users (OR for suboptimal adherence 1.6, 95% CI 0.9-2.6; p  = 0.075), compared to heterosexuals. Risk of suboptimal adherence decreased with longer ART duration in both regions. Participants in low- and lower-middle-income countries had a higher risk of suboptimal adherence (OR 1.6, 1.3-2.0; p  < 0.001), compared to those in upper-middle or high-income countries. Suboptimal adherence was strongly associated with virological failure, in Africa (OR 5.8, 95% CI 4.3-7.7; p  < 0

  14. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sim, Benedict LH; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke De Wit, Tobias F; Sohn, Annette H; Hamers, Raph L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a bi-regional cohort in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Methods: This multicentre prospective study of adults starting first-line ART assessed patient-reported adherence at follow-up clinic visits using a 30-day visual analogue scale. Determinants of suboptimal adherence (<95%) were assessed for six-month intervals, using generalized estimating equations multivariable logistic regression with multiple imputations. Region of residence (Africa vs. Asia) was assessed as a potential effect modifier. Results: Of 13,001 adherence assessments in 3934 participants during the first 24 months of ART, 6.4% (837) were suboptimal, with 7.3% (619/8484) in the African cohort versus 4.8% (218/4517) in the Asian cohort (p < 0.001). In the African cohort, determinants of suboptimal adherence were male sex (odds ratio (OR) 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06–1.53; p = 0.009), younger age (OR 0.8 per 10 year increase; 0.8–0.9; p = 0.003), use of concomitant medication (OR 1.8, 1.0–3.2; p = 0.044) and attending a public facility (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.7; p = 0.004). In the Asian cohort, adherence was higher in men who have sex with men (OR for suboptimal adherence 0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9; p = 0.029) and lower in injecting drug users (OR for suboptimal adherence 1.6, 95% CI 0.9–2.6; p = 0.075), compared to heterosexuals. Risk of suboptimal adherence decreased with longer ART duration in both regions. Participants in low- and lower-middle-income countries had a higher risk of suboptimal adherence (OR 1.6, 1.3–2.0; p < 0.001), compared to those in upper-middle or high-income countries. Suboptimal adherence was strongly associated with virological

  15. Optimal recall period in assessing the adherence to antihypertensive therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Doró, Péter; Benko, Ria; Czakó, Anikó; Matuz, Mária; Thurzó, Ferenc; Soós, Gyöngyvér

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the validity of patient self-reported adherence, and to find the optimal length of recall period which best reflects the long-term adherence pattern of the patient. Patients were recruited from a general practitioner's practice in a Hungarian town. In this prospective study 30 patients, who had already been on antihypertensive treatment, were involved. The study was designed to monitor one antihypertensive medication per patient for 3 months. Patients received a 3-month supply of one antihypertensive medication in an electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). At the end of the study period patients completed a structured questionnaire regarding their medication taking behavior during the last 7, 14 and 30 days. The results measured with MEMS were considered as the reference value, and other measures were compared using the Bland-Altman method. Self-reported adherence, length of recall period, taking adherence and timing adherence measured by MEMS. Of the 30 patients included, 29 patients (13 males and 16 females) completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 60.6 years, ranging between 36 and 86 years. Patients were monitored for an average of 89 days (ranging between 49 and 106 days). Fifteen patients were on once daily, 9 patients were on twice daily, and 5 patients were on 3 times daily dosing schedule. The total expected number of medication taking events was 4,281. The MEMS caps recorded a total of 4,071 openings, which showed only a 3.56% deviation from the pill counts of the remaining tablets. The overall taking adherence was 95.1%, timing adherence was 75.2%. Patients' adherence report using a visual analog scale and reporting the number of missed doses became more accurate as the length of the recall period increased. Increased number of chronically taken medications was associated with better adherence. Increased dosing frequency of the observed antihypertensive medication resulted in decreased adherence. The results showed

  16. Religiosity and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among patients attending a public hospital-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kisenyi, Rita N; Muliira, Joshua K; Ayebare, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    In Uganda, the prevalence of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) by HIV/AIDS patients remains high and sometimes this is blamed on patients' religious behavior. A descriptive design was used to examine the relationship between religiosity and ART adherence in a sample of 220 patients attending a HIV/AIDS clinic in a Ugandan public hospital. Participants who self-identified as Pentecostal and Muslim had the highest percentage of members with high religiosity scores and ART adherence. Among Muslim participants (34), 82% reported high religiosity scores and high levels of ART adherence. Of the fifty Pentecostals participants, 96% reported high religiosity scores and 80% reported high levels of ART adherence. Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between ART adherence and religiosity (r = 0.618, P ≤ 0.01). Therefore, collaboration between religious leaders and HIV/AIDS healthcare providers should be encouraged as one of the strategies for enhancing ART adherence.

  17. The enabling effect of food assistance in improving adherence and/or treatment completion for antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis treatment: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Pee, Saskia; Grede, Nils; Mehra, Divya; Bloem, Martin W

    2014-10-01

    Socioeconomic costs of HIV and TB and the difficulty of maintaining optimal treatment are well documented. Social protection measures such as food assistance may be required to offset some of the treatment related costs as well as to ensure food security and maintain good health of the affected individual and household. Programmes have started placing greater emphasis on treatment adherence and are looking for proven interventions that can optimize it. This paper looks at the effect of food assistance for enabling treatment adherence and reviews studies that used food assistance to promote adherence. Eight of ten studies found that provision of food can improve adherence and/or treatment completion for HIV care and treatment, ART and TB-DOTS. This indicates that food provision is not only a biological, but also a behavioural intervention, and underscores that unresolved food insecurity can be an impediment to treatment adherence and consequently to good treatment outcomes.

  18. Barriers to and Facilitators of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Patient's adherence is crucial to get the best out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study explores in-depth the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence among Nepalese patients and service providers prescribing ART. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 participants. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and translated into English before being analyzed thematically. ART-prescribed patients described a range of barriers for failing to adhere to ART. Financial difficulties, access to healthcare services, frequent transport blockades, religious/ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, and side-effects were the most-frequently discussed barriers whereas trustworthy health workers, perceived health benefits, and family support were the most-reported facilitators. Understanding barriers and facilitators can help in the design of an appropriate and targeted intervention. Healthcare providers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social policy to promote adherence among ART-prescribed patients. PMID:23304907

  19. Measuring adherence to antiretroviral treatment: the role of pharmacy records of drug withdrawals.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eliana Battaggia; Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Schmidt, Ana Lucia; Piloto, Bruna Mamprim; França, Bruna Biagi; de Oliveira, Adriana Santos; Pouza, Adriana Rodrigues; Moreno, Roberta Vilela; de Melo Picone, Camila; de Almeida Ribeiro, Manoel Carlos Sampaio

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) among HIV + adults, assess its association with HIV viral load (VL) and identify factors associated to adherence. A survey involving a random sample of adults followed at a HIV/AIDS reference center in São Paulo city, Brazil, from 2007 to 2009 was done. A questionnaire was applied and data were retrieved from the pharmacy and medical records. The study involved 292 subjects: 70.2% men; median age: 43 years; median duration of ART: 8 years. 89.3% self-reported taken all prescribed pills in the last 3 days but only 39.3% picked up ≥95% of the prescribed ART from the pharmacy in the last 12 months. At the multivariate analysis having symptoms prior to ART, taking fewer ART pills, and not missing medical appointments were independently associated to higher adherence. Adherence was strongly associated with undetectable HIV VL. Rates of undetectable HIV VL did not differ from 80 to ≥95% of adherence.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral therapy adherence among Peruvian adolescents living with HIV: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Milagros; Muñoz, Maribel; Valle, Emiliano; Leon, Segundo R.; Díaz Perez, Dayana; Kolevic, Lenka; Franke, Molly

    2018-01-01

    AIDS deaths among adolescents are increasing globally. This qualitative study investigated the barriers and facilitators to cART adherence among Peruvian adolescents living with HIV. Guided by a social ecological model, we analyzed transcripts from 24 psychosocial support groups for HIV-positive adolescents aged 13–17 years and 15 individual, in-depth interviews with cART providers and caregivers to identify the barriers and facilitators to cART adherence at the individual, family/caregiver and hospital levels. Most barriers and facilitators to cART adherence clustered at the individual and family/caregiver levels, centering on support provided to adolescents; history of declining health due to suboptimal cART adherence; side effects from antiretroviral drugs; and cART misinformation. Interventions to support adolescent HIV cART adherence should begin at the individual and family/caregiver levels and include an educational component. No adolescent living with HIV should die from AIDS in an era of accessible cART. PMID:29447226

  1. Association Between Internalized HIV-Related Stigma and HIV Care Visit Adherence.

    PubMed

    Rice, Whitney S; Crockett, Kaylee B; Mugavero, Michael J; Raper, James L; Atkins, Ghislaine C; Turan, Bulent

    2017-12-15

    Internalized HIV-related stigma acts as a barrier to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, but its effects on other HIV care continuum outcomes are unclear. Among 196 HIV clinic patients in Birmingham, AL, we assessed internalized HIV-related stigma and depressive symptom severity using validated multi-item scales and assessed ART adherence using a validated single-item measure. HIV visit adherence (attended out of total scheduled visits) was calculated using data from clinic records. Using covariate-adjusted regression analysis, we investigated the association between internalized stigma and visit adherence. Using path analytic methods with bootstrapping, we tested the mediating role of depressive symptoms in the association between internalized stigma and visit adherence and the mediating role of visit adherence in the association between internalized stigma and ART adherence. Higher internalized stigma was associated with lower visit adherence (B = -0.04, P = 0.04). Black (versus white) race and depressive symptoms were other significant predictors within this model. Mediation analysis yielded no indirect effect through depression in the association between internalized stigma and visit adherence (B = -0.18, SE = 0.11, 95% confidence interval: -0.44 to -0.02) in the whole sample. Supplemental mediated moderation analyses revealed gender-specific effects. Additionally, the effect of internalized stigma on suboptimal ART adherence was mediated by lower visit adherence (B = -0.18, SE = 0.11, 95% confidence interval: -0.44 to -0.02). Results highlight the importance of internalized HIV stigma to multiple and sequential HIV care continuum outcomes. Also, findings suggest multiple intervention targets, including addressing internalized stigma directly, reducing depressive symptoms, and promoting consistent engagement in care.

  2. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Bhagwanjee, Anil; Govender, Kaymarlin; Akintola, Olagoke; Petersen, Inge; George, Gavin; Johnstone, Leigh; Naidoo, Kerisha

    2011-01-01

    Social and psychological barriers to the disclosure of one's seropositive HIV status to significant others and poor adherence to taking medications pose significant challenges to the scaling-up of access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the workplace. Such barriers are predictive of sub-optimal treatment outcomes and bedevil HIV-prevention interventions at a societal level. Against this background, this article explores the lived experiences of 19 HIV-positive male participants, between the ages of 33 and 57 years, who were enrolled in an ART programme managed at an occupational health clinic at a mining company in South Africa. The majority of these mineworkers had been aware of their HIV status for between 5 and 7 years. The study explored psychological and relational factors, as aspects of these participants lived experiences, which had a bearing on their adherence to their ART regimen and the disclosure choices that they made regarding their HIV status. In our sample, those participants who were adherent demonstrated higher levels of control and acceptance of their HIV infection and were more confident in their ability to manage their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and significant challenges in maintaining control over their lives. While most of the men favoured disclosing their HIV status to their partners for the sake of treatment support, they were less sure about disclosing to family members and non-family members, respectively, because of their need to protect these persons and due to their fear of being stigmatised. It was evident that treatment adherence choices and behaviours were impacted by psychological and relational factors, including disclosure decisions. We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and

  3. Substance Use, Violence, and Antiretroviral Adherence: A Latent Class Analysis of Women Living with HIV in Canada.

    PubMed

    Carter, Allison; Roth, Eric Abella; Ding, Erin; Milloy, M-J; Kestler, Mary; Jabbari, Shahab; Webster, Kath; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Loutfy, Mona; Kaida, Angela

    2018-03-01

    We used latent class analysis to identify substance use patterns for 1363 women living with HIV in Canada and assessed associations with socio-economic marginalization, violence, and sub-optimal adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). A six-class model was identified consisting of: abstainers (26.3%), Tobacco Users (8.81%), Alcohol Users (31.9%), 'Socially Acceptable' Poly-substance Users (13.9%), Illicit Poly-substance Users (9.81%) and Illicit Poly-substance Users of All Types (9.27%). Multinomial logistic regression showed that women experiencing recent violence had significantly higher odds of membership in all substance use latent classes, relative to Abstainers, while those reporting sub-optimal cART adherence had higher odds of being members of the poly-substance use classes only. Factors significantly associated with Illicit Poly-substance Users of All Types were sexual minority status, lower income, and lower resiliency. Findings underline a need for increased social and structural supports for women who use substances to support them in leading safe and healthy lives with HIV.

  4. Novel Approaches for Visualizing and Analyzing Dose-Timing Data from Electronic Drug Monitors, or "How the 'Broken Window' Theory Pertains to ART Adherence".

    PubMed

    Gill, Christopher J; DeSilva, Mary Bachman; Hamer, Davidson H; Keyi, Xu; Wilson, Ira B; Sabin, Lora

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral medications is usually expressed in terms of the proportion of doses taken. However, the timing of doses taken may also be an important dimension to overall adherence. Little is known about whether patients who mistime doses are also more likely to skip doses. Using data from the completed Adherence for Life randomized controlled trial, we created visual and statistical models to capture and analyze dose timing data collected longitudinally with electronic drug monitors (EDM). From scatter plots depicting dose time versus calendar date, we identified dominant patterns of dose taking and calculated key features [slope of line over calendar date; residual mean standard error (RMSE)]. Each was assessed for its ability to categorize subjects with 'sub-optimal' (<95 % of doses taken) using area under the receiver operating characteristic (AROC) curve analysis. Sixty eight subjects contributed EDM data, with ~300 to 400 observations/subject. While regression line slopes did not predict 'sub-optimal' adherence (AROC 0.51, 95 % CI 0.26-0.75), the variability in dose timing (RMSE) was strongly predictive (AROC 0.79, 95 % CI 0.62-0.97). Compared with the lowest quartile of RMSE (minimal dose time variability), each successive quartile roughly doubled the odds of 'sub-optimal' adherence (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.3-3.4). Patterns of dose timing and mistiming are strongly related to overall adherence behavior. Notably, individuals who skip doses are more likely to mistime doses, with the degree of risk positively correlated with the extent of dose timing variability.

  5. Optimization of proximity ligation assay (PLA) for detection of protein interactions and fusion proteins in non-adherent cells: application to pre-B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Debaize, Lydie; Jakobczyk, Hélène; Rio, Anne-Gaëlle; Gandemer, Virginie; Troadec, Marie-Bérengère

    2017-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities, including chromosomal translocations, are described for many hematological malignancies. From the clinical perspective, detection of chromosomal abnormalities is relevant not only for diagnostic and treatment purposes but also for prognostic risk assessment. From the translational research perspective, the identification of fusion proteins and protein interactions has allowed crucial breakthroughs in understanding the pathogenesis of malignancies and consequently major achievements in targeted therapy. We describe the optimization of the Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) to ascertain the presence of fusion proteins, and protein interactions in non-adherent pre-B cells. PLA is an innovative method of protein-protein colocalization detection by molecular biology that combines the advantages of microscopy with the advantages of molecular biology precision, enabling detection of protein proximity theoretically ranging from 0 to 40 nm. We propose an optimized PLA procedure. We overcome the issue of maintaining non-adherent hematological cells by traditional cytocentrifugation and optimized buffers, by changing incubation times, and modifying washing steps. Further, we provide convincing negative and positive controls, and demonstrate that optimized PLA procedure is sensitive to total protein level. The optimized PLA procedure allows the detection of fusion proteins and protein interactions on non-adherent cells. The optimized PLA procedure described here can be readily applied to various non-adherent hematological cells, from cell lines to patients' cells. The optimized PLA protocol enables detection of fusion proteins and their subcellular expression, and protein interactions in non-adherent cells. Therefore, the optimized PLA protocol provides a new tool that can be adopted in a wide range of applications in the biological field.

  6. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment in HIV-positive patients in the Cameroon context: promoting the use of medication reminder methods.

    PubMed

    Roux, Perrine; Kouanfack, Charles; Cohen, Julien; Marcellin, Fabienne; Boyer, Sylvie; Delaporte, Eric; Carrieri, Patrizia; Laurent, Christian; Spire, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa has made it possible to investigate the maintenance of adherence to HIV medications. We describe here adherence to ART and identify its correlates in the Cameroonian context. Prospective cohort study in 9 rural district hospitals. A mixed logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence to ART in 401 patients with data prospectively collected on adherence. Although 73% of patients were adherent after the first month on ART, this proportion decreased to 61% after 24 months. After adjustment for known factors of adherence to ART (such as knowledge, motivation and side-effects), patients who reported willingness to start ART before initiation, those who were satisfied with information provided by their physicians, and those who implemented reminder methods for ART intake {eg, using an alarm clock, mobile phone, or watch [odds ratio (95% confidence interval)] = 2.45 (1.58 to 3.79), but also the help of a relative to remind them or other methods} were more likely to be adherent to ART. Besides highlighting some correlates already known to have an impact on adherence to ART, our findings also underline the need to reinforce the counseling component of follow-up through innovative methods. Accordingly, training and implementation research should encourage the use of medication reminder methods, such as mobile phones, to assure adherence over time and improve long-term response to ART.

  7. A qualitative study examining HIV Antiretroviral Adherence Counseling and Support in Community Pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Cocohoba, Jennifer; Comfort, Megan; Kianfar, Hamaseh; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To use qualitative research methods to obtain an in-depth understanding of how antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence support and counseling is provided in HIV-focused community pharmacies. To determine relevant facilitators and barriers around adherence support from both patient’s and pharmacist’s perspectives. METHODS Qualitative research study of patients who patronize and pharmacists employed at HIV-focused pharmacies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Participants were recruited using flyers at HIV clinics, community-based organizations, and using newsletter blurbs. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methods to determine emergent themes in the data. RESULTS 19 eligible patients with a self-reported diagnosis of HIV, taking their current ART regimen for at least 3 months, and who obtained their ART from a community pharmacy in the San Francisco Bay Area were included. 9 pharmacists employed at 13 different pharmacy locations frequented by participants were interviewed. Emergent themes included descriptions of pharmacy adherence counseling and support, roles and responsibilities regarding medication adherence, barriers to providing adherence support, and feeling connected as a facilitator to adherence support relationships. CONCLUSION Pharmacists provide diverse types of ART adherence support and are uniquely positioned to help clients manage their medications. Additional training on developing relationships with patients and advertising regarding their adherence services may further the role of community pharmacists in supporting antiretroviral adherence. PMID:23806059

  8. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Debra; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Kunene, Pinky; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, including 30 individual interviews and four focus group discussions with patients in the first 9 months of ART initiation. Data were inductively analyzed, using thematic analysis, to identify themes central to ART adherence in this context. Four themes emerged that characterize the participants' experiences and high motivation to adhere to ART. Participants in this study were highly motivated to adhere, as they acknowledged that ART was ‘life-giving’, in the face of a large amount of morbidity and mortality. They were further supported by techniques of routine remembering, and highlighted the importance of good social support and access to supportive healthcare workers, to their continued success in negotiating their treatment. Participants in the current study told us that their adherence motivation is enhanced by free accessible care, approachable and supportive healthcare workers, broad social acceptance of ART, and past first-hand experiences with AIDS-related co-morbidity and mortality. Programs that include specific attention to these aspects of care will likely be successful in the long term. PMID:25692575

  9. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy During and After Pregnancy: Cohort Study on Women Receiving Care in Malawi's Option B+ Program.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas D; Msukwa, Malango T; Egger, Matthias; Tenthani, Lyson; Tweya, Hannock; Jahn, Andreas; Gadabu, Oliver J; Tal, Kali; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Spoerri, Adrian; Phiri, Nozgechi; Chimbwandira, Frank; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Keiser, Olivia

    2016-11-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial to preventing mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and ensuring the long-term effectiveness of ART, yet data are sparse from African routine care programs on maternal adherence to triple ART.  We analyzed data from women who started ART at 13 large health facilities in Malawi between September 2011 and October 2013. We defined adherence as the percentage of days "covered" by pharmacy claims. Adherence of ≥90% was deemed adequate. We calculated inverse probability of censoring weights to adjust adherence estimates for informative censoring. We used descriptive statistics, survival analysis, and pooled logistic regression to compare adherence between pregnant and breastfeeding women eligible for ART under Option B+, and nonpregnant and nonbreastfeeding women who started ART with low CD4 cell counts or World Health Organization clinical stage 3/4 disease.  Adherence was adequate for 73% of the women during pregnancy, for 66% in the first 3 months post partum, and for about 75% during months 4-21 post partum. About 70% of women who started ART during pregnancy and breastfeeding adhered adequately during the first 2 years of ART, but only about 30% of them had maintained adequate adherence at every visit. Risk factors for inadequate adherence included starting ART with an Option B+ indication, at a younger age, or at a district hospital or health center.  One-third of women retained in the Option B+ program adhered inadequately during pregnancy and breastfeeding, especially soon after delivery. Effective interventions to improve adherence among women in this program should be implemented. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Mental Health and Antiretroviral Adherence Among Youth Living With HIV in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Ng, Lauren; Kanyanganzi, Fredrick; Kirk, Catherine; Bizimana, Justin; Cyamatare, Felix; Mushashi, Christina; Kim, Taehoon; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Binagwaho, Agnes; Betancourt, Theresa S

    2016-10-01

    In Rwanda, significant progress has been made in advancing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among youth. As availability of ART increases, adherence is critical for preventing poor clinical outcomes and transmission of HIV. The goals of the study are to (1) describe ART adherence and mental health problems among youth living with HIV aged 10 to 17; and (2) examine the association between these factors among this population in rural Rwanda. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted that examined the association of mental health status and ART adherence among youth (n = 193). ART adherence, mental health status, and related variables were examined based on caregiver and youth report. Nonadherence was defined as ever missing or refusing a dose of ART within the past month. Multivariate modeling was performed to examine the association between mental health status and ART adherence. Approximately 37% of youth missed or refused ART in the past month. In addition, a high level of depressive symptoms (26%) and attempt to hurt or kill oneself (12%) was observed in this population of youth living with HIV in Rwanda. In multivariate analysis, nonadherence was significantly associated with some mental health outcomes, including conduct problems (odds ratio 2.90, 95% confidence interval 1.55-5.43) and depression (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.04), according to caregiver report. A marginally significant association was observed for youth report of depressive symptoms. The findings suggest that mental health should be considered among the factors related to ART nonadherence in HIV services for youth, particularly for mental health outcomes, such as conduct problems and depression. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Tailored nutrition education and food assistance improve adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy: evidence from Honduras.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Homero; Palar, Kartika; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Ramírez, Blanca; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity and malnutrition negatively affect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are associated with poor HIV clinical outcomes. We examined the effect of providing household food assistance and nutrition education on ART adherence. A 12-month prospective clinical trial compared the effect of a monthly household food basket (FB) plus nutrition education (NE) versus NE alone on ART adherence on 400 HIV patients at four clinics in Honduras. Participants had been receiving ART for an average of 3.7 years and were selected because they had suboptimal adherence. Primary outcome measures were missed clinic appointments, delayed prescription refills, and self-reported missed doses of ART. These three adherence measures improved for both groups over 12 months (p < 0.01), mostly within 6 months. On-time prescription refills improved for the FB plus NE group by 19.6 % more than the group receiving NE alone after 6 months (p < 0.01), with no further change at 12 months. Change in missed appointments and self-reported missed ART doses did not significantly differ by intervention group.

  12. Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence among patients with severe mental illnesses in a tertiary psychiatric facility in Maiduguri, North-eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdu Wakawa; Yahya, Shuaibu; Pindar, Sadique Kwajafa; Wakil, Musa Abba; Garkuwa, Adamu; Sale, Shehu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sub-optimal adherence constitutes a significant impediment to the management of severe mental illnesses (SMIs) as it negatively impacts on the course of the illness and the treatment outcome. In this study, the levels of adherence, prevalence and the predictors of sub-optimal adherence were assessed in a sub-Saharan African setting. Methods Three hundred and seventy (370) respondents with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression were randomly enrolled and interviewed at the out-patient department of the Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Maiduguri in northeastern Nigeria. An anonymous sociodemographic questionnaire and a clinical proforma designed by the authors, Oslo social support scale and the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were used for data collection. Results The prevalence of sub-optimal adherence was 55.7%. The independent predictors of sub-optimal adherence were; seeking for traditional/ spiritual treatment (Odds Ratio (O.R.) = 6.523, 95% C.I. = 3.773 - 11.279, P = < 0.001), male gender (O.R. = 3.307, 95% C.I. = 1.907 - 5.737, P = < 0.001), low levels of insight (O.R. = 1.753, 95 C.I. = 1.220 - 2.519, P = 0.002), and low social support levels (O.R. = 1.528, 95% C.I. = 1.097 - 2.129, P = 0.012). Conclusion Based on the outcome of the study, we recommend the development of psycho-educational programmes on adherence and the active involvement of the relations and significant others in the management of patients with SMIs in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26405475

  13. Food insecurity and antiretroviral adherence among HIV positive adults who drink alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Grebler, Tamar; Amaral, Christina M; McKerney, Megan; White, Denise; Kalichman, Moira O; Cherry, Chauncey; Eaton, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Food insecurity is associated with HIV treatment non-adherence and poor health outcomes for people living with HIV/AIDS. Given the poor nutritional status common to people who drink alcohol, food insecurity may be particularly problematic for HIV positive individuals who drink alcohol. To examine food insecurity among HIV positive men and women who drink alcohol and its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, health outcomes and health service utilization. Adults living with HIV (N = 183) in Atlanta, Georgia who reported alcohol use in the previous week and were receiving ART participated in a 12-month cohort. Participants were recruited from infectious disease clinics and social services to complete computerized interviews, monthly-unannounced pill counts to monitor ART adherence, and daily cell-phone delivered interactive-text assessments for alcohol use. Forty-three percent of participants experienced food insecurity during at least one month of the study period. Food insecurity was independently associated with suboptimal ART adherence and less suppressed HIV viral load over. Individuals who experienced food insecurity also had histories of more medical and psychiatric hospitalizations, and greater mental health problems. Food insecurity is prevalent among alcohol using people receiving ART and food insecurity is associated with treatment non-adherence, poor health outcomes, and increased medical and psychiatric hospitalizations.

  14. HIV-infected adolescents have low adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Firdu, Naod; Enquselassie, Fikre; Jerene, Degu

    2017-01-01

    For antiretroviral therapy (ART) to work effectively, adherence is very crucial. However, most studies done on ART adherence are either on children or on adults. There is limited information on the level of adherence among adolescents. Using a cross-sectional study design, we interviewed 273 HIV-infected adolescents receiving ART from three hospitals in Addis Ababa. We used a structured questionnaire to measure adherence levels using patient self-reports. Bivariate and multivariate methods were used for analysis. We interviewed 273 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years, and 144 (52.7%) of the participants were girls. Their mean age was 15.4 years (SD± 1.75). The self-reported adherence rate of the respondents was 79.1% (216/273). On bivariate analysis, variables like WHO clinical stage, being on Cotrimoxazole Prophylactic Therapy (CPT), marital and living status of the parent, whether parent was on ART or not and having special instructions for ART medications were associated with optimum adherence. However of those, only WHO stage IV (adjusted OR, 12.874 95% CI, 2.079-79.706), being on CPT (adjusted OR, 0.339 95% CI, 0.124-0.97) and adolescents with widowed parent (adjusted OR, 0.087 with 95% CI, 0.021-0.359) were found to be significantly associated with optimum ART adherence. The level of self-reported ART adherence among HIV-infected adolescents at the three hospitals was below the recommended threshold. Though earlier presentation of adolescents to care should be encouraged, more targeted adherence support should be planned for those who present at an early stage of their illness.

  15. Medication adherence in glaucoma: approaches for optimizing patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Tsai, James C

    2006-04-01

    To summarize recent literature regarding medication adherence with a focus on the complexities inherent in glaucoma management. Adherence to medications can be enhanced by undertaking the following strategies: enhanced patient education; improved dosing schedules; increased accessibility to healthcare (including longer hours, evening hours, and shorter wait times), and improved provider-patient relationships (e.g. increased trust). Patients may be less likely to forgo medication use due to cost pressures if the physician trust level is high. Recent studies suggest a role for baseline screening for adherence predictors and focused interventions in addressing modifiable risk factors for poor adherence (such as depression, stress, and lower education). Many factors are associated with the lack of medication adherence in patients. The solution is likely to be multi-dimensional and employ combination strategy (must be individualized for the patient). Educational interventions involving patients, family members, or both can be effective in improving adherence.

  16. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and retention in care for adolescents living with HIV from 10 districts in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nabukeera-Barungi, Nicolette; Elyanu, Peter; Asire, Barbara; Katureebe, Cordelia; Lukabwe, Ivan; Namusoke, Eleanor; Musinguzi, Joshua; Atuyambe, Lynn; Tumwesigye, Nathan

    2015-11-14

    Adolescents have gained increased attention because they are the only age group where HIV related mortality is going up. We set out to describe the level and factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) as well as the 1 year retention in care among adolescents in 10 representative districts in Uganda. In addition, we explored the barriers and facilitators of adherence to ART among adolescents. The study involved 30 health facilities from 10 representative districts in Uganda. We employed both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods in convergent design. The former involved Focus group discussions with adolescents living with HIV, Key informant interviews with various stakeholders and in depth interviews with adolescents. The quantitative involved using retrospective records review to extract the last recorded adherence level from all adolescents who were active in HIV care. Factors associated with adherence were extracted from the ART cards. For the 1 year retention in care, we searched the hospital records of all adolescents in the 30 facilities who had started ART 1 year before the study to find out how many were still in care. Out of 1824 adolescents who were active on ART, 90.4 % (N = 1588) had ≥95 % adherence recorded on their ART cards at their last clinic visit. Only location in rural health facilities was independently associated with poor adherence to ART (P = 0.008, OR 2.64 [1.28 5.43]). Of the 156 adolescents who started ART, 90 % (N = 141) were still active in care 1 year later. Stigma, discrimination and disclosure issues were the most outstanding of all barriers to adherence. Other barriers included poverty, fatigue, side effects, pill burden, depression among others. Facilitators of adherence mainly included peer support groups, counseling, supportive health care workers, short waiting time and provision of food and transport. Adherence to ART was good among adolescents. Being in rural areas was associated with

  17. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a clinical cohort of HIV-infected children in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Ayaya, Samuel O; Musick, Beverly S; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Cohen, Craig R; Nash, Denis; Wabwire, Deo; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Wiehe, Sarah E

    2018-01-01

    To describe antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and associated factors for a large HIV-infected pediatric cohort followed by sites of the East Africa International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) consortium. This study utilized prospectively collected clinical data from HIV-infected children less than 13 years of age who initiated ART within 4 clinical care programs (with 26 clinical sites) in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania and were followed for up to 6 years. Programs used one of 3 adherence measures, including 7-day quantitative recall, 7-day categorical recall, and clinician pill assessments. We fit a hierarchical, three-level, logistic-regression model to examine adherence, with observations nested within patient, and patients within the 26 sites providing pediatric HIV data to this analysis. In East Africa, 3,304 children, 52.0% male, were enrolled in care and were subsequently observed for a median of 92 weeks (inter-quartile range [IQR] 50.3-145.0 weeks). Median age at ART initiation was 5.5 years ([IQR] 3.0-8.5 years). "Good" adherence, as reported by each clinic's measures, was extremely high, remaining on average above 90% throughout all years of follow-up. Longer time on ART was associated with higher adherence (adjusted Odds Ratio-aOR-per log-transformed week on ART: 1.095, 95% Confidence Interval-CI-[1.052-1.150].) Patients enrolled in higher-volume programs exhibited higher rates of clinician-assessed adherence (aOR per log-500 patients: 1.174, 95% CI [1.108-1.245]). Significant site-level variability in reported adherence was observed (0.28), with even higher variability among patients (0.71). In a sub-analysis, being an orphan at the start of ART was strongly associated with lower ART adherence rates (aOR: 0.919, 95% CI [0.864-0.976]). Self-reported adherence remained high over a median of 1.8 years in HIV care, but varied according to patient-level and site-level factors. Consistent adherence monitoring with validated measures and

  18. Antiretroviral Adherence Perspectives of Pregnant and Postpartum Women in Guyana.

    PubMed

    Vitalis, Deborah; Hill, Zelee

    The Caribbean region has the second highest HIV prevalence after Sub-Saharan Africa. Guyana's adult HIV prevalence is 1.9% among pregnant women, with women accounting for an estimated 58% of all persons living with HIV. However, there are few studies on ART adherence in the Caribbean, none from Guyana, and none focusing on adherence in pregnancy and the postpartum period. The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives of HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women and healthcare providers in Guyana about barriers and facilitators to ART adherence. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with 24 HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women and nine healthcare professionals at five clinics between February and April 2012. The Framework Method for analysing qualitative data identified facilitators and barriers related to five core themes: (i) Concern for wellbeing of children; (ii) ART-related factors; (iii) Disclosure; (iv) Socio-economic issues; and (v) Religious and cultural beliefs. Non-disclosure did not adversely affect adherence, contrary to other studies in the literature. Two broad categories emerged from the lived experiences of women in Guyana. The first is related to the act of actually taking their medication where their tenacity is displayed in efforts made to ensure ART is taken. The second relates to the significance of ART to them in terms of reduced risk of MTCT, and the possibility of better health for themselves to enable them to care for their children. However, issues related to poverty, food insecurity and side effects reduced adherence need to be adequately addressed.

  19. Impact of Socioeconomic Inequality on Access, Adherence, and Outcomes of Antiretroviral Treatment Services for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Hwang, Jongnam; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Latkin, Noah Reed Knowlton; Tran, Ngoc Kim; Minh Thuc, Vu Thi; Nguyen, Huong Lan Thi; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Le, Huong Thi; Tran, Tho Dinh; Latkin, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring an equal benefit across different patient groups is necessary while scaling up free-of-charge antiretroviral treatment (ART) services. This study aimed to measure the disparity in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART in Vietnam and the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) characteristics on the levels of inequality. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1133 PLWH in Vietnam. ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes were self-reported using a structured questionnaire. Wealth-related inequality was calculated using a concentration index, and a decomposition analysis was used to determine the contribution of each SES variable to inequality in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART. Based on SES, minor inequality was found in ART access and adherence while there was considerable inequality in ART outcomes. Poor people were more likely to start treatment early, while rich people had better adherence and overall treatment outcomes. Decomposition revealed that occupation and education played important roles in inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes. The findings suggested that health services should be integrated into the ART regimen. Furthermore, occupational orientation and training courses should be provided to reduce inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes.

  20. What makes orphans in Kigali, Rwanda, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy? Perspectives of their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Poudel, Krishna C; Muganda, John; Sato, Tomoko; Mutabazi, Vincent; Muhayimpundu, Ribakare; Majyambere, Adolphe; Nyonsenga, Simon P; Sase, Eriko; Jimba, Masamine

    2014-01-01

    Every year, approximately 260,000 children are infected with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. The timely initiation and high level of maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are crucial to reducing the suffering of HIV-positive children. We need to develop a better understanding of the background of children's ART non-adherence because it is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to explore the background related to ART non-adherence, specifically in relation to the orphan status of children in Kigali, Rwanda. We conducted 19 focus group discussions with a total of 121 caregivers of HIV-positive children in Kigali. The primary data for analysis were verbatim transcripts and socio-demographic data. A content analysis was performed for qualitative data analysis and interpretation. The study found several contextual factors that influenced non-adherence: among double orphans, there was psychological distance between the caregivers and children, whereas economic burden was the primary issue among paternal orphans. The factors promoting adherence also were unique to each orphan status, such as the positive attitude about disclosing serostatus to the child by double orphans' caregivers, and feelings of guilt about the child's condition among non-orphaned caregivers. Knowledge of orphan status is essential to elucidate the factors influencing ART adherence among HIV-positive children. In this qualitative study, we identified the orphan-related contextual factors that influenced ART adherence. Understanding the social context is important in dealing with the challenges to ART adherence among HIV-positive children.

  1. ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG HIV-INFECTED ADULTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Linda; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    National estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and adherence support services utilization are needed to inform efforts to improve the health of HIV-infected persons in the United States. In a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 86% self-reported taking all ART doses in the past 72 hours. Overall, 20% reported using adherence support services and 2% reported an unmet need for services. If all nonadherent persons not receiving adherence support and all persons with a self-perceived unmet need for adherence support accessed services, resources to support ~42,673 additional persons would be needed. Factors associated with lower adherence included younger age, female gender, depression, stimulant use, binge alcohol use, greater than once-daily dosing, longer time since HIV diagnosis, and patient beliefs. Predictors of adherence are multifactorial so multiple targeted strategies to improve adherence are warranted. Providing adherence support services to all those in need may require additional resources. PMID:25490733

  2. Managing HIV-infected children in a low-resource, public clinic: a comparison of nurse vs. clinical officer practices in ART refill, calculation of adherence and subsequent appointments.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Ralf; Feldacker, Caryl; Tweya, Hannock; Gondwe, Chimwemwe; Chiwoko, Jane; Gumulira, Joe; Kalulu, Mike; Phiri, Sam

    2012-01-01

    In Malawi, as in other sub-Saharan African countries, nurses manage patients of all ages on antiretroviral treatment(ART). Nurse management of children is rarely studied.We compare ART prescribing between nurses and clinical officers during routine clinic visits at an urban, public clinic to inform policy in paediatric ART management. Caregivers of children on first-line ART provided information about visit dates, pill counts, ART dosage and formulation to a nurse and, subsequently, to a clinical officer. Nurses and clinical officers independently calculated adherence, dosage based on body weight, and set next appointment date. Clinical officers, but not nurses, accessed an electronic data system that made the calculations for them based on information from prior visits, actual and expected pill consumption, and standard drug supplies. Nurses calculated with pen and paper. For numerical variables, Bland-Altman graphs plot differences of each nurse clinical officer pair against the mean, show the 95% limits of agreement (LoA), and also show the mean difference across all reviews. Kappa statistics assess agreement for categorical variables. A total of 704 matched nurse clinical officer reviews of 367 children attending the ART clinics between March and July 2010 were analyzed. Eight nurses and 18 clinical officers were involved; two nurses and five clinical officers managed 100 visits or more. Overall, there was a good agreement between the two cadres. Differences between nurses and clinical officers were within narrow LoA and mean differences showed little deviation from zero, indicating little skewing towards one cadre. LoA of adherence and morning and evening ART dosages varied from -24% to 24%, -0.4 to 0.4 and -0.41 to 0.40 tablets,respectively, with mean differences (95% CI) of 0.003 (-0.9, 0.91), -0.005 (-0.02, 0.01) and -0.009 (-0.02, 0.01). Next appointment calculations differed more between cadres with LoA from -40 to 42 days [mean difference: 0.96 days (95

  3. Psychosocial Aspects of ART Counseling: A Comparison of HIV Beliefs and Knowledge in PMTCT and ART-Naïve Women.

    PubMed

    Gouse, Hetta; Henry, Michelle; Robbins, Reuben N; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Joska, John A

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-readiness counseling has been deemed critical to adherence, instilling knowledge, and promoting positive beliefs and attitudes. In the landscape of changing policy in South Africa, some ART initiators have had prior ART-readiness counseling (e.g., for prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission [PMTCT] programs). The extent to which previous counseling resulted in retained knowledge and belief is unknown, which may be important to the promotion of women's ART adherence. We compared 320 women living with HIV and initiating ART, with and without prior PMTCT on HIV knowledge, treatment, beliefs, and attitudes. The PMTCT group held more accurate beliefs and more positive attitudes about ART. Both groups lacked understanding of basic HIV biology. Nondisclosure of HIV status was high. Thus, in individuals re-initiating therapy, some knowledge about HIV and its treatment was not well retained. Tailored education and counseling may be critical to adherence, with a focus on biological concepts that impact ART resistance. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Race-Based Medical Mistrust, Medication Beliefs and HIV Treatment Adherence: Test of a Mediation Model in People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Eaton, Lisa; Kalichman, Moira O.; Grebler, Tama; Merely, Cynthia; Welles, Brandi

    2016-01-01

    Race-based medical mistrust significantly predicts non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in people living with HIV. The current study builds on previous research that shows beliefs about medication necessity (i.e., “My medicines protect me from becoming worse”) and concerns (i.e., Having to take my medicines worries me) mediate the association between race-based medical mistrust and medication adherence. Racial and ethnic minority men and women living with HIV and receiving ART (N=178) in a southern US city completed computerized measures of demographic and health characteristics, telephone interviews of race-based medical mistrust and medication beliefs, and unannounced phone-based pill counts for ART adherence. Multiple mediation modeling showed that medical mistrust is related to medication necessity and concerns beliefs and ART adherence. Furthermore, medication necessity beliefs predicted ART adherence. The indirect effect of medical mistrust on adherence through medication necessity beliefs was also significant. Results confirm that medication necessity beliefs, although not concerns beliefs, mediate the association between medical mistrust and ART adherence. Medication necessity beliefs offer a viable target for interventions to improve ART adherence in the context of mistrust that patients may have for medical providers and health care systems. PMID:27392477

  5. Refining a personalized mHealth intervention to promote medication adherence among HIV+ methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jessica L; Georges, Shereen; Poquette, Amelia; Depp, Colin A; Atkinson, J Hampton; Moore, David J

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions to promote antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence have shown promise; however, among persons living with HIV who abuse methamphetamine (MA), effective tailoring of content to match the expressed needs of this patient population may be necessary. This study aimed (1) to understand patient perspectives of barriers and facilitators of ART adherence among people with HIV who use MA, and (2) to obtain feedback on the thematic content of an mHealth intervention in order to tailor the intervention to this subgroup. Two separate focus groups, each with 10 HIV+/MA+ individuals, were conducted. Transcribed audio recordings were qualitatively analyzed to identify emergent themes. Inter-rater reliability of themes was high (mean Kappa = .97). Adherence barriers included MA use, misguided beliefs about ART adherence, memory and planning difficulties, social barriers and perceived stigma, and mental heath issues. Facilitators of effective ART adherence were cognitive compensatory strategies, promotion of well-being, health-care supports, adherence education, and social support. Additionally, the focus groups generated content for reminder text messages to be used in the medication adherence intervention. This qualitative study demonstrates the feasibility of using focus groups to derive patient-centered intervention content to address the health challenge at hand in targeted populations.

  6. Optimal Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and High Muscular Fitness Are Associated with a Healthier Cardiometabolic Profile in Collegiate Students

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Ojeda-Pardo, Mónica Liliana; Sandoval-Cuellar, Carolina; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Prieto-Benavides, Daniel Humberto; Tordecilla-Sanders, Alejandra; Martinkėnas, Arvydas

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the combined association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and muscular fitness (MF) with cardiometabolic health in collegiate students. The present cross-sectional analysis consisted of 1248 (714 females) healthy collegiate students (20.1 ± 2.7 years old). Adherence to a MedDiet was assessed by a KIDMED (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index) questionnaire. Standing broad jump, standing vertical jump, and isometric handgrip dynamometry were used as indicators of MF. The cardiometabolic profile was assessed using the following components: triglycerides, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, glucose, and waist circumference. Analysis of covariance shows a significant difference in the cardiometabolic profile of both genders between the high MF/low MedDiet and high MF/optimal MedDiet groups, and the low MF/low MedDiet and low MF/optimal MedDiet groups (p < 0.001). No difference was found on cardiometabolic profile between high MF/optimal MedDiet and high MF/low MedDiet, both in males and females. Additionally, logistic regression shows that both female (odds ratio (OR) = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.8–3.7); p = 0.02) and male (OR = 3.38; 95% CI: (1.9–5.8); p < 0.001) participants in the optimal MedDiet/high MF group had the highest odds of expressing a healthier cardiometabolic profile as compared to those in the low MF/low MedDiet group. In conclusion, a combination of high MF levels and optimal adherence to a MedDiet is associated with a healthier cardiometabolic profile; however, high MF levels seem to circumvent the deleterious effects of having a low adherence to a MedDiet. PMID:29677099

  7. Optimal Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and High Muscular Fitness Are Associated with a Healthier Cardiometabolic Profile in Collegiate Students.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Ojeda-Pardo, Mónica Liliana; Sandoval-Cuellar, Carolina; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Carrillo, Hugo Alejandro; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Prieto-Benavides, Daniel Humberto; Tordecilla-Sanders, Alejandra; Martinkėnas, Arvydas; Agostinis-Sobrinho, César

    2018-04-20

    The aim of the study was to investigate the combined association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and muscular fitness (MF) with cardiometabolic health in collegiate students. The present cross-sectional analysis consisted of 1248 (714 females) healthy collegiate students (20.1 ± 2.7 years old). Adherence to a MedDiet was assessed by a KIDMED (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index) questionnaire. Standing broad jump, standing vertical jump, and isometric handgrip dynamometry were used as indicators of MF. The cardiometabolic profile was assessed using the following components: triglycerides, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, glucose, and waist circumference. Analysis of covariance shows a significant difference in the cardiometabolic profile of both genders between the high MF/low MedDiet and high MF/optimal MedDiet groups, and the low MF/low MedDiet and low MF/optimal MedDiet groups ( p < 0.001). No difference was found on cardiometabolic profile between high MF/optimal MedDiet and high MF/low MedDiet, both in males and females. Additionally, logistic regression shows that both female (odds ratio (OR) = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.8⁻3.7); p = 0.02) and male (OR = 3.38; 95% CI: (1.9⁻5.8); p < 0.001) participants in the optimal MedDiet/high MF group had the highest odds of expressing a healthier cardiometabolic profile as compared to those in the low MF/low MedDiet group. In conclusion, a combination of high MF levels and optimal adherence to a MedDiet is associated with a healthier cardiometabolic profile; however, high MF levels seem to circumvent the deleterious effects of having a low adherence to a MedDiet.

  8. [Factors influencing antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected people on antiretroviral therapy in Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Liu, W; Chen, T; Liu, N P; Zheng, Y J; Ye, S D; Zhang, Y; Wang, X M; Wang, G Z; Zhang, H B

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To analyze factors influencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients receiving ART at the town level in Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture (Ili) in May 2015 and to document enhanced ART for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using one-on-one interviews and data collection from the system of AIDS follow-up management in three ART services centers at the town level of Ili. The subjects were HIV-infected individuals, aged 18 years or older, who were receiving ART during the survey. The surveys collected demographic characteristics, information related to ART and status of engaging ART, smoking and drinking behavior, depression, and quality of life. Results: A total of 412 participants completed the survey. The age was (41.1±8.0) years (range, 19-67 years). Approximately 60.9% (251) were male and 39.1% (161) were female. The survey showed that 75.0% (309) of participants were in good adherence and the P (50) ( P (25), P (75)) of quality of life was 56.31 (50.55, 59.42). Females demonstrated better adherence to ART (82.6% ( n= 133)) than males (70.1% ( n= 76)) (χ(2)=8.16, P= 0.005). The compliance rate of participants (78.0% ( n= 54)) with depression was higher than non-depressed participants (63.5% ( n= 255)) (χ(2)=7.52, P= 0.008). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the probability of good adherence to ART increased with increasing quality of life ( OR= 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.09). Moreover, participants who consumed alcohol or disclosed their HIV infection status to families were less likely to have good adherence to ART ( OR= 0.26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.53 and OR= 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13-0.72, respectively). Additionally, employed participants were also less likely to have good adherence to ART compared with unemployed participants ( OR= 0.45, 95% CI: 0.21-0.97). Conclusion: HIV/AIDS patients primarily showed good adherence to ART. Factors

  9. Impact of Socioeconomic Inequality on Access, Adherence, and Outcomes of Antiretroviral Treatment Services for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Long Hoang; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Latkin, Noah Reed Knowlton; Tran, Ngoc Kim; Minh Thuc, Vu Thi; Nguyen, Huong Lan Thi; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Le, Huong Thi; Tran, Tho Dinh; Latkin, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ensuring an equal benefit across different patient groups is necessary while scaling up free-of-charge antiretroviral treatment (ART) services. This study aimed to measure the disparity in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART in Vietnam and the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) characteristics on the levels of inequality. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1133 PLWH in Vietnam. ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes were self-reported using a structured questionnaire. Wealth-related inequality was calculated using a concentration index, and a decomposition analysis was used to determine the contribution of each SES variable to inequality in access, adherence, and outcomes of ART. Results Based on SES, minor inequality was found in ART access and adherence while there was considerable inequality in ART outcomes. Poor people were more likely to start treatment early, while rich people had better adherence and overall treatment outcomes. Decomposition revealed that occupation and education played important roles in inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes Conclusion The findings suggested that health services should be integrated into the ART regimen. Furthermore, occupational orientation and training courses should be provided to reduce inequality in ART access, adherence, and treatment outcomes. PMID:28005937

  10. Non-Disclosure of HIV Status and Associations with Psychological Factors, ART Non-Adherence, and Viral Load Non-Suppression Among People Living with HIV in the UK.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulou, Marina; Lampe, Fiona C; Sherr, Lorraine; Phillips, Andrew N; Johnson, Margaret A; Gilson, Richard; Perry, Nicky; Wilkins, Ed; Lascar, Monica; Collins, Simon; Hart, Graham; Speakman, Andrew; Rodger, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    Disclosure of HIV status to family, friends, and a stable partner may be linked to improved health outcomes for people living with HIV. This study assessed whether non-disclosure is associated with psychological symptoms, non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and viral load (VL) non-suppression. A total of 3258 HIV-diagnosed individuals in the UK completed the confidential ASTRA study questionnaire (2011-2012). Participants reported whether they told anyone they had HIV; to which confidant(s) (friends, family, work colleagues, stable partner) and to what extent (none, some, most/all). The prevalence and factors associated with non-disclosure were assessed. Associations between non-disclosure and the following factors were established using modified Poisson regression with adjustment for socio-demographic factors (gender, age group, ethnicity), HIV-related factors (time since HIV diagnosis, ART status), and clinic: low social support (score ≤ 12 on modified Duke-UNC FSSQ); depression and anxiety symptoms (≥10 on PHQ-9 and GAD-7 respectively); self-reported ART non-adherence in past 2 weeks/3 months; VL non-suppression (clinic-recorded VL > 50 copies/mL among those who started ART ≥ 6 months ago). Among 3233 participants with disclosure data, the prevalence of non-disclosure to anyone was 16.6 % (n/N = 61/367) among heterosexual men, 15.7 % (98/626) among women, and 5.0 % (113/2240) among MSM. MSM were more likely to disclose to some/all friends compared to family (85.8 vs. 59.9 %) while heterosexuals were less likely to disclose to friends than family (44.1 vs. 61.1 % for men, 57.5 vs. 67.1 % for women). Among 1,631 participants with a stable partner, non-disclosure to a stable partner was 4.9 % for MSM, 10.9 % for heterosexual men, and 13.0 % for women. In adjusted analyses, older age (≥60 years), non-white ethnicity, more recent HIV diagnosis, and not having a stable partner were significantly associated with overall non

  11. What makes orphans in Kigali, Rwanda, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy? Perspectives of their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Poudel, Krishna C; Muganda, John; Sato, Tomoko; Mutabazi, Vincent; Muhayimpundu, Ribakare; Majyambere, Adolphe; Nyonsenga, Simon P; Sase, Eriko; Jimba, Masamine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Every year, approximately 260,000 children are infected with HIV in low- and middle-income countries. The timely initiation and high level of maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are crucial to reducing the suffering of HIV-positive children. We need to develop a better understanding of the background of children's ART non-adherence because it is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to explore the background related to ART non-adherence, specifically in relation to the orphan status of children in Kigali, Rwanda. Methods We conducted 19 focus group discussions with a total of 121 caregivers of HIV-positive children in Kigali. The primary data for analysis were verbatim transcripts and socio-demographic data. A content analysis was performed for qualitative data analysis and interpretation. Results The study found several contextual factors that influenced non-adherence: among double orphans, there was psychological distance between the caregivers and children, whereas economic burden was the primary issue among paternal orphans. The factors promoting adherence also were unique to each orphan status, such as the positive attitude about disclosing serostatus to the child by double orphans’ caregivers, and feelings of guilt about the child's condition among non-orphaned caregivers. Conclusions Knowledge of orphan status is essential to elucidate the factors influencing ART adherence among HIV-positive children. In this qualitative study, we identified the orphan-related contextual factors that influenced ART adherence. Understanding the social context is important in dealing with the challenges to ART adherence among HIV-positive children. PMID:25477050

  12. Evaluation of Longitudinal Clinical Outcomes and Adherence to Care among HIV-Infected Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Susanna E.; Montague, Brian T.; Lopez, Michael J.; Delong, Allison; LeMarchand, Chloe; Bedoya, Armando; Gillani, Fizza S.; Beckwith, Curt G.

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-infected refugees resettled in the United States face many challenges. Longitudinal data regarding HIV-specific outcomes in this population are limited. Methods We reviewed charts of 51 HIV-infected sub-Saharan African refugees matched to 102 nonrefugees. Outcomes analyzed included CD4 counts, viral loads (VLs), antiretroviral treatment (ART) use, appointment adherence, opportunistic infections, and resistance mutations. Results The ART initiation was similar. Appointment adherence was similar in year 1, but refugees were significantly less adherent beyond year 3. Refugees and nonrefugees spent similar amounts of time in care suppressed (83% vs 80%, P = .93). Refugees had higher odds of viremia following undetectable VL (OR 2.3, P < .05). Discussion Initially, sub-Saharan African HIV-infected refugees have comparable appointment adherence, ART use, and VL suppression to nonrefugees. Overtime refugees were less adherent to appointments and more likely to have postsuppression viremia. The support services provided to refugees early in care may be important for retention in care and treatment success. PMID:23024042

  13. Alignment of adherence and risk for HIV acquisition in a demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda: a prospective analysis of prevention-effective adherence.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Kidoguchi, Lara; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Katabira, Elly; Asiimwe, Stephen; Thomas, Katherine K; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-07-25

    Adherence is essential for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to protect against HIV acquisition, but PrEP use need not be life-long. PrEP is most efficient when its use is aligned with periods of risk - a concept termed prevention-effective adherence. The objective of this paper is to describe prevention-effective adherence and predictors of adherence within an open-label delivery project of integrated PrEP and antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda (the Partners Demonstration Project). We offered PrEP to HIV-uninfected participants until the partner living with HIV had taken ART for ≥6 months (a strategy known as "PrEP as a bridge to ART"). The level of adherence sufficient to protect against HIV was estimated in two ways: ≥4 and ≥6 doses/week (per electronic monitoring). Risk for HIV acquisition was considered high if the couple reported sex with <100% condom use before six months of ART, low if they reported sex but had 100% condom use and/or six months of ART and very low if no sex was reported. We assessed prevention-effective adherence by cross-tabulating PrEP use with HIV risk and used multivariable regression models to assess predictors of ≥4 and ≥6 doses/week. Results A total of 985 HIV-uninfected participants initiated PrEP; 67% were male, median age was twenty-nine years, and 67% reported condomless sex in the month before enrolment. An average of ≥4 doses and ≥6 doses/week were taken in 81% and 67% of participant-visits, respectively. Adherence sufficient to protect against HIV acquisition was achieved in 75-88% of participant-visits with high HIV risk. The strongest predictor of achieving sufficient adherence was reporting sex with the study partner who was living with HIV; other statistically significant predictors included no concerns about daily PrEP, pregnancy or pregnancy intention, females aged >25 years, older male partners and desire for relationship success. Predictors of not achieving

  14. Antiretroviral therapy adherence and self-efficacy among people living with HIV and a history of drug use in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Lee, Sung-Jae; Tuan, Le Anh; Feng, Nan; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2017-10-01

    People living with HIV with a history of drug use face additional psychosocial challenges that could compromise their adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study examined ART treatment adherence and adherence self-efficacy among people living with HIV with a history of drug use in Vietnam. We used cross-sectional baseline data collected between October 2014 and February 2015 from a randomized controlled trial in Vietnam. Of the 900 persons with a history of drug use in the trial, a sample of 109 people living with HIV currently on ART were included in the study. The vast majority (92%) of the participants reported not missing any medications in the past 30 days. Multiple regression results indicated that social support was positively associated with adherence self-efficacy (β = 0.420, P < 0.001) and general adherence to ART (β = 0.201, P = 0.0368). General adherence to ART was negatively associated with depressive symptoms (β = -0.188, P = 0.046) and current heroin use (β = -0.196, P = 0.042). These findings underscore the importance of addressing mental health and social challenges facing people living with HIV with a history of drug use to promote ART treatment adherence. Clinical management of HIV should identify and address concurrent substance use behaviors to maximize adherence and treatment outcomes.

  15. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and treatment outcomes among conflict-affected and forcibly displaced populations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optimal adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is required to promote viral suppression and to prevent disease progression and mortality. Forcibly displaced and conflict-affected populations may face challenges succeeding on HAART. We performed a systematic review of the literature on adherence to HAART and treatment outcomes in these groups, including refugees and internally-displaced persons (IDPs), assessed the quality of the evidence and suggest a future research program. Methods Medline, Embase, and Global Health databases for 1995–2011 were searched using the Ovid platform. A backward citation review of subsequent work that had cited the Ovid results was performed using the Web of Science database. ReliefWeb and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) websites were searched for additional grey literature. Results and conclusion We screened 297 records and identified 17 reports covering 15 quantitative and two qualitative studies from 13 countries. Three-quarters (11/15) of the quantitative studies were retrospective studies based on chart review; five studies included <100 clients. Adherence or treatment outcomes were reported in resettled refugees, conflict-affected persons, internally-displaced persons (IDPs), and combinations of refugees, IDPs and other foreign-born persons. The reviewed reports showed promise for conflict-affected and forcibly-displaced populations; the range of optimal adherence prevalence reported was 87–99.5%. Treatment outcomes, measured using virological, immunological and mortality estimates, were good in relation to non-affected groups. Given the diversity of settings where forcibly-displaced and conflict-affected persons access ART, further studies on adherence and treatment outcomes are needed to support scale-up and provide evidence-based justifications for inclusion of these vulnerable groups in national treatment plans. Future studies and program evaluations should focus on systematic monitoring of

  16. Identifying the Intersection of Alcohol, Adherence and Sex in HIV Positive Men on ART Treatment in India Using an Adapted Timeline Followback Procedure.

    PubMed

    Schensul, Jean J; Ha, Toan; Schensul, Stephen; Sarna, Avina; Bryant, Kendall

    2017-11-01

    People living with HIV (PLHIV) on anti-retroviral treatment (ART) who drink are less adherent and more likely to engage in unprotected sex but the connections among these events are correlational. Using an adapted Timeline Follow-Back (A-TLFB) procedure, this paper examines the day by day interface of alcohol, medication adherence and sex to provide a fine grained understanding of how multiple behavioral risks coincide in time and space, explores concordance/discordance of measures with survey data and identifies potential recall bias. Data are drawn from a survey of behavior, knowledge and attitudes, and a 30 day TLFB assessment of multiple risk behaviors adapted for the Indian PLHIV context, administered to 940 alcohol-consuming, HIV positive men on ART at the baseline evaluation stage of a multilevel, multi-centric intervention study. On days participants drank they were significantly more likely to be medication non-adherent and to have unprotected sex. In the first day after their alcohol consuming day, the pattern of nonadherence persisted. Binge and regular drinking days were associated with nonadherence but only binge drinking co-occurred with unprotected sex. Asking about specific "drinking days" improved recall for drinking days and number of drinks consumed. Recall declined for both drinking days and nonadherence from the first week to subsequent weeks but varied randomly for sex risk. There was high concordance and low discordance between A-TLFB drinking and nonadherence but these results were reversed for unprotected sex. Moving beyond simple drinking-adherence correlational analysis, the A-TLFB offers improved recall probes and provides researchers and interventionists with the opportunity to identify types of risky days and tailor behavioral modification to reduce alcohol consumption, nonadherence and risky sex on those days.

  17. A good patient? How notions of 'a good patient' affect patient-nurse relationships and ART adherence in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Skovdal, Morten; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2015-09-30

    While patient-provider interactions are commonly understood as mutually constructed relationships, the role of patient behaviour, participation in interactions, and characteristics, particularly ideals surrounding notions of 'good' and 'bad' patients, are under-examined. This article examines social representations of 'a good patient' and how these representations affect patient-healthcare provider relationships and antiretroviral treatment (ART) for people living with HIV. Using thematic network analysis, we examined interview and focus group transcripts involving 25 healthcare staff, 48 ART users, and 31 carers of HIV positive children, as well as field notes from over 100 h of ethnographic observation at health centres in rural Zimbabwe. Characteristics of a good patient include obedience, patience, politeness, listening, enthusiasm for treatment, intelligence, physical cleanliness, honesty, gratitude and lifestyle adaptations (taking pills correctly and coming to the clinic when told). As healthcare workers may decide to punish patients who do not live up the 'good patient persona', many patients seek to perform within the confines of the 'good patient persona' to access good care and ensure continued access to ART. The notion of a 'good ART patient' can have positive effects on patient health outcomes. It is one of the only arenas of the clinic experience that ART patients can influence in their favour. However, for people not conforming to the norms of the 'good patient persona', the productive and health-enabling patient-nurse relationship may break down and be detrimental to the patient. We conclude that policy makers need to take heed of the social representations that govern patient-nurse relationships and their role in facilitating or undermining ART adherence.

  18. Socioeconomic Factors in Adherence to HIV Therapy in Low- and Middle-income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Pengpid, Supa

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear what effect socioeconomic factors have on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among patients in low- and middle-income countries.  We performed a systematic review of the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with adherence to treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries. We searched electronic databases to identify studies concerning SES and HIV/AIDS and collected data on the association between various determinants of SES (income, education, occupation) and adherence to ART in low- and middle-income countries. From 252 potentially-relevant articles initially identified, 62 original studies were reviewed in detail, which contained data evaluating the association between SES and adherence to treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Income, level of education, and employment/occupational status were significantly and positively associated with the level of adherence in 15 studies (41.7%), 10 studies (20.4%), and 3 studies (11.1%) respectively out of 36, 49, and 27 studies reviewed. One study for income, four studies for education, and two studies for employment found a negative and significant association with adherence to ART. However, the aforementioned SES determinants were not found to be significantly associated with adherence in relation to 20 income-related (55.6%), 35 education-related (71.4%), 23 employment/occupational status-related (81.5%), and 2 SES-related (100%) studies. The systematic review of the available evidence does not provide conclusive support for the existence of a clear association between SES and adherence to ART among adult patients infected with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries. There seems to be a positive trend among components of SES (income, education, employment status) and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in many of the reviewed studies. PMID:23930333

  19. Socioeconomic factors in adherence to HIV therapy in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2013-06-01

    It is not clear what effect socioeconomic factors have on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among patients in low- and middle-income countries. We performed a systematic review of the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with adherence to treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries. We searched electronic databases to identify studies concerning SES and HIV/AIDS and collected data on the association between various determinants of SES (income, education, occupation) and adherence to ART in low- and middle-income countries. From 252 potentially-relevant articles initially identified, 62 original studies were reviewed in detail, which contained data evaluating the association between SES and adherence to treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Income, level of education, and employment/occupational status were significantly and positively associated with the level of adherence in 15 studies (41.7%), 10 studies (20.4%), and 3 studies (11.1%) respectively out of 36, 49, and 27 studies reviewed. One study for income, four studies for education, and two studies for employment found a negative and significant association with adherence to ART. However, the aforementioned SES determinants were not found to be significantly associated with adherence in relation to 20 income-related (55.6%), 35 education-related (71.4%), 23 employment/occupational status-related (81.5%), and 2 SES-related (100%) studies. The systematic review of the available evidence does not provide conclusive support for the existence of a clear association between SES and adherence to ART among adult patients infected with HIV/ AIDS in low- and middle-income countries. There seems to be a positive trend among components of SES (income, education, employment status) and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in many of the reviewed studies.

  20. Goal Setting and Treatment Adherence Among Patients With Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms: Applying a Patient-Centered Approach.

    PubMed

    Houston, Eric; Tatum, Alexander K; Guy, Arryn; Mikrut, Cassandra; Yoder, Wren

    2015-10-26

    Poor treatment adherence is a major problem among individuals with chronic illness. Research indicates that adherence is worsened when accompanied by depressive symptoms. In this preliminary study, we aimed to describe how a patient-centered approach could be employed to aid patients with depressive symptoms in following their treatment regimens. The sample consisted of 14 patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV who reported clinically-significant depressive symptoms. Participant ratings of 23 treatment-related statements were examined using two assessment and analytic techniques. Interviews were conducted with participants to determine their views of information based on the technique. Results indicate that while participants with optimal adherence focused on views of treatment associated with side effects to a greater extent than participants with poor adherence, they tended to relate these side effects to sources of intrinsic motivation. The study provides examples of how practitioners could employ the assessment techniques outlined to better understand how patients think about treatment and aid them in effectively framing their health-related goals.

  1. Plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load rebound among people who inject drugs receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a Canadian setting: an ethno-epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Small, Will; Milloy, M J; McNeil, Ryan; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) living with HIV often experience sub-optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment outcomes, including HIV plasma viral load (PVL) rebound. While previous studies have identified risk factors for PVL rebound among PWID, no study has examined the perspectives of PWID who have experienced PVL rebound episodes. We conducted an ethno-epidemiological study to investigate the circumstances surrounding the emergence of rebound episodes among PWID in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Comprehensive clinical records linked to a community-based prospective observational cohort of HIV-positive drug users were used to identify PWID who had recently experienced viral rebound. In-depth qualitative interviews with 16 male and 11 female participants explored participant perspectives regarding the emergence of viral rebound. A timeline depicting each participant's HIV viral load and adherence to ART was used to elicit discussion of circumstances surrounding viral rebound. Viral rebound episodes were shaped by interplay between various individual, social, and environmental factors that disrupted routines facilitating adherence. Structural-environmental influences resulting in non-adherence included housing transitions, changes in drug use patterns and intense drug scene involvement, and inadequate care for co-morbid health conditions. Social-environmental influences on ART adherence included poor interactions between care providers and patients producing non-adherence, and understandings of HIV treatment that fostered intentional treatment discontinuation. This study describes key pathways which led to rebound episodes among PWID receiving ART and illustrates how environmental forces may increase vulnerability for non-adherence leading to treatment failure. Our findings have potential to help inform interventions and supports that address social-structural forces that foster non-adherence among PWID.

  2. Evaluation of mHealth strategies to optimize adherence and efficacy of Option B+ prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission: rationale, design and methods of a 3-armed randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Alison L.; Unger, Jennifer A.; Ronen, Keshet; Matemo, Daniel; Perrier, Trevor; DeRenzi, Brian; Richardson, Barbra A.; Kinuthia, John; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-01-01

    Background Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) (Option B+) is recommended for all HIV-infected pregnant/postpartum women, but high adherence is required to maximize HIV prevention potential and maintain maternal health. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions may provide treatment adherence support for women during, and beyond, the pregnancy and postpartum periods. Methods and Design We are conducting an unblinded, triple-arm randomized clinical trial (Mobile WACh X) of one-way short message service (SMS) versus two-way SMS versus control (no SMS) to improve maternal ART adherence and retention in care by 2 years postpartum. We will enroll 825 women from Nairobi and Western Kenya. Women in the intervention arms receive weekly, semi-automated motivational and educational SMS and visit reminders via an interactive, human-computer hybrid communication system. Participants in the two-way SMS arm are also asked to respond to a question related to the message. SMS are based in behavioral theory, are tailored to participant characteristics through SMS tracks, and are timed along the pregnancy/postpartum continuum. After enrollment, follow-up visits are scheduled at 6 weeks; 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum. The primary outcomes, virological failure (HIV viral load ≥1000 copies/mL), maternal retention in care, and infant HIV-free survival, will be compared in an intent to treat analysis. We will also measure ART adherence and drug resistance. Discussion Personalized and tailored SMS to support HIV-infected women during and after pregnancy may be an effective strategy to motivate women to adhere to ART and remain in care and improve maternal and infant outcomes. PMID:28315480

  3. Evaluation of mHealth strategies to optimize adherence and efficacy of Option B+ prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission: Rationale, design and methods of a 3-armed randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Drake, Alison L; Unger, Jennifer A; Ronen, Keshet; Matemo, Daniel; Perrier, Trevor; DeRenzi, Brian; Richardson, Barbra A; Kinuthia, John; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-06-01

    Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) (Option B+) is recommended for all HIV-infected pregnant/postpartum women, but high adherence is required to maximize HIV prevention potential and maintain maternal health. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions may provide treatment adherence support for women during, and beyond, the pregnancy and postpartum periods. We are conducting an unblinded, triple-arm randomized clinical trial (Mobile WACh X) of one-way short message service (SMS) vs. two-way SMS vs. control (no SMS) to improve maternal ART adherence and retention in care by 2years postpartum. We will enroll 825 women from Nairobi and Western Kenya. Women in the intervention arms receive weekly, semi-automated motivational and educational SMS and visit reminders via an interactive, human-computer hybrid communication system. Participants in the two-way SMS arm are also asked to respond to a question related to the message. SMS are based in behavioral theory, are tailored to participant characteristics through SMS tracks, and are timed along the pregnancy/postpartum continuum. After enrollment, follow-up visits are scheduled at 6weeks; 6, 12, 18, and 24months postpartum. The primary outcomes, virological failure (HIV viral load ≥1000copies/mL), maternal retention in care, and infant HIV infection or death, will be compared in an intent to treat analysis. We will also measure ART adherence and drug resistance. Personalized and tailored SMS to support HIV-infected women during and after pregnancy may be an effective strategy to motivate women to adhere to ART and remain in care and improve maternal and infant outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A review of the role of food insecurity in adherence to care and treatment among adult and pediatric populations living with HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sera; Wheeler, Amanda; McCoy, Sandi; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is critical for reducing HIV/AIDS morbidity and mortality. Food insecurity (FI) is emerging as an important barrier to adherence to care and treatment recommendations for people living with HIV (PLHIV), but this relationship has not been comprehensively examined. Therefore, we reviewed the literature to explore how FI may impact ART adherence, retention in medical care, and adherence to health care recommendations among PLHIV. We found data to support FI as a critical barrier to adherence to ART and to other health care recommendations among HIV-infected adults, HIV-infected pregnant women and their HIV-exposed infants, and child and adolescent populations of PLHIV. Associations between FI and ART non-adherence were seen in qualitative and quantitative studies. We identified a number of mechanisms to explain how food insecurity and ART non-adherence may be causally linked, including the exacerbation of hunger or ART side effects in the absence of adequate food and competing resource demands. Interventions that address FI may improve adherence to care and treatment recommendations for PLHIV. PMID:23842717

  5. Literacy, education and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, A; Bailey, R L; Ahadzie, B; Alabi, A; Peterson, K

    2010-11-01

    We examined the relationship of patients' literacy and education to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in an urban treatment centre in The Gambia. Information on education and literacy systematically collected before ART initiation was compared against selected adherence outcomes. Formally educated patients were significantly more likely to achieve virological suppression at both six and 12 months (87% vs. 67%, OR=3.13, P=0.03; 88% vs. 63%, OR=4.49, P=0.007, respectively). Literate patients had similar benefit at 12 months (OR=3.39 P=0.03), with improved virological outcomes associated with degree of literacy (P=0.003). A trend towards similar results was seen at 6 months for Koranically educated patients; however, this was no longer apparent at 12 months. No significant correlation was seen between socio-demographic characteristics and missed appointments. Our study suggests that literacy, formal education and possibly Koranic education may impact favourably on adherence to ART.

  6. Impact of use of alcohol and illicit drugs by AIDS patients on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Celia; Dourado, Maria De Lourdes; Santos, Marcio P; Brites, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Use of alcohol and illicit drugs is a common finding among HIV-infected individuals, but there are many open questions about its impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy and virological outcomes. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact of the use of alcohol and illicit drugs on the adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among patients starting ART in Salvador, Brazil. We followed up 144 AIDS patients initiating ART for a 6-month period. At baseline, they were interviewed about demographics, behavior, and use of illicit drugs and alcohol. All of them had HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cells count measured before starting therapy. After 60 days of treatment they were asked to answer a new questionnaire on adherence to ART. All patients were monitored during the following months, and new CD4(+) cell count/HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load determinations were performed after 6 months of therapy. Optimal adherence to therapy was defined by self-reported questionnaire, by 95% use of prescribed drug doses, and by using plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load as a biological marker. A total of 61 (42.4%) patients reported alcohol use, 7 (4.9%) used illicit drugs, and 17 (11.8%) used both alcohol and illicit drugs. Being in a steady relationship was protective to nonadherence (95% CI: 0.18-0.84). Missing more than two medical visits was also associated with a 68% higher likelihood of nonadherence (95% CI: 0.10-1.02). After logistic regression we detected a higher risk of nonadherence for patients declaring use of alcohol plus illicit drugs (odds ratio=6.0; 95% CI: 1.78-20.28) or high-intensity use of alcohol (odds ratio=3.29; 95% CI: 1.83-5.92). AIDS patients using alcohol and/or illicit drugs are socially vulnerable, and need specific and flexible programs, combining mental health care, harm reduction strategies, and assisted drug therapy to maximize the chances of successful use of ART.

  7. Level of suboptimal adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment & its determinants among HIV positive people in India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Beena; Chauhan, Sanjay; Pasi, Achhelal; Kulkarni, Ragini; Sunil, Nithya; Bachani, Damodar; Mankeshwar, Ranjit

    2014-07-01

    National Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) programme in India was launched in 2004. Since then, there has been no published country representative estimate of suboptimal adherence among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on first line ART in public settings. Hence a multicentric study was undertaken in 15 States of India to assess the level of suboptimal adherence and its determinants among PLHIV. Using a prospective observational study design, 3285 PLHIV were enrolled and followed up to six months across 30 ART centres in India. Adherence was assessed using pill count and self-reported recall method and determinants of suboptimal adherence were explored based on the responses to various issues as perceived by them. Suboptimal adherence was found in 24.5 per cent PLHIV. Determinants of suboptimal adherence were illiteracy (OR--1.341, CI--1.080-1.665), on ART for less than 6 months (OR--1.540, CI--1.280-1.853), male gender (OR for females--0.807, CI--0.662-0.982), tribals (OR--2.246, CI--1.134-4.447), on efavirenz (EFA) regimen (OR--1.479, CI--1.190-1.837), presence of anxiety (OR--1.375, CI--1.117-1.692), non-disclosure of HIV status to family (OR--1.549, CI--1.176-2.039), not motivated for treatment (OR--1.389, CI--1.093-1.756), neglect from friends (OR--1.368, CI--1.069-1.751), frequent change of residence (OR--3.373, CI--2.659-4.278), travel expenses (OR--1.364, CI--1.138-1.649), not meeting the PLHIV volunteer/community care coordinator at the ART center (OR--1.639, CI--1.330-2.019). To enhance identification of PLHIV vulnerable to suboptimal adherence, the existing checklist to identify the barriers to adherence in the National ART Guidelines needs to be updated based on the study findings. Quality of comprehensive adherence support services needs to be improved coupled with vigilant monitoring of adherence measurement.

  8. Level of suboptimal adherence to first line antiretroviral treatment & its determinants among HIV positive people in India

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Beena; Chauhan, Sanjay; Pasi, Achhelal; Kulkarni, Ragini; Sunil, Nithya; Bachani, Damodar; Mankeshwar, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: National Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) programme in India was launched in 2004. Since then, there has been no published country representative estimate of suboptimal adherence among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on first line ART in public settings. Hence a multicentric study was undertaken in 15 States of India to assess the level of suboptimal adherence and its determinants among PLHIV. Methods: Using a prospective observational study design, 3285 PLHIV were enrolled and followed up to six months across 30 ART centres in India. Adherence was assessed using pill count and self-reported recall method and determinants of suboptimal adherence were explored based on the responses to various issues as perceived by them. Results: Suboptimal adherence was found in 24.5 per cent PLHIV. Determinants of suboptimal adherence were illiteracy (OR-1.341, CI-1.080-1.665), on ART for less than 6 months (OR-1.540, CI- 1.280-1.853), male gender (OR for females -0.807, CI- 0.662-0.982), tribals (OR-2.246, CI-1.134-4.447), on efavirenz (EFA) regimen (OR- 1.479, CI - 1.190 - 1.837), presence of anxiety (OR- 1.375, CI - 1.117 - 1.692), non-disclosure of HIV status to family (OR- 1.549, CI - 1.176 - 2.039), not motivated for treatment (OR- 1.389, CI - 1.093 - 1.756), neglect from friends (OR-1.368, CI-1.069-1.751), frequent change of residence (OR- 3.373, CI - 2.659 - 4.278), travel expenses (OR- 1.364, CI - 1.138-1.649), not meeting the PLHIV volunteer/community care coordinator at the ART center (OR-1.639, CI-1.330-2.019). Interpretation & conclusions: To enhance identification of PLHIV vulnerable to suboptimal adherence, the existing checklist to identify the barriers to adherence in the National ART Guidelines needs to be updated based on the study findings. Quality of comprehensive adherence support services needs to be improved coupled with vigilant monitoring of adherence measurement. PMID:25222782

  9. Factors influencing antiretroviral treatment suboptimal adherence among perinatally HIV-infected adolescents in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Kerim; Kanabkaew, Cheeraya; Le Coeur, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Background Existing studies have suggested decreased adherence and rebound in mortality in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared to adults and young children. Methods We used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to identify factors influencing adherence among perinatally infected adolescents in Thailand. We analyzed data from 568 pairs of perinatally infected adolescents (aged 12–19) and their primary caregivers in the Teens Living With Antiretrovirals (TEEWA) study, a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2010–2012. We also conducted 12 in-depth interviews in 2014 with infected adolescents or their primary caregivers to elicit experiences of living with long-term ART. Results From the quantitative analysis, a total of 275 (48.4%) adolescents had evidence of suboptimal adherence based on this composite outcome: adolescents self-reported missing doses in the past 7 days, caregiver rating of overall adherence as suboptimal, or latest HIV-RNA viral load ≥1000 copies/ml. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, younger age, having grandparents or extended family members as the primary caregiver, caregiver-assessed poor intellectual ability, having a boy/girlfriend, frequent online chatting, self-reported unhappiness and easiness in asking doctors questions were significantly associated with suboptimal adherence. From the in-depth interviews, tensed relationships with caregivers, forgetfulness due to busy schedules, and fear of disclosing HIV status to others, especially boy/girlfriends, were important contributors to suboptimal adherence. Social and emotional support and counseling from peer group was consistently reported as a strong adherence-promoting factor. Conclusion Our findings highlight unique barriers of ART adherence among the perinatally infected adolescents. Future interventions should be targeted at helping adolescents to improve interpersonal relationships and build adaptive skills in

  10. A Longitudinal Analysis of Antiretroviral Adherence Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Dexter R; Quinn, Katherine; Kim, Dong Ha; Schneider, John

    2017-04-01

    Young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) experience poorer antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence relative to their white counterparts. However, few studies have longitudinally examined factors that may correlate with various classifications of ART adherence among this population, which was the primary aim of this study. Project nGage was a randomized controlled trial conducted across five Chicago clinics from 2012 to 2015. Survey and medical records data were collected at baseline and 3- and 12-month periods to assess whether psychological distress, HIV stigma, substance use, family acceptance, social support, and self-efficacy predicted ART medication adherence among 92 YBMSM ages 16-29 years. Major results controlling for the potential effects of age, education level, employment, and intervention condition indicated that participants with high versus low medication adherence were less likely to report daily/weekly alcohol or marijuana use, had higher family acceptance, and exhibited greater self-efficacy. These findings identity important factors that can be targeted in clinical and program interventions to help improve ART medication adherence for YBMSM. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing adherence in HIV prevention product trials: Development and psychometric evaluation of simple tools for screening and adherence counseling.

    PubMed

    Tolley, Elizabeth E; Guthrie, Kate Morrow; Zissette, Seth; Fava, Joseph L; Gill, Katherine; Louw, Cheryl E; Kotze, Philip; Reddy, Krishnaveni; MacQueen, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Low adherence in recent HIV prevention clinical trials highlights the need to better understand, measure, and support product use within clinical trials. Conventional self-reported adherence instruments within HIV prevention trials, often relying on single-item questions, have proven ineffective. While objective adherence measures are desirable, none currently exist that apply to both active and placebo arms. Scales are composed of multiple items in the form of questions or statements that, when combined, measure a more complex construct that may not be directly observable. When psychometrically validated, such measures may better assess the multiple factors contributing to adherence/non-adherence. This study aimed to develop and psychometrically evaluate tools to screen and monitor trial participants' adherence to HIV prevention products within the context of clinical trial research. Based on an extensive literature review and conceptual framework, we identified and refined 86 items assessing potential predictors of adherence and 48 items assessing adherence experience. A structured survey, including adherence items and other variables, was administered to former ASPIRE and Ring Study participants and similar non-trial participants (n = 709). We conducted exploratory factor analyses (EFA) to identify a reduced set of constructs and items that could be used at screening to predict potential adherence, and at follow-up to monitor and intervene on adherence. We examined associations with other variables to assess content and construct validity. The EFA of screener items resulted in a 6-factor solution with acceptable to very good internal reliability (α: .62-.84). Similar to our conceptual framework, factors represent trial-related commitment (Distrust of Research and Commitment to Research); alignment with trial requirements (Visit Adherence and Trial Incompatibility); Belief in Trial Benefits and Partner Disclosure. The EFA on monitoring items resulted in 4

  12. Health Provider Views on Improving Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Micheni, Murugi; Kombo, Bernadette K.; Secor, Andrew; Simoni, Jane M.; Operario, Don; van der Elst, Elise M.; Mugo, Peter; Kanungi, Jennifer; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract HIV-positive Kenyan men who have sex with men (MSM) are a highly stigmatized group facing barriers to care engagement and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Because care providers' views are important in improving outcomes, we sought the perspective of those serving MSM patients on how to optimize ART adherence in a setting where same-sex behavior is criminalized. We conducted 4 focus group discussions with a total of 29 healthcare workers (HCWs) experienced in providing HIV care to MSM. The semistructured, open-ended topic guide used was based on an access-information-motivation-proximal cues model of adherence, with added focus on trust in providers, stigma, and discrimination. Detailed facilitator notes and transcripts were translated into English and reviewed for common themes. The HCW identified adherence challenges of MSM patients that are similar to those of the general population, including HIV-related stigma and lack of disclosure. In addition, HCWs noted challenges specific to MSM, such as lack of access to MSM-friendly health services, economic and social challenges due to stigma, difficult relationships with care providers, and discrimination at the clinic and in the community. HCWs recommended clinic staff sensitivity training, use of trained MSM peer navigators, and stigma reduction in the community as interventions that might improve adherence and health outcomes for MSM. Despite noting MSM-specific barriers, HCWs recommended strategies for improving HIV care for MSM in rights-constrained settings that merit future research attention. Most likely, multilevel interventions incorporating both individual and structural factors will be necessary. PMID:28282249

  13. Health Provider Views on Improving Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Micheni, Murugi; Kombo, Bernadette K; Secor, Andrew; Simoni, Jane M; Operario, Don; van der Elst, Elise M; Mugo, Peter; Kanungi, Jennifer; Sanders, Eduard J; Graham, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    HIV-positive Kenyan men who have sex with men (MSM) are a highly stigmatized group facing barriers to care engagement and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Because care providers' views are important in improving outcomes, we sought the perspective of those serving MSM patients on how to optimize ART adherence in a setting where same-sex behavior is criminalized. We conducted 4 focus group discussions with a total of 29 healthcare workers (HCWs) experienced in providing HIV care to MSM. The semistructured, open-ended topic guide used was based on an access-information-motivation-proximal cues model of adherence, with added focus on trust in providers, stigma, and discrimination. Detailed facilitator notes and transcripts were translated into English and reviewed for common themes. The HCW identified adherence challenges of MSM patients that are similar to those of the general population, including HIV-related stigma and lack of disclosure. In addition, HCWs noted challenges specific to MSM, such as lack of access to MSM-friendly health services, economic and social challenges due to stigma, difficult relationships with care providers, and discrimination at the clinic and in the community. HCWs recommended clinic staff sensitivity training, use of trained MSM peer navigators, and stigma reduction in the community as interventions that might improve adherence and health outcomes for MSM. Despite noting MSM-specific barriers, HCWs recommended strategies for improving HIV care for MSM in rights-constrained settings that merit future research attention. Most likely, multilevel interventions incorporating both individual and structural factors will be necessary.

  14. Understanding the facilitators and barriers of antiretroviral adherence in Peru: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral scale-up is increasing in resource-constrained settings. To date, few studies have explored the barriers and facilitators of adherence to ART in these settings. Facilitators and barriers of antiretroviral adherence in Peru are not completely understood. Methods At two clinics that serve a large number of HIV-positive individuals in Lima, Peru, 31 in-depth interviews were carried out in 2006 with adult HIV-positive individuals receiving ART. Purposive sampling was used to recruit the participants. Interviews were transcribed and coded using two Spanish-speaking researchers and a content analysis approach to identify themes in the data. Results Among the participants, 28/31 (90%) were male, 25/31 (81%) were self-identified as mestizo, and 19/31 (61%) had an education above high school. The most frequently discussed barriers to adherence included side effects, simply forgetting, inconvenience, dietary requirements, being away from home, and fear of disclosure/stigma. The most frequently discussed facilitators to adherence included having a fixed routine, understanding the need for compliance, seeing positive results, treatment knowledge, and faith in treatment. Conclusions Overall, these findings were similar to the facilitators and challenges experienced by individuals on ART in other resource constrained settings. Further treatment support tools and networks should be developed to decrease the challenges of ART adherence for HIV-positive individuals in Lima, Peru. PMID:20070889

  15. Guidelines for Improving Entry Into and Retention in Care and Antiretroviral Adherence for Persons With HIV: Evidence-Based Recommendations From an International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care Panel

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Amico, K. Rivet; Cargill, Victoria A.; Chang, Larry W.; Gross, Robert; Orrell, Catherine; Altice, Frederick L.; Bangsberg, David R.; Bartlett, John G.; Beckwith, Curt G.; Dowshen, Nadia; Gordon, Christopher M.; Horn, Tim; Kumar, Princy; Scott, James D.; Stirratt, Michael J.; Remien, Robert H.; Simoni, Jane M.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2014-01-01

    Description After HIV diagnosis, timely entry into HIV medical care and retention in that care are essential to the provision of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART adherence is among the key determinants of successful HIV treatment outcome and is essential to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care convened a panel to develop evidence-based recommendations to optimize entry into and retention in care and ART adherence for people with HIV. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to produce an evidence base restricted to randomized, controlled trials and observational studies with comparators that had at least 1 measured biological or behavioral end point. A total of 325 studies met the criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted and coded data from each study using a standardized data extraction form. Panel members drafted recommendations based on the body of evidence for each method or intervention and then graded the overall quality of the body of evidence and the strength for each recommendation. Recommendations Recommendations are provided for monitoring of entry into and retention in care, interventions to improve entry and retention, and monitoring of and interventions to improve ART adherence. Recommendations cover ART strategies, adherence tools, education and counseling, and health system and service delivery interventions. In addition, they cover specific issues pertaining to pregnant women, incarcerated individuals, homeless and marginally housed individuals, and children and adolescents, as well as substance use and mental health disorders. Recommendations for future research in all areas are also provided. PMID:22393036

  16. Treatment simplification in HIV-infected adults as a strategy to prevent toxicity, improve adherence, quality of life and decrease healthcare costs

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B; Mugavero, Michael J; Zeier, Michele; Vitória, Marco; Gallant, Joel E

    2011-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become more potent and better tolerated. While the current treatment regimens still have limitations, they are more effective, more convenient, and less toxic than regimens used in the early HAART era, and new agents, formulations and strategies continue to be developed. Simplification of therapy is an option for many patients currently being treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The main goals are to reduce pill burden, improve quality of life and enhance medication adherence, while minimizing short- and long-term toxicities, reducing the risk of virologic failure and maximizing cost-effectiveness. ART simplification strategies that are currently used or are under study include the use of once-daily regimens, less toxic drugs, fixed-dose coformulations and induction-maintenance approaches. Improved adherence and persistence have been observed with the adoption of some of these strategies. The role of regimen simplification has implications not only for individual patients, but also for health care policy. With increased interest in ART regimen simplification, it is critical to study not only implications for individual tolerability, toxicity, adherence, persistence and virologic efficacy, but also cost, scalability, and potential for dissemination and implementation, such that limited human and financial resources are optimally allocated for maximal efficiency, coverage and sustainability of global HIV/AIDS treatment. PMID:21845035

  17. Beyond Risk Compensation: Clusters of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Users in Sexual Networks Can Modify the Impact of ART on HIV Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Wim; Helleringer, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Concerns about risk compensation—increased risk behaviours in response to a perception of reduced HIV transmission risk—after the initiation of ART have largely been dispelled in empirical studies, but other changes in sexual networking patterns may still modify the effects of ART on HIV incidence. Methods We developed an exploratory mathematical model of HIV transmission that incorporates the possibility of ART clusters, i.e. subsets of the sexual network in which the density of ART patients is much higher than in the rest of the network. Such clusters may emerge as a result of ART homophily—a tendency for ART patients to preferentially form and maintain relationships with other ART patients. We assessed whether ART clusters may affect the impact of ART on HIV incidence, and how the influence of this effect-modifying variable depends on contextual variables such as HIV prevalence, HIV serosorting, coverage of HIV testing and ART, and adherence to ART. Results ART homophily can modify the impact of ART on HIV incidence in both directions. In concentrated epidemics and generalized epidemics with moderate HIV prevalence (≈ 10%), ART clusters can enhance the impact of ART on HIV incidence, especially when adherence to ART is poor. In hyperendemic settings (≈ 35% HIV prevalence), ART clusters can reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence when adherence to ART is high but few people living with HIV (PLWH) have been diagnosed. In all contexts, the effects of ART clusters on HIV epidemic dynamics are distinct from those of HIV serosorting. Conclusions Depending on the programmatic and epidemiological context, ART clusters may enhance or reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence, in contrast to serosorting, which always leads to a lower impact of ART on HIV incidence. ART homophily and the emergence of ART clusters should be measured empirically and incorporated into more refined models used to plan and evaluate ART programmes. PMID:27657492

  18. Beyond Risk Compensation: Clusters of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Users in Sexual Networks Can Modify the Impact of ART on HIV Incidence.

    PubMed

    Delva, Wim; Helleringer, Stéphane

    Concerns about risk compensation-increased risk behaviours in response to a perception of reduced HIV transmission risk-after the initiation of ART have largely been dispelled in empirical studies, but other changes in sexual networking patterns may still modify the effects of ART on HIV incidence. We developed an exploratory mathematical model of HIV transmission that incorporates the possibility of ART clusters, i.e. subsets of the sexual network in which the density of ART patients is much higher than in the rest of the network. Such clusters may emerge as a result of ART homophily-a tendency for ART patients to preferentially form and maintain relationships with other ART patients. We assessed whether ART clusters may affect the impact of ART on HIV incidence, and how the influence of this effect-modifying variable depends on contextual variables such as HIV prevalence, HIV serosorting, coverage of HIV testing and ART, and adherence to ART. ART homophily can modify the impact of ART on HIV incidence in both directions. In concentrated epidemics and generalized epidemics with moderate HIV prevalence (≈ 10%), ART clusters can enhance the impact of ART on HIV incidence, especially when adherence to ART is poor. In hyperendemic settings (≈ 35% HIV prevalence), ART clusters can reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence when adherence to ART is high but few people living with HIV (PLWH) have been diagnosed. In all contexts, the effects of ART clusters on HIV epidemic dynamics are distinct from those of HIV serosorting. Depending on the programmatic and epidemiological context, ART clusters may enhance or reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence, in contrast to serosorting, which always leads to a lower impact of ART on HIV incidence. ART homophily and the emergence of ART clusters should be measured empirically and incorporated into more refined models used to plan and evaluate ART programmes.

  19. Highly specific reasons for nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy: results from the German adherence study.

    PubMed

    Boretzki, Johanna; Wolf, Eva; Wiese, Carmen; Noe, Sebastian; Balogh, Annamaria; Meurer, Anja; Krznaric, Ivanka; Zink, Alexander; Lersch, Christian; Spinner, Christoph D

    2017-01-01

    Reasons for and frequency of nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may have changed due to pharmacological improvements. In addition, the importance of known non-pharmacologic reasons for nonadherence is unclear. We performed a cross-sectional, noninterventional, multicenter study to identify current reasons for nonadherence. Patients were categorized by physicians into the following adherence groups: good, unstable, or poor adherence. Co-variables of interest included age, sex, time since HIV diagnosis, ART duration, current ART regimen, HIV transmission route, comorbidity, HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL), and CD4 cell count. Patients self-reported the number of missed doses and provided their specific reasons for nonadherent behavior. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's extended exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and logistic regression models. Our study assessed 215 participants with good (n=162), unstable (n=36), and poor adherence (n=17). Compared to patients with good adherence, patients with unstable and poor adherence reported more often to have missed at least one dose during the last week (good 11% vs unstable 47% vs poor 63%, p <0.001). Physicians' adherence assessment was concordant with patients' self-reports of missed doses during the last week (no vs one or more) in 81% cases. Similarly, we found a strong association of physicians' assessment with viral suppression. Logistic regression analysis showed that "reduced adherence" - defined as unstable or poor - was significantly associated with patients <30 years old, intravenous drug use, history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and psychiatric disorders ( p <0.05). Univariate analyses showed that specific reasons, such as questioning the efficacy/dosing of ART, HIV stigma, interactive toxicity beliefs regarding alcohol and/or party drugs, and dissatisfaction with regimen complexity, correlated with unstable or poor adherence ( p <0.05). Identification of factors associated

  20. A Self-Reported Adherence Measure to Screen for Elevated HIV Viral Load in Pregnant and Postpartum Women on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Kirsty; Mellins, Claude A.; Zerbe, Allison; Remien, Robert H.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Myer, Landon; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a concern and monitoring adherence presents a significant challenge in low-resource settings. We investigated the association between self-reported adherence, measured using a simple three-item scale, and elevated viral load (VL) among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women on ART in Cape Town, South Africa. This is the first reported use of this scale in a non-English speaking setting and it achieved good psychometric characteristics (Cronbach α = 0.79). Among 452 women included in the analysis, only 12 % reported perfect adherence on the self-report scale, while 92 % had a VL <1000 copies/mL. Having a raised VL was consistently associated with lower median adherence scores and the area under the curve for the scale was 0.599, 0.656 and 0.642 using a VL cut-off of ≥50, ≥1000 and ≥10000 copies/mL, respectively. This simple self-report adherence scale shows potential as a first-stage adherence screener in this setting. Maternal adherence monitoring in low resource settings requires attention in the era of universal ART, and the value of this simple adherence scale in routine ART care settings warrants further investigation. PMID:27278548

  1. Relationship between medication synchronization and antiretroviral adherence.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Emily; Smith, Jennifer; Owens, Laura; Herring, Charles; Holland, Melissa

    2018-06-12

    To compare antiretroviral adherence (measured as the proportion of days covered [PDC]) and change in viral load in insured, HIV-infected, adult outpatients enrolled and not enrolled in a medication synchronization program. This was a multicenter, retrospective, pilot cohort study. Fifty-eight insured, HIV-infected, outpatients at least 18 years of age receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 3 months as of August 2015 were included. PDC, viral load, PDC dichotomized into adherent or nonadherent, and viral load dichotomized into detectable or undetectable were collected for each patient. Study data were compared in those with (enrolled) and without (not enrolled or control) medication synchronization. The study end points were analyzed between the 2 groups retrospectively after 3 months. PDC in patients undergoing medication synchronization was significantly higher than in control patients: mean ± SD 96 ± 9% versus 71 ± 27%, respectively (P < 0.0001). The medication synchronization group was also more likely to be adherent to ART than the control group (odds ratio 10.67, 95% confidence interval 2.63-43.31). In the medication synchronization group, 75.9% of patients had an undetectable baseline viral load, and 83.3% had an undetectable viral load at study completion. In the control group, 62.1% and 64.7% had an undetectable viral load at baseline and completion, respectively. No statistically significant change in viral load was observed between groups (P = 0.34). In insured, HIV-infected, adult outpatients, implementation of a medication synchronization program was associated with improved ART adherence. Future studies are needed to better assess the impact of medication synchronization on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  2. Food Insecurity Is Associated with Increased Risk of Non-Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Musumari, Patou Masika; Wouters, Edwin; Kayembe, Patrick Kalambayi; Kiumbu Nzita, Modeste; Mbikayi, Samclide Mutindu; Suguimoto, S. Pilar; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; El-saaidi, Christina; Piot, Peter; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Food insecurity is increasingly reported as an important barrier of patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in both resource-poor and rich settings. However, unlike in resource rich-settings, very few quantitative studies to date have investigated the association of food insecurity with patient adherence to ART in Sub-Saharan Africa. The current study examines the association between food insecurity and adherence to ART among HIV-infected adults in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods and Findings This is a cross-sectional quantitative study of patients receiving ART at three private and one public health facilities in Kinshasa, DRC. Participants were consecutively recruited into the study between April and November 2012. Adherence was measured using a combined method coupling pharmacy refill and self-reported adherence. Food insecurity was the primary predictor, and was assessed using the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Of the 898 participants recruited into the study, 512 (57%) were food insecure, and 188 (20.9%) were not adherent to ART. Food insecurity was significantly associated with non-adherence to ART (AOR, 2.06; CI, 1.38–3.09). We also found that perceived harmfulness of ART and psychological distress were associated respectively with increased (AOR, 1.95; CI, 1.15–3.32) and decreased (AOR, 0.31; CI, 0.11–0.83) odds of non-adherence to ART. Conclusion Food insecurity is prevalent and a significant risk factor for non-adherence to ART among HIV-infected individuals in the DRC. Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to improve food access among HIV-infected on ART in order to ensure patient adherence to ART and ultimately the long-term success of HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24454841

  3. Antiretroviral therapy initiation and adherence in rural South Africa: community health workers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Loeliger, Kelsey B.; Niccolai, Linda M.; Mtungwa, Lillian N.; Moll, Anthony; Shenoi, Sheela V.

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has the largest global HIV/AIDS epidemic, but barriers along the HIV care continuum prevent patients from initiating and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To qualitatively explore reasons for poor ART initiation and adherence rates from the unique perspective of community health workers (CHWs), we conducted focus groups during May–August 2014 with 21 CHWs in rural Msinga, KwaZulu-Natal. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated from Zulu into English. Hybrid deductive and inductive analytical methods were applied to identify emergent themes. Multiple psychosocial, socioeconomic, and socio-medical barriers acted at the level of the individual, social network, broader community, and healthcare environment to simultaneously hinder initiation of and adherence to ART. Key themes included insufficient patient education and social support, patient dissatisfaction with healthcare services, socioeconomic factors, and tension between ART and alternative medicine. Fear of lifelong therapy thwarted initiation whereas substance abuse principally impeded adherence. In conclusion, HIV/AIDS management requires patient counselling and support extending beyond initial diagnosis. Treating HIV/AIDS as a chronic rather than acute infectious disease is key to improving ART initiation and long-term adherence. Public health strategies include expanding CHWs' roles to strengthen healthcare services, provide longitudinal patient support, and foster collaboration with alternative medicine providers. PMID:27043077

  4. Goal Setting and Treatment Adherence among Patients with Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms: Applying a Patient-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Eric; Tatum, Alexander K.; Guy, Arryn; Mikrut, Cassandra; Yoder, Wren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Poor treatment adherence is a major problem among individuals with chronic illness. Research indicates that adherence is worsened when accompanied by depressive symptoms. In this preliminary study, we aimed to describe how a patient-centered approach could be employed to aid patients with depressive symptoms in following their treatment regimens. Methods: The sample consisted of 14 patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV who reported clinically-significant depressive symptoms. Participant ratings of 23 treatment-related statements were examined using two assessment and analytic techniques. Interviews were conducted with participants to determine their views of information based on the technique. Results: Results indicate that while participants with optimal adherence focused on views of treatment associated with side effects to a greater extent than participants with poor adherence, they tended to relate these side effects to sources of intrinsic motivation. Conclusion: The study provides examples of how practitioners could employ the assessment techniques outlined to better understand how patients think about treatment and aid them in effectively framing their health-related goals. PMID:26755463

  5. Psychiatric diagnosis and antiretroviral adherence among adolescent Medicaid beneficiaries diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walkup, James; Akincigil, Ayse; Bilder, Scott; Rosato, Nancy Scotto; Crystal, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    Research on adults with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has suggested that psychiatric and substance abuse comorbidities are prevalent in this population, and that these may sometimes be associated with use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and adherence. For adolescents with HIV/AIDS, much less is known about patterns of mental health comorbidity, and even fewer data are available that compare them to socioeconomically comparable youth without HIV/AIDS. Using medical and pharmacy data from 1999 to 2000 Medicaid claims (Medicaid Analytic Extract) from 4 states for beneficiaries aged 12 to 17 years, we identified 833 youth under care for HIV/AIDS meeting study criteria within the HIV/AIDS group, receipt of ART was less likely for youth who had diagnoses of substance abuse, conduct disorders, or emotional disorders than for others. Once ART was initiated, adherence did not significantly differ between adolescents living with a psychiatric condition, and those who were not, with the exception of an association between conduct disorder and lower adherence. Among those with HIV/AIDS, ART use and adherence were more common among youth with higher rates of service use, regardless of psychiatric status. Associations between race and adherence varied by gender: compared with their white counterparts, minority girls had lower, and minority boys had higher adherence.

  6. Impact of HIV-specialized pharmacies on adherence to medications for comorbid conditions.

    PubMed

    DuChane, Janeen; Clark, Bobby; Hou, John; Fitzner, Karen; Pietrandoni, Glen; Duncan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients using human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specialized pharmacies have greater adherence to drugs used to treat comorbid conditions and HIV compared with patients who use traditional pharmacies. Retrospective cohort study, with patients' propensity matched based on pharmacy use: HIV-specialized versus traditional. Nationwide pharmacy chain. Adult patients who filled at least two prescriptions for an antiretroviral therapy (ART). Patients also needed to have at least two prescriptions for an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) or a statin for analyses examining comorbid conditions. Proportion of days covered (PDC). The adherence analyses for ART, ACE inhibitors/ARBs, and statins included 14,278, 1,484, and 1,372 pairs, respectively. The mean PDC for ART patients using HIV-specialized pharmacies was higher than that for patients using traditional pharmacies (86.20% vs. 81.87%; P <0.0001). Patients taking ACE inhibitors/ARBs in the specialized group also had a higher mean PDC compared with patients in the traditional group (82.61 vs. 79.66; P = 0.0002), as did specialized pharmacy users in the statin group (83.77 vs. 81.29; P = 0.0009). HIV patients managed by an HIV-specialized pharmacy have significantly higher adherence to medication for comorbid conditions compared with patients using traditional pharmacies. Patients of HIV-specialized pharmacies also have significantly higher adherence to ART compared with peers using traditional pharmacies.

  7. When masculinity interferes with women's treatment of HIV infection: a qualitative study about adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Skovdal, Morten; Campbell, Catherine; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2011-06-09

    Social constructions of masculinity have been shown to serve as an obstacle to men's access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ART). In the light of women's relative lack of power in many aspects of interpersonal relationships with men in many African settings, our objective is to explore how male denial of HIV/AIDS impacts on their female partners' ability to access and adhere to ART. We conducted a qualitative case study involving thematic analysis of 37 individual interviews and five focus groups with a total of 53 male and female antiretroviral drug users and 25 healthcare providers in rural eastern Zimbabwe. Rooted in hegemonic notions of masculinity, men saw HIV/AIDS as a threat to their manhood and dignity and exhibited a profound fear of the disease. In the process of denying and avoiding their association with AIDS, many men undermine their wives' efforts to access and adhere to ART. Many women felt unable to disclose their HIV status to their husbands, forcing them to take their medication in secret, and act without a supportive treatment partner, which is widely accepted to be vitally important for adherence success. Some husbands, when discovering that their wives are on ART, deny them permission to take the drugs, or indeed steal the drugs for their own treatment. Men's avoidance of HIV also leaves many HIV-positive women feeling vulnerable to re-infection as their husbands, in an attempt to demonstrate their manhood, are believed to continue engaging in HIV-risky behaviours. Hegemonic notions of masculinity can interfere with women's adherence to ART. It is important that those concerned with promoting effective treatment services recognise the gender and household dynamics that may prevent some women from successfully adhering to ART, and explore ways to work with both women and men to identify couples-based strategies to increase adherence to ART.

  8. Utility of Mobile Communication Devices as a Tool to Improve Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in HIV-infected Children and Young Adults in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Stankievich, Erica; Malanca, Adriana; Foradori, Irene; Ivalo, Silvina; Losso, Marcelo

    2018-04-01

    Optimal adherence is critical to achieve the benefits of antiretroviral treatment (ART). The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of mobile devices as a strategy to improve adherence to ART, measured by viral load (VL) in HIV+ patients less than 25 years of age. A prospective study was conducted in a cohort of HIV+ patients less than 25 years of age. HIV+ patients, on ART, VL >1000 copies/mL, using mobile devices and suboptimal adherence were included. The intervention was based on a mobile generic contact twice a month using text message and Facebook during 32 weeks. Extended communications were generated by the patient. VL was performed before and after the intervention. Twenty-five patients were included. Three were excluded and 22 patients were enrolled. Mean age was 17.2 ± 6.1 years (range: 6-25); 15 (68%) were female; mean baseline VL was 25,100 copies/mL (range: 1020-500,000 copies/mL), mean log was 4.3 (range: 3-5.7 log). Each participant received a total of 16 contacts; 84% (296) were answered by the patient and 54% (189) of the contacts generated extended communications. After the strategy implementation, 20/22 VL results were available: 13/20 (65%) were undetectable, 14/20 (70%) had VL < 1000 copies/mL and 6/20 (30%) VLs had no changes. The use of mobile devices and social networks is a valid tool to improve ART adherence in HIV+ pediatric and young adults, evaluated through VL. The strategy is feasible. The reminder messages trigger additional communications between patients and health provider and better engagement with HIV care. Longer follow-up time is needed.

  9. A qualitative study of community home-based care and antiretroviral adherence in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robin; Whiteside, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV and AIDS a chronic condition for individuals in many parts of the world. Adherence, however, is integral to achieving chronicity. Studies have shown both relatively high ART adherence rates in sub-Saharan Africa and the importance of community home-based care (CHBC) to facilitating this process. In light of diminished HIV and AIDS funding globally and increased reliance on CHBC throughout Africa, a better understanding of how CHBC may strengthen ART adherence is essential to improving patients’ quality of life, tending to the needs of care supporters and achieving healthier populations. Methods This article reports findings from a qualitative study of a CHBC organiztion serving an estimated 2500 clients in rural Swaziland. Semi-structured questionnaires with 79 HIV-positive clients [people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA)] yielded data on diverse aspects of being HIV positive, including insights on whether and how PLWHA perceived care supporters to facilitate ART adherence in a high stigma and structurally impoverished setting. Results Ninety-two percent of participants said their health had improved since care supporters came into their lives. A major finding was that an estimated 53% of participants said they would have died, a few from suicide had the care supporter never intervened. More than one in four participants (27.9%) sought HIV testing after a care supporter began visiting them. Nearly a third (31%) commenced ART after and largely as a consequence of care supporter intervention. Approximately one in four (23%) reported that their care supporter had helped them to disclose their HIV-positive status to family members. Twenty-seven percent said they had felt discouraged or had been discouraged from taking ART by members of their family or community. Discussion General inductive analysis of participant reports suggested two social mechanisms of CHBC impact on ART adherence: (i) cultivating client

  10. Contemporary issues on the epidemiology and antiretroviral adherence of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Adejumo, Olurotimi A; Malee, Kathleen M; Ryscavage, Patrick; Hunter, Scott J; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents are a unique and sometimes neglected group in the planning of healthcare services. This is the case in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, where more than eight out of ten of the world's HIV-infected adolescents live. Although the last decade has seen a reduction in AIDS-related mortality worldwide, largely due to improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), AIDS remains a significant contributor to adolescent mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although inadequate access to ART in parts of the subcontinent may be implicated, research among youth with HIV elsewhere in the world suggests that suboptimal adherence to ART may play a significant role. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology of HIV among sub-Saharan African adolescents and review their adherence to ART, emphasizing the unique challenges and factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of online databases for articles, relevant abstracts, and conference reports from meetings held between 2010 and 2014. Our search terms included “adherence,” “compliance,” “antiretroviral use” and “antiretroviral adherence,” in combination with “adolescents,” “youth,” “HIV,” “Africa,” “interventions” and the MeSH term “Africa South of the Sahara.” Of 19,537 articles and abstracts identified, 215 met inclusion criteria, and 148 were reviewed. Discussion Adolescents comprise a substantial portion of the population in many sub-Saharan African countries. They are at particular risk of HIV and may experience worse outcomes. Although demonstrated to have unique challenges, there is a dearth of comprehensive health services for adolescents, especially for those with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. ART adherence is poorer among older adolescents than other age groups, and psychosocial, socio-economic, individual, and treatment-related factors influence adherence behaviour among adolescents in this region. With

  11. Association between prescription cost sharing and adherence to initial combination antiretroviral therapy in commercially insured antiretroviral-naïve patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephen S; Juday, Timothy; Seekins, Daniel; Espindle, Derek; Chu, Bong-Chul

    2012-03-01

    In treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), high levels of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are required to prevent failure of virologic suppression, development of drug resistance, and permanent loss of therapeutic options. No published research has assessed the association between cART prescription cost sharing and adherence to cART. To analyze the association between cART prescription cost sharing and adherence to initial cART in commercially insured antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve patients with HIV. This retrospective observational cohort study used 2002-2008 data from a large U.S. claims database of more than 56 million commercially insured individuals. Study subjects were patients aged 18 years or older who initiated cART during the period January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2007, had no ARV claims during the 6-month period prior to the initiation date, and had at least 1 ICD-9-CM diagnosis code for HIV infection (042, 795.71, V08) from 12 months before to 12 months after cART initiation. A minimum 12-month period of continuous enrollment after cART initiation was used to construct a patient-quarter repeated measures panel dataset in which each quarter of data that a patient contributed represented an observation. The evaluation period extended from cART initiation until the occurrence of 1 of the following events: addition of an ARV that was not part of the initial cART regimen, 30-day gap in possession of an ARV within the initiated cART regimen, hospitalization of 30 or more days, loss to follow-up due to study end (December 31, 2008), or disenrollment. The study's outcome was quarterly adherence to cART, defined as the number of days within the quarter that a patient possessed all components of the initial cART regimen. Each patient's cART cost-sharing amount was calculated per 30-day supply of the entire cART regimen. Adherence was dichotomized for analysis at the clinically meaningful thresholds of 95% and 78%. The dichotomized

  12. Cognitive-behavioural theories and adherence: Application and relevance in antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Adefolalu, Adegoke O

    2018-01-01

    Adherence in chronic disease conditions is described as the extent to which a person's behaviour corresponds to the prescribed medical advice of the healthcare provider. This is not limited to medication intake only but also includes acts such as following instructions regarding dietary or fluid restrictions and taking medicines at the prescribed times and intervals. Although adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a predictor of good clinical outcome among HIV-infected persons on ART, it is a major challenge and strict adherence is not very common. This article aims to examine the application and relevance of some cognitive-behavioural theories in antiretroviral therapy adherence. After doing a thorough literature review, contemporary theories of health behaviour at the individual and interpersonal levels referred to as cognitive-behavioural theories were explored. This review highlights some aspects of the cognitive perspective of health behaviour theories as a good theoretical framework that could be used for organising thoughts about adherence and other health behaviours among patients on lifelong treatment such as ART. Key concepts of these theories stipulate that behaviour is mediated by cognition i.e. knowledge and attitude affect the person's action. In addition, cognitive-behavioural theories recognise knowledge alone as being insufficient to produce behavioural change; a person's perception, motivation, skills and social environment are all influential in the process of behavioural change. Prediction of medication adherence is complex, and health-related knowledge and beliefs alone are insufficient to achieve behaviour change, especially in chronic conditions such as HIV/AIDS. However, people can control or influence the events affecting their lives by integrating cognitive, social, and behavioural sub-skills related to beliefs of personal efficacy in performing these skills.

  13. Relationships Among Adherence and Physical and Mental Health Among Women Living with HIV in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Ekstrand, Maria; Heylen, Elsa; Ramakrishna, Padma; Yadav, Kartik; Sinha, Sanjeev; Hudson, Angela; Carpenter, Catherine L; Arab, Lenore

    2018-03-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional examination of the physical and psychological factors related to ART adherence among a sample of 400 women living with HIV/AIDS in rural India. Interviewer-administered measures assessed adherence, internalized stigma, depressive symptoms, quality of life, food insecurity, health history and sociodemographic information. CD4 counts were measured using blood collected at screening. Findings revealed that adherence to ART was generally low, with 94% of women taking 50% or less of prescribed medication in past month. Multivariate analyses showed a non-linear association between numbers of self-reported opportunistic infections (OIs) in past 6 months (p = 0.016) and adherence, with adherence decreasing with each additional OI for 0-5 OIs. For those reporting more than 5 OIs, the association reversed direction, with increasing OIs beyond 5 associated with greater adherence.

  14. Positive psychological determinants of treatment adherence among primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Nsamenang, Sheri A; Hirsch, Jameson K

    2015-07-01

    Patient adherence to medical treatment recommendations can affect disease prognosis, and may be beneficially or deleteriously influenced by psychological factors. Aim We examined the relationships between both adaptive and maladaptive psychological factors and treatment adherence among a sample of primary care patients. One hundred and one rural, primary care patients completed the Life Orientation Test-Revised, Trait Hope Scale, Future Orientation Scale, NEO-FFI Personality Inventory (measuring positive and negative affect), and Medical Outcomes Study General Adherence Scale. In independent models, positive affect, optimism, hope, and future orientation were beneficially associated with treatment adherence, whereas pessimism and negative affect were negatively related to adherence. In multivariate models, only negative affect, optimism and hope remained significant and, in a comparative model, trait hope was most robustly associated with treatment adherence. Therapeutically, addressing negative emotions and expectancies, while simultaneously bolstering motivational and goal-directed attributes, may improve adherence to treatment regimens.

  15. Using Path Analysis to Evaluate the Healthcare Empowerment Model Among Persons Living with HIV for Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Neilands, Torsten B.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Chen, Bing; Saberi, Parya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Healthcare empowerment (HCE) is patient controlled and includes the process and state of being engaged, informed, collaborative, committed, and tolerant of uncertainty. Understanding psychosocial factors that impact HCE for persons living with HIV is critical for their treatment and care. A sample of 1494 male and female participants living with HIV in the United States with a mean age of 45.6 (standard deviation = 11.4) completed a one-time online survey about their demographic characteristics, social support, healthcare provider relationship, HIV treatment knowledge, perceived HIV-related stigma, lifetime trauma, depressive symptoms, HCE, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. A path analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling software to fit a theory-based model of HCE. Results included statistically significant direct pathways between depressive symptoms, healthcare provider relationship, lifetime trauma, and ART adherence, as well as between healthcare provider relationship, HIV treatment knowledge, and HCE. Specifically, ART adherence was positively linked to healthcare provider relationship and negatively linked to depressive symptoms and lifetime trauma. In addition, healthcare provider relationship and HIV treatment knowledge were positively associated with HCE. The indirect effects of healthcare provider relationship and HIV treatment knowledge on adherence through HCE were also significant. In particular, ART adherence was indirectly and positively affected by healthcare provider relationship and HIV treatment knowledge through HCE. Multi-level interventions are urgently needed to address the effects of these psychosocial factors on ART adherence. PMID:27849372

  16. The association between market availability and adherence to antihypertensive medications: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charity D; Eurich, Dean T; Lu, Xinya; Remillard, Alfred J; Shevchuk, Yvonne M; Blackburn, David

    2013-02-01

    High adherence to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) reported in observational studies has frequently been attributed to improved tolerability. However, these agents are also relatively new to the market compared to other antihypertensive medications. We aimed to determine if an association exists between adherence and market availability of a specific antihypertensive agent. This retrospective cohort study used administrative data from Saskatchewan, Canada. Subjects were ≥40 years of age and received a new antihypertensive medication between 1994 and 2002. The primary outcome was the proportion of subjects achieving optimal adherence (≥80%) at 1 year, stratified by antihypertensive medication class and the year of availability. Adherence was measured using the cumulative mean gap ratio. A total of 36,214 subjects met the inclusion criteria. Optimal adherence was observed in 4987 of 8623 (57.8%) subjects receiving ACEIs and 1013 of 1600 (63.3%) subjects receiving ARBs, but adherence appeared inconsistent when examined within each antihypertensive class. A pattern of increasing mean adherence was observed according to availability in the ACEI subgroup (Spearman r = 0.82; P = 0.007) but not the ARB subgroup (Spearman r = 0.41; P = 0.49). However, the association between availability and optimal adherence converged when ARB and ACEI users were combined (Spearman r = 0.85, P < 0.001). Optimal adherence with ACEIs and ARBs compared to other antihypertensive agents may be associated with their relative availability. To what extent optimal adherence is also associated with improved tolerability, as currently believed, remains to be determined.

  17. Explaining Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Success Among HIV-Infected Children in Rural Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Olds, Peter K.; Kiwanuka, Julius P.; Ware, Norma C.; Tsai, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    High adherence is critical for achieving clinical benefits of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) and particularly challenging for children. We conducted 35 qualitative interviews with caregivers of HIV-infected Ugandan children who were followed in a longitudinal study of real-time ART adherence monitoring; 18 participants had undetectable HIV RNA, while 17 had detectable virus. Interviews blinded to viral suppression status elicited information on adherence experiences, barriers and facilitators to adherence, and social support. Using an inductive content analytic approach, we identified ‘lack of resources,’ ‘Lazarus effect,’ ‘caregiver's sense of obligation and commitment,’ and ‘child's personal responsibility’ as categories of influence on adherence, and defined types of caregiver social support. Among children with viral suppression, high hopes for the child's future and ready access to private instrumental support appeared particularly important. These findings suggest clinical counseling should explore caregivers' views of their children's futures and ability to access support in overcoming adherence barriers. PMID:25323679

  18. Mobile phones to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the Indian National AIDS Control Programme?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rashmi; Bogg, Lennart; Shet, Anita; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical to maintaining health and good clinical outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. To address poor treatment adherence, low-cost interventions using mobile communication technology are being studied. While there are some studies that show an effect of mobile phone reminders on adherence to ART, none has reported on the costs of such reminders for national AIDS programmes. This paper aims to study the costs of mobile phone reminder strategies (mHealth interventions) to support adherence in the context of India's National AIDS Control Program (NACP). The study was undertaken at two tertiary level teaching hospitals that implement the NACP in Karnataka state, South India. Costs for a mobile phone reminder application to support adherence, implemented at these sites (i.e. weekly calls, messages or both) were studied. Costs were collected based on the concept of avoidable costs specific to the application. The costs that were assessed were one-time costs and recurrent costs that included fixed and variable costs. A sequential procedure for costing was used. Costs were calculated at national-programme level, individual ART-centre level and individual patient level from the NACP's perspective. The assessed costs were pooled to obtain an annual cost per patient. The type of application, number of ART centres and number of patients on ART were varied in a sensitivity analysis of costs. The Indian NACP would incur a cost of between 79 and 110 INR (USD 1.27-1.77) per patient per year, based on the type of reminder, the number of patients on ART and the number of functioning ART centres. The total programme costs for a scale-up of the mHealth intervention to reach the one million patients expected to be on treatment by 2017 is estimated to be 0.36% of the total five-year national-programme budget. The cost of the mHealth intervention for ART-adherence support in the context of the Indian NACP is low and is facilitated by

  19. Mobile phones to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the Indian National AIDS Control Programme?

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Rashmi; Bogg, Lennart; Shet, Anita; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical to maintaining health and good clinical outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. To address poor treatment adherence, low-cost interventions using mobile communication technology are being studied. While there are some studies that show an effect of mobile phone reminders on adherence to ART, none has reported on the costs of such reminders for national AIDS programmes. This paper aims to study the costs of mobile phone reminder strategies (mHealth interventions) to support adherence in the context of India's National AIDS Control Program (NACP). Methods The study was undertaken at two tertiary level teaching hospitals that implement the NACP in Karnataka state, South India. Costs for a mobile phone reminder application to support adherence, implemented at these sites (i.e. weekly calls, messages or both) were studied. Costs were collected based on the concept of avoidable costs specific to the application. The costs that were assessed were one-time costs and recurrent costs that included fixed and variable costs. A sequential procedure for costing was used. Costs were calculated at national-programme level, individual ART-centre level and individual patient level from the NACP's perspective. The assessed costs were pooled to obtain an annual cost per patient. The type of application, number of ART centres and number of patients on ART were varied in a sensitivity analysis of costs. Results The Indian NACP would incur a cost of between 79 and 110 INR (USD 1.27–1.77) per patient per year, based on the type of reminder, the number of patients on ART and the number of functioning ART centres. The total programme costs for a scale-up of the mHealth intervention to reach the one million patients expected to be on treatment by 2017 is estimated to be 0.36% of the total five-year national-programme budget. Conclusions The cost of the mHealth intervention for ART-adherence support in the context of the

  20. HIV-Related Stress and Life Chaos Mediate the Association Between Poverty and Medication Adherence Among People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kalichman, Moira O

    2016-12-01

    HIV treatment depends on high-levels of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, which is severely impeded by poverty. Men and women living with HIV infection (N = 92) completed computerized interviews of demographic and health characteristics, poverty markers, stressful life events, and life chaos, as well as unannounced pill counts to determine prospective medication adherence and medical record chart abstractions for HIV viral load. Poverty markers were associated with both stressors and chaos, and the direct effects of all three factors predicted ART non-adherence. The multiple mediation model showed that accounting for stressors and chaos resulted in a non-significant association between poverty markers and ART adherence. The indirect effect of poverty markers on adherence through life chaos was significant, whereas the indirect effect of poverty markers on adherence through stressors was not significant. Factors that render HIV-related stress and create chaos offer intervention targets that are more amenable to change than poverty itself.

  1. When masculinity interferes with women's treatment of HIV infection: a qualitative study about adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Social constructions of masculinity have been shown to serve as an obstacle to men's access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ART). In the light of women's relative lack of power in many aspects of interpersonal relationships with men in many African settings, our objective is to explore how male denial of HIV/AIDS impacts on their female partners' ability to access and adhere to ART. Methods We conducted a qualitative case study involving thematic analysis of 37 individual interviews and five focus groups with a total of 53 male and female antiretroviral drug users and 25 healthcare providers in rural eastern Zimbabwe. Results Rooted in hegemonic notions of masculinity, men saw HIV/AIDS as a threat to their manhood and dignity and exhibited a profound fear of the disease. In the process of denying and avoiding their association with AIDS, many men undermine their wives' efforts to access and adhere to ART. Many women felt unable to disclose their HIV status to their husbands, forcing them to take their medication in secret, and act without a supportive treatment partner, which is widely accepted to be vitally important for adherence success. Some husbands, when discovering that their wives are on ART, deny them permission to take the drugs, or indeed steal the drugs for their own treatment. Men's avoidance of HIV also leave many HIV-positive women feeling vulnerable to re-infection as their husbands, in an attempt to demonstrate their manhood, are believed to continue engaging in HIV-risky behaviours. Conclusions Hegemonic notions of masculinity can interfere with women's adherence to ART. It is important that those concerned with promoting effective treatment services recognise the gender and household dynamics that may prevent some women from successfully adhering to ART, and explore ways to work with both women and men to identify couples-based strategies to increase adherence to ART PMID:21658260

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in a context of universal access, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Remien, R H; Bastos, F I; Jnr, V Terto; Raxach, J C; Pinto, R M; Parker, R G; Berkman, A; Hacker, M A

    2007-07-01

    Adherence is integral to improving and maintaining the health and quality of life of people living with HIV. Two-hundred HIV-positive adults recruited from teaching hospitals and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Rio de Janeiro City were assessed on socio-demographic factors, adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and psychosocial factors hypothesized to be associated with ART. Predictors of non-adherence were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Self-reported medication adherence was high (82% had adherence >90%). Non-adherence was associated with personal factors (i.e. sexual orientation, self-efficacy), physical factors (i.e. loss of appetite) and interpersonal factors (i.e. doctor-patient relationship). Adherence in Brazil is as good, if not better, than that seen in the US and western Europe, which is noteworthy since the sample was derived predominantly from public healthcare settings. It is possible that the connection to NGOs in Rio de Janeiro City played a helpful role in achieving high levels of adherence in this sample of people living with HIV and AIDS. Recommendations, based on study findings, include enhancing and sustaining supportive services for NGOs, promoting patient self-efficacy and behavioral skills for adherence, increasing social network support and having healthcare providers directly address patients' medication beliefs, attitudes and experience with side effects.

  3. A Peer-Led HIV Mediation Adherence Intervention Targeting Adults Linked to Medical Care but without a Suppressed Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, Maithe; Cheng, An-Lin; Banderas, Julie; Farnan, Rose; Chertoff, Keyna; Hayes, Deana; Ortego, Gerry; Moreno, Jose; Peterson, Jane; McKinsey, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to antiretroviral (ART) treatment remains a prevalent problem even among the segment of the U.S. HIV population that is ‘linked’ to medical care. Methods Controlled pilot feasibility study with ART experienced adult patients (n=20) linked to HIV medical care without suppressed viral load. Patients were randomized to a peer-led HIV medication adherence intervention named ‘Ready’ or a time equivalent ‘healthy eating’ control arm. Lay individuals living with HIV were trained to facilitate ‘Ready’. Results Patients had been prescribed a mean of three prior ART regimens. The group randomized to ‘Ready’ had significantly improved adherence. MEMS and pharmacy refill data correlated with viral load log drop. Higher readiness for healthful behavior change correlated with viral load drop and approached significance. Conclusion A peer-led medication adherence intervention had a positive impact among adults who had experienced repeated non-adherence to HIV treatment. A larger study is needed to examine intervention dissemination and efficacy. PMID:25412724

  4. The association between poor antiretroviral adherence and unsafe sex: differences by gender and sexual orientation and implications for scale-up of treatment as prevention.

    PubMed

    Remien, Robert H; Dolezal, Curtis; Wagner, Glenn J; Goggin, Kathy; Wilson, Ira B; Gross, Robert; Rosen, Marc I; Shen, Jie; Simoni, Jane M; Golin, Carol E; Arnsten, Julia H; Bangsberg, David R; Liu, Honghu

    2014-08-01

    Non-adherence to safer sex and non-adherence to ART can each have adverse health consequences for HIV-infected individuals and their sex partners, but little is known about the association of these behaviors with each other. This "dual risk" has potential negative public health consequences since non-adherence can lead to the development of resistant virus that can then be transmitted to sex partners. Among participants in the Multi-site Adherence Collaboration in HIV we examined, at study baseline, the association between the frequency of unprotected sex (assessed by self-report) and ART adherence (assessed by Medication Event Monitoring System, Aardex) among the sexually active participants in the five studies (N = 459) that collected sexual risk behavior. The bivariate association between sexual risk behaviors and ART adherence was assessed by Pearson correlations; subsequently regression analyses were used to evaluate the role of demographic characteristics, depression and substance use in explaining the "dual risk" outcome (sexual risk and non-adherence). Among participants who had been sexually active, more unprotected anal/vaginal sex was weakly associated with poorer ART adherence (r = -0.12, p = 0.01 for the overall sample). Further analysis showed this association was driven by the heterosexual men in the sample (r = -0.29, p < 0.001), and was significant only for this group, and not for gay/bisexual men or for women (heterosexual and homosexual). Neither substance use nor depression accounted for the association between sexual risk and ART adherence. HIV-infected heterosexual men who are having difficulty adhering to ART are also more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors and therefore may benefit from counseling about these risk behaviors. We must identify procedures to screen for these risk behaviors and develop interventions, appropriately tailored to specific populations and identified risk factors, that can be integrated into routine clinical

  5. Optimal breastfeeding durations for HIV-exposed infants: the impact of maternal ART use, infant mortality and replacement feeding risk.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Divya; MacLean, Rachel L; Shapiro, Roger; Dabis, Francois; Engelsmann, Barbara; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Leroy, Valeriane; Lockman, Shahin; Walensky, Rochelle; Rollins, Nigel; Ciaranello, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    In 2010, the WHO recommended women living with HIV breastfeed for 12 months while taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) to balance breastfeeding benefits against HIV transmission risks. To inform the 2016 WHO guidelines, we updated prior research on the impact of breastfeeding duration on HIV-free infant survival (HFS) by incorporating maternal ART duration, infant/child mortality and mother-to-child transmission data. Using the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications (CEPAC)-Infant model, we simulated the impact of breastfeeding duration on 24-month HFS among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. We defined "optimal" breastfeeding durations as those maximizing 24-month HFS. We varied maternal ART duration, mortality rates among breastfed infants/children, and relative risk of mortality associated with replacement feeding ("RRRF"), modelled as a multiplier on all-cause mortality for replacement-fed infants/children (range: 1 [no additional risk] to 6). The base-case simulated RRRF = 3, median infant mortality, and 24-month maternal ART duration. In the base-case, HFS ranged from 83.1% (no breastfeeding) to 90.2% (12-months breastfeeding). Optimal breastfeeding durations increased with higher RRRF values and longer maternal ART durations, but did not change substantially with variation in infant mortality rates. Optimal breastfeeding durations often exceeded the previous WHO recommendation of 12 months. In settings with high RRRF and long maternal ART durations, HFS is maximized when mothers breastfeed longer than the previously-recommended 12 months. In settings with low RRRF or short maternal ART durations, shorter breastfeeding durations optimize HFS. If mothers are supported to use ART for longer periods of time, it is possible to reduce transmission risks and gain the benefits of longer breastfeeding durations. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  6. The impact of specific HIV treatment-related adverse events on adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Dakkak, Imad; Patel, Seema; McCann, Eilish; Gadkari, Abhijit; Prajapati, Girish; Maiese, Eric M

    2013-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapies (ARTs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients increases the risk of incomplete viral suppression, development of viral resistance, progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome and death. This study assesses the impact of specific treatment-related adverse events (AEs) on adherence to ART in the adult HIV patient population. A systematic review of studies involving adult HIV-infected patients aged ≥ 16 years that reported an odds ratio (OR) for factors affecting adherence to ART was conducted through a search of the EMBASE(®) and Medline(®) databases. Database searches were complemented with a search of titles in the bibliographies of review papers. Studies conducted in populations limited to a particular demographic characteristic or behavioural risk were excluded. To qualify for inclusion into a meta-analysis, treatment-related AEs had to be defined similarly across studies. Also, multiple ORs from the same study were included where study sub-groups were distinct. Random effects models were used to pool ORs. In total, 19 studies and 18 ART-related AEs were included in meta-analyses. Adherence to ART was significantly lower in patients with non-specific AEs than in patients who did not experience AEs [OR = 0.623; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.465-0.834]. Patients with specific AEs such as fatigue (OR = 0.631; 95% CI: 0.433-0.918), confusion (OR = 0.349; 95% CI: 0.184-0.661), taste disturbances (OR = 0.485; 95% CI: 0.303-0.775) and nausea (OR = 0.574; 95% CI: 0.427-0.772) were significantly less likely to adhere to ART compared to patients without these AEs. Knowledge of specific treatment-related AEs may allow for targeted management of these events and a careful consideration of well-tolerated treatment regimens to improve ART adherence and clinical outcomes.

  7. Facilitators and barriers to uptake and adherence to lifelong antiretroviral therapy among HIV infected pregnant women in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Buregyeya, Esther; Naigino, Rose; Mukose, Aggrey; Makumbi, Fred; Esiru, Godfrey; Arinaitwe, Jim; Musinguzi, Joshua; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2017-03-21

    In 2012, Uganda started implementing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) in line with the WHO 2012 guidelines. This study explored experiences of HIV infected pregnant and breastfeeding women regarding barriers and facilitators to uptake and adherence to lifelong ART. This was a cross-sectional qualitative study conducted in three districts (Masaka, Mityana and Luwero) in Uganda, between February and May 2014. We conducted in-depth interviews with 57 pregnant and breastfeeding women receiving care in six health facilities, who had been on lifelong ART for at least 6 months. Data analysis was done using a content thematic approach with Atlas-ti software. Initiation of lifelong ART was done the same day the mother tested HIV positive. Several women felt the counselling was inadequate and had reservations about taking ART for life. The main motivation to initiate and adhere to ART was the desire to have an HIV-free baby. Adherence was a challenge, ranging from not taking the drugs at the right time, to completely missing doses and clinic appointments. Support from their male partners and peer family support groups enhanced good adherence. Fear to disclose HIV status to partners, drug related factors (side effects and the big size of the tablet), and HIV stigma were major barriers to ART initiation and adherence. Transition from antenatal care to HIV chronic care clinics was a challenge due to fear of stigma and discrimination. In order to maximize the benefits of lifelong ART, adequate preparation of women before ART initiation and on-going support through family support groups and male partner engagement are critical, particularly after birth and cessation of breastfeeding.

  8. Adherence as therapeutic citizenship: impact of the history of access to antiretroviral drugs on adherence to treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Kim; Ako, Cyriaque Yapo; Niamba, Pascal; Sylla, Aliou; Tiendrébéogo, Issoufou

    2007-10-01

    A dramatic increase in the use of antiretroviral drugs in Africa has increased focus on adherence to treatment, which has so far been equivalent if not superior to that in northern contexts. The reasons for this exceptional adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine adherence in the historical and ethnographic context of access to treatment in Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire and Mali. Living where there is no social security and minimal, if any, medical care, individuals diagnosed with HIV are faced with the threat of illness, death, ostracism and destitution, and were obliged to negotiate conflicting networks of obligation, reciprocity, and value. HIV and AIDS programmes value efforts to address social, and indeed biological, vulnerability. In contrast, kinship-based social relationships may value individuals in other ways. These conflicting moral economies often intersect in the worlds of people living with HIV. HIV status can be used to claim resources from the public or non-governmental organization programmes. This may interfere with social networks that are the most stable source of material and emotional support. Self-help and empowerment techniques provided effective tools for people living with HIV to fashion themselves into effective advocates. In the early years of the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), access to treatment was thus mediated by confessional practices and forms of social triage. We introduce the term 'therapeutic citizenship' to describe the way in which people living with HIV appropriate ART as a set of rights and responsibilities to negotiate these at times conflicting moral economies. Exemplary adherence should be viewed through the lens of therapeutic citizenship.

  9. HIV Stigma, Retention in Care, and Adherence Among Older Black Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Jamison, Amelia M; Dyer, Typhanye V

    Stigma is recognized as a barrier to the prevention, care, and treatment of HIV, including engagement in the HIV care continuum. HIV stigma in older Black women may be compounded by preexisting social inequities based on gender, age, and race. Using semi-structured interviews and survey questionnaires, we explore experiences of HIV stigma, retention in care, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in 35 older Black women with HIV from Prince George's County, Maryland. Study findings indicated that older Black women experienced high levels of HIV stigma, retention in care, and ART adherence. Findings suggest that experiences of HIV stigma were intensified for older Black women due to multiple stigmatized social positions. Participants also reported experiences of marginalization in health care that hindered retention in care and ART adherence. Interventions aimed at improving HIV prevention, care, and treatment outcomes should incorporate HIV stigma reduction strategies as core elements. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Michael L; Vreeman, Rachel C

    2013-01-01

    The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a compelling case for more data to guide strategies to improve access and adherence to treatment in resource-limited settings. PMID:23326204

  11. Mechanisms for the Negative Effects of Internalized HIV-Related Stigma on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Women: The Mediating Roles of Social Isolation and Depression.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent; Smith, Whitney; Cohen, Mardge H; Wilson, Tracey E; Adimora, Adaora A; Merenstein, Daniel; Adedimeji, Adebola; Wentz, Eryka L; Foster, Antonina G; Metsch, Lisa; Tien, Phyllis C; Weiser, Sheri D; Turan, Janet M

    2016-06-01

    Internalization of HIV-related stigma may inhibit a person's ability to manage HIV disease through adherence to treatment regimens. Studies, mainly with white men, have suggested an association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there is a scarcity of research with women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and on mediating mechanisms in the association between internalized stigma and ART adherence. The Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) is a multicenter cohort study. Women living with HIV complete interviewer-administered questionnaires semiannually. Cross-sectional analyses for the current article included 1168 women on ART for whom data on medication adherence were available from their last study visit between April 2013 and March 2014, when the internalized stigma measure was initially introduced. The association between internalized stigma and self-reported suboptimal ART adherence was significant for those in racial/ethnic minority groups (AOR = 0.69, P = 0.009, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.91), but not for non-Hispanic whites (AOR = 2.15, P = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.69 to 6.73). Depressive symptoms, loneliness, and low perceived social support mediated the association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence in the whole sample, as well as in the subsample of minority participants. In serial mediation models, internalized stigma predicted less-perceived social support (or higher loneliness), which in turn predicted more depressive symptoms, which in turn predicted suboptimal medication adherence. Findings suggest that interconnected psychosocial mechanisms affect ART adherence, and that improvements in adherence may require multifaceted interventions addressing both mental health and interpersonal factors, especially for minority women.

  12. Adherence to medication under mandatory and voluntary mail benefit designs.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joshua N; Hutchins, David S; Shrank, Will H; Slezak, Julie; Brennan, Troyen A

    2011-07-01

    To compare adherence rates under voluntary and mandatory mail benefit designs. Matched retrospective cohort. Adherence rates in the first year of therapy were compared between voluntary and mandatory mail cohorts composed of individuals who initiated statin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), platelet aggregation inhibitor, metformin, glitazone, or sulfonylurea therapy at a retail pharmacy between January 1 and March 31, 2009. Initiators in mandatory mail plans were matched on therapeutic class, age, sex, prospective risk, and cost of initial prescription with those in voluntary mail plans. Logistic regression models of optimal adherence were constructed to adjust for measured confounders. Persistence rates were similar through the first 60 days of therapy. The mandatory mail cohort had a notable drop in persistence by day 90 (63.3% vs 56.3%, P <.001), with a more pronounced drop among those without previous mail-service pharmacy use (50.5%). Median medication possession ratio (49.2% vs 57.4%) and optimal adherence (33.6% vs 36.1) were also lower. In the multivariable models, mandatory mail participants were less likely to achieve optimal adherence overall (odds ratio [OR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.74) and in the metformin (OR 0.55), sulfonylurea (OR 0.72), ACE inhibitor (OR 0.74), ARB (OR 0.69), and statin (OR 0.69) classes. Participants with no prior use of mail-service pharmacy had significantly lower odds of achieving optimal adherence in all therapeutic classes. Mandatory mail appears to cause some members to discontinue therapy prematurely, particularly those without previous mail service pharmacy experience.

  13. Applying the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model in Medication Adherence Among Thai Youth Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Kaljee, Linda M.; Panthong, Apirudee; Koken, Juline A.; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With disproportionately higher rates of HIV/AIDS among youth and increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Thailand, there is a growing urgency in understanding the challenges to medication adherence confronting this population and in developing theory-based interventions to address these challenges. One potentially relevant model, the information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of adherence, was developed in Western settings characterized by a more individualistic culture in contrast to the more collectivistic culture of Thailand. We explored the application and adaptability of IMB on ART adherence among HIV-positive Thai youth through the analysis of qualitative data from a pilot motivational interviewing study. Twenty-two interview sessions from 10 HIV-positive Thai youth (17–24 years) were analyzed; 6 youth were on ART. Data support the utility of IMB as a potential framework for understanding ART adherence in this population. However, data indicate a consideration to expand the motivation construct of IMB to incorporate youths' perceived familial and social responsibilities and the need to adhere to medications for short- and long-term well-being of self, family, and society in a context of Buddhist values. These modifications to IMB could be relevant in other cultural settings with more collectivistic worldviews. PMID:21091238

  14. Enhancing medication adherence: in older adults with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Depp, Colin A; Lebowitz, Barry D

    2007-06-01

    The number of older adults with bipolar disorder is increasing, yet little is known about the optimal clinical management of these patients. Medication adherence is a vital to effective long-term treatment of these patients; thus enhancement of adherence is often an important clinical goal. We reviewed available evidence about the characteristics of later-life bipolar disorder along with behavioral and organizational strategies to enhance adherence in this population. Based on available data, cognitive impairment, medical comorbidity, and functional limitations are frequent and are likely to impact treatment adherence in this population. In terms of treatment, there have been no placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials of medications or psychosocial interventions for this population. Based on extrapolation from intervention research on younger adults with bipolar disorder and older adults with other chronic illness, psychosocial interventions that reduce effortful cognitive processing in managing medications and reduce organizational barriers to adherence may be beneficial in enhancing adherence in this population. Much more research needs to be done to understand the impact of aging on bipolar disorder, along with optimization of treatment. Interventions to enhance adherence in this population need to be adapted to fit with the unique needs of older adults with bipolar disorder.

  15. Effect of a clinic-wide social marketing campaign to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Thomas P.; Rodriguez, Sonia; Zhang, Hong; Kallen, Michael A.; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Buscher, April L.; Arya, Monisha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Ross, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This demonstration study tested the impact of a 5-month clinic-wide social marketing campaign at improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The intervention included a video, posters, pens, mugs, and lapel buttons with the campaign slogan “Live the Solution: Take Your Pills Every Day.” Participants self-reported adherence over a 4-week interval, the primary outcome, with a visual analogue scale. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by 141 participants. Adherence did not change over time (absolute mean change −2.02%, paired t-test p=0.39). Among the 39.7% of participants who correctly identified the campaign slogan on the post-intervention survey, adherence increased by 3.3%, while it decreased in the other participants by 5.5% (paired t-test p=0.07). The well-received campaign did not increase short-term adherence to ART, but adherence tended to increase in participants who were more engaged with the intervention. Future interventions should engage patients more completely and have a more potent effect on adherence. PMID:22983536

  16. Effect of a clinic-wide social marketing campaign to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Thomas P; Rodriguez, Sonia; Zhang, Hong; Kallen, Michael A; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Buscher, April L; Arya, Monisha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Ross, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This demonstration study tested the impact of a 5-month clinic-wide social marketing campaign at improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). The intervention included a video, posters, pens, mugs, and lapel buttons with the campaign slogan "Live the Solution: Take Your Pills Every Day." Participants self-reported adherence over a 4-week interval, the primary outcome, with a visual analogue scale. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were completed by 141 participants. Adherence did not change over time (absolute mean change -2.02 %, paired t test P = 0.39). Among the 39.7 % of participants who correctly identified the campaign slogan on the post-intervention survey, adherence increased by 3.3 %, while it decreased in the other participants by 5.5 % (paired t test P = 0.07). The well-received campaign did not increase short-term adherence to ART, but adherence tended to increase in participants who were more engaged with the intervention. Future interventions should engage patients more completely and have a more potent effect on adherence.

  17. Associations between the legal context of HIV, perceived social capital, and HIV antiretroviral adherence in North America.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J Craig; Webel, Allison; Rose, Carol Dawson; Corless, Inge B; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Nokes, Kathleen; Brion, John; Chen, Wei-Ti; Iipinge, Scholastika; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Nicholas, Patrice K; Johnson, Mallory O; Maryland, Mary; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Portillo, Carmen J; Chaiphibalsarisdi, Puangtip; Kirksey, Kenn M; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Reid, Paula; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L

    2013-08-08

    Human rights approaches to manage HIV and efforts to decriminalize HIV exposure/transmission globally offer hope to persons living with HIV (PLWH). However, among vulnerable populations of PLWH, substantial human rights and structural challenges (disadvantage and injustice that results from everyday practices of a well-intentioned liberal society) must be addressed. These challenges span all ecosocial context levels and in North America (Canada and the United States) can include prosecution for HIV nondisclosure and HIV exposure/transmission. Our aims were to: 1) Determine if there were associations between the social structural factor of criminalization of HIV exposure/transmission, the individual factor of perceived social capital (resources to support one's life chances and overcome life's challenges), and HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among PLWH and 2) describe the nature of associations between the social structural factor of criminalization of HIV exposure/transmission, the individual factor of perceived social capital, and HIV ART adherence among PLWH. We used ecosocial theory and social epidemiology to guide our study. HIV related criminal law data were obtained from published literature. Perceived social capital and HIV ART adherence data were collected from adult PLWH. Correlation and logistic regression were used to identify and characterize observed associations. Among a sample of adult PLWH (n = 1873), significant positive associations were observed between perceived social capital, HIV disclosure required by law, and self-reported HIV ART adherence. We observed that PLWH who have higher levels of perceived social capital and who live in areas where HIV disclosure is required by law reported better average adherence. In contrast, PLWH who live in areas where HIV transmission/exposure is a crime reported lower 30-day medication adherence. Among our North American participants, being of older age, of White or Hispanic ancestry, and having

  18. Current Situation of Medication Adherence in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vrijens, Bernard; Antoniou, Sotiris; Burnier, Michel; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Volpe, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Despite increased awareness, poor adherence to treatments for chronic diseases remains a global problem. Adherence issues are common in patients taking antihypertensive therapy and associated with increased risks of coronary and cerebrovascular events. Whilst there has been a gradual trend toward improved control of hypertension, the number of patients with blood pressure values above goal has remained constant. This has both personal and economic consequences. Medication adherence is a multifaceted issue and consists of three components: initiation, implementation, and persistence. A combination of methods is recommended to measure adherence, with electronic monitoring and drug measurement being the most accurate. Pill burden, resulting from free combinations of blood pressure lowering treatments, makes the daily routine of medication taking complex, which can be a barrier to optimal adherence. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations simplify the habit of medication taking and improve medication adherence. Re-packing of medication is also being utilized as a method of improving adherence. This paper presents the outcomes of discussions by a European group of experts on the current situation of medication adherence in hypertension.

  19. Barriers and facilitators to paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa: a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to the development of drug resistance. HIV-infected children, especially those 5 years and under, are dependent on a caregiver to adhere to ART. However, characteristics of the caregiver, child, regimen, clinic and social context affect clinic attendance and medication-taking, both of which constitute adherent behaviour. We conducted nine interviews and three focus groups to determine how doctors, nurses, counsellors, traditional healers and caregivers understood the barriers and facilitators to ART adherence among children residing in rural South Africa. The data were transcribed, translated into English from isiZulu where necessary, and coded using Atlas.ti version 7. Results were interpreted through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory. We found that at the micro-level, palatability of medication and large volumes of medication were problematic for young children. Characteristics of the caregiver including absent mothers, grandmothers as caregivers and denial of HIV amongst fathers were themes related to the micro-system. Language barriers and inconsistent attendance of caregivers to monthly clinic visits were factors affecting adherence in the meso-system. Adherence counselling and training were the most problematic features in the exo-system. In the macro-system, the effects of food insecurity and the controversy surrounding the use of traditional medicines were most salient. Increased supervision and regular training amongst lay adherence counsellors are needed, as well as regular monitoring of the persons attending the clinic on the child's behalf.

  20. Using communication skills to improve adherence in children with chronic disease: the adherence equation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2013-12-01

    Nonadherence to maintenance medication is common in paediatric chronic conditions. Despite the common belief that nonadherence is therapy-resistant, and the apparent lack of evidence for successful interventions to improve adherence, there is, in fact, a considerable body of evidence suggesting that adherence can be improved by applying specific communicative consultation skills. These can be summarized as the adherence equation: adherence=follow-up+dialogue+barriers and beliefs+empathy and education => concordance. Close follow-up of children with a chronic condition is needed to establish a therapeutic partnership with the family. Teaching self management skills is not a unidirectional process of providing information, but requires a constructive and collaborative dialogue between the medical team and the family. Identifying barriers to adherence can be achieved in a non-confrontational manner, by showing a genuine interest what the patient's views and preferences are. In particular, parental illness perceptions and medication beliefs should be identified, because they are strong drivers of nonadherence. Through empathic evidence-based education, such perceptions and beliefs can be modified. By applying these strategies, concordance between the child's family and the medical team can be achieved, resulting in optimal adherence to the jointly created treatment plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms for the Negative Effects of Internalized HIV-Related Stigma on Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Women: The Mediating Roles of Social Isolation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Whitney; Cohen, Mardge H.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Adimora, Adaora A.; Merenstein, Daniel; Adedimeji, Adebola; Wentz, Eryka L.; Foster, Antonina G.; Metsch, Lisa; Tien, Phyllis C.; Weiser, Sheri D.; Turan, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internalization of HIV-related stigma may inhibit a person's ability to manage HIV disease through adherence to treatment regimens. Studies, mainly with white men, have suggested an association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there is a scarcity of research with women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds and on mediating mechanisms in the association between internalized stigma and ART adherence. Methods: The Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) is a multicenter cohort study. Women living with HIV complete interviewer-administered questionnaires semiannually. Cross-sectional analyses for the current article included 1168 women on ART for whom data on medication adherence were available from their last study visit between April 2013 and March 2014, when the internalized stigma measure was initially introduced. Results: The association between internalized stigma and self-reported suboptimal ART adherence was significant for those in racial/ethnic minority groups (AOR = 0.69, P = 0.009, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.91), but not for non-Hispanic whites (AOR = 2.15, P = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.69 to 6.73). Depressive symptoms, loneliness, and low perceived social support mediated the association between internalized stigma and suboptimal adherence in the whole sample, as well as in the subsample of minority participants. In serial mediation models, internalized stigma predicted less-perceived social support (or higher loneliness), which in turn predicted more depressive symptoms, which in turn predicted suboptimal medication adherence. Conclusions: Findings suggest that interconnected psychosocial mechanisms affect ART adherence, and that improvements in adherence may require multifaceted interventions addressing both mental health and interpersonal factors, especially for minority women. PMID:26885803

  2. Multivariate analysis of covariates of adherence among HIV-positive mothers with low viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Nsubuga-Nyombi, Tamara; Sensalire, Simon; Karamagi, Esther; Aloyo, Judith; Byabagambi, John; Rahimzai, Mirwais; Nabitaka, Linda Kisaakye; Calnan, Jacqueline

    2018-03-31

    As part of efforts to improve the prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Northern Uganda, we explored reasons for poor viral suppression among 122 pregnant and lactating women who were in care, received viral load tests, but had not achieved viral suppression and had more than 1000 copies/mL. Understanding the patient factors associated with low viral suppression was of interest to the Ministry of Health to guide the development of tools and interventions to achieve viral suppression for pregnant and lactating women newly initiating on ART as well as those on ART with unsuppressed viral load. A facility-based cross-sectional and mixed methods study design was used, with retrospective medical record review. We assessed 122 HIV-positive mothers with known low viral suppression across 31 health facilities in Northern Uganda. Adjusted odds ratios were used to determine the covariates of adherence among HIV positive mothers using logistic regression. A study among health care providers shed further light on predictors of low viral suppression and a history of low early retention. This study was part of a larger national evaluation of the performance of integrated care services for mothers. Adherence defined as taking antiretroviral medications correctly everyday was low at 67.2%. The covariates of low adherence are: taking other medications in addition to ART, missed appointments in the past 6 months, experienced violence in the past 6 months, and faces obstacles to treatment. Mothers who were experiencing each of these covariates were less likely to adhere to treatment. These covariates were triangulated with perspectives of health providers as covariates of low adherence and included: long distances to health facility, missed appointments, running out of pills, sharing antiretroviral drugs, violence, and social lifestyles such as multiple sexual partners coupled with non-disclosure to partners. Inadequate counseling, stigma, and lack of client identity are

  3. Understanding Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Among HIV-Positive Women at Four Postpartum Time Intervals: Qualitative Results from the Kabeho Study in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michelle M; Umutoni, Aline; Hoffman, Heather J; Ndatimana, Dieudonne; Ndayisaba, Gilles F; Kibitenga, Solange; Mugwaneza, Placidie; Asiimwe, Anita; Bobrow, Emily A

    2017-04-01

    As lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for pregnant women is implemented, it is important to understand the attitudes and norms affecting women's postpartum ART adherence. This is a qualitative cross-sectional study of HIV-positive postpartum women (n = 112) enrolled in a 2-year observational prospective cohort in Rwanda. Informed by the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), we conducted in-depth interviews with women whose children were 0-6, 7-12, 13-18, or 21-24 months of age to describe factors contributing to adherence and changes over time. Positive ART attitudes reported by women included mothers' health promotion, prevention of infant HIV infection, higher CD4 count, and improved physical appearance. Negative attitudes were few, but included side effects and the lifelong nature of treatment. Learning from people living with HIV (PLHIV) was identified as a norm facilitating adherence; ART adherence was inhibited by fear of disclosure or stigmatization in communities and clinics. Poor adherence behaviors were common immediately after HIV diagnosis, not necessarily during prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). Women with older children, most of whom stopped breastfeeding by 13-18 months, reported more barriers and missed doses than women with younger children. The TRA was useful in identifying the collective influence of attitudes, norms, and intentions on behavior. Findings suggest that HIV-positive women are vulnerable to poor adherence following HIV diagnosis and around the time of breastfeeding cessation. Lifelong treatment adherence can be supported through PLHIV exemplifying long-term ART use, fewer and less stigmatizing clinic visits, and counseling messages highlighting the benefits of drugs on appearance and illness prevention and incorporating biological feedback.

  4. Influence of the number of daily pills and doses on adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a 7-year study.

    PubMed

    Hernández Arroyo, M J; Cabrera Figueroa, S E; Sepúlveda Correa, R; Valverde Merino, M P; Luna Rodrigo, G; Domínguez-Gil Hurlé, A

    2016-02-01

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) is hampered by complicated regimens, high pill burden, drug-drug interactions, and frequent short- and long-term adverse effects, leading to decreased adherence. Over recent years, considerable effort has been directed at developing regimens that are less burdening. We undertook a 7-year retrospective study of the records of 264 HIV-infected subjects enrolled in a pharmaceutical care programme to document the progress made and to study the influence of the number of ART pills and doses on the level of treatment adherence. Antiretroviral dispensing records were analysed for the number of pills and doses administered and the ART adherence rate estimated. In 2005, the patients took a mean of 6·2 pills daily (CI 95%: 5·9-6·6), and 92·9% of them were on a twice-a-day (BID) dosage regimen. By 2012, the mean number of pills was reduced to 4·1 (CI 95%: 3·8-4·4), and only 50·9% were on a BID regimen. No statistically significant relation was observed between number of daily pills and doses and ART adherence reached by the patients in any of the analyses performed. There has been a continuous reduction in the number of pills and doses of antiretrovirals taken by individual patients over the last 7 years due largely to the introduction of improved treatments and regimens. More daily pills or doses was not associated with worse ART adherence in our pharmaceutical care programme. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Facilitating Medication Adherence in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yolanda; Logan, Diana; Williamson, Caroline; Treadaway, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews adherence to medication in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from the perspective of nurse and social worker authors. It reviews data on patient adherence and offers practical, evidence-based strategies that health-care providers can use to facilitate adherence. In addition, it examines how emerging MS therapies may affect patient adherence and associated interventions. To promote adherence, interventions need to incorporate new and creative approaches. A proactive approach includes assessing patient needs and lifestyle before the start of medication and selecting the most appropriate disease-modifying therapy for each individual patient. Including multidisciplinary expertise and services in the treatment plan can be part of a comprehensive, holistic approach to helping patients and families. Optimization of health-care provider roles is likely to facilitate improved adherence. PMID:24453761

  6. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, María Jesús Hernández; Figueroa, Salvador Enrique Cabrera; Correa, Rosa Sepúlveda; de la Paz Valverde Merino, María; Gómez, Alicia Iglesias; Hurlé, Alfonso Domínguez-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatments (ART) form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2) to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR). The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR) in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010). Results A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01). Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001), and there was a considerable decrease in the percentage of patients with CD4+ lymphocytes less than 200 cells/mm3 (P < 0.001). A relationship was found between the number of patients with optimum adherence levels and the time that plasma viral load remained undetected. The number of interviews and interventions performed in each patient in the first 12 months from the onset of the pharmaceutical care program (month 6), was related to a significant increase in adherence during this same time period. Conclusion The results suggest that the establishment and permanence of a pharmaceutical care program may increase ART adherence

  7. Acceptability and Feasibility of Real-Time Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Interventions in Rural Uganda: Mixed-Method Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atukunda, Esther C; Tumuhimbise, Wilson; Pisarski, Emily E; Tam, Melanie; Wyatt, Monique A; Ware, Norma C; Haberer, Jessica E

    2018-01-01

    Background Wireless electronic adherence monitors can detect antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence lapses and trigger interventions in real time, thus potentially avoiding unnecessary HIV viremia. Evidence about the acceptability and feasibility of these monitors and associated interventions, however, is limited. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of real-time adherence monitoring linked to text messaging (short message service, SMS) reminders and notifications to support adherence among individuals living with HIV who are taking ART in rural southwestern Uganda. Methods Individuals living with HIV who were initiating ART were enrolled in a pilot randomized controlled trial and followed up for 9 months. Participants received a real-time adherence monitor and were randomized to one of the following study arms: (1) scheduled SMS, (2) SMS triggered by missed or delayed doses, or (3) no SMS. SMS notifications were also sent to 45 patient-identified social supporters for sustained adherence lapses in the scheduled SMS and triggered SMS arms. Study participants and social supporters participated in qualitative semistructured in-depth interviews on acceptability and feasibility of this technology. An inductive, content analytic approach, framed by the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model, was used to analyze qualitative data. Quantitative feasibility data, including device functionality and SMS tracking data, were recorded based upon device metrics collected electronically and summarized descriptively. Results A total of 63 participants participated in the study. Participants reported that real-time monitoring intervention linked to SMS reminders and notifications are generally acceptable; the predominant feedback was perceived utility—the intervention was beneficial in motivating and reminding patients to take medication, as well as enabling provision of social support. The intervention was found to be

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Personalized Text Message Reminders to Promote Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Robert; Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna; Johnson, Amy; Muldoon, Abigail; Rice, Dion

    2016-05-01

    HIV-positive adolescents and young adults often experience suboptimal medication adherence, yet few interventions to improve adherence in this group have shown evidence of efficacy. We conducted a randomized trial of a two-way, personalized daily text messaging intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among N = 105 poorly adherent HIV-positive adolescents and young adults, ages 16-29. Adherence to ART was assessed via self-reported visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 %) at 3 and 6-months for mean adherence level and proportion ≥90 % adherent. The average effect estimate over the 6-month intervention period was significant for ≥90 % adherence (OR = 2.12, 95 % CI 1.01-4.45, p < .05) and maintained at 12-months (6 months post-intervention). Satisfaction scores for the intervention were very high. These results suggest both feasibility and initial efficacy of this approach. Given study limitations, additional testing of this intervention as part of a larger clinical trial with objective and/or clinical outcome measures of adherence is warranted.

  9. Unearthing how, why, for whom and under what health system conditions the antiretroviral treatment adherence club intervention in South Africa works: A realist theory refining approach.

    PubMed

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Marchal, Bruno; Van Belle, Sara; van Wyk, Brian

    2018-05-09

    Poor retention in care and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) undermine its successful rollout in South Africa. The adherence club intervention was designed as an adherence-enhancing intervention to enhance the retention in care of patients on ART and their adherence to medication. Although empirical evidence suggests the effective superiority of the adherence club intervention to standard clinic ART care schemes, it is poorly understood exactly how and why it works, and under what health system contexts. To this end, we aimed to develop a refined programme theory explicating how, why, for whom and under what health system contexts the adherence club intervention works (or not). We undertook a realist evaluation study to uncover the programme theory of the adherence club intervention. We elicited an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention and tested the initial programme theory in three contrastive sites. Using a cross-case analysis approach, we delineated the conceptualisation of the intervention, context, actor and mechanism components of the three contrastive cases to explain the outcomes of the adherence club intervention, guided by retroductive inferencing. We found that an intervention that groups clinically stable patients on ART in a convenient space to receive a quick and uninterrupted supply of medication, health talks, counselling, and immediate access to a clinician when required works because patients' self-efficacy improves and they become motivated and nudged to remain in care and adhere to medication. The successful implementation and rollout of the adherence club intervention are contingent on the separation of the adherence club programme from other patients who are HIV-negative. In addition, there should be available convenient space for the adherence club meetings, continuous support of the adherence club facilitators by clinicians and buy-in from the health workers at the health-care facility and the

  10. Economic evaluation of mobile phone text message interventions to improve adherence to HIV therapy in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anik R; Kessler, Jason; Braithwaite, R Scott; Nucifora, Kimberly A; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Zhou, Qinlian; Lester, Richard T; Marra, Carlo A

    2017-02-01

    A surge in mobile phone availability has fueled low cost short messaging service (SMS) adherence interventions. Multiple systematic reviews have concluded that some SMS-based interventions are effective at improving antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, and they are hypothesized to improve retention in care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of SMS-based adherence interventions and explore the added value of retention benefits. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of weekly SMS interventions compared to standard care among HIV+ individuals initiating ART for the first time in Kenya. We used an individual level micro-simulation model populated with data from two SMS-intervention trials, an East-African HIV+ cohort and published literature. We estimated average quality adjusted life years (QALY) and lifetime HIV-related costs from a healthcare perspective. We explored a wide range of scenarios and assumptions in one-way and multivariate sensitivity analyses. We found that SMS-based adherence interventions were cost-effective by WHO standards, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $1,037/QALY. In the secondary analysis, potential retention benefits improved the cost-effectiveness of SMS intervention (ICER = $864/QALY). In multivariate sensitivity analyses, the interventions remained cost-effective in most analyses, but the ICER was highly sensitive to intervention costs, effectiveness and average cohort CD4 count at ART initiation. SMS interventions remained cost-effective in a test and treat scenario where individuals were assumed to initiate ART upon HIV detection. Effective SMS interventions would likely increase the efficiency of ART programs by improving HIV treatment outcomes at relatively low costs, and they could facilitate achievement of the UNAIDS goal of 90% viral suppression among those on ART by 2020.

  11. Economics of non-adherence to biologic therapies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Mary A; Mailman, Jonathan; Galo, Jessica S

    2014-11-01

    Adherence to biologic therapies among patients with rheumatoid arthritis is sub-optimal, with the proportion of adherent patients reported to be as low as 11 %. We found few studies evaluating economic outcomes, including health care costs, associated with non-adherence with biologic therapies. Findings suggest that while higher pharmacy costs drive total health care costs among adherent patients, non-adherent patients incur greater health care utilization including inpatient, outpatient, and laboratory services. Finally, economic factors are important determinants of adherence to biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence to date has shown that higher out-of-pocket payments have a negative association with adherence to biologics. Furthermore, cost-related non-adherence is a highly prevalent problem in rheumatoid arthritis. Given the high costs of biologics and continued expansion of use in rheumatoid arthritis, there is need for more research to understand the economic implications of adherence to these therapies.

  12. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N; Fielding, Katherine; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n = 150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n = 147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1 % male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119,000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at 9 months was achieved in 89.8 % of didactic and 87.9 % of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p = 0.62). 82.9 % of didactic and 79.5 % of motivational counselling participants achieved >95 % adherence by pill count at 6 months (RR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.85-1.09, p = 0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting.

  13. Individualised motivational counselling to enhance adherence to antiretroviral therapy is not superior to didactic counselling in South African patients: Findings of the CAPRISA 058 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Loggerenberg, Francois; Grant, Alison D.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Murrman, Marita; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Fielding, Katherine; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Concerns that standard didactic adherence counselling may be inadequate to maximise antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence led us to evaluate more intensive individualised motivational adherence counselling. We randomised 297 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients in Durban, South Africa, to receive either didactic counselling, prior to ART initiation (n=150), or an intensive motivational adherence intervention after initiating ART (n=147). Study arms were similar for age (mean 35.8 years), sex (43.1% male), CD4+ cell count (median 121.5 cells/μl) and viral load (median 119 000 copies/ml). Virologic suppression at nine months was achieved in 89.8% of didactic and 87.9% of motivational counselling participants (risk ratio [RR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.07, p=0.62). 82.9% of didactic and 79.5% of motivational counselling participants achieved >95% adherence by pill count at six months (RR 0.96, 95%CI 0.85-1.09, p=0.51). Participants receiving intensive motivational counselling did not achieve higher treatment adherence or virological suppression than those receiving routinely provided didactic adherence counselling. These data are reassuring that less resource intensive didactic counselling was adequate for excellent treatment outcomes in this setting. PMID:24696226

  14. Optimization and inhibition of the adherent ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, H; Crandall, I; Prudhomme, J; Sherman, I W

    1992-01-01

    The vast majority of the 1-2 million malaria associated deaths that occur each year are due to anemia and cerebral malaria (the attachment of erythrocytes containing mature forms of Plasmodium falciparum to the endothelial cells that line the vascular beds of the brain). A "model system" for the study of cerebral malaria employs amelanotic melanoma cells as the "target" cells in an in vitro cytoadherence assay. Using this model system we determined that the optimum pH for adherence is 6.6 to 6.8, that high concentrations of Ca2+ (50mM) result in increased levels of binding, and that the type of buffer used influences adherence (Bis Tris > MOPS > HEPES > PIPES). We also observed that the ability of infected erythrocytes to cytoadhere varied from (erythrocyte) donor to donor. We have produced murine monoclonal antibodies against P. falciparum-infected red cells which recognize modified forms of human band 3; these inhibit the adherence of infected erythrocytes to melanoma cells in a dose-responsive fashion. Antimalarials (chloroquine, quinacrine, mefloquine, artemisinin), on the other hand, affected adherence in an indirect fashion i.e. since cytoadherence is due, in part, to the presence of knobs on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, and knob formation is dependent on intracellular parasite growth, when plasmodial development is inhibited so is knob production, and consequently adherence is ablated.

  15. Ethno-Cultural Considerations in Cardiac Patients' Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    King-Shier, K M; Singh, S; Khan, N A; LeBlanc, P; Lowe, J C; Mather, C M; Chong, E; Quan, H

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop an in-depth understanding about factors that influence cardiac medication adherence among South Asian, Chinese, and European White cardiac patients. Sixty-four patients were purposively sampled from an ongoing study cohort. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed for analyses. Physicians' culturally sensitive communication and patients' motivation to live a symptom-free and longer life enhanced adherence. European Whites were motivated to enhance personal well-being and enjoy family life. South Asians' medication adherence was influenced by the desire to fulfill the will of God and family responsibilities. The Chinese were motivated to avoid pain, illness, and death, and to obey a health care provider. The South Asians and Chinese wanted to ultimately reduce medication use. Previous positive experiences, family support, and establishing a routine also influenced medication adherence. Deterrents to adherence were essentially the reverse of the motivators/facilitators. This analysis represents an essential first step forward in developing ethno-culturally tailored interventions to optimize adherence.

  16. Orientation to Commercial and Advertising Art; Commercial and Advertising Art--Basic: 9183.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This outline is presented as an introduction to help the student become familiar with the many facets and requirements to be adhered to in the field of Commercial and Advertising Art. The student is given an in-depth orientation to the entire course content, including rules, regulations, safety factors, and employment opportunities available in…

  17. Adherence Counseling Practices of Generalist and Specialist Physicians Caring for People Living with HIV/AIDS in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Golin, Carol E; Smith, Scott R; Reif, Susan

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT National guidelines recommend that practitioners assess and reinforce patient adherence when prescribing antiretroviral (ART) medications, but the extent to which physicians do this routinely is unknown. OBJECTIVE To assess the adherence counseling practices of physicians caring for patients with HIV/AIDS in North Carolina and to determine characteristics associated with providing routine adherence counseling. DESIGN A statewide self-administered survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS All physicians in North Carolina who prescribed a protease inhibitor (PI) during 1999. Among the 589 surveys sent, 369 were returned for a response rate of 63%. The 190 respondents who reported prescribing a PI in the last year comprised the study sample. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physicians reported how often they carried out each of 16 adherence counseling behaviors as well as demographics, practice characteristics, and attitudes. RESULTS On average, physicians reported spending 13 minutes counseling patients when starting a new 3-drug ART regimen. The vast majority performed basic but not more extensive adherence counseling; half reported carrying out 7 or fewer of 16 adherence counseling behaviors “most” or “all of the time.” Physicians who reported conducting more adherence counseling were more likely to be infectious disease specialists, care for more HIV-positive patients, have more time allocated for an HIV visit, and to perceive that they had enough time, reimbursement, skill, and office space to counsel. After also controlling for the amount of reimbursement and availability of space for counseling, physicians who were significantly more likely to perform a greater number of adherence counseling practices were those who 1) cared for a greater number of HIV/AIDS patients; 2) had more time allocated for an HIV physical; 3) felt more adequately skilled; and 4) had more positive attitudes toward ART. CONCLUSIONS This first investigation of adherence counseling practices in

  18. Importance of Self-Motivation and Social Support in Medication Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents in the United Kingdom and Ireland: A Multicentre HYPNet Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; McDonald, Susan; Kim, Samuel; Foster, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Adolescents are a vulnerable population, not only to the acquisition of HIV, but also to poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) associated with disease progression and a increased risk of onward viral transmission. The aim of the study was to examine the factors that aid or act as barriers to adherence in a UK population of adolescents and young adults receiving ART. A cross-sectional survey was completed of 138 adolescents (12-24 years) across 14 clinical and community sites in the UK and Ireland. Analysis of results was undertaken using Chi-square testing in SPSS. Of the 138 patients, 48% were female, and 52% were born outside of the UK. Fifty-two of the 138 (43%) reported being on ART for at least 8 years. More than a third of the patients have ever interrupted treatment since initiating ART. One hundred four of the 138 (75%) patients self-reported being >85% adherent to medication for 7 day recall. Self-motivation (e.g., having a routine, specific goal) was cited as being most helpful in medication compliance (33%), followed by reminders by friends and family (25%), with 20% identifing no specific factor. Only 15% chose interventions such as an adherence diary or mobile phone reminders as helpful factors, and 1% chose healthcare professional input such as home visits. This study highlights the importance of self-motivation and social support in medication adherence in an HIV-infected adolescent population, in preference to healthcare professional input. Education and motivational strategies may confer the biggest impact on sustained ART adherence amongst this vulnerable group.

  19. Brief Report: Context Matters: PrEP Adherence is Associated With Sexual Behavior Among HIV Serodiscordant Couples in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Ngure, Kenneth; Muwonge, Timothy; Mugo, Nelly; Katabira, Elly; Heffron, Renee; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Bangsberg, David R; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-12-15

    Short message service (SMS) surveys are a promising tool for understanding whether preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adherence aligns with risk for HIV acquisition-a concept known as prevention-effective adherence. The Partners Demonstration Project was an open-label study of integrated PrEP and antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery among high-risk HIV serodiscordant couples in East Africa. HIV-uninfected partners were offered PrEP until their HIV-infected partner had taken ART for ≥6 months. At 2 study sites, HIV-uninfected partners were offered enrollment into the Partners Mobile Adherence to PrEP (PMAP) substudy based on ongoing PrEP use, personal cell phone ownership, and ability to use SMS. SMS surveys asked about PrEP adherence and sexual activity in the previous 24 hours; these surveys were sent daily for the 7 days before and 7 days after routine study visits in the Partners Demonstration Project. The PMAP substudy enrolled 373 HIV-uninfected partners; 69% were men and mean age was 31 years. Participants completed 17,030 of 23,056 SMS surveys sent (74%) with a mean of 47 surveys per participant over 9.8 months of follow-up. While HIV-infected partner use of ART was <6 months, mean reported PrEP adherence was 92% on surveys concurrently reporting sex within the serodiscordant partnership, and 84% on surveys reporting no sex (P < 0.001). SMS surveys provided daily assessment of concurrent PrEP adherence and sexual behavior. Higher PrEP adherence was temporally associated with increased risk for HIV acquisition.

  20. An adherence trilogy is essential for long-term HAART success.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rosa; Schooley, Robert T; Badaró, Roberto

    2003-10-01

    Adherence is the milestone of a successful therapy. Over the last decade several authors have addressed the importance of adherence for optimal results of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Many health care systems are investing substantial resources to make available contemporary antiretroviral therapy. Despite the large investment in medications, insufficient investments have been made into an integrated adherence component to maximize the impact of these medications. Adherence, unlike drug therapy, cannot be defined as a single method with a defined prescription or formula. Instead, it is the result of a complex interaction between the patient, a prescribed medication and the health system. Many reports are available analyzing each of these components. We have found that critical elements of adherence include the patient's knowledge about the disease and how medications will help achieve a longer and healthier life, together with the motivation to adapt to a new style of life. A trilogy composed of information, motivation and behavioral skills is essential to achieve the maximum desired level of adherence. We have computerized this trilogy in a software program for self-administration in which each of the three components is provided to the patient as many times as necessary to transmit an understanding of the problem and to help make a rational decision to adhere to the ARV treatment program. In this review we analyze several efforts and techniques to improve adherence to any recommended medication that may interfere with the patient's lifestyle and outline how the adherence trilogy can be best used to optimize the ability of ARV therapy to durably suppress plasma HIV RNA to undetectable levels.

  1. Beyond Survival in the 1980s for Liberal Arts Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blecker, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Strict adherence to the mission of a church-related liberal arts college is seen as a viable approach to the 1980s. Trends to discredit the liberal arts, to use departmentalization to cope with knowledge, and to encroach on the college's domain with electronic advances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  2. Association between daily antiretroviral pill burden and treatment adherence, hospitalisation risk, and other healthcare utilisation and costs in a US medicaid population with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Calvin J; Meyers, Juliana L; Davis, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lower pill burden leads to improved antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV patients. Simpler dosing regimens have not been widely explored in real-world populations. We retrospectively assessed ART adherence, all-cause hospitalisation risk and costs, and other healthcare utilisation and costs in Medicaid enrollees with HIV treated with ART as a once-daily single-tablet regimen (STR) or two or more pills per day (2+PPD). Design Patients with an HIV diagnosis from 2005 to 2009 receiving complete ART (ie, two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus a third agent) for ≥60 days as STR or 2+PPD were selected and followed until the first of (1) discontinuation of the complete ART, (2) loss of enrolment or (3) end of database. Adherence was measured using the medication possession ratio. Monthly all-cause healthcare utilisation and costs were observed from regimen initiation until follow-up end. Results Of the 7381 patients who met inclusion criteria, 1797 were treated with STR and 5584 with 2+PPD. STR patients were significantly more likely to reach 95% adherence and had fewer hospitalisations than 2+PPD patients (both p<0.01). STR patients had mean (SD) total monthly costs of $2959 ($4962); 2+PPD patients had $3544 ($5811; p<0.001). Hospital costs accounted for 53.8% and pharmacy costs accounted for 32.5% of this difference. Multivariate analyses found that STR led to a 23% reduction in hospitalisations and a 17% reduction in overall healthcare costs. ART adherence appears to be a key mechanism mediating hospitalisation risk, as patients with ≥95% adherence (regardless of regimen type) had a lower hospitalisation rate compared with <95% adherence. Conclusions While it was expected that STR patients would have lower pharmacy costs, we also found that STR patients had fewer hospitalisations and lower hospital costs than 2+PPD patients, resulting in significantly lower total healthcare costs for STR patients. PMID:23906955

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression Among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sam, Tanyka Suzanne; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-11-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9 % (n = 118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed.

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Use, Medication Adherence, and Viral Suppression among PLWHA with Panic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Tanyka S; Hutton, Heidi E; Lau, Bryan; McCaul, Mary E; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Chander, Geetanjali

    2015-01-01

    Panic symptoms are prevalent among PLWHAs, yet few studies have examined their relationship with HIV outcomes. Using data from an observational cohort study in Baltimore, MD, we examined the association between panic symptoms and ART use, medication adherence, and viral suppression. Data were analyzed using GEE and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cocaine and/or heroin use, clinic enrollment time, alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Between June 2010 and September 2012, 1195 individuals participated in 2080 audio computer assisted interviews; 9.9% (n=118) of individuals endorsed current panic symptoms. In multivariate analysis, panic symptoms were associated with decreased ART use (IRR 0.94; p = 0.05). Panic symptoms were neither associated with medication adherence nor viral suppression. These findings were independent of depressive symptoms and substance use. Panic symptoms are under-recognized in primary care settings and present an important barrier to ART use. Further studies investigating the reasons for this association are needed. PMID:25903506

  5. Predicting adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV in Tanzania: A test of an extended theory of planned behaviour model.

    PubMed

    Banas, Kasia; Lyimo, Ramsey A; Hospers, Harm J; van der Ven, Andre; de Bruin, Marijn

    2017-10-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV is widely available in sub-Saharan Africa. Adherence is crucial to successful treatment. This study aimed to apply an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model to predict objectively measured adherence to cART in Tanzania. Prospective observational study (n = 158) where patients completed questionnaires on demographics (Month 0), socio-cognitive variables including intentions (Month 1), and action planning and self-regulatory processes hypothesised to mediate the intention-behaviour relationship (Month 3), to predict adherence (Month 5). Taking adherence was measured objectively using the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS) caps. Model tests were conducted using regression and bootstrap mediation analyses. Perceived behavioural control (PBC) was positively (β = .767, p < .001, R 2  = 57.5%) associated with adherence intentions. Intentions only exercised an indirect effect on adherence (B = 1.29 [0.297-3.15]) through self-regulatory processes (B = 1.10 [0.131-2.87]). Self-regulatory processes (β = .234, p = .010, R 2  = 14.7%) predicted better adherence. This observational study using an objective behavioural measure, identified PBC as the main driver of adherence intentions. The effect of intentions on adherence was only indirect through self-regulatory processes, which were the main predictor of objectively assessed adherence.

  6. Barriers and facilitators of interventions for improving antiretroviral therapy adherence: a systematic review of global qualitative evidence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyan; Tso, Lai Sze; Rich, Zachary C; Hall, Brian J; Beanland, Rachel; Li, Haochu; Lackey, Mellanye; Hu, Fengyu; Cai, Weiping; Doherty, Meg; Tucker, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions can provide a deeper understanding of intervention facilitators and barriers. This systematic review aims to synthesize qualitative evidence of interventions for improving ART adherence and to inform patient-centred policymaking. We searched 19 databases to identify studies presenting primary qualitative data on the experiences, attitudes and acceptability of interventions to improve ART adherence among PLHIV and treatment providers. We used thematic synthesis to synthesize qualitative evidence and the CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative Research) approach to assess the confidence of review findings. Of 2982 references identified, a total of 31 studies from 17 countries were included. Twelve studies were conducted in high-income countries, 13 in middle-income countries and six in low-income countries. Study populations focused on adults living with HIV (21 studies, n =1025), children living with HIV (two studies, n =46), adolescents living with HIV (four studies, n =70) and pregnant women living with HIV (one study, n =79). Twenty-three studies examined PLHIV perspectives and 13 studies examined healthcare provider perspectives. We identified six themes related to types of interventions, including task shifting, education, mobile phone text messaging, directly observed therapy, medical professional outreach and complex interventions. We also identified five cross-cutting themes, including strengthening social relationships, ensuring confidentiality, empowerment of PLHIV, compensation and integrating religious beliefs into interventions. Our qualitative evidence suggests that strengthening PLHIV social relationships, PLHIV empowerment and developing culturally appropriate interventions may facilitate adherence interventions. Our study indicates that potential barriers are inadequate training and compensation for lay health workers and inadvertent disclosure of

  7. Switching to second-line ART in relation to mortality in a large Tanzanian HIV cohort.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Claudia; Hertzmark, Ellen; Spiegelman, Donna; Muya, Aisa; Ulenga, Nzovu; Kim, Sehee; Khudyakov, Polyna; Christian, Beatrice; Sando, David; Aris, Eric; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2017-07-01

    In a large cohort of HIV-infected Tanzanians, we assessed: (i) rates of first-line treatment failure and switches to second-line ART; (ii) the effect of switching to second-line ART on death and loss to follow-up; and (iii) treatment outcomes on second-line ART by regimen. HIV-1-infected adults (≥15 years) initiated on first-line ART between November 2004 and September 2012, and who remained on initial therapy for at least 24 weeks before switching, were studied. Survival analyses were conducted to examine the effect of second-line ART on mortality and loss to follow-up in: (i) the whole cohort; (ii) all patients eligible for second-line ART by immunological failure (IF) and/or virological failure (VF) criteria; and (iii) patients eligible by VF criteria. In total, 47 296 HIV-infected patients [mean age 37.5 (SD 9.5) years, CD4 175 (SD 158) cells/mm 3 , 71% female] were included in the analyses. Of these, 1760 (3.7%) patients switched to second-line ART (incidence rate = 1.7/100 person-years). Higher rates of mortality were observed in switchers versus non-switchers in all patients and patients with ART failure using IF/VF criteria. Switching only protected against mortality in patients with ART failure defined virologically and with the highest level of adherence [switching versus non-switching; >95% adherence; adjusted HR = 0.50 (95% CI = 0.26-0.93); P  =   0.03]. Switching patients to second-line ART may only be beneficial in a select group of patients who are virologically monitored and demonstrate good adherence. Our data emphasize the need for routine viral load monitoring and aggressive adherence interventions in HIV programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effect of social relationships on antiretroviral medication adherence for people living with HIV and substance use disorders and transitioning from prison.

    PubMed

    Rozanova, Julia; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Bhushan, Ambika; Marcus, Ruthanne; Altice, Frederick L

    This paper examines how family and social relations facilitate and inhibit adherence to antiretroviraltherapy (ART) for people living with HIV (PLH) who have underlying substance use disorders and are transitioningto the community post-incarceration. Combining the methods of inductive close reading and constantcomparison, we analyzed the data from 30 semi-structured interviews of PLH who had recently transitioned to thecommunity within the previous 90 days. Three central themes were anticipated as important socialrelationships post-release: self-reported family, friends and clinicians. Among these, four sub-themes (social isolation, 'double jeopardy', search for belonging, and trust and respect) emerged, highlighting how they impacted ART adherence. Post-release, participants returned to resource-poor communities where they experienced socialisolation. ART adherence was enabled by having a purpose in life, which correlated with having robust family support structures. Many former prisoners felt that a chasm between them and their families existed, both because of HIV stigma and their addiction problems. In this context, relationships with untrustworthy friends from their druguse networks led to relapse of drug use and risky behaviors, jeopardizing participants' ART adherence and persistence. To avoid the double jeopardy, defined as seeking friends for support but who were also the ones who contributed to drug relapse, participants searched for new social anchors, which often included their healthcare providers who represented trusted and respected persons in their life. While some former prisonersperceived doctors as uncaring and their relationships asymmetrical, positive relationships with these providers,when respect and trust was mutual, reinforced the participants' sense of belonging to what they called 'the world that don't do drugs' and motivated them to adhere to ART.

  9. A randomized controlled trial testing an adherence-optimized Vitamin D regimen to mitigate bone change in adolescents being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Etan; Mueske, Nicole M; Sposto, Richard; Gilsanz, Vicente; Wren, Tishya A L; Freyer, David R; Butturini, Anna M; Mittelman, Steven D

    2017-10-01

    Adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) develop osteopenia early in therapy, potentially exacerbated by high rates of concurrent Vitamin D deficiency. We conducted a randomized clinical trial testing a Vitamin D-based intervention to improve Vitamin D status and reduce bone density decline. Poor adherence to home supplementation necessitated a change to directly observed therapy (DOT) with intermittent, high-dose Vitamin D3 randomized versus standard of care (SOC). Compared to SOC, DOT Vitamin D3 successfully increased trough Vitamin 25(OH)D levels (p = .026) with no residual Vitamin D deficiency, 100% adherence to DOT Vitamin D3, and without associated toxicity. However, neither Vitamin D status nor supplementation impacted bone density. Thus, this adherence-optimized intervention is feasible and effective to correct Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents during ALL therapy. Repletion of Vitamin D and calcium alone did not mitigate osteopenia, however, and new, comprehensive approaches are needed to address treatment-associated osteopenia during ALL therapy.

  10. A Structural Equation Model of HIV-related Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, and Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Yoo-Jeong, Moka; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; McCoy, Katryna; Ownby, Raymond L

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains critical in management of HIV infection. This study evaluated depression as a potential mechanism by which HIV-related symptoms affect medication adherence and explored if particular clusters of HIV symptoms are susceptible to this mechanism. Baseline data from a multi-visit intervention study were analyzed among 124 persons living with HIV (PLWH). A bifactor model showed two clusters of HIV-related symptom distress: general HIV-related symptoms and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Structural equation modeling showed that both general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were related to higher levels of depressive symptoms, and higher levels of depressive symptoms were related to lower levels of medication adherence. Although general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were not directly related to adherence, they were indirectly associated with adherence via depression. The findings highlight the importance of early recognition and evaluation of symptoms of depression, as well as the underlying physical symptoms that might cause depression, to improve medication adherence.

  11. A Structural Equation Model of HIV-related Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Yoo-Jeong, Moka; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; McCoy, Katryna; Ownby, Raymond L

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains critical in management of HIV infection. This study evaluated depression as a potential mechanism by which HIV-related symptoms affect medication adherence and explored if particular clusters of HIV symptoms are susceptible to this mechanism. Baseline data from a multi-visit intervention study were analyzed among 124 persons living with HIV (PLWH). A bifactor model showed two clusters of HIV-related symptom distress: general HIV-related symptoms and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Structural equation modeling showed that both general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were related to higher levels of depressive symptoms, and higher levels of depressive symptoms were related to lower levels of medication adherence. Although general HIV-related symptoms and GI symptoms were not directly related to adherence, they were indirectly associated with adherence via depression. The findings highlight the importance of early recognition and evaluation of symptoms of depression, as well as the underlying physical symptoms that might cause depression, to improve medication adherence. PMID:27695710

  12. Severe menopausal symptoms associated with reduced adherence to antiretroviral therapy among perimenopausal and menopausal women living with HIV in Metro Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Duff, Putu K; Money, Deborah M; Ogilvie, Gina S; Ranville, Florence; Kestler, Mary; Braschel, Melissa C; Pick, Neora; Shannon, Kate

    2018-05-01

    Although more women living with HIV (WLWH) are entering midlife, the experiences of perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH, including the effects of menopausal symptoms severity, remain understudied. This study longitudinally investigated the correlates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH from Metro Vancouver. Analyses drew on longitudinal data (2014-2017) from Sexual health and HIV/AIDS: Women's Longitudinal Needs Assessment, an ongoing community-based cohort of WLWH, aged 14+, from Metro Vancouver, Canada. At baseline and biannually, participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations were used to identify the correlates of self-reported <95% ART adherence. The sample included 109 perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH (233 observations), with a median age of 49 years (IQR 44-53). Whereas most (68.8%) participants experienced menopausal symptoms, only 17% had received treatment (eg, antidepressants, hormone therapy) at baseline. In multivariable analysis, severe menopausal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.06), injection drug use (AOR 2.86, 95% CI 1.44-5.55), and physical/sexual violence (AOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.02-5.26) independently and positively correlated with <95% adherence. These findings suggest that menopausal symptoms may undermine ART adherence, with overlapping vulnerabilities such as injection drug use and sexual/physical violence further exacerbating poor ART adherence. Women-centred, trauma-informed care approaches to detect menopause and treat menopausal symptoms are urgently needed. Such approaches should holistically address the intersecting barriers to adherence and link WLWH to peripheral health and social services, including trauma counseling and evidence-based harm reduction services.

  13. Optimizing adherence to advice from antimicrobial stewardship audit and feedback rounds.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Matthew D M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Ingram, Paul R; McLellan, Duncan G J; Crawford, Colin; D'Orsogna, Luca; Dyer, John

    2018-02-01

    We examined adherence to antimicrobial stewardship prospective audit and feedback rounds in a rehabilitation service compared with the remainder of the acute hospital, and explored the reasons for this. Between October 2014 and December 2015, we retrospectively assessed the rate of non-adherence to advice from antimicrobial stewardship prospective audit and feedback rounds between the rehabilitation service and the acute hospital, along with the source of the patient referral. Compared with the rehabilitation service, acute hospital medical staff were almost twice as likely to not adhere to advice provided on antimicrobial stewardship prospective audit and feedback rounds (13.8% vs. 7.6%, p < 0.0001, relative risk 1.8 [95% confidence interval 1.3, 2.5]). In the rehabilitation service, referrals were more likely to come from medical staff (61.9% vs. 16.3%, p < 0.0001). These findings may be explained by regular, direct engagement of the antimicrobial stewardship team with the rehabilitation service clinical team, a model potentially applicable to other settings.

  14. "I want to stand on my own legs": A qualitative study of antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-positive women in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Badahdah, Abdallah M; Pedersen, Daphne E

    2011-06-01

    A review of the antiretroviral therapy (ART) literature revealed that not a single published study has examined the factors that influence patients' adherence to HIV medications in the Arab world. To mend this gap, this qualitative study collected data via face-to-face interviews with 27 HIV-positive Egyptian women who had been on ART for at least three months. Using a thematic analysis technique, five themes were identified: fear of stigma, financial constraints, characteristics of ART, social support, and reliance on faith. Notwithstanding the overwhelming number of inhibiting factors, most patients in this study were highly motivated to achieve perfect adherence.

  15. Using the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST) to optimize an HIV care continuum intervention for vulnerable populations: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Collins, Linda M; Cleland, Charles M; Leonard, Noelle R; Wilton, Leo; Gandhi, Monica; Scott Braithwaite, R; Perlman, David C; Kutnick, Alexandra; Ritchie, Amanda S

    2017-05-04

    More than half of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in the United States are insufficiently engaged in HIV primary care and not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), mainly African Americans/Blacks and Hispanics. In the proposed project, a potent and innovative research methodology, the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), will be employed to develop a highly efficacious, efficient, scalable, and cost-effective intervention to increase engagement along the HIV care continuum. Whereas randomized controlled trials are valuable for evaluating the efficacy of multi-component interventions as a package, they are not designed to evaluate which specific components contribute to efficacy. MOST, a pioneering, engineering-inspired framework, addresses this problem through highly efficient randomized experimentation to assess the performance of individual intervention components and their interactions. We propose to use MOST to engineer an intervention to increase engagement along the HIV care continuum for African American/Black and Hispanic PLWH not well engaged in care and not taking ART. Further, the intervention will be optimized for cost-effectiveness. A similar set of multi-level factors impede both HIV care and ART initiation for African American/Black and Hispanic PLWH, primary among them individual- (e.g., substance use, distrust, fear), social- (e.g., stigma), and structural-level barriers (e.g., difficulties accessing ancillary services). Guided by a multi-level social cognitive theory, and using the motivational interviewing approach, the study will evaluate five distinct culturally based intervention components (i.e., counseling sessions, pre-adherence preparation, support groups, peer mentorship, and patient navigation), each designed to address a specific barrier to HIV care and ART initiation. These components are well-grounded in the empirical literature and were found acceptable, feasible, and promising with respect to efficacy in a preliminary study. Study

  16. Adherence as a predictor of sexual behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS during the first year of antiretroviral therapy in rural Cameroon: data from Stratall ANRS 12110/ESTHER trial.

    PubMed

    Ndziessi, Gilbert; Boyer, Sylvie; Kouanfack, Charles; Cohen, Julien; Marcellin, Fabienne; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Delaporte, Eric; Spire, Bruno; Laurent, Christian; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the time pattern of inconsistence condom use (ICU) during the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and its relationship with treatment adherence in naïve HIV-infected adult patients. Data collection was nested within a longitudinal trial on HIV treatment. ICU was defined as reporting to have "never", "sometimes" or "nearly always" used condoms with one's main or casual partner(s)--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status in the three previous months. Adherence was defined as taking 100% of their ART prescribed doses in the 4 days before the visit and "not having interrupted treatment", even once, for more than two consecutive days during the 4 previous weeks. Mixed logistic regression was used to study the relationship between adherence and ICU. Among the 459 patients enrolled, 212 (46%) during 334 visits reported to have had sexual intercourse at least once with their partner(s)--either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status--during the first 12 months of ART. The proportion of ICU was 76%, 50% and 59% at month 0 (M0), month 6 (M6) and month 12 (M12), while 60% and 66% of patients were ART-adherent at M6 and M12, respectively. After adjustment for the frequency of sexual activity, type of sexual partner(s), perceived social class and desire for a child, patients adherent to ART were less likely to report ICU when compared with baseline (AOR [95% CI]: 0.38 [0.19-0.76]; P = 0.006). Adherence to ART is associated with a lower risk of ICU but this result needs to be interpreted carefully. As adherence behaviors are not only determined by problems with the healthcare systems but also by social barriers encountered by patients in their daily life, counseling should not only be ART adherence-centered but also patient-centered, including sexual risk minimization and psychosocial support.

  17. Adherence as a Predictor of Sexual Behaviors in People Living with HIV/AIDS during the First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Cameroon: Data from Stratall ANRS 12110/ESTHER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ndziessi, Gilbert; Boyer, Sylvie; Kouanfack, Charles; Cohen, Julien; Marcellin, Fabienne; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Delaporte, Eric; Spire, Bruno; Laurent, Christian; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate the time pattern of inconsistence condom use (ICU) during the first year of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and its relationship with treatment adherence in naïve HIV-infected adult patients. Methods Data collection was nested within a longitudinal trial on HIV treatment. ICU was defined as reporting to have “never”, “sometimes” or “nearly always” used condoms with one’s main or casual partner(s) - either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status in the three previous months. Adherence was defined as taking 100% of their ART prescribed doses in the 4 days before the visit and “not having interrupted treatment”, even once, for more than two consecutive days during the 4 previous weeks. Mixed logistic regression was used to study the relationship between adherence and ICU. Results Among the 459 patients enrolled, 212 (46%) during 334 visits reported to have had sexual intercourse at least once with their partner(s) – either HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status- during the first 12 months of ART. The proportion of ICU was 76%, 50% and 59% at month 0 (M0), month 6 (M6) and month 12 (M12), while 60% and 66% of patients were ART-adherent at M6 and M12, respectively. After adjustment for the frequency of sexual activity, type of sexual partner(s), perceived social class and desire for a child, patients adherent to ART were less likely to report ICU when compared with baseline (AOR [95% CI]: 0.38 [0.19–0.76]; P = 0.006). Conclusions Adherence to ART is associated with a lower risk of ICU but this result needs to be interpreted carefully. As adherence behaviors are not only determined by problems with the healthcare systems but also by social barriers encountered by patients in their daily life, counseling should not only be ART adherence-centered but also patient-centered, including sexual risk minimization and psychosocial support. PMID:22701555

  18. Effect of antiretroviral therapy use and adherence on the risk of hyperlipidemia among HIV-infected patients, in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Lai, Chih-Ho; Wu, Yang-Chang; Ho, Mao-Wang; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Tien, Ni; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Jung-Chun; Lin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liang, Wen-Miin; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2017-01-01

    HIV-infected patients exposed to antiretroviral therapy (ART) have an increased risk for hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease. We performed a longitudinal, comprehensive, and population-based study to investigate the cumulative effect of different types of ART regimens on hyperlipidemia risk in the Taiwanese HIV/ART cohort. A total of 13,370 HIV-infected patients (2,674 hyperlipidemia and 10,696 non-hyperlipidemia patients) were recruited after matching for age, gender, and the first diagnosis date of HIV infection by using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Hyperlipidemia risk associated with cumulative ART use, ART adherence, and their combination was assessed. The matched hyperlipidemia group had a larger number of patients using ART and a higher incidence of comorbidities, specifically, respiratory disease and diabetes. Patients with high ART dosage and dose-dependent manner adherence, respectively, demonstrated an increased risk of hyperlipidemia. For single ART regimens, patients receiving nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI/NRTI)- containing regimen had the highest hyperlipidemia risk, followed by protease inhibitor (PI)- containing and non-NRTI- containing regimens. For combination ART regimens, patients receiving a NRTI/NRTI + PI regimen had the highest hyperlipidemia risk. An increased cumulative drug dose was observed in patients who received the PI, NRTI/NRTI, NRTI, and NNRTI regimens in the hyperlipidemia group, when compared to the non-hyperlipidemia group. In conclusion, ART cumulative use, adherence, and regimen may affect hyperlipidemia risk among HIV-infected patients in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:29290955

  19. Prescription of and adherence to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastroprotective agents in at-risk gastrointestinal patients.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Polo-Tomás, Mónica; Roncales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-05-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) risk factors who take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should also take gastroprotective agents (GPAs). No studies have evaluated adherence and reasons for non-adherence to GPA and NSAID therapies. This was a prospective, multicenter, observational, longitudinal study. Patients attending rheumatology/orthopedic clinics who were co-prescribed NSAID plus GPA for at least 15 days and had risk factors for GI complications were followed up by telephone call. Optimal adherence was defined as taking the drug for ≥ 80% of prescribed days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence. Of 1,232 patients interviewed, 192 were excluded because of inaccurate data. Of the remaining 1,040 patients, 74 % were prescribed low-dose NSAIDs and 99.8 % were prescribed a standard or high-dose GPA. In all, 70 % of NSAIDs and 63.1 % of GPA prescriptions were short term (< 30 days). The majority of patients who were prescribed either an NSAID (92.5 % ) or GPA (85.9 % ) started therapy. Optimal adherence to GPA or NSAIDs was reported by 79.7 % (95 % confidence interval (CI): 76.9-82.2 % ) and 84.1 % (95 % CI: 81.7-86.3 % ) of patients, respectively. More adverse events occurred among patients who reported non-optimal adherence than among patients with optimal adherence to GPA (22.1 vs. 1.9 % , P < 0.0001). As reasons for non-adherence, patients most frequently cited infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Adverse events and short-term treatment were independent factors associated with poor adherence for both NSAIDs and GPAs. History of uncomplicated peptic ulcer and frequent dosing were additional factors associated with non-adherence to NSAIDs. Most frequent reasons for non-adherence are infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Short-term treatment and adverse events were associated with poor adherence for both

  20. The effect of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) on antiretroviral therapeutic adherence and mental health in women infected with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Surilena; Ismail, R Irawati; Irwanto; Djoerban, Zubairi; Utomo, Budi; Sabarinah; Iwan; Akip, Arwin A P

    2014-10-01

    To identify the effectiveness of rational-emotive-behavior-based therapy (REBT-based therapy) on improved mental health and antiretroviral (ART) therapeutic adherence in women infected with HIV/AIDS (female subjects with HIV/AIDS). A randomized and single-blinded clinical trial in women infected with HIV/AIDS who had their treatment at the outpatient clinic of Pokdiksus AIDS RSCM and at the AIDS Comprehensive Diagnostic Unit of Dharmais Hospital was conducted between October 2011 and March 2012. A block randomization of 160 female subjects with AIDS was performed that resulted in a REBT-based treatment group (n=80) and a control group (n=80). The treatment group received REBT-based intervention of 8 sessions weekly including 6 individual-therapeutic sessions/week and 2 group-therapeutic sessions/week. Instruments used in the study were questionnaires on demography, ART adherence (measured by self report and pill count), and mental health (SRQ-20). Data were analyzed using Chi-Square test, Generalized Linear Model, and Generalized Estimating Equations. There were 148 respondents analyzed including in the REBT-based group (n=72) and in the control group (n=76) with mean age of 33-34 years. After 8 weeks of REBT-based intervention, there was improved (increased) mean value of the self-reported adherence score (self-report) compared to control group (100%; CI 95%,83.3-96.7 vs. 84%; CI 95%,77.5-87.8) and improved (decreased) SRQ-20 mean score in REBT-based treatment group compared to control group (2.9; CI 95%, 2.7-13.0 vs. 5.4; CI 95%: 5.0-13.6). ART adherence based on viral load titer was not analyzed in both group since most of VL titer were undetected (<400 copies/mL). GLM analysis showed decreased SRQ-20 mean score and increased mean value of self-reported ART adherence (self-report) in the REBT-based treatment group, which were more significant (p<0.000) than control group on the 8th week. GEE analysis showed that 1 point decrement of SRQ-20 would increase self

  1. Adherence to Biobehavioral Recommendations in Pediatric Migraine as Measured by Electronic Monitoring: The Adherence in Migraine (AIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Ramsey, Rachelle; Aylward, Brandon; Kroner, John W; Sullivan, Stephanie M; Nause, Katie; Allen, Janelle R; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Slater, Shalonda; Hommel, Kevin; LeCates, Susan L; Kabbouche, Marielle A; O'Brien, Hope L; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine treatment adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations among pediatric migraine patients using electronic monitoring systems. Nonadherence to medical treatment is a significant public health concern, and can result in poorer treatment outcomes, decreased cost-effectiveness of medical care, and increased morbidity. No studies have systematically examined adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations in adolescents with migraine outside of a clinical trial. Participants included 56 adolescents ages 11-17 who were presenting for clinical care. All were diagnosed with migraine with or without aura or chronic migraine and had at least 4 headache days per month. Medication adherence was objectively measured using electronic monitoring systems (Medication Event Monitoring Systems technology) and daily, prospective self-report via personal electronic devices. Adherence to lifestyle recommendations of regular exercise, eating, and fluid intake were also assessed using daily self-report on personal electronic devices. Electronic monitoring indicates that adolescents adhere to their medication 75% of the time, which was significantly higher than self-reported rates of medication adherence (64%). Use of electronic monitoring of medication detected rates of adherence that were significantly higher for participants taking once daily medication (85%) versus participants taking twice daily medication (59%). Average reported adherence to lifestyle recommendations of consistent noncaffeinated fluid intake (M = 5 cups per day) was below recommended levels of a minimum of 8 cups per day. Participants on average also reported skipping 1 meal per week despite recommendations of consistently eating three meals per day. Results suggest that intervention focused on adherence to preventive treatments (such as medication) and lifestyle recommendations may provide more optimal outcomes for children and adolescents with

  2. Denial and Acceptance Coping Styles and Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Aldebot, Stephanie; Weisman de Mamani, Amy G.

    2009-01-01

    Antipsychotics are often the first line of treatment for individuals with schizophrenia (Fialko et al., 2008). One challenge to effective treatment is lack of adherence to prescribed medication. Lower rates of adherence are associated with considerably higher rates of relapse and poorer course of illness. Therefore studying characteristics that may be related to medication adherence is important. Coping styles may be one such factor. Individuals utilize a variety of coping mechanisms to manage and navigate difficult life events, including mental illness (Cooke et al., 2007). In the present study, forty individuals with schizophrenia were assessed regarding their coping styles and medication adherence practices. As hypothesized, it was found that denial coping was inversely related to medication adherence. However, contrary to expectations, acceptance coping was not related to medication adherence. These findings suggest that targeting denial coping strategies in treatment may help foster more optimal strategies for managing schizophrenia. PMID:19684494

  3. A Systematic Review on Promoting Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-infected Patients Using Mobile Phone Technology.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Gonzalez Martorell, Eduardo A; Fahy, Darren; Safran, Charles

    2018-04-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount to successful long-term suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For poorly adherent patients with HIV, barriers to remaining adherent may be overcome by the implementation of targeted interventions delivered via mobile devices. This systematic review is focused specifically on mobile phone technologies to deliver adherence interventions in HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) populations.  This review (PROSPERO #CRD42017065131) systematically extracted data from published literature from five databases on mobile phone interventions to improve adherence to ART for HIV. The reported studies had been conducted between 2007 and 2017. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane method ranking each criterion as low, high, or unclear risk of bias.  Of the 835 articles returned, we identified 26 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), retrospective and prospective cohort trials, or mixed method studies with a comparison group that fit criteria for inclusion. No standard measure of adherence was consistent throughout the examined studies, and assessments by self-report, pill counting, and medication event monitoring system (MEMS) were utilized. The studies reported mixed results, with 17 reporting significant improvements to adherence, 3 reporting improvements without supplying p -values, and 6 reporting no significant change or a reduction in adherence.  The mixed nature of the results exemplifies the need for more comprehensive approaches and larger scale trials to confirm results observed in limited cohort sizes. To better retain satisfactory adherence within the HIV population, and especially in low-resource settings, we recommend that future interventions incorporate multiple strategies: mobile-based reminders, social support structures, and personalized content. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  4. High-intensity compared to moderate-intensity training for exercise initiation, enjoyment, adherence, and intentions: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Katie M; Patel, Pratik M; O'Neal, Joshua L; Heinrich, Bryan S

    2014-08-03

    Understanding exercise participation for overweight and obese adults is critical for preventing comorbid conditions. Group-based high-intensity functional training (HIFT) provides time-efficient aerobic and resistance exercise at self-selected intensity levels which can increase adherence; behavioral responses to HIFT are unknown. This study examined effects of HIFT as compared to moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance training (ART) on exercise initiation, enjoyment, adherence, and intentions. A stratified, randomized two-group pre-test posttest intervention was conducted for eight weeks in 2012 with analysis in 2013. Participants (n = 23) were stratified by median age (< or ≥ 28) and body mass index (BMI; < or ≥ 30.5). Participants were physically inactive with an average BMI of 31.1 ± 3.5 kg/m2, body fat percentage of 42.0 ± 7.4%, weight of 89.5 ± 14.2 kg, and ages 26.8 ± 5.9 years. Most participants were white, college educated, female, and married/engaged. Both groups completed 3 training sessions per week. The ART group completed 50 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise each session and full-body resistance training on two sessions per week. The HIFT group completed 60-minute sessions of CrossFit™ with actual workouts ranging from 5-30 minutes. Participants completed baseline and posttest questionnaires indicating reasons for exercise initiation (baseline), exercise enjoyment, and exercise intentions (posttest). Adherence was defined as completing 90% of exercise sessions. Daily workout times were recorded. Participants provided mostly intrinsic reasons for exercise initiation. Eighteen participants adhered (ART = 9, 81.8%; HIFT = 9, 75%). HIFT dropouts (p = .012) and ART participants (p = .009) reported lower baseline exercise enjoyment than HIFT participants, although ART participants improved enjoyment at posttest (p = .005). More HIFT participants planned to continue the same exercise than ART participants (p = .002). No significant changes in

  5. Disability and Living with HIV: Baseline from a Cohort of People on Long Term ART in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen; Carpenter, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background Through access to life saving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in southern Africa, HIV has been reconceptualised as a chronic disease. This comes with new challenges of HIV-related co-morbidities and disabilities. We still lack an understanding of the types and scope of disabilities experienced by people on long term ART and how this impacts health, adherence, and livelihood. This paper describes the results of a cohort study examining the new health- and disability-related needs of the millions of people on ART in the region. Methods Data was collected from a cohort of people who had been on ART for six months or longer in a semi-urban public health care setting in South Africa. 1042 adults (18 and older) participated in the cross-sectional study which investigated disabilities/activity limitations, health, ART adherence, depression symptoms, and livelihood. We analysed the associations between these constructs using descriptive statistics, and bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results A large number of participants (35.5%) obtained a weighted score of two or more on the WHODAS 2.0 indicating possible activity limitations. A positive relationship was found between activity limitations and depression symptoms, adherence, and worse health outcomes, while none was found for BMI or CD4 count. These associations varied by type of activity limitations and, in some cases, by gender. Conclusion Activity limitations are potentially experienced by a large portion of people on ART in southern Africa which impacts health and ART adherence negatively. These results highlight the importance of better understanding the new health-related needs of people who are on long term ART, as well as the nuances of the disability they experience. This is urgently needed in order to enable HIV-endemic countries to better prepare for the new health-related needs of the millions of people on ART in southern Africa. PMID:26625001

  6. Livelihood Experiences and Adherence to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy among Participants in a Food Assistance Pilot in Bolivia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Palar, Kartika; Martin, Alexis; Oropeza Camacho, Martha Lidia; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Health and development organizations increasingly promote livelihood interventions to improve health and economic outcomes for people living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART). In-depth understanding about how PLHIV make labor decisions in the context of treatment for HIV – and treatment decisions in the context of their livelihoods – is essential to guiding intervention design and developing hypotheses for future research on livelihoods and ART. However, few studies have explored the perspectives of PLHIV regarding integration of livelihoods and ART in urban, resource-limited settings. Methods Qualitative interviews explored the livelihood experiences of food insecure ART patients in four Bolivian cities (n = 211). Topics included work-related barriers to ART adherence, HIV-related barriers to work, and economic coping mechanisms. Themes were identified using content coding procedures, with two coders to maximize reliability. Results Participants reported complex economic lives often characterized by multiple economic activities, including both formal and informal labor. They struggled to manage ART treatment and livelihoods simultaneously, and faced a range of interpersonal and structural barriers. In particular, lack of HIV status disclosure, stigma, and discrimination were highly salient issues for study participants and likely to be unique to people with HIV, leading to conflict around requesting time off for clinic visits, resentment from co-workers about time off, and difficulties adhering to medication schedules. In addition, health system issues such as limited clinic hours or drug shortages exacerbated the struggle to balance economic activities with HIV treatment adherence. Conclusions Improved policy-level efforts to enforce existing anti-discrimination laws, reduce HIV-related stigma, and expand health services accessibility could mitigate many of the barriers discussed by our participants

  7. Food insecurity, sexual risk behavior, and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among women living with HIV: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chop, Elisabeth; Duggaraju, Avani; Malley, Angela; Burke, Virginia; Caldas, Stephanie; Yeh, Ping Teresa; Narasimhan, Manjulaa; Amin, Avni; Kennedy, Caitlin E

    2017-09-01

    Gender inequalities shape the experience of food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV). We systematically reviewed the impact of food insecurity on sexual risk behaviors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among WLHIV. We included qualitative or quantitative peer-reviewed articles, extracted data in duplicate, and assessed rigor. Seven studies, from sub-Saharan Africa, North America, and Europe, met inclusion criteria. Food insecurity was associated with increased sexual risk through transactional sex and inability to negotiate safer sex. Hunger and food insecurity were barriers to ART initiation/adherence. Multidimensional programming and policies should simultaneously address poverty, gender inequality, food insecurity, and HIV.

  8. Investigating the impact of a community home-based care on mental health and anti-retroviral therapy adherence in people living with HIV in Nepal: a community intervention study.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Khem N; Sharma, Vidya D; Pokhrel, Kalpana G; Neupane, Sanjeev R; Mlunde, Linda B; Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine

    2018-06-07

    HIV-positive people often experience mental health disorders and engage in substance use when the disease progresses. In resource limited settings, mental health services are not integrated into HIV services. In Nepal, HIV-positive people do receive psychosocial support and other basic health care services from a community home-based care intervention; however, the effects of the intervention on health outcomes is not yet known. Therefore, we examined the impact of the intervention on mental health and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We conducted an intervention study to identify the effects of a community home-based care intervention on mental health disorders, substance use, and non-adherence to ART among HIV-positive people in Nepal from March to August 2015. In total, 344 participated in the intervention and another 338 were in the control group. The intervention was comprised of home-based psychosocial support and peer counseling, adherence support, basic health care, and referral services. We measured the participants' depression, anxiety, stress, substance use, and non-adherence to ART. We applied a generalized estimating equation to examine the effects of intervention on health outcomes. The intervention had positive effects in reducing depressive symptoms [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 0.44, p < 0.001)], anxiety (AOR = 0.54, p = 0.014), stress (β = - 3.98, p < 0.001), substance use (AOR = 0.51, p = 0.005), and non-adherence to ART (AOR = 0.62, p = 0.025) among its participants at six-month follow-up. The intervention was effective in reducing mental health disorders, substance use, and non-adherence to ART among HIV-positive people. Community home-based care intervention can be applied in resource limited setting to improve the mental health of the HIV-positive people. Such intervention should be targeted to include more HIV-positive people in order to improve their ART adherence. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT

  9. Is patient empowerment the key to promote adherence? A systematic review of the relationship between self-efficacy, health locus of control and medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, Lilla; Nakamoto, Kent; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Current health policies emphasize the need for an equitable doctor-patient relationship, and this requires a certain level of patient empowerment. However, a systematic review of the empirical evidence on how empowerment affects medication adherence-the extent to which patients follow the physician's prescription of medication intake-is still missing. The goal of this systematic review is to sum up current state-of-the-art knowledge concerning the relationship between patient empowerment and medication adherence across medical conditions. As our conceptualization defines health locus of control and self-efficacy as being crucial components of empowerment, we explored the relationship between these two constructs and medication adherence. Relevant studies were retrieved through a comprehensive search of Medline and PsychINFO databases (1967 to 2017). In total, 4903 publications were identified. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and quality assessment, 154 articles were deemed relevant. Peer-reviewed articles, written in English, addressing the relationship between empowerment (predictor) and medication adherence (outcome) were included. High levels of self-efficacy and Internal Health Locus of Control are consistently found to promote medication adherence. External control dimensions were found to have mainly negative (Chance and God attributed control beliefs) or ambiguous (Powerful others attributed control beliefs) links to adherence, except for Doctor Health Locus of Control which had a positive association with medication adherence. To fully capture how health locus of control dimensions influence medication adherence, the interaction between the sub-dimensions and the attitudinal symmetry between the doctor and patient, regarding the patient's control over the disease management, can provide promising new alternatives. The beneficial effect of patients' high internal and concurrent physician-attributed control beliefs suggests that a so

  10. "Health regains but livelihoods lag": findings from a study with people on ART in Zambia and Kenya.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Fiona A; Rutenberg, Naomi

    2011-06-01

    Although ART is increasingly accessible and eases some stresses, it creates other challenges including the importance of food security to enhance ART-effectiveness. This paper explores the role livelihood strategies play in achieving food security and maintaining nutritional status among ART patients in Kenya and Zambia. Ongoing quantitative studies exploring adherence to ART in Mombasa, Kenya (n=118) and in Lusaka, Zambia (n=375) were used to identify the relationship between BMI and adherence; an additional set of in-depth interviews with people on ART (n=32) and members of their livelihood networks (n=64) were undertaken. Existing frameworks and scales for measuring food security and a positive deviance approach was used to analyse data. Findings show the majority of people on ART in Zambia are food insecure; similarly most respondents in both countries report missing meals. Snacking is important for dietary intake, especially in Kenya. Most food is purchased in both countries. Having assets is key for achieving livelihood security in both Kenya and Zambia. Food supplementation is critical to survival and for developing social capital since most is shared amongst family members and others. Whilst family and friends are key to an individual's livelihood network, often more significant for daily survival is proximity to people and the ability to act immediately, characteristics most often found amongst neighbours and tenants. In both countries findings show that with ART health has rebounded but livelihoods lag. Similarly, in both countries respondents with high adherence and high BMI are more self-reliant, have multiple income sources and assets; those with low adherence and low BMI have more tenuous livelihoods and were less likely to have farms/gardens. Food supplementation is, therefore, not a long-term solution. Building on existing livelihood strategies represents an alternative for programme managers and policy-makers as do other strategies including

  11. Overlooked potential: older-age parents in the era of ART.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathalie; Knodel, John; Kiry Kim, Sovan; Puch, Sina; Saengtienchai, Chanpen

    2008-11-01

    The advent of widespread ART provision in low- and middle-income countries requires not just medical attention, but also social and psychological support to encourage and monitor strict adherence to drug regimens. Developing innovative approaches to providing this broad support is a major challenge, especially within the financial constraints of resource-limited countries hardest hit by the epidemic. In this study, we examine the role of older-age parents in monitoring ART treatment and caring for their HIV-infected children and grandchildren in Cambodia. Our results are based on 25 open-ended interviews with older-age parents of people with AIDS (PWHA). A high level of co-residence when PWHA become ill and a sense of parental responsibility and emotional attachment facilitate high parental involvement in their children's and grandchildren's illness, care and treatment. Our interviews indicate that parents play an important role in encouraging their children to get tested and to access treatment if they test positive. They consistently monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and opportunistic infections and remind PWHA to attend medical appointments and support-group meetings. Parents also provide for the nutrition and hygiene of PWHA essential to the success of ART treatments. We find that despite low levels of education, older parents were able to express clear, correct and detailed knowledge of complicated ART treatment regimens, nutrition and hygiene. Overall, our findings show that older parents play a pivotal role in care and treatment if they are provided with proper resources and training and have the ability to understand the necessity and details of ensuring strict adherence to medications. Based on these results, we suggest that explicitly including older parents in policy and programs for care and treatment would allow Cambodia and other countries to take advantage of this unique and effective but overlooked asset in AIDS care and treatment.

  12. Thrive With Me: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial to Test a Peer Support Intervention to Improve Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith J; Amico, K Rivet; Erickson, Darin; Ecklund, Alexandra M; Martinka, Aldona; DeWitt, James; McLaughlin, Jeffery; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2018-05-31

    The suboptimal rate of viral suppression among persons aged 13 years and older and residing in 37 states and the District of Columbia leaves considerable opportunities for onward transmission and contributes to poor health outcomes. Men who have sex with men (MSM) represent one of the most at-risk groups in the United States. There is a clear and continued need for innovative adherence support programs to optimize viral suppression. To address this gap, we designed and are implementing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to test the efficacy of the Thrive with Me intervention for MSM living with HIV. Critical components of the protocol are presented. The aim of this study is to describe the protocol for rigorously testing the efficacy of Thrive with Me to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-positive MSM residing in New York City. A community advisory board and beta testing were used to obtain feedback from HIV-positive MSM on the overall look and feel of Thrive with Me and problems with navigation to finalize intervention components and content. We will enroll 400 HIV-positive MSM residing in the New York City area into a two-arm prospective RCT and follow them for 17 months. Men in the Thrive with Me experimental intervention arm will have access to Thrive with Me for 5 months. Thrive with Me has three primary components: (1) a private social networking feature; (2) tailored HIV and ART adherence information; and (3) medication reminders, self-monitoring, and reflection. Gamification components include badges and leveling up to increase intrinsic motivation to engage with the intervention. Men randomized to the control condition will view a weekly newsletter for 5 months. The newsletter will be delivered via email and contains information on topics related to HIV with the exception of ART adherence. Study assessments will occur at enrollment and 5, 11, and 17 months post enrollment. The primary study outcome is HIV viral load, which is

  13. Barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence in developed countries: a qualitative synthesis to develop a conceptual framework for a new patient-reported outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Engler, Kim; Lènàrt, Andras; Lessard, David; Toupin, Isabelle; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2018-05-02

    Suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains common. Patient-centered tools are needed to comprehensively assess adherence barriers in HIV clinical practice. Thus, we conducted a research synthesis to produce a conceptual framework for a new patient-reported outcome measure (PRO) for use in routine HIV care in Canada and France. A PRO's conceptual framework graphically represents the concepts to be measured and the potential relationships between them. Towards ensuring the framework's relevance to the target populations' concerns, qualitative studies with HIV-positive adults on barriers to ART adherence in developed countries were synthesized with thematic analysis, attending to the cross-study prevalence and interrelationships of barrier themes. In March 2016, searches within Medline, PsychINFO, and Embase produced 5,284 records. Two reviewers determined the final sample (n = 41). Analysis generated three levels of ART adherence barrier themes. Twenty Level 2 themes and their component subthemes (Level 3) were organized into 6 higher-order themes (Level 1): Cognitive and emotional aspects (100% of studies contributing content -prevalence), Lifestyle factors (95%), Social and material context (95%), Characteristics of ART (90%), Health experience and state (73%), and Healthcare services and system (66%). As to interrelationships, study authors articulated relationships between all higher-order themes (Level 3). Linkages between Level 2 barrier themes showed great variability, from 21% to 95%. Overall, this synthesis contributes an exceptionally detailed conceptual framework and report of ART adherence barriers, applicable to a wide range of PLHIV. It suggests that a key to understanding many barriers is through their interconnections. It also identifies gaps in barrier research. Concerning the new PRO's development, comprehensiveness will need to be weighed against other concerns (e.g., respondent burden) and the provision of barrier

  14. Adherence to PI-based 2nd-line regimens in Cambodia is not simply a question of individual behaviour: the ANRS 12276 2PICAM study.

    PubMed

    Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis; Mmadi Mrenda, Bakridine; Khol, Vohith; Ferradini, Laurent; Mam, Sovatha; Ngin, Sopheak; Mora, Marion; Maradan, Gwenaëlle; Vun Mean, Chhi; Ségéral, Olivier; Nerrienet, Eric; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Spire, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    To investigate whether adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) can be explained not only by individual factors but also by health care facilities' characteristics, among a sample of people living with HIV (PLWH) treated with PI-based regimens in Cambodia. The ANRS 12276 2PICAM cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 2013 and April 2014 among PLWH followed up in 13 health care facilities. The 1316 patients in this analysis corresponded to 90% of the total number of adult patients treated with 2nd-line PI-based regimens in Cambodia in the study period. A variable indicating whether patients were non-adherent (=1) or completely adherent (=0) was constructed. Health care facilities and individual characteristics were included in a two-level logistic model to investigate their influence on patients' adherence to ART. A total of 17% of participants did not adhere to ART. Patients in health care facilities outside the capital Phnom Penh were six times more likely to be non-adherent than those treated in health care facilities in the capital (OR: 6.15, 95% CI [1.47, 25.79]). Providing psychosocial care (provided by psychologist counsellors and/or full-time coaches) was found to be a structural facilitator of adherence, as the probability of non-adherence fell by 38.5% per each additional psychological worker present in health care facilities (OR: 0.62, 95% CI [0.43, 0.89]). Financial constraints were the main individual factor preventing adherence. Our results suggest that inefficiencies in health care delivery are detrimental to PLWH health and to the exceptional progress currently being made by Cambodia in response to HIV. Policy makers should focus on increasing the number of psychosocial workers, especially in areas outside the capital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Guideline adherence is worth the effort: a cost-effectiveness analysis in intrauterine insemination care.

    PubMed

    Haagen, E C; Nelen, W L D M; Adang, E M; Grol, R P T M; Hermens, R P M G; Kremer, J A M

    2013-02-01

    Is optimal adherence to guideline recommendations in intrauterine insemination (IUI) care cost-effective from a societal perspective when compared with suboptimal adherence to guideline recommendations? Optimal guideline adherence in IUI care has substantial economic benefits when compared with suboptimal guideline adherence. Fertility guidelines are tools to help health-care professionals, and patients make better decisions about clinically effective, safe and cost-effective care. Up to now, there has been limited published evidence about the association between guideline adherence and cost-effectiveness in fertility care. In a retrospective cohort study involving medical record analysis and a patient survey (n = 415), interviews with staff members (n = 13) and a review of hospitals' financial department reports and literature, data were obtained about patient characteristics, process aspects and clinical outcomes of IUI care and resources consumed. In the cost-effectiveness analyses, restricted to four relevant guideline recommendations, the ongoing pregnancy rate per couple (effectiveness), the average medical and non-medical costs of IUI care, possible additional IVF treatment, pregnancy, delivery and period from birth up to 6 weeks after birth for both mother and offspring per couple (costs) and the incremental net monetary benefits were calculated to investigate if optimal guideline adherence is cost-effective from a societal perspective when compared with suboptimal guideline adherence. Seven hundred and sixty five of 1100 randomly selected infertile couples from the databases of the fertility laboratories of 10 Dutch hospitals, including 1 large university hospital providing tertiary care and 9 public hospitals providing secondary care, were willing to participate, but 350 couples were excluded because of ovulatory disorders or the use of donated spermatozoa (n = 184), still ongoing IUI treatment (n = 143) or no access to their medical records (n = 23). As

  16. Industrial Arts/Technology: What Are We Doing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlett, James; Huff, Brad

    2007-01-01

    The push to prepare all students for college has resulted in the near disappearance of high school industrial arts courses. This trend is exemplified by California high schools' adherence to the University of California and California State University systems' prescribed courses, called the "A to G" requirements, which students must take…

  17. Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy: is it a factor for ethnic differences in breast cancer outcomes in New Zealand?

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Campbell, Ian; Scott, Nina; Kuper-Hommel, Marion; Kim, Boa; Pillai, Avinesh; Lawrenson, Ross

    2015-02-01

    Despite the benefits of adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone receptor positive breast cancer, many women are non-adherent or discontinue endocrine treatment early. We studied differences in adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy by ethnicity in a cohort of New Zealand women with breast cancer and its impact on breast cancer outcomes. We analysed data on women (n = 1149) with newly diagnosed hormone receptor positive, non-metastatic, invasive breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy in the Waikato during 2005-2011. Linked data from the Waikato Breast Cancer Registry and National Pharmaceutical Database were examined to identify differences by ethnicity in adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and the effect of sub-optimal adherence on cancer recurrence and mortality. Overall, a high level of adherence of ≥80% was observed among 70.4% of women, which declined from 76.8% to 59.3% from the first to fifth year of treatment. Māori women were significantly more likely to be sub-optimally adherent (<80%) compared with European women (crude rate 37% vs. 28%, p = 0.005, adjusted OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.17). Sub-optimal adherence was associated with a significantly higher risk of breast cancer mortality (HR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.05-2.99) and recurrence (HR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.46-3.14). Sub-optimal adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy was a likely contributor for breast cancer mortality inequity between Māori and European women, and highlights the need for future research to identify effective ways to increase adherence in Māori women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Review: An urgent need for research on factors impacting adherence to and retention in care among HIV-positive youth and adolescents from key populations

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Priya; Lim, Sin How; Khairuddin, Norliana; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 50% increase in HIV-related deaths in youth and adolescents (aged 10–24) from 2005 to 2012 highlights the need to improve HIV treatment and care in this population, including treatment adherence and retention. Youth and adolescents from key populations or young key populations (YKP) in particular are highly stigmatized and may face additional barrier(s) in adhering to HIV treatment and services. We reviewed the current knowledge on treatment adherence and retention in HIV care among YKP to identify gaps in the literature and suggest future directions to improve HIV care for YKP. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search for YKP and their adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retention in HIV care on PsycInfo (Ovid), PubMed and Google Scholar using combinations of the keywords HIV/AIDS, ART, adolescents, young adults, adherence (or compliance), retention, men who have sex with men, transgender, injection drug users, people who inject drugs and prisoners. We included empirical studies on key populations defined by WHO; included the terms youth and adolescents and/or aged between 10 and 24; examined adherence to or retention in HIV care; and published in English-language journals. All articles were coded using NVivo. Results and discussion The systematic search yielded 10 articles on YKP and 16 articles on behaviourally infected youth and adolescents from 1999 to 2014. We found no studies reporting on youth and adolescents identified as sex workers, transgender people and prisoners. From existing literature, adherence to ART was reported to be influenced by age, access to healthcare, the burden of multiple vulnerabilities, policy involving risk behaviours and mental health. A combination of two or more of these factors negatively impacted adherence to ART among YKP. Collectively, these studies demonstrated that future programmes need to be tailored specifically to YKP to ensure adherence. Conclusions There is an urgent need for

  19. Evaluation of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-related counselling in a workplace-based ART implementation programme, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Stenson, A L; Charalambous, S; Dwadwa, T; Pemba, L; Du Toit, J D; Baggaley, R; Grant, A D; Churchyard, G J

    2005-11-01

    Counselling about antiretroviral therapy (ART) is thought important to prepare patients for treatment and enhance adherence. A workplace-based HIV care programme in South Africa instituted a three-step ART counselling protocol with guidelines prompting issues to be covered at each step. We carried out an early evaluation of ART counselling to determine whether patients understood key information about ART, and the perceptions that patients and health care professionals (HCP) had of the process. Among 40 patients (median time on ART 83 days), over 90% answered 6/7 HIV/ART knowledge-related questions correctly. 95% thought counselling sessions were good. 93% thought ongoing counselling was important. Recommendations included the need for continuing education about HIV/ART, being respectful, promoting HIV testing and addressing the issues of infected partners and stigma. 24 participating HCP identified additional training needs including counselling of family and friends, family planning, sexually transmitted infections and running support groups. 90% of HCP thought that counselling guidelines were helpful. The programme appears to be preparing patients well for ART. Counselling should be offered at every clinic visit. Counselling guidelines were a valuable tool and may be useful elsewhere. The evaluation helped to assess the quality of the programme and to suggest areas for improvement.

  20. Theoretical Approaches to Enhancing Motivation for Adherence to Antidepressant Medications.

    PubMed

    Hamrin, Vanya; Sinclair, Vaughn G; Gardner, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antidepressants is a major challenge in our health care system, with a high percentage of patients discontinuing their medications within six months. The purpose of this position paper is to discuss theoretical frameworks that address the psychological beliefs, benefits and barriers and feelings of autonomy that affect a person's willingness and motivation to take anti-depressant medications within a therapeutic relationship with a nurse practitioner. Three theoretical frameworks were selected to highlight particular perspectives relevant to enhancing patient motivation for medication adherence. The Self-Regulation Model, Health Belief Model, and Self-Determination Theory combined with motivational interviewing all offer guidance on strategies for improving adherence to antidepressants. The Self-Regulation Model underscores the importance of illness representations that prompt considering patient perceptions of depression that affect adherence. The Health Belief Model focuses on cost-benefit considerations that affect patient's adherence, along with perceived control. Finally, Self-Determination Theory combined with motivational interviewing offers strategies that enhance autonomy and optimize collaboration and motivation for adherence. These three theoretical models are applied to a vignette for a patient who is having difficulty with adherence to antidepressant medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adapting an adherence support workers intervention: engaging traditional healers as adherence partners for persons enrolled in HIV care and treatment in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Audet, Carolyn M; Salato, José; Vermund, Sten H; Amico, K Rivet

    2017-04-13

    Systematic adaptation of evidence-informed interventions that increase retention in care and improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are essential to ending the HIV epidemic in rural sub-Saharan Africa. We selected and adapted an adherence support worker intervention employed in Malawi for use by traditional healers in rural Mozambique. Given the levels of trust and dependence previously expressed by persons living with HIV (PLHIV) for traditional medicine, we adapted the program to engage traditional healers within the allopathic health system. Adaption followed a theoretically driven approach to intervention adaption: the Assessment-Decision-Administration-Production-Topical Experts-Integration-Training-Testing (ADAPT-ITT) model. Three rounds of performance feedback, based on theater presentations of the adapted intervention for stakeholders and idea generation, were completed with 12 groups from March to July 2016 to develop the final model. We offered healer support to 180 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients. Traditional healers were an acceptable group of community health workers to assist with patient adherence and retention. Traditional healers, clinicians, and interested community members suggested novel strategies to tailor the adherence support worker intervention, revealing a local culture of HIV denialism, aversion to the health system, and dislike of healthcare providers, as well as a preference for traditional treatments. Proposed changes to the intervention included modifications to the training language and topics, expanded community-based activities to support acceptability of an HIV diagnosis and to facilitate partner disclosure, and accompaniment to the health facility by healers to encourage delivery of respectful clinical care. PLHIV, healers, and clinicians deemed the intervention socially acceptable during focus groups. We subsequently recruited 180 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients into the program: 170 (94%) accepted

  2. Using machine learning to examine medication adherence thresholds and risk of hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Lo-Ciganic, Wei-Hsuan; Donohue, Julie M; Thorpe, Joshua M; Perera, Subashan; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Marcum, Zachary A; Gellad, Walid F

    2015-08-01

    Quality improvement efforts are frequently tied to patients achieving ≥80% medication adherence. However, there is little empirical evidence that this threshold optimally predicts important health outcomes. To apply machine learning to examine how adherence to oral hypoglycemic medications is associated with avoidance of hospitalizations, and to identify adherence thresholds for optimal discrimination of hospitalization risk. A retrospective cohort study of 33,130 non-dual-eligible Medicaid enrollees with type 2 diabetes. We randomly selected 90% of the cohort (training sample) to develop the prediction algorithm and used the remaining (testing sample) for validation. We applied random survival forests to identify predictors for hospitalization and fit survival trees to empirically derive adherence thresholds that best discriminate hospitalization risk, using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Time to first all-cause and diabetes-related hospitalization. The training and testing samples had similar characteristics (mean age, 48 y; 67% female; mean PDC=0.65). We identified 8 important predictors of all-cause hospitalizations (rank in order): prior hospitalizations/emergency department visit, number of prescriptions, diabetes complications, insulin use, PDC, number of prescribers, Elixhauser index, and eligibility category. The adherence thresholds most discriminating for risk of all-cause hospitalization varied from 46% to 94% according to patient health and medication complexity. PDC was not predictive of hospitalizations in the healthiest or most complex patient subgroups. Adherence thresholds most discriminating of hospitalization risk were not uniformly 80%. Machine-learning approaches may be valuable to identify appropriate patient-specific adherence thresholds for measuring quality of care and targeting nonadherent patients for intervention.

  3. Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents and Adults in Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Kityo, Cissy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Roura, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term success of HIV antiretroviral therapy requires near-perfect adherence, maintained throughout one’s lifetime. However, perceptions towards ART and patterns of adherence may change during the life course. We assessed challenges to long-term adherence in adolescents and adults in three regional HIV treatment centers in Uganda. Methods We conducted 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus group discussions with a total of 33 health-care providers and expert clients (HIV patients on long-term ART who assist with adherence support of fellow patients). Interview topics included experiences with patients on long-term treatment with either declining adherence or persistent poor adherence. Transcribed texts were coded and analyzed based on the social-ecological framework highlighting differences and commonalities between adolescents and adults. Results The overarching themes in adolescents were unstructured treatment holidays, delays in disclosure of HIV status by caretakers, stigma, which was mainly experienced in boarding schools, and diminishing or lack of clinical support. In particular, there was minimal support for early and gradual disclosure for caretakers to the infected children, diminishing clinical support for young adults during transition to adult-based care and declining peer-to-peer support group activities. The predominating theme in adults was challenges with treatment access among temporary economic migrants. Common themes to adults and adolescents were challenges with disclosure in intimate relationships, treatment related factors including side effects, supply of single tablets in place of fixed-dose combined drugs, supply of drug brands with unfavorable taste and missed opportunities for counseling due to shortage of staff. Conclusion Adherence counseling and support should be adapted differently for adolescents and adults and to the emerging life course challenges in long-term treated patients. Programs should also address constraints

  4. Psychological model of ART adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS in Mexico: a structural equation analysis.

    PubMed

    Sagarduy, José Luis Ybarra; López, Julio Alfonso Piña; Ramírez, Mónica Teresa González; Dávila, Luis Enrique Fierros

    2017-09-04

    The objective of this study has been to test the ability of variables of a psychological model to predict antiretroviral therapy medication adherence behavior. We have conducted a cross-sectional study among 172 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), who completed four self-administered assessments: 1) the Psychological Variables and Adherence Behaviors Questionnaire, 2) the Stress-Related Situation Scale to assess the variable of Personality, 3) The Zung Depression Scale, and 4) the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to construct a model to predict medication adherence behaviors. Out of all the participants, 141 (82%) have been considered 100% adherent to antiretroviral therapy. Structural equation modeling has confirmed the direct effect that personality (decision-making and tolerance of frustration) has on motives to behave, or act accordingly, which was in turn directly related to medication adherence behaviors. In addition, these behaviors have had a direct and significant effect on viral load, as well as an indirect effect on CD4 cell count. The final model demonstrates the congruence between theory and data (x2/df. = 1.480, goodness of fit index = 0.97, adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.94, comparative fit index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.05), accounting for 55.7% of the variance. The results of this study support our theoretical model as a conceptual framework for the prediction of medication adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Implications for designing, implementing, and evaluating intervention programs based on the model are to be discussed.

  5. Rethinking adherence.

    PubMed

    Steiner, John F

    2012-10-16

    In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will introduce measures of adherence to oral hypoglycemic, antihypertensive, and cholesterol-lowering drugs into its Medicare Advantage quality program. To meet these quality goals, delivery systems will need to develop and disseminate strategies to improve adherence. The design of adherence interventions has too often been guided by the mistaken assumptions that adherence is a single behavior that can be predicted from readily available patient characteristics and that individual clinicians alone can improve adherence at the population level.Effective interventions require recognition that adherence is a set of interacting behaviors influenced by individual, social, and environmental forces; adherence interventions must be broadly based, rather than targeted to specific population subgroups; and counseling with a trusted clinician needs to be complemented by outreach interventions and removal of structural and organizational barriers. To achieve the adherence goals set by CMS, front-line clinicians, interdisciplinary teams, organizational leaders, and policymakers will need to coordinate efforts in ways that exemplify the underlying principles of health care reform.

  6. The impact of medication regimen factors on adherence to chronic treatment: a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jessye

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews recent literature in chronic illness or long-term health management including asthma, contraception, diabetes, HIV disease, and hypertension/cardiovascular disease, mental disorders, pain, and other diseases to determine the relationship between regimen factors and adherence to medications. The authors conducted an electronic literature search to detect articles published between 1998 and 2007. Articles were included if they pertained to a chronic illness or to contraception, included a clear definition of how adherence was measured, and included regimen factors as primary or secondary explanatory variables. Methodology of the studies varied greatly, as did methods of measuring adherence and regimen factors. Surprisingly few of these articles concerned (1) chronic treatment, (2) regimen factors such as dosing, pill burden, and regimen complexity, and (3) adherence measured in a clear manner. Most studies failed to use state-of-the-art methods of measuring adherence. Despite these flaws, a suggestive pattern of the importance of regimen factors, specifically dose frequency and regimen complexity, emerged from this review. PMID:18202907

  7. Sexual risk behaviors among HIV-patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Southern Thailand: roles of antiretroviral adherence and serostatus disclosure.

    PubMed

    Thanawuth, Nattasiri; Rojpibulstit, Malee

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of unprotected sex among patients already established in HIV-medical care and their associated factors. Sexually active patients who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from five public hospitals in Trang province, Southern Thailand, were interviewed. Of 279 studied patients, 37.3% had unprotected sex in the prior 3 months and 27.2% did not disclose their serostatus to sexual partners. The median duration interquartile range (IQR) of using ART was 47 (27-60) months and 26.7% were non-adherent to ART (i.e., taking less than 95% of the prescribed doses). More than one-third had the perception that ART use would protect against HIV transmission even with unprotected sex. About 36.6% reported that they were unaware of their current CD4 counts and nearly one-third did not receive any safe sex counseling at each medical follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, non-adherence to ART and HIV-nondisclosure were strongly associated with an increase in the risk of unprotected sex with the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 5.03 (95% CI 2.68-9.44) and 3.89 (95% CI 1.57-9.61), respectively. In contrast, the risk for engaging in unprotected sex was less likely among patients having a negative-serostatus partner (aOR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.12-0.75), a longer duration of the use of ART (aOR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.97-0.99) and an unawareness of their current CD4 levels (aOR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99). To maximize the benefits from ART, there should be a bigger emphasis on the "positive prevention" program and more efforts are needed to target the population at risk for unprotected sex. Strategies to encourage adherence to ART and for disclosure of serostatus are also required.

  8. Psychological model of ART adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS in Mexico: a structural equation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sagarduy, José Luis Ybarra; López, Julio Alfonso Piña; Ramírez, Mónica Teresa González; Dávila, Luis Enrique Fierros

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE The objective of this study has been to test the ability of variables of a psychological model to predict antiretroviral therapy medication adherence behavior. METHODS We have conducted a cross-sectional study among 172 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), who completed four self-administered assessments: 1) the Psychological Variables and Adherence Behaviors Questionnaire, 2) the Stress-Related Situation Scale to assess the variable of Personality, 3) The Zung Depression Scale, and 4) the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to construct a model to predict medication adherence behaviors. RESULTS Out of all the participants, 141 (82%) have been considered 100% adherent to antiretroviral therapy. Structural equation modeling has confirmed the direct effect that personality (decision-making and tolerance of frustration) has on motives to behave, or act accordingly, which was in turn directly related to medication adherence behaviors. In addition, these behaviors have had a direct and significant effect on viral load, as well as an indirect effect on CD4 cell count. The final model demonstrates the congruence between theory and data (x 2/df. = 1.480, goodness of fit index = 0.97, adjusted goodness of fit index = 0.94, comparative fit index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.05), accounting for 55.7% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study support our theoretical model as a conceptual framework for the prediction of medication adherence behaviors in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Implications for designing, implementing, and evaluating intervention programs based on the model are to be discussed. PMID:28876412

  9. Predictors of medication adherence in high risk youth of color living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Macdonell, Karen E; Naar-King, Sylvie; Murphy, Debra A; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Harper, Gary W

    2010-07-01

    To test predictors of medication adherence in high-risk racial or ethnic minority youth living with HIV (YLH) using a conceptual model of social cognitive predictors including a continuous measure of motivational readiness. Youth were participants in a multi-site clinical trial examining the efficacy of a motivational intervention. Racial-minority YLH (primarily African American) who were prescribed antiretroviral medication were included (N = 104). Data were collected using computer-assisted personal interviewing method via an Internet-based application and questionnaires. Using path analysis with bootstrapping, most youth reported suboptimal adherence, which predicted higher viral load. Higher motivational readiness predicted optimal adherence, and higher social support predicted readiness. Decisional balance was indirectly related to adherence. The model provided a plausible framework for understanding adherence in this population. Culturally competent interventions focused on readiness and social support may be helpful for improving adherence in YLH.

  10. Alcohol use and depression: link with adherence and viral suppression in adult patients on antiretroviral therapy in rural Lesotho, Southern Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Bernard; Broers, Barbara; Masetsibi, Motlomelo; Faturiyele, Olatunbosun; Toti-Mokoteli, Likabelo; Motlatsi, Mokete; Bader, Joelle; Klimkait, Thomas; Labhardt, Niklaus D

    2016-09-08

    Depression and alcohol use disorder have been shown to be associated with poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Studies examining their association with viral suppression in rural Africa are, however, scarce. This study reports prevalence of depressive symptoms and alcohol use disorder, and their potential association with adherence and viral suppression in adult patients on ART in ten clinics in rural Lesotho, Southern Africa. Among 1,388 adult patients (69 % women), 80.7 % were alcohol abstinent, 6.3 % were hazardous drinkers (men: 10.7 %, women: 4.4 %, p < 0.001). The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 28.8 % (men 20.2 %, women 32.7 %, p < 0.001). Both alcohol consumption (adjusted odds-ratio: 2.09, 95 % CI: 1.58-2.77) and alcohol use disorder (2.73, 95 % CI: 1.68-4.42) were significantly associated with poor adherence. There was, however, no significant association with viral suppression. Whereas the results of this study confirm previously reported association of alcohol use disorder with adherence to ART, there was no association with viral suppression. April 28th 2014; NCT02126696 .

  11. Randomized trial of stopping or continuing ART among postpartum women with pre-ART CD4 ≥ 400 cells/mm3.

    PubMed

    Currier, Judith S; Britto, Paula; Hoffman, Risa M; Brummel, Sean; Masheto, Gaerolwe; Joao, Esau; Santos, Breno; Aurpibul, Linda; Losso, Marcelo; Pierre, Marie F; Weinberg, Adriana; Gnanashanmugam, Devasena; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Klingman, Karin; Browning, Renee; Coletti, Anne; Mofenson, Lynne; Shapiro, David; Pilotto, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Health benefits of postpartum antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive women with high CD4+ T-counts have not been assessed in randomized trials. Asymptomatic, HIV-positive, non-breastfeeding women with pre-ART CD4+ T-cell counts ≥ 400 cells/mm3 started on ART during pregnancy were randomized up to 42 days after delivery to continue or discontinue ART. Lopinavir/ritonavir plus tenofovir/emtricitabine was the preferred ART regimen. The sample size was selected to provide 88% power to detect a 50% reduction from an annualized primary event rate of 2.07%. A post-hoc analysis evaluated HIV/AIDS-related and World Health Organization (WHO) Stage 2 and 3 events. All analyses were intent to treat. 1652 women from 52 sites in Argentina, Botswana, Brazil, China, Haiti, Peru, Thailand and the US were enrolled (1/2010-11/2014). Median age was 28 years and major racial categories were Black African (28%), Asian (25%) White (15%). Median entry CD4 count was 696 cells/mm3 (IQR 575-869), median ART exposure prior to delivery was 19 weeks (IQR 13-24) and 94% had entry HIV-1 RNA < 1000 copies/ml. After a median follow-up of 2.3 years, the primary composite endpoint rate was significantly lower than expected, and not significantly different between arms (continue arm 0.21 /100 person years(py); discontinue 0.31/100 py, Hazard ratio (HR) 0.68, 95% CI: 0.19, 2.40). WHO Stage 2 and 3 events were significantly reduced with continued ART (2.08/100 py vs. 4.36/100 py in the discontinue arm; HR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.33, 0.70). Toxicity rates did not differ significantly between arms. Among women randomized to continue ART, 189/827 (23%) had virologic failure; of the 155 with resistance testing, 103 (66%) failed without resistance to their current regimen, suggesting non-adherence. Overall, serious clinical events were rare among young HIV-positive post-partum women with high CD4 cell counts. Continued ART was safe and was associated with a halving of the rate

  12. Trauma, Dissociation, and Antiretroviral Adherence among Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Keuroghlian, Alex S.; Kamen, Charles S.; Neri, Eric; Lee, Susanne; Liu, Rhianon; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Background There are approximately 1,000,000 persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLH) in the United States; to reduce rates of new infection and curb disease progression, adherence to HIV medication among PLH is critical. Despite elevated trauma rates in PLH, no studies to date have investigated the relationship between dissociation, a specific symptom of trauma, and HIV medication adherence. We hypothesized that Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms would be associated with lower adherence, and that dissociation would moderate this relationship. Methods Forty-three individuals with HIV were recruited from community-based clinics to participate in a cross-sectional study. The relationship of trauma, dissociation, and their interaction to the probability of antiretroviral adherence was assessed using a hierarchical binary logistic regression analysis. Results Among 38 eligible participants, greater PTSD was associated with lower odds of adherence (OR = .92, p < .05). Dissociation moderated the effect of PTSD on adherence, resulting in lower odds of adherence (OR = .95, p < .05). PTSD symptoms were significantly associated with lower odds of adherence in individuals reporting high levels of dissociation (OR = .86, p < .05) but not in those reporting low levels of dissociation (OR = 1.02, p > .05). Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate a relationship between dissociation and medication adherence. Findings are discussed in the context of clinical management of PLH with trauma histories and the need for interventions targeting dissociative symptomatology to optimize adherence. PMID:21636097

  13. Archaeology as the Basis of an Inquiry Process Paradigm for Secondary Level Art Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labadie, John Antoine

    This paper explored how art history is taught in secondary schools. The author maintained that identifying the origins and evolution of ideas ensures that proposed models of teaching art history adhere to the philosophical base from which they derive. The paper is divided into five sections. In the first part, the author described four categories…

  14. Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with Both Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Risk Behaviors in Women Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Sydney; Higgins, Melinda; Dalmida, Safiya George; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify key psychosocial characteristics of HIV-infected women who exhibit different levels of both ART adherence and risk behaviors. We analyzed baseline data from 193 predominately African American HIV-infected women participating in a behavioral clinical trial. Women were categorized into high/low groups based on levels of adherence and risky behaviors. There was a significant interaction effect for internal motivation for adherence. Women at high risk for poor health and transmitting HIV (low adherence/high risk group) had the lowest levels of internal motivation and also reported more difficult life circumstances. Gender roles, caretaking and reliance on men for economic and other support may promote external versus internal motivation as well as riskier behaviors in this group. The highest levels of internal motivation were found in those with High Adherence/High Risk behaviors. This group was highly knowledgeable about HIV and had the lowest VL. Compared to others, this group seems to tolerate risky behaviors given their high level of adherence. Adherence and risk reduction behaviors are key to individual and public health. Motivation and risk compensation should be addressed when providing interventions to women living with HIV. PMID:26452670

  15. Is patient empowerment the key to promote adherence? A systematic review of the relationship between self-efficacy, health locus of control and medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Current health policies emphasize the need for an equitable doctor-patient relationship, and this requires a certain level of patient empowerment. However, a systematic review of the empirical evidence on how empowerment affects medication adherence—the extent to which patients follow the physician’s prescription of medication intake—is still missing. The goal of this systematic review is to sum up current state-of-the-art knowledge concerning the relationship between patient empowerment and medication adherence across medical conditions. As our conceptualization defines health locus of control and self-efficacy as being crucial components of empowerment, we explored the relationship between these two constructs and medication adherence. Methods Relevant studies were retrieved through a comprehensive search of Medline and PsychINFO databases (1967 to 2017). In total, 4903 publications were identified. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria and quality assessment, 154 articles were deemed relevant. Peer-reviewed articles, written in English, addressing the relationship between empowerment (predictor) and medication adherence (outcome) were included. Findings High levels of self-efficacy and Internal Health Locus of Control are consistently found to promote medication adherence. External control dimensions were found to have mainly negative (Chance and God attributed control beliefs) or ambiguous (Powerful others attributed control beliefs) links to adherence, except for Doctor Health Locus of Control which had a positive association with medication adherence. To fully capture how health locus of control dimensions influence medication adherence, the interaction between the sub-dimensions and the attitudinal symmetry between the doctor and patient, regarding the patient’s control over the disease management, can provide promising new alternatives. Discussion The beneficial effect of patients’ high internal and concurrent physician

  16. Investigating self-efficacy, disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Faint, Nicholas R; Staton, Janelle M; Stick, Stephen M; Foster, Juliet M; Schultz, André

    2017-05-01

    Patient adherence is integral to the effectiveness of prescribed treatment, and is associated with beneficial disease outcomes, yet in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, adherence is often sub-optimal. Multiple factors may contribute to treatment adherence, including disease knowledge and self-efficacy. In adolescents with cystic fibrosis: (i) to compare the disease knowledge of adolescents and their parents before transition to adult care; (ii) to determine the relationship between disease knowledge (adolescent, parent) and adherence; and (iii) to evaluate self-efficacy and its association with disease knowledge and adherence. Adolescents with cystic fibrosis and their parents were recruited from a tertiary children's hospital. Disease knowledge and self-efficacy was assessed using the Knowledge of Disease Management-CF and General Self-Efficacy Scales respectively. Using pharmacy records, medication possession ratio was calculated to measure treatment adherence in the preceding year. Thirty-nine adolescent (aged 12-17 (median 14) years) and parent pairs were recruited. Adherence to hypertonic saline, but not other medications, was significantly associated with disease knowledge in adolescents (r 2  = 0.40, P = 0.029). Mean (SD) adolescent self-efficacy was 30.8 (4.0), and not associated with disease knowledge or adherence. Mean (SD) disease knowledge was less in adolescents than parents (55 (16)% and 72 (14)% respectively, P < 0.001). Disease knowledge is sub-optimal in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, even in the 2 years immediately before transition to adult care. Given that adherence with some treatments has been associated with disease knowledge our results suggest the need for educational interventions in adolescents with cystic fibrosis to optimise self-management and health outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data

    PubMed Central

    Krumme, Alexis A; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Franklin, Jessica M; Isaman, Danielle L; Mahesri, Mufaddal; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Brennan, Troyen A; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of retail purchasing data may improve adherence prediction over approaches using healthcare insurance claims alone. Design Retrospective. Setting and participants A cohort of patients who received prescription medication benefits through CVS Caremark, used a CVS Pharmacy ExtraCare Health Care (ECHC) loyalty card, and initiated a statin medication in 2011. Outcome We evaluated associations between retail purchasing patterns and optimal adherence to statins in the 12 subsequent months. Results Among 11 010 statin initiators, 43% were optimally adherent at 12 months of follow-up. Greater numbers of store visits per month and dollar amount per visit were positively associated with optimal adherence, as was making a purchase on the same day as filling a prescription (p<0.0001 for all). Models to predict adherence using retail purchase variables had low discriminative ability (C-statistic: 0.563), while models with both clinical and retail purchase variables achieved a C-statistic of 0.617. Conclusions While the use of retail purchases may improve the discriminative ability of claims-based approaches, these data alone appear inadequate for adherence prediction, even with the addition of more complex analytical approaches. Nevertheless, associations between retail purchasing behaviours and adherence could inform the development of quality improvement interventions. PMID:28186924

  18. Beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients.

    PubMed

    Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte; Akerlind, Ingemar; Jörgensen, Tove

    2007-12-01

    To analyse any association between general beliefs about medicines and self-reported adherence among pharmacy clients. Further, to examine general beliefs about medicines by background variables. The data were collected by questionnaires including the general section of the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), the self-reporting Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the following background variables: gender, age, education, country of birth and medicine use. The General BMQ measures beliefs about medicines as something harmful (General-Harm), beneficial (General-Benefit) and beliefs about how doctors prescribe medicines (General-Overuse). Of the 324 participating pharmacy clients, 54% were considered non-adherent. An association was found between General-Harm and adherence. Adherent behaviour and higher level of education were associated respectively with more beneficial and less harmful beliefs about medicines. Those born in the Nordic countries regarded medicines as more beneficial. Current users of herbal medicines and non-users of medicines were more likely to believe that doctors overprescribed medicines. General-Harm was associated with adherence to medication among Swedish pharmacy clients. Country of birth, education and medicine use influenced beliefs about medicines. Increased awareness of the patient's beliefs about medicines is needed among healthcare providers. We should encourage patients to express their views about medicines in order to optimize and personalize the information process. This can stimulate concordance and adherence to medication.

  19. Adherence to Insulin Pump Behaviors in Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Patton, Susana R; Driscoll, Kimberly A; Clements, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Parents of young children are responsible for daily type 1 diabetes (T1DM) cares including insulin bolusing. For optimal insulin pump management, parents should enter a blood glucose result (SMBG) and a carbohydrate estimate (if food will be consumed) into the bolus advisor in their child's pump to assist in delivering the recommended insulin bolus. Previously, pump adherence behaviors were described in adolescents; we describe these behaviors in a sample of young children. Pump data covering between 14-30 consecutive days were obtained for 116 children. Assessed adherence to essential pump adherence behaviors (eg, SMBG, carbohydrate entry, and insulin use) and adherence to 3 Wizard/Bolus Advisor steps: SMBG-carbohydrate entry-insulin bolus delivered. Parents completed SMBG ≥4 times on 99% of days, bolused insulin ≥3 times on 95% of days, and entered carbohydrates ≥3 times on 93% of days, but they corrected for hyperglycemia (≥250 mg/dl or 13.9 mmol/l) only 63% of the time. Parents completed Wizard/Bolus Advisor steps (SMBG, carbohydrate entry, insulin bolus) within 30 minutes for 43% of boluses. Inverse correlations were found between children's mean daily glucose and the percentage of days with ≥4 SMBG and ≥3 carbohydrate entries as well as the percentage of boluses where all Wizard/Bolus Advisor steps were completed. Parents of young children adhered to individual pump behaviors, but showed some variability in their adherence to Wizard/Bolus Advisor steps. Parents showed low adherence to recommendations to correct for hyperglycemia. Like adolescents, targeting pump behaviors in young children may have the potential to optimize glycemic control.

  20. Prospective study of vaginal dilator use adherence and efficacy following radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ethel; Kelvin, Joanne F.; Thom, Bridgette; Riedel, Elyn; Tom, Ashlyn; Carter, Jeanne; Alektiar, Kaled; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Vaginal stenosis (VS) after pelvic radiotherapy can impair long-term quality of life. We prospectively assessed adherence and efficacy of VD use as the primary and secondary objectives, respectively. Material and methods Women with gastrointestinal (n=63) and gynecologic (n=46) cancers self-reported use and VD size in monthly diaries for 12 months after radiotherapy. Adherence was measured as actual VD use out of recommended times over 12 months (3×/week × 52 weeks = 156). Results Among 109 participants, aged 28–81 years (median, 58 years), mean percent adherence over 12 months was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%–48%). Adherence was highest in the first quarter (56%), but fell to 25% by the fourth. Disease type, treatment sequence, and chemotherapy were predictors of adherence (all P<.05). Eighty-two percent maintained pre-RT VD size at 12 months; of 49% with decrease in VD size at 1 month post-RT, 71% returned to pre-RT VD size at 12 months. Disease type, younger age, and increased adherence at 6 months were associated with maintaining or returning to pre-RT size at 12 months (all P≤.05). Conclusions VD use is effective in minimizing VS, but adherence at 12 months was poor. Studies evaluating methods of improving adherence and determining the optimal frequency and duration of use are needed. PMID:26164775

  1. Prevalence, predictors, and clinical consequences of medical adherence in IBD: How to improve it?

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic diseases with a relapsing-remitting disease course necessitating lifelong treatment. However, non-adherence has been reported in over 40% of patients, especially those in remission taking maintenance therapies for IBD. The economical impact of non-adherence to medical therapy including absenteeism, hospitalization risk, and the health care costs in chronic conditions, is enormous. The causes of medication non-adherence are complex, where the patient-doctor relationship, treatment regimen, and other disease-related factors play key roles. Moreover, subjective assessment might underestimate adherence. Poor adherence may result in more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, in ulcerative colitis, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Improving medication adherence in patients is an important challenge for physicians. Understanding the different patient types, the reasons given by patients for non-adherence, simpler and more convenient dosage regimens, dynamic communication within the health care team, a self-management package incorporating enhanced patient education and physician-patient interaction, and identifying the predictors of non-adherence will help devise suitable plans to optimize patient adherence. This editorial summarizes the available literature on frequency, predictors, clinical consequences, and strategies for improving medical adherence in patients with IBD. PMID:19750566

  2. Prevalence, predictors, and clinical consequences of medical adherence in IBD: how to improve it?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-09-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic diseases with a relapsing-remitting disease course necessitating lifelong treatment. However, non-adherence has been reported in over 40% of patients, especially those in remission taking maintenance therapies for IBD. The economical impact of non-adherence to medical therapy including absenteeism, hospitalization risk, and the health care costs in chronic conditions, is enormous. The causes of medication non-adherence are complex, where the patient-doctor relationship, treatment regimen, and other disease-related factors play key roles. Moreover, subjective assessment might underestimate adherence. Poor adherence may result in more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, in ulcerative colitis, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Improving medication adherence in patients is an important challenge for physicians. Understanding the different patient types, the reasons given by patients for non-adherence, simpler and more convenient dosage regimens, dynamic communication within the health care team, a self-management package incorporating enhanced patient education and physician-patient interaction, and identifying the predictors of non-adherence will help devise suitable plans to optimize patient adherence. This editorial summarizes the available literature on frequency, predictors, clinical consequences, and strategies for improving medical adherence in patients with IBD.

  3. Does cognitive impairment impact adherence? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between cognitive impairment and medication non-adherence in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Niamh A.; Doyle, Frank; Bennett, Kathleen; Williams, David; Hickey, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background While medication adherence is essential for the secondary prevention of stroke, it is often sub-optimal, and can be compromised by cognitive impairment. This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyse the association between cognitive impairment and medication non-adherence in stroke. Methods A systematic literature search of longitudinal and cross-sectional studies of adults with any stroke type, which reported on the association between any measure of non-adherence and cognitive impairment, was carried out according to PRISMA guidelines. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were the primary measure of effect. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Bias Methods Group's Tool to Assess Risk of Bias in Cohort Studies, with evidence quality assessed according to the GRADE approach. We conducted sensitivity analyses according to measure of cognitive impairment, measure of medication adherence, population, risk of bias and adjustment for covariates. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO. Results From 1,760 titles and abstracts, we identified 9 studies for inclusion. Measures of cognitive impairment varied from dementia diagnosis to standardised cognitive assessments. Medication adherence was assessed through self-report or administrative databases. The majority of studies were of medium risk of bias (n = 6); two studies had low risk of bias. Findings were mixed; when all studies were pooled, there was no evidence of an association between cognitive impairment and medication non-adherence post-stroke [OR (95% CI): 0.85 (0.66, 1.03)]. However, heterogeneity was substantial [I2 = 90.9%, p < .001], and the overall evidence quality was low. Conclusions Few studies have explored associations between cognitive impairment and medication adherence post-stroke, with substantial heterogeneity in study populations, and definitions and assessments of non-adherence and cognitive impairment. Further research using clear, standardised and objective

  4. Developing a patient-reported outcome measure for HIV care on perceived barriers to antiretroviral adherence: assessing the needs of HIV clinicians through qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Toupin, Isabelle; Engler, Kim; Lessard, David; Wong, Leo; Lènàrt, Andràs; Spire, Bruno; Raffi, François; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2018-02-01

    To identify HIV clinicians' needs for the clinical use of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PRO) on barriers to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. In 2015, five focus groups with 31 clinicians from France were transcribed, coded with Atlas.ti, and submitted to a typological analysis. The analysis identified seven patient profiles, each tied to distinct barriers to adherence and to specific needs for the PRO's content, data collection and transmission. Clinicians preferred, for the patient who is: (1) 'passive,' that the PRO collect information on ART knowledge, to ensure that the prescription's instructions are being respected; (2) 'misleading,' that it be able to detect adherence to ART and socially desirable responses; (3) 'stoic,' that questions challenge the patient to recognize treatment-specific side effects; (4) 'hedonistic,' that the PRO contains content on lifestyle and risk-taking; (5) 'obsessive,' that the PRO captures quality of life and stressful life events; (6) 'overburdened,' that the PRO provides information on the person's home environment, socioeconomic status and cultural constraints. For all or most patient profiles, the clinicians wished that the PRO be completed, minimally, prior to the medical consultation and to receive alerts, under varying conditions, when problematic scores were detected. Depending on the profile, there was preference for the inclusion of open-ended questions and transmission of cross-sectional, periodic or longitudinal PRO data. Overall, this study's findings suggest that to support the clinical management of ART adherence, our PRO must meet the needs of a wide variety of patients and must perform multiple functions.

  5. The effect of reminder systems on patients’ adherence to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fenerty, Sarah D; West, Cameron; Davis, Scott A; Kaplan, Sebastian G; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Reminder-based interventions may improve adherence to daily medications. However, the interventions used in these studies, which included reminder phone calls, text messages, pagers, interactive voice response systems, videotelephone calls, and programmed electronic audiovisual reminder devices, are impractical for widespread implementation, and their efficacy may be optimized when combined with alternative adherence-modifying strategies. More practical reminder-based interventions should be assessed to determine their value in improving patient adherence and treatment outcomes. PMID:22379363

  6. Perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to combination antiretroviral therapy adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS in Gujarat, India: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sangita; Baxi, Rajendra K.; Patel, Shilpa N.; Golin, Carol E; Mehta, Mansi; Bakshi, Harsh; Shingrapure, Kalpita; Modi, Ekta; Coonor, Priyanka; Mehta, Kedar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To know the perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to cART adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS Materials and Methods: To adapt U.S. based SAFETALK “prevention with positives” intervention to be culturally relevant in Gujarat, India in assisting PLWHA, a formative study was conducted. We conducted 30 in-depth interviews with PLWHA in the local language, assessing the experiences, perceived barriers, and facilitators to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) among PLWHA in Gujarat. PLWHA were selected from the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centre (VCTC) in Gujarat. To triangulate interview findings, we conducted two focus group discussions (FGDs) with medical and non-medical providers, respectively. Results: Travel and commuting to clinic, fear of possible physical reactions, high cost of ART from private practitioners, CD4 count being in normal limits and resistance to medication acted as barriers to cART adherence. Initiation of cART was facilitated by family members′ suggestion, advice of treating doctors and counselors, appropriate counseling before starting cART, belief that cART would aid in living a better and longer life and due to lowering of the CD4 count. Interpretation and Conclusions: Our study suggests that several issues need to be considered when providing cART. Further research is needed to study interactions between patients and their health care providers. PMID:23188935

  7. Pharmacist's Role in Improving Medication Adherence in Transplant Recipients With Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Khorassani, Farah; Tellier, Shannon; Tsapepas, Demetra

    2018-01-01

    Medication nonadherence rates are high in both the transplant and psychiatric populations. The consequence of medication nonadherence posttransplant is graft rejection and psychiatric decompensation, highlighting the importance of optimizing adherence to medication regimens. Pharmacists may work with transplant patients with psychiatric comorbidity to improve medication adherence through identifying patient-specific barriers and recommending an appropriate intervention. Multiple evidence-based practices for improving nonadherence have been detailed in the transplant and psychiatric population. Medication adherence aids, medication management, patient education, and motivational interviewing are all strategies that may be used to improve adherence. Selecting which interventions to make will be based on the reasons for a patient's nonadherence. Most patients benefit from medication management, patient education, and medication adherence aids. Selection of medication adherence aids may be based on patient demographics, technology literacy, and preference. Motivational interviewing may be considered in patients with intentional nonadherence relating to a lack of insight into their illness or the importance of taking medication. Pharmacists may promote adherence and potentially improve patient outcomes in transplant recipients with comorbid psychiatric disorders through assisting patients with designing a tailored medication adherence plan.

  8. Toward an information-motivation-behavioral skills model of microbicide adherence in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Morrow, Kathleen M; Fisher, William A; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2010-08-01

    Unless optimal adherence in microbicide clinical trials is ensured, an efficacious microbicide may be rejected after trial completion, or development of a promising microbicide may be stopped, because low adherence rates create the illusion of poor efficacy. We provide a framework with which to conceptualize and improve microbicide adherence in clinical trials, supported by a critical review of the empirical literature. The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model of microbicide adherence conceptualizes microbicide adherence in clinical trials and highlights factors that can be addressed in behavioral interventions to increase adherence in such trials. This model asserts that microbicide adherence-related information, motivation, and behavioral skills are fundamental determinants of adherent microbicide utilization. Specifically, information consists of objective facts about microbicide use (e.g., administration and dosage) as well as heuristics that facilitate use (e.g., microbicides must be used with all partners). Motivation to adhere consists of attitudes toward personal use of microbicides (e.g., evaluating the consequences of using microbicides as good or pleasant) as well as social norms that support their use (e.g., beliefs that a sexual partner approves use of microbicides). Behavioral skills consist of objective skills necessary for microbicide adherence (e.g., the ability to apply the microbicide correctly and consistently). Empirical evidence concerning microbicide acceptability and adherence to spermicides, medication, and condom use regimens support the utility of this model for understanding and promoting microbicide adherence in clinical trials.

  9. Adherence-Specific Social Support Enhances Adherence to Calcium Supplementation Regimens among Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephanie L; Omotayo, Moshood O; Pelto, Gretel H; Chapleau, Gina M; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Dickin, Katherine L

    2017-04-01

    Background: WHO guidelines recommend integrating calcium supplementation into antenatal care (ANC) alongside iron and folic acid (IFA) to reduce maternal mortality. However, supplementation programs face multiple barriers, and strategies to improve adherence are needed. An adherence partner is someone whom pregnant women ask to support adherence at home. Objectives: This study 1 ) assessed adherence partner acceptability, feasibility, and associations with calcium and IFA supplement adherence and 2 ) examined relations between social support and adherence. Methods: This secondary analysis is from a trial integrating calcium supplementation into ANC in Kenya. ANC providers were trained on calcium and IFA supplementation and counseling, provided with behavior change materials, and given adequate supplement supplies. Pregnant women from 16 government health facilities were recruited ( n = 1036); sociodemographic and adherence data were collected at baseline and at 4- to 6-wk follow-up visits. Adherence was measured with pill counts and self-reports. Culturally adapted scales measured social support in general and specific to adherence. Mixed-effects regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with adherence partners, social support, and adherence. Results: Most participants received information about adherence partners (91%) and had a partner at follow-up (89%). Participants with adherence partners reported higher adherence support (OR: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.32, 3.34). Mean ± SD adherence was high for calcium (88.3% ± 20.7%) and IFA (86.1% ± 20.9%). Adherence support was positively associated with calcium adherence at follow-up by using pill counts (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.6) and self-report data (OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.9), but there was not a direct relation between adherence partners and adherence. Conclusions: Adherence support enhanced adherence to calcium supplements. The adherence partner strategy was highly acceptable and feasible but warrants

  10. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  11. Can purchasing information be used to predict adherence to cardiovascular medications? An analysis of linked retail pharmacy and insurance claims data.

    PubMed

    Krumme, Alexis A; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Franklin, Jessica M; Isaman, Danielle L; Mahesri, Mufaddal; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Brennan, Troyen A; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2016-11-09

    The use of retail purchasing data may improve adherence prediction over approaches using healthcare insurance claims alone. Retrospective. A cohort of patients who received prescription medication benefits through CVS Caremark, used a CVS Pharmacy ExtraCare Health Care (ECHC) loyalty card, and initiated a statin medication in 2011. We evaluated associations between retail purchasing patterns and optimal adherence to statins in the 12 subsequent months. Among 11 010 statin initiators, 43% were optimally adherent at 12 months of follow-up. Greater numbers of store visits per month and dollar amount per visit were positively associated with optimal adherence, as was making a purchase on the same day as filling a prescription (p<0.0001 for all). Models to predict adherence using retail purchase variables had low discriminative ability (C-statistic: 0.563), while models with both clinical and retail purchase variables achieved a C-statistic of 0.617. While the use of retail purchases may improve the discriminative ability of claims-based approaches, these data alone appear inadequate for adherence prediction, even with the addition of more complex analytical approaches. Nevertheless, associations between retail purchasing behaviours and adherence could inform the development of quality improvement interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Conceptions of agency and constraint for HIV-positive patients and healthcare workers to support long-term engagement with antiretroviral therapy care in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Erin; Colvin, Christopher; Gxabagxaba, Nobom; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the optimism around antiretroviral therapy (ART) as prevention of HIV/AIDS, addressing the barriers to long-term ART adherence is critical. This is particularly important given the tendency to individualise or use a blame discourse when exploring why HIV-infected patients “fail” to adequately adhere to ART, and not sufficiently exploring contextual reasons for poor adherence that may require varying solutions. This study took place at three clinics and one hospital in Khayelitsha, South Africa, to document the contextual factors that challenged ART adherence in this community. Interviews were conducted with 20 HIV-infected patients who had defaulted on their ART and were subsequently admitted to Khayelitsha hospital for clinical complications, and 9 ART service providers including doctors, nurses and HIV counsellors. Interviews assessed the reasons patients defaulted on ART and explored ways this could be prevented. Data from both groups were analysed collectively using thematic analysis. While the interviews revealed a landscape of environmental risks threatening adherence to ART, all patients managed to overcome the identified barriers at some point in their treatment phase, indicating the fluidity of patients’ needs and decision making. Patients reported that distrustful relationships with service providers could inhibit their understanding of ART and/or interrupt their follow-up at clinics. Patients described their rationale and agency underlying non-adherence, such as testing their bodies’ physical limits without ART medication. The study speaks to the need to appreciate contextual social and structural barriers related to ART adherence, and how these are negotiated differently by specific sub-groups, to support an appropriate response. It is imperative to not solely emphasise loss to follow-up but also assess patients’ subjective trajectory of their ART journey, decision making and agency with adhering to ART, their relations with

  13. Super Learner Analysis of Electronic Adherence Data Improves Viral Prediction and May Provide Strategies for Selective HIV RNA Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maya L; LeDell, Erin; Schwab, Joshua; Sarovar, Varada; Gross, Robert; Reynolds, Nancy; Haberer, Jessica E; Goggin, Kathy; Golin, Carol; Arnsten, Julia; Rosen, Marc I; Remien, Robert H; Etoori, David; Wilson, Ira B; Simoni, Jane M; Erlen, Judith A; van der Laan, Mark J; Liu, Honghu; Bangsberg, David R

    2015-05-01

    Regular HIV RNA testing for all HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expensive and has low yield since most tests are undetectable. Selective testing of those at higher risk of failure may improve efficiency. We investigated whether a novel analysis of adherence data could correctly classify virological failure and potentially inform a selective testing strategy. Multisite prospective cohort consortium. We evaluated longitudinal data on 1478 adult patients treated with ART and monitored using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) in 16 US cohorts contributing to the MACH14 consortium. Because the relationship between adherence and virological failure is complex and heterogeneous, we applied a machine-learning algorithm (Super Learner) to build a model for classifying failure and evaluated its performance using cross-validation. Application of the Super Learner algorithm to MEMS data, combined with data on CD4 T-cell counts and ART regimen, significantly improved classification of virological failure over a single MEMS adherence measure. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, evaluated on data not used in model fitting, was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 0.80) and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.76 to 0.81) for failure defined as single HIV RNA level >1000 copies per milliliter or >400 copies per milliliter, respectively. Our results suggest that 25%-31% of viral load tests could be avoided while maintaining sensitivity for failure detection at or above 95%, for a cost savings of $16-$29 per person-month. Our findings provide initial proof of concept for the potential use of electronic medication adherence data to reduce costs through behavior-driven HIV RNA testing.

  14. Super learner analysis of electronic adherence data improves viral prediction and may provide strategies for selective HIV RNA monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya L.; LeDell, Erin; Schwab, Joshua; Sarovar, Varada; Gross, Robert; Reynolds, Nancy; Haberer, Jessica E.; Goggin, Kathy; Golin, Carol; Arnsten, Julia; Rosen, Marc; Remien, Robert; Etoori, David; Wilson, Ira; Simoni, Jane M.; Erlen, Judith A.; van der Laan, Mark J.; Liu, Honghu; Bangsberg, David R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Regular HIV RNA testing for all HIV positive patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expensive and has low yield since most tests are undetectable. Selective testing of those at higher risk of failure may improve efficiency. We investigated whether a novel analysis of adherence data could correctly classify virological failure and potentially inform a selective testing strategy. Design Multisite prospective cohort consortium. Methods We evaluated longitudinal data on 1478 adult patients treated with ART and monitored using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) in 16 United States cohorts contributing to the MACH14 consortium. Since the relationship between adherence and virological failure is complex and heterogeneous, we applied a machine-learning algorithm (Super Learner) to build a model for classifying failure and evaluated its performance using cross-validation. Results Application of the Super Learner algorithm to MEMS data, combined with data on CD4+ T cell counts and ART regimen, significantly improved classification of virological failure over a single MEMS adherence measure. Area under the ROC curve, evaluated on data not used in model fitting, was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.80) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.81) for failure defined as single HIV RNA level >1000 copies/ml or >400 copies/ml, respectively. Our results suggest 25–31% of viral load tests could be avoided while maintaining sensitivity for failure detection at or above 95%, for a cost savings of $16–$29 per person-month. Conclusions Our findings provide initial proof-of-concept for the potential use of electronic medication adherence data to reduce costs through behavior-driven HIV RNA testing. PMID:25942462

  15. Predictors of Treatment Failure among Adult Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Haile, Demewoz; Takele, Abulie; Gashaw, Ketema; Demelash, Habtamu; Nigatu, Dabere

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure defined as progression of disease after initiation of ART or when the anti-HIV medications can't control the infection. One of the major concerns over the rapid scaling up of ART is the emergence and transmission of HIV drug resistant strains at the population level due to treatment failure. This could lead to the failure of basic ART programs. Thus this study aimed to investigate the predictors of treatment failure among adult ART clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South east Ethiopia. Retrospective cohort study was employed in four hospitals of Bale zone named Goba, Robe, Ginir and Delomena. A total of 4,809 adult ART clients were included in the analysis from these four hospitals. Adherence was measured by pill count method. The Kaplan Meier (KM) curve was used to describe the survival time of ART patients without treatment failure. Bivariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for identifying associated factors of treatment failure. The incidence rate of treatment failure was found 9.38 (95% CI 7.79-11.30) per 1000 person years. Male ART clients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to females [AHR = 4.49; 95% CI: (2.61-7.73)].Similarly, lower CD4 count (<100 m3/dl) at initiation of ART was found significantly associated with higher odds of treatment failure [AHR = 3.79; 95% CI: (2.46-5.84).Bedridden [AHR = 5.02; 95% CI: (1.98-12.73)] and ambulatory [AHR = 2.12; 95% CI: (1.08-4.07)] patients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to patients with working functional status. TB co-infected clients had also higher odds to experience treatment failure [AHR = 3.06; 95% CI: (1.72-5.44)]. Those patients who had developed TB after ART initiation had higher odds to experience treatment failure as compared to their counter parts [AHR = 4.35; 95% CI: (1.99-9.54]. Having other opportunistic infection during ART initiation was also associated with higher odds of experiencing

  16. Predictors of Treatment Failure among Adult Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Takele, Abulie; Gashaw, Ketema; Demelash, Habtamu; Nigatu, Dabere

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment failure defined as progression of disease after initiation of ART or when the anti-HIV medications can’t control the infection. One of the major concerns over the rapid scaling up of ART is the emergence and transmission of HIV drug resistant strains at the population level due to treatment failure. This could lead to the failure of basic ART programs. Thus this study aimed to investigate the predictors of treatment failure among adult ART clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South east Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective cohort study was employed in four hospitals of Bale zone named Goba, Robe, Ginir and Delomena. A total of 4,809 adult ART clients were included in the analysis from these four hospitals. Adherence was measured by pill count method. The Kaplan Meier (KM) curve was used to describe the survival time of ART patients without treatment failure. Bivariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for identifying associated factors of treatment failure. Result The incidence rate of treatment failure was found 9.38 (95% CI 7.79–11.30) per 1000 person years. Male ART clients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to females [AHR = 4.49; 95% CI: (2.61–7.73)].Similarly, lower CD4 count (<100 m3/dl) at initiation of ART was found significantly associated with higher odds of treatment failure [AHR = 3.79; 95% CI: (2.46–5.84).Bedridden [AHR = 5.02; 95% CI: (1.98–12.73)] and ambulatory [AHR = 2.12; 95% CI: (1.08–4.07)] patients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to patients with working functional status. TB co-infected clients had also higher odds to experience treatment failure [AHR = 3.06; 95% CI: (1.72–5.44)]. Those patients who had developed TB after ART initiation had higher odds to experience treatment failure as compared to their counter parts [AHR = 4.35; 95% CI: (1.99–9.54]. Having other opportunistic infection during ART initiation was also

  17. Antiretroviral drug diversion links social vulnerability to poor medication adherence in substance abusing populations.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Surratt, Hilary L

    2015-05-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) medication diversion to the illicit market has been documented in South Florida, and linked to sub-optimal adherence in people living with HIV. ARV diversion reflects an unmet need for care in vulnerable populations that have difficulty engaging in consistent HIV care due to competing needs and co-morbidities. This study applies the Gelberg-Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization for vulnerable populations to understand how social vulnerability is linked to ARV diversion and adherence. Cross-sectional data were collected from a targeted sample of vulnerable people living with HIV in South Florida between 2010 and 2012 (n = 503). Structured interviews collected quantitative data on ARV diversion, access and utilization of care, and ARV adherence. Logistic regression was used to estimate the goodness-of-fit of additive models that test domain fit. Linear regression was used to estimate the effects of social vulnerability and ARV diversion on ARV adherence. The best fitting model to predict ARV diversion identifies having a low monthly income and unstable HIV care as salient enabling factors that promote ARV diversion. Importantly, health care need factors did not protect against ARV diversion, evidence that immediate competing needs are prioritized even in the face of poor health for this sample. We also find that ARV diversion provides a link between social vulnerability and sub-optimal ARV adherence, with ARV diversion and domains from the Behavioral Model explaining 25 % of the variation in ARV adherence. Our analyses reveal great need to improve engagement in HIV care for vulnerable populations by strengthening enabling factors (e.g. patient-provider relationship) to improve retention in HIV care and ARV adherence for vulnerable populations.

  18. Epic Allies, a Gamified Mobile Phone App to Improve Engagement in Care, Antiretroviral Uptake, and Adherence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men and Young Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Background In the United States, young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and transgender women who have sex with men (YTWSM) bear a disproportionate burden of prevalent and incident HIV infections. Once diagnosed, many YMSM and YTWSM struggle to engage in HIV care, adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and achieve viral suppression. Computer-based interventions, including those focused on behavior change, are recognized as effective tools for engaging youth. Objective The purpose of the study described in this protocol is to evaluate the efficacy of Epic Allies, a theory-based mobile phone app that utilizes game mechanics and social networking features to improve engagement in HIV care, ART uptake, ART adherence, and viral suppression among HIV-positive YMSM and YTWSM. The study also qualitatively assesses intervention acceptability, perceived impact, and sustainability. Methods This is a two-group, active-control randomized controlled trial of the Epic Allies app. YMSM and YTWSM aged 16 to 24 inclusive, with detectable HIV viral load are randomized 1:1 within strata of new to care (newly entered HIV medical care ≤12 months of baseline visit) or ART-nonadherent (first entered HIV medical care >12 months before baseline visit) to intervention or control conditions. The intervention condition addresses ART adherence barriers through medication reminders and adherence monitoring, tracking of select adherence-related behaviors (eg, alcohol and marijuana use), an interactive dashboard that displays the participant’s adherence-related behaviors and provides tailored feedback, encouragement messages from other users, daily HIV/ART educational articles, and gamification features (eg, mini-games, points, badges) to increase motivation for behavior change and app engagement. The control condition features weekly phone-based notifications to encourage participants to view educational information in the control app. Follow-up assessments are administered at 13, 26, and 39

  19. Arts Integration as a Catalyst for High School Renewal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Dorinne

    2008-01-01

    The director of a small career academy of the arts in a public high school reflects on the conflicting demands to establish a college-preparatory program adhering to state standards and to facilitate the personal growth, artistic discovery, and democratic empowerment of teens. By narrating experiences that go to the heart of philosophical discord,…

  20. ASCII Art Synthesis from Natural Photographs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuemiao; Zhong, Linyuan; Xie, Minshan; Liu, Xueting; Qin, Jing; Wong, Tien-Tsin

    2017-08-01

    While ASCII art is a worldwide popular art form, automatic generating structure-based ASCII art from natural photographs remains challenging. The major challenge lies on extracting the perception-sensitive structure from the natural photographs so that a more concise ASCII art reproduction can be produced based on the structure. However, due to excessive amount of texture in natural photos, extracting perception-sensitive structure is not easy, especially when the structure may be weak and within the texture region. Besides, to fit different target text resolutions, the amount of the extracted structure should also be controllable. To tackle these challenges, we introduce a visual perception mechanism of non-classical receptive field modulation (non-CRF modulation) from physiological findings to this ASCII art application, and propose a new model of non-CRF modulation which can better separate the weak structure from the crowded texture, and also better control the scale of texture suppression. Thanks to our non-CRF model, more sensible ASCII art reproduction can be obtained. In addition, to produce more visually appealing ASCII arts, we propose a novel optimization scheme to obtain the optimal placement of proportional-font characters. We apply our method on a rich variety of images, and visually appealing ASCII art can be obtained in all cases.

  1. Dosage optimization in positron emission tomography: state-of-the-art methods and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Fokou, Eleni; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used nowadays for tumor staging and therapy response in the clinic. However, average PET radiation exposure has increased due to higher PET utilization. This study aims to review state-of-the-art PET tracer dosage optimization methods after accounting for the effects of human body attenuation and scan protocol parameters on the counting rate. In particular, the relationship between the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and the dosage (NECR-dosage curve) for a range of clinical PET systems and body attenuation sizes will be systematically studied to prospectively estimate the minimum dosage required for sufficiently high NECR. The optimization criterion can be determined either as a function of the peak of the NECR-dosage curve or as a fixed NECR score when NECR uniformity across a patient population is important. In addition, the systematic NECR assessments within a controllable environment of realistic simulations and phantom experiments can lead to a NECR-dosage response model, capable of predicting the optimal dosage for every individual PET scan. Unlike conventional guidelines suggesting considerably large dosage levels for obese patients, NECR-based optimization recommends: i) moderate dosage to achieve 90% of peak NECR for obese patients, ii) considerable dosage reduction for slimmer patients such that uniform NECR is attained across the patient population, and iii) prolongation of scans for PET/MR protocols, where longer PET acquisitions are affordable due to lengthy MR sequences, with motion compensation becoming important then. Finally, the need for continuous adaptation of dosage optimization to emerging technologies will be discussed. PMID:26550543

  2. Cost of Behavioral Interventions Utilizing Electronic Drug Monitoring for Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Rasu, Rafia S.; Malewski, David F.; Banderas, Julie W.; Thomson, Domonique Malomo; Goggin, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide data on the actual costs associated with behavioral ART adherence interventions and electronic drug monitoring used in a clinical trial to inform their implementation in future studies and real-world practice. Methods Direct and time costs were calculated from a multi-site three-arm randomized controlled ART adherence trial. HIV positive participants (n = 204) were randomized to standard care (SC), enhanced counseling (EC), or EC and modified directly observed therapy (mDOT) interventions. Electronic drug monitoring (EDM) was used. Costs were calculated for various components of the 24-week adherence intervention. This economic evaluation was conducted from the perspective of an agency that may wish to implement these strategies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine costs and savings associated with different scenarios. Results Total direct costs were $126,068 ($618/patient). Initial time costs were $53,590 ($262/patient). Base cost of labor was $0.36/minute. EC costs for 134 patients were $18,427 ($137/patient) and mDOT for 64 patients cost $18,638 ($291/patient). Total per patient costs were: SC=$880, EC=$1,018, EC/mDOT=$1,309. Removing driving costs evidenced the most variable impact on savings between the three study arms. The tornado diagram (sensitivity analysis) showed a graphical representation of how each sensitivity assumption reduced costs compared to each other and the resulting comparative costs for each group. Conclusion This novel economic analysis provides valuable cost information to guide treatment implementation and research design decisions. PMID:23337364

  3. Development and pilot testing of daily Interactive Voice Response (IVR) calls to support antiretroviral adherence in India: A mixed-methods pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Swendeman, Dallas; Jana, Smarajit; Ray, Protim; Mindry, Deborah; Das, Madhushree; Bhakta, Bhumi

    2015-01-01

    This two-phase pilot study aimed to design, pilot, and refine an automated Interactive Voice Response (IVR) intervention to support antiretroviral adherence for people living with HIV (PLH), in Kolkata, India. Mixed-methods formative research included a community advisory board (CAB) for IVR message development, one-month pre-post pilot, post-pilot focus groups, and further message development. Two IVR calls are made daily, timed to patients’ dosing schedules, with brief messages (<1-minute) on strategies for self-management of three domains: medical (adherence, symptoms, co-infections), mental health (social support, stress, positive cognitions), and nutrition and hygiene (per PLH preferences). Three ART appointment reminders are also sent each month. One-month pilot results (n=46, 80% women, 60% sex workers) found significant increases in self-reported ART adherence, both within past three days (p=0.05) and time since missed last dose (p=0.015). Depression was common. Messaging content and assessment domains were expanded for testing in a randomized trial is currently underway. PMID:25638037

  4. Development and Pilot Testing of Daily Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Calls to Support Antiretroviral Adherence in India: A Mixed-Methods Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Swendeman, Dallas; Jana, Smarajit; Ray, Protim; Mindry, Deborah; Das, Madhushree; Bhakta, Bhumi

    2015-06-01

    This two-phase pilot study aimed to design, pilot, and refine an automated interactive voice response (IVR) intervention to support antiretroviral adherence for people living with HIV (PLH), in Kolkata, India. Mixed-methods formative research included a community advisory board for IVR message development, 1-month pre-post pilot, post-pilot focus groups, and further message development. Two IVR calls are made daily, timed to patients' dosing schedules, with brief messages (<1-min) on strategies for self-management of three domains: medical (adherence, symptoms, co-infections), mental health (social support, stress, positive cognitions), and nutrition and hygiene (per PLH preferences). Three ART appointment reminders are also sent each month. One-month pilot results (n = 46, 80 % women, 60 % sex workers) found significant increases in self-reported ART adherence, both within past three days (p = 0.05) and time since missed last dose (p = 0.015). Depression was common. Messaging content and assessment domains were expanded for testing in a randomized trial currently underway.

  5. Perspectives Regarding Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Highly Adherent HIV-Infected Gay Men.

    PubMed

    Brion, John M; Menke, Edna M

    2008-01-01

    Focus group methodology was used to describe the medication adherence experience of 24 HIV-infected gay men who reported being adherent to their medication regimens. A conceptualization of medication adherence as an evolving process consisted of challenges to adherence (learning the diagnosis, starting the medications, struggling with the medications, dealing with side effects, coping with stigma) as well as those factors supportive of adherence (believing in medications, finding motivating factors, using reminders, depending on others, owning the disease). Themes associated with challenges to adherence focused on diagnosis and the physical and emotional adjustments individuals made to incorporate antiretroviral medications into their daily lives and move toward medication adherence. The factors supportive of adherence were related to the ongoing behaviors identified with establishing and maintaining adherence behaviors. What can be taken from the study is that adherence is a complex and dynamic process rather than a static behavior.

  6. Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in HIV-Infected Rwandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Musiime, Stephenson; Muhairwe, Fred; Rutagengwa, Alfred; Mutimura, Eugene; Anastos, Kathryn; Hoover, Donald R.; Qiuhu, Shi; Munyazesa, Elizaphane; Emile, Ivan; Uwineza, Annette; Cowan, Ethan

    2011-01-01

    Background Scale-up of highly active antiretroviral treatment therapy (HAART) programs in Rwanda has been highly successful but data on adherence is limited. We examined HAART adherence in a large cohort of HIV+ Rwandan women. Methods The Rwanda Women's Interassociation Study Assessment (RWISA) was a prospective cohort study that assessed effectiveness and toxicity of ART. We analyzed patient data 12±3 months after HAART initiation to determine adherence rates in HIV+ women who had initiated HAART. Results Of the 710 HIV+ women at baseline, 490 (87.2%) initiated HAART. Of these, 6 (1.2%) died within 12 months, 15 others (3.0%) discontinued the study and 80 others (19.0%) remained in RWISA but did not have a post-HAART initiation visit that fell within the 12±3 month time points leaving 389 subjects for analysis. Of these 389, 15 women stopped their medications without being advised to do so by their doctors. Of the remaining 374 persons who reported current HAART use 354 completed the adherence assessment. All women, 354/354, reported 100% adherence to HAART at the post-HAART visit. The high self-reported level of adherence is supported by changes in laboratory measures that are influenced by HAART. The median (interquartile range) CD4 cell count measured within 6 months prior to HAART initiation was 185 (128, 253) compared to 264 (182, 380) cells/mm3 at the post-HAART visit. Similarly, the median (interquartile range) MCV within 6 months prior to HAART initiation was 88 (83, 93) fL compared to 104 (98, 110) fL at the 12±3 month visit. Conclusion Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral treatment 12±3 months after initiating therapy was 100% in this cohort of HIV-infected Rwandan women. Future studies should explore country-specific factors that may be contributing to high levels of adherence to HAART in this population. PMID:22114706

  7. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Reuben N; Mellins, Claude A; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J; Remien, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni-is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5-6 weeks after baseline), -clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10 % improvement for-participants and a decrease of 8 % for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches.

  8. Enhancing Lay Counselor Capacity to Improve Patient Outcomes with Multimedia Technology

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Reuben N.; Mellins, Claude A.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Rowe, Jessica; Warne, Patricia; Abrams, Elaine J.; Witte, Susan; Stein, Dan J.; Remien, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia technologies offer powerful tools to increase capacity of health workers to deliver standardized, effective, and engaging antiretroviral medication adherence counseling. Masivukeni is an innovative multimedia-based, computer-driven, lay counselor-delivered intervention designed to help people living with HIV in resource-limited settings achieve optimal adherence. This pilot study examined medication adherence and key psychosocial outcomes among 55 non-adherent South African HIV+ patients, on ART for at least 6 months, who were randomized to receive either Masivukeni or standard of care (SOC) counseling for ART non-adherence. At baseline, there were no significant differences between the SOC and Masivukeni groups on any outcome variables. At post-intervention (approximately 5–6 weeks after baseline), clinic-based pill count adherence data available for 20 participants (10 per intervention arm) showed a 10% improvement for Masivukeni participants and a decrease of 8% for SOC participants. Masivukeni participants reported significantly more positive attitudes towards disclosure and medication social support, less social rejection, and better clinic-patient relationships than did SOC participants. Masivukeni shows promise to promote optimal adherence and provides preliminary evidence that multimedia, computer-based technology can help lay counselors offer better adherence counseling than standard approaches. PMID:25566763

  9. Self-report measures of antiretroviral therapy adherence: A review with recommendations for HIV research and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Jane M; Kurth, Ann E; Pearson, Cynthia R; Pantalone, David W; Merrill, Joseph O; Frick, Pamela A

    2006-05-01

    A review of 77 studies employing self-report measures of antiretroviral adherence published 1/1996 through 8/2004 revealed great variety in adherence assessment item content, format, and response options. Recall periods ranged from 2 to 365 days (mode = 7 days). The most common cutoff for optimal adherence was 100% (21/48 studies, or 44%). In 27 of 34 recall periods (79%), self-reported adherence was associated with adherence as assessed with other indirect measures. Data from 57 of 67 recall periods (84%) indicated self-reported adherence was significantly associated with HIV-1 RNA viral load; in 16 of 26 (62%), it was associated with CD4 count. Clearly, the field would benefit from item standardization and a priori definitions and operationalizations of adherence. We conclude that even brief self-report measures of antiretroviral adherence can be robust, and recommend items and strategies for HIV research and clinical management.

  10. Mobile Text Messaging to Improve Medication Adherence and Viral Load in a Vulnerable Canadian Population Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Repeated Measures Study

    PubMed Central

    King, Elizabeth; Kinvig, Karen; Steif, Jonathan; Qiu, Annie Q; Maan, Evelyn J; Albert, Arianne YK; Pick, Neora; Alimenti, Ariane; Kestler, Mary H; Money, Deborah M; Lester, Richard T

    2017-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) as treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is effective and available, but poor medication adherence limits benefits, particularly in vulnerable populations. In a Kenyan randomized controlled trial, a weekly text-messaging intervention (WelTel) improved cART adherence and HIV viral load (VL). Despite growing evidence for short message service (SMS) text-message interventions in HIV care, there is a paucity of data utilizing these interventions in marginalized or female cohorts. Objective This study was undertaken to assess whether the standardized WelTel SMS text-message intervention applied to a vulnerable, predominantly female, population improved cART adherence and VL. Methods We conducted a repeated measures study of the WelTel intervention in high-risk HIV-positive persons by measuring change in VL, CD4 count, and self-reported adherence 12 months before and 12 months after the WelTel intervention was introduced. Inclusion criteria included VL ≥200 copies/mL, indication for treatment, and meeting vulnerability criteria. Participants were given a mobile phone with unlimited texting (where required), and weekly check-in text messages were sent for one year from the WelTel computer platform. Clinical data were collected for control and intervention years. Participants were followed by a multidisciplinary team in a clinical setting. Outcomes were assessed using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests for change in CD4 and VL from control year to study end and mixed-effects logistic regressions for change in cART adherence and appointment attendance. A secondary analysis was conducted to assess the effect of response rate on the outcome by modeling final log10 VL by number of responses while controlling for mean log10 VL in the control year. Results Eighty-five participants enrolled in the study, but 5 withdrew (final N=80). Participants were predominantly female (90%, 72/80) with a variety of

  11. Medication adherence as a learning process: insights from cognitive psychology.

    PubMed

    Rottman, Benjamin Margolin; Marcum, Zachary A; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Gellad, Walid F

    2017-03-01

    Non-adherence to medications is one of the largest contributors to sub-optimal health outcomes. Many theories of adherence include a 'value-expectancy' component in which a patient decides to take a medication partly based on expectations about whether it is effective, necessary, and tolerable. We propose reconceptualising this common theme as a kind of 'causal learning' - the patient learns whether a medication is effective, necessary, and tolerable, from experience with the medication. We apply cognitive psychology theories of how people learn cause-effect relations to elaborate this causal-learning challenge. First, expectations and impressions about a medication and beliefs about how a medication works, such as delay of onset, can shape a patient's perceived experience with the medication. Second, beliefs about medications propagate both 'top-down' and 'bottom-up', from experiences with specific medications to general beliefs about medications and vice versa. Third, non-adherence can interfere with learning about a medication, because beliefs, adherence, and experience with a medication are connected in a cyclic learning problem. We propose that by conceptualising non-adherence as a causal-learning process, clinicians can more effectively address a patient's misconceptions and biases, helping the patient develop more accurate impressions of the medication.

  12. Pathways From HIV-Related Stigma to Antiretroviral Therapy Measures in the HIV Care Cascade for Women Living With HIV in Canada.

    PubMed

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Wang, Ying; Kaida, Angela; Conway, Tracey; Webster, Kath; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Loutfy, Mona R; Anema, Aranka; Becker, Denise; Brotto, Lori; Carter, Allison; Cardinal, Claudette; Colley, Guillaume; Ding, Erin; Duddy, Janice; Gataric, Nada; Hogg, Robert S; Hosward, Terry; Jabbari, Shahab; Jones, Evin; Kestler, Mary; Langlois, Andrea; Lima, Viviane; Lloyd-Smith, Elisa; Medjuck, Melissa; Miller, Cari; Money, Deborah; Nicholson, Valerie; Ogilvie, Gina; Patterson, Sophie; Pick, Neora; Roth, Eric; Salters, Kate; Sanchez, Margarite; Sas, Jacquie; Sereda, Paul; Summers, Marcie; Tom, Christina; Wang, Lu; Webster, Kath; Zhang, Wendy; Abdul-Noor, Rahma; Angel, Jonathan; Barry, Fatimatou; Bauer, Greta; Beaver, Kerrigan; Benoit, Anita; Bertozzi, Breklyn; Borton, Sheila; Bourque, Tammy; Brophy, Jason; Burchell, Ann; Carlson, Allison; Cioppa, Lynne; Cohen, Jeffrey; Conway, Tracey; Cooper, Curtis; Cotnam, Jasmine; Cousineau, Janette; Fraleigh, Annette; Gagnier, Brenda; Gasingirwa, Claudine; Greene, Saara; Hart, Trevor; Islam, Shazia; Kaushic, Charu; Kennedy, Logan; Kerr, Desiree; Kiboyogo, Maxime; Kwaramba, Gladys; Leonard, Lynne; Lewis, Johanna; Logie, Carmen; Margolese, Shari; Muchenje, Marvelous; Ndungʼu, Mary; OʼBrien, Kelly; Ouellette, Charlene; Powis, Jeff; Quan, Corinna; Raboud, Janet; Rachlis, Anita; Ralph, Edward; Rourke, Sean; Rueda, Sergio; Sandre, Roger; Smaill, Fiona; Smith, Stephanie; Tigere, Tsitsi; Tharao, Wangari; Walmsley, Sharon; Wobeser, Wendy; Yee, Jessica; Yudin, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy; Burke, Nora Butler; Clément, Pierrette; Dayle, Janice; Dubuc, Danièle; Fernet, Mylène; Groleau, Danielle; Hot, Aurélie; Klein, Marina; Martin, Carrie; Massie, Lyne; Ménard, Brigitte; OʼBrien, Nadia; Otis, Joanne; Peltier, Doris; Pierre, Alie; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Rouleau, Danielle; Savoie, Édénia; Tremblay, Cécile; Trottier, Benoit; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Christos; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Hankins, Catherine; Masching, Renee; Ogunnaike-Cooke, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    Associations between HIV-related stigma and reduced antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence are widely established, yet the mechanisms accounting for this relationship are underexplored. There has been less attention to HIV-related stigma and its associations with ART initiation and current ART use. We examined pathways from HIV-related stigma to ART initiation, current ART use, and ART adherence among women living with HIV in Canada. We used baseline survey data from a national cohort of women living with HIV in Canada (n = 1425). Structural equation modeling using weighted least squares estimation methods was conducted to test the direct effects of HIV-related stigma dimensions (personalized, negative self-image, and public attitudes) on ART initiation, current ART use, and 90% ART adherence, and indirect effects through depression and HIV disclosure concerns, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. In the final model, the direct paths from personalized stigma to ART initiation (β = -0.104, P < 0.05) and current ART use (β = -0.142, P < 0.01), and negative self-image to ART initiation (β = -0.113, P < 0.01) were significant, accounting for the mediation effects of depression and HIV disclosure concerns. Depression mediated the pathways from personalized stigma to ART adherence, and negative self-image to current ART use and ART adherence. Final model fit indices suggest that the model fit the data well [χ(25) = 90.251, P < 0.001; comparative fit index = 0.945; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.044]. HIV-related stigma is associated with reduced likelihood of ART initiation and current ART use, and suboptimal ART adherence. To optimize the benefit of ART among women living with HIV, interventions should reduce HIV-related stigma and address depression.

  13. Adherence to isoniazid prophylaxis among HIV-infected children: a randomized controlled trial comparing two dosing schedules

    PubMed Central

    le Roux, Stanzi M; Cotton, Mark F; Golub, Jonathan E; le Roux, David M; Workman, Lesley; Zar, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa. Isoniazid prophylaxis can reduce tuberculosis incidence in this population. However, for the treatment to be effective, adherence to the medication must be optimized. We investigated adherence to isoniazid prophylaxis administered daily, compared to three times a week, and predictors of adherence amongst HIV-infected children. Methods We investigated adherence to study medication in a two centre, randomized trial comparing daily to three times a week dosing of isoniazid. The study was conducted at two tertiary paediatric care centres in Cape Town, South Africa. Over a 5 year period, we followed 324 HIV-infected children aged ≥ 8 weeks. Adherence information based on pill counts was available for 276 children. Percentage adherence was calculated by counting the number of pills returned. Adherence ≥ 90% was considered to be optimal. Analysis was done using summary and repeated measures, comparing adherence to the two dosing schedules. Mean percentage adherence (per child during follow-up time) was used to compare the mean of each group as well as the proportion of children achieving an adherence of ≥ 90% in each group. For repeated measures, percentage adherence (per child per visit) was dichotomized at 90%. A logistic regression model with generalized estimating equations, to account for within-individual correlation, was used to evaluate the impact of the dosing schedule. Adjustments were made for potential confounders and we assessed potential baseline and time-varying adherence determinants. Results The overall adherence to isoniazid was excellent, with a mean adherence of 94.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 93.5-95.9); similar mean adherence was achieved by the group taking daily medication (93.8%; 95% CI 92.1-95.6) and by the three times a week group (95.5%; 95% CI 93.8-97.2). Two-hundred and seventeen (78.6%) children achieved a

  14. The OPTIMIZE trial: Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of motivational enhancement therapy to improve adherence to statin medication.

    PubMed

    Rash, Joshua A; Lavoie, Kim L; Sigal, Ronald J; Campbell, David J T; Manns, Braden J; Tonelli, Marcello; Campbell, Tavis S

    2016-07-01

    Statins are a class of medications that are particularly effective for lowering cholesterol and reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite a range of benefits, non-adherence to statin medication is prevalent with 50% to 75% of patients failing to adhere to treatment within the first 2-years. A previous review on interventions to improve adherence to cholesterol lowering medication concluded that rigorous trials were needed with emphasis on the patient's perspective and shared decision making. Motivational interviewing (MInt) is a promising patient-centered approach for improving adherence in patients with chronic diseases. This manuscript describes the rational and design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) testing the efficacy of MInt in improving adherence to statin medication. Patients filling their first statin prescription will be recruited to complete a 6-month observation run-in period (phase-1) after which medication possession ratio (MPR) will be assessed. Patients meeting criteria for non-adherence (MPR≤60%) will be invited to participate in the trial. 336 non-adherent new statin users will undergo a fasting lipid panel, complete baseline questionnaires, and be randomly allocated to receive four sessions of adherence education delivered using MInt (EdMInt) or to an education control (EC) delivered at 3-month intervals. Final assessments will occur 12-months after the first EdMInt or EC session. The primary outcome is change in MPR adherence to statin medication from baseline to 12-months. Secondary outcomes include within-patient change in self-reported medication adherence, stage of change and self-efficacy for medication adherence, motivation to adhere to statin medication, and lipid profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epic Allies, a Gamified Mobile Phone App to Improve Engagement in Care, Antiretroviral Uptake, and Adherence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men and Young Transgender Women Who Have Sex With Men: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Sara; Muessig, Kathryn E; Platt, Alyssa; Soni, Karina; Egger, Joseph R; Nwoko, Nkechinyere; McNulty, Tobias; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2018-04-05

    In the United States, young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and transgender women who have sex with men (YTWSM) bear a disproportionate burden of prevalent and incident HIV infections. Once diagnosed, many YMSM and YTWSM struggle to engage in HIV care, adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and achieve viral suppression. Computer-based interventions, including those focused on behavior change, are recognized as effective tools for engaging youth. The purpose of the study described in this protocol is to evaluate the efficacy of Epic Allies, a theory-based mobile phone app that utilizes game mechanics and social networking features to improve engagement in HIV care, ART uptake, ART adherence, and viral suppression among HIV-positive YMSM and YTWSM. The study also qualitatively assesses intervention acceptability, perceived impact, and sustainability. This is a two-group, active-control randomized controlled trial of the Epic Allies app. YMSM and YTWSM aged 16 to 24 inclusive, with detectable HIV viral load are randomized 1:1 within strata of new to care (newly entered HIV medical care ≤12 months of baseline visit) or ART-nonadherent (first entered HIV medical care >12 months before baseline visit) to intervention or control conditions. The intervention condition addresses ART adherence barriers through medication reminders and adherence monitoring, tracking of select adherence-related behaviors (eg, alcohol and marijuana use), an interactive dashboard that displays the participant's adherence-related behaviors and provides tailored feedback, encouragement messages from other users, daily HIV/ART educational articles, and gamification features (eg, mini-games, points, badges) to increase motivation for behavior change and app engagement. The control condition features weekly phone-based notifications to encourage participants to view educational information in the control app. Follow-up assessments are administered at 13, 26, and 39 weeks for each arm. The

  16. Supporting patient adherence to antiretrovirals using mobile phone reminders: patient responses from South India.

    PubMed

    Sidney, Kristi; Antony, Jimmy; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Arumugam, Karthika; Krishnamurthy, Shubha; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha; Shet, Anita

    2012-01-01

    There has been exponential growth in the use of mobile phones in India over the last few years, and their potential benefits as a healthcare tool has raised tremendous interest. We used mobile phone reminders to help support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients at an infectious disease clinic in a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. Between March and June 2010, 139 adult HIV patients taking regular ART for at least a month received weekly reminders to support adherence. These reminders consisted of a weekly interactive call and a non-interactive neutral pictorial short message service (SMS). After four weeks of the intervention, participants were interviewed to study perceptions on preference, usefulness, potential stigma and privacy concerns associated with this intervention. Majority of the participants were urban (89%), and had at least a secondary education (85%). A total of 744 calls were made, 545 (76%) of which were received by the participants. In addition, all participants received the weekly pictorial SMS reminder. A month later, 90% of participants reported the intervention as being helpful as medication reminders, and did not feel their privacy was intruded. Participants (87%) reported that they preferred the call as reminders, just 11% favoured SMS reminders alone. Only 59% of participants viewed all the SMSs that were delivered, while 15% never viewed any at all. Participants also denied any discomfort or stigma despite 20% and 13%, respectively, reporting that another person had inadvertently received their reminder call or SMS. Mobile phone interventions are an acceptable way of supporting adherence in this setting. Voice calls rather than SMSs alone seem to be preferred as reminders. Further research to study the influence of this intervention on adherence and health maintenance is warranted.

  17. The Effect on Treatment Adherence of Administering Drugs as Fixed-Dose Combinations versus as Separate Pills: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    van Galen, Katy A; Nellen, Jeannine F; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2014-01-01

    Administering drugs as fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) versus the same active drugs administered as separate pills is assumed to enhance treatment adherence. We synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about the effect of FDCs versus separate pills on adherence. We searched PubMed for RCTs comparing a FDC with the same active drugs administered as separate pills, including a quantitative estimate of treatment adherence, without restriction to medical condition. The odds ratio (OR) of optimal adherence with FDCs versus separate pills was used as common effect size and aggregated into a pooled effect estimate using a random effect model with inverse variance weights. Out of 1258 articles screened, only six studies fulfilled inclusion criteria. Across medical conditions, administering drugs as FDC significantly increased the likelihood of optimal adherence (OR 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.71)). Within subgroups of specific medical conditions, the favourable effect of FDCs on adherence was of borderline statistical significance for HIV infection only (OR 1.46 (95% CI, 1.00-2.13)). We observed a remarkable paucity of RCTs comparing the effect on adherence of administering drugs as FDC versus as separate pills. Administering drugs as FDC improved medication adherence. However, this conclusion is based on a limited number of RCTs only.

  18. Short-term effectiveness of a community health worker intervention for HIV-infected pregnant women in Tanzania to improve treatment adherence and retention in care: A cluster-randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Nance, Nerissa; Pendo, Prosper; Masanja, Joseph; Ngilangwa, David Paul; Webb, Karen; Noronha, Rita; McCoy, Sandra I

    2017-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are lay workers who have the potential to enhance services to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) and improve the health of women living with HIV infection. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial of an intervention to integrate CHWs with 'Option B+' PMTCT services in Shinyanga Region, Tanzania. The intervention was implemented for 11 months and included four integrated components: 1) formal linkage of CHWs to health facilities; 2) CHW-led antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence counseling; 3) loss to follow-up tracing by CHWs; and 4) distribution of Action Birth Cards (ABCs), a birth planning tool. We cluster-randomized 32 facilities offering PMTCT services, within strata of size, to the intervention (n = 15) or comparison (standard of care, n = 17) groups. Intervention effectiveness was determined with a difference-in-differences strategy based on clinical and pharmacy data from HIV-infected postpartum women at baseline (births in 2014) and endline (births April-Oct 2015). The primary outcome was retention in care between 60 and 120 days postpartum. Secondary outcomes included ART initiation, timing of ART initiation (as measured by week of gestation), and ART adherence 90 days postpartum, measured using the medication possession ratio (MPR≥95%). Intervention and comparison facilities were similar at baseline. Data were collected from 1,152 and 678 mother-infant pairs at baseline and endline, respectively. There were no significant differences in retention in care, ART initiation, or timing of ART initiation between the intervention and control groups. Adherence (MPR≥95%) at 90 days postpartum was 11.3 percentage points higher in the intervention group in ITT analyses (95% CI: -0.7, 23.3, p = 0.06), though this effect was attenuated after adjusting for baseline imbalance (9.5 percentage points, 95% CI: -2.9, 22.0, p = 0.13). Among only sites that had the greatest fidelity to the intervention, however, we found a

  19. The role of social support on HIV testing and treatment adherence: A qualitative study of HIV-infected refugees in southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Shada A; O'Laughlin, Kelli N; Faustin, Zikama M; Tsai, Alexander C; Kasozi, Julius; Ware, Norma C

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the factors that encourage or discourage refugees to test for HIV, or to access and adhere to HIV care. In non-refugee populations, social support has been shown to influence HIV testing and utilisation of services. The present study enrolled HIV-infected refugees on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda, who participated in qualitative interviews on HIV testing, treatment, and adherence. Interviews were analysed for themes about four types of social support: emotional, informational, instrumental, and appraisal support. A total of 61 interviews were analysed. Four roles for these types of social support were identified: (1) informational support encouraged refugees to test for HIV; (2) emotional support helped refugees cope with a diagnosis of HIV; (3) instrumental support facilitated adherence to ART and (4) after diagnosis, HIV-infected refugees provided informational and emotional support to encourage other refugees to test for HIV. These results suggest that social support influences HIV testing and treatment among refugees. Future interventions should capitalise on social support within a refugee settlement to facilitate testing and treatment.

  20. A decade review: methods to improve adherence to the treatment among haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L

    2001-01-01

    Haemodialysis patients are asked to adhere to a very difficult treatment regimen consisting of fluid and diet restrictions, many daily medications, and usually 3 or 4 hour haemodialysis sessions three times each week. Many haemodialysis patients fail to adhere to their prescribed treatment and although this regimen is difficult, it is necessary for patients to adhere for optimal health and well-being. It is important for nephrology nurses to know what interventions help patients overcome the barriers that keep them from adhering to prescribed treatment The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to examine the research that has been published on methods to improve adherence among haemodialysis patients. Behavioural approaches, education, and primary nursing are interventions that have been researched More research has been reported on the demographics of noncompliant haemodialysis patients than on effective methods that help patients improve adherence to the treatment regimen. Demographic characteristics do not consistently predict compliance for individual patients. Each patient is unique. Research supports the idea that the nephrology nurse should spend time with the patient on a regular basis in order to understand the factors that hinder the individual patient from adhering to the treatment regimen. The nurse who knows the patient well is empowered to develop individualised interventions aimed at reducing barriers that interfere with the patient's ability to adhere to treatment.

  1. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  2. Patient Attitudinal and Behavioral Factors Associated with Warfarin Non-adherence at Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Localio, A. Russell; Platt, Alec B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Christie, Jason D.; Gross, Robert; Parker, Catherine S.; Price, Maureen; Metlay, Joshua P.; Cohen, Abigail; Newcomb, Craig W.; Strom, Brian L.; Kimmel, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin is an anticoagulant effective in preventing stroke, but it has a narrow therapeutic range requiring optimal adherence to achieve the most favorable effects. Purpose The goal of this study was to examine specific patient factors that might help explain warfarin non-adherence at outpatient anticoagulation clinics. Method In a prospective cohort study of 156 adults, we utilized logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between the five Treatment Prognostics scales from the Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic (MBMD), as well as three additional MBMD scales (Depression, Future Pessimism, and Social Isolation), and daily warfarin non-adherence assessed using electronic medication event monitoring systems caps over a median of 139 days. Results Four of the five Treatment Prognostic scales and greater social isolation were associated with warfarin non-adherence. When controlling for pertinent demographic and medical variables, the Information Discomfort scale remained significantly associated with warfarin non-adherence over time. Conclusion Although several factors were related to warfarin non-adherence, patients reporting a lack of receptivity to details regarding their medical illness seemed most at risk for warfarin non-adherence. This information might aid in the development of interventions to enhance warfarin adherence and perhaps reduce adverse medical events. PMID:19579066

  3. Defining success with HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis: A prevention-effective adherence paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Haberer, Jessica E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Baeten, Jared M.; Curran, Kathryn; Koechlin, Florence; Amico, K. Rivet; Anderson, Peter; Mugo, Nelly; Venter, Francois; Goicochea, Pedro; Caceres, Carlos; O’Reilly, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trial data have shown that oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is efficacious when taken as prescribed; however, PrEP adherence is complex and must be understood within the context of variable risk for HIV infection and use of other HIV prevention methods. Different levels of adherence may be needed in different populations to achieve HIV prevention, and the optimal methods for achieving the necessary adherence for both individual and public health benefits are unknown. Guidance for PrEP use must consider these questions to determine the success of PrEP-based HIV prevention programs. In this article, we propose a new paradigm for understanding and measuring PrEP adherence, termed prevention-effective adherence, which incorporates dynamic HIV acquisition risk behaviors and the use of HIV alternative prevention strategies. We discuss the need for daily PrEP use only during periods of risk for HIV exposure, describe key issues for measuring and understanding relevant behaviors, review lessons from another health prevention field (i.e., family planning), and provide guidance for prevention-effective PrEP use. Moreover, we challenge emerging calls for sustained, near perfect PrEP adherence regardless of risk exposure and offer a more practical and public health-focused vision for this prevention intervention. PMID:26103095

  4. Effect of Medicaid Policy Changes on Medication Adherence: Differences by Baseline Adherence.

    PubMed

    Amin, Krutika; Farley, Joel F; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Domino, Marisa E

    2017-03-01

    In 2001, the North Carolina (NC) Medicaid program reduced the number of days prescription supply that enrollees could fill from 100 days to 34 days and increased copayments for brand-name medications. Previous work has shown that a change in these policies led to a decrease in medication adherence from 2.9 to 8.0 percentage points in specific populations with chronic conditions. Studies have also shown that days supply limits and copayment increases have heterogeneous effects based on enrollees' baseline characteristics, including baseline adherence. However, this phenomenon has not been studied in the Medicaid population. We undertook this study to assess the heterogeneous effect of the NC Medicaid policy changes in groups with varying levels of baseline adherence. To examine whether restrictions on days supply had heterogeneous effects in subgroups defined by medication adherence before the policy changes. A partial difference-in-difference-in-differences model with fixed effects was used to compare medication adherence before and after the NC Medicaid policy changes among Medicaid enrollees subject to the policy changes because of their use of long prescriptions (> 40 days) as compared with (a) NC Medicaid enrollees using short prescriptions (< 40 days) before policy adoption, as well as (b) Medicaid enrollees in Georgia restricted to a 31 days supply through the study period. Medicaid enrollees were included if they filled a prescription for 1 of the following medication classes: antihypertensives, lipid-lowering drugs, or antipsychotics. The effect of the policy changes on medication adherence, calculated using the proportion of days covered (PDC) each quarter by baseline adherence level and clinical condition group, was studied. Average adherence levels over the 18-month prechange period were used to stratify individuals into 3 baseline adherence groups: fully adherent (PDC ≥ 80%), partially adherent (50%-79%), and nonadherent (PDC ≤ 50%). Enrollees fully

  5. Impact of adherence on the outcome of antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Mulhall, Brian P; Younossi, Zobair

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 4 million people in the United States have evidence of hepatitis C infection (HCV), representing a significant cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer as well a major burden to our healthcare systems and society. Antiviral therapy can successfully eradicate HCV over the long term, potentially reducing the risk of progression and improving patients' quality of life. The currently preferred HCV treatment is a combination of pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin, which can achieve an overall sustained viral eradication rate of 55%. The duration of this treatment is typically determined by HCV genotype and the patient's early virologic response to the antiviral regimen. Evidence has accumulated over the past few years to indicate that close adherence to the optimal antiviral regimen can enhance sustained virologic response. But optimal treatment outcomes require diligence and careful management of side effects related to combination therapy. Although reducing the dose of pegylated interferon alfa, ribavirin, or both can effectively treat side effects, suboptimal doses of this regimen, especially ribavirin, may negatively affect virologic response. An alternative strategy is to use growth factors to treat cytopenias. This strategy can obviate dose reductions while potentially improving patients' quality of life. Patient support seems especially important early after the initiation of antiviral therapy. Encouraging study findings involving the growth factors, epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa, suggest improved anemia and quality of life while maintaining the optimal ribavirin dose. Future work should be aimed at providing stronger evidence for the use of these "supportive products" during anti-HCV therapy. As we strive to develop better treatment options for our HCV patients, the importance of adhering to the treatment regimen continues to play a central role. Effective side effect management is crucial for the success of this treatment because adherence is

  6. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and academic performance in youth: the UP&DOWN study.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Izquierdo-Gomez, Rocio; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Padilla-Moledo, Carmen; Castro-Piñero, Jose; Marcos, Ascensión; Veiga, Oscar L

    2016-04-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and academic performance in children and adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 1371 youth aged 12.04 ± 2.50 years (685 girls) in Spain during 2011-2012. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the KIDMED index (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index in children and adolescents), which includes 16 questions on specific dietary patterns. Levels of adherence were classified into three groups: poor adherence (0-3), average adherence (4-7), and good adherence (8-12). Academic performance was assessed through school records using four indicators: math, language, an average of math and language, and grade point average score. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was related to academic performance (β ranging from 0.107 to 0.148; all P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounders. The group of good adherence to the Mediterranean diet had significantly higher scores in all of the academic indicators compared with the poor group (ranging from +0.429 to 0.464; all P ≤ 0.001); as well as the group of average adherence to the Mediterranean diet had significantly higher scores in all of the academic indicators compared with the poor group (ranging from +0.292 to 0.344; all P ≤ 0.06). There were no differences between the groups of good and average adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet may have a beneficial influence on academic performance in youth. Importantly, the benefits of adherence to the Mediterranean diet on academic performance may be stronger as youth adhered to the optimal Mediterranean diet levels.

  7. Boosting ART uptake and retention among HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women and their infants: the promise of innovative service delivery models.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Meena; Sullivan, David; Phelps, B Ryan; Modi, Surbhi; Broyles, Laura N

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the "Treat All" era, there has been increasing emphasis on using differentiated models of HIV service delivery. The gaps within the clinical cascade for mothers and their infants suggest that current service delivery models are not meeting families' needs and prompt re-consideration of how services are provided. This article will explore considerations for differentiated care and encourage the ongoing increase of ART coverage through innovative strategies while also addressing the unique needs of mothers and infants. Service delivery models should recognize that the timing of the mother's HIV diagnosis is a critical aspect of determining eligibility. Women newly diagnosed with HIV require a more intensive approach so that adequate counselling and monitoring of ART initiation and response can be provided. Women already on ART with evidence of virologic failure are also at high risk of transmitting HIV to their infants and require close follow-up. However, women stable on ART with a suppressed viral load before conception have a very low likelihood of HIV transmission and thus are strong candidates for multi-month ART dispensing, community-based distribution of ART, adherence clubs, community adherence support groups and longer intervals between clinical visits. A number of other factors should be considered when defining eligibility of mothers and infants for differentiated care, including location of services, viral load monitoring and duration on ART. To provide differentiated care that is client-centred and driven while encompassing a family-based approach, it will be critical to engage mothers, families and communities in models that will optimize client satisfaction, retention in care and quality of services. Differentiated care for mothers and infants represents an opportunity to provide client-centred care that reduces the burden on clients and health systems while improving the quality and uptake

  8. Effects of a mobile phone short message service on antiretroviral treatment adherence in Kenya (WelTel Kenya1): a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Lester, Richard T; Ritvo, Paul; Mills, Edward J; Kariri, Antony; Karanja, Sarah; Chung, Michael H; Jack, William; Habyarimana, James; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Marra, Carlo A; Estambale, Benson; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Ball, T Blake; Thabane, Lehana; Gelmon, Lawrence J; Kimani, Joshua; Ackers, Marta; Plummer, Francis A

    2010-11-27

    Mobile (cell) phone communication has been suggested as a method to improve delivery of health services. However, data on the effects of mobile health technology on patient outcomes in resource-limited settings are limited. We aimed to assess whether mobile phone communication between health-care workers and patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Kenya improved drug adherence and suppression of plasma HIV-1 RNA load. WelTel Kenya1 was a multisite randomised clinical trial of HIV-infected adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in three clinics in Kenya. Patients were randomised (1:1) by simple randomisation with a random number generating program to a mobile phone short message service (SMS) intervention or standard care. Patients in the intervention group received weekly SMS messages from a clinic nurse and were required to respond within 48 h. Randomisation, laboratory assays, and analyses were done by investigators masked to treatment allocation; however, study participants and clinic staff were not masked to treatment. Primary outcomes were self-reported ART adherence (>95% of prescribed doses in the past 30 days at both 6 and 12 month follow-up visits) and plasma HIV-1 viral RNA load suppression (<400 copies per mL) at 12 months. The primary analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00830622. Between May, 2007, and October, 2008, we randomly assigned 538 participants to the SMS intervention (n=273) or to standard care (n=265). Adherence to ART was reported in 168 of 273 patients receiving the SMS intervention compared with 132 of 265 in the control group (relative risk [RR] for non-adherence 0·81, 95% CI 0·69-0·94; p=0·006). Suppressed viral loads were reported in 156 of 273 patients in the SMS group and 128 of 265 in the control group, (RR for virologic failure 0·84, 95% CI 0·71-0·99; p=0·04). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve greater than 95% adherence was nine (95% CI 5·0-29·5

  9. Mobile Text Messaging to Improve Medication Adherence and Viral Load in a Vulnerable Canadian Population Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Repeated Measures Study.

    PubMed

    King, Elizabeth; Kinvig, Karen; Steif, Jonathan; Qiu, Annie Q; Maan, Evelyn J; Albert, Arianne Yk; Pick, Neora; Alimenti, Ariane; Kestler, Mary H; Money, Deborah M; Lester, Richard T; Murray, Melanie Caroline Margaret

    2017-06-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) as treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is effective and available, but poor medication adherence limits benefits, particularly in vulnerable populations. In a Kenyan randomized controlled trial, a weekly text-messaging intervention (WelTel) improved cART adherence and HIV viral load (VL). Despite growing evidence for short message service (SMS) text-message interventions in HIV care, there is a paucity of data utilizing these interventions in marginalized or female cohorts. This study was undertaken to assess whether the standardized WelTel SMS text-message intervention applied to a vulnerable, predominantly female, population improved cART adherence and VL. We conducted a repeated measures study of the WelTel intervention in high-risk HIV-positive persons by measuring change in VL, CD4 count, and self-reported adherence 12 months before and 12 months after the WelTel intervention was introduced. Inclusion criteria included VL ≥200 copies/mL, indication for treatment, and meeting vulnerability criteria. Participants were given a mobile phone with unlimited texting (where required), and weekly check-in text messages were sent for one year from the WelTel computer platform. Clinical data were collected for control and intervention years. Participants were followed by a multidisciplinary team in a clinical setting. Outcomes were assessed using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests for change in CD4 and VL from control year to study end and mixed-effects logistic regressions for change in cART adherence and appointment attendance. A secondary analysis was conducted to assess the effect of response rate on the outcome by modeling final log 10 VL by number of responses while controlling for mean log 10 VL in the control year. Eighty-five participants enrolled in the study, but 5 withdrew (final N=80). Participants were predominantly female (90%, 72/80) with a variety of vulnerabilities. Mean VL decreased from 1098

  10. The impact of social support and partner relationship dynamics on engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence among MSM in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kelsey; Biello, Katie; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Novak, David; Mayer, Kenneth; Carey, Kate; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2018-03-27

    In Latin America (LA), HIV prevalence among MSM is estimated at thirty times greater than in the general male population. Little is known about the role of social support or disclosure status in relation to the HIV care continuum among LA MSM. Using multivariable logistic generalized estimation equations, we assessed the impact of social support satisfaction and disclosure status on engagement in HIV care, ART initiation, and ART adherence with data from an online, multinational sample of HIV infected MSM in Latin America (N = 2,350). 80.0% were engaged in HIV care, 71% initiated ART, and among those, 37% reported missing at least one dose in the past month. In multivariable models, compared to being very satisfied with social support, being somewhat satisfied (aOR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56, 0.95) or somewhat dissatisfied (aOR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.70, 0.98) were associated with reduced odds of reporting 100% ART adherence. Disclosure of status was associated with a greater odds of HIV care engagement (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.28, 2.07) and ART initiation (OR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.30, 1.84). Greater satisfaction with social support and comfort disclosing HIV status to these sources were associated with improved engagement in HIV care and greater initiation of ART among MSM in LA.

  11. Early warning indicators for first-line virologic failure independent of adherence measures in a South African urban clinic.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Vincent C; Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Ordóñez, Claudia E; Johnson, Brent A; Singh, Dinesh; John, Sally; Gordon, Michelle; Hare, Anna; Murphy, Richard; Nachega, Jean; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; del Rio, Carlos; Sunpath, Henry

    2013-12-01

    We sought to develop individual-level Early Warning Indicators (EWI) of virologic failure (VF) for clinicians to use during routine care complementing WHO population-level EWI. A case-control study was conducted at a Durban clinic. Patients after ≥ 5 months of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) were defined as cases if they had VF [HIV-1 viral load (VL)>1000 copies/mL] and controls (2:1) if they had VL ≤ 1000 copies/mL. Pharmacy refills and pill counts were used as adherence measures. Participants responded to a questionnaire including validated psychosocial and symptom scales. Data were also collected from the medical record. Multivariable logistic regression models of VF included factors associated with VF (p<0.05) in univariable analyses. We enrolled 158 cases and 300 controls. In the final multivariable model, male gender, not having an active religious faith, practicing unsafe sex, having a family member with HIV, not being pleased with the clinic experience, symptoms of depression, fatigue, or rash, low CD4 counts, family recommending HIV care, and using a TV/radio as ART reminders (compared to mobile phones) were associated with VF independent of adherence measures. In this setting, we identified several key individual-level EWI associated with VF including novel psychosocial factors independent of adherence measures.

  12. Sustainability of professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ament, Stephanie M C; de Groot, Jeanny J A; Maessen, José M C; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals’ adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. Design Systematic review. Data sources Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Guidelines International Network (GIN) library. A snowball strategy, in which reference sections of other reviews and of included papers were searched, was used to identify additional papers. Eligibility criteria Studies needed to be focused on sustainability and on professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care. Studies had to include at least 2 measurements: 1 before (PRE) or immediately after implementation (EARLY POST) and 1 measurement longer than 1 year after active implementation (LATE POST). Results The search retrieved 4219 items, of which 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving 18 sustainability evaluations. The mean timeframe between the end of active implementation and the sustainability evaluation was 2.6 years (minimum 1.5–maximum 7.0). The studies were heterogeneous with respect to their methodology. Sustainability was considered to be successful if performance in terms of professionals’ adherence was fully maintained in the late postimplementation phase. Long-term sustainability of professionals’ adherence was reported in 7 out of 18 evaluations, adherence was not sustained in 6 evaluations, 4 evaluations showed mixed sustainability results and in 1 evaluation it was unclear whether the professional adherence was sustained. Conclusions (2) Professionals’ adherence to a clinical practice guideline in medical care decreased after more than 1 year after implementation in about half of the cases. (1) Owing to the limited number of studies, the absence of a uniform definition, the high risk of bias, and the mixed results of studies, no firm conclusion about the

  13. Patient adherence in COPD.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, J; Bartlett, S J

    2008-09-01

    Patient adherence to treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is essential to optimise disease management. As with other chronic diseases, poor adherence is common and results in increased rates of morbidity, healthcare expenditures, hospitalisations and possibly mortality, as well as unnecessary escalation of therapy and reduced quality of life. Examples include overuse, underuse, and alteration of schedule and doses of medication, continued smoking and lack of exercise. Adherence is affected by patients' perception of their disease, type of treatment or medication, the quality of patient provider communication and the social environment. Patients are more likely to adhere to treatment when they believe it will improve disease management or control, or anticipate serious consequences related to non-adherence. Providers play a critical role in helping patients understand the nature of the disease, potential benefits of treatment, addressing concerns regarding potential adverse effects and events, and encouraging patients to develop self-management skills. For clinicians, it is important to explore patients' beliefs and concerns about the safety and benefits of the treatment, as many patients harbour unspoken fears. Complex regimens and polytherapy also contribute to suboptimal adherence. This review addresses adherence related issues in COPD, assesses current efforts to improve adherence and highlights opportunities to improve adherence for both providers and patients.

  14. Sticking to it: the effect of maximally assisted therapy on antiretroviral treatment adherence among individuals living with HIV who are unstably housed.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Surita; Palmer, Alexis K; O'Brien, Nadia; Chan, Keith; Shen, Anya; Coulter, Suzy; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2011-11-01

    Housing is a known determinant of health behaviors, which includes adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Within the Longitudinal Investigations into Supportive and Ancillary Health Services (LISA) study, unstable housing is inversely associated with adherence. Several comprehensive adherence support services have emerged to improve adherence for unstably housed or otherwise vulnerable populations. The Maximally Assisted Therapy (MAT) program in Vancouver, British Columbia uses a multidisciplinary approach to support HIV-positive clients with a history of addictions or mental illness, many of whom also experience episodic homelessness. This study investigated the association between antiretroviral adherence and use of support services, including the MAT program, amongst people living with HIV and AIDS who are unstably housed in the LISA sample. Of the 212 unstably housed participants, those who attended the MAT program were 4.76 times more likely to be ≥95% adherent (95% CI 1.72-13.13; P = 0.003) than those who did not. The findings suggest that in the absence of sustainable housing solutions, programs such as MAT play an important role in supporting treatment adherence in this population.

  15. A peer adherence support intervention to improve the antiretroviral treatment outcomes of HIV patients in South Africa: the moderating role of family dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Edwin; Masquillier, Caroline; Ponnet, Koen; le Roux Booysen, Frederik

    2014-07-01

    Given the severe shortage of human resources in the healthcare sector in many countries with high HIV prevalence, community-based peer adherence support is being increasingly cited as an integral part of a sustainable antiretroviral treatment (ART) strategy. However, the available scientific evidence on this topic reports discrepant findings on the effectiveness of peer adherence support programmes. These conflicting findings to some extent can be attributed to the lack of attention to the social contexts in which peer adherence support programmes are implemented. This study explores the potential moderating role of family dynamics by assessing the differential impact of peer adherence support in different types of families, based on the theoretical underpinnings of the family functioning framework. These relationships were explored with the aid of multivariate statistical analysis of cross-sectional, post-trial data for a sample of 340 patients interviewed as part of the Effectiveness of Aids Treatment and Support in the Free State (FEATS) study conducted in the public-sector ART programme of the Free State Province of South Africa. The analysis reveals no significant overall differences in CD4 cell count between the intervention group accessing additional peer adherence support and the control group receiving standard care. When controlling for the potential moderating role of family dynamics, however, the outcomes clearly reveal a significant interaction effect between the adherence intervention and the level of family functioning with regard to treatment outcomes. Multi-group analysis demonstrates that peer adherence support has a positive effect on immunological restoration in well-functioning families, while having a negative effect in dysfunctional families. The study outcomes stress the need for peer adherence interventions that are sensitive to the suboptimal contexts in which they are often implemented. Generic, broad-based interventions do not

  16. Examining adherence to components of cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety after training and consultation.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Julie M; Brodman, Douglas M; Ringle, Vanesa A; Read, Kendra L; Kendall, Philip C; Beidas, Rinad S

    2017-02-01

    The present study examined 115 service providers' adherence to components of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth anxiety prior to training, post workshop training, and after three months of weekly consultation. Adherence was measured using a role-play with a trained actor. We examined differences in individual adherence to CBT components across time and the relationship between number of consultation sessions attended and adherence ratings following consultation. Findings indicated that somatic arousal identification and relaxation were the most used treatment components prior to training. Adherence to all components of CBT increased following workshop training, except the usage of problem-solving. Adherence to problem-solving, positive reinforcement, the identification of anxious self-talk, and the creation of coping thoughts increased following consultation but usage of problem-solving remained low compared to other treatment components. Overall adherence remained less than optimal at the final measurement point. Number of consultation sessions attended predicted post-consultation adherence to identification of somatic arousal, identification of anxious self-talk, and positive reinforcement. Implications include tailoring future training based on baseline levels of adherence and spending more time during training and consultation on underutilized CBT components, such as problem-solving. Limitations of the present study, including how adherence was measured, are discussed. This study adds to the implementation science literature by providing more nuanced information on changes in adherence over the course of training and consultation of service providers.

  17. Factors influencing adherence to cancer treatment in older adults with cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Puts, M T E; Tu, H A; Tourangeau, A; Howell, D; Fitch, M; Springall, E; Alibhai, S M H

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a disease that mostly affects older adults. Treatment adherence is crucial to obtain optimal outcomes such as cure or improvement in quality of life. Older adults have numerous comorbidites as well as cognitive and sensory impairments that may affect adherence. The aim of this systematic review was to examine factors that influence adherence to cancer treatment in older adults with cancer. Systematic review of the literature published between inception of the databases and February 2013. English, Dutch, French and German-language articles reporting cross-sectional or longitudinal, intervention or observational studies of cancer treatment adherence were included. Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Web of Science, ASSIA, Ageline, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), SocAbstracts and the Cochrane Library. Two reviewers reviewed abstracts and abstracted data using standardized forms. Study quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool 2011. Twenty-two manuscripts were identified reporting on 18 unique studies. The quality of most studies was good. Most studies focused on women with breast cancer and adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy. More than half of the studies used data from administrative or clinical databases or chart reviews. The adherence rate varied from 52% to 100%. Only one qualitative study asked older adults about reasons for non-adherence. Factors associated with non-adherence varied widely across studies. Non-adherence was common across studies but little is known about the factors influencing non-adherence. More research is needed to investigate why older adults choose to adhere or not adhere to their treatment regimens taking into account their multimorbidity.

  18. Non-adherence to prescribed home rehabilitation exercises for musculoskeletal injuries: the role of the patient-practitioner relationship.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bradley James; Galtieri, Nicholas Justin; Fell, Michelle

    2014-02-01

    To identify which factors best explain non-adherence to home rehabilitation exercises (HRE) for patients with musculoskeletal injuries. Cross-sectional study. Participants (n = 87) aged 17-91 years completed questionnaires measuring demographic and injury-related information, self-efficacy, personality, health locus of control, patient-practitioner relationship, optimism, health value and adherence to HRE. In addition, each participant's attending physiotherapist assessed the participant's adherence and effort during the appointment. A hierarchical regression with 3 steps (step 1: disposition; step 2: cognitive factors; step 3: patient-practitioner relationship) and adherence to HRE as the dependent variable was conducted. The factors in step 3 were the most significant and explained 16% (p < 0.001) of the variance in adherence to HRE. In addition, a high score for patient neuroticism was found to correlate with poor adherence to HRE. These preliminary results suggest that the patient-practitioner relationship is the best predictor of adherence to HRE, and that improving patient perception of the clinician's productivity, communication of information and trust during consultations may improve adherence to HRE.

  19. Optimization of USMC Hornet Inventory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    maintenance activities while adhering to the required number of aircraft for 22 operational use. He introduced an optimization based on an ILP... operational requirements across the entire planning process. In dealing with tail assignment as an optimization problem instead of a feasibility...aircraft and the goal is to minimize the penalties associated with failing to meet operational requirements. This research focuses on the optimal

  20. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    DOE PAGES

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  1. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  2. Experiences of alcohol consumption and taking antiretroviral medication among men living with HIV in Tshwane, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nkosi, Sebenzile; Rich, Eileen P; Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2016-12-01

    Hazardous alcohol consumption may compromise optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among patients. Adoption of hegemonic notions of masculinity may encourage health-risk behaviours, such as alcohol consumption, and discourage health-enhancing behaviours, such as ART adherence among men. This study aimed to explore linkages between masculinity, alcohol consumption, and taking ART medication among male ART recipients in South Africa. Male facilitators conducted five focus group discussions with 27 black male ART recipients aged between 28 and 65 years at five ART clinics. Eligibility criteria were: 18 years or older, at least three months on ART, and alcohol consumption in the past three months. Data were analysed inductively using thematic content analysis. The men demonstrated a masculinity that fostered commitment to taking ART. However, normative notions of masculinity in the men's social circles often compromised their timeous taking of medication. Fears of alcohol-ART interactions often led to intentional non-adherence to ART when drinking. Finally, healthcare provider-patient power dynamics seemed to prevent the men from discussing their challenges regarding alcohol use and ART adherence with their healthcare providers. Interventions that focus on addressing harmful hegemonic notions of masculinity among men are needed in community settings such as drinking establishments where men tend to socialise. Patient-centred approaches which enhance men's sense of involvement in their treatment are needed in healthcare settings.

  3. Application of Rasch analysis to the parent adherence report questionnaire in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toupin April, Karine; Higgins, Johanne; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie

    2016-07-28

    Adherence to treatment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is associated with better outcomes. Assessing patient adherence in JIA, as well as attitudes and beliefs about prescribed treatments, is important for the clinician in order to optimize patient management. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Parent (proxy-report) Adherence Report Questionnaires (PARQ), which assesses beliefs and behaviors related to adherence to treatments prescribed for JIA. A Rasch analysis was conducted on data collected with parents of children with JIA from two studies in which the PARQ was used as a measure of adherence. The PARQ showed preliminary evidence of multidimensionality with two factors, accounting for 38 % and 27 % of the variance respectively. The PARQ in its original version does not adhere to expectations of the Rasch model. A transformed version of the PARQ obtained by deletion of the general adherence scale and modification of visual analog scales into 5-point likert scales improved fit to the model and showed preliminary evidence of unidimensionality. The PARQ was transformed based on the results of the Rasch analysis. The transformed version of the PARQ shows preliminary evidence of unidimensionality and may allow computation of a total score, although further testing is needed to verify these findings.

  4. Implementation and Operational Research: A Time-Motion Analysis of HIV Transmission Prevention Counseling and Antiretroviral Adherence Messages in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Were, Martin C; Kessler, Jason; Shen, Changyu; Sidle, John; Macharia, Stephen; Lizcano, John; Siika, Abraham; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Kurth, Ann

    2015-08-01

    Shortages of health workers and large number of HIV-infected persons in Africa mean that time to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and other messages to patients is limited. Using time-motion methodology, we documented the intensity and nature of counseling delivered to patients. The study was conducted at a rural and an urban HIV clinic in western Kenya. We recorded all activities of 190 adult patients on ART during their return clinic visits to assess type, frequency, and duration of counseling messages. Mean visit length for patients at the rural clinic was 44.5 (SD = 27.9) minutes and at urban clinic was 78.2 (SD = 42.1) minutes. Median time spent receiving any counseling during a visit was 4.07 minutes [interquartile range (IQR), 1.57-7.33] at rural and 3.99 (IQR, 2.87-6.25) minutes at urban, representing 11% and 8% of total mean visit time, respectively. Median time patients received ART adherence counseling was 1.29 (IQR, 0.77-2.83) minutes at rural and 1.76 (IQR, 1.23-2.83) minutes at urban (P = 0.001 for difference). Patients received a median time of 0.18 (0-0.72) minutes at rural and 0.28 (IQR, 0-0.67) minutes at urban clinic of counseling regarding contraception and pregnancy. Most patients in the study did not receive any counseling regarding alcohol/substance use, emerging risks for ongoing HIV transmission. Although ART adherence was discussed with most patients, time was limited. Reproductive counseling was provided to only half of the patients, and "positive prevention" messaging was minimal. There are strategic opportunities to enhance counseling and information received by clients within HIV programs in resource-limited settings.

  5. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2011-01-01

    As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence. Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive). Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods. This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  6. Conditional economic incentives to improve HIV treatment adherence: literature review and theoretical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Galárraga, Omar; Genberg, Becky L.; Martin, Rosemarie A.; Laws, M. Barton; Wilson, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We present selected theoretical issues regarding conditional economic incentives (CEI) for HIV treatment adherence. High HIV treatment adherence is essential not only to improve individual health for persons living with HIV, but also to reduce transmission. The incentives literature spans several decades and various disciplines, thus we selectively point out useful concepts from economics, psychology and HIV clinical practice to elucidate the complex interaction between socio-economic issues, psychological perspectives and optimal treatment adherence. Appropriately-implemented CEI can help patients improve their adherence to HIV treatment in the short-term, while the incentives are in place. However, more research is needed to uncover mechanisms that can increase habit formation or maintenance effects in the longer-term. We suggest some potentially fruitful avenues for future research in this area, including the use of concepts from self-determination theory. This general framework may have implications for related research among disadvantaged communities with high rates of HIV/AIDS infection. PMID:23370833

  7. Feasibility of mHealth and Near Field Communication technology based medication adherence monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morak, Juergen; Schwarz, Mark; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Poor patients' adherence to intake of prescribed medication has been identified as a serious problem in the treatment of chronically ill patients. Technical solutions are needed to measure and - if necessary - to increase the patients' adherence. A telemonitoring solution was developed to record a patient's medication intake based on smart blisters and mobile phones with NFC functionality. The components allowed recording of drug type, timestamp, and dosage of pills taken. The system's usability and technical feasibility was evaluated in the course of an application study. Over a period of 13 months 59 patients suffering from diabetes were monitored. 1,760 blisters were handed out to these patients and 14,843 takeout events were recorded and transmitted via mobile phone. Results indicate the feasibility of this concept to monitor adherence. Although the system still needs to be optimized for routine use it shows the potential for targeting the problem of poor patient adherence by NFC enabled devices.

  8. Prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors among HIV/AIDS patients with pre-ART and on-ART attending dessie hospital ART clinic, Northeast Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Missaye, Assefa; Dagnew, Mulat; Alemu, Abebe; Alemu, Agersew

    2013-02-25

    like cryptosporidium spps were found in low CD4 counts in ART naive patients. This study identified some environmental and some clinical finding as determinant factor for IP infections. Therefore, public health measures and adherence to ART should be strengthened to improve the quality of life of these patients.

  9. Ethical considerations in adherence research.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nupur U; Moore, Blake A; Craver, Rebekah F; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to treatment is a common cause of medical treatment failure. Studying adherence is complicated by the potential for the study environment to impact adherence behavior. Studies performed without informing patients about adherence monitoring must balance the risks of deception against the potential benefits of the knowledge to be gained. Ethically monitoring a patient's adherence to a treatment plan without full disclosure of the monitoring plan requires protecting the patient's rights and upholding the fiduciary obligations of the investigator. Adherence monitoring can utilize different levels of deception varying from stealth monitoring, debriefing after the study while informing the subject that some information had been withheld in regard to the use of adherence monitoring (withholding), informed consent that discloses some form of adherence monitoring is being used and will be disclosed at the end of the study (authorized deception), and full disclosure. Different approaches offer different benefits and potential pitfalls. The approach used must balance the risk of nondisclosure against the potential for confounding the adherence monitoring data and the potential benefits that adherence monitoring data will have for the research subjects and/or other populations. This commentary aims to define various methods of adherence monitoring and to provide a discussion of the ethical considerations that accompany the use of each method and adherence monitoring in general as it is used in clinical research.

  10. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Stephen M M; Jensen, Emily L; Simon, Stacey L; Friedman, Norman R

    2016-06-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ(2) test. Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20-4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27-5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the pathophysiology of and to develop adherence

  11. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml. In unadjusted analyses, self-reported hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  12. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  13. Exercise Intervention: Attrition, Compliance, Adherence, and Progression Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tara; Erdmann, Ruby; Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2018-02-01

    Exercise is widely touted as an effective intervention to optimize health and well-being after high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. 
. This article reports attrition, compliance, adherence, and progression from the strength training arm of the single-blind randomized, controlled trial Strength Training to Enhance Early Recovery (STEER). 
. 37 patients were randomized to the intervention and participated in a structured strength training program introduced during hospitalization and continued for six weeks after release. Research staff and patients maintained exercise logs to document compliance, adherence, and progression. 
. No patients left the study because of burden. Patients were compliant with completion of exercise sessions, and their adherence was high; they also progressed on their exercise prescription. Because STEER balances intervention effectiveness with patient burden, the findings support the likelihood of successful translation into clinical practice.

  14. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  15. Utilization of Medical Treatments and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Positive Adults with Histories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract HIV is a chronic, life-threatening illness that necessitates regular and consistent medical care. Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a common experience among HIV-positive adults and may interfere with treatment utilization. This study examined rates and correlates of treatment utilization among HIV-positive adults with CSA enrolled in a coping intervention trial in New York City. The baseline assessment included measures of treatment utilization, mental health, substance abuse, and other psychosocial factors. In 2002–2004, participants (50% female, 69% African-American, M = 42.3 ± 6.8 years old) were recruited. Nearly all (99%) received HIV medical care. However, 20% had no outpatient visits and 24% sought emergency services in the past 4 months. Among 184 participants receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), 22% were less than 90% adherent in the past week. In a multivariable logistic regression model, no outpatient treatment was associated with African American race (AOR = 3.46 [1.42–8.40]), poor social support (AOR = 1.59 [1.03–2.45]), and abstinence from illicit drug use (AOR = 0.37 [0.16–0.85]). Emergency service utilization was associated with HIV symptoms (AOR = 2.30 [1.22–4.35]), binge drinking (AOR=2.92 (1.18–7.24)), and illicit drug use (AOR = 1.98 [1.02–3.85]). Poor medication adherence was associated with trauma symptoms (AOR = 2.64 [1.07–6.75]) and poor social support (AOR = 1.82 [1.09–2.97]). In sum, while participants had access to HIV medical care, a sizable minority did not adhere to recommended guidelines and thus may not be benefiting optimally from treatment. Interventions targeting HIV-positive adults with CSA histories may need to address trauma symptoms, substance abuse, and poor social support that interfere with medical treatment utilization and adherence. PMID:19260772

  16. Treatment Satisfaction and Adherence to Oral Chemotherapy in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jamie M; Pensak, Nicole A; Sporn, Nora J; MacDonald, James J; Lennes, Inga T; Safren, Steven A; Pirl, William F; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    Although patients with cancer overwhelming prefer oral to intravenous chemotherapy, little is known about adherence to oral agents. We aimed to identify the rates and correlates of adherence in patients with diverse malignancies. Ninety patients with chronic myeloid leukemia or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, or breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, single-group, observational study of medication-taking behaviors. Adherence was measured via self-report and with an electronic pill cap (Medication Event Monitoring System cap). Patients completed surveys regarding symptom distress, mood, quality of life, cancer-specific distress, and satisfaction with clinician communication and treatment at baseline and 12-week follow-up. As measured by the Medication Event Monitoring System, patients took, on average, 89.3% of their prescribed oral chemotherapy over the 12 weeks. One quarter of the sample was less than 90% adherent, and women were more adherent than men (mean difference, 9.59%; SE difference, 4.50%; 95% CI, -18.65 to -0.52; P = .039). Improvements in patient symptom distress (B = -0.79; 95% CI, -1.41 to -0.18), depressive symptoms (B = -1.57; 95% CI, -2.86 to -0.29), quality of life (B = 0.38; 95% CI ,0.07 to 0.68), satisfaction with clinician communication and treatment (B = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.98), and perceived burden to others (B = -1.28; 95% CI, -2.20 to -0.37) were associated with better adherence. In a multivariate model, improved treatment satisfaction (B = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.94) and reduced perceived burden (B = -0.92; 95% CI, -1.76 to -0.09) were the strongest indicators of better adherence. Women and patients who reported increased treatment satisfaction and reduced burden to others were more adherent to oral chemotherapy. Interventions that help patients improve communication with clinicians and reduce burden may optimize oral chemotherapy adherence.

  17. Adherence to oral cancer therapy in older adults: The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) taskforce recommendations.

    PubMed

    Mislang, Anna Rachelle; Wildes, Tanya M; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Baldini, Capucine; Holmes, Holly M; Nightingale, Ginah; Coolbrandt, Annemarie; Biganzoli, Laura

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing trend towards using oral systemic therapy in patients with cancer. Compared to parenteral therapy, oral cancer agents offer convenience, have similar efficacy, and are preferred by patients, consequently making its use appealing in older adults. However, adherence is required to ensure its efficacy and to avoid compromising treatment outcomes, especially when the treatment goal is curative, or in case of symptomatic/rapidly progressing disease, where dose-intensity is important. This opens a new challenge for clinicians, as optimizing patient adherence is challenging, particularly due to lack of consensus and scarcity of available clinical evidence. This manuscript aims to review the impact of age-related factors on adherence, summarize the evidence on adherence, recommend methods for selecting patients suitable for oral cancer agents, and advise monitoring interventions to promote adherence to treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (