Science.gov

Sample records for optimal control modification

  1. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  2. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  3. Bi-Objective Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Control for Systems with Input Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new model-reference adaptive control method based on a bi-objective optimal control formulation for systems with input uncertainty. A parallel predictor model is constructed to relate the predictor error to the estimation error of the control effectiveness matrix. In this work, we develop an optimal control modification adaptive control approach that seeks to minimize a bi-objective linear quadratic cost function of both the tracking error norm and predictor error norm simultaneously. The resulting adaptive laws for the parametric uncertainty and control effectiveness uncertainty are dependent on both the tracking error and predictor error, while the adaptive laws for the feedback gain and command feedforward gain are only dependent on the tracking error. The optimal control modification term provides robustness to the adaptive laws naturally from the optimal control framework. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive control approach.

  4. Optimal Control Modification for Robust Adaptation of Singularly Perturbed Systems with Slow Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham; Stepanyan, Vahram; Boskovic, Jovan

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. The model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in increase in the feedback gain and modification of the adaptive law.

  5. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  6. Asymptotic Linearity of Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law with Analytical Stability Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal control modification has been developed to improve robustness to model-reference adaptive control. For systems with linear matched uncertainty, optimal control modification adaptive law can be shown by a singular perturbation argument to possess an outer solution that exhibits a linear asymptotic property. Analytical expressions of phase and time delay margins for the outer solution can be obtained. Using the gradient projection operator, a free design parameter of the adaptive law can be selected to satisfy stability margins.

  7. Control Systems with Normalized and Covariance Adaptation by Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Burken, John J. (Inventor); Hanson, Curtis E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed is a novel adaptive control method and system called optimal control modification with normalization and covariance adjustment. The invention addresses specifically to current challenges with adaptive control in these areas: 1) persistent excitation, 2) complex nonlinear input-output mapping, 3) large inputs and persistent learning, and 4) the lack of stability analysis tools for certification. The invention has been subject to many simulations and flight testing. The results substantiate the effectiveness of the invention and demonstrate the technical feasibility for use in modern aircraft flight control systems.

  8. Verifiable Adaptive Control with Analytical Stability Margins by Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a verifiable model-reference adaptive control method based on an optimal control formulation for linear uncertain systems. A predictor model is formulated to enable a parameter estimation of the system parametric uncertainty. The adaptation is based on both the tracking error and predictor error. Using a singular perturbation argument, it can be shown that the closed-loop system tends to a linear time invariant model asymptotically under an assumption of fast adaptation. A stability margin analysis is given to estimate a lower bound of the time delay margin using a matrix measure method. Using this analytical method, the free design parameter n of the optimal control modification adaptive law can be determined to meet a specification of stability margin for verification purposes.

  9. Optimal control of insects through sterile insect release and habitat modification.

    PubMed

    Renee Fister, K; McCarthy, Maeve L; Oppenheimer, Seth F; Collins, Craig

    2013-08-01

    This paper develops an optimal control framework for an ordinary differential equation model to investigate the introduction of sterile mosquitoes to reduce the incidence of mosquito-borne diseases. Existence of a solution given an optimal strategy and the optimal control is determined in association with the negative effects of the disease on the population while minimizing the cost due to this control mechanism. Numerical simulations have shown the importance of effects of the bounds on the release of sterile mosquitoes and the bounds on the likelihood of egg maturation. The optimal strategy is to maximize the use of habitat modification or insecticide. A combination of techniques leads to a more rapid elimination of the wild mosquito population. PMID:23743207

  10. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  12. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  13. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  14. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOEpatents

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  15. Timing optimization control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.; Leung, C.; Schira, J.J.

    1983-03-01

    A closed loop timing optimization control for an internal combustion engine closed about the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft is disclosed herein. The optimization control computes from the instantaneous rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft, a signal indicative of the angle at which the crankshaft has a maximum rotational velocity for the torque impulses imparted to the engine's crankshaft by the burning of an air/fuel mixture in each of the engine's combustion chambers and generates a timing correction signal for each of the engine's combustion chambers. The timing correction signals, applied to the engine timing control, modifies the time at which the ignition signal, injection signals or both are generated such that the rotational velocity of the engine's crankshaft has a maximum value at a predetermined angle for each torque impulse generated optimizing the conversion of the combustion energy to rotational torque.

  16. Adaptive Control with Reference Model Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the conventional model reference adaptive control (MRAC) architecture in order to improve transient performance of the input and output signals of uncertain systems. A simple modification of the reference model is proposed by feeding back the tracking error signal. It is shown that the proposed approach guarantees tracking of the given reference command and the reference control signal (one that would be designed if the system were known) not only asymptotically but also in transient. Moreover, it prevents generation of high frequency oscillations, which are unavoidable in conventional MRAC systems for large adaptation rates. The provided design guideline makes it possible to track a reference commands of any magnitude from any initial position without re-tuning. The benefits of the method are demonstrated with a simulation example

  17. Nox2 Modification of LDL Is Essential for Optimal Apolipoprotein B-mediated Control of agr Type III Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Spang, Cynthia H.; Alexander, Susan M.; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Daly, Seth M.; Peterson, M. Michal; Sully, Erin K.; Femling, Jon K.; Otto, Michael; Horswill, Alexander R.; Timmins, Graham S.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains an autoinducing quorum-sensing system encoded within the agr operon that coordinates expression of virulence genes required for invasive infection. Allelic variation within agr has generated four agr specific groups, agr I–IV, each of which secretes a distinct autoinducing peptide pheromone (AIP1-4) that drives agr signaling. Because agr signaling mediates a phenotypic change in this pathogen from an adherent colonizing phenotype to one associated with considerable tissue injury and invasiveness, we postulated that a significant contribution to host defense against tissue damaging and invasive infections could be provided by innate immune mechanisms that antagonize agr signaling. We determined whether two host defense factors that inhibit AIP1-induced agrI signaling, Nox2 and apolipoprotein B (apoB), also contribute to innate control of AIP3-induced agrIII signaling. We hypothesized that apoB and Nox2 would function differently against AIP3, which differs from AIP1 in amino acid sequence and length. Here we show that unlike AIP1, AIP3 is resistant to direct oxidant inactivation by Nox2 characteristic ROS. Rather, the contribution of Nox2 to defense against agrIII signaling is through oxidation of LDL. ApoB in the context of oxLDL, and not LDL, provides optimal host defense against S. aureus agrIII infection by binding the secreted signaling peptide, AIP3, and preventing expression of the agr-driven virulence factors which mediate invasive infection. ApoB within the context of oxLDL also binds AIP 1-4 and oxLDL antagonizes agr signaling by all four agr alleles. Our results suggest that Nox2-mediated oxidation of LDL facilitates a conformational change in apoB to one sufficient for binding and sequestration of all four AIPs, demonstrating the interdependence of apoB and Nox2 in host defense against agr signaling. These data reveal a novel role for oxLDL in host defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing signaling. PMID:23459693

  18. Modification of species-based differential evolution for multimodal optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrus, Said Iskandar Al; Syahputra, Hermawan; Firdaus, Muliawan

    2015-12-01

    At this time optimization has an important role in various fields as well as between other operational research, industry, finance and management. Optimization problem is the problem of maximizing or minimizing a function of one variable or many variables, which include unimodal and multimodal functions. Differential Evolution (DE), is a random search technique using vectors as an alternative solution in the search for the optimum. To localize all local maximum and minimum on multimodal function, this function can be divided into several domain of fitness using niching method. Species-based niching method is one of method that build sub-populations or species in the domain functions. This paper describes the modification of species-based previously to reduce the computational complexity and run more efficiently. The results of the test functions show species-based modifications able to locate all the local optima in once run the program.

  19. COBRA-SFS modifications and cask model optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Spent-fuel storage systems are complex systems and developing a computational model for one can be a difficult task. The COBRA-SFS computer code provides many capabilities for modeling the details of these systems, but these capabilities can also allow users to specify a more complex model than necessary. This report provides important guidance to users that dramatically reduces the size of the model while maintaining the accuracy of the calculation. A series of model optimization studies was performed, based on the TN-24P spent-fuel storage cask, to determine the optimal model geometry. Expanded modeling capabilities of the code are also described. These include adding fluid shear stress terms and a detailed plenum model. The mathematical models for each code modification are described, along with the associated verification results. 22 refs., 107 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Yilmaz; Mark Christie; Anna Stefanopoulou

    2010-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a true Flex Fuel Vehicle capable of running on any blend of ethanol from 0 to 85% with reduced penalty in usable vehicle range. A research and development program, targeting 10% improvement in fuel economy using a direct injection (DI) turbocharged spark ignition engine was conducted. In this project a gasoline-optimized high-technology engine was considered and the hardware and configuration modifications were defined for the engine, fueling system, and air path. Combined with a novel engine control strategy, control software, and calibration this resulted in a highly efficient and clean FFV concept. It was also intended to develop robust detection schemes of the ethanol content in the fuel integrated with adaptive control algorithms for optimized turbocharged direct injection engine combustion. The approach relies heavily on software-based adaptation and optimization striving for minimal modifications to the gasoline-optimized engine hardware system. Our ultimate objective was to develop a compact control methodology that takes advantage of any ethanol-based fuel mixture and not compromise the engine performance under gasoline operation.

  1. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  2. Metacognitive Control and Optimal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Lisa K.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    The notion of optimality is often invoked informally in the literature on metacognitive control. We provide a precise formulation of the optimization problem and show that optimal time allocation strategies depend critically on certain characteristics of the learning environment, such as the extent of time pressure, and the nature of the uptake…

  3. Supercomputer optimizations for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Siu-Leung; Hanson, Floyd B.; Xu, Huihuang

    1991-01-01

    Supercomputer optimizations for a computational method of solving stochastic, multibody, dynamic programming problems are presented. The computational method is valid for a general class of optimal control problems that are nonlinear, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by general Markov noise in continuous time, i.e., nonsmooth Gaussian as well as jump Poisson random white noise. Optimization techniques for vector multiprocessors or vectorizing supercomputers include advanced data structures, loop restructuring, loop collapsing, blocking, and compiler directives. These advanced computing techniques and superconducting hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations, by permitting the solution of large multibody problems. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random aerospace fluctuations.

  4. Fuel consumption in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, Jim; Silverberg, Larry

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for comparing three optimal control strategies based on fuel consumption. A general cost function minimization procedure was developed by applying two theorems associated with convex sets. Three cost functions associated with control saturation, pseudofuel, and absolute fuel are introduced and minimized. The first two cost functions led to the bang-bang and continuous control strategies, and the minimization of absolute fuel led to an impulsive strategy. The three control strategies were implemented on two elementary systems and a comparison of fuel consumption was made. The impulse control strategy consumes significantly less fuel than the continuous and bang-bang control strategies. This comparison suggests a potential for fuel savings in higher-order systems using impulsive control strategies. However, since exact solutions to fuel-optimal control for large-order systems are difficult if not impossible to achieve, the alternative is to develop near-optimal control strategies.

  5. Optimality principles in sensorimotor control.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2004-09-01

    The sensorimotor system is a product of evolution, development, learning and adaptation-which work on different time scales to improve behavioral performance. Consequently, many theories of motor function are based on 'optimal performance': they quantify task goals as cost functions, and apply the sophisticated tools of optimal control theory to obtain detailed behavioral predictions. The resulting models, although not without limitations, have explained more empirical phenomena than any other class. Traditional emphasis has been on optimizing desired movement trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. Recent work has redefined optimality in terms of feedback control laws, and focused on the mechanisms that generate behavior online. This approach has allowed researchers to fit previously unrelated concepts and observations into what may become a unified theoretical framework for interpreting motor function. At the heart of the framework is the relationship between high-level goals, and the real-time sensorimotor control strategies most suitable for accomplishing those goals.

  6. Optimal control of motorsport differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremlett, A. J.; Massaro, M.; Purdy, D. J.; Velenis, E.; Assadian, F.; Moore, A. P.; Halley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modern motorsport limited slip differentials (LSD) have evolved to become highly adjustable, allowing the torque bias that they generate to be tuned in the corner entry, apex and corner exit phases of typical on-track manoeuvres. The task of finding the optimal torque bias profile under such varied vehicle conditions is complex. This paper presents a nonlinear optimal control method which is used to find the minimum time optimal torque bias profile through a lane change manoeuvre. The results are compared to traditional open and fully locked differential strategies, in addition to considering related vehicle stability and agility metrics. An investigation into how the optimal torque bias profile changes with reduced track-tyre friction is also included in the analysis. The optimal LSD profile was shown to give a performance gain over its locked differential counterpart in key areas of the manoeuvre where a quick direction change is required. The methodology proposed can be used to find both optimal passive LSD characteristics and as the basis of a semi-active LSD control algorithm.

  7. Optimal control of native predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; O'Connell, Allan F.; Kendall, William L.; Runge, Michael C.; Simons, Theodore R.; Waldstein, Arielle H.; Schulte, Shiloh A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Smith, Graham W.; Pinion, Timothy; Rikard, Michael; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply decision theory in a structured decision-making framework to evaluate how control of raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native predator, can promote the conservation of a declining population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Our management objective was to maintain Oystercatcher productivity above a level deemed necessary for population recovery while minimizing raccoon removal. We evaluated several scenarios including no raccoon removal, and applied an adaptive optimization algorithm to account for parameter uncertainty. We show how adaptive optimization can be used to account for uncertainties about how raccoon control may affect Oystercatcher productivity. Adaptive management can reduce this type of uncertainty and is particularly well suited for addressing controversial management issues such as native predator control. The case study also offers several insights that may be relevant to the optimal control of other native predators. First, we found that stage-specific removal policies (e.g., yearling versus adult raccoon removals) were most efficient if the reproductive values among stage classes were very different. Second, we found that the optimal control of raccoons would result in higher Oystercatcher productivity than the minimum levels recommended for this species. Third, we found that removing more raccoons initially minimized the total number of removals necessary to meet long term management objectives. Finally, if for logistical reasons managers cannot sustain a removal program by removing a minimum number of raccoons annually, managers may run the risk of creating an ecological trap for Oystercatchers.

  8. Optimization approaches to nonlinear model predictive control

    SciTech Connect

    Biegler, L.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rawlings, J.B. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    With the development of sophisticated methods for nonlinear programming and powerful computer hardware, it now becomes useful and efficient to formulate and solve nonlinear process control problems through on-line optimization methods. This paper explores and reviews control techniques based on repeated solution of nonlinear programming (NLP) problems. Here several advantages present themselves. These include minimization of readily quantifiable objectives, coordinated and accurate handling of process nonlinearities and interactions, and systematic ways of dealing with process constraints. We motivate this NLP-based approach with small nonlinear examples and present a basic algorithm for optimization-based process control. As can be seen this approach is a straightforward extension of popular model-predictive controllers (MPCs) that are used for linear systems. The statement of the basic algorithm raises a number of questions regarding stability and robustness of the method, efficiency of the control calculations, incorporation of feedback into the controller and reliable ways of handling process constraints. Each of these will be treated through analysis and/or modification of the basic algorithm. To highlight and support this discussion, several examples are presented and key results are examined and further developed. 74 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  10. Reentry trajectory optimization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, P.; Kiefer, A.; Burkhardt, D.; Horn, K.

    1990-06-01

    There are several possible methods to increase the cross range capability of a winged reentry vehicle, for instance, skip trajectories, a powered cruise phase, or high lift/drag ratio flight. However, most of these alternative descent strategies have not yet been investigated sufficiently with respect to aero-thermodynamic effects and the design of the thermal protection system. This problem is treated by two different means. First, a nominal reentry trajectory is generated based on a phase concept, and then the same problem is again solved using a numerical optimization code to determine the control functions. The nominal reentry trajectory design presented first subdivides the total reentry trajectory into several segments with partially constant control/state parameters such as maximum heat flux and deceleration. The optimal conditions for a given segment can then be selected. In contrast, the parameterized optimization code selects the control functions freely. Both approaches consider a mass point simulation which uses realistic model assumptions for atmosphere, earth and gravity. Likewise, both approaches satisfy all flight regime limitations and boundary conditions such as thermal constraints throughout the flight path and specified speed and altitude at the final time. For the optimization of high cross reentry trajectories the cross range per total absorbed heat represents an appropriate cost function. The optimization code delivers quite a different flight strategy than that usually generated by the nominal reentry design program, first flying longer along the temperature boundary at highest possible angle of attack (AOAs) (utilizing higher average turn rates), and afterwards performing flare-dive segments to reduce heat flux and to increase range. Finally, the aspect of guiding the nominal or optimized reentry trajectory during a cross range flight is considered. The vertical guidance is performed with both angles of attack and roll angle control. The

  11. Combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Milman, M.; Bruno, R.; Scheid, R.; Gibson, S.

    1989-01-01

    An approach for combined control-structure optimization keyed to enhancing early design trade-offs is outlined and illustrated by numerical examples. The approach employs a homotopic strategy and appears to be effective for generating families of designs that can be used in these early trade studies. Analytical results were obtained for classes of structure/control objectives with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) costs. For these, researchers demonstrated that global optima can be computed for small values of the homotopy parameter. Conditions for local optima along the homotopy path were also given. Details of two numerical examples employing the LQR control cost were given showing variations of the optimal design variables along the homotopy path. The results of the second example suggest that introducing a second homotopy parameter relating the two parts of the control index in the LQG/LQR formulation might serve to enlarge the family of Pareto optima, but its effect on modifying the optimal structural shapes may be analogous to the original parameter lambda.

  12. An optimal modification of a Kalman filter for time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Kalman filter in question, which was implemented in the time scale algorithm TA(NIST), produces time scales with poor short-term stability. A simple modification of the error covariance matrix allows the filter to produce time scales with good stability at all averaging times, as verified by simulations of clock ensembles.

  13. Servo Controlled Variable Pressure Modification to Space Shuttle Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Engineering drawings show modifications made to the constant pressure control of the model AP27V-7 hydraulic pump to an electrically controlled variable pressure setting compensator. A hanger position indicator was included for continuously monitoring hanger angle. A simplex servo driver was furnished for controlling the pressure setting servovalve. Calibration of the rotary variable displacement transducer is described as well as pump performance and response characteristics.

  14. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  15. Implementing Behavior Modification in a Weight Control Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Jr., George Stotelmyer; Girdano, Dorothy Dusek

    1980-01-01

    Behavior modification in a weight control program is examined in two models of operant and classical conditioning. Successful utilization of behavioral techniques is dependent on adherence to principles of learning, the skill and insight of the clinician, and the sensitivity to the individual needs of each client. (JN)

  16. Behavior Modification Project: Reducing and Controlling Calling Out Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah Anne

    The purpose of this study was to determine which behavior modification procedures were the most effective in reducing and controlling the inappropriate calling out behavior of a fifth-grade socially and emotionally disturbed student. Three phases of interventions were involved. As the study began, the resource room instructor was using a behavior…

  17. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  18. In-flight performance optimization for rotorcraft with redundant controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Gurbuz Taha

    establish a schedule. The method has been expanded to search a two-dimensional control space. Simulation results demonstrate the ability to maximize range by optimizing stabilator deflection and an airspeed set point. Another set of results minimize power required in high speed flight by optimizing collective pitch and stabilator deflection. Results show that the control laws effectively hold the flight condition while the FTO method is effective at improving performance. Optimizations show there can be issues when the control laws regulating altitude push the collective control towards it limits. So a modification was made to the control law to regulate airspeed and altitude using propeller pitch and angle of attack while the collective is held fixed or used as an optimization variable. A dynamic trim limit avoidance algorithm is applied to avoid control saturation in other axes during optimization maneuvers. Range and power optimization FTO simulations are compared with comprehensive sweeps of trim solutions and FTO optimization shown to be effective and reliable in reaching an optimal when optimizing up to two redundant controls. Use of redundant controls is shown to be beneficial for improving performance. The search method takes almost 25 minutes of simulated flight for optimization to be complete. The optimization maneuver itself can sometimes drive the power required to high values, so a power limit is imposed to restrict the search to avoid conditions where power is more than5% higher than that of the initial trim state. With this modification, the time the optimization maneuver takes to complete is reduced down to 21 minutes without any significant change in the optimal power value.

  19. Optimization of selenylation modification for garlic polysaccharide based on immune-enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jin; Qiu, Shulei; Li, Youying; Wang, Deyun; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Liu, Jie; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-01-20

    Garlic polysaccharide (GPS) was modified in selenylation respectively by nitric acid-sodium selenite (NA-SS), glacial acetic acid-selenous acid (GA-SA), glacial acetic acid-sodium selenite (GA-SS) and selenium oxychloride (SOC) methods each under nine modification conditions of L9(3(4)) orthogonal design and each to obtain nine selenizing GPSs (sGPSs). Their structures were identified, yields and selenium contents were determined, selenium yields were calculated, and the immune-enhancing activities of four sGPSs with higher selenium yields were compared taking unmodified GPS as control. The results showed that among four methods the selenylation efficiency of NA-SS method were the highest, the activity of sGPS5 was the strongest and significantly stronger than that of unmodified GPS. This indicates that selenylation modification can significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of GPS, NA-SS method is the best method and the optimal conditions are 0.8:1 weight ratio of sodium selenite to GPS, reaction temperature of 70 °C and reaction time of 10h.

  20. Optimization of selenylation modification for garlic polysaccharide based on immune-enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jin; Qiu, Shulei; Li, Youying; Wang, Deyun; Liu, Cui; Li, Xiuping; Hou, Ranran; Yue, Chanjuan; Liu, Jie; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-01-20

    Garlic polysaccharide (GPS) was modified in selenylation respectively by nitric acid-sodium selenite (NA-SS), glacial acetic acid-selenous acid (GA-SA), glacial acetic acid-sodium selenite (GA-SS) and selenium oxychloride (SOC) methods each under nine modification conditions of L9(3(4)) orthogonal design and each to obtain nine selenizing GPSs (sGPSs). Their structures were identified, yields and selenium contents were determined, selenium yields were calculated, and the immune-enhancing activities of four sGPSs with higher selenium yields were compared taking unmodified GPS as control. The results showed that among four methods the selenylation efficiency of NA-SS method were the highest, the activity of sGPS5 was the strongest and significantly stronger than that of unmodified GPS. This indicates that selenylation modification can significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of GPS, NA-SS method is the best method and the optimal conditions are 0.8:1 weight ratio of sodium selenite to GPS, reaction temperature of 70 °C and reaction time of 10h. PMID:26572388

  1. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  2. Fuzzy logic control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng

    2012-04-17

    A control system (300) for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input signal (369) and an output for outputting an output signal (367), and a hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) operably connected to the chemical loop. The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) includes a plurality of fuzzy controllers (330). The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) receives the output signal (367), optimizes the input signal (369) based on the received output signal (367), and outputs an optimized input signal (369) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  3. Spatial Control of Biochemical Modification Cascades and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Alam-Nazki, Aiman; Krishnan, J

    2015-06-16

    Information transmission in cells occurs through complex networks of proteins and genes and is relayed through cascades of biochemical modifications, which are typically studied through ordinary differential equations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that spatial factors can strongly influence chemical information transmission in cells. In this article, we systematically disentangle the effects of space in signaling cascades. This is done by examining the effects of localization/compartmentalization and diffusion of enzymes and substrates in multiple variants of chemical modification cascades. This includes situations where the modified form of species at one stage 1) acts as an enzyme for the next stage; 2) acts as a substrate for the next stage; and 3) is involved in phosphotransfer. Our analysis reveals the multiple effects of space in signal transduction cascades. Although in some cases space plays a modulatory effect (itself of interest), in other cases, spatial regulation and control can profoundly affect the nature of information processing as a result of the subtle interplay between the patterns of localization of species, diffusion, and the nature of the modification cascades. Our results provide a platform for disentangling the role of space and spatial control in multiple cellular contexts and a basis for engineering spatial control in signaling cascades through localization/compartmentalization.

  4. Optimal control, geometry, and quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Michael A.; Dowling, Mark R.; Gu, Mile; Doherty, Andrew C.

    2006-06-01

    We prove upper and lower bounds relating the quantum gate complexity of a unitary operation, U , to the optimal control cost associated to the synthesis of U . These bounds apply for any optimal control problem, and can be used to show that the quantum gate complexity is essentially equivalent to the optimal control cost for a wide range of problems, including time-optimal control and finding minimal distances on certain Riemannian, sub-Riemannian, and Finslerian manifolds. These results generalize the results of [Nielsen, Dowling, Gu, and Doherty, Science 311, 1133 (2006)], which showed that the gate complexity can be related to distances on a Riemannian manifold.

  5. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  6. Optimal singular control with applications to trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the problem of singular control is presented. Singular control enters an optimal trajectory when the so called switching function vanishes identically over a finite time interval. Using the concept of domain of maneuverability, the problem of optical switching is analyzed. Criteria for the optimal direction of switching are presented. The switching, or junction, between nonsingular and singular subarcs is examined in detail. Several theorems concerning the necessary, and also sufficient conditions for smooth junction are presented. The concepts of quasi-linear control and linearized control are introduced. They are designed for the purpose of obtaining approximate solution for the difficult Euler-Lagrange type of optimal control in the case where the control is nonlinear.

  7. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-12

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  8. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  9. Mixed-Strategy Chance Constrained Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Kuwata, Yoshiaki; Balaram, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel chance constrained optimal control (CCOC) algorithm that chooses a control action probabilistically. A CCOC problem is to find a control input that minimizes the expected cost while guaranteeing that the probability of violating a set of constraints is below a user-specified threshold. We show that a probabilistic control approach, which we refer to as a mixed control strategy, enables us to obtain a cost that is better than what deterministic control strategies can achieve when the CCOC problem is nonconvex. The resulting mixed-strategy CCOC problem turns out to be a convexification of the original nonconvex CCOC problem. Furthermore, we also show that a mixed control strategy only needs to "mix" up to two deterministic control actions in order to achieve optimality. Building upon an iterative dual optimization, the proposed algorithm quickly converges to the optimal mixed control strategy with a user-specified tolerance.

  10. Optimal management strategies in variable environments: Stochastic optimal control methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic optimization was used to investigate the optimal defoliation of salt desert shrubs in north-western Utah. Management was formulated in the context of optimal stochastic control theory, with objective functions composed of discounted or time-averaged biomass yields. Climatic variability and community patterns of salt desert shrublands make the application of stochastic optimal control both feasible and necessary. A primary production model was used to simulate shrub responses and harvest yields under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The simulation results then were used in an optimization model to determine optimal defoliation strategies. The latter model encodes an algorithm for finite state, finite action, infinite discrete time horizon Markov decision processes. Three questions were addressed: (i) What effect do changes in weather patterns have on optimal management strategies? (ii) What effect does the discounting of future returns have? (iii) How do the optimal strategies perform relative to certain fixed defoliation strategies? An analysis was performed for the three shrub species, winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). In general, the results indicate substantial differences among species in optimal control strategies, which are associated with differences in physiological and morphological characteristics. Optimal policies for big sagebrush varied less with variation in climate, reserve levels and discount rates than did either shadscale or winterfat. This was attributed primarily to the overwintering of photosynthetically active tissue and to metabolic activity early in the growing season. Optimal defoliation of shadscale and winterfat generally was more responsive to differences in plant vigor and climate, reflecting the sensitivity of these species to utilization and replenishment of carbohydrate reserves. Similarities could be seen in the influence of both

  11. Mathematical Modeling And Design Optimization Of Plunge Shaving Cutter For Gears With Tooth Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shinn-Liang; Liu, Jia-Hung

    2009-10-01

    Gears are the most important components in transmission systems. Modifications of gear teeth can accommodate errors and deformations encountered in the manufacture, assembly, and operation of gear pairs. For plunge shaving gears with tooth modifications, the design criteria of cutter clearance manufactured by protuberance hob cutter is investigated. With this novel design, the cutter has better strength and stiffness to keep the shaved gear profile stable. With the analytical descriptions of crowned gear and hence plunge shaving cutter have been constructed so that the grinding wheel can be optimized to minimized the topographic error. Efficiency is greatly improved by avoiding the traditional trial and error method.

  12. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  13. Lie algebroids and optimal control: abnormality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero-Liñán, M.; de Diego, D. Martín; Muñoz-Lecanda, M. C.

    2009-05-01

    Candidates to be solutions to optimal control problems, called extremals, are found using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle [9]. This Principle gives necessary conditions for optimality and, under suitable assumptions, starts a presymplectic constraint algorithm in the sense given in [3]. This procedure, first considered in optimal control theory in [6], can be adapted to characterize the different kinds of extremals [1]. In this paper, we describe the constraints given by the algorithm for the so-called abnormal extremals for optimal control problems defined on Lie algebroids [4, 7, 8]. The peculiarity of the abnormal extremals is their independence on the cost function to characterize them. In particular, we are interested in how useful the geometry provided by the Lie algebroid is to study the constraints obtained in the optimal control problems for affine connection control systems. These systems model the motion of different types of mechanical systems such as rigid bodies, nonholonomic systems and robotic arms [2].

  14. Optimal birth control of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chan, W L; Guo, B Z

    1989-11-01

    The authors studied optimal birth control policies for an age-structured population of McKendrick type which is a distributed parameter system involving 1st order partial differential equations with nonlocal bilinear boundary control. The functional analytic approach of Dubovitskii and Milyutin is adopted in the investigation. Maximum principles for problems with a free end condition and fixed final horizon are developed, and the time optimal control problems, the problem with target sets, and infinite planning horizon case are investigated.

  15. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  16. Role of controllability in optimizing quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Rebing; Hsieh, Michael A.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-06-15

    This paper reveals an important role that controllability plays in the complexity of optimizing quantum control dynamics. We show that the loss of controllability generally leads to multiple locally suboptimal controls when gate fidelity in a quantum control system is maximized, which does not happen if the system is controllable. Such local suboptimal controls may attract an optimization algorithm into a local trap when a global optimal solution is sought, even if the target gate can be perfectly realized. This conclusion results from an analysis of the critical topology of the corresponding quantum control landscape, which refers to the gate fidelity objective as a functional of the control fields. For uncontrollable systems, due to SU(2) and SU(3) dynamical symmetries, the control landscape corresponding to an implementable target gate is proven to possess multiple locally optimal critical points, and its ruggedness can be further increased if the target gate is not realizable. These results imply that the optimization of quantum dynamics can be seriously impeded when operating with local search algorithms under these conditions, and thus full controllability is demanded.

  17. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  18. Modification of the azimuth control system in the LLMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Yang, Lei; Chen, Linfei; Mao, Wei

    2000-10-01

    A new control system of the azimuth transmission mechanism used in the Lower Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC) is described in this paper. Because the original azimuth transmission mechanism causes too much vibration during the transposition of the horizontal axis of the instrument, we decided to modify the original system by two ways. One is to modify the lift mechanism and the azimuth transmission mechanism. The other is to replace the original stepper motors with a new type of stepper motor. According to the requirement of the new motor and its sine subdivided microstep driver, the original control system has been modified. The new system has an expansion output board and a new control program compared with the original one. The hardware architecture of the new system is described. The program in the single chip microcontroller is written in ASM, which is composed of 10 subroutines. The program in a host PC is written in C++. The methods using in controlling motors and skills in designing these programs are discussed. Two sketch flow charts of the control program are presented in the paper. Modification of the lift mechanism is also introduced. All this works make the vibration very slight.

  19. Direct Optimal Control of Duffing Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Ramsey, John K.

    2002-01-01

    The "direct control method" is a novel concept that is an attractive alternative and competitor to the differential-equation-based methods. The direct method is equally well applicable to nonlinear, linear, time-varying, and time-invariant systems. For all such systems, the method yields explicit closed-form control laws based on minimization of a quadratic control performance measure. We present an application of the direct method to the dynamics and optimal control of the Duffing system where the control performance measure is not restricted to a quadratic form and hence may include a quartic energy term. The results we present in this report also constitute further generalizations of our earlier work in "direct optimal control methodology." The approach is demonstrated for the optimal control of the Duffing equation with a softening nonlinear stiffness.

  20. Controlling DNA methylation: many roads to one modification.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Michael; Selker, Eric U

    2005-04-01

    Genetic, biochemical and cytological studies on DNA methylation in several eukaryotic organisms have resulted in leaps of understanding in the past three years. Discoveries of mechanistic links between DNA methylation and histone methylation, and between these processes and RNA interference (RNAi) machineries have reinvigorated the field. The details of the connections between DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA silencing remain to be elucidated, but it is already clear that no single pathway accounts for all DNA methylation found in eukaryotes. Rather, different taxa use one or more of several general mechanisms to control methylation. Despite recent progress, classic questions remain, including: What are the signals for DNA methylation? Are "de novo" and "maintenance" methylation truly separate processes? How is DNA methylation regulated?

  1. Post-Translational Modification Control of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Qian, Cheng; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-07-19

    A coordinated balance between the positive and negative regulation of pattern-recognition receptor (PRR)-initiated innate inflammatory responses is required to ensure the most favorable outcome for the host. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of innate sensors and downstream signaling molecules influence their activity and function by inducing their covalent linkage to new functional groups. PTMs including phosphorylation and polyubiquitination have been shown to potently regulate innate inflammatory responses through the activation, cellular translocation, and interaction of innate receptors, adaptors, and downstream signaling molecules in response to infectious and dangerous signals. Other PTMs such as methylation, acetylation, SUMOylation, and succinylation are increasingly implicated in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. In this review, we focus on the roles of PTMs in controlling PRR-triggered innate immunity and inflammatory responses. The emerging roles of PTMs in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of infectious and inflammatory immune diseases are also discussed.

  2. Neuro-optimal control of helicopter UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodland, David; Ghosh, Arpita; Zargarzadeh, H.; Jagannathan, S.

    2011-05-01

    Helicopter UAVs can be extensively used for military missions as well as in civil operations, ranging from multirole combat support and search and rescue, to border surveillance and forest fire monitoring. Helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems with correspondingly challenging controller designs. This paper presents an optimal controller design for the regulation and vertical tracking of an underactuated helicopter using an adaptive critic neural network framework. The online approximator-based controller learns the infinite-horizon continuous-time Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation and then calculates the corresponding optimal control input that minimizes the HJB equation forward-in-time. In the proposed technique, optimal regulation and vertical tracking is accomplished by a single neural network (NN) with a second NN necessary for the virtual controller. Both of the NNs are tuned online using novel weight update laws. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design in hovering applications.

  3. Automated beam steering using optimal control

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a steering algorithm which, with the aid of a model, allows the user to specify beam behavior throughout a beamline, rather than just at specified beam position monitor (BPM) locations. The model is used primarily to compute the values of the beam phase vectors from BPM measurements, and to define cost functions that describe the steering objectives. The steering problem is formulated as constrained optimization problem; however, by applying optimal control theory we can reduce it to an unconstrained optimization whose dimension is the number of control signals.

  4. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  5. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  6. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  7. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  8. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  9. Stochastic Optimal Control via Bellman's Principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Sun, Jian Q.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a method for finding optimal controls of nonlinear systems subject to random excitations. The method is capable to generate global control solutions when state and control constraints are present. The solution is global in the sense that controls for all initial conditions in a region of the state space are obtained. The approach is based on Bellman's Principle of optimality, the Gaussian closure and the Short-time Gaussian approximation. Examples include a system with a state-dependent diffusion term, a system in which the infinite hierarchy of moment equations cannot be analytically closed, and an impact system with a elastic boundary. The uncontrolled and controlled dynamics are studied by creating a Markov chain with a control dependent transition probability matrix via the Generalized Cell Mapping method. In this fashion, both the transient and stationary controlled responses are evaluated. The results show excellent control performances.

  10. The first variation and Pontryagin's maximum principle in optimal control for partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, M. I.

    2009-06-01

    A modification of the classical needle variation, namely, the so-called two-parameter variation of controls is proposed. The first variation of a functional is understood as a repeated limit. It is shown that the modified needle variation can be effectively used to derive necessary optimality conditions for a rather wide class of optimal control problems involving partial differential equations with weak solutions. Specifically, the two-parameter variation is used to obtain necessary optimality conditions in the form of a maximum principle for the optimal control of divergent hyperbolic equations.

  11. A reliable algorithm for optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, powerful design tools for linear time-invariant multivariable control systems have been developed based on direct parameter optimization. In this report, an algorithm for reliable optimal control synthesis using parameter optimization is presented. Specifically, a robust numerical algorithm is developed for the evaluation of the H(sup 2)-like cost functional and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The method is specifically designed to handle defective degenerate systems and is based on the well-known Pade series approximation of the matrix exponential. Numerical test problems in control synthesis for simple mechanical systems and for a flexible structure with densely packed modes illustrate positively the reliability of this method when compared to a method based on diagonalization. Several types of cost functions have been considered: a cost function for robust control consisting of a linear combination of quadratic objectives for deterministic and random disturbances, and one representing an upper bound on the quadratic objective for worst case initial conditions. Finally, a framework for multivariable control synthesis has been developed combining the concept of closed-loop transfer recovery with numerical parameter optimization. The procedure enables designers to synthesize not only observer-based controllers but also controllers of arbitrary order and structure. Numerical design solutions rely heavily on the robust algorithm due to the high order of the synthesis model and the presence of near-overlapping modes. The design approach is successfully applied to the design of a high-bandwidth control system for a rotorcraft.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The highly variable and intermittent pollutant concentrations and flowrates associated with wet-weather events in combined sewersheds necessitates the use of storage-treatment systems to control pollution.An optimized combined-sewer-overflow (CSO) control system requires a manage...

  13. Algorithm For Optimal Control Of Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Garba, John A..; Utku, Senol

    1989-01-01

    Cost of computation appears competitive with other methods. Problem to compute optimal control of forced response of structure with n degrees of freedom identified in terms of smaller number, r, of vibrational modes. Article begins with Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of mechanics and use of quadratic cost functional. Complexity reduced by alternative approach in which quadratic cost functional expressed in terms of control variables only. Leads to iterative solution of second-order time-integral matrix Volterra equation of second kind containing optimal control vector. Cost of algorithm, measured in terms of number of computations required, is of order of, or less than, cost of prior algoritms applied to similar problems.

  14. Centralized Stochastic Optimal Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV operation as a controlled Markov chain using the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion online. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion.

  15. Optimal performance of constrained control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, P. Scott, Jr.; Gavin, Henri P.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method to compute optimal open-loop trajectories for systems subject to state and control inequality constraints in which the cost function is quadratic and the state dynamics are linear. For the case in which inequality constraints are decentralized with respect to the controls, optimal Lagrange multipliers enforcing the inequality constraints may be found at any time through Pontryagin’s minimum principle. In so doing, the set of differential algebraic Euler-Lagrange equations is transformed into a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem for states and costates whose solution meets the necessary conditions for optimality. The optimal performance of inequality constrained control systems is calculable, allowing for comparison to previous, sub-optimal solutions. The method is applied to the control of damping forces in a vibration isolation system subjected to constraints imposed by the physical implementation of a particular controllable damper. An outcome of this study is the best performance achievable given a particular objective, isolation system, and semi-active damper constraints.

  16. Conjunctive Multibasin Management: An Optimal Control Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Jay E.; Howitt, Richard E.

    1982-08-01

    The economic effects of conjunctive management of ground and surface water supplies for irrigation are formulated as an optimal control model. An empirical hydroeconomic model is estimated for the Yolo County district in California. Two alternative solution methodologies (analytic Riccatti and mathematical programing) are applied and compared. Results show the economic potential for interbasin transfers and the impact of increased electricity prices on optimal groundwater management.

  17. Advanced rotorcraft control using parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters is presented. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for an optimal linear dynamic output feedback controller that minimizes a finite time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of a accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  18. Stochastic time-optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Elliot, D.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of stochastic time-optimal controls in a one-dimensional setting are considered. Multidimensional problems, in the case of complete state information available and the system modeled by stochastic differential equations, are studied under the formulation of minimizing the expected transient-response time. The necessary condition of optimality is the satisfaction for the value function of a parabolic partial differential equation with boundary conditions. The sufficient condition of optimality is also provided, based on Dynkin's formula. Finally, three examples are given.

  19. Road map to adaptive optimal control. [jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R.

    1980-01-01

    A building block control structure leading toward adaptive, optimal control for jet engines is developed. This approach simplifies the addition of new features and allows for easier checkout of the control by providing a baseline system for comparison. Also, it is possible to eliminate certain features that do not have payoff by being selective in the addition of new building blocks to be added to the baseline system. The minimum risk approach specifically addresses the need for active identification of the plant to be controlled in real time and real time optimization of the control for the identified plant.

  20. Low-cost modification of sediment control ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.S.; Jenkins, C.R.

    1982-12-01

    This study explores the use of low cost modifications to improve sediment pond performance. Modifications used include: 1) baffles, 2) siphon and 3) floating outlet. The baffles were constructed of brattice cloth suspended from floating pieces of pipe. The siphon outlets were made up of a small diameter siphon and a large diameter siphon drawing water from different levels and attached to the riser outlet. The floating outlet was designed to skim water from the pond surface. Data was collected on effluent water quality for a period of time before and after all modifications. Data collected prior to the modifications showed the ponds breaking effluent limitations frequently. Data collection, after the modifications, showed improved pond performance with the baffles helping the most.

  1. Multimodel methods for optimal control of aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guoquan; Collis, Samuel Scott

    2005-01-01

    A new multidomain/multiphysics computational framework for optimal control of aeroacoustic noise has been developed based on a near-field compressible Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a far-field linearized Euler solver both based on a discontinuous Galerkin formulation. In this approach, the coupling of near- and far-field domains is achieved by weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface that encloses all nonlinearities and noise sources. For optimal control, gradient information is obtained by the solution of an appropriate adjoint problem that involves the propagation of adjoint information from the far-field to the near-field. This computational framework has been successfully applied to study optimal boundary-control of blade-vortex interaction, which is a significant noise source for helicopters on approach to landing. In the model-problem presented here, the noise propagated toward the ground is reduced by 12dB.

  2. Optimal control of a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2014-11-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution toward a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of noncontrollable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a nonunitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to a large measurement contrast close to 99 % . We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 -ns pulses with 98.2 % contrast.

  3. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  4. Optimal control of the Starfire Beam Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Troy V.

    1992-12-01

    The Starfire Beam Director (SBD) is located at the Starfire Optical Range at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SBD capabilities include tracking celestial objects and active or passive tracking of artificial satellites to support the Phillips Laboratory Ground Based Laser Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing (GBL ATP) program. The pointing and tracking accuracy needed to support such experiments is micron rad to sub-grad level. To accomplish this goal requires precise pointing of the massive 6 ton 1-meter clear aperture coelostat. Optimal control design techniques are used to develop a controller to meet the stringent pointing requirements. A nominal linear state-space model was built which included gimbal dynamics, plant disturbances, and sensor noise. Then optimal control design techniques were used to develop unity feedback and two degree of freedom controllers. The various controllers were simulated with the coelostat truth model, which incorporated the higher frequency control loop and motor dynamics, nonlinearities, plant disturbances, sensor noise, and discrete control effects. The best of the designs, the H2 unity feedback controller, was compared and contrasted with the performance of the controller currently being used, which was obtained by classical control design. The H2 controller exceeded tracking requirements and in most areas performed better than the current controller.

  5. Finite set control transcription for optimal control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Stuart Andrew

    An enhanced method in optimization rooted in direct collocation is formulated to treat the finite set optimal control problem. This is motivated by applications in which a hybrid dynamical system is subject to ordinary differential continuity constraints, but control variables are contained within finite spaces. Resulting solutions display control discontinuities as variables switch between one feasible value to another. Solutions derived are characterized as optimal switching schedules between feasible control values. The methodology allows control switches to be determined over a continuous spectrum, overcoming many of the limitations associated with discretized solutions. Implementation details are presented and several applications demonstrate the method's utility and capability. Simple applications highlight the effectiveness of the methodology, while complicated dynamic systems showcase its relevance. A key example considers the challenges associated with libration point formations. Extensions are proposed for broader classes of hybrid systems.

  6. Optimal control of gypsy moth populations.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Andrew; Lenhart, Suzanne; White, K A J

    2008-02-01

    This study investigates an optimal strategy for the cost effective control of gypsy moth populations. Gypsy moth populations cycle between low sparse numbers to high outbreak levels and it is during the outbreak levels that the moths cause extensive damage to plant foliage which can lead to deforestation. Deforestation can result in significant economic damage to infested areas, and consequently, there have been many efforts to control moth populations. One effective method of control is the use of the biocontrol agent, Gypchek, but its production is costly. We develop a mathematical model which combines population dynamics and optimal control of the moth population to explore strategies by which the total cost of the gypsy moth problem (economic damage and cost of Gypchek) can be minimized.

  7. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1980-01-01

    Problem involves design of controls for linear time-invariant system disturbed by white noise. Solution is Kalman filter coupled through set of optimal regulator gains to produce desired control signal. Key to solution is solving matrix Riccati differential equation. LSOCE effectively solves problem for wide range of practical applications. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on IBM 360.

  8. Optimal control solutions to sodic soil reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2016-05-01

    We study the reclamation process of a sodic soil by irrigation with water amended with calcium cations. In order to explore the entire range of time-dependent strategies, this task is framed as an optimal control problem, where the amendment rate is the control and the total rehabilitation time is the quantity to be minimized. We use a minimalist model of vertically averaged soil salinity and sodicity, in which the main feedback controlling the dynamics is the nonlinear coupling of soil water and exchange complex, given by the Gapon equation. We show that the optimal solution is a bang-bang control strategy, where the amendment rate is discontinuously switched along the process from a maximum value to zero. The solution enables a reduction in remediation time of about 50%, compared with the continuous use of good-quality irrigation water. Because of its general structure, the bang-bang solution is also shown to work for the reclamation of other soil conditions, such as saline-sodic soils. The novelty in our modeling approach is the capability of searching the entire "strategy space" for optimal time-dependent protocols. The optimal solutions found for the minimalist model can be then fine-tuned by experiments and numerical simulations, applicable to realistic conditions that include spatial variability and heterogeneities.

  9. Mean-field sparse optimal control

    PubMed Central

    Fornasier, Massimo; Piccoli, Benedetto; Rossi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the rigorous limit process connecting finite dimensional sparse optimal control problems with ODE constraints, modelling parsimonious interventions on the dynamics of a moving population divided into leaders and followers, to an infinite dimensional optimal control problem with a constraint given by a system of ODE for the leaders coupled with a PDE of Vlasov-type, governing the dynamics of the probability distribution of the followers. In the classical mean-field theory, one studies the behaviour of a large number of small individuals freely interacting with each other, by simplifying the effect of all the other individuals on any given individual by a single averaged effect. In this paper, we address instead the situation where the leaders are actually influenced also by an external policy maker, and we propagate its effect for the number N of followers going to infinity. The technical derivation of the sparse mean-field optimal control is realized by the simultaneous development of the mean-field limit of the equations governing the followers dynamics together with the Γ-limit of the finite dimensional sparse optimal control problems. PMID:25288818

  10. Determination of optimal gains for constrained controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, C.M.; Mestha, L.K.

    1993-08-01

    In this report, we consider the determination of optimal gains, with respect to a certain performance index, for state feedback controllers where some elements in the gain matrix are constrained to be zero. Two iterative schemes for systematically finding the constrained gain matrix are presented. An example is included to demonstrate the procedures.

  11. Preconception optimization of glycaemic control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Najmul

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus is increasing worldwide. In developing countries 25% of adult females with diabetes are in the reproductive age. Thus in developing countries increased number of pregnancies are complicated by diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes in pregnancy is associated with increased risk for both mother and foetus. These risks can be minimized by good control of diabetes before and during pregnancy. Management in the preconception period is discussed in this review article. Detailed management involves general advice of lifestyle modification followed by specific details of screening for complications of diabetes. Changes in the drugs for both glycaemic control and other co-morbid conditions are discussed. The recommended insulin regimen in the preconception period and monitoring of glycaemic control by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and HbA1C has also been highlighted.

  12. Preconception optimization of glycaemic control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Najmul

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus is increasing worldwide. In developing countries 25% of adult females with diabetes are in the reproductive age. Thus in developing countries increased number of pregnancies are complicated by diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes in pregnancy is associated with increased risk for both mother and foetus. These risks can be minimized by good control of diabetes before and during pregnancy. Management in the preconception period is discussed in this review article. Detailed management involves general advice of lifestyle modification followed by specific details of screening for complications of diabetes. Changes in the drugs for both glycaemic control and other co-morbid conditions are discussed. The recommended insulin regimen in the preconception period and monitoring of glycaemic control by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and HbA1C has also been highlighted. PMID:27582143

  13. Optimal singular control for nonlinear semistabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Afflitto, Andrea; Haddad, Wassim M.

    2016-06-01

    The singular optimal control problem for asymptotic stabilisation has been extensively studied in the literature. In this paper, the optimal singular control problem is extended to address a weaker version of closed-loop stability, namely, semistability, which is of paramount importance for consensus control of network dynamical systems. Three approaches are presented to address the nonlinear semistable singular control problem. Namely, a singular perturbation method is presented to construct a state-feedback singular controller that guarantees closed-loop semistability for nonlinear systems. In this approach, we show that for a non-negative cost-to-go function the minimum cost of a nonlinear semistabilising singular controller is lower than the minimum cost of a singular controller that guarantees asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system. In the second approach, we solve the nonlinear semistable singular control problem by using the cost-to-go function to cancel the singularities in the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For this case, we show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Finally, we provide a framework based on the concepts of state-feedback linearisation and feedback equivalence to solve the singular control problem for semistabilisation of nonlinear dynamical systems. For this approach, we also show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Three numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed singular semistabilisation frameworks.

  14. Optimal and robust control of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, T. R.; Agarwal, R.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal and robust control theories are used to determine feedback control rules that effectively stabilize a linearly unstable flow in a plane channel. Wall transpiration (unsteady blowing/suction) with zero net mass flux is used as the control. Control algorithms are considered that depend both on full flowfield information and on estimates of that flowfield based on wall skin-friction measurements only. The development of these control algorithms accounts for modeling errors and measurement noise in a rigorous fashion; these disturbances are considered in both a structured (Gaussian) and unstructured ('worst case') sense. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of the eigenmodes of the resulting controlled systems, and the sensitivity of individual eigenmodes to both control and observation is quantified.

  15. Distributed optimization and flight control using collectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniawski, Stefan Richard

    The increasing complexity of aerospace systems demands new approaches for their design and control. Approaches are required to address the trend towards aerospace systems comprised of a large number of inherently distributed and highly nonlinear components with complex and sometimes competing interactions. This work introduces collectives to address these challenges. Although collectives have been used for distributed optimization problems in computer science, recent developments based upon Probability Collectives (PC) theory enhance their applicability to discrete, continuous, mixed, and constrained optimization problems. Further, they are naturally applied to distributed systems and those involving uncertainty, such as control in the presence of noise and disturbances. This work describes collectives theory and its implementation, including its connections to multi-agent systems, machine learning, statistics, and gradient-based optimization. To demonstrate the approach, two experiments were developed. These experiments built upon recent advances in actuator technology that resulted in small, simple flow control devices. Miniature-Trailing Edge Effectors (MiTE), consisting of a small, 1-5% chord, moveable surface mounted at the wing trailing edge, are used for the experiments. The high bandwidth, distributed placement, and good control authority make these ideal candidates for rigid and flexible mode control of flight vehicles. This is demonstrated in two experiments: flutter suppression of a flexible wing, and flight control of a remotely piloted aircraft. The first experiment successfully increased the flutter speed by over 25%. The second experiment included a novel distributed flight control system based upon the MiTEs that includes distributed sensing, logic, and actuation. Flight tests validated the control capability of the MiTEs and the associated flight control architecture. The collectives approach was used to design controllers for the distributed

  16. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  17. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  18. Coordination and Control of Multiple Spacecraft using Convex Optimization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Jonathan P.

    2002-06-01

    Formation flying of multiple spacecraft is an enabling technology for many future space science missions. These future missions will, for example, use the highly coordinated, distributed array of vehicles for earth mapping interferometers and synthetic aperture radar. This thesis presents coordination and control algorithms designed for a fleet of spacecraft. These algorithms are embedded in a hierarchical fleet archi- tecture that includes a high-level coordinator for the fleet maneuvers used to form, re-size, or re-target the formation configuration and low-level controllers to generate and implement the individual control inputs for each vehicle. The trajectory and control problems are posed as linear programming (LP) optimizations to solve for the minimum fuel maneuvers. The combined result of the high-level coordination and low-level controllers is a very flexible optimization framework that can be used off-line to analyze aspects of a mission design and in real-time as part of an on-board autonomous formation flying control system. This thesis also investigates several crit- ical issues associated with the implementation of this formation flying approach. In particular, modifications to the LP algorithms are presented to: include robustness to sensor noise, include actuator constraints, ensure that the optimization solutions are always feasible, and reduce the LP solution times. Furthermore, the dynamics for the control problem are analyzed in terms of two key issues: 1) what dynamics model should be used to specify the desired state to maintain a passive aperture; and 2) what dynamics model should be used in the LP to represent the motion about this state. Several linearized models of the relative dynamics are considered in this analysis, including Hill's equations for circular orbits, modified linear dynamics that partially account for the J2 effects, and Lawden's equations for eccentric orbits.

  19. Optimality principles in sensorimotor control (review)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    The sensorimotor system is a product of evolution, development, learning, adaptation – processes that work on different time scales to improve behavioral performance. Consequenly, many theories of motor function are based on the notion of optimal performance: they quantify the task goals, and apply the sophisticated tools of optimal control theory to obtain detailed behavioral predictions. The resulting models, although not without limitations, has explained a wider range of empirical phenomena than any other class of models. Traditional emphasis has been on optimizing average trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. Recent work has redefined optimality on the level of feedback control laws, and focused on the mechanisms that generate behavior online. This has made it possible to fit a number of previously unrelated concepts and observations into what may become a unified theoretical framework for interpreting motor function. At the heart of the framework is the relationship between high-level goals, and the realtime sensorimotor control strategies most suitable for accomplishing those goals. PMID:15332089

  20. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  1. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  2. Simultaneous structure and control optimization of tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper concerns optimization of prestress of a tensegrity structure to achieve the optimal mixed dynamic and control performance. A linearized dynamic model of the structure is derived. The force density variables that parameterize prestress of the structure appear linearly in the model. The feasible region of these parameters is defined in terms of the extreme directions of the prestress cone. Several properties of the problem are established inside the feasible region of the parameters. The problem is solved using a gradient method that provides a monotonic decrease of the objective function inside the feasible region. A numerical example of a cantilevered planar tensegrity beam is shown.

  3. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  4. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  5. Preliminary Field Evaluation of Mercury Control Using Combustion Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    V. Lissianski; P. Maly; T. Marquez

    2005-01-22

    In this project EER conducted a preliminary field evaluation of the integrated approach for mercury (Hg) and NO{sub x} control. The approach enhanced the 'naturally occurring' Hg capture by fly ash through combustion optimization, increasing carbon in ash content, and lowering ESP temperature. The evaluation took place in Green Station Units 1 and 2 located near Henderson, Kentucky and operated by Western Kentucky Energy. Units 1 and 2 are equipped with cold-side ESPs and wet scrubbers. Green Station Units 1 and 2 typically fire two types of fuel: a bituminous coal and a blend of bituminous coals based on availability. Testing of Hg emissions in Unit 2 without reburning system in operation and at minimum OFA demonstrated that efficiencies of Hg reduction downstream of the ESP were 30-40%. Testing also demonstrated that OFA system operation at 22% air resulted in 10% incremental increase in Hg removal efficiency at the ESP outlet. About 80% of Hg in flue gas at ESP outlet was present in the oxidized form. Testing of Hg emissions under reburning conditions showed that Hg emissions decreased with LOI increase and ESP temperature decrease. Testing demonstrated that maximum Hg reduction downstream of ESP was 40-45% at ESP temperatures higher than 300 F and 60-80% at ESP temperatures lower than 300 F. The program objective to demonstrate 80% Hg removal at the ESP outlet has been met.

  6. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  7. Optimal Control via Self-Generated Stochasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    The problem of global maxima of functionals has been examined. Mathematical roots of local maxima are the same as those for a much simpler problem of finding global maximum of a multi-dimensional function. The second problem is instability even if an optimal trajectory is found, there is no guarantee that it is stable. As a result, a fundamentally new approach is introduced to optimal control based upon two new ideas. The first idea is to represent the functional to be maximized as a limit of a probability density governed by the appropriately selected Liouville equation. Then, the corresponding ordinary differential equations (ODEs) become stochastic, and that sample of the solution that has the largest value will have the highest probability to appear in ODE simulation. The main advantages of the stochastic approach are that it is not sensitive to local maxima, the function to be maximized must be only integrable but not necessarily differentiable, and global equality and inequality constraints do not cause any significant obstacles. The second idea is to remove possible instability of the optimal solution by equipping the control system with a self-stabilizing device. The applications of the proposed methodology will optimize the performance of NASA spacecraft, as well as robot performance.

  8. Optimal motor control may mask sensory dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kiemel, Tim; Cowan, Noah J.; Jeka, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Properties of neural controllers for closed-loop sensorimotor behavior can be inferred with system identification. Under the standard paradigm, the closed-loop system is perturbed (input), measurements are taken (output), and the relationship between input and output reveals features of the system under study. Here we show that under common assumptions made about such systems (e.g. the system implements optimal control with a penalty on mechanical, but not sensory, states) important aspects of the neural controller (its zeros mask the modes of the sensors) remain hidden from standard system identification techniques. Only by perturbing or measuring the closed-loop system “between” the sensor and the control can these features be exposed with closed-loop system identification methods; while uncommon, there exist noninvasive techniques such as galvanic vestibular stimulation that perturb between sensor and controller in this way. PMID:19408009

  9. Intermittent locomotion as an optimal control strategy

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Birds, fish and other animals routinely use unsteady effects to save energy by alternating between phases of active propulsion and passive coasting. Here, we construct a minimal model for such behaviour that can be couched as an optimal control problem via an analogy to travelling with a rechargeable battery. An analytical solution of the optimal control problem proves that intermittent locomotion has lower energy requirements relative to steady-state strategies. Additional realistic hypotheses, such as the assumption that metabolic cost at a given power should be minimal (the fixed gear hypothesis), a nonlinear dependence of the energy storage rate on propulsion and/or a preferred average speed, allow us to generalize the model and demonstrate the flexibility of intermittent locomotion with implications for biological and artificial systems. PMID:24711718

  10. Optimization of EB plant by constraint control

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, H.K.; de Wit, G.B.C.; Maarleveld, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Optimum plant operation can often be achieved by means of constraint control instead of model- based on-line optimization. This is because optimum operation is seldom at the top of the hill but usually at the intersection of constraints. This article describes the development of a constraint control system for a plant producing ethylbenzene (EB) by the Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process. Plant optimization can be defined as the maximization of a profit function describing the economics of the plant. This function contains terms with product values, feedstock prices and operational costs. Maximization of the profit function can be obtained by varying relevant degrees of freedom in the plant, such as a column operating pressure or a reactor temperature. These degrees of freedom can be varied within the available operating margins of the plant.

  11. Cancer Behavior: An Optimal Control Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Pedro J.; Russo, Irma H.; Russo, J.

    2009-01-01

    With special attention to cancer, this essay explains how Optimal Control Theory, mainly used in Economics, can be applied to the analysis of biological behaviors, and illustrates the ability of this mathematical branch to describe biological phenomena and biological interrelationships. Two examples are provided to show the capability and versatility of this powerful mathematical approach in the study of biological questions. The first describes a process of organogenesis, and the second the development of tumors. PMID:22247736

  12. Computational alternatives to obtain time optimal jet engine control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two computational methods to determine an open loop time optimal control sequence for a simple single spool turbojet engine are described by a set of nonlinear differential equations. Both methods are modifications of widely accepted algorithms which can solve fixed time unconstrained optimal control problems with a free right end. Constrained problems to be considered have fixed right ends and free time. Dynamic programming is defined on a standard problem and it yields a successive approximation solution to the time optimal problem of interest. A feedback control law is obtained and it is then used to determine the corresponding open loop control sequence. The Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient method has been selected for adaptation to solve a nonlinear optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints.

  13. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  14. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  15. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations. PMID:27725688

  16. Optimization of parameters for semiempirical methods V: Modification of NDDO approximations and application to 70 elements

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Several modifications that have been made to the NDDO core-core interaction term and to the method of parameter optimization are described. These changes have resulted in a more complete parameter optimization, called PM6, which has, in turn, allowed 70 elements to be parameterized. The average unsigned error (AUE) between calculated and reference heats of formation for 4,492 species was 8.0 kcal mol−1. For the subset of 1,373 compounds involving only the elements H, C, N, O, F, P, S, Cl, and Br, the PM6 AUE was 4.4 kcal mol−1. The equivalent AUE for other methods were: RM1: 5.0, B3LYP 6–31G*: 5.2, PM5: 5.7, PM3: 6.3, HF 6–31G*: 7.4, and AM1: 10.0 kcal mol−1. Several long-standing faults in AM1 and PM3 have been corrected and significant improvements have been made in the prediction of geometries. Figure Calculated structure of the complex ion [Ta6Cl12]2+ (footnote): Reference value in parenthesis Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00894-007-0233-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17828561

  17. On necessary optimality conditions in discrete control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardanov, M. J.; Melikov, T. K.; Mahmudov, N. I.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with a nonlinear discrete-time optimal control problem with a cost functional of terminal type. Using a new variation of the control and new properties of optimal controls, we prove the linearised optimality conditions extending such classical optimality conditions. Along with this, various optimality conditions of quasi-singular controls are obtained. Finally, the examples illustrating the rich content of the obtained results are illustrated.

  18. Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

  19. Averaging and Linear Programming in Some Singularly Perturbed Problems of Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitsgory, Vladimir; Rossomakhine, Sergey

    2015-04-15

    The paper aims at the development of an apparatus for analysis and construction of near optimal solutions of singularly perturbed (SP) optimal controls problems (that is, problems of optimal control of SP systems) considered on the infinite time horizon. We mostly focus on problems with time discounting criteria but a possibility of the extension of results to periodic optimization problems is discussed as well. Our consideration is based on earlier results on averaging of SP control systems and on linear programming formulations of optimal control problems. The idea that we exploit is to first asymptotically approximate a given problem of optimal control of the SP system by a certain averaged optimal control problem, then reformulate this averaged problem as an infinite-dimensional linear programming (LP) problem, and then approximate the latter by semi-infinite LP problems. We show that the optimal solution of these semi-infinite LP problems and their duals (that can be found with the help of a modification of an available LP software) allow one to construct near optimal controls of the SP system. We demonstrate the construction with two numerical examples.

  20. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  1. Adaptive hybrid optimal quantum control for imprecisely characterized systems.

    PubMed

    Egger, D J; Wilhelm, F K

    2014-06-20

    Optimal quantum control theory carries a huge promise for quantum technology. Its experimental application, however, is often hindered by imprecise knowledge of the input variables, the quantum system's parameters. We show how to overcome this by adaptive hybrid optimal control, using a protocol named Ad-HOC. This protocol combines open- and closed-loop optimal control by first performing a gradient search towards a near-optimal control pulse and then an experimental fidelity estimation with a gradient-free method. For typical settings in solid-state quantum information processing, adaptive hybrid optimal control enhances gate fidelities by an order of magnitude, making optimal control theory applicable and useful. PMID:24996074

  2. Optimal control of HIV/AIDS dynamic: Education and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A mathematical model which describes the transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS is developed. The optimal control representing education and treatment for this model is explored. The existence of optimal Control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations suggest that education and treatment for the infected has a positive impact on HIV/AIDS control.

  3. 76 FR 75911 - Certain Video Game Systems and Controllers; Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Video Game Systems and Controllers; Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. Section 337 of the Tariff Act of...

  4. Achievement of Low Emissions by Engine Modification to Utilize Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Advanced Emission Controls on a Class 8 Truck

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, T. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Barton, G.; Rumminger, M.; Duggal, V.; Nelson, C.; Ray, M.; Cherrillo, R. A.

    2005-11-01

    A 2002 Cummins ISM engine was modified to be optimized for operation on gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and advanced emission control devices. The engine modifications included increased exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), decreased compression ratio, and reshaped piston and bowl configuration.

  5. Modification of a fuel-cell engine for control by a digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    A manually operated fuel-cell system was modified to be monitored and controlled by a digital computer. The purpose was to have a test item with which to study possible system-computer interface problems. The modification consisted of installing solenoid valves, circuitry, transducers, and limit switches on the system. These modifications permit computer control of load current, reactant purge, water removal, and electrolyte concentration and computer initiation of system shutdown.

  6. Optimal second order sliding mode control for nonlinear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a chattering free optimal second order sliding mode control (OSOSMC) method is proposed to stabilize nonlinear systems affected by uncertainties. The nonlinear optimal control strategy is based on the control Lyapunov function (CLF). For ensuring robustness of the optimal controller in the presence of parametric uncertainty and external disturbances, a sliding mode control scheme is realized by combining an integral and a terminal sliding surface. The resulting second order sliding mode can effectively reduce chattering in the control input. Simulation results confirm the supremacy of the proposed optimal second order sliding mode control over some existing sliding mode controllers in controlling nonlinear systems affected by uncertainty.

  7. Optimizing cosmic shear surveys to measure modifications to gravity on cosmic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Donnacha; Laszlo, Istvan; Bridle, Sarah; Bean, Rachel

    2013-03-01

    We consider how upcoming photometric large-scale structure surveys can be optimized to measure the properties of dark energy (DE) and possible cosmic-scale modifications to General Relativity in light of realistic astrophysical and instrumental systematic uncertainties. In particular, we include flexible descriptions of intrinsic alignments (IAs), galaxy bias and photometric redshift uncertainties in a Fisher Matrix analysis of shear, position and position-shear correlations, including complementary cosmological constraints from the cosmic microwave background. We study the impact of survey trade-offs in depth versus breadth, and redshift quality. We parametrize the results in terms of the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit, and deviations from General Relativity through an analogous modified gravity (MG) figure of merit. We find that IAs weaken the dependence of figure of merit on area and that, for a fixed observing time, halving the area of a Stage IV reduces the figure of merit by 20 per cent when IAs are not included and by only 10 per cent when IAs are included. While reducing photometric redshift scatter improves constraining power, the dependence is shallow. The variation in constraining power is stronger once IAs are included and is slightly more pronounced for MG constraints than for DE. The inclusion of IAs and galaxy position information reduces the required prior on photometric redshift accuracy by an order of magnitude for both the fiducial Stage III and IV surveys, equivalent to a factor of 100 reduction in the number of spectroscopic galaxies required to calibrate the photometric sample.

  8. Controlled nanopatterning & modifications of materials by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    Compound semiconductors (InP, InAs and GaSb) has been exposed to energetic 3kev Ar+ ions for a varying fluence range of 1013 ions/cm2 to 1018 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Morphological modifications of the irradiated surfaces have been investigated by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) in UHV conditions. It is observed that InP and GaSb have fluence dependent nanopattering e.g. nanoneedle, aligned nanodots, superimposed nanodots ripple like structures while InAs has little fluence dependent behaviour indicating materials dependent growth of features on irradiated surfaces. Moreover, surface roughness and wavelength of the features are also depending on the materials and fluences. The RMS surface roughness has been found to be increased rapidly in the early stage of irradiation followed by slower escalate rate and later tends to saturate indicating influence of the nonlinear processes.

  9. Addressing the human factors issues associated with control room modifications

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Stubler, W.; Kramer, J.

    1998-03-01

    Advanced human-system interface (HSI) technology is being integrated into existing nuclear plants as part of plant modifications and upgrades. The result of this trend is that hybrid HSIs are created, i.e., HSIs containing a mixture of conventional (analog) and advanced (digital) technology. The purpose of the present research is to define the potential effects of hybrid HSIs on personnel performance and plant safety and to develop human factors guidance for safety reviews of them where necessary. In support of this objective, human factors issues associated with hybrid HSIs were identified. The issues were evaluated for their potential significance to plant safety, i.e., their human performance concerns have the potential to compromise plant safety. The issues were then prioritized and a subset was selected for design review guidance development.

  10. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  11. Hypersonic Vehicle Trajectory Optimization and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, S. N.; Shen, J.; Grohs, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Two classes of neural networks have been developed for the study of hypersonic vehicle trajectory optimization and control. The first one is called an 'adaptive critic'. The uniqueness and main features of this approach are that: (1) they need no external training; (2) they allow variability of initial conditions; and (3) they can serve as feedback control. This is used to solve a 'free final time' two-point boundary value problem that maximizes the mass at the rocket burn-out while satisfying the pre-specified burn-out conditions in velocity, flightpath angle, and altitude. The second neural network is a recurrent network. An interesting feature of this network formulation is that when its inputs are the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices, the network outputs are the Kalman sequences (with a quadratic cost function); the same network is also used for identifying the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices. Consequently, we can use it to control a system whose parameters are uncertain. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the potential of these methods.

  12. Optimal and robust control of robot manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabbe, Michael Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The problem of controlling a robot manipulator typically requires determining the actuating torques at each joint, in the form of a feedback control law, which force the manipulator joint angles to follow a prescribed trajectory. This problem is often referred to as the trajectory tracking problem, and is difficult to solve due to the highly nonlinear dynamics associated with the robot manipulator and the time variance of the system induced by the prescribed trajectory. The complexity of the problem is compounded in cases where the manipulator end effector is constrained by contact with a surface, there are modeling or parametric uncertainties in the manipulator dynamics, or there are disturbances to the system. The trajectory tracking problem is addressed in two distinct cases. The first case involves the ideal situation in which the manipulator is unconstrained in its motion and there are no uncertainties or disturbances in the system. Optimal control theory is used to develop a class of feedback control laws which produce a globally uniformly asymptotically stable (GUAS) system. The second case involves both constrained motion and the possibilities of uncertainties and disturbances in the system. Two feedback control laws are developed which are robust with respect to uncertainties and disturbances, provide globally exponentially stable (GES) position tracking error, and provide a means of regulating the force applied.

  13. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  14. Graphite anode surface modification with controlled reduction of specific aryl diazonium salts for improved microbial fuel cells power output.

    PubMed

    Picot, Matthieu; Lapinsonnière, Laure; Rothballer, Michael; Barrière, Frédéric

    2011-10-15

    modification is easy to control and can be optimized and implemented for many carbon materials currently used in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems.

  15. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  16. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies).

  17. The neural optimal control hierarchy for motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, T.; Eliasmith, C.

    2011-10-01

    Our empirical, neuroscientific understanding of biological motor systems has been rapidly growing in recent years. However, this understanding has not been systematically mapped to a quantitative characterization of motor control based in control theory. Here, we attempt to bridge this gap by describing the neural optimal control hierarchy (NOCH), which can serve as a foundation for biologically plausible models of neural motor control. The NOCH has been constructed by taking recent control theoretic models of motor control, analyzing the required processes, generating neurally plausible equivalent calculations and mapping them on to the neural structures that have been empirically identified to form the anatomical basis of motor control. We demonstrate the utility of the NOCH by constructing a simple model based on the identified principles and testing it in two ways. First, we perturb specific anatomical elements of the model and compare the resulting motor behavior with clinical data in which the corresponding area of the brain has been damaged. We show that damaging the assigned functions of the basal ganglia and cerebellum can cause the movement deficiencies seen in patients with Huntington's disease and cerebellar lesions. Second, we demonstrate that single spiking neuron data from our model's motor cortical areas explain major features of single-cell responses recorded from the same primate areas. We suggest that together these results show how NOCH-based models can be used to unify a broad range of data relevant to biological motor control in a quantitative, control theoretic framework.

  18. Mechanically braked elliptical Wingate test: modification considerations, load optimization, and reliability.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Ozgur; Colakoglu, Muzaffer; Kuzucu, Erinc O; Yildiztepe, Engin

    2012-05-01

    The 30-second, all-out Wingate test evaluates anaerobic performance using an upper or lower body cycle ergometer (cycle Wingate test). A recent study showed that using a modified electromagnetically braked elliptical trainer for Wingate testing (EWT) leads to greater power outcomes because of larger muscle group recruitment. The main purpose of this study was to modify an elliptical trainer using an easily understandable mechanical brake system instead of an electromagnetically braked modification. Our secondary aim was to determine a proper test load for the EWT to reveal the most efficient anaerobic test outcomes such as peak power (PP), average power (AP), minimum power (MP), power drop (PD), and fatigue index ratio (FI%) and to evaluate the retest reliability of the selected test load. Delta lactate responses (ΔLa) were also analyzed to confirm all the anaerobic performance of the athletes. Thirty healthy and well-trained male university athletes were selected to participate in the study. By analysis of variance, an 18% body mass workload yielded significantly greater test outcomes (PP = 19.5 ± 2.4 W·kg, AP = 13.7 ± 1.7 W·kg, PD = 27.9 ± 5 W·s, FI% = 58.4 ± 3.3%, and ΔLa = 15.4 ± 1.7 mM) than the other (12-24% body mass) tested loads (p < 0.05). Test and retest results for relative PP, AP, MP, PD, FI%, and ΔLa were highly correlated (r = 0.97, 0.98, 0.94, 0.91, 0.81, and 0.95, respectively). In conclusion, it was found that the mechanically braked modification of an elliptical trainer successfully estimated anaerobic power and capacity. A workload of 18% body mass was optimal for measuring maximal and reliable anaerobic power outcomes. Anaerobic testing using an EWT may be more useful to athletes and coaches than traditional cycle ergometers because a greater proportion of muscle groups are worked during exercise on an elliptical trainer.

  19. How Well Can We Control Dyslipidemias Through Lifestyle Modifications?

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Gabriele; Vaccaro, Olga; Costabile, Giuseppina; Rivellese, Angela A

    2016-07-01

    The role for lifestyle modifications to correct dyslipidemia(s) is reviewed. Dietary composition is crucial. Replacing saturated fat with MUFA or n-6 PUFA lowers plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol and ameliorates the LDL/HDL ratio. Replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates has diverging effects due to the heterogeneity of carbohydrate foods. Diets rich in refined carbohydrates increase fasting and postprandial triglycerides, whereas the consumption of fiber-rich, low GI foods lowers LDL cholesterol with no detrimental effects on triglycerides. The role of polyphenols is debated: available evidence suggests a lowering effect of polyphenol-rich foods on postprandial triglycerides. As for functional foods, health claims on a cholesterol lowering effect of psyllium, beta-glucans and phytosterols are accepted by regulatory agencies. The importance of alcohol intake, weight reduction, and physical activity is discussed. In conclusion, there is evidence that lifestyle affects plasma lipid. A multifactorial approach including multiple changes with additive effects is the best option. This may also ensure feasibility and durability. The traditional Mediterranean way of life can represent a useful model.

  20. Modification of wave-cut and faulting-controlled landforms.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, T.C.; Bucknam, R.C.; Lajoie, K.R.; Wallace, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    From a casual observation that the form of degraded fault scarps resembles the error function, this investigation proceeds through an elementary diffusion equation representation of landform evolution to the application of the resulting equations to the modern topography of scarplike landforms. The value of K = 1 GKG (K = 'mass diffusivity'; 1 GKG = 1m2/ka) may be generally applicable as a good first approximation, to the modification of alluvial terranes within the semiarid regions of the western United States. The Lake Bonneville shoreline K is the basis for dating four sets of fault scarps in west-central Utah. The Drum Mountains fault scarps date at 3.6 to 5.7 ka BP. Fault scarps along the eastern base of the Fish Springs Range are very young, 3 ka BP. We estimate the age of fault scarps along the western flank of the Oquirrh Mountains to be 32 ka B.P. Fault scarps along the NE margin of the Sheeprock Mountains are even older, 53 ka BP. -from Authors

  1. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  2. A modified method of vibration surveillance by using the optimal control at energy performance index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliński, Krzysztof J.; Galewski, Marek A.

    2015-06-01

    A method of vibration surveillance by using the optimal control at energy performance index has been creatively modified. The suggested original modification depends on consideration of direct relationship between the measured acceleration signal and the optimal control command. The paper presents the results of experiments and Hardware-in-the-loop simulations of a new active vibration reduction algorithm based on the energy performance index idea modified in such a way, that it directly utilises the acceleration feedback signal. Promising prospects towards real application of the modified method in case of the high speed milling are predicted as well.

  3. Software Architecture for Simultaneous Process Control and Software Development/Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Hileman, Michael S; McMillan, David E; Holmes Jr, William; Blankenship, Mark; Wilder, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A software architecture is described that allows modification of some application code sections while the remainder of the application continues executing. This architecture facilitates long term testing and process control because the overall process need not be stopped and restarted to allow modifications or additions to the software. A working implementation using National Instruments LabVIEW{trademark} sub-panel and shared variable features is described as an example. This architecture provides several benefits in both the program development and execution environments. The software is easier to maintain and it is not necessary to recompile the entire program after a modification.

  4. MTO1 mediates tissue specificity of OXPHOS defects via tRNA modification and translation optimization, which can be bypassed by dietary intervention.

    PubMed

    Tischner, Christin; Hofer, Annette; Wulff, Veronika; Stepek, Joanna; Dumitru, Iulia; Becker, Lore; Haack, Tobias; Kremer, Laura; Datta, Alexandre N; Sperl, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia; De Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Klopstock, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Wenz, Tina

    2015-04-15

    Mitochondrial diseases often exhibit tissue-specific pathologies, but this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here we present regulation of mitochondrial translation by the Mitochondrial Translation Optimization Factor 1, MTO1, as a novel player in this scenario. We demonstrate that MTO1 mediates tRNA modification and controls mitochondrial translation rate in a highly tissue-specific manner associated with tissue-specific OXPHOS defects. Activation of mitochondrial proteases, aberrant translation products, as well as defects in OXPHOS complex assembly observed in MTO1 deficient mice further imply that MTO1 impacts translation fidelity. In our mouse model, MTO1-related OXPHOS deficiency can be bypassed by feeding a ketogenic diet. This therapeutic intervention is independent of the MTO1-mediated tRNA modification and involves balancing of mitochondrial and cellular secondary stress responses. Our results thereby establish mammalian MTO1 as a novel factor in the tissue-specific regulation of OXPHOS and fine tuning of mitochondrial translation accuracy.

  5. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  6. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ova, Maria

    2009-09-09

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  7. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, Daniela; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2015-10-15

    We consider a non-quadratic optimal control problem associated to a nonlinear elliptic variational inequality, where the obstacle is the control itself. We show that, fixed a desired profile, there exists an optimal solution which is not far from it. Detailed characterizations of the optimal solution are given, also in terms of approximating problems.

  8. Skinner Rusk unified formalism for optimal control systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero-Liñán, María; Echeverría-Enríquez, Arturo; Martín de Diego, David; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2007-10-01

    A geometric approach to time-dependent optimal control problems is proposed. This formulation is based on the Skinner and Rusk formalism for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems. The corresponding unified formalism developed for optimal control systems allows us to formulate geometrically the necessary conditions given by a weak form of Pontryagin's maximum principle, provided that the differentiability with respect to controls is assumed and the space of controls is open. Furthermore, our method is also valid for implicit optimal control systems and, in particular, for the so-called descriptor systems (optimal control problems including both differential and algebraic equations).

  9. Optimal singular control with applications to trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.

    1979-01-01

    The switching conditions are expressed explicitly in terms of the derivatives of the Hamiltonians at the two ends of the switching. A new expression of the Kelley-Contensou necessary condition for the optimality of a singular arc is given. Some examples illustrating the application of the theory are presented.

  10. Optimal control of an asymptotic model of flow separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Ubaid; Schmid, Peter; LFC-UK Team

    2015-11-01

    In the presence of surface imperfections, the boundary layer developing over an aircraft wing can separate and reattach, leading to a small separation bubble. We are interested in developing a low-order model that can be used to control the onset of separation at high Reynolds numbers typical of aircraft flight. In contrast to previous studies, we use a high Reynolds number asymptotic description of the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the motion of motion of the fluid. We obtain a steady solution to the nonlinear triple-deck equations for the separated flow over a small bump at high Reynolds numbers. We derive for the first time the adjoint of the nonlinear triple-deck equations and use it to study optimal control of the separated flow. We calculate the sensitivity of the properties of the separation bubble to local base flow modifications and steady forcing. We assess the validity of using this simplified asymptotic model by comparing our results with those obtained using the full Navier-Stokes equations.

  11. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications. PMID:26274112

  12. 33 CFR 203.47 - Modifications to non-Federal flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flood control works. 203.47 Section 203.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.47 Modifications to non-Federal flood...

  13. 33 CFR 203.47 - Modifications to non-Federal flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flood control works. 203.47 Section 203.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.47 Modifications to non-Federal flood...

  14. 33 CFR 203.47 - Modifications to non-Federal flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flood control works. 203.47 Section 203.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.47 Modifications to non-Federal flood...

  15. 33 CFR 203.47 - Modifications to non-Federal flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flood control works. 203.47 Section 203.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.47 Modifications to non-Federal flood...

  16. 33 CFR 203.47 - Modifications to non-Federal flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flood control works. 203.47 Section 203.47 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.47 Modifications to non-Federal flood...

  17. Analyzing Genome-Wide Association Studies with an FDR Controlling Modification of the Bayesian Information Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Dolejsi, Erich; Bodenstorfer, Bernhard; Frommlet, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing method of analyzing GWAS data is still to test each marker individually, although from a statistical point of view it is quite obvious that in case of complex traits such single marker tests are not ideal. Recently several model selection approaches for GWAS have been suggested, most of them based on LASSO-type procedures. Here we will discuss an alternative model selection approach which is based on a modification of the Bayesian Information Criterion (mBIC2) which was previously shown to have certain asymptotic optimality properties in terms of minimizing the misclassification error. Heuristic search strategies are introduced which attempt to find the model which minimizes mBIC2, and which are efficient enough to allow the analysis of GWAS data. Our approach is implemented in a software package called MOSGWA. Its performance in case control GWAS is compared with the two algorithms HLASSO and d-GWASelect, as well as with single marker tests, where we performed a simulation study based on real SNP data from the POPRES sample. Our results show that MOSGWA performs slightly better than HLASSO, where specifically for more complex models MOSGWA is more powerful with only a slight increase in Type I error. On the other hand according to our simulations GWASelect does not at all control the type I error when used to automatically determine the number of important SNPs. We also reanalyze the GWAS data from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium and compare the findings of the different procedures, where MOSGWA detects for complex diseases a number of interesting SNPs which are not found by other methods. PMID:25061809

  18. Age-related modifications in neural cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A U

    1992-09-01

    Integrated cardiovascular responses to a range of different stimuli, as well as the overall, spontaneously occurring variability in blood pressure and heart rate, undergo complex changes with aging. A general trend is that homeostatic control mechanisms lose part of their ability to modulate heart rate and to buffer the concomitant blood pressure variations; the two phenomena are possibly linked by a cause-effect relationship. A detailed analysis of the age-related changes in the major reflex systems reveals a clear-cut impairment in arterial baroreceptor control of the heart rate, but much less pronounced changes in its control of blood pressure, on the other hand, both the hemodynamic and humoral components of the cardiopulmonary reflex appear to be markedly attenuated. The experimental evidence of the mechanisms underlying these changes is still largely incomplete, and it appears that the gaps will have to be filled by a systematic, detailed analysis, i.e., that no generalizations or extrapolations will be possible. Indeed, the data available so far indicate that the age-related alterations are highly non-uniform, some functions undergoing a definite impairment but others being much better preserved and some being even enhanced; thus aging is by no means associated with a generalized decline in cardiovascular functions and should instead be viewed as a complex, highly selective process. These peculiar biological features of the aging phenomena merit further investigation in both the cardiovascular and the other organ systems, in order to verify the possibility that currently unrecognized homeostatic potentials in the elderly subject may be exploited to advance his/her clinical management in health and disease.

  19. Network Upgrade for the SLC: Control System Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, M.; Mackenzie, R.; Sass, R.; Himel, T.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Current communications between the SLAC Linear Collider control system central host and the SLCmicros is built upon the SLAC developed SLCNET communication hardware and protocols. We will describe how the Internet Suite of protocols (TCP/IP) are used to replace the SLCNET protocol interface. The major communication pathways and their individual requirements are described. A proxy server is used to reduce the number of total system TCP/IP connections. The SLCmicros were upgraded to use Ethernet and TCP/IP as well as SLCNET. Design choices and implementation experiences are addressed.

  20. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  1. Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols - GOAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assémat, Elie; Machnes, Shai; Tannor, David; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank

    Quantum optimal control becomes a necessary step in a number of studies in the quantum realm. Recent experimental advances showed that superconducting qubits can be controlled with an impressive accuracy. However, most of the standard optimal control algorithms are not designed to manage such high accuracy. To tackle this issue, a novel quantum optimal control algorithm have been introduced: the Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols (GOAT). It avoids the piecewise constant approximation of the control pulse used by standard algorithms. This allows an efficient implementation of very high accuracy optimization. It also includes a novel method to compute the gradient that provides many advantages, e.g. the absence of backpropagation or the natural route to optimize the robustness of the control pulses. This talk will present the GOAT algorithm and a few applications to transmons systems.

  2. Controlled modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with Zno nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuying; Xia Baiying; Zhu Xingfu; Chen Jiesheng; Qiu Shilun; Li Jixue

    2008-04-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been successfully modified with ZnO nanostructures by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds. Flower-like ZnO on the tips of MWNTs and ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs have been obtained, respectively, via adjusting the reaction time. The modified MWNTs have been characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures. Photoluminescence properties of the as-synthesized products have also been investigated. - Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)/flower-like ZnO heterojunctions and MWNT/ZnO nanoparticle composites were prepared by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds via adjusting the reaction time. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures.

  3. Decentralized optimal control of dynamical systems under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasov, R.; Dmitruk, N. M.; Kirillova, F. M.

    2011-07-01

    The problem of optimal control of a group of interconnected dynamical objects under uncertainty is considered. The cases are examined in which the centralized control of the group of objects is impossible due to delay in the channel for information exchange between the group members. Optimal self-control algorithms in real time for each dynamical object are proposed. Various types of a priori and current information about the behavior of the group members and about uncertainties in the system are examined. The proposed methods supplement the earlier developed optimal control methods for an individual dynamical system and the methods of decentralized optimal control of deterministic objects. The results are illustrated with examples.

  4. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Stochastic Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Maroulas, Vasileios; Xiong, Professor Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of subsystems that interact with each other and the environment. We treat the stochastic control problem as a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution is an optimal control policy that minimizes the average cost criterion for the entire system. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value in deriving online an optimal control policy in complex systems.

  5. Control of thin film processing behavior through precursor structural modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Voigt, J.A.; Boyle, T.J.; Christenson, T.A.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    In the sol-gel processing of ceramic thin films it has been frequently noted that the processing behavior, microstructure and properties of the films are dependent on the nature of the coating solution. In an attempt to understand such thin film processing-property relationships, the authors have systematically investigated the effects of varying the precursor nature on thin film densification and crystallization for ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} films. Metal alkoxide starting compounds, e.g., zirconium n-butoxide{center_dot}n-butanol and titanium i-propoxide, were reacted with acetic acid and 2,4-pentanedione to prepare coating solutions for thin film deposition. The use of these chelating ligands resulted in solution oligomeric species of different nature. Studies of thin film processing indicated that film processing characteristics, i.e., consolidation, densification and crystallization, were strongly dependent on solution precursor nature. Ligand steric size, pyrolysis behavior, extent of chelation, and precursor reactivity were found to be key variables in controlling film processing characteristics.

  6. Optimality Conditions for Semilinear Hyperbolic Equations with Controls in Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bo; Lou Hongwei

    2012-06-15

    An optimal control problem for semilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations is considered. The control variable appears in coefficients. Necessary conditions for optimal controls are established by method of two-scale convergence and homogenized spike variation. Results for problems with state constraints are also stated.

  7. Optimal stochastic control in natural resource management: Framework and examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1982-01-01

    A framework is presented for the application of optimal control methods to natural resource problems. An expression of the optimal control problem appropriate for renewable natural resources is given and its application to Markovian systems is presented in some detail. Three general approaches are outlined for determining optimal control of infinite time horizon systems and three examples from the natural resource literature are used for illustration.

  8. Existence, stability and optimality for optimal control problems governed by maximal monotone operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño-Arias, Luis M.; Hoang, Nguyen Dinh; Peypouquet, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We study optimal control problems governed by maximal monotone differential inclusions with mixed control-state constraints in infinite dimensional spaces. We obtain some existence results for this kind of dynamics and construct the discrete approximations that allows us to strongly approximate optimal solutions of the continuous-type optimal control problems by their discrete counterparts. Our approach allows us to apply our results for a wide class of mappings that are applicable in mechanics and material sciences.

  9. Optimal Control for a Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-yun; Guan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is put forward in a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator (PHHE). A power-train mathematical model of PHHE is illustrated along with the analysis of components' parameters. Then, the optimal control problem is addressed, and PSO algorithm is introduced to deal with this nonlinear optimal problem which contains lots of inequality/equality constraints. Then, the comparisons between the optimal control and rule-based one are made, and the results show that hybrids with the optimal control would increase fuel economy. Although PSO algorithm is off-line optimization, still it would bring performance benchmark for PHHE and also help have a deep insight into hybrid excavators. PMID:23818832

  10. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    DOE PAGES

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety usingmore » an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.« less

  11. Controlled levels of protein modification through a chromatography-mediated bioconjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, Richard L.; Jaffe, Jake; Palmere, Peter J.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-02-27

    Synthetically modified proteins are increasingly finding applications as well-defined scaffolds for materials. In practice it remains difficult to construct bioconjugates with precise levels of modification because of the limited number of repeated functional groups on proteins. This article describes a method to control the level of protein modification in cases where there exist multiple potential modification sites. A protein is first tagged with a handle using any of a variety of modification chemistries. This handle is used to isolate proteins with a particular number of modifications via affinity chromatography, and then the handle is elaborated with a desired moiety using an oxidative coupling reaction. This method results in a sample of protein with a well-defined number of modifications, and we find it particularly applicable to systems like protein homomultimers in which there is no way to discern between chemically identical subunits. We demonstrate the use of this method in the construction of a protein-templated light-harvesting mimic, a type of system which has historically been difficult to make in a well-defined manner.

  12. Optimizing the controllability of arbitrary networks with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhe-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to optimize networks' controllability has become a common and urgent problem. In this paper, we develop an efficient genetic algorithm oriented optimization tool to optimize the controllability of arbitrary networks consisting of both state nodes and control nodes under Popov-Belevitch-Hautus rank condition. The experimental results on a number of benchmark networks show the effectiveness of this method and the evolution of network topology is captured. Furthermore, we explore how network structure affects its controllability and find that the sparser a network is, the more control nodes are needed to control it and the larger the differences between node degrees, the more control nodes are needed to achieve the full control. Our framework provides an alternative to controllability optimization and can be applied to arbitrary networks without any limitations.

  13. BBD Optimization of K-ZnO Catalyst Modification Process for Heterogeneous Transesterification of Rice Bran Oil to Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabo, K. S.; Yacob, A. R.; Bakar, W. A. W. A.; Buang, N. A.; Bello, A. M.; Ruskam, A.

    2016-07-01

    Environmentally benign zinc oxide (ZnO) was modified with 0-15% (wt.) potassium through wet impregnation and used in transesterification of rice bran oil (RBO) to form biodiesel. The catalyst was characterized by X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), its basic sites determined by back titration and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) Box-Behnken Design (BBD) was used to optimize the modification process variables on the basic sites of the catalyst. The transesterification product, biodiesel was analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The result reveals K-modified ZnO with highly increased basic sites. Quadratic model with high regression R2 = 0.9995 was obtained from the ANOVA of modification process, optimization at maximum basic sites criterion gave optimum modification conditions of K-loading = 8.5% (wt.), calcination temperature = 480 oC and time = 4 hours with response and basic sites = 8.14 mmol/g which is in close agreement with the experimental value of 7.64 mmol/g. The catalyst was used and a value of 95.53% biodiesel conversion was obtained and effect of potassium leaching was not significant in the process

  14. Optimal coordination and control of posture and movements.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Rolf; Fransson, Per-Anders; Magnusson, Måns

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of stability and coordination of posture and locomotion, together with algorithms for continuous-time quadratic optimization of motion control. Explicit solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for optimal control of rigid-body motion are obtained by solving an algebraic matrix equation. The stability is investigated with Lyapunov function theory and it is shown that global asymptotic stability holds. It is also shown how optimal control and adaptive control may act in concert in the case of unknown or uncertain system parameters. The solution describes motion strategies of minimum effort and variance. The proposed optimal control is formulated to be suitable as a posture and movement model for experimental validation and verification. The combination of adaptive and optimal control makes this algorithm a candidate for coordination and control of functional neuromuscular stimulation as well as of prostheses. Validation examples with experimental data are provided. PMID:19671443

  15. A multiple objective optimization approach to aircraft control systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabak, D.; Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Giesy, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The design of an aircraft lateral control system, subject to several performance criteria and constraints, is considered. While in the previous studies of the same model a single criterion optimization, with other performance requirements expressed as constraints, has been pursued, the current approach involves a multiple criteria optimization. In particular, a Pareto optimal solution is sought.

  16. Optimal control theory for unitary transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-12-01

    The dynamics of a quantum system driven by an external field is well described by a unitary transformation generated by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The inverse problem of finding the field that generates a specific unitary transformation is the subject of study. The unitary transformation which can represent an algorithm in a quantum computation is imposed on a subset of quantum states embedded in a larger Hilbert space. Optimal control theory is used to solve the inversion problem irrespective of the initial input state. A unified formalism based on the Krotov method is developed leading to a different scheme. The schemes are compared for the inversion of a two-qubit Fourier transform using as registers the vibrational levels of the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} electronic state of Na{sub 2}. Raman-like transitions through the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} electronic state induce the transitions. Light fields are found that are able to implement the Fourier transform within a picosecond time scale. Such fields can be obtained by pulse-shaping techniques of a femtosecond pulse. Of the schemes studied, the square modulus scheme converges fastest. A study of the implementation of the Q qubit Fourier transform in the Na{sub 2} molecule was carried out for up to five qubits. The classical computation effort required to obtain the algorithm with a given fidelity is estimated to scale exponentially with the number of levels. The observed moderate scaling of the pulse intensity with the number of qubits in the transformation is rationalized.

  17. Searching for quantum optimal controls under severe constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviello, Gregory; Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Brif, Constantin; Long, Ruixing; Wu, Re-Bing; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-04-01

    The success of quantum optimal control for both experimental and theoretical objectives is connected to the topology of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local traps if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is of full rank, and (3) there are no constraints on the control field. This paper investigates how the violation of assumption (3) affects gradient searches for globally optimal control fields. The satisfaction of assumptions (1) and (2) ensures that the control landscape lacks fundamental traps, but certain control constraints can still introduce artificial traps. Proper management of these constraints is an issue of great practical importance for numerical simulations as well as optimization in the laboratory. Using optimal control simulations, we show that constraints on quantities such as the number of control variables, the control duration, and the field strength are potentially severe enough to prevent successful optimization of the objective. For each such constraint, we show that exceeding quantifiable limits can prevent gradient searches from reaching a globally optimal solution. These results demonstrate that careful choice of relevant control parameters helps to eliminate artificial traps and facilitates successful optimization.

  18. 77 FR 1726 - Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Video Game Systems and Controllers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Motiva, LLC of Dublin, Ohio (``Motiva''). 75 FR 68379 (Nov. 5, 2010). The complaint alleged violations of... COMMISSION Investigations: Terminations, Modifications and Rulings: Certain Video Game Systems and... United States after importation of certain video game systems and controllers by reason of...

  19. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryolab Control Valve Modification Information for D0-EVMF-H

    SciTech Connect

    Rucincki, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-10-26

    This engineering note documents some information regarding the solenoid magnet flow valve, EVMF. See also EN-437 'Control Dewar valve sizing' also for further information on this valve. This note documents the modification done to the valve to change it to a Cv = 0.32.

  20. Lessons from the quantum control landscape: Robust optimal control of quantum systems and optimal control of nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David Lance

    The control of quantum systems occurs across a broad range of length and energy scales in modern science, and efforts have demonstrated that locating suitable controls to perform a range of objectives has been widely successful. The justification for this success arises from a favorable topology of a quantum control landscape, defined as a mapping of the controls to a cost function measuring the success of the operation. This is summarized in the landscape principle that no suboptimal extrema exist on the landscape for well-suited control problems, explaining a trend of successful optimizations in both theory and experiment. This dissertation explores what additional lessons may be gleaned from the quantum control landscape through numerical and theoretical studies. The first topic examines the experimentally relevant problem of assessing and reducing disturbances due to noise. The local curvature of the landscape is found to play an important role on noise effects in the control of targeted quantum unitary operations, and provides a conceptual framework for assessing robustness to noise. Software for assessing noise effects in quantum computing architectures was also developed and applied to survey the performance of current quantum control techniques for quantum computing. A lack of competition between robustness and perfect unitary control operation was discovered to fundamentally limit noise effects, and highlights a renewed focus upon system engineering for reducing noise. This convergent behavior generally arises for any secondary objective in the situation of high primary objective fidelity. The other dissertation topic examines the utility of quantum control for a class of nonlinear Hamiltonians not previously considered under the landscape principle. Nonlinear Schrodinger equations are commonly used to model the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), one of the largest known quantum objects. Optimizations of BEC dynamics were performed in which the

  1. Optimizing Sensor and Actuator Arrays for ASAC Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of an approach to optimizing the locations for arrays of sensors and actuators in active noise control systems. A type of directed combinatorial search, called Tabu Search, is used to select an optimal configuration from a much larger set of candidate locations. The benefit of using an optimized set is demonstrated. The importance of limiting actuator forces to realistic levels when evaluating the cost function is discussed. Results of flight testing an optimized system are presented. Although the technique has been applied primarily to Active Structural Acoustic Control systems, it can be adapted for use in other active noise control implementations.

  2. Stochastic Optimal Control for Series Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Increasing demand for improving fuel economy and reducing emissions has stimulated significant research and investment in hybrid propulsion systems. In this paper, we address the problem of optimizing online the supervisory control in a series hybrid configuration by modeling its operation as a controlled Markov chain using the average cost criterion. We treat the stochastic optimal control problem as a dual constrained optimization problem. We show that the control policy that yields higher probability distribution to the states with low cost and lower probability distribution to the states with high cost is an optimal control policy, defined as an equilibrium control policy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed controller in a series hybrid configuration and compare it with a thermostat-type controller.

  3. Modifications to the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel for the laminar flow control experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Modifications to the NASA Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel in support of the Lamina Flow Control (LFC) Experiment included the installation of a honeymoon and five screens in the settling chamber upstream of the test section 41-long test section liner that extended from the upstream end of the test section contraction region, through the best section, and into the diffuser. The honeycomb and screens were installed as permanent additions to the facility, and the liner was a temporary addition to be removed at the conclusion of the LFC Experiment. These modifications are briefly described.

  4. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation. PMID:26392149

  5. A Framework for Optimal Control Allocation with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Jutte, Christine V.; Burken, John J.; Trinh, Khanh V.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aircraft generally employ mixing algorithms or lookup tables to determine control surface deflections needed to achieve moments commanded by the flight control system. Control allocation is the problem of converting desired moments into control effector commands. Next generation aircraft may have many multipurpose, redundant control surfaces, adding considerable complexity to the control allocation problem. These issues can be addressed with optimal control allocation. Most optimal control allocation algorithms have control surface position and rate constraints. However, these constraints are insufficient to ensure that the aircraft's structural load limits will not be exceeded by commanded surface deflections. In this paper, a framework is proposed to enable a flight control system with optimal control allocation to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints. A proof of concept simulation that demonstrates the framework in a simulation of a generic transport aircraft is presented.

  6. A criterion for joint optimization of identification and robust control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.; Mettler, E.

    1992-01-01

    A criterion for system identification is developed that is consistent with the intended used of the fitted model for modern robust control synthesis. Specifically, a joint optimization problem is posed which simultaneously solves the plant model estimate and control design, so as to optimize robust performance over the set of plants consistent with a specified experimental data set.

  7. Educational Tool for Optimal Controller Tuning Using Evolutionary Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona Morales, D.; Jimenez-Hornero, J. E.; Vazquez, F.; Morilla, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal tuning tool is presented for control structures based on multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control, using genetic algorithms as an alternative to traditional optimization algorithms. From an educational point of view, this tool provides students with the necessary means to consolidate their knowledge on…

  8. Attitude Control Optimization for ROCSAT-2 Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Wu, A.-M.

    one revolution. The purpose of this paper is to present the attitude control design optimization such that the maximum solar energy is ingested while minimum maneuvering energy is dissipated. The strategy includes the maneuvering sequence design, the minimization of angular path, the sizing of three magnetic torquers, and the trade-off of the size, number and orientations arrangement of momentum wheels.

  9. Voltage controlled modification of flux closure domains in planar magnetic structures for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parkes, D. E.; Beardsley, R.; Edmonds, K. W.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Rushforth, A. W. E-mail: Andrew.Rushforth@nottingham.ac.uk; Bowe, S.; Isakov, I.; Warburton, P. A.; Cavill, S. A. E-mail: Andrew.Rushforth@nottingham.ac.uk

    2014-08-11

    Voltage controlled modification of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in a hybrid piezoelectric/ferromagnet device has been studied using Photoemission Electron Microscopy with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate that the large magnetostriction of the epitaxial Fe{sub 81}Ga{sub 19} layer enables significant modification of the domain pattern in laterally confined disc structures. In addition, micromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the strain induced modification of the magnetic anisotropy allows for voltage tuneability of the natural resonance of both the confined spin wave modes and the vortex motion. These results demonstrate the possibility for using voltage induced strain in low-power voltage tuneable magnetic microwave oscillators.

  10. The application of quadratic optimal cooperative control synthesis to a CH-47 helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Barbara K.

    1986-01-01

    A control-system design method, Quadratic Optimal Cooperative Control Synthesis (CCS), is applied to the design of a Stability and Control Augmentation Systems (SCAS). The CCS design method is different from other design methods in that it does not require detailed a priori design criteria, but instead relies on an explicit optimal pilot-model to create desired performance. The design model, which was developed previously for fixed-wing aircraft, is simplified and modified for application to a Boeing Vertol CH-47 helicopter. Two SCAS designs are developed using the CCS design methodology. The resulting CCS designs are then compared with designs obtained using classical/frequency-domain methods and Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) theory in a piloted fixed-base simulation. Results indicate that the CCS method, with slight modifications, can be used to produce controller designs which compare favorably with the frequency-domain approach.

  11. Optimization and Control of Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Molzahn, Daniel K.

    2014-10-17

    The analysis and optimization needs for planning and operation of the electric power system are challenging due to the scale and the form of model representations. The connected network spans the continent and the mathematical models are inherently nonlinear. Traditionally, computational limits have necessitated the use of very simplified models for grid analysis, and this has resulted in either less secure operation, or less efficient operation, or both. The research conducted in this project advances techniques for power system optimization problems that will enhance reliable and efficient operation. The results of this work appear in numerous publications and address different application problems include optimal power flow (OPF), unit commitment, demand response, reliability margins, planning, transmission expansion, as well as general tools and algorithms.

  12. Optimizing and controlling earthmoving operations using spatial technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshibani, Adel

    This thesis presents a model designed for optimizing, tracking, and controlling earthmoving operations. The proposed model utilizes, Genetic Algorithm (GA), Linear Programming (LP), and spatial technologies including Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to support the management functions of the developed model. The model assists engineers and contractors in selecting near optimum crew formations in planning phase and during construction, using GA and LP supported by the Pathfinder Algorithm developed in a GIS environment. GA is used in conjunction with a set of rules developed to accelerate the optimization process and to avoid generating and evaluating hypothetical and unrealistic crew formations. LP is used to determine quantities of earth to be moved from different borrow pits and to be placed at different landfill sites to meet project constraints and to minimize the cost of these earthmoving operations. On the one hand, GPS is used for onsite data collection and for tracking construction equipment in near real-time. On the other hand, GIS is employed to automate data acquisition and to analyze the collected spatial data. The model is also capable of reconfiguring crew formations dynamically during the construction phase while site operations are in progress. The optimization of the crew formation considers: (1) construction time, (2) construction direct cost, or (3) construction total cost. The model is also capable of generating crew formations to meet, as close as possible, specified time and/or cost constraints. In addition, the model supports tracking and reporting of project progress utilizing the earned-value concept and the project ratio method with modifications that allow for more accurate forecasting of project time and cost at set future dates and at completion. The model is capable of generating graphical and tabular reports. The developed model has been implemented in prototype software, using Object

  13. New Applications of Variational Analysis to Optimization and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordukhovich, Boris S.

    We discuss new applications of advanced tools of variational analysis and generalized differentiation to a number of important problems in optimization theory, equilibria, optimal control, and feedback control design. The presented results are largely based on the recent work by the author and his collaborators. Among the main topics considered and briefly surveyed in this paper are new calculus rules for generalized differentiation of nonsmooth and set-valued mappings; necessary and sufficient conditions for new notions of linear subextremality and suboptimality in constrained problems; optimality conditions for mathematical problems with equilibrium constraints; necessary optimality conditions for optimistic bilevel programming with smooth and nonsmooth data; existence theorems and optimality conditions for various notions of Pareto-type optimality in problems of multiobjective optimization with vector-valued and set-valued cost mappings; Lipschitzian stability and metric regularity aspects for constrained and variational systems.

  14. Matching trajectory optimization and nonlinear tracking control for HALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjong; Jang, Jieun; Ryu, Hyeok; Lee, Kyun Ho

    2014-11-01

    This paper concerns optimal trajectory generation and nonlinear tracking control for stratospheric airship platform of VIA-200. To compensate for the mismatch between the point-mass model of optimal trajectory and the 6-DOF model of the nonlinear tracking problem, a new matching trajectory optimization approach is proposed. The proposed idea reduces the dissimilarity of both problems and reduces the uncertainties in the nonlinear equations of motion for stratospheric airship. In addition, its refined optimal trajectories yield better results under jet stream conditions during flight. The resultant optimal trajectories of VIA-200 are full three-dimensional ascent flight trajectories reflecting the realistic constraints of flight conditions and airship performance with and without a jet stream. Finally, 6-DOF nonlinear equations of motion are derived, including a moving wind field, and the vectorial backstepping approach is applied. The desirable tracking performance is demonstrated that application of the proposed matching optimization method enables the smooth linkage of trajectory optimization to tracking control problems.

  15. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  16. Dynamics systems vs. optimal control--a unifying view.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Stefan; Mohajerian, Peyman; Ijspeert, Auke

    2007-01-01

    In the past, computational motor control has been approached from at least two major frameworks: the dynamic systems approach and the viewpoint of optimal control. The dynamic system approach emphasizes motor control as a process of self-organization between an animal and its environment. Nonlinear differential equations that can model entrainment and synchronization behavior are among the most favorable tools of dynamic systems modelers. In contrast, optimal control approaches view motor control as the evolutionary or development result of a nervous system that tries to optimize rather general organizational principles, e.g., energy consumption or accurate task achievement. Optimal control theory is usually employed to develop appropriate theories. Interestingly, there is rather little interaction between dynamic systems and optimal control modelers as the two approaches follow rather different philosophies and are often viewed as diametrically opposing. In this paper, we develop a computational approach to motor control that offers a unifying modeling framework for both dynamic systems and optimal control approaches. In discussions of several behavioral experiments and some theoretical and robotics studies, we demonstrate how our computational ideas allow both the representation of self-organizing processes and the optimization of movement based on reward criteria. Our modeling framework is rather simple and general, and opens opportunities to revisit many previous modeling results from this novel unifying view.

  17. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  18. Exact optimal solution for a class of dual control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Suping; Qian, Fucai; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers a discrete-time stochastic optimal control problem for which only measurement equation is partially observed with unknown constant parameters taking value in a finite set of stochastic systems. Because of the fact that the cost-to-go function at each stage contains variance and the non-separability of the variance is so complicated that the dynamic programming cannot be successfully applied, the optimal solution has not been found. In this paper, a new approach to the optimal solution is proposed by embedding the original non-separable problem into a separable auxiliary problem. The theoretical condition on which the optimal solution of the original problem can be attained from a set of solutions of the auxiliary problem is established. In addition, the optimality of the interchanging algorithm is proved and the analytical solution of the optimal control is also obtained. The performance of this controller is illustrated with a simple example.

  19. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  20. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  1. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  2. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  3. A Riccati approach for constrained linear quadratic optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Athanasios; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2011-02-01

    An active-set method is proposed for solving linear quadratic optimal control problems subject to general linear inequality path constraints including mixed state-control and state-only constraints. A Riccati-based approach is developed for efficiently solving the equality constrained optimal control subproblems generated during the procedure. The solution of each subproblem requires computations that scale linearly with the horizon length. The algorithm is illustrated with numerical examples.

  4. Robust control systems design by H-infinity optimization theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. C.; Li, X. P.; Banda, S. S.; Yeh, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, step-by-step procedures of applying the H-infinity theory to robust control systems design are given. The objective of the paper is to eliminate the possible difficulties a control engineer may encounter in applying H-infinity control theory and to clear up some misconceptions about H-infinity theory like high-gain controller and numerical obstacles, etc. An efficient algorithm is used to compute the optimal H-infinity norm. The Glover and Doyle (1988) controller formulas are slightly modified and used to construct an optimal controller without any numerical difficulties.

  5. Optimal control design that accounts for model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1995-02-01

    A new technique is presented in this paper that reduces the complexity of state differential equations while accounting for modeling assumptions. The mismatch controls are defined as the differences between the model equations and the true state equations. The performance index of the optimal control problem is formulated with a set of tuning parameters that are user-selected to tune the control solution in order to achieve the best results. Computer simulations demonstrate that the tuned control law outperforms the untuned controller and produces results that are comparable to a numerically-determined, piecewise-linear optimal controller.

  6. Neighboring extremal optimal control design including model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1994-11-01

    The mismatch control technique that is used to simplify model equations of motion in order to determine analytic optimal control laws is extended using neighboring extremal theory. The first variation optimal control equations are linearized about the extremal path to account for perturbations in the initial state and the final constraint manifold. A numerical example demonstrates that the tuning procedure inherent in the mismatch control method increases the performance of the controls to the level of a numerically-determined piecewise-linear controller.

  7. Control strategy optimization of HVAC plants

    SciTech Connect

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Zanfardino, Antonella; Martini, Fabrizio; Pirozzi, Salvatore; Ubertini, Stefano

    2015-03-10

    In this paper we present a methodology to optimize the operating conditions of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) plants to achieve a higher energy efficiency in use. Semi-empiric numerical models of the plant components are used to predict their performances as a function of their set-point and the environmental and occupied space conditions. The optimization is performed through a graph-based algorithm that finds the set-points of the system components that minimize energy consumption and/or energy costs, while matching the user energy demands. The resulting model can be used with systems of almost any complexity, featuring both HVAC components and energy systems, and is sufficiently fast to make it applicable to real-time setting.

  8. Optimal control of Atlantic population Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauser, C.E.; Runge, M.C.; Cooch, E.G.; Johnson, F.A.; Harvey, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Management of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) can be a balance between providing sustained harvest opportunity while not allowing populations to become overabundant and cause damage. In this paper, we focus on the Atlantic population of Canada geese and use stochastic dynamic programming to determine the optimal harvest strategy over a range of plausible models for population dynamics. There is evidence to suggest that the population exhibits significant age structure, and it is possible to reconstruct age structure from surveys. Consequently the harvest strategy is a function of the age composition, as well as the abundance, of the population. The objective is to maximize harvest while maintaining the number of breeding adults in the population between specified upper and lower limits. In addition, the total harvest capacity is limited and there is uncertainty about the strength of density-dependence. We find that under a density-independent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at the highest acceptable abundance. However if harvest capacity is limited, then the optimal long-term breeding population size is lower than the highest acceptable level, to reduce the risk of the population growing to an unacceptably large size. Under the proposed density-dependent model, harvest is maximized by maintaining the breeding population at an intermediate level between the bounds on acceptable population size; limits to harvest capacity have little effect on the optimal long-term population size. It is clear that the strength of density-dependence and constraints on harvest significantly affect the optimal harvest strategy for this population. Model discrimination might be achieved in the long term, while continuing to meet management goals, by adopting an adaptive management strategy.

  9. A comparison of control samples for ChIP-seq of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Flensburg, Christoffer; Kinkel, Sarah A; Keniry, Andrew; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing has allowed genome wide profiling of histone modifications by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (ChIP) followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq). In this assay the histone mark of interest is enriched through a chromatin pull-down assay using an antibody for the mark. Due to imperfect antibodies and other factors, many of the sequenced fragments do not originate from the histone mark of interest, and are referred to as background reads. Background reads are not uniformly distributed and therefore control samples are usually used to estimate the background distribution at any given genomic position. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium guidelines suggest sequencing a whole cell extract (WCE, or "input") sample, or a mock ChIP reaction such as an IgG control, as a background sample. However, for a histone modification ChIP-seq investigation it is also possible to use a Histone H3 (H3) pull-down to map the underlying distribution of histones. In this paper we generated data from a hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell population isolated from mouse fetal liver to compare WCE and H3 ChIP-seq as control samples. The quality of the control samples is estimated by a comparison to pull-downs of histone modifications and to expression data. We find minor differences between WCE and H3 ChIP-seq, such as coverage in mitochondria and behavior close to transcription start sites. Where the two controls differ, the H3 pull-down is generally more similar to the ChIP-seq of histone modifications. However, the differences between H3 and WCE have a negligible impact on the quality of a standard analysis.

  10. Climate control: United States weather modification in the cold war and beyond.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kristine C

    2008-03-01

    Rainmaking, hail busting, fog lifting, snowpack enhancing, lightning suppressing, hurricane snuffing...weather control. At the lunatic fringe of scientific discussion in the early twentieth century--and the subject of newspaper articles with tones ranging from skeptical titters to awestruck wonder--weather modification research became more serious after World War II. In the United States, the 'seeds' of silver iodide and dry ice purported to enhance rainfall and bust hailstorms soon became seeds of controversy from which sprouted attempts by federal, state and local government to control the controllers and exploit 'designer weather' for their own purposes.

  11. Modification of the logic and control system for the 80-ounce injection molding machine

    SciTech Connect

    Domer, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The modification of the hydraulic logic and control system for the 80-ounce injection molding machine in the Molding and Machining, Plastics, department was required to allow production of near net size thick-walled parts and machining stock from high-shrinkage materials while retaining the original logic for standard product. The control system that was developed allows the new capability of open clamp injection. This capability will replace the present method of purchasing machining stock from an outside source. The control system was implemented with a Giddings Lewis Programmable Industrial Computer 409 (G L PiC 409). Hydraulic modifications included adding Vickers servo valves, an Inductosyn position transducer, and MOOG pressure transducers to perform force and position control. The control system provides two capabilities, NORMAL and SERVO. The NORMAL mode is defined as operating the machine according to original design specifications. The SERVO mode is defined as operating the machine according to a recipe in open loop position control then in closed loop force control. The G L PiC 409 controls the tasks of both modes. A selector switch determines the mode of operation (NORMAL or SERVO). The NORMAL mode uses the original hydraulic circuits, and the SERVO mode diverts fluid into the modified hydraulic circuits. 11 figs.

  12. A duality framework for stochastic optimal control of complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of interactive subsystems. We formulate a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems and provide a duality framework to prove that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion of the system. We provide the conditions of existence and a geometric interpretation of the solution. For practical situations having constraints consistent with those studied here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value when we seek to derive online the optimal control policy in complex systems.

  13. Optimal control of a harmonic oscillator: Economic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janová, Jitka; Hampel, David

    2013-10-01

    Optimal control is a popular technique for modelling and solving the dynamic decision problems in economics. A standard interpretation of the criteria function and Lagrange multipliers in the profit maximization problem is well known. On a particular example, we aim to a deeper understanding of the possible economic interpretations of further mathematical and solution features of the optimal control problem: we focus on the solution of the optimal control problem for harmonic oscillator serving as a model for Phillips business cycle. We discuss the economic interpretations of arising mathematical objects with respect to well known reasoning for these in other problems.

  14. Time dependent optimal switching controls in online selling models

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Cohen, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to incorporate dishonesty in online selling via a stochastic optimal control problem. In our framework, the seller wishes to maximize her average wealth level W at a fixed time T of her choosing. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellmann (HJB) equation is analyzed for a basic case. For more general models, the admissible control set is restricted to a jump process that switches between extreme values. We propose a new approach, where the optimal control problem is reduced to a multivariable optimization problem.

  15. Optimal actuator location of minimum norm controls for heat equation with general controlled domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Yashan; Yang, Dong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study optimal actuator location of the minimum norm controls for a multi-dimensional heat equation with control defined in the space L2 (Ω × (0 , T)). The actuator domain is time-varying in the sense that it is only required to have a prescribed Lebesgue measure for any moment. We select an optimal actuator location so that the optimal control takes its minimal norm over all possible actuator domains. We build a framework of finding the Nash equilibrium so that we can develop a sufficient and necessary condition to characterize the optimal relaxed solutions for both actuator location and corresponding optimal control of the open-loop system. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal classical solutions are therefore concluded. As a result, we synthesize both optimal actuator location and corresponding optimal control into a time-varying feedbacks.

  16. Dynamics and linear quadratic optimal control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chin-Wei

    1994-12-01

    An efficient algorithm for the modeling, dynamic analysis, and optimal control of flexible multibody systems (FMBS) is presented. The cantilevered Bernoulli-Euler beam model and the assumed mode method are used to represent flexibility of elastic bodies in 3D vibration problems. Centrifugal stiffening effects are introduced to correctly represent the dynamic response. The governing equations of motion are based on Kane's equations, adopting a recursive formulation and strategic positioning of the generalized coordinates. The linear quadratic optimization scheme is employed to formulate the vibration control problem. The solutions to the Riccati equation and the use of Kalman gain as optimal control feedbacks to the control of flexibility are also introduced. Based on the optimal control theory and the property of the built-in redundancy for flexible multibody systems, the performance index measure in the optimization control of such systems can be classified into two manifolds: (1) using the extra degrees of freedom resulting from redundancy as control inputs and choosing an integral-type performance index which results in a global optimization scheme and (2) using the joint forces and torques as control inputs and allowing the system output state to keep close track to a reference state while the performance index is kept minimum. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodologies developed.

  17. Coupled Low-thrust Trajectory and System Optimization via Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrina, Matthew A.; Englander, Jacob Aldo; Ghosh, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of low-thrust trajectories is tightly coupled with the spacecraft hardware. Trading trajectory characteristics with system parameters ton identify viable solutions and determine mission sensitivities across discrete hardware configurations is labor intensive. Local independent optimization runs can sample the design space, but a global exploration that resolves the relationships between the system variables across multiple objectives enables a full mapping of the optimal solution space. A multi-objective, hybrid optimal control algorithm is formulated using a multi-objective genetic algorithm as an outer loop systems optimizer around a global trajectory optimizer. The coupled problem is solved simultaneously to generate Pareto-optimal solutions in a single execution. The automated approach is demonstrated on two boulder return missions.

  18. Lessons from chlorophylls: modifications of porphyrinoids towards optimized solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Dariusz; Boroń, Bożena; Matwijczuk, Arkadiusz; Furso, Justyna; Staroń, Jakub; Ratuszna, Alicja; Fiedor, Leszek

    2014-10-03

    Practical applications of photosynthesis-inspired processes depend on a thorough understanding of the structures and physiochemical features of pigment molecules such as chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls. Consequently, the major structural features of these pigments have been systematically examined as to how they influence the S1 state energy, lifetimes, quantum yields, and pigment photostability. In particular, the effects of the macrocyclic π-electron system, central metal ion (CMI), peripheral substituents, and pigment aggregation, on these critical parameters are discussed. The results obtained confirm that the π-electron system of the chromophore has the greatest influence on the light energy conversion capacity of porphyrinoids. Its modifications lead to changes in molecular symmetry, which determine the energy levels of frontier orbitals and hence affect the S1 state properties. In the case of bacteriochlorophylls aggregation can also strongly decrease the S1 energy. The CMI may be considered as another influential structural feature which only moderately influences the ground-state properties of bacteriochlorophylls but strongly affects the singlet excited-state. An introduction of CMIs heavier than Mg2+ significantly improves pigments' photostabilities, however, at the expense of S1 state lifetime. Modifications of the peripheral substituents may also influence the S1 energy, and pigments' redox potentials, which in turn influence their photostability.

  19. Optimal Control of the Parametric Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, B.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Nulton, J.; Tsirlin, A.; Salamon, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a solution to the minimum time control problem for a classical harmonic oscillator to reach a target energy E[subscript T] from a given initial state (q[subscript i], p[subscript i]) by controlling its frequency [omega], [omega][subscript min] less than or equal to [omega] less than or equal to [omega][subscript max]. A brief synopsis…

  20. Understanding Product Optimization: Kinetic versus Thermodynamic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, King-Chuen

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the concept of kinetic versus thermodynamic control of reactions. Explains on the undergraduate level (1) the role of kinetic and thermodynamic control in kinetic equations, (2) the influence of concentration and temperature upon the reaction, and (3) the application of factors one and two to synthetic chemistry. (MVL)

  1. Optimized synthesis of concurrently checked controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Leveugle, R.; Saucier, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Dedicated controllers (or FSM's) with concurrent checking capabilities are of prime importance in highly dependable applications. This paper presents a new method for introducing on-line test facilities in a controller with a very low overhead. This on-line test consists in detecting illegal paths in the control flow graph. These illegal paths may be due either to permanent faults or to transient errors. The state code flow is compacted through polynomial division. An implicit justifying signature method is applied at the state code level and ensures identical signatures before each join node of the control flow graph. The signatures are then independent of the path followed previously in the graph and the comparison to reference data is greatly facilitated. This property is obtained by a clever state assignment, nearly without area overhead. The controllers can then be checked by signature analysis, either by a built-in monitor or by an external checker.

  2. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF INTEGRATED URBAN WET-WEATHER CONTROL STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimization method for urban wet weather control (WWC) strategies is presented. The developed optimization model can be used to determine the most cost-effective strategies for the combination of centralized storage-release systems and distributed on-site WWC alternatives. T...

  4. Shape Optimization for Trailing Edge Noise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison; Wang, Meng; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moin, Parviz

    2001-11-01

    Noise generated by turbulent boundary layers near the trailing edge of lifting surfaces continues to pose a challenge for many applications. In this study, we explore noise reduction strategies through shape optimization. A gradient based shape design method is formulated and implemented for use with large eddy simulation of the flow over an airfoil. The cost function gradient is calculated using the method of incomplete sensitivities (Mohammadi and Pironneau 2001 ph Applied shape Optimization for Fluids, Oxford Univ. Press). This method has the advantage that effects of geometry changes on the flow field can be neglected when computing the gradient of the cost function, making it far more cost effective than solving the full adjoint problem. Validation studies are presented for a model problem of the unsteady laminar flow over an acoustically compact airfoil. A section of the surface is allowed to deform and the cost function is derived based on aeroacoustic theroy. Rapid convergence of the trailing-edge shape and significant reduction of the noise due to vortex shedding and wake instability have been achieved. The addition of constraints and issues of extension to fully turbulent flows past an acoustically noncompact airfoil are also discussed.

  5. Optimal guidance law for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Xia, Yuanqing

    2012-08-01

    This article considers the problem of optimal guidance laws for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on the optimal control theory. New guidance laws are presented such that multiple missiles attack a single target simultaneously. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  6. Optimal control studies of solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, C B

    1980-01-01

    In the past few years fuel prices have seen steady increases. Also, the supply of fuel has been on the decline. Because of these two problems there has been an increase in the number of solar heated buildings. Since conventional fuel prices are increasing and as a solar heating system represents a high capital cost it is desirable to obtain the maximum performance from a solar heating system. The control scheme that is used in a solar heated building has an effect on the performance of the solar system. The best control scheme possible would, of course, be desired. This report deals with the control problems of a solar heated building. The first of these problems is to control the inside temperature of the building and to minimize the fuel consumption. This problem applies to both solar and conventionally heated buildings. The second problem considered is to control the collector fluid flow to maximize the difference between the useful energy collected and the energy required to pump the fluid. The third problem is to control the enclosure temperature of a building which has two sources of heat, one solar and the other conventional.

  7. Optimal False Discovery Rate Control for Dependent Data.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jichun; Cai, T Tony; Maris, John; Li, Hongzhe

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of optimal false discovery rate control when the test statistics are dependent. An optimal joint oracle procedure, which minimizes the false non-discovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate is developed. A data-driven marginal plug-in procedure is then proposed to approximate the optimal joint procedure for multivariate normal data. It is shown that the marginal procedure is asymptotically optimal for multivariate normal data with a short-range dependent covariance structure. Numerical results show that the marginal procedure controls false discovery rate and leads to a smaller false non-discovery rate than several commonly used p-value based false discovery rate controlling methods. The procedure is illustrated by an application to a genome-wide association study of neuroblastoma and it identifies a few more genetic variants that are potentially associated with neuroblastoma than several p-value-based false discovery rate controlling procedures.

  8. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Wang, Ying; Kumar, Ananad; Wavrik, Kathryn

    2001-10-29

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs. This research project had three objectives. The first objective was to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective was to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective was to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs.

  9. Optimal second order sliding mode control for linear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-11-01

    In this paper an optimal second order sliding mode controller (OSOSMC) is proposed to track a linear uncertain system. The optimal controller based on the linear quadratic regulator method is designed for the nominal system. An integral sliding mode controller is combined with the optimal controller to ensure robustness of the linear system which is affected by parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. To achieve finite time convergence of the sliding mode, a nonsingular terminal sliding surface is added with the integral sliding surface giving rise to a second order sliding mode controller. The main advantage of the proposed OSOSMC is that the control input is substantially reduced and it becomes chattering free. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed OSOSMC over some existing.

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of optimal control measures for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Paula; Silva, Cristiana J; Torres, Delfim F M

    2014-10-01

    We propose and analyze an optimal control problem where the control system is a mathematical model for tuberculosis that considers reinfection. The control functions represent the fraction of early latent and persistent latent individuals that are treated. Our aim was to study how these control measures should be implemented, for a certain time period, in order to reduce the number of active infected individuals, while minimizing the interventions implementation costs. The optimal intervention is compared along different epidemiological scenarios, by varying the transmission coefficient. The impact of variation of the risk of reinfection, as a result of acquired immunity to a previous infection for treated individuals on the optimal controls and associated solutions, is analyzed. A cost-effectiveness analysis is done, to compare the application of each one of the control measures, separately or in combination.

  11. Can price controls induce optimal physician behavior?

    PubMed

    Wedig, G; Mitchell, J B; Cromwell, J

    1989-01-01

    Recently, budget-conscious policymakers have shifted their attention to the physician services market and have begun to consider a wide variety of price regulatory schemes for moderating expenditures in this market. In a recent article in this journal, Feldman and Sloan warned that price controls on physician services may cause undesirable declines in service quality, independent of their budgetary ramifications. Our aim in this article is to reconsider the effects of price controls in the broader context of insurance coverage and moral hazard. Our ultimate goal is to assess the benefits of price controls independent of specific assumptions about the controversial issues of demand inducement and income targeting. Using a simple extension of the Feldman/Sloan model, we find that price controls can be and almost certainly are welfare-improving as long as consumers are sufficiently well insured, regardless of where one stands on the inducement issue. The salutary effects of price controls, on the other hand, can be compromised by income-targeting behavior on the part of physicians. We also introduce evidence from Medicare's recent fee freeze to evaluate the possibility of income-targeting behavior empirically. While formal studies of income targeting suggest that its magnitude is small in cross-section, we warn that its effects may be larger over time; this is what our descriptive evidence suggests. We conclude that more dramatic short-term progress on physician fee inflation will require stronger measures, such as putting physicians at risk for consumer expenditures.

  12. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Online Stochastic Optimal Control in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The increasing urgency to extract additional efficiency from hybrid propulsion systems has led to the development of advanced power management control algorithms. In this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV operation as a controlled Markov chain and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes online the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion. Both solutions achieved the same cumulative fuel consumption demonstrating that the online Pareto control policy is an optimal control policy.

  13. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Online Stochastic Optimal Control in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    DOE PAGES

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The increasing urgency to extract additional efficiency from hybrid propulsion systems has led to the development of advanced power management control algorithms. In this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV operation as a controlled Markov chain and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes online the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion.more » Both solutions achieved the same cumulative fuel consumption demonstrating that the online Pareto control policy is an optimal control policy.« less

  14. Information fusion based optimal control for large civil aircraft system.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Ziyang; Jiang, Ju; Wang, Xinhua; Gao, Chen

    2015-03-01

    Wind disturbance has a great influence on landing security of Large Civil Aircraft. Through simulation research and engineering experience, it can be found that PID control is not good enough to solve the problem of restraining the wind disturbance. This paper focuses on anti-wind attitude control for Large Civil Aircraft in landing phase. In order to improve the riding comfort and the flight security, an information fusion based optimal control strategy is presented to restrain the wind in landing phase for maintaining attitudes and airspeed. Data of Boeing707 is used to establish a nonlinear mode with total variables of Large Civil Aircraft, and then two linear models are obtained which are divided into longitudinal and lateral equations. Based on engineering experience, the longitudinal channel adopts PID control and C inner control to keep longitudinal attitude constant, and applies autothrottle system for keeping airspeed constant, while an information fusion based optimal regulator in the lateral control channel is designed to achieve lateral attitude holding. According to information fusion estimation, by fusing hard constraint information of system dynamic equations and the soft constraint information of performance index function, optimal estimation of the control sequence is derived. Based on this, an information fusion state regulator is deduced for discrete time linear system with disturbance. The simulation results of nonlinear model of aircraft indicate that the information fusion optimal control is better than traditional PID control, LQR control and LQR control with integral action, in anti-wind disturbance performance in the landing phase.

  15. Controllable local modification of fractured Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, T. Y.; Santos, T. S.; Bode, M.; Guisinger, N. P.; Freeland, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale surface modification of a fractured Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} surface is demonstrated in a controlled way by scanning tunneling microscopy. By applying positive voltage pulses, holes can be created and the width and depth of the hole can be controlled by selecting the appropriate bias and pulse duration. The process shows a threshold condition for creation of the holes and change in the local electronic density of state consistent with exposure of the underlying TiO{sub 2} layer by removal of SrO. By applying negative bias, the hole can be partially refilled from the transfer of adsorbates on the tip.

  16. Multiobjective optimization design of a fractional order PID controller for a gun control system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Chen, Jilin; Wang, Li; Xu, Shiqing; Hou, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    Motion control of gun barrels is an ongoing topic for the development of gun control equipments possessing excellent performances. In this paper, a typical fractional order PID control strategy is employed for the gun control system. To obtain optimal parameters of the controller, a multiobjective optimization scheme is developed from the loop-shaping perspective. To solve the specified nonlinear optimization problem, a novel Pareto optimal solution based multiobjective differential evolution algorithm is proposed. To enhance the convergent rate of the optimization process, an opposition based learning method is embedded in the chaotic population initialization process. To enhance the robustness of the algorithm for different problems, an adapting scheme of the mutation operation is further employed. With assistance of the evolutionary algorithm, the optimal solution for the specified problem is selected. The numerical simulation results show that the control system can rapidly follow the demand signal with high accuracy and high robustness, demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed controller parameter tuning method.

  17. Multidimensional optimal droop control for wind resources in DC microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Kaitlyn J.

    Two important and upcoming technologies, microgrids and electricity generation from wind resources, are increasingly being combined. Various control strategies can be implemented, and droop control provides a simple option without requiring communication between microgrid components. Eliminating the single source of potential failure around the communication system is especially important in remote, islanded microgrids, which are considered in this work. However, traditional droop control does not allow the microgrid to utilize much of the power available from the wind. This dissertation presents a novel droop control strategy, which implements a droop surface in higher dimension than the traditional strategy. The droop control relationship then depends on two variables: the dc microgrid bus voltage, and the wind speed at the current time. An approach for optimizing this droop control surface in order to meet a given objective, for example utilizing all of the power available from a wind resource, is proposed and demonstrated. Various cases are used to test the proposed optimal high dimension droop control method, and demonstrate its function. First, the use of linear multidimensional droop control without optimization is demonstrated through simulation. Next, an optimal high dimension droop control surface is implemented with a simple dc microgrid containing two sources and one load. Various cases for changing load and wind speed are investigated using simulation and hardware-in-the-loop techniques. Optimal multidimensional droop control is demonstrated with a wind resource in a full dc microgrid example, containing an energy storage device as well as multiple sources and loads. Finally, the optimal high dimension droop control method is applied with a solar resource, and using a load model developed for a military patrol base application. The operation of the proposed control is again investigated using simulation and hardware-in-the-loop techniques.

  18. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition in Optimal Control of Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindran, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, we present a reduced order modeling approach suitable for active control of fluid dynamical systems based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The rationale behind the reduced order modeling is that numerical simulation of Navier-Stokes equations is still too costly for the purpose of optimization and control of unsteady flows. We examine the possibility of obtaining reduced order models that reduce computational complexity associated with the Navier-Stokes equations while capturing the essential dynamics by using the POD. The POD allows extraction of certain optimal set of basis functions, perhaps few, from a computational or experimental data-base through an eigenvalue analysis. The solution is then obtained as a linear combination of these optimal set of basis functions by means of Galerkin projection. This makes it attractive for optimal control and estimation of systems governed by partial differential equations. We here use it in active control of fluid flows governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. We show that the resulting reduced order model can be very efficient for the computations of optimization and control problems in unsteady flows. Finally, implementational issues and numerical experiments are presented for simulations and optimal control of fluid flow through channels.

  19. Optimal control of hopper unloading on collection conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Bernshtein, A.I.

    1987-11-01

    This article describes a computer simulation and control approach for optimizing the configuration of a hopper-belt conveyor system for the excavation of coal from underground mine workings. The purpose of the approach is to optimize the placement of hoppers along the conveyor route for maximum load capacity and optimal load distribution. The simulation is based on linear programming and has been implemented to control hopper loading and unloading in the Krasnoarmeiskaya mine No. 1 of the Krasnoarmeiskugol' Coal Production Association. Input criteria are given.

  20. Fundamental Solutions and Optimal Control of Neutral Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    In this work, we shall consider standard optimal control problems for a class of neutral functional differential equations in Banach spaces. As the basis of a systematic theory of neutral models, the fundamental solution is constructed and a variation of constants formula of mild solutions is established. Necessary conditions in terms of the solutions of neutral adjoint systems are established to deal with the fixed time integral convex cost problem of optimality. Based on optimality conditions, the maximum principle for time varying control domain is presented.

  1. Backward bifurcation and optimal control of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria with direct transmission is developed. The model is analyzed using dynamical system techniques and it shows that the backward bifurcation occurs for some range of parameters. The model is extended to assess the impact of time dependent preventive (biological and chemical control) against the mosquitoes and vaccination for susceptible humans, while treatment for infected humans. The existence of optimal control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations of the problem, suggest that applying the four control measure can effectively reduce if not eliminate the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi in a community.

  2. Mechanisms of Molecular Response in the Optimal Control of Photoisomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Brueggemann, Ben; Pascher, Torbjoern; Yartsev, Arkady

    2006-12-22

    We report on adaptive feedback control of photoinduced barrierless isomerization of 1,1'-diethyl-2,2'-cyanine in solution. We compare the effect of different fitness parameters and show that optimal control of the absolute yield of isomerization (photoisomer concentration versus excitation photons) can be achieved, while the relative isomerization yield (photoisomer concentration versus number of relaxed excited-state molecules) is unaffected by adaptive feedback control. The temporal structure of the optimized excitation pulses allows one to draw clear mechanistic conclusions showing the critical importance of coherent nuclear motion for the control of isomerization.

  3. Reproducibility, Controllability, and Optimization of Lenr Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments.

  4. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1976-01-01

    Digital program has been written to solve the LSOCE problem by using a time-domain formulation. LSOCE problem is defined as that of designing controls for linear time-invariant system which is disturbed by white noise in such a way as to minimize quadratic performance index.

  5. Reengineering for optimized control of DC networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintea, Adela; Schiopu, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The management of the Independent Power Grids is the global body/structure with flexible technological support for Command-Control-Communications and Informatized Management having the responsibility for providing the conditions and information (the informational flux of decision) for the decision-maker aiming at predictable and harmonic administration of the situations (crises) and for generating the harmonic situations (results).

  6. Microstructurally Controlled Composites with Optimal Elastodynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hossein

    Periodic composites (PCs) are artificial materials with specially designed microstructure to manage stress waves. The objective of this dissertation is to study various techniques for microstructural design of PCs for a desired elastodynamic response. A mixed variational formulation is studied for band structure calculation of PCs. Dynamic homogenization is studied for calculation of the frequency dependent effective properties of PCs. Optimization techniques are used together with mixed variational formulation and dynamic homogenization to make a computational platform for microstructural design of PCs. Several PCs are designed and fabricated, and various tests are performed for experimental verification. First, band-gap in one- and two-dimensional PCs is investigated experimentally. Mixed variational formulation is used to design samples with band-gaps at frequencies convenient to conduct experiment. Samples are fabricated and their transmission coefficient is measured. Experimental data are compared with theoretical results for evaluation of the band structure. Using constituent materials with temperature dependent material properties, it is also shown that band structure of PCs can be tuned by changing the ambient temperature. Furthermore, dynamic homogenization is used to design a one-dimensional PC for acoustic impedance matching. As a result, the reflection of stress waves at the interface of two impedance matched media becomes zero. Samples are fabricated and ultrasound tests are performed to measure the reflection coefficient for experimental verification. In addition, a one-dimensional PC with metamaterial response is designed to achieve a composite with both high stiffness-to-density ratio and high attenuation at low frequency regime. Samples are fabricated and the attenuation coefficient is measured for experimental verification. Moreover, optimal design of PCs for shock wave mitigation is investigated. A genetic algorithm is used to design the

  7. Genetic Algorithm Optimizes Q-LAW Control Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Terrile, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a multi-objective, genetic algorithm designed to optimize Lyapunov feedback control law (Q-law) parameters in order to efficiently find Pareto-optimal solutions for low-thrust trajectories for electronic propulsion systems. These would be propellant-optimal solutions for a given flight time, or flight time optimal solutions for a given propellant requirement. The approximate solutions are used as good initial solutions for high-fidelity optimization tools. When the good initial solutions are used, the high-fidelity optimization tools quickly converge to a locally optimal solution near the initial solution. Q-law control parameters are represented as real-valued genes in the genetic algorithm. The performances of the Q-law control parameters are evaluated in the multi-objective space (flight time vs. propellant mass) and sorted by the non-dominated sorting method that assigns a better fitness value to the solutions that are dominated by a fewer number of other solutions. With the ranking result, the genetic algorithm encourages the solutions with higher fitness values to participate in the reproduction process, improving the solutions in the evolution process. The population of solutions converges to the Pareto front that is permitted within the Q-law control parameter space.

  8. Hydro- abrasive jet machining modeling for computer control and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppetti, R.; Jovane, F.

    1993-06-01

    Use of hydro-abrasive jet machining (HAJM) for machining a wide variety of materials—metals, poly-mers, ceramics, fiber-reinforced composites, metal-matrix composites, and bonded or hybridized mate-rials—primarily for two- and three-dimensional cutting and also for drilling, turning, milling, and deburring, has been reported. However, the potential of this innovative process has not been explored fully. This article discusses process control, integration, and optimization of HAJM to establish a plat-form for the implementation of real-time adaptive control constraint (ACC), adaptive control optimiza-tion (ACO), and CAD/CAM integration. It presents the approach followed and the main results obtained during the development, implementation, automation, and integration of a HAJM cell and its computer-ized controller. After a critical analysis of the process variables and models reported in the literature to identify process variables and to define a process model suitable for HAJM real-time control and optimi-zation, to correlate process variables and parameters with machining results, and to avoid expensive and time-consuming experiments for determination of the optimal machining conditions, a process predic-tion and optimization model was identified and implemented. Then, the configuration of the HAJM cell, architecture, and multiprogramming operation of the controller in terms of monitoring, control, process result prediction, and process condition optimization were analyzed. This prediction and optimization model for selection of optimal machining conditions using multi-objective programming was analyzed. Based on the definition of an economy function and a productivity function, with suitable constraints relevant to required machining quality, required kerfing depth, and available resources, the model was applied to test cases based on experimental results.

  9. Control of liquid crystal alignment by polyimide surface modification using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidduck, A. J.; Haslam, S. D.; Bryan-Brown, G. P.; Bannister, R.; Kitely, I. D.

    1997-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to modify a polyimide surface to give controlled liquid crystal (LC) alignment, and to examine the modification produced. Strong LC azimuthal anchoring was observed typically for normal forces >300 nN and line densities >5 μm-1, and optically diffracting LC elements were fabricated by repeatedly overpatterning the same area along different directions. Atomic force microscopy images showed little sign of topographic modification such as grooving, whereas lateral force images showed locally increased friction. Estimated contact pressures, 0.08-0.3 GPa, suggest shear-yielding occurs within a surface layer, causing polymer chain alignment. The AFM micromechanical interaction is compared with that occurring during the conventional cloth-rubbing LC alignment process.

  10. Optimizing anti-coking abilities of zeolites by ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid modification on catalytic fast pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Song, Zuwei; Ding, Kuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In order to minimize coke yield during biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) process, ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid (EDTA) chemical modification method is carried out to selectively remove the external framework aluminum of HZSM-5 catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen (N2)-adsorption and ammonia-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) techniques are employed to investigate the porosity and acidity characteristics of original and modified HZSM-5 samples. Py-GC/MS and thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) experiments are further conducted to explore the catalytic effect of modified HZSM-5 samples on biomass CFP and to verify the positive effect on coke reduction. Results show that EDTA treatment does not damage the crystal structure of HZSM-5 zeolites, but leads to a slight increase of pore volume and pore size. Meanwhile, the elimination of the strong acid peak indicates the dealumination of outer surface of HZSM-5 zeolites. Treatment time of 2 h (labeled EDTA-2H) is optimal for acid removal and hydrocarbon formation. Among all modified catalysts, EDTA-2H performs the best for deacidification and can obviously increase the yields of positive chemical compositions in pyrolysis products. Besides, EDTA modification can improve the anti-coking properties of HZSM-5 zeolites, and EDTA-2H gives rise to the lowest coke yield.

  11. Adaptive control based on retrospective cost optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santillo, Mario A. (Inventor); Bernstein, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A discrete-time adaptive control law for stabilization, command following, and disturbance rejection that is effective for systems that are unstable, MIMO, and/or nonminimum phase. The adaptive control algorithm includes guidelines concerning the modeling information needed for implementation. This information includes the relative degree, the first nonzero Markov parameter, and the nonminimum-phase zeros. Except when the plant has nonminimum-phase zeros whose absolute value is less than the plant's spectral radius, the required zero information can be approximated by a sufficient number of Markov parameters. No additional information about the poles or zeros need be known. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the algorithm's effectiveness in handling systems with errors in the required modeling data, unknown latency, sensor noise, and saturation.

  12. Optimizing wind turbine control system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schluter, Larry L.; Vachon, William A.

    1993-05-01

    The impending expiration of the levelized period in the Interim Standard Offer Number 4 (ISO4) utility contracts for purchasing wind-generated power in California mandates, more than ever, that windplants be operated in a cost-effective manner. Operating plans and approaches are needed that maximize the net revenue from wind parks--after accounting for operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a design tool that makes it possible to tailor a control system of a wind turbine (WT) to maximize energy production while minimizing the financial consequences of fatigue damage to key structural components. Plans for code enhancements to include expert systems and fuzzy logic are discussed, and typical results are presented in which the code is applied to study the controls of a generic Danish 15-m horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT).

  13. Induction factor optimization through variable lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John; Corke, Thomas; Nelson, Robert; Williams, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Due to practical design limitations coupled with the detrimental effects posed by complex wind regimes, modern wind turbines struggle to maintain or even reach ideal operational states. With additional gains through traditional approaches becoming more difficult and costly, active lift control represents a more attractive option for future designs. Here, plasma actuators have been explored experimentally in trailing edge applications for use in attached flow regimes. This authority would be used to drive the axial induction factor toward the ideal given by the Betz limit through distributed lift control thereby enhancing energy capture. Predictions of power improvement achievable by this methodology are made with blade - element momentum theory but will eventually be demonstrated in the field at the Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design, currently under construction at the University of Notre Dame.

  14. Optimizing wind turbine control system parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schluter, L.L.; Vachon, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    The impending expiration of the levelized period in the Interim Standard Offer Number 4 (ISO4) utility contracts for purchasing wind-generated power in California mandates, more than ever, that windplants be operated in a cost-effective manner. Operating plans and approaches are needed that maximize the net revenue from wind parks--after accounting for operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a design tool that makes it possible to tailor a control system of a wind turbine (WT) to maximize energy production while minimizing the financial consequences of fatigue damage to key structural components. Plans for code enhancements to include expert systems and fuzzy logic are discussed, and typical results are presented in which the code is applied to study the controls of a generic Danish 15-m horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT).

  15. Integrated structure/control law design by multilevel optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    A new approach to integrated structure/control law design based on multilevel optimization is presented. This new approach is applicable to aircraft and spacecraft and allows for the independent design of the structure and control law. Integration of the designs is achieved through use of an upper level coordination problem formulation within the multilevel optimization framework. The method requires the use of structure and control law design sensitivity information. A general multilevel structure/control law design problem formulation is given, and the use of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control law design and design sensitivity methods within the formulation is illustrated. Results of three simple integrated structure/control law design examples are presented. These results show the capability of structure and control law design tradeoffs to improve controlled system performance within the multilevel approach.

  16. Optimizing and controlling the operation of heat-exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, N.; Marchetti, J.L.

    1998-05-01

    A procedure was developed for on-line optimization and control systems of heat-exchanger networks, which features a two-level control structure, one for a constant configuration control system and the other for a supervisor on-line optimizer. The coordination between levels is achieved by adjusting the formulation of the optimization problem to meet requirements of the adopted control system. The general goal is always to work without losing stream temperature targets while keeping the highest energy integration. The operation constraints used for heat-exchanger and utility units emphasize the computation of heat-exchanger duties rather than intermediate stream temperatures. This simplifies the modeling task and provides clear links with the limits of the manipulated variables. The optimal condition is determined using LP or NLP, depending on the final problem formulation. Degrees of freedom for optimization and equation constraints for considering simple and multiple bypasses are rigorously discussed. An example used shows how the optimization problem can be adjusted to a specific network design, its expected operating space, and the control configuration. Dynamic simulations also show benefits and limitations of this procedure.

  17. Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan Sheppard; Bruce Woodrow; Paul Kilmurray; Simon Thwaite

    2011-06-30

    A multi phase program was undertaken with the stated goal of using advanced design and development tools to create a unique combination of existing technologies to create a powertrain system specification that allowed minimal increase of volumetric fuel consumption when operating on E85 relative to gasoline. Although on an energy basis gasoline / ethanol blends typically return similar fuel economy to straight gasoline, because of its lower energy density (gasoline ~ 31.8MJ/l and ethanol ~ 21.1MJ/l) the volume based fuel economy of gasoline / ethanol blends are typically considerably worse. This project was able to define an initial engine specification envelope, develop specific hardware for the application, and test that hardware in both single and multi-cylinder test engines to verify the ability of the specified powertrain to deliver reduced E85 fuel consumption. Finally, the results from the engine testing were used in a vehicle drive cycle analysis tool to define a final vehicle level fuel economy result. During the course of the project, it was identified that the technologies utilized to improve fuel economy on E85 also enabled improved fuel economy when operating on gasoline. However, the E85 fueled powertrain provided improved vehicle performance when compared to the gasoline fueled powertrain due to the improved high load performance of the E85 fuel. Relative to the baseline comparator engine and considering current market fuels, the volumetric fuel consumption penalty when running on E85 with the fully optimized project powertrain specification was reduced significantly. This result shows that alternative fuels can be utilized in high percentages while maintaining or improving vehicle performance and with minimal or positive impact on total cost of ownership to the end consumer. The justification for this project was two-fold. In order to reduce the US dependence on crude oil, much of which is imported, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

  18. Control optimization of the cryoplant warm compressor station for EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L. B.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-29

    The cryogenic control system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) was designed based on DeltaV DCS of Emerson Corporation. The automatic control of the cryoplant warm compressors has been implemented. However, with ever-degrading performance of critical equipment, the cryoplant operation in the partial design conditions makes the control system fluctuate and unstable. In this paper, the warm compressor control system was optimized to eliminate the pressure oscillation based on the expert PID theory.

  19. Lyapunov optimal feedback control of a nonlinear inverted pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. J.; Anderson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Liapunov optimal feedback control is applied to a nonlinear inverted pendulum in which the control torque was constrained to be less than the nonlinear gravity torque in the model. This necessitates a control algorithm which 'rocks' the pendulum out of its potential wells, in order to stabilize it at a unique vertical position. Simulation results indicate that a preliminary Liapunov feedback controller can successfully overcome the nonlinearity and bring almost all trajectories to the target.

  20. Near-time-optimal control for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Ming; Wu, Re-Bing; Zhang, Tian-Ming; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-12-01

    For a quantum system controlled by an external field, time-optimal control is referred to as the shortest-time-duration control that can still permit maximizing an objective function J , which is especially a desirable goal for engineering quantum dynamics against decoherence effects. However, since rigorously finding a time-optimal control is usually very difficult and in many circumstances the control is only required to be sufficiently short and precise, one can design algorithms seeking such suboptimal control solutions for much reduced computational effort. In this paper, we propose an iterative algorithm for finding near-time-optimal control in a high level set (i.e., the set of controls that achieves the same value of J ) that can be arbitrarily close to the global optima. The algorithm proceeds seeking to decrease the time duration T while the value of J remains invariant, until J leaves the level-set value; the deviation of J due to numerical errors is corrected by gradient climbing that brings the search back to the level-set J value. Since the level set is very close to the maximum value of J , the resulting control solution is nearly time optimal with manageable precision. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness and general applicability of the algorithm.

  1. Optimization of nitrogen removal for alternating intermittent aeration-type activated sludge system: a new process modification.

    PubMed

    Insel, Guclu; Sözen, Seval; Başak, Serden; Orhon, Derin

    2006-01-01

    A new activated sludge process modification was proposed for intermittent aeration process to achieve more stable nitrogen removal performance. A single completely mixed reactor was divided into two compartments in series and operated in intermittent aeration mode by using activated sludge simulation model. The new configuration provided competetive advantage on nitrification as well as denitrification capacity, compared to the intermittently aerated system with a single reactor. In addition, the dissolved oxygen set-point control during air-on periods was found to be an important parameter in terms of nitrogen removal.

  2. Modification and testing of an engine and fuel control system for a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Recker, E.

    2011-10-01

    The control of pollutant emissions has become more and more important by the development of new gas turbines. The use of hydrogen produced by renewable energy sources could be an alternative. Besides the reduction of NOx emissions emerged during the combustion process, another major question is how a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine including the metering unit can be controlled and operated. This paper presents a first insight in modifications on an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36300 for using gaseous hydrogen as a gas turbine fuel. For safe operation with hydrogen, the metering of hydrogen has to be fast, precise, and secure. So, the quality of the metering unit's control loop has an important influence on this topic. The paper documents the empiric determination of the proportional integral derivative (PID) control parameters for the metering unit.

  3. Flight evaluation of modifications to a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Zeller, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The third phase of a flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 has recently been completed. It was found that digital electronic engine control software logic changes and augmentor hardware improvements resulted in significant improvements in engine operation. For intermediate to maximum power throttle transients, an increase in altitude capability of up to 8000 ft was found, and for idle to maximum transients, an increase of up to 4000 ft was found. A nozzle instability noted in earlier flight testing was investigated on a test engine at NASA Lewis Research Center, a digital electronic engine control software logic change was developed and evaluated, and no instability occurred in the Phase 3 flight evaluation. The backup control airstart modification was evaluated, and gave an improvement of airstart capability by reducing the minimum airspeed for successful airstarts by 50 to 75 knots.

  4. An optimized buffer controlled data compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosik, P. H.; Schwartz, M.

    1974-01-01

    The digital data compression system considered uses a buffer controlled aperture algorithm which minimizes the mean-squared error between the reconstructed receiver output and transmitter input. The data compression technique selected is based on the zero-order floating aperture prediction rule. It is assumed that the statistics of the input data are initially uniformly distributed, stationary, and first-order Markov. The problem is solved for stationary data. An approach is presented for extending the results to slowly varying uniformly distributed nonstationary Markov data.

  5. Game controller modification for fMRI hyperscanning experiments in a cooperative virtual reality environment

    PubMed Central

    Trees, Jason; Snider, Joseph; Falahpour, Maryam; Guo, Nick; Lu, Kun; Johnson, Douglas C.; Poizner, Howard; Liu, Thomas T.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperscanning, an emerging technique in which data from multiple interacting subjects’ brains are simultaneously recorded, has become an increasingly popular way to address complex topics, such as “theory of mind.” However, most previous fMRI hyperscanning experiments have been limited to abstract social interactions (e.g. phone conversations). Our new method utilizes a virtual reality (VR) environment used for military training, Virtual Battlespace 2 (VBS2), to create realistic avatar-avatar interactions and cooperative tasks. To control the virtual avatar, subjects use a MRI compatible Playstation 3 game controller, modified by removing all extraneous metal components and replacing any necessary ones with 3D printed plastic models. Control of both scanners’ operation is initiated by a VBS2 plugin to sync scanner time to the known time within the VR environment. Our modifications include:•Modification of game controller to be MRI compatible.•Design of VBS2 virtual environment for cooperative interactions.•Syncing two MRI machines for simultaneous recording. PMID:26150964

  6. Game controller modification for fMRI hyperscanning experiments in a cooperative virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Trees, Jason; Snider, Joseph; Falahpour, Maryam; Guo, Nick; Lu, Kun; Johnson, Douglas C; Poizner, Howard; Liu, Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    Hyperscanning, an emerging technique in which data from multiple interacting subjects' brains are simultaneously recorded, has become an increasingly popular way to address complex topics, such as "theory of mind." However, most previous fMRI hyperscanning experiments have been limited to abstract social interactions (e.g. phone conversations). Our new method utilizes a virtual reality (VR) environment used for military training, Virtual Battlespace 2 (VBS2), to create realistic avatar-avatar interactions and cooperative tasks. To control the virtual avatar, subjects use a MRI compatible Playstation 3 game controller, modified by removing all extraneous metal components and replacing any necessary ones with 3D printed plastic models. Control of both scanners' operation is initiated by a VBS2 plugin to sync scanner time to the known time within the VR environment. Our modifications include:•Modification of game controller to be MRI compatible.•Design of VBS2 virtual environment for cooperative interactions.•Syncing two MRI machines for simultaneous recording. PMID:26150964

  7. Solving Optimal Control Problems by Exploiting Inherent Dynamical Systems Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaßkamp, Kathrin; Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Kobilarov, Marin

    2012-08-01

    Computing globally efficient solutions is a major challenge in optimal control of nonlinear dynamical systems. This work proposes a method combining local optimization and motion planning techniques based on exploiting inherent dynamical systems structures, such as symmetries and invariant manifolds. Prior to the optimal control, the dynamical system is analyzed for structural properties that can be used to compute pieces of trajectories that are stored in a motion planning library. In the context of mechanical systems, these motion planning candidates, termed primitives, are given by relative equilibria induced by symmetries and motions on stable or unstable manifolds of e.g. fixed points in the natural dynamics. The existence of controlled relative equilibria is studied through Lagrangian mechanics and symmetry reduction techniques. The proposed framework can be used to solve boundary value problems by performing a search in the space of sequences of motion primitives connected using optimized maneuvers. The optimal sequence can be used as an admissible initial guess for a post-optimization. The approach is illustrated by two numerical examples, the single and the double spherical pendula, which demonstrates its benefit compared to standard local optimization techniques.

  8. Polynomial method for PLL controller optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ta-Chung; Lall, Sanjay; Chiou, Tsung-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) is a key component of modern electronic communication and control systems. PLL is designed to extract signals from transmission channels. It plays an important role in systems where it is required to estimate the phase of a received signal, such as carrier tracking from global positioning system satellites. In order to robustly provide centimeter-level accuracy, it is crucial for the PLL to estimate the instantaneous phase of an incoming signal which is usually buried in random noise or some type of interference. This paper presents an approach that utilizes the recent development in the semi-definite programming and sum-of-squares field. A Lyapunov function will be searched as the certificate of the pull-in range of the PLL system. Moreover, a polynomial design procedure is proposed to further refine the controller parameters for system response away from the equilibrium point. Several simulation results as well as an experiment result are provided to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:22163973

  9. Exploring quantum control landscapes: Topology, features, and optimization scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Katharine W.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-07-15

    Quantum optimal control experiments and simulations have successfully manipulated the dynamics of systems ranging from atoms to biomolecules. Surprisingly, these collective works indicate that the effort (i.e., the number of algorithmic iterations) required to find an optimal control field appears to be essentially invariant to the complexity of the system. The present work explores this matter in a series of systematic optimizations of the state-to-state transition probability on model quantum systems with the number of states N ranging from 5 through 100. The optimizations occur over a landscape defined by the transition probability as a function of the control field. Previous theoretical studies on the topology of quantum control landscapes established that they should be free of suboptimal traps under reasonable physical conditions. The simulations in this work include nearly 5000 individual optimization test cases, all of which confirm this prediction by fully achieving optimal population transfer of at least 99.9% on careful attention to numerical procedures to ensure that the controls are free of constraints. Collectively, the simulation results additionally show invariance of required search effort to system dimension N. This behavior is rationalized in terms of the structural features of the underlying control landscape. The very attractive observed scaling with system complexity may be understood by considering the distance traveled on the control landscape during a search and the magnitude of the control landscape slope. Exceptions to this favorable scaling behavior can arise when the initial control field fluence is too large or when the target final state recedes from the initial state as N increases.

  10. Reciprocal control between a bacterium's regulatory system and the modification status of its lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akinori; Chen, H Deborah; Latifi, Tammy; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2012-09-28

    Gram-negative bacteria often modify their lipopolysaccharide (LPS), thereby increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents and avoidance of the host immune system. However, it is unclear how bacteria adjust the levels and activities of LPS-modifying enzymes in response to the modification status of their LPS. We now address this question by investigating the major regulator of LPS modifications in Salmonella enterica. We report that the PmrA/PmrB system controls expression of a membrane peptide that inhibits the activity of LpxT, an enzyme responsible for increasing the LPS negative charge. LpxT's inhibition and the PmrA-dependent incorporation of positively charged L-4-aminoarabinose into the LPS decrease Fe(3+) binding to the bacterial cell. Because Fe(3+) is an activating ligand for the sensor PmrB, transcription of PmrA-dependent LPS-modifying genes is reduced. This mechanism enables bacteria to sense their cell surface by its effect on the availability of an inducing signal for the system regulating cell-surface modifications.

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF DECENTRALIZED BMP CONTROLS IN URBAN AREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will present an overview of a recently completed project for the US EPA entitled, Optimization of Urban Wet-weather Flow Control Systems. The focus of this effort is on techniques that are suitable for evaluating decentralized BMP controls. The four major components ...

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF DECENTRALIZED BMP CONTROLS IN URBAN AREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will present an overview of a recently completed project for the US EPA entitled Optimization of Urban Wet-weather Flow Control Systems. The focus of this effort is on techniques that are suitable for evaluating decentralized BMP controls. The four major components o...

  13. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimal Control of Anthroponotic Cutaneous Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Muhammad; Zaman, Gul; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the transmission dynamics and optimal control of Anthroponotic Cutaneous Leishmania. The threshold condition R0 for initial transmission of infection is obtained by next generation method. Biological sense of the threshold condition is investigated and discussed in detail. The sensitivity analysis of the reproduction number is presented and the most sensitive parameters are high lighted. On the basis of sensitivity analysis, some control strategies are introduced in the model. These strategies positively reduce the effect of the parameters with high sensitivity indices, on the initial transmission. Finally, an optimal control strategy is presented by taking into account the cost associated with control strategies. It is also shown that an optimal control exists for the proposed control problem. The goal of optimal control problem is to minimize, the cost associated with control strategies and the chances of infectious humans, exposed humans and vector population to become infected. Numerical simulations are carried out with the help of Runge-Kutta fourth order procedure. PMID:27505634

  14. Semilinear Kolmogorov Equations and Applications to Stochastic Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Federica

    2005-03-15

    Semilinear parabolic differential equations are solved in a mild sense in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Applications to stochastic optimal control problems are studied by solving the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. These results are applied to some controlled stochastic partial differential equations.

  15. Optimal Control of a Dengue Epidemic Model with Vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Teresa, M.; Monteiro, T.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2011-09-01

    We present a SIR+ASI epidemic model to describe the interaction between human and dengue fever mosquito populations. A control strategy in the form of vaccination, to decrease the number of infected individuals, is used. An optimal control approach is applied in order to find the best way to fight the disease.

  16. Recursive multibody dynamics and discrete-time optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deleuterio, G. M. T.; Damaren, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    A recursive algorithm is developed for the solution of the simulation dynamics problem for a chain of rigid bodies. Arbitrary joint constraints are permitted, that is, joints may allow translational and/or rotational degrees of freedom. The recursive procedure is shown to be identical to that encountered in a discrete-time optimal control problem. For each relevant quantity in the multibody dynamics problem, there exists an analog in the context of optimal control. The performance index that is minimized in the control problem is identified as Gibbs' function for the chain of bodies.

  17. Optimization of an Aeroservoelastic Wing with Distributed Multiple Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the aeroelastic optimization of a subsonic transport wingbox under a variety of static and dynamic aeroelastic constraints. Three types of design variables are utilized: structural variables (skin thickness, stiffener details), the quasi-steady deflection scheduling of a series of control surfaces distributed along the trailing edge for maneuver load alleviation and trim attainment, and the design details of an LQR controller, which commands oscillatory hinge moments into those same control surfaces. Optimization problems are solved where a closed loop flutter constraint is forced to satisfy the required flight margin, and mass reduction benefits are realized by relaxing the open loop flutter requirements.

  18. Optimal member damper controller design for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the selection of velocity feedback gains for individual dampers for the members of a structurally controlled large flexible space structure. The problem is formulated as an optimal output feedback regulator problem, and necessary conditions are derived for minimizing a quadratic performance function. The diagonal nature of the gain matrix is taken into account, along with knowledge of noise covariances. It is pointed out that the method presented offers a systematic approach to the design of a class of controllers for enhancing structural damping, which have significant potential if used in conjunction with a reduced-order optimal controller for rigid-body modes and selected structural modes.

  19. Solving the optimal attention allocation problem in manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Within the context of the optimal control model of human response, analytic expressions for the gradients of closed-loop performance metrics with respect to human operator attention allocation are derived. These derivatives serve as the basis for a gradient algorithm that determines the optimal attention that a human should allocate among several display indicators in a steady-state manual control task. Application of the human modeling techniques are made to study the hover control task for a CH-46 VTOL flight tested by NASA.

  20. State-Constrained Optimal Control Problems of Impulsive Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Forcadel, Nicolas; Rao Zhiping Zidani, Hasnaa

    2013-08-01

    The present paper studies an optimal control problem governed by measure driven differential systems and in presence of state constraints. The first result shows that using the graph completion of the measure, the optimal solutions can be obtained by solving a reparametrized control problem of absolutely continuous trajectories but with time-dependent state-constraints. The second result shows that it is possible to characterize the epigraph of the reparametrized value function by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation without assuming any controllability assumption.

  1. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-01

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  2. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes in phase space.

    PubMed

    Joe-Wong, Carlee; Ho, Tak-San; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel; Wu, Rebing

    2013-03-28

    Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on (a) a model diatomic molecule, (b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and (c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous quantum state-to-state transition probability control landscape.

  3. Optimal control methods for rapidly time-varying Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Motzoi, F.; Merkel, S. T.; Wilhelm, F. K.; Gambetta, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    In this article, we develop a numerical method to find optimal control pulses that accounts for the separation of timescales between the variation of the input control fields and the applied Hamiltonian. In traditional numerical optimization methods, these timescales are treated as being the same. While this approximation has had much success, in applications where the input controls are filtered substantially or mixed with a fast carrier, the resulting optimized pulses have little relation to the applied physical fields. Our technique remains numerically efficient in that the dimension of our search space is only dependent on the variation of the input control fields, while our simulation of the quantum evolution is accurate on the timescale of the fast variation in the applied Hamiltonian.

  4. Macronutrient modifications of optimal foraging theory: an approach using indifference curves applied to some modern foragers

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.

    1988-06-01

    The use of energy (calories) as the currency to be maximized per unit time in Optimal Foraging Models is considered in light of data on several foraging groups. Observations on the Ache, Cuiva, and Yora foragers suggest men do not attempt to maximize energetic return rates, but instead often concentration on acquiring meat resources which provide lower energetic returns. The possibility that this preference is due to the macronutrient composition of hunted and gathered foods is explored. Indifference curves are introduced as a means of modeling the tradeoff between two desirable commodities, meat (protein-lipid) and carbohydrate, and a specific indifference curve is derived using observed choices in five foraging situations. This curve is used to predict the amount of meat that Mbuti foragers will trade for carbohydrate, in an attempt to test the utility of the approach.

  5. Control optimization, stabilization and computer algorithms for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M. (Editor); Willsky, A. S. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The analysis and design of complex multivariable reliable control systems are considered. High performance and fault tolerant aircraft systems are the objectives. A preliminary feasibility study of the design of a lateral control system for a VTOL aircraft that is to land on a DD963 class destroyer under high sea state conditions is provided. Progress in the following areas is summarized: (1) VTOL control system design studies; (2) robust multivariable control system synthesis; (3) adaptive control systems; (4) failure detection algorithms; and (5) fault tolerant optimal control theory.

  6. Optimal control of information epidemics modeled as Maki Thompson rumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandhway, Kundan; Kuri, Joy

    2014-12-01

    We model the spread of information in a homogeneously mixed population using the Maki Thompson rumor model. We formulate an optimal control problem, from the perspective of single campaigner, to maximize the spread of information when the campaign budget is fixed. Control signals, such as advertising in the mass media, attempt to convert ignorants and stiflers into spreaders. We show the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem when the campaigning incurs non-linear costs under the isoperimetric budget constraint. The solution employs Pontryagin's Minimum Principle and a modified version of forward backward sweep technique for numerical computation to accommodate the isoperimetric budget constraint. The techniques developed in this paper are general and can be applied to similar optimal control problems in other areas. We have allowed the spreading rate of the information epidemic to vary over the campaign duration to model practical situations when the interest level of the population in the subject of the campaign changes with time. The shape of the optimal control signal is studied for different model parameters and spreading rate profiles. We have also studied the variation of the optimal campaigning costs with respect to various model parameters. Results indicate that, for some model parameters, significant improvements can be achieved by the optimal strategy compared to the static control strategy. The static strategy respects the same budget constraint as the optimal strategy and has a constant value throughout the campaign horizon. This work finds application in election and social awareness campaigns, product advertising, movie promotion and crowdfunding campaigns.

  7. Optimal control of coupled PDE networks with automated code generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a framework for the optimal control of coupled PDE networks. A coupled PDE network is a system of partial differential equations coupled together. Such systems can be represented as a directed graph. A domain specific language (DSL)—an extension of the DOT language—is used for the description of such a coupled PDE network. The adjoint equations and the gradient, required for its optimal control, are computed with the help of a computer algebra system (CAS). Automated code generation techniques have been used for the generation of the PDE systems of both the direct and the adjoint equations. Both the direct and adjoint equations are solved with the standard finite element method. Finally, for the numerical optimization of the system standard optimization techniques are used such as BFGS and Newton conjugate gradient.

  8. Thermodynamic framework for discrete optimal control in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieniutycz, Stanislaw

    1999-08-01

    Bellman's method of dynamic programming is used to synthesize diverse optimization approaches to active (work producing) and inactive (entropy generating) multiphase flow systems. Thermal machines, optimally controlled unit operations, nonlinear heat conduction, spontaneous relaxation processes, and self-propagating wave fronts are all shown to satisfy a discrete Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and a corresponding discrete optimization algorithm of Pontryagin's type, with the maximum principle for a Hamiltonian. The extremal structures are always canonical. A common unifying criterion is set for all considered systems, which is the criterion of a minimum generated entropy. It is shown that constraints can modify the entropy functionals in a different way for each group of the processes considered; thus the resulting structures of these functionals may differ significantly. Practical conclusions are formulated regarding the energy savings and energy policy in optimally controlled systems.

  9. Exploring the complexity of quantum control optimization trajectories.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Arun; Shir, Ofer M; Donovan, Ashley; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-01-01

    The control of quantum system dynamics is generally performed by seeking a suitable applied field. The physical objective as a functional of the field forms the quantum control landscape, whose topology, under certain conditions, has been shown to contain no critical point suboptimal traps, thereby enabling effective searches for fields that give the global maximum of the objective. This paper addresses the structure of the landscape as a complement to topological critical point features. Recent work showed that landscape structure is highly favorable for optimization of state-to-state transition probabilities, in that gradient-based control trajectories to the global maximum value are nearly straight paths. The landscape structure is codified in the metric R ≥ 1.0, defined as the ratio of the length of the control trajectory to the Euclidean distance between the initial and optimal controls. A value of R = 1 would indicate an exactly straight trajectory to the optimal observable value. This paper extends the state-to-state transition probability results to the quantum ensemble and unitary transformation control landscapes. Again, nearly straight trajectories predominate, and we demonstrate that R can take values approaching 1.0 with high precision. However, the interplay of optimization trajectories with critical saddle submanifolds is found to influence landscape structure. A fundamental relationship necessary for perfectly straight gradient-based control trajectories is derived, wherein the gradient on the quantum control landscape must be an eigenfunction of the Hessian. This relation is an indicator of landscape structure and may provide a means to identify physical conditions when control trajectories can achieve perfect linearity. The collective favorable landscape topology and structure provide a foundation to understand why optimal quantum control can be readily achieved.

  10. Optimized Reactive Power Compensation Using Fuzzy Logic Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S.; Mini, K. N.; Supriya, K.

    2015-03-01

    Reactive power flow in a long transmission line plays a vital role in power transfer capability and voltage stability in power system. Traditionally, shunt connected compensators are used to control reactive power in long transmission line. Thyristor controlled reactor is used to control reactive power under lightly loaded condition. By controlling firing angle of thyristor, it is possible to control reactive power in the transmission lines. However, thyristor controlled reactor will inject harmonic current into the system. An attempt to reduce reactive power injection will increase harmonic distortion in the line current and vice versa. Thus, there is a trade-off between reactive power injection and harmonics in current. By optimally controlling the reactive power injection, harmonics in current can be brought within the specified limit. In this paper, a Fuzzy Logic Controller is implemented to obtain optimal control of reactive power of the compensator to maintain voltage and harmonic in current within the limits. An algorithm which optimizes the firing angle in each fuzzy subset by calculating the rank of feasible firing angles is proposed for the construction of rules in Fuzzy Logic Controller. The novelty of the algorithm is that it uses a simple error formula for the calculation of the rank of the feasible firing angles in each fuzzy subset.

  11. Optimal Robust Motion Controller Design Using Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Svečko, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a multiobjective genetic algorithm for robust motion controller design. Motion controller structure is based on a disturbance observer in an RIC framework. The RIC approach is presented in the form with internal and external feedback loops, in which an internal disturbance rejection controller and an external performance controller must be synthesised. This paper involves novel objectives for robustness and performance assessments for such an approach. Objective functions for the robustness property of RIC are based on simple even polynomials with nonnegativity conditions. Regional pole placement method is presented with the aims of controllers' structures simplification and their additional arbitrary selection. Regional pole placement involves arbitrary selection of central polynomials for both loops, with additional admissible region of the optimized pole location. Polynomial deviation between selected and optimized polynomials is measured with derived performance objective functions. A multiobjective function is composed of different unrelated criteria such as robust stability, controllers' stability, and time-performance indexes of closed loops. The design of controllers and multiobjective optimization procedure involve a set of the objectives, which are optimized simultaneously with a genetic algorithm—differential evolution. PMID:24987749

  12. Optimal robust motion controller design using multiobjective genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sarjaš, Andrej; Svečko, Rajko; Chowdhury, Amor

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a multiobjective genetic algorithm for robust motion controller design. Motion controller structure is based on a disturbance observer in an RIC framework. The RIC approach is presented in the form with internal and external feedback loops, in which an internal disturbance rejection controller and an external performance controller must be synthesised. This paper involves novel objectives for robustness and performance assessments for such an approach. Objective functions for the robustness property of RIC are based on simple even polynomials with nonnegativity conditions. Regional pole placement method is presented with the aims of controllers' structures simplification and their additional arbitrary selection. Regional pole placement involves arbitrary selection of central polynomials for both loops, with additional admissible region of the optimized pole location. Polynomial deviation between selected and optimized polynomials is measured with derived performance objective functions. A multiobjective function is composed of different unrelated criteria such as robust stability, controllers' stability, and time-performance indexes of closed loops. The design of controllers and multiobjective optimization procedure involve a set of the objectives, which are optimized simultaneously with a genetic algorithm-differential evolution. PMID:24987749

  13. Efficient algorithms for the laboratory discovery of optimal quantum controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinici, Gabriel; Le Bris, Claude; Rabitz, Herschel

    2004-07-01

    The laboratory closed-loop optimal control of quantum phenomena, expressed as minimizing a suitable cost functional, is currently implemented through an optimization algorithm coupled to the experimental apparatus. In practice, the most commonly used search algorithms are variants of genetic algorithms. As an alternative choice, a direct search deterministic algorithm is proposed in this paper. For the simple simulations studied here, it outperforms the existing approaches. An additional algorithm is introduced in order to reveal some properties of the cost functional landscape.

  14. Solving bi-objective optimal control problems with rectangular framing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Karunia Putra; Götz, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Optimization problems, e.g. arising from epidemiology models, often ask for solutions minimizing multi-criteria objective functions. In this paper we discuss a novel approach for solving bi-objective optimal control problems. The set of non-dominated points is constructed via a decreasing sequence of rectangles. Particular attention is paid to a problem with disconnected set of non-dominated points. Several examples from epidemiology are investigated and show the applicability of the method.

  15. Optimizing laser pulses to control photoinduced states of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bin; Duxbury, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a computational approach to optimal laser pulse shaping directed at accessing novel photoinduced states of matter. Results are illustrated for a simple charge-density wave (CDW) model where the targeted effect is CDW melting and negative temperature states. Optimal control is implemented using the Krotov method applied to nonequilibrium tight-binding Hamiltonians where the laser pulse is introduced using the Peierls substitution, and we demonstrate monotonic convergence for this class of problem.

  16. Optimal periodic control for spacecraft pointing and attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittelkau, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to autonomous magnetic roll/yaw control of polar-orbiting, nadir-pointing momentum bias spacecraft is considered as the baseline attitude control system for the next Tiros series. It is shown that the roll/yaw dynamics with magnetic control are periodically time varying. An optimal periodic control law is then developed. The control design features a state estimator that estimates attitude, attitude rate, and environmental torque disturbances from Earth sensor and sun sensor measurements; no gyros are needed. The state estimator doubles as a dynamic attitude determination and prediction function. In addition to improved performance, the optimal controller allows a much smaller momentum bias than would otherwise be necessary. Simulation results are given.

  17. Optimal Variable-Structure Control Tracking of Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Vadali, Srinivas R.; Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    An optimal control approach using variable-structure (sliding-mode) tracking for large angle spacecraft maneuvers is presented. The approach expands upon a previously derived regulation result using a quaternion parameterization for the kinematic equations of motion. This parameterization is used since it is free of singularities. The main contribution of this paper is the utilization of a simple term in the control law that produces a maneuver to the reference attitude trajectory in the shortest distance. Also, a multiplicative error quaternion between the desired and actual attitude is used to derive the control law. Sliding-mode switching surfaces are derived using an optimal-control analysis. Control laws are given using either external torque commands or reaction wheel commands. Global asymptotic stability is shown for both cases using a Lyapunov analysis. Simulation results are shown which use the new control strategy to stabilize the motion of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe spacecraft.

  18. Optimization in Hardy space and the problem of controller optimization (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, V. B.

    1992-02-01

    Problems related to optimization in Hardy space H2 are examined with particular reference to approaches based on the Wiener-Kolmogorov and Wiener-Hopf methods. The existing parametrization procedures for sets of stabilizing controllers are compared. The use of the LQG approach and H2 optimization in applied problems is discussed using specific examples. Consideration is also given to the solution of the Riccati algebraic equation and factorization of matrix polynomials.

  19. A Higher Harmonic Optimal Controller to Optimise Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    1996-01-01

    Three methods to optimize rotorcraft aeromechanical behavior for those cases where the rotorcraft plant can be adequately represented by a linear model system matrix were identified and implemented in a stand-alone code. These methods determine the optimal control vector which minimizes the vibration metric subject to constraints at discrete time points, and differ from the commonly used non-optimal constraint penalty methods such as those employed by conventional controllers in that the constraints are handled as actual constraints to an optimization problem rather than as just additional terms in the performance index. The first method is to use a Non-linear Programming algorithm to solve the problem directly. The second method is to solve the full set of non-linear equations which define the necessary conditions for optimality. The third method is to solve each of the possible reduced sets of equations defining the necessary conditions for optimality when the constraints are pre-selected to be either active or inactive, and then to simply select the best solution. The effects of maneuvers and aeroelasticity on the systems matrix are modelled by using a pseudo-random pseudo-row-dependency scheme to define the systems matrix. Cases run to date indicate that the first method of solution is reliable, robust, and easiest to use, and that it was superior to the conventional controllers which were considered.

  20. Advanced launch system trajectory optimization using suboptimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaver, Douglas A.; Hull, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The maximum-final mass trajectory of a proposed configuration of the Advanced Launch System is presented. A model for the two-stage rocket is given; the optimal control problem is formulated as a parameter optimization problem; and the optimal trajectory is computed using a nonlinear programming code called VF02AD. Numerical results are presented for the controls (angle of attack and velocity roll angle) and the states. After the initial rotation, the angle of attack goes to a positive value to keep the trajectory as high as possible, returns to near zero to pass through the transonic regime and satisfy the dynamic pressure constraint, returns to a positive value to keep the trajectory high and to take advantage of minimum drag at positive angle of attack due to aerodynamic shading of the booster, and then rolls off to negative values to satisfy the constraints. Because the engines cannot be throttled, the maximum dynamic pressure occurs at a single point; there is no maximum dynamic pressure subarc. To test approximations for obtaining analytical solutions for guidance, two additional optimal trajectories are computed: one using untrimmed aerodynamics and one using no atmospheric effects except for the dynamic pressure constraint. It is concluded that untrimmed aerodynamics has a negligible effect on the optimal trajectory and that approximate optimal controls should be able to be obtained by treating atmospheric effects as perturbations.

  1. Optimal control of switched linear systems based on Migrant Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fuqiang; Wang, Yongji; Zheng, Zongzhun; Li, Chuanfeng

    2009-10-01

    The optimal control problem for switched linear systems with internally forced switching has more constraints than with externally forced switching. Heavy computations and slow convergence in solving this problem is a major obstacle. In this paper we describe a new approach for solving this problem, which is called Migrant Particle Swarm Optimization (Migrant PSO). Imitating the behavior of a flock of migrant birds, the Migrant PSO applies naturally to both continuous and discrete spaces, in which definitive optimization algorithm and stochastic search method are combined. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is illustrated via a numerical example.

  2. Optimization of methods for the genetic modification of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon Cd

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are not only critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi) owing to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low because of multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4(+) T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T-cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4(+) T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4(+) T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4(+) T cells.

  3. Optimization of Methods for the Genetic Modification of Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNAi due to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low due to multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4+ T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4+ T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4+ T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4+ T cells. PMID:26027856

  4. Integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition is presented. It is shown that several previously reported methods were actually partial decompositions wherein only the control was decomposed into a subsystem design. One of these partially decomposed problems was selected as a benchmark example for comparison. The present paper fully decomposes the system into structural and control subsystem designs and produces an improved design. Theory, implementation, and results for the method are presented and compared with the benchmark example.

  5. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  6. Integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition is presented. It is shown that several previously reported methods were actually partial decompositions wherein only the control was decomposed into a subsystem design. One of these partially decomposed problems was selected as a benchmark example for comparison. The system is fully decomposed into structural and control subsystem designs and an improved design is produced. Theory, implementation, and results for the method are presented and compared with the benchmark example.

  7. An optimal performance control scheme for a 3D crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamed, Z.; Husain, A. R.; Tokhi, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal performance control scheme for control of a three dimensional (3D) crane system including a Zero Vibration shaper which considers two control objectives concurrently. The control objectives are fast and accurate positioning of a trolley and minimum sway of a payload. A complete mathematical model of a lab-scaled 3D crane is simulated in Simulink. With a specific cost function the proposed controller is designed to cater both control objectives similar to a skilled operator. Simulation and experimental studies on a 3D crane show that the proposed controller has better performance as compared to a sequentially tuned PID-PID anti swing controller. The controller provides better position response with satisfactory payload sway in both rail and trolley responses. Experiments with different payloads and cable lengths show that the proposed controller is robust to changes in payload with satisfactory responses.

  8. Force control of a tri-layer conducting polymer actuator using optimized fuzzy logic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itik, Mehmet; Sabetghadam, Mohammadreza; Alici, Gursel

    2014-12-01

    Conducting polymers actuators (CPAs) are potential candidates for replacing conventional actuators in various fields, such as robotics and biomedical engineering, due to their advantageous properties, which includes their low cost, light weight, low actuation voltage and biocompatibility. As these actuators are very suitable for use in micro-nano manipulation and in injection devices in which the magnitude of the force applied to the target is of crucial importance, the force generated by CPAs needs to be accurately controlled. In this paper, a fuzzy logic (FL) controller with a Mamdani inference system is designed to control the blocking force of a trilayer CPA with polypyrrole electrodes, which operates in air. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is employed to optimize the controller’s membership function parameters and therefore enhance the performance of the FL controller. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model, which can capture the nonlinear dynamics of the actuator, is utilized in the optimization process. The optimized Mamdani FL controller is then implemented on the CPA experimentally, and its performance is compared with a non-optimized fuzzy controller as well as with those obtained from a conventional PID controller. The results presented indicate that the blocking force at the tip of the CPA can be effectively controlled by the optimized FL controller, which shows excellent transient and steady state characteristics but increases the control voltage compared to the non-optimized fuzzy controllers.

  9. A novel model of motor learning capable of developing an optimal movement control law online from scratch.

    PubMed

    Shimansky, Yury P; Kang, Tao; He, Jiping

    2004-02-01

    A computational model of a learning system (LS) is described that acquires knowledge and skill necessary for optimal control of a multisegmental limb dynamics (controlled object or CO), starting from "knowing" only the dimensionality of the object's state space. It is based on an optimal control problem setup different from that of reinforcement learning. The LS solves the optimal control problem online while practicing the manipulation of CO. The system's functional architecture comprises several adaptive components, each of which incorporates a number of mapping functions approximated based on artificial neural nets. Besides the internal model of the CO's dynamics and adaptive controller that computes the control law, the LS includes a new type of internal model, the minimal cost (IM(mc)) of moving the controlled object between a pair of states. That internal model appears critical for the LS's capacity to develop an optimal movement trajectory. The IM(mc) interacts with the adaptive controller in a cooperative manner. The controller provides an initial approximation of an optimal control action, which is further optimized in real time based on the IM(mc). The IM(mc) in turn provides information for updating the controller. The LS's performance was tested on the task of center-out reaching to eight randomly selected targets with a 2DOF limb model. The LS reached an optimal level of performance in a few tens of trials. It also quickly adapted to movement perturbations produced by two different types of external force field. The results suggest that the proposed design of a self-optimized control system can serve as a basis for the modeling of motor learning that includes the formation and adaptive modification of the plan of a goal-directed movement.

  10. Optimizing the lifetimes of phenoxonium cations derived from vitamin E via structural modifications.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yanni; Novianti, Maria L; Tessensohn, Malcolm E; Hirao, Hajime; Webster, Richard D

    2015-12-28

    Systematic synthesis of a number of new phenolic compounds with structures similar to vitamin E led to the identification of several sterically hindered compounds that when electrochemically oxidised in acetonitrile in a -2e(-)/-H(+) process formed phenoxonium diamagnetic cations that were resistant to hydrolysis reactions. The reactivity of the phenoxonium ions was ascertained by performing cyclic voltammetric scans during the addition of carefully controlled quantities of water into acetonitrile solutions, with the data modelled using digital simulation techniques.

  11. Optimal control strategy for abnormal innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jinying; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune response plays an important role in control and clearance of pathogens following viral infection. However, in the majority of virus-infected individuals, the response is insufficient because viruses are known to use different evasion strategies to escape immune response. In this study, we use optimal control theory to investigate how to control the innate immune response. We present an optimal control model based on an ordinary-differential-equation system from a previous study, which investigated the dynamics and regulation of virus-triggered innate immune signaling pathways, and we prove the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem involving antiviral treatment or/and interferon therapy. We conduct numerical experiments to investigate the treatment effects of different control strategies through varying the cost function and control efficiency. The results show that a separate treatment, that is, only inhibiting viral replication (u1(t)) or enhancing interferon activity (u2(t)), has more advantages for controlling viral infection than a mixed treatment, that is, controlling both (u1(t)) and (u2(t)) simultaneously, including the smallest cost and operability. These findings would provide new insight for developing effective strategies for treatment of viral infectious diseases.

  12. Multi-objective optimization for model predictive control.

    PubMed

    Wojsznis, Willy; Mehta, Ashish; Wojsznis, Peter; Thiele, Dirk; Blevins, Terry

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a technique of multi-objective optimization for Model Predictive Control (MPC) where the optimization has three levels of the objective function, in order of priority: handling constraints, maximizing economics, and maintaining control. The greatest weights are assigned dynamically to control or constraint variables that are predicted to be out of their limits. The weights assigned for economics have to out-weigh those assigned for control objectives. Control variables (CV) can be controlled at fixed targets or within one- or two-sided ranges around the targets. Manipulated Variables (MV) can have assigned targets too, which may be predefined values or current actual values. This MV functionality is extremely useful when economic objectives are not defined for some or all the MVs. To achieve this complex operation, handle process outputs predicted to go out of limits, and have a guaranteed solution for any condition, the technique makes use of the priority structure, penalties on slack variables, and redefinition of the constraint and control model. An engineering implementation of this approach is shown in the MPC embedded in an industrial control system. The optimization and control of a distillation column, the standard Shell heavy oil fractionator (HOF) problem, is adequately achieved with this MPC. PMID:17382946

  13. A duality framework for stochastic optimal control of complex systems

    DOE PAGES

    Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of interactive subsystems. We formulate a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems and provide a duality framework to prove that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion of the system. We provide the conditions of existence and a geometric interpretation of the solution. For practical situations having constraints consistent with those studied here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value when we seek to derivemore » online the optimal control policy in complex systems.« less

  14. An optimal control approach to probabilistic Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2012-12-01

    External control of some genes in a genetic regulatory network is useful for avoiding undesirable states associated with some diseases. For this purpose, a number of stochastic optimal control approaches have been proposed. Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) as powerful tools for modeling gene regulatory systems have attracted considerable attention in systems biology. In this paper, we deal with a problem of optimal intervention in a PBN with the help of the theory of discrete time Markov decision process. Specifically, we first formulate a control model for a PBN as a first passage model for discrete time Markov decision processes and then find, using a value iteration algorithm, optimal effective treatments with the minimal expected first passage time over the space of all possible treatments. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, an example is also displayed.

  15. Optimal Control for Coupled Near-Field/Far-Field Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoquan; Collis, S. Scott; Ghayour, Kaveh; Heinkenschloss, Matthias

    2002-11-01

    A new multidomain/multiphysics computational framework for optimal control of aeroacoustic noise has been developed based on a near-field compressible Navier--Stokes solver coupled with a far-field wave equation using a discontinuous Galerkin formulation. In this approach, the coupling of near-field and far-field domains is achieved by weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface that encloses all nonlinear flow effects and noise sources. For optimal control, gradient formation is obtained by the solution of an appropriate adjoint problem that involves the propagation of adjoint information from the far-field to the near-field. The formulation and implementation of the state and adjoint problems will be presented along with preliminary results. This computational framework will be applied in the future to study optimal boundary control of blade-vortex interaction, which is a significant noise source for helicopters on approach to landing.

  16. Single step optimization of manipulator maneuvers with variable structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, N.; Dwyer, T. A. W., III

    1987-01-01

    One step ahead optimization has been recently proposed for spacecraft attitude maneuvers as well as for robot manipulator maneuvers. Such a technique yields a discrete time control algorithm implementable as a sequence of state-dependent, quadratic programming problems for acceleration optimization. Its sensitivity to model accuracy, for the required inversion of the system dynamics, is shown in this paper to be alleviated by a fast variable structure control correction, acting between the sampling intervals of the slow one step ahead discrete time acceleration command generation algorithm. The slow and fast looping concept chosen follows that recently proposed for optimal aiming strategies with variable structure control. Accelerations required by the VSC correction are reserved during the slow one step ahead command generation so that the ability to overshoot the sliding surface is guaranteed.

  17. A multiple objective optimization approach to quality control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaman, Christopher Michael

    1991-01-01

    The use of product quality as the performance criteria for manufacturing system control is explored. The goal in manufacturing, for economic reasons, is to optimize product quality. The problem is that since quality is a rather nebulous product characteristic, there is seldom an analytic function that can be used as a measure. Therefore standard control approaches, such as optimal control, cannot readily be applied. A second problem with optimizing product quality is that it is typically measured along many dimensions: there are many apsects of quality which must be optimized simultaneously. Very often these different aspects are incommensurate and competing. The concept of optimality must now include accepting tradeoffs among the different quality characteristics. These problems are addressed using multiple objective optimization. It is shown that the quality control problem can be defined as a multiple objective optimization problem. A controller structure is defined using this as the basis. Then, an algorithm is presented which can be used by an operator to interactively find the best operating point. Essentially, the algorithm uses process data to provide the operator with two pieces of information: (1) if it is possible to simultaneously improve all quality criteria, then determine what changes to the process input or controller parameters should be made to do this; and (2) if it is not possible to improve all criteria, and the current operating point is not a desirable one, select a criteria in which a tradeoff should be made, and make input changes to improve all other criteria. The process is not operating at an optimal point in any sense if no tradeoff has to be made to move to a new operating point. This algorithm ensures that operating points are optimal in some sense and provides the operator with information about tradeoffs when seeking the best operating point. The multiobjective algorithm was implemented in two different injection molding scenarios

  18. A stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback control methodology for superagility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Direskeneli, Haldun; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1992-01-01

    A new control design methodology is developed: Stochastic Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Technology (SOFFT). Traditional design techniques optimize a single cost function (which expresses the design objectives) to obtain both the feedforward and feedback control laws. This approach places conflicting demands on the control law such as fast tracking versus noise atttenuation/disturbance rejection. In the SOFFT approach, two cost functions are defined. The feedforward control law is designed to optimize one cost function, the feedback optimizes the other. By separating the design objectives and decoupling the feedforward and feedback design processes, both objectives can be achieved fully. A new measure of command tracking performance, Z-plots, is also developed. By analyzing these plots at off-nominal conditions, the sensitivity or robustness of the system in tracking commands can be predicted. Z-plots provide an important tool for designing robust control systems. The Variable-Gain SOFFT methodology was used to design a flight control system for the F/A-18 aircraft. It is shown that SOFFT can be used to expand the operating regime and provide greater performance (flying/handling qualities) throughout the extended flight regime. This work was performed under the NASA SBIR program. ICS plans to market the software developed as a new module in its commercial CACSD software package: ACET.

  19. Multidisciplinary optimization of controlled space structures with global sensitivity equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; James, Benjamin B.; Graves, Philip C.; Woodard, Stanley E.

    1991-01-01

    A new method for the preliminary design of controlled space structures is presented. The method coordinates standard finite element structural analysis, multivariable controls, and nonlinear programming codes and allows simultaneous optimization of the structures and control systems of a spacecraft. Global sensitivity equations are a key feature of this method. The preliminary design of a generic geostationary platform is used to demonstrate the multidisciplinary optimization method. Fifteen design variables are used to optimize truss member sizes and feedback gain values. The goal is to reduce the total mass of the structure and the vibration control system while satisfying constraints on vibration decay rate. Incorporating the nonnegligible mass of actuators causes an essential coupling between structural design variables and control design variables. The solution of the demonstration problem is an important step toward a comprehensive preliminary design capability for structures and control systems. Use of global sensitivity equations helps solve optimization problems that have a large number of design variables and a high degree of coupling between disciplines.

  20. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  1. An inverter/controller subsystem optimized for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickrell, R. L.; Osullivan, G.; Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of solar array dc power to ac power stimulated the specification, design, and simulation testing of an inverter/controller subsystem tailored to the photovoltaic power source characteristics. Optimization of the inverter/controller design is discussed as part of an overall photovoltaic power system designed for maximum energy extraction from the solar array. The special design requirements for the inverter/ controller include: a power system controller (PSC) to control continuously the solar array operating point at the maximum power level based on variable solar insolation and cell temperatures; and an inverter designed for high efficiency at rated load and low losses at light loadings to conserve energy.

  2. On large-scale nonlinear programming techniques for solving optimal control problems

    SciTech Connect

    Faco, J.L.D.

    1994-12-31

    The formulation of decision problems by Optimal Control Theory allows the consideration of their dynamic structure and parameters estimation. This paper deals with techniques for choosing directions in the iterative solution of discrete-time optimal control problems. A unified formulation incorporates nonlinear performance criteria and dynamic equations, time delays, bounded state and control variables, free planning horizon and variable initial state vector. In general they are characterized by a large number of variables, mostly when arising from discretization of continuous-time optimal control or calculus of variations problems. In a GRG context the staircase structure of the jacobian matrix of the dynamic equations is exploited in the choice of basic and super basic variables and when changes of basis occur along the process. The search directions of the bound constrained nonlinear programming problem in the reduced space of the super basic variables are computed by large-scale NLP techniques. A modified Polak-Ribiere conjugate gradient method and a limited storage quasi-Newton BFGS method are analyzed and modifications to deal with the bounds on the variables are suggested based on projected gradient devices with specific linesearches. Some practical models are presented for electric generation planning and fishery management, and the application of the code GRECO - Gradient REduit pour la Commande Optimale - is discussed.

  3. Torque-based optimal acceleration control for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongbin; Ouyang, Minggao

    2014-03-01

    The existing research of the acceleration control mainly focuses on an optimization of the velocity trajectory with respect to a criterion formulation that weights acceleration time and fuel consumption. The minimum-fuel acceleration problem in conventional vehicle has been solved by Pontryagin's maximum principle and dynamic programming algorithm, respectively. The acceleration control with minimum energy consumption for battery electric vehicle(EV) has not been reported. In this paper, the permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM) is controlled by the field oriented control(FOC) method and the electric drive system for the EV(including the PMSM, the inverter and the battery) is modeled to favor over a detailed consumption map. The analytical algorithm is proposed to analyze the optimal acceleration control and the optimal torque versus speed curve in the acceleration process is obtained. Considering the acceleration time, a penalty function is introduced to realize a fast vehicle speed tracking. The optimal acceleration control is also addressed with dynamic programming(DP). This method can solve the optimal acceleration problem with precise time constraint, but it consumes a large amount of computation time. The EV used in simulation and experiment is a four-wheel hub motor drive electric vehicle. The simulation and experimental results show that the required battery energy has little difference between the acceleration control solved by analytical algorithm and that solved by DP, and is greatly reduced comparing with the constant pedal opening acceleration. The proposed analytical and DP algorithms can minimize the energy consumption in EV's acceleration process and the analytical algorithm is easy to be implemented in real-time control.

  4. Control design variable linking for optimization of structural/control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    In this study a method is presented to integrate the design space of structural/control system optimization problems in the case of state feedback control. Conventional structural sizing variables and elements of the feedback gain matrix are both treated as strictly independent design variables in the optimization by extending design variable linking concepts to the control gains. Examples which involve a variety of behavior constraints, including dynamic transient response and control force limits, are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  5. Optimizing Locomotion Controllers Using Biologically-Based Actuators and Objectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Delp, Scott L.; Koltun, Vladlen

    2015-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically synthesizing walking and running controllers for physically-simulated 3D humanoid characters. The sagittal hip, knee, and ankle degrees-of-freedom are actuated using a set of eight Hill-type musculotendon models in each leg, with biologically-motivated control laws. The parameters of these control laws are set by an optimization procedure that satisfies a number of locomotion task terms while minimizing a biological model of metabolic energy expenditure. We show that the use of biologically-based actuators and objectives measurably increases the realism of gaits generated by locomotion controllers that operate without the use of motion capture data, and that metabolic energy expenditure provides a simple and unifying measurement of effort that can be used for both walking and running control optimization. PMID:26251560

  6. Optimal control alleviation of tilting proprotor gust response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to the design of a control system for alleviation of the gust response of tilting proprotor aircraft. Using a proprotor and cantilever wing analytical model, the uncontrolled and controlled gust response is examined over the entire operating range of the aircraft except for hover: helicopter mode, conversion, and airplane mode flight. Substantial improvements in the loads, ride quality, and aeroelastic stability are possible with a properly designed controller. A single controller, nominally optimal only at the design point speed (160 knots here), operated efficiently over the entire speed range, with the possible exception of very low speed in helicopter mode. Kalman-Bucy filters were used as compensation networks to provide state estimates from various measurements in the wing motion, rotor speed perturbation, and tip-path-plane tilt.

  7. Fuel optimal control of an experimental multi-mode system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, J.; Mayer, J. L.; Silverberg, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic characteristics associated with the fuel optimal control of a harmonic oscillator are utilized in the development of a near fuel optimal feedback control strategy for spacecraft vibration suppression. In this scheme, single level thrust actuators are governed by recursive computations of the standard deviations of displacement and velocity at the actuator's locations. The algorithm was tested on an experimental structure possessing a significant number of flexible body modes. The structure's response to both single and multiple mode excitation is presented.

  8. Optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; Martín De Diego, David; Zuccalli, Marcela

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a geometric formalism for optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems. Our techniques are an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk approach for the case of Lagrangian dynamics with higher-order constraints. We study a regular case where it is possible to establish a symplectic framework and, as a consequence, to obtain a unique vector field determining the dynamics of the optimal control problem. These developments will allow us to develop a new class of geometric integrators based on discrete variational calculus.

  9. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  10. Optimal control of quaternion propagation errors in spacecraft navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vathsal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Optimal control techniques are used to drive the numerical error (truncation, roundoff, commutation) in computing the quaternion vector to zero. The normalization of the quaternion is carried out by appropriate choice of a performance index, which can be optimized. The error equations are derived from Friedland's (1978) theoretical development, and a matrix Riccati equation results for the computation of the gain matrix. Simulation results show that a high precision of the order of 10 to the -12th can be obtained using this technique in meeting the q(T)q=1 constraint. The performance of the estimator in the presence of the feedback control that maintains the normalization, is studied.

  11. Control and structural optimization for maneuvering large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, H. M.; Turner, J. D.; Yu, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Presented here are the results of an advanced control design as well as a discussion of the requirements for automating both the structures and control design efforts for maneuvering a large spacecraft. The advanced control application addresses a general three dimensional slewing problem, and is applied to a large geostationary platform. The platform consists of two flexible antennas attached to the ends of a flexible truss. The control strategy involves an open-loop rigid body control profile which is derived from a nonlinear optimal control problem and provides the main control effort. A perturbation feedback control reduces the response due to the flexibility of the structure. Results are shown which demonstrate the usefulness of the approach. Software issues are considered for developing an integrated structures and control design environment.

  12. Occupant-responsive optimal control of smart facade systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol-Soo

    Windows provide occupants with daylight, direct sunlight, visual contact with the outside and a feeling of openness. Windows enable the use of daylighting and offer occupants a outside view. Glazing may also cause a number of problems: undesired heat gain/loss in winter. An over-lit window can cause glare, which is another major complaint by occupants. Furthermore, cold or hot window surfaces induce asymmetric thermal radiation which can result in thermal discomfort. To reduce the potential problems of window systems, double skin facades and airflow window systems have been introduced in the 1970s. They typically contain interstitial louvers and ventilation openings. The current problem with double skin facades and airflow windows is that their operation requires adequate dynamic control to reach their expected performance. Many studies have recognized that only an optimal control enables these systems to truly act as active energy savers and indoor environment controllers. However, an adequate solution for this dynamic optimization problem has thus far not been developed. The primary objective of this study is to develop occupant responsive optimal control of smart facade systems. The control could be implemented as a smart controller that operates the motorized Venetian blind system and the opening ratio of ventilation openings. The objective of the control is to combine the benefits of large windows with low energy demands for heating and cooling, while keeping visual well-being and thermal comfort at an optimal level. The control uses a simulation model with an embedded optimization routine that allows occupant interaction via the Web. An occupant can access the smart controller from a standard browser and choose a pre-defined mode (energy saving mode, visual comfort mode, thermal comfort mode, default mode, nighttime mode) or set a preferred mode (user-override mode) by moving preference sliders on the screen. The most prominent feature of these systems is the

  13. Digital robust control law synthesis using constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivekananda

    1989-01-01

    Development of digital robust control laws for active control of high performance flexible aircraft and large space structures is a research area of significant practical importance. The flexible system is typically modeled by a large order state space system of equations in order to accurately represent the dynamics. The active control law must satisy multiple conflicting design requirements and maintain certain stability margins, yet should be simple enough to be implementable on an onboard digital computer. Described here is an application of a generic digital control law synthesis procedure for such a system, using optimal control theory and constrained optimization technique. A linear quadratic Gaussian type cost function is minimized by updating the free parameters of the digital control law, while trying to satisfy a set of constraints on the design loads, responses and stability margins. Analytical expressions for the gradients of the cost function and the constraints with respect to the control law design variables are used to facilitate rapid numerical convergence. These gradients can be used for sensitivity study and may be integrated into a simultaneous structure and control optimization scheme.

  14. Optimal control for stochastic systems with polynomial chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, David James

    Assuring robustness of control system performance against model uncertainty is a significant component of control design. Current methods for developing a robust controller, however, are typically either too conservative or too computationally expensive. This thesis uses generalized polynomial chaos alongside finite-horizon optimal control as a new method of robust control design for a stochastic system. Since the equations for the mean and variance of the response can be expressed in terms of coefficients from a polynomial chaos expansion, optimizing a polynomial chaos expansion can be used to optimize the mean and variance, thus providing robust responses in a stochastic system. This thesis first provides a review of the concepts and literature then the rationale as well as the derivation of the proposed robust control method. Three examples are given to show the effectiveness of the new control method and are discussed. In particular, the final example demonstrates the applicability of using polynomial chaos to provide robust control for a stochastic soft landing problem.

  15. Automated design of multiphase space missions using hybrid optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilan, Christian Miguel

    A modern space mission is assembled from multiple phases or events such as impulsive maneuvers, coast arcs, thrust arcs and planetary flybys. Traditionally, a mission planner would resort to intuition and experience to develop a sequence of events for the multiphase mission and to find the space trajectory that minimizes propellant use by solving the associated continuous optimal control problem. This strategy, however, will most likely yield a sub-optimal solution, as the problem is sophisticated for several reasons. For example, the number of events in the optimal mission structure is not known a priori and the system equations of motion change depending on what event is current. In this work a framework for the automated design of multiphase space missions is presented using hybrid optimal control (HOC). The method developed uses two nested loops: an outer-loop that handles the discrete dynamics and finds the optimal mission structure in terms of the categorical variables, and an inner-loop that performs the optimization of the corresponding continuous-time dynamical system and obtains the required control history. Genetic algorithms (GA) and direct transcription with nonlinear programming (NLP) are introduced as methods of solution for the outer-loop and inner-loop problems, respectively. Automation of the inner-loop, continuous optimal control problem solver, required two new technologies. The first is a method for the automated construction of the NLP problems resulting from the use of a direct solver for systems with different structures, including different numbers of categorical events. The method assembles modules, consisting of parameters and constraints appropriate to each event, sequentially according to the given mission structure. The other new technology is for a robust initial guess generator required by the inner-loop NLP problem solver. Two new methods were developed for cases including low-thrust trajectories. The first method, based on GA

  16. Optimization and Control of Cyber-Physical Vehicle Systems.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Justin M; Atkins, Ella M

    2015-01-01

    A cyber-physical system (CPS) is composed of tightly-integrated computation, communication and physical elements. Medical devices, buildings, mobile devices, robots, transportation and energy systems can benefit from CPS co-design and optimization techniques. Cyber-physical vehicle systems (CPVSs) are rapidly advancing due to progress in real-time computing, control and artificial intelligence. Multidisciplinary or multi-objective design optimization maximizes CPS efficiency, capability and safety, while online regulation enables the vehicle to be responsive to disturbances, modeling errors and uncertainties. CPVS optimization occurs at design-time and at run-time. This paper surveys the run-time cooperative optimization or co-optimization of cyber and physical systems, which have historically been considered separately. A run-time CPVS is also cooperatively regulated or co-regulated when cyber and physical resources are utilized in a manner that is responsive to both cyber and physical system requirements. This paper surveys research that considers both cyber and physical resources in co-optimization and co-regulation schemes with applications to mobile robotic and vehicle systems. Time-varying sampling patterns, sensor scheduling, anytime control, feedback scheduling, task and motion planning and resource sharing are examined. PMID:26378541

  17. Optimization and Control of Cyber-Physical Vehicle Systems.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Justin M; Atkins, Ella M

    2015-09-11

    A cyber-physical system (CPS) is composed of tightly-integrated computation, communication and physical elements. Medical devices, buildings, mobile devices, robots, transportation and energy systems can benefit from CPS co-design and optimization techniques. Cyber-physical vehicle systems (CPVSs) are rapidly advancing due to progress in real-time computing, control and artificial intelligence. Multidisciplinary or multi-objective design optimization maximizes CPS efficiency, capability and safety, while online regulation enables the vehicle to be responsive to disturbances, modeling errors and uncertainties. CPVS optimization occurs at design-time and at run-time. This paper surveys the run-time cooperative optimization or co-optimization of cyber and physical systems, which have historically been considered separately. A run-time CPVS is also cooperatively regulated or co-regulated when cyber and physical resources are utilized in a manner that is responsive to both cyber and physical system requirements. This paper surveys research that considers both cyber and physical resources in co-optimization and co-regulation schemes with applications to mobile robotic and vehicle systems. Time-varying sampling patterns, sensor scheduling, anytime control, feedback scheduling, task and motion planning and resource sharing are examined.

  18. Optimization and Control of Cyber-Physical Vehicle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Justin M.; Atkins, Ella M.

    2015-01-01

    A cyber-physical system (CPS) is composed of tightly-integrated computation, communication and physical elements. Medical devices, buildings, mobile devices, robots, transportation and energy systems can benefit from CPS co-design and optimization techniques. Cyber-physical vehicle systems (CPVSs) are rapidly advancing due to progress in real-time computing, control and artificial intelligence. Multidisciplinary or multi-objective design optimization maximizes CPS efficiency, capability and safety, while online regulation enables the vehicle to be responsive to disturbances, modeling errors and uncertainties. CPVS optimization occurs at design-time and at run-time. This paper surveys the run-time cooperative optimization or co-optimization of cyber and physical systems, which have historically been considered separately. A run-time CPVS is also cooperatively regulated or co-regulated when cyber and physical resources are utilized in a manner that is responsive to both cyber and physical system requirements. This paper surveys research that considers both cyber and physical resources in co-optimization and co-regulation schemes with applications to mobile robotic and vehicle systems. Time-varying sampling patterns, sensor scheduling, anytime control, feedback scheduling, task and motion planning and resource sharing are examined. PMID:26378541

  19. Preservicing mission, on-orbit modifications to Hubble Space Telescope pointing control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Sharkey, J. P.; Nelson, J. D.; Bradley, A. J.

    1995-03-01

    Because of unexpected, thermally induced disturbances originating in the solar arrays (SAs), the Hubble Space Telescope was initially unable to meet its pointing error specifications of 0.007 arc-s (root mean square) for observations lasting from a few seconds to several hours. The effort to pinpoint the mechanism causing the problem and to redesign the onboard controller to accommodate the disturbance began shortly after deployment. After controller modifications, the pointing errors were well within the specification for all of the orbit except for short intervals during transitions in and out of Earth's shadow. This paper presents a chronology of the redesign process and flight data showing the achieved pointing performance. During the recent servicing mission (December 1993) the SAs were replaced with arrays of a modified mechanical design. A preliminary assessment of pointing performance since that time is presented.

  20. Markov Modeling of Component Fault Growth over a Derived Domain of Feasible Output Control Effort Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bole, Brian; Goebel, Kai; Vachtsevanos, George

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel Markov process formulation of stochastic fault growth modeling, in order to facilitate the development and analysis of prognostics-based control adaptation. A metric representing the relative deviation between the nominal output of a system and the net output that is actually enacted by an implemented prognostics-based control routine, will be used to define the action space of the formulated Markov process. The state space of the Markov process will be defined in terms of an abstracted metric representing the relative health remaining in each of the system s components. The proposed formulation of component fault dynamics will conveniently relate feasible system output performance modifications to predictions of future component health deterioration.

  1. Neural network based optimal control of HVAC&R systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Min

    Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems have wide applications in providing a desired indoor environment for different types of buildings. It is well acknowledged that 30%-40% of the total energy generated is consumed by buildings and HVAC&R systems alone account for more than 50% of the building energy consumption. Low operational efficiency especially under partial load conditions and poor control are part of reasons for such high energy consumption. To improve energy efficiency, HVAC&R systems should be properly operated to maintain a comfortable and healthy indoor environment under dynamic ambient and indoor conditions with the least energy consumption. This research focuses on the optimal operation of HVAC&R systems. The optimization problem is formulated and solved to find the optimal set points for the chilled water supply temperature, discharge air temperature and AHU (air handling unit) fan static pressure such that the indoor environment is maintained with the least chiller and fan energy consumption. To achieve this objective, a dynamic system model is developed first to simulate the system behavior under different control schemes and operating conditions. The system model is modular in structure, which includes a water-cooled vapor compression chiller model and a two-zone VAV system model. A fuzzy-set based extended transformation approach is then applied to investigate the uncertainties of this model caused by uncertain parameters and the sensitivities of the control inputs with respect to the interested model outputs. A multi-layer feed forward neural network is constructed and trained in unsupervised mode to minimize the cost function which is comprised of overall energy cost and penalty cost when one or more constraints are violated. After training, the network is implemented as a supervisory controller to compute the optimal settings for the system. In order to implement the optimal set points predicted by the

  2. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Liu, Jin; Wavrik, Kathryn

    1999-09-27

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project, ''Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs.'' This research project has three objectives. The first objective is to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective is to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective is to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs. This research project consists of three tasks, each of which addresses one of the above objectives. Our work is directed at both injection wells and production wells and at vertical, horizontal, and highly deviated wells.

  3. Optimal preview game theory approach to vehicle stability controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Seyed Hossein; Taheri, Saied; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic game theory brings together different features that are keys to many situations in control design: optimisation behaviour, the presence of multiple agents/players, enduring consequences of decisions and robustness with respect to variability in the environment, etc. In the presented methodology, vehicle stability is represented by a cooperative dynamic/difference game such that its two agents (players), namely the driver and the direct yaw controller (DYC), are working together to provide more stability to the vehicle system. While the driver provides the steering wheel control, the DYC control algorithm is obtained by the Nash game theory to ensure optimal performance as well as robustness to disturbances. The common two-degrees-of-freedom vehicle-handling performance model is put into discrete form to develop the game equations of motion. To evaluate the developed control algorithm, CarSim with its built-in nonlinear vehicle model along with the Pacejka tire model is used. The control algorithm is evaluated for a lane change manoeuvre, and the optimal set of steering angle and corrective yaw moment is calculated and fed to the test vehicle. Simulation results show that the optimal preview control algorithm can significantly reduce lateral velocity, yaw rate, and roll angle, which all contribute to enhancing vehicle stability.

  4. Optimizing rapid aiming behaviour: Movement kinematics depend on the cost of corrective modifications.

    PubMed

    Lyons, James; Hansen, Steve; Hurding, Suzanne; Elliott, Digby

    2006-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the initial impulse associated with goal-directed aiming movements typically brings the limb to a position short of the target. This is because target overshooting is associated with greater temporal and energy costs than target undershooting. Presumably these costs can be expected to vary not only with the muscular forces required to move the limb, but also the gravitational forces inherent in the aiming task. In this study we examined the degree to which primary movement endpoint distributions depend on the direction of the movement with respect to gravity. We hypothesized that the magnitude of an undershoot bias would be greatest for downward movements because target overshooting necessitates a time and energy consuming movement reversal against gravity. Participants completed rapid aiming movements toward targets located above and below, as well as proximal and distal to a central home position. Movements were made both with and without additional mass attached to the limb. Although movement time did not vary with experimental condition, primary movement endpoint distributions were consistent with our predictions. Specifically, both greater undershooting and greater endpoint variability was associated with downward aiming movements. As well, a greater proportion of the overall movement time was spent in the corrective phase of the movement. These results are consistent with models of energy minimization that posit an inherent efficiency of control and hold that movements are organized to minimize movement time and energy expenditure and maximize mechanical advantages.

  5. Computer simulation of control strategies for optimal anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, S; Possfelt, M O; Liu, J

    2013-01-01

    Three previously published control strategies for anaerobic digestion were implemented in Simulink/Matlab using Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to model the biological process. The controllers' performance were then simulated and evaluated based on their responses from five different types of process scenarios i.e. start-up and steady state performance as well as disturbances from concentration, pH and ammonia in the inflow. Of the three evaluated control strategies, the extremum-seeking variable gain controller gave the best overall performance. However, a proportional feedback controller based on the pH-level, used as a reference case in the evaluation, proved to give as good results as the extremum-seeking variable gain controller but with a lower wear on the pump. It was therefore concluded that a fast proportional control of the reactor pH is a key element for optimally controlling a low-buffering anaerobic digestion process.

  6. Lossless Convexification of Control Constraints for a Class of Nonlinear Optimal Control Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet; Carson, John M.,III

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we consider a class of optimal control problems that have continuous-time nonlinear dynamics and nonconvex control constraints. We propose a convex relaxation of the nonconvex control constraints, and prove that the optimal solution to the relaxed problem is the globally optimal solution to the original problem with nonconvex control constraints. This lossless convexification enables a computationally simpler problem to be solved instead of the original problem. We demonstrate the approach in simulation with a planetary soft landing problem involving a nonlinear gravity field.

  7. Stochastic real-time optimal control: A pseudospectral approach for bearing-only trajectory optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Steven M.

    A method is presented to couple and solve the optimal control and the optimal estimation problems simultaneously, allowing systems with bearing-only sensors to maneuver to obtain observability for relative navigation without unnecessarily detracting from a primary mission. A fundamentally new approach to trajectory optimization and the dual control problem is presented, constraining polynomial approximations of the Fisher Information Matrix to provide an information gradient and allow prescription of the level of future estimation certainty required for mission accomplishment. Disturbances, modeling deficiencies, and corrupted measurements are addressed recursively using Radau pseudospectral collocation methods and sequential quadratic programming for the optimal path and an Unscented Kalman Filter for the target position estimate. The underlying real-time optimal control (RTOC) algorithm is developed, specifically addressing limitations of current techniques that lose error integration. The resulting guidance method can be applied to any bearing-only system, such as submarines using passive sonar, anti-radiation missiles, or small UAVs seeking to land on power lines for energy harvesting. System integration, variable timing methods, and discontinuity management techniques are provided for actual hardware implementation. Validation is accomplished with both simulation and flight test, autonomously landing a quadrotor helicopter on a wire.

  8. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector Lawrence N.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node I was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node I nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit for Node 1, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  9. Node 3 Relocation Environmental Control and Life Support System Modification Kit Verification and Updated Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    2009-01-01

    Node 1 (Unity) flew to International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A. Node 1 was the first module of the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) launched to ISS. The Node 1 ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design featured limited ECLS capability. The main purpose of Node 1 was to provide internal storage by providing four stowage rack locations within the module and to allow docking of multiple modules and a truss segment to it. The ECLS subsystems inside Node 1 were routed through the element prior to launch to allow for easy integration of the attached future elements, particularly the Habitation Module which was planned to be located at the nadir docking port of Node 1. After Node 1 was on-orbit, the Program decided not to launch the Habitation Module and instead, to replace it with Node 3 (Tranquility). In 2007, the Program became concerned with a potential Russian docking port approach issue for the Russian FGB nadir docking port after Node 3 is attached to Node 1. To solve this concern the Program decided to relocate Node 3 from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port. To support the movement of Node 3 the Program decided to build a modification kit for Node 1, an on-orbit feedthrough leak test device, and new vestibule jumpers to support the ECLS part of the relocation. This paper provides a design overview of the modification kit, a summary of the Node 1 ECLS re-verification to support the Node 3 relocation from Node 1 nadir to Node 1 port, and a status of the ECLS modification kit installation into Node 1.

  10. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control.

    PubMed

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-21

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents," that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed. PMID:24559348

  11. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents," that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

  12. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  13. Optimal control of systems with intermediate phase constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichenko, S.B.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we derive necessary conditions of minimum for the general optimal control problem with the following characteristics: the trajectory is corrected at intermediate time instants using matching relationships; the system dynamics may vary in each time interval; the optimand functional and the functional constraints depend on the intermediate time instants, the momenta, and the phase coordinates of the trajectories. The result is derived by the methods of modern optimization theory and nonsmooth analysis. It is presented in the form of a maximum principle. The specific solution scheme for this problem has been developed in greater detail elsewhere for systems of the form x{sub i}={line_integral}{sub i}(t, x{sub i}). Much of the previous manipulations and results on the structure of the conjugate cone and the form of the directional derivatives are used also in this paper. This is legitimate because the optimized parameters and controls are independent.

  14. Optimal Control of a Parabolic Equation with Dynamic Boundary Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Hoemberg, D. Krumbiegel, K.; Rehberg, J.

    2013-02-15

    We investigate a control problem for the heat equation. The goal is to find an optimal heat transfer coefficient in the dynamic boundary condition such that a desired temperature distribution at the boundary is adhered. To this end we consider a function space setting in which the heat flux across the boundary is forced to be an L{sup p} function with respect to the surface measure, which in turn implies higher regularity for the time derivative of temperature. We show that the corresponding elliptic operator generates a strongly continuous semigroup of contractions and apply the concept of maximal parabolic regularity. This allows to show the existence of an optimal control and the derivation of necessary and sufficient optimality conditions.

  15. Learning the Optimal Control of Coordinated Eye and Head Movements

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Sohrab; Weber, Cornelius; Triesch, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Various optimality principles have been proposed to explain the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements during visual orienting behavior. At the same time, researchers have suggested several neural models to underly the generation of saccades, but these do not include online learning as a mechanism of optimization. Here, we suggest an open-loop neural controller with a local adaptation mechanism that minimizes a proposed cost function. Simulations show that the characteristics of coordinated eye and head movements generated by this model match the experimental data in many aspects, including the relationship between amplitude, duration and peak velocity in head-restrained and the relative contribution of eye and head to the total gaze shift in head-free conditions. Our model is a first step towards bringing together an optimality principle and an incremental local learning mechanism into a unified control scheme for coordinated eye and head movements. PMID:22072953

  16. Stochastic Maximum Principle for Optimal Control of SPDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, Marco; Hu, Ying; Tessitore, Gianmario

    2013-10-15

    We prove a version of the maximum principle, in the sense of Pontryagin, for the optimal control of a stochastic partial differential equation driven by a finite dimensional Wiener process. The equation is formulated in a semi-abstract form that allows direct applications to a large class of controlled stochastic parabolic equations. We allow for a diffusion coefficient dependent on the control parameter, and the space of control actions is general, so that in particular we need to introduce two adjoint processes. The second adjoint process takes values in a suitable space of operators on L{sup 4}.

  17. Health benefit modelling and optimization of vehicular pollution control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonawane, Nayan V.; Patil, Rashmi S.; Sethi, Virendra

    2012-12-01

    This study asserts that the evaluation of pollution reduction strategies should be approached on the basis of health benefits. The framework presented could be used for decision making on the basis of cost effectiveness when the strategies are applied concurrently. Several vehicular pollution control strategies have been proposed in literature for effective management of urban air pollution. The effectiveness of these strategies has been mostly studied as a one at a time approach on the basis of change in pollution concentration. The adequacy and practicality of such an approach is studied in the present work. Also, the assessment of respective benefits of these strategies has been carried out when they are implemented simultaneously. An integrated model has been developed which can be used as a tool for optimal prioritization of various pollution management strategies. The model estimates health benefits associated with specific control strategies. ISC-AERMOD View has been used to provide the cause-effect relation between control options and change in ambient air quality. BenMAP, developed by U.S. EPA, has been applied for estimation of health and economic benefits associated with various management strategies. Valuation of health benefits has been done for impact indicators of premature mortality, hospital admissions and respiratory syndrome. An optimization model has been developed to maximize overall social benefits with determination of optimized percentage implementations for multiple strategies. The model has been applied for sub-urban region of Mumbai city for vehicular sector. Several control scenarios have been considered like revised emission standards, electric, CNG, LPG and hybrid vehicles. Reduction in concentration and resultant health benefits for the pollutants CO, NOx and particulate matter are estimated for different control scenarios. Finally, an optimization model has been applied to determine optimized percentage implementation of specific

  18. Improved Sensitivity Relations in State Constrained Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettiol, Piernicola; Frankowska, Hélène; Vinter, Richard B.

    2015-04-15

    Sensitivity relations in optimal control provide an interpretation of the costate trajectory and the Hamiltonian, evaluated along an optimal trajectory, in terms of gradients of the value function. While sensitivity relations are a straightforward consequence of standard transversality conditions for state constraint free optimal control problems formulated in terms of control-dependent differential equations with smooth data, their verification for problems with either pathwise state constraints, nonsmooth data, or for problems where the dynamic constraint takes the form of a differential inclusion, requires careful analysis. In this paper we establish validity of both ‘full’ and ‘partial’ sensitivity relations for an adjoint state of the maximum principle, for optimal control problems with pathwise state constraints, where the underlying control system is described by a differential inclusion. The partial sensitivity relation interprets the costate in terms of partial Clarke subgradients of the value function with respect to the state variable, while the full sensitivity relation interprets the couple, comprising the costate and Hamiltonian, as the Clarke subgradient of the value function with respect to both time and state variables. These relations are distinct because, for nonsmooth data, the partial Clarke subdifferential does not coincide with the projection of the (full) Clarke subdifferential on the relevant coordinate space. We show for the first time (even for problems without state constraints) that a costate trajectory can be chosen to satisfy the partial and full sensitivity relations simultaneously. The partial sensitivity relation in this paper is new for state constraint problems, while the full sensitivity relation improves on earlier results in the literature (for optimal control problems formulated in terms of Lipschitz continuous multifunctions), because a less restrictive inward pointing hypothesis is invoked in the proof, and because

  19. Optimal control by least squares support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Suykens, J A; Vandewalle, J; De Moor, B

    2001-01-01

    Support vector machines have been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce the use of least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM's) for the optimal control of nonlinear systems. Linear and neural full static state feedback controllers are considered. The problem is formulated in such a way that it incorporates the N-stage optimal control problem as well as a least squares support vector machine approach for mapping the state space into the action space. The solution is characterized by a set of nonlinear equations. An alternative formulation as a constrained nonlinear optimization problem in less unknowns is given, together with a method for imposing local stability in the LS-SVM control scheme. The results are discussed for support vector machines with radial basis function kernel. Advantages of LS-SVM control are that no number of hidden units has to be determined for the controller and that no centers have to be specified for the Gaussian kernels when applying Mercer's condition. The curse of dimensionality is avoided in comparison with defining a regular grid for the centers in classical radial basis function networks. This is at the expense of taking the trajectory of state variables as additional unknowns in the optimization problem, while classical neural network approaches typically lead to parametric optimization problems. In the SVM methodology the number of unknowns equals the number of training data, while in the primal space the number of unknowns can be infinite dimensional. The method is illustrated both on stabilization and tracking problems including examples on swinging up an inverted pendulum with local stabilization at the endpoint and a tracking problem for a ball and beam system.

  20. Modification of hemiplegic compensatory gait pattern by symmetry-based motion controller of HAL.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Kadone, Hideki; Sakurai, Takeru; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    As one of several characteristics of hemiplegic patients after stroke, compensatory gait caused by affected limb is often seen. The purpose of this research is to apply a symmetry-based controller of a wearable type lower limb robot, Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) to hemiplegic patients with compensatory gait, and to investigate improvement of gait symmetry. The controller is designed respectively for swing phase and support phase according to characteristics of hemiplegic gait pattern. The controller during swing phase stores the motion of the unaffected limb and then provides motion support on the affected limb during the subsequent swing using the stored pattern to realize symmetric gait based on spontaneous limb swing. Moreover, the controller during support phase provides motion to extend hip and knee joints to support wearer's body. Clinical tests were conducted in order to assess the modification of gait symmetry. Our case study involved participation of one chronic stroke patient who performs abnormally-compensatory gait for both of the affected and unaffected limbs. As a result, the patient's gait symmetry was improved by providing motion support during the swing phase on the affected side and motion constraint during the support phase on the unaffected side. The study showed promising basis for the effectiveness of the controller for the future clinical study.

  1. Optimal control of molecular motion expressed through quantum fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Rabitz, Herschel; Askar, Attila

    2000-04-01

    A quantum fluid-dynamic (QFD) control formulation is presented for optimally manipulating atomic and molecular systems. In QFD the control quantum system is expressed in terms of the probability density ρ and the quantum current j. This choice of variables is motivated by the generally expected slowly varying spatial-temporal dependence of the fluid-dynamical variables. The QFD approach is illustrated for manipulation of the ground electronic state dynamics of HCl induced by an external electric field.

  2. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  3. A Connection between Singular Stochastic Control and Optimal Stopping

    SciTech Connect

    Espen Benth, Fred Reikvam, Kristin

    2003-12-15

    We show that the value function of a singular stochastic control problem is equal to the integral of the value function of an associated optimal stopping problem. The connection is proved for a general class of diffusions using the method of viscosity solutions.

  4. A Control Theory Solution to Optimal Faculty Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Stephen M.; And Others

    This study investigates the resource allocation problem of faculty hiring and promotion patterns using the techniques of optimal control theory. The mathematical structure of an academic faculty is described by a linear dynamic model whose parameters were estimated from actual data by two different techniques. The principal characteristics of the…

  5. Quasivelocities and Optimal Control for underactuated Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, L.; de Diego, D. Martín

    2010-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of the theory of quasivelocities for optimal control for underactuated mechanical systems. Using this theory, we convert the original problem in a variational second-order lagrangian system subjected to constraints. The equations of motion are geometrically derived using an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk formalism.

  6. The Relationship between Pupil Control Ideology and Academic Optimism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between pupil control ideology and academic optimism. Information was generated through responses to a questionnaire emailed to teachers in two school districts in Central New Jersey. The districts were categorized GH, as determined by the State's district factor grouping. The research concludes that…

  7. Time optimal control of pendulum-cart system

    SciTech Connect

    Turnau, A.; Korytowski, A.

    1994-12-31

    We consider the synthesis of time optimal control which steers a pendulum hinged to a cart to a given state (e.g., the upright position), starting from arbitrary initial conditions. The control of the pendulum can system has attracted attention of many authors because of its relatively simple structure and at the same time, nontrivial nonlinearity. Various heuristic approaches combined with 1q stabilization in the vicinity of the target state were used to swing the pendulum up to the upright position and to keep it there. However, time-optimality was not achieved. We construct the time optimal control using a sequence of fixed horizon problems in which the norms of terminal states are minimized. The problems with fixed horizons are solved numerically by means of gradient optimization, with gradients determined from the solution of adjoint equations. Due to embedding the synthesis algorithms in the Matlab - Simulink environment, it is possible to track and visualize the control process as well as the results of simulation experiments.

  8. Optimizing a mobile robot control system using GPU acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Nat; McGuinness, Michael; Martin, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our attempt to optimize a robot control program for the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) by running computationally intensive portions of the system on a commodity graphics processing unit (GPU). The IGVC Autonomous Challenge requires a control program that performs a number of different computationally intensive tasks ranging from computer vision to path planning. For the 2011 competition our Robot Operating System (ROS) based control system would not run comfortably on the multicore CPU on our custom robot platform. The process of profiling the ROS control program and selecting appropriate modules for porting to run on a GPU is described. A GPU-targeting compiler, Bacon, is used to speed up development and help optimize the ported modules. The impact of the ported modules on overall performance is discussed. We conclude that GPU optimization can free a significant amount of CPU resources with minimal effort for expensive user-written code, but that replacing heavily-optimized library functions is more difficult, and a much less efficient use of time.

  9. Control over in-channel mesostructure orientation through AAM surface modification.

    PubMed

    Keller, Avigail; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Kauffmann, Yaron; Frey, Gitti L

    2013-08-28

    The synthesis of mesostructured silica from a tetrahydrofuran (THF) based sol-gel was carried out in the channels of an anodic alumina membrane (AAM) using the evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method. The effect of channel surface chemistry on the orientation of the in-channel hexagonal mesostructure was studied by treating the channel walls. A variety of channel-surface modifications have been performed, including oxygen plasma treatment, atomic layer deposition (ALD) of pure alumina, and deposition of a hydrophobic monolayer. The in-channel mesostructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy filtered TEM (EFTEM). It was found that these modifications control the concentration of anions at the channel surfaces, and consequently the orientation of the hexagonal mesostructure. Namely, high anion concentration at the channel surface induces the formation of the desired vertically aligned columnar hexagonal phase. A model to understand the effect of anions at the channel wall on the competition between mesostructure phase transformation and silica condensation is proposed. Finally, this study demonstrates that by judiciously modifying the chemistry at the channel walls the formation of desired orientations can be induced. PMID:23836024

  10. Neural network learning of optimal Kalman prediction and control.

    PubMed

    Linsker, Ralph

    2008-11-01

    Although there are many neural network (NN) algorithms for prediction and for control, and although methods for optimal estimation (including filtering and prediction) and for optimal control in linear systems were provided by Kalman in 1960 (with nonlinear extensions since then), there has been, to my knowledge, no NN algorithm that learns either Kalman prediction or Kalman control (apart from the special case of stationary control). Here we show how optimal Kalman prediction and control (KPC), as well as system identification, can be learned and executed by a recurrent neural network composed of linear-response nodes, using as input only a stream of noisy measurement data. The requirements of KPC appear to impose significant constraints on the allowed NN circuitry and signal flows. The NN architecture implied by these constraints bears certain resemblances to the local-circuit architecture of mammalian cerebral cortex. We discuss these resemblances, as well as caveats that limit our current ability to draw inferences for biological function. It has been suggested that the local cortical circuit (LCC) architecture may perform core functions (as yet unknown) that underlie sensory, motor, and other cortical processing. It is reasonable to conjecture that such functions may include prediction, the estimation or inference of missing or noisy sensory data, and the goal-driven generation of control signals. The resemblances found between the KPC NN architecture and that of the LCC are consistent with this conjecture.

  11. Nanoscale controls of inorganic impurities and peptides on shape modification during calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; de Yoreo, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many organisms produce crystalline structures during controlled biomineralization that exhibit complex topological forms. These biominerals often express facets or pseudofacets that are not found on crystals grown from pure solutions in the laboratory. This modification of growth shape, whether by inorganic and organic modulators, is generally explained within the paradigm of "stereochemical recognition". According to this model, stereochemical matching of the growth modulator to the molecular structure of these new and otherwise unexpressed faces, stabilizes the formation of new faces to result in a new crystal shape. This idea, however, was developed primarily from bulk crystallization experiments and geometrical models that focused on interactions between impurities and atomic planes of the newly expressed faces. Over the last several years, we have reported nanoscale investigations of how small molecule modifiers (Mg, Sr, amino acids) interact with calcite surfaces during growth. Low concentrations of these `simple' impurities have significant shape-modifying effects. While the observed mechanisms of growth modification are highly diverse, in all cases, it is clear that the source of shape modification always arises from step-specific interactions that alter either the equilibrium properties of the crystal (step edge and bulk free energy) or the kinetics of step motion. The resulting macroscopic shape changes can be traced to these effects at steps on existing faces rather than to stereochemical matching to and thermodynamic stabilization of new faces. Molecular modeling shows that the essential reason for this is that steps provide non-planar environments in which non-planar modifiers can form contacts to both the lower terrace and the step riser. Our findings provide a mechanism-based understanding of shape modification. This is essential as biomineralization studies advance to investigate more complex studies of systems that employ long-chain polypeptides or

  12. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  13. Modification of Traffic-related Respiratory Response by Asthma Control in a Population of Car Commuters

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Golan, Rachel; Greenwald, Roby; Raysoni, Amit U.; Holguin, Fernando; Kewada, Priya; Winquist, Andrea; Flanders, W. Dana; Sarnat, Jeremy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effects of traffic-related exposures on respiratory health are well documented, but little information is available about whether asthma control influences individual susceptibility. We analyzed data from the Atlanta Commuter Exposure study to evaluate modification of associations between rush-hour commuting, in-vehicle air pollution, and selected respiratory health outcomes by asthma control status. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, 39 adults participated in Atlanta Commuter Exposure, and each conducted two scripted rush-hour highway commutes. In-vehicle particulate components were measured during all commutes. Among adults with asthma, we evaluated asthma control by questionnaire and spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and other metrics of respiratory health were measured precommute and 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours postcommute. We used mixed effects linear regression to evaluate associations between commute-related exposures and postcommute changes in metrics of respiratory health by level of asthma control. Results We observed increased exhaled nitric oxide across all levels of asthma control compared with precommute measurements, with largest postcommute increases observed among participants with below-median asthma control (2 hours postcommute: 14.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} = 5.7, 24.2]; 3 hours postcommute: 19.5% [95% CI = 7.8, 32.5]). No associations between in-vehicle pollutants and percent of predicted FEV1 were observed, although higher PM2.5 was associated with lower FEV1 % predicted among participants with below-median asthma control (3 hours postcommute: −7.2 [95% CI = −11.8, −2.7]). Conclusions Level of asthma control may influence respiratory response to in-vehicle exposures experienced during rush-hour commuting. PMID:25901844

  14. Optimal control analysis of the dynamic growth behavior of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mandli, Aravinda R; Modak, Jayant M

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the growth behavior of microorganisms using modeling and optimization techniques is an active area of research in the fields of biochemical engineering and systems biology. In this paper, we propose a general modeling framework, based on Monod model, to model the growth of microorganisms. Utilizing the general framework, we formulate an optimal control problem with the objective of maximizing a long-term cellular goal and solve it analytically under various constraints for the growth of microorganisms in a two substrate batch environment. We investigate the relation between long term and short term cellular goals and show that the objective of maximizing cellular concentration at a fixed final time is equivalent to maximization of instantaneous growth rate. We then establish the mathematical connection between the generalized framework and optimal and cybernetic modeling frameworks and derive generalized governing dynamic equations for optimal and cybernetic models. We finally illustrate the influence of various constraints in the cybernetic modeling framework on the optimal growth behavior of microorganisms by solving several dynamic optimization problems using genetic algorithms.

  15. Multi Objective Controller Design for Linear System via Optimal Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay

    1996-01-01

    We propose a methodology for the design of a controller which satisfies a set of closed-loop objectives simultaneously. The set of objectives consists of: (1) pole placement, (2) decoupled command tracking of step inputs at steady-state, and (3) minimization of step response transients with respect to envelope specifications. We first obtain a characterization of all controllers placing the closed-loop poles in a prescribed region of the complex plane. In this characterization, the free parameter matrix Q(s) is to be determined to attain objectives (2) and (3). Objective (2) is expressed as determining a Pareto optimal solution to a vector valued optimization problem. The solution of this problem is obtained by transforming it to a scalar convex optimization problem. This solution determines Q(O) and the remaining freedom in choosing Q(s) is used to satisfy objective (3). We write Q(s) = (l/v(s))bar-Q(s) for a prescribed polynomial v(s). Bar-Q(s) is a polynomial matrix which is arbitrary except that Q(O) and the order of bar-Q(s) are fixed. Obeying these constraints bar-Q(s) is now to be 'shaped' to minimize the step response characteristics of specific input/output pairs according to the maximum envelope violations. This problem is expressed as a vector valued optimization problem using the concept of Pareto optimality. We then investigate a scalar optimization problem associated with this vector valued problem and show that it is convex. The organization of the report is as follows. The next section includes some definitions and preliminary lemmas. We then give the problem statement which is followed by a section including a detailed development of the design procedure. We then consider an aircraft control example. The last section gives some concluding remarks. The Appendix includes the proofs of technical lemmas, printouts of computer programs, and figures.

  16. A method for obtaining practical flutter-suppression control laws using results of optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newson, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of optimal control theory are used to synthesize a feedback filter. The feedback filter is used to force the output of the filtered frequency response to match that of a desired optimal frequency response over a finite frequency range. This matching is accomplished by employing a nonlinear programing algorithm to search for the coefficients of the feedback filter that minimize the error between the optimal frequency response and the filtered frequency response. The method is applied to the synthesis of an active flutter-suppression control law for an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. It is shown that the resulting control law suppresses flutter over a wide range of subsonic Mach numbers. This is a promising method for synthesizing practical control laws using the results of optimal control theory.

  17. Optimal control in a model of malaria with differential susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    A malaria model with differential susceptibility is analyzed using the optimal control technique. In the model the human population is classified as susceptible, infected and recovered. Susceptibility is assumed dependent on genetic, physiological, or social characteristics that vary between individuals. The model is described by a system of differential equations that relate the human and vector populations, so that the infection is transmitted to humans by vectors, and the infection is transmitted to vectors by humans. The model considered is analyzed using the optimal control method when the control consists in using of insecticide-treated nets and educational campaigns; and the optimality criterion is to minimize the number of infected humans, while keeping the cost as low as is possible. One first goal is to determine the effects of differential susceptibility in the proposed control mechanism; and the second goal is to determine the algebraic form of the basic reproductive number of the model. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is claimed that the analytical results obtained are important for the design and implementation of control measures for malaria. It is suggested some future investigations such as the application of the method to other vector-borne diseases such as dengue or yellow fever; and also it is suggested the possible application of free software of computer algebra like Maxima.

  18. Genomewide Analysis Reveals Novel Pathways Affecting Endoplasmic Reticulum Homeostasis, Protein Modification and Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Čopič, Alenka; Dorrington, Mariana; Pagant, Silvere; Barry, Justine; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Singh, Indira; Hartman, John L.; Miller, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    To gain new mechanistic insight into ER homeostasis and the biogenesis of secretory proteins, we screened a genomewide collection of yeast mutants for defective intracellular retention of the ER chaperone, Kar2p. We identified 87 Kar2p-secreting strains, including a number of known components in secretory protein modification and sorting. Further characterization of the 73 nonessential Kar2p retention mutants revealed roles for a number of novel gene products in protein glycosylation, GPI-anchor attachment, ER quality control, and retrieval of escaped ER residents. A subset of these mutants, required for ER retrieval, included the GET complex and two novel proteins that likely function similarly in membrane insertion of tail-anchored proteins. Finally, the variant histone, Htz1p, and its acetylation state seem to play an important role in maintaining ER retrieval pathways, suggesting a surprising link between chromatin remodeling and ER homeostasis. PMID:19433630

  19. Optimal control of systems with capacity: Related noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruan, Milfang; Choudhury, Ajit K.

    1991-01-01

    In the ordinary theory of optimal control (LQR and Kalman filter), the variances of the actuators and the sensors are assumed to be known (not related to the capacities of the devices). This assumption is not true in practice. Generally, a device with greater capacity to exert actuating forces and a sensor capable of sensing greater sensing range will generate noise of greater power spectral density. When the ordinary theory of optimal control is used to estimate the errors of the outputs in such cases it will lead to faulty results, because the capacities of such devices are unknown before the system is designed. The performance of the system designed by the ordinary theory will not be optimal as the variances of the sensors and the actuators are neither known nor constant. The interaction between the control system and structure could be serious because the ordinary method will lead to greater feedback (Kalman gain) matrices. Methods which can optimize the performance of systems when noises of the actuators and the sensors are related to their capacities are developed. These methods will result in smaller feedback (Kalman gain) matrix.

  20. Optimal Load Control via Frequency Measurement and Neighborhood Area Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, CH; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2013-11-01

    We propose a decentralized optimal load control scheme that provides contingency reserve in the presence of sudden generation drop. The scheme takes advantage of flexibility of frequency responsive loads and neighborhood area communication to solve an optimal load control problem that balances load and generation while minimizing end-use disutility of participating in load control. Local frequency measurements enable individual loads to estimate the total mismatch between load and generation. Neighborhood area communication helps mitigate effects of inconsistencies in the local estimates due to frequency measurement noise. Case studies show that the proposed scheme can balance load with generation and restore the frequency within seconds of time after a generation drop, even when the loads use a highly simplified power system model in their algorithms. We also investigate tradeoffs between the amount of communication and the performance of the proposed scheme through simulation-based experiments.

  1. The population model of bone remodelling employed the optimal control.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Several models have been developed in recent years which apply population dynamics methods to describe the mechanisms of bone remodelling. This study incorporates the population kinetics model of bone turnover (including the osteocyte loop regulation) with the optimal control technique. Model simulations have been performed with a wide range of rate parameters using the Monte Carlo method. The regression method has also been used to investigate the interdependence of the location of equilibrium and the characteristics of the equilibrium/relaxation time on the rate parameters employed. The dynamic optimal control outlook for the regulation of bone remodelling processes, in the context of the osteocyte-control population model, has been discussed. Optimisation criteria have been formulated from the perspective of the energetic and metabolic losses in the tissue, with respect to the performance of the bone multicellular unit.

  2. Optimal control of Formula One car energy recovery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limebeer, D. J. N.; Perantoni, G.; Rao, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    The utility of orthogonal collocation methods in the solution of optimal control problems relating to Formula One racing is demonstrated. These methods can be used to optimise driver controls such as the steering, braking and throttle usage, and to optimise vehicle parameters such as the aerodynamic down force and mass distributions. Of particular interest is the optimal usage of energy recovery systems (ERSs). Contemporary kinetic energy recovery systems are studied and compared with future hybrid kinetic and thermal/heat ERSs known as ERS-K and ERS-H, respectively. It is demonstrated that these systems, when properly controlled, can produce contemporary lap time using approximately two-thirds of the fuel required by earlier generation (2013 and prior) vehicles.

  3. The controlled growth method - A tool for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1981-01-01

    An adaptive design variable linking scheme in a NLP based optimization algorithm is proposed and evaluated for feasibility of application. The present scheme, based on an intuitive effectiveness measure for each variable, differs from existing methodology in that a single dominant variable controls the growth of all others in a prescribed optimization cycle. The proposed method is implemented for truss assemblies and a wing box structure for stress, displacement and frequency constraints. Substantial reduction in computational time, even more so for structures under multiple load conditions, coupled with a minimal accompanying loss in accuracy, vindicates the algorithm.

  4. Solving inverse problems of identification type by optimal control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S.; Protopopescu, V.; Jiongmin Yong

    1997-06-01

    Inverse problems of identification type for nonlinear equations are considered within the framework of optimal control theory. The rigorous solution of any particular problem depends on the functional setting, type of equation, and unknown quantity (or quantities) to be determined. Here the authors present only the general articulations of the formalism. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g. Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach presents several advantages, namely: (i) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type; (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution; and (iii) a convenient numerical solution of these approximations.

  5. Efficient algorithms for the laboratory discovery of optimal quantum controls.

    PubMed

    Turinici, Gabriel; Le Bris, Claude; Rabitz, Herschel

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory closed-loop optimal control of quantum phenomena, expressed as minimizing a suitable cost functional, is currently implemented through an optimization algorithm coupled to the experimental apparatus. In practice, the most commonly used search algorithms are variants of genetic algorithms. As an alternative choice, a direct search deterministic algorithm is proposed in this paper. For the simple simulations studied here, it outperforms the existing approaches. An additional algorithm is introduced in order to reveal some properties of the cost functional landscape. PMID:15324201

  6. Multiobjective Optimization of Low-Energy Trajectories Using Optimal Control on Dynamical Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, Thomas M.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a computational method to design efficient low-energy trajectories by extracting initial solutions from dynamical channels formed by invariant manifolds, and improving these solutions through variational optimal control. We consider trajectories connecting two unstable periodic orbits in the circular restricted 3-body problem (CR3BP). Our method leverages dynamical channels to generate a range of solutions, and approximates the areto front for impulse and time of flight through a multiobjective optimization of these solutions based on primer vector theory. We demonstrate the application of our method to a libration orbit transfer in the Earth-Moon system.

  7. Optimal dynamic control of invasions: applying a systematic conservation approach.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vanessa M; Setterfield, Samantha A

    2015-06-01

    The social, economic, and environmental impacts of invasive plants are well recognized. However, these variable impacts are rarely accounted for in the spatial prioritization of funding for weed management. We examine how current spatially explicit prioritization methods can be extended to identify optimal budget allocations to both eradication and control measures of invasive species to minimize the costs and likelihood of invasion. Our framework extends recent approaches to systematic prioritization of weed management to account for multiple values that are threatened by weed invasions with a multi-year dynamic prioritization approach. We apply our method to the northern portion of the Daly catchment in the Northern Territory, which has significant conservation values that are threatened by gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus), a highly invasive species recognized by the Australian government as a Weed of National Significance (WONS). We interface Marxan, a widely applied conservation planning tool, with a dynamic biophysical model of gamba grass to optimally allocate funds to eradication and control programs under two budget scenarios comparing maximizing gain (MaxGain) and minimizing loss (MinLoss) optimization approaches. The prioritizations support previous findings that a MinLoss approach is a better strategy when threats are more spatially variable than conservation values. Over a 10-year simulation period, we find that a MinLoss approach reduces future infestations by ~8% compared to MaxGain in the constrained budget scenarios and ~12% in the unlimited budget scenarios. We find that due to the extensive current invasion and rapid rate of spread, allocating the annual budget to control efforts is more efficient than funding eradication efforts when there is a constrained budget. Under a constrained budget, applying the most efficient optimization scenario (control, minloss) reduces spread by ~27% compared to no control. Conversely, if the budget is unlimited it

  8. Optimization design combined with coupled structural-electrostatic analysis for the electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Guigeng; Zhang, Yiqun

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatically controlled deployable membrane reflector (ECDMR) is a promising scheme to construct large size and high precision space deployable reflector antennas. This paper presents a novel design method for the large size and small F/D ECDMR considering the coupled structure-electrostatic problem. First, the fully coupled structural-electrostatic system is described by a three field formulation, in which the structure and passive electrical field is modeled by finite element method, and the deformation of the electrostatic domain is predicted by a finite element formulation of a fictitious elastic structure. A residual formulation of the structural-electrostatic field finite element model is established and solved by Newton-Raphson method. The coupled structural-electrostatic analysis procedure is summarized. Then, with the aid of this coupled analysis procedure, an integrated optimization method of membrane shape accuracy and stress uniformity is proposed, which is divided into inner and outer iterative loops. The initial state of relatively high shape accuracy and uniform stress distribution is achieved by applying the uniform prestress on the membrane design shape and optimizing the voltages, in which the optimal voltage is computed by a sensitivity analysis. The shape accuracy is further improved by the iterative prestress modification using the reposition balance method. Finally, the results of the uncoupled and coupled methods are compared and the proposed optimization method is applied to design an ECDMR. The results validate the effectiveness of this proposed methods.

  9. Object Correlation and Maneuver Detection Using Optimal Control Performance Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, M.; Scheeres, D.

    2010-09-01

    Object correlation and maneuver detection are persistent problems in space surveillance and space object catalog maintenance. This paper demonstrates the utility of using quadratic trajectory control cost, an analog to the trajectory L2-norm in control, as a distance metric with which to both correlate object tracks and detect maneuvers using Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs), real-time sensor measurement residuals, and prior state uncertainty. State and measurement uncertainty are incorporated into the computation, and distributions of optimal control usage are computed. Both UCT correlation as well as maneuver detection are demonstrated in several scenarios Potential avenues for future research and contributions are summarized.

  10. Development of a digital adaptive optimal linear regulator flight controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Digital adaptive controllers have been proposed as a means for retaining uniform handling qualities over the flight envelope of a high-performance aircraft. Towards such an implementation, an explicit adaptive controller, which makes direct use of online parameter identification, has been developed and applied to the linearized lateral equations of motion for a typical fighter aircraft. The system is composed of an online weighted least-squares parameter identifier, a Kalman state filter, and a model following control law designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Simulation experiments with realistic measurement noise indicate that the proposed adaptive system has the potential for onboard implementation.

  11. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2014-06-24

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  12. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  13. Design of Life Extending Controls Using Nonlinear Parameter Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual development of a life extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel and oxidizer turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. This design approach makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of a rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using nonlinear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure.

  14. Control design variable linking for optimization of structural/control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik Min; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space of structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Conventional structural sizing variables and elements of the feedback gain matrix are both treated as strictly independent design variables in optimization by extending design variable linking concepts to the control gains. Several approximation concepts including new control design variable linking schemes are used to formulate the integrated structural/control optimization problem as a sequence of explicit nonlinear mathematical programming problems. Examples which involve a variety of behavior constraints, including constraints on dynamic stability, damped frequencies, control effort, peak transient displacement, acceleration, and control force limits, are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  15. Vision-based stereo ranging as an optimal control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Sridhar, B.; Chatterji, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    The recent interest in the use of machine vision for flight vehicle guidance is motivated by the need to automate the nap-of-the-earth flight regime of helicopters. Vision-based stereo ranging problem is cast as an optimal control problem in this paper. A quadratic performance index consisting of the integral of the error between observed image irradiances and those predicted by a Pade approximation of the correspondence hypothesis is then used to define an optimization problem. The necessary conditions for optimality yield a set of linear two-point boundary-value problems. These two-point boundary-value problems are solved in feedback form using a version of the backward sweep method. Application of the ranging algorithm is illustrated using a laboratory image pair.

  16. A Nonlinear Fuel Optimal Reaction Jet Control Law

    SciTech Connect

    Breitfeller, E.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    We derive a nonlinear fuel optimal attitude control system (ACS) that drives the final state to the desired state according to a cost function that weights the final state angular error relative to the angular rate error. Control is achieved by allowing the pulse-width-modulated (PWM) commands to begin and end anywhere within a control cycle, achieving a pulse width pulse time (PWPT) control. We show through a MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink model that this steady-state condition may be accomplished, in the absence of sensor noise or model uncertainties, with the theoretical minimum number of actuator cycles. The ability to analytically achieve near-zero drift rates is particularly important in applications such as station-keeping and sensor imaging. Consideration is also given to the fact that, for relatively small sensor and model errors, the controller requires significantly fewer actuator cycles to reach the final state error than a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The optimal PWPT attitude controller may be applicable for a high performance kinetic energy kill vehicle.

  17. Self-Contained Automated Methodology for Optimal Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, Roy A.; Erlebacherl, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for active flow control which couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields and controls (e.g., actuators), may be determined. The problem of boundary layer instability suppression through wave cancellation is used as the initial validation case to test the methodology. Here, the objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc. The present methodology has been extended to three dimensions and may potentially be applied to separation control, re-laminarization, and turbulence control applications using one to many sensors and actuators.

  18. Vibrational computing: simulation of a full adder by optimal control.

    PubMed

    Bomble, L; Lauvergnat, D; Remacle, F; Desouter-Lecomte, M

    2008-02-14

    Within the context of vibrational molecular quantum computing, we investigate the implementation of a full addition of two binary digits and a carry that provides the sum and the carry out. Four qubits are necessary and they are encoded into four different normal vibrational modes of a molecule. We choose the bromoacetyl chloride molecule because it possesses four bright infrared active modes. The ground and first excited states of each mode form the one-qubit computational basis set. Two approaches are proposed for the realization of the full addition. In the first one, we optimize a pulse that implements directly the entire addition by a single unitary transformation. In the second one, we decompose the full addition in elementary quantum gates, following a scheme proposed by Vedral et al. [Phys. Rev. A 54, 147 (1996)]. Four elementary quantum gates are necessary, two two-qubit CNOT gates (controlled NOT) and two three-qubit TOFFOLI gates (controlled-controlled NOT). All the logic operations consist in one-qubit flip. The logic implementation is therefore quasiclassical and the readout is based on a population analysis of the vibrational modes that does not take the phases into account. The fields are optimized by the multitarget extension of the optimal control theory involving all the transformations among the 2(4) qubit states. A single cycle of addition without considering the preparation or the measure or copy of the result can be carried out in a very competitive time, on a picosecond time scale. PMID:18282031

  19. Multiobjective Optimization Design of a Fractional Order PID Controller for a Gun Control System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jilin; Wang, Li; Xu, Shiqing; Hou, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    Motion control of gun barrels is an ongoing topic for the development of gun control equipments possessing excellent performances. In this paper, a typical fractional order PID control strategy is employed for the gun control system. To obtain optimal parameters of the controller, a multiobjective optimization scheme is developed from the loop-shaping perspective. To solve the specified nonlinear optimization problem, a novel Pareto optimal solution based multiobjective differential evolution algorithm is proposed. To enhance the convergent rate of the optimization process, an opposition based learning method is embedded in the chaotic population initialization process. To enhance the robustness of the algorithm for different problems, an adapting scheme of the mutation operation is further employed. With assistance of the evolutionary algorithm, the optimal solution for the specified problem is selected. The numerical simulation results show that the control system can rapidly follow the demand signal with high accuracy and high robustness, demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed controller parameter tuning method. PMID:23766721

  20. Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Scharff, R. J.; Greenfield, M.; Moore, D. S.

    2009-10-01

    While the means to selectively excite a single vibrational mode using ultrafast pulse shaping are well established, the subsequent problem of selectively exciting multiple vibrational modes simultaneously has been largely neglected. The coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations has applications in control of chemistry, chemical detection and molecular vibrational quantum information processing. Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that multiple vibrational modes can be selectively excited with the concurrent suppression of multiple interfering modes by orders of magnitude. While the mechanism of selectivity is analogous to that of single mode selectivity, the interferences required to select multiple modes require complicated non-intuitive pulse trains. Additionally, we show that selective detection can be achieved by the optimal pulse shape, even when the nature of the interfering species is varied, suggesting that optimized detection should be practical in real world applications. Experimental measurements of the multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra (CARS) and CARS decay times of toluene, acetone, cis-stilbene and nitromethane liquids are reported, along with optimizations attempting to selectively excite nitromethane in a mixture of the four solvents. The experimental implementation exhibits a smaller degree of signal to background enhancement than predicted, which is primarily attributed to the single objective optimization methodology and not to fundamental limitations.

  1. Optimal Parametric Discrete Event Control: Problem and Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel optimization problem for discrete event control, similar in spirit to the optimal parametric control problem common in statistical process control. In our problem, we assume a known finite state machine plant model $G$ defined over an event alphabet $\\Sigma$ so that the plant model language $L = \\LanM(G)$ is prefix closed. We further assume the existence of a \\textit{base control structure} $M_K$, which may be either a finite state machine or a deterministic pushdown machine. If $K = \\LanM(M_K)$, we assume $K$ is prefix closed and that $K \\subseteq L$. We associate each controllable transition of $M_K$ with a binary variable $X_1,\\dots,X_n$ indicating whether the transition is enabled or not. This leads to a function $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, that returns a new control specification depending upon the values of $X_1,\\dots,X_n$. We exhibit a branch-and-bound algorithm to solve the optimization problem $\\min_{X_1,\\dots,X_n}\\max_{w \\in K} C(w)$ such that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ and $\\LanM(M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)) \\in \\Con(L)$. Here $\\Pi$ is a set of logical assertions on the structure of $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, and $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ indicates that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$ satisfies the logical assertions; and, $\\Con(L)$ is the set of controllable sublanguages of $L$.

  2. Applications of the theory of optimal control of distributed-parameter systems to structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    An extension of classical methods of optimal control theory for systems described by ordinary differential equations to distributed-parameter systems described by partial differential equations is presented. An application is given involving the minimum-mass design of a simply-supported shear plate with a fixed fundamental frequency of vibration. An optimal plate thickness distribution in analytical form is found. The case of a minimum-mass design of an elastic sandwich plate whose fundamental frequency of free vibration is fixed. Under the most general conditions, the optimization problem reduces to the solution of two simultaneous partial differential equations involving the optimal thickness distribution and the modal displacement. One equation is the uniform energy distribution expression which was found by Ashley and McIntosh for the optimal design of one-dimensional structures with frequency constraints, and by Prager and Taylor for various design criteria in one and two dimensions. The second equation requires dynamic equilibrium at the preassigned vibration frequency.

  3. Human energy - optimal control of disturbance rejection during constrained standing.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, M; Munih, M; Ponikvar, M

    2003-01-01

    An optimal control system that enables a subject to stand without hand support in the sagittal plane was designed. The subject was considered as a double inverted pendulum structure with a voluntarily controlled degree of freedom in the upper trunk and artificially controlled degree of freedom in the ankle joints. The control system design was based on a minimization of cost function that estimated the effort of the ankle joint muscles through observation of the ground reaction force position relative to the ankle joint axis. By maintaining the centre of pressure close to the ankle joint axis the objective of the upright stance is fulfilled with minimal ankle muscle energy cost. The performance of the developed controller was evaluated in a simulation-based study. The results were compared with the responses of an unimpaired subject to different disturbances in the sagittal plane. The proposed cost function was shown to produce a reasonable approximation of human natural behaviour. PMID:12936049

  4. Microgravity vibration isolation: Optimal preview and feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Allaire, P. E.; Lewis, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to achieve adequate low-frequency vibration isolation for certain space experiments an active control is needed, due to inherent passive-isolator limitations. Proposed here are five possible state-space models for a one-dimensional vibration isolation system with a quadratic performance index. The five models are subsets of a general set of nonhomogeneous state space equations which includes disturbance terms. An optimal control is determined, using a differential equations approach, for this class of problems. This control is expressed in terms of constant, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) feedback gains and constant feedforward (preview) gains. The gains can be easily determined numerically. They result in a robust controller and offers substantial improvements over a control that uses standard LQR feedback alone.

  5. Human energy - optimal control of disturbance rejection during constrained standing.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, M; Munih, M; Ponikvar, M

    2003-01-01

    An optimal control system that enables a subject to stand without hand support in the sagittal plane was designed. The subject was considered as a double inverted pendulum structure with a voluntarily controlled degree of freedom in the upper trunk and artificially controlled degree of freedom in the ankle joints. The control system design was based on a minimization of cost function that estimated the effort of the ankle joint muscles through observation of the ground reaction force position relative to the ankle joint axis. By maintaining the centre of pressure close to the ankle joint axis the objective of the upright stance is fulfilled with minimal ankle muscle energy cost. The performance of the developed controller was evaluated in a simulation-based study. The results were compared with the responses of an unimpaired subject to different disturbances in the sagittal plane. The proposed cost function was shown to produce a reasonable approximation of human natural behaviour.

  6. Monotonically convergent optimal control theory of quantum systems under a nonlinear interaction with the control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapert, M.; Tehini, R.; Turinici, G.; Sugny, D.

    2008-08-01

    We consider the optimal control of quantum systems interacting nonlinearly with an electromagnetic field. We propose monotonically convergent algorithms to solve the optimal equations. The monotonic behavior of the algorithm is ensured by a nonstandard choice of the cost, which is not quadratic in the field. These algorithms can be constructed for pure- and mixed-state quantum systems. The efficiency of the method is shown numerically for molecular orientation with a nonlinearity of order 3 in the field. Discretizing the amplitude and the phase of the Fourier transform of the optimal field, we show that the optimal solution can be well approximated by pulses that could be implemented experimentally.

  7. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  8. A model for HIV/AIDS pandemic with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is pandemic. It has affected nearly 60 million people since the detection of the disease in 1981 to date. In this paper basic deterministic HIV/AIDS model with mass action incidence function are developed. Stability analysis is carried out. And the disease free equilibrium of the basic model was found to be locally asymptotically stable whenever the threshold parameter (RO) value is less than one, and unstable otherwise. The model is extended by introducing two optimal control strategies namely, CD4 counts and treatment for the infective using optimal control theory. Numerical simulation was carried out in order to illustrate the analytic results.

  9. Nonlinear singularly perturbed optimal control problems with singular arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    A third order, nonlinear, singularly perturbed optimal control problem is considered under assumptions which assure that the full problem is singular and the reduced problem is nonsingular. The separation between the singular arc of the full problem and the optimal control law of the reduced one, both of which are hypersurfaces in state space, is of the same order as the small parameter of the problem. Boundary layer solutions are constructed which are stable and reach the outer solution in a finite time. A uniformly valid composite solution is then formed from the reduced and boundary layer solutions. The value of the approximate solution is that it is relatively easy to obtain and does not involve singular arcs. To illustrate the utility of the results, the technique is used to obtain an approximate solution of a simplified version of the aircraft minimum time-to-climb problem. A numerical example is included.

  10. Optimal Qubit Control Using Single-Flux Quantum Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Per J.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2016-08-01

    Single-flux quantum pulses are a natural candidate for on-chip control of superconducting qubits. We show that they can drive high-fidelity single-qubit rotations—even in leaky transmon qubits—if the pulse sequence is suitably optimized. We achieve this objective by showing that, for these restricted all-digital pulses, genetic algorithms can be made to converge to arbitrarily low error, verified up to a reduction in gate error by 2 orders of magnitude compared to an evenly spaced pulse train. Timing jitter of the pulses is taken into account, exploring the robustness of our optimized sequence. This approach takes us one step further towards on-chip qubit controls.

  11. Investigation of Optimal Control Allocation for Gust Load Alleviation in Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Bodson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Advances in sensors and avionics computation power suggest real-time structural load measurements could be used in flight control systems for improved safety and performance. A conventional transport flight control system determines the moments necessary to meet the pilot's command, while rejecting disturbances and maintaining stability of the aircraft. Control allocation is the problem of converting these desired moments into control effector commands. In this paper, a framework is proposed to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints in the control allocator. Constrained optimal control allocation can be used to achieve desired moments without exceeding specified limits on monitored load points. Minimization of structural loads by the control allocator is used to alleviate gust loads. The framework to incorporate structural loads in the flight control system and an optimal control allocation algorithm will be described and then demonstrated on a nonlinear simulation of a generic transport aircraft with flight dynamics and static structural loads.

  12. Implicit methods for efficient musculoskeletal simulation and optimal control

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogert, Antonie J.; Blana, Dimitra; Heinrich, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary differential equations for musculoskeletal dynamics are often numerically stiff and highly nonlinear. Consequently, simulations require small time steps, and optimal control problems are slow to solve and have poor convergence. In this paper, we present an implicit formulation of musculoskeletal dynamics, which leads to new numerical methods for simulation and optimal control, with the expectation that we can mitigate some of these problems. A first order Rosenbrock method was developed for solving forward dynamic problems using the implicit formulation. It was used to perform real-time dynamic simulation of a complex shoulder arm system with extreme dynamic stiffness. Simulations had an RMS error of only 0.11 degrees in joint angles when running at real-time speed. For optimal control of musculoskeletal systems, a direct collocation method was developed for implicitly formulated models. The method was applied to predict gait with a prosthetic foot and ankle. Solutions were obtained in well under one hour of computation time and demonstrated how patients may adapt their gait to compensate for limitations of a specific prosthetic limb design. The optimal control method was also applied to a state estimation problem in sports biomechanics, where forces during skiing were estimated from noisy and incomplete kinematic data. Using a full musculoskeletal dynamics model for state estimation had the additional advantage that forward dynamic simulations, could be done with the same implicitly formulated model to simulate injuries and perturbation responses. While these methods are powerful and allow solution of previously intractable problems, there are still considerable numerical challenges, especially related to the convergence of gradient-based solvers. PMID:22102983

  13. Implicit methods for efficient musculoskeletal simulation and optimal control.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Antonie J; Blana, Dimitra; Heinrich, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary differential equations for musculoskeletal dynamics are often numerically stiff and highly nonlinear. Consequently, simulations require small time steps, and optimal control problems are slow to solve and have poor convergence. In this paper, we present an implicit formulation of musculoskeletal dynamics, which leads to new numerical methods for simulation and optimal control, with the expectation that we can mitigate some of these problems. A first order Rosenbrock method was developed for solving forward dynamic problems using the implicit formulation. It was used to perform real-time dynamic simulation of a complex shoulder arm system with extreme dynamic stiffness. Simulations had an RMS error of only 0.11 degrees in joint angles when running at real-time speed. For optimal control of musculoskeletal systems, a direct collocation method was developed for implicitly formulated models. The method was applied to predict gait with a prosthetic foot and ankle. Solutions were obtained in well under one hour of computation time and demonstrated how patients may adapt their gait to compensate for limitations of a specific prosthetic limb design. The optimal control method was also applied to a state estimation problem in sports biomechanics, where forces during skiing were estimated from noisy and incomplete kinematic data. Using a full musculoskeletal dynamics model for state estimation had the additional advantage that forward dynamic simulations, could be done with the same implicitly formulated model to simulate injuries and perturbation responses. While these methods are powerful and allow solution of previously intractable problems, there are still considerable numerical challenges, especially related to the convergence of gradient-based solvers.

  14. Optimal feedback control infinite dimensional parabolic evolution systems: Approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wang, C.

    1989-01-01

    A general approximation framework is discussed for computation of optimal feedback controls in linear quadratic regular problems for nonautonomous parabolic distributed parameter systems. This is done in the context of a theoretical framework using general evolution systems in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Conditions are discussed for preservation under approximation of stabilizability and detectability hypotheses on the infinite dimensional system. The special case of periodic systems is also treated.

  15. Characterizations of Overtaking Optimality for Controlled Diffusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jasso-Fuentes, Hector Hernandez-Lerma, Onesimo

    2008-06-15

    In this paper we give conditions for (the existence and) several characterizations of overtaking optimal policies for a general class of controlled diffusion processes. Our characterization results are of a lexicographical type; namely, first we identify the class of so-called canonical policies, and then within this class we search for policies with some special feature-for instance, canonical policies that in addition maximize the bias.

  16. A general weight matrix formulation using optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farotimi, Oluseyi; Dembo, Amir; Kailath, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Classical methods from optimal control theory are used in deriving general forms for neural network weights. The network learning or application task is encoded in a performance index of a general structure. Consequently, different instances of this performance index lead to special cases of weight rules, including some well-known forms. Comparisons are made with the outer product rule, spectral methods, and recurrent back-propagation. Simulation results and comparisons are presented.

  17. Optimal control in microgrid using multi-agent reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-Dong; Wu, Min; He, Yong; Chen, Xin

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an improved reinforcement learning method to minimize electricity costs on the premise of satisfying the power balance and generation limit of units in a microgrid with grid-connected mode. Firstly, the microgrid control requirements are analyzed and the objective function of optimal control for microgrid is proposed. Then, a state variable "Average Electricity Price Trend" which is used to express the most possible transitions of the system is developed so as to reduce the complexity and randomicity of the microgrid, and a multi-agent architecture including agents, state variables, action variables and reward function is formulated. Furthermore, dynamic hierarchical reinforcement learning, based on change rate of key state variable, is established to carry out optimal policy exploration. The analysis shows that the proposed method is beneficial to handle the problem of "curse of dimensionality" and speed up learning in the unknown large-scale world. Finally, the simulation results under JADE (Java Agent Development Framework) demonstrate the validity of the presented method in optimal control for a microgrid with grid-connected mode.

  18. Optimal control in microgrid using multi-agent reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-Dong; Wu, Min; He, Yong; Chen, Xin

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an improved reinforcement learning method to minimize electricity costs on the premise of satisfying the power balance and generation limit of units in a microgrid with grid-connected mode. Firstly, the microgrid control requirements are analyzed and the objective function of optimal control for microgrid is proposed. Then, a state variable "Average Electricity Price Trend" which is used to express the most possible transitions of the system is developed so as to reduce the complexity and randomicity of the microgrid, and a multi-agent architecture including agents, state variables, action variables and reward function is formulated. Furthermore, dynamic hierarchical reinforcement learning, based on change rate of key state variable, is established to carry out optimal policy exploration. The analysis shows that the proposed method is beneficial to handle the problem of "curse of dimensionality" and speed up learning in the unknown large-scale world. Finally, the simulation results under JADE (Java Agent Development Framework) demonstrate the validity of the presented method in optimal control for a microgrid with grid-connected mode. PMID:22824135

  19. Optimal cooperative control synthesis applied to a control-configured aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1984-01-01

    A multivariable control augmentation synthesis method is presented that is intended to enable the designer to directly optimize pilot opinion rating of the augmented system. The approach involves the simultaneous solution for the augmentation and predicted pilot's compensation via optimal control techniques. The methodology is applied to the control law synthesis for a vehicle similar to the AFTI F16 control-configured aircraft. The resulting dynamics, expressed in terms of eigenstructure and time/frequency responses, are presented with analytical predictions of closed loop tracking performance, pilot compensation, and other predictors of pilot acceptance.

  20. Analysis of modern optimal control theory applied to plasma position and current control in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    The strong compression TFTR discharge has been segmented into regions where linear dynamics can approximate the plasma's interaction with the OH and EF power supply systems. The dynamic equations for these regions are utilized within the linear optimal control theory framework to provide active feedback gains to control the plasma position and current. Methods are developed to analyze and quantitatively evaluate the quality of control in a nonlinear, more realistic simulation. Tests are made of optimal control theory's assumptions and requirements, and the feasibility of this method for TFTR is assessed.

  1. Age-structured optimal control in population economics.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Gustav; Prskawetz, Alexia; Veliov, Vladimir M

    2004-06-01

    This paper brings both intertemporal and age-dependent features to a theory of population policy at the macro-level. A Lotka-type renewal model of population dynamics is combined with a Solow/Ramsey economy. We consider a social planner who maximizes an aggregate intertemporal utility function which depends on per capita consumption. As control policies we consider migration and saving rate (both age-dependent). By using a new maximum principle for age-structured control systems we derive meaningful results for the optimal migration and saving rate in an aging population. The model used in the numerical calculations is calibrated for Austria.

  2. Topology of optimally controlled quantum mechanical transition probability landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Rabitz, H.; Ho, T.-S.; Hsieh, M.; Kosut, R.; Demiralp, M.

    2006-07-15

    An optimally controlled quantum system possesses a search landscape defined by the physical objective as a functional of the control field. This paper particularly explores the topological structure of quantum mechanical transition probability landscapes. The quantum system is assumed to be controllable and the analysis is based on the Euler-Lagrange variational equations derived from a cost function only requiring extremizing the transition probability. It is shown that the latter variational equations are automatically satisfied as a mathematical identity for control fields that either produce transition probabilities of zero or unit value. Similarly, the variational equations are shown to be inconsistent (i.e., they have no solution) for any control field that produces a transition probability different from either of these two extreme values. An upper bound is shown to exist on the norm of the functional derivative of the transition probability with respect to the control field anywhere over the landscape. The trace of the Hessian, evaluated for a control field producing a transition probability of a unit value, is shown to be bounded from below. Furthermore, the Hessian at a transition probability of unit value is shown to have an extensive null space and only a finite number of negative eigenvalues. Collectively, these findings show that (a) the transition probability landscape extrema consists of values corresponding to no control or full control, (b) approaching full control involves climbing a gentle slope with no false traps in the control space and (c) an inherent degree of robustness exists around any full control solution. Although full controllability may not exist in some applications, the analysis provides a basis to understand the evident ease of finding controls that produce excellent yields in simulations and in the laboratory.

  3. Multigrid one shot methods for optimal control problems: Infinite dimensional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    The multigrid one shot method for optimal control problems, governed by elliptic systems, is introduced for the infinite dimensional control space. ln this case, the control variable is a function whose discrete representation involves_an increasing number of variables with grid refinement. The minimization algorithm uses Lagrange multipliers to calculate sensitivity gradients. A preconditioned gradient descent algorithm is accelerated by a set of coarse grids. It optimizes for different scales in the representation of the control variable on different discretization levels. An analysis which reduces the problem to the boundary is introduced. It is used to approximate the two level asymptotic convergence rate, to determine the amplitude of the minimization steps, and the choice of a high pass filter to be used when necessary. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on a series of test problems. The new method enables the solutions of optimal control problems at the same cost of solving the corresponding analysis problems just a few times.

  4. A multilevel control system for the large space telescope. [numerical analysis/optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Sundareshan, S. K.; Vukcevic, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    A multilevel scheme was proposed for control of Large Space Telescope (LST) modeled by a three-axis-six-order nonlinear equation. Local controllers were used on the subsystem level to stabilize motions corresponding to the three axes. Global controllers were applied to reduce (and sometimes nullify) the interactions among the subsystems. A multilevel optimization method was developed whereby local quadratic optimizations were performed on the subsystem level, and global control was again used to reduce (nullify) the effect of interactions. The multilevel stabilization and optimization methods are presented as general tools for design and then used in the design of the LST Control System. The methods are entirely computerized, so that they can accommodate higher order LST models with both conceptual and numerical advantages over standard straightforward design techniques.

  5. Infinite horizon optimal impulsive control with applications to Internet congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrachenkov, Konstantin; Habachi, Oussama; Piunovskiy, Alexey; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate infinite-horizon deterministic optimal control problems with both gradual and impulsive controls, where any finitely many impulses are allowed simultaneously. Both discounted and long-run time-average criteria are considered. We establish very general and at the same time natural conditions, under which the dynamic programming approach results in an optimal feedback policy. The established theoretical results are applied to the Internet congestion control, and by solving analytically and nontrivially the underlying optimal control problems, we obtain a simple threshold-based active queue management scheme, which takes into account the main parameters of the transmission control protocols, and improves the fairness among the connections in a given network.

  6. A Sliding Mode Control with Optimized Sliding Surface for Aircraft Pitch Axis Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangchul; Kim, Kwangjin; Kim, Youdan

    A sliding mode controller with an optimized sliding surface is proposed for an aircraft control system. The quadratic type of performance index for minimizing the angle of attack and the angular rate of the aircraft in the longitudinal motion is used to design the sliding surface. For optimization of the sliding surface, a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated and it is solved through a numerical algorithm using a Generalized HJB (GHJB) equation and the Galerkin spectral method. The solution of this equation denotes a nonlinear sliding surface, on which the trajectory of the system approximately satisfies the optimality condition. Numerical simulation is performed for a nonlinear aircraft model with an optimized sliding surface and a simple linear sliding surface. The simulation result demonstrates that the proposed controller can be effectively applied to the longitudinal maneuver of an aircraft.

  7. Spacecraft attitude control using neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) was developed for spacecraft attitude control to mitigate large computational load of the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) controller. The NFC was developed by training a neuro-fuzzy network to approximate the SDRE controller. The stability of the NFC was numerically verified using a Lyapunov-based method, and the performance of the controller was analyzed in terms of approximation ability, steady-state error, cost, and execution time. The simulations and test results indicate that the developed NFC efficiently approximates the SDRE controller, with asymptotic stability in a bounded region of angular velocity encompassing the operational range of rapid-attitude maneuvers. In addition, it was shown that an approximated optimal feedback controller can be designed successfully through neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal open-loop controller.

  8. Comparative study of flare control laws. [optimal control of b-737 aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A digital 3-D automatic control law was developed to achieve an optimal transition of a B-737 aircraft between various initial glid slope conditions and the desired final touchdown condition. A discrete, time-invariant, optimal, closed-loop control law presented for a linear regulator problem, was extended to include a system being acted upon by a constant disturbance. Two forms of control laws were derived to solve this problem. One method utilized the feedback of integral states defined appropriately and augmented with the original system equations. The second method formulated the problem as a control variable constraint, and the control variables were augmented with the original system. The control variable constraint control law yielded a better performance compared to feedback control law for the integral states chosen.

  9. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a

  10. Optimal control strategy of malaria vector using genetically modified mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, M; Bevilacqua, L; Wyse, A P P

    2009-06-01

    The development of transgenic mosquitoes that are resistant to diseases may provide a new and effective weapon of diseases control. Such an approach relies on transgenic mosquitoes being able to survive and compete with wild-type populations. These transgenic mosquitoes carry a specific code that inhibits the plasmodium evolution in its organism. It is said that this characteristic is hereditary and consequently the disease fades away after some time. Once transgenic mosquitoes are released, interactions between the two populations and inter-specific mating between the two types of mosquitoes take place. We present a mathematical model that considers the generation overlapping and variable environment factors. Based on this continuous model, the malaria vector control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how genetically modified mosquitoes should be introduced in the environment. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed control.

  11. Perturbing engine performance measurements to determine optimal engine control settings

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-12-30

    Methods and systems for optimizing a performance of a vehicle engine are provided. The method includes determining an initial value for a first engine control parameter based on one or more detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine, determining a value of an engine performance variable, and artificially perturbing the determined value of the engine performance variable. The initial value for the first engine control parameter is then adjusted based on the perturbed engine performance variable causing the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. Operation of the vehicle engine is controlled based on the adjusted initial value for the first engine control parameter. These acts are repeated until the engine performance variable approaches the target engine performance variable.

  12. Optimal placement of actuators and sensors in control augmented structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A control-augmented structural synthesis methodology is presented in which actuator and sensor placement is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes and control variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. A multiobjective utopian approach is used to obtain a compromise solution for inherently conflicting objective functions such as strucutal mass control effort and number of actuators. Constraints are imposed on transient displacements, natural frequencies, actuator forces and dynamic stability as well as controllability and observability of the system. The combinatorial aspects of the mixed - (0,1) continuous variable design optimization problem are made tractable by combining approximation concepts with branch and bound techniques. Some numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  13. Multiresolution strategies for the numerical solution of optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    There exist many numerical techniques for solving optimal control problems but less work has been done in the field of making these algorithms run faster and more robustly. The main motivation of this work is to solve optimal control problems accurately in a fast and efficient way. Optimal control problems are often characterized by discontinuities or switchings in the control variables. One way of accurately capturing the irregularities in the solution is to use a high resolution (dense) uniform grid. This requires a large amount of computational resources both in terms of CPU time and memory. Hence, in order to accurately capture any irregularities in the solution using a few computational resources, one can refine the mesh locally in the region close to an irregularity instead of refining the mesh uniformly over the whole domain. Therefore, a novel multiresolution scheme for data compression has been designed which is shown to outperform similar data compression schemes. Specifically, we have shown that the proposed approach results in fewer grid points in the grid compared to a common multiresolution data compression scheme. The validity of the proposed mesh refinement algorithm has been verified by solving several challenging initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations in 1D. The examples have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm adapted dynamically to any existing or emerging irregularities in the solution by automatically allocating more grid points to the region where the solution exhibited sharp features and fewer points to the region where the solution was smooth. Thereby, the computational time and memory usage has been reduced significantly, while maintaining an accuracy equivalent to the one obtained using a fine uniform mesh. Next, a direct multiresolution-based approach for solving trajectory optimization problems is developed. The original optimal control problem is transcribed into a

  14. Finite-horizon control-constrained nonlinear optimal control using single network adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Ali; Balakrishnan, Sivasubramanya N

    2013-01-01

    To synthesize fixed-final-time control-constrained optimal controllers for discrete-time nonlinear control-affine systems, a single neural network (NN)-based controller called the Finite-horizon Single Network Adaptive Critic is developed in this paper. Inputs to the NN are the current system states and the time-to-go, and the network outputs are the costates that are used to compute optimal feedback control. Control constraints are handled through a nonquadratic cost function. Convergence proofs of: 1) the reinforcement learning-based training method to the optimal solution; 2) the training error; and 3) the network weights are provided. The resulting controller is shown to solve the associated time-varying Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and provide the fixed-final-time optimal solution. Performance of the new synthesis technique is demonstrated through different examples including an attitude control problem wherein a rigid spacecraft performs a finite-time attitude maneuver subject to control bounds. The new formulation has great potential for implementation since it consists of only one NN with single set of weights and it provides comprehensive feedback solutions online, though it is trained offline.

  15. Finite-horizon control-constrained nonlinear optimal control using single network adaptive critics.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Ali; Balakrishnan, Sivasubramanya N

    2013-01-01

    To synthesize fixed-final-time control-constrained optimal controllers for discrete-time nonlinear control-affine systems, a single neural network (NN)-based controller called the Finite-horizon Single Network Adaptive Critic is developed in this paper. Inputs to the NN are the current system states and the time-to-go, and the network outputs are the costates that are used to compute optimal feedback control. Control constraints are handled through a nonquadratic cost function. Convergence proofs of: 1) the reinforcement learning-based training method to the optimal solution; 2) the training error; and 3) the network weights are provided. The resulting controller is shown to solve the associated time-varying Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and provide the fixed-final-time optimal solution. Performance of the new synthesis technique is demonstrated through different examples including an attitude control problem wherein a rigid spacecraft performs a finite-time attitude maneuver subject to control bounds. The new formulation has great potential for implementation since it consists of only one NN with single set of weights and it provides comprehensive feedback solutions online, though it is trained offline. PMID:24808214

  16. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  17. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  18. Startle Modification and P50 Gating in Schizophrenia Patients and Controls: Russian Population.

    PubMed

    Storozheva, Zinaida I; Kirenskaya, Anna V; Novototsky-Vlasov, Vladimir Y; Telesheva, Klavdia Y; Pletnikov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Prepulse modification of the acoustic startle response (ASR) and P50 gating are potential neurophysiological endophenotypes of schizophrenia and may be used in the construction of valid clinical biomarkers. Such approach requires a large amount of data obtained in the representative samples from different gender, socio-typological and ethnic groups, replicating studies using the similar protocols and meta-analyses. This is a replication study of ASR and the first study of P50 suppression in Russian patients with schizophrenia (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 25). ASR and P50 were estimated according to standard protocols. Patients exhibited increased baseline ASR latency (d = 0.35, p = .026) and reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) at 60 ms interval (d = 0.39, p = .003) and 120 ms interval (d = 0.37, p = .005) relative to controls. In the P50 test patients displayed greater S2 response amplitude (d = 0.24, p = .036) and deficit of P50 suppression (d = 0.43, p = .001). No correlations of PPI and P50 suppression were found in both groups. Only in controls prepulse ASR facilitation (at 2500 ms interval) positively correlated with P50 suppression (r = -.514, p = .013). In patients PPI displayed significant correlations with Difficulty in abstract thinking (N5: r = -.49, p = .005) and Hallucination (P3: r = .40, p = .036) PANSS scales. Logistic regression showed that the combination of PPI and P50 suppression could serve as a diagnostic predictor. Obtained results demonstrated that both PPI and P50 could be regarded as potential schizophrenia biomarkers in Russian population. PMID:26936103

  19. Combined structures-controls optimization of lattice trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role that distributed parameter model can play in CSI is demonstrated, in particular in combined structures controls optimization problems of importance in preliminary design. Closed form solutions can be obtained for performance criteria such as rms attitude error, making possible analytical solutions of the optimization problem. This is in contrast to the need for numerical computer solution involving the inversion of large matrices in traditional finite element model (FEM) use. Another advantage of the analytic solution is that it can provide much needed insight into phenomena that can otherwise be obscured or difficult to discern from numerical computer results. As a compromise in level of complexity between a toy lab model and a real space structure, the lattice truss used in the EPS (Earth Pointing Satellite) was chosen. The optimization problem chosen is a generic one: of minimizing the structure mass subject to a specified stability margin and to a specified upper bond on the rms attitude error, using a co-located controller and sensors. Standard FEM treating each bar as a truss element is used, while the continuum model is anisotropic Timoshenko beam model. Performance criteria are derived for each model, except that for the distributed parameter model, explicit closed form solutions was obtained. Numerical results obtained by the two model show complete agreement.

  20. Fundamental role of bistability in optimal homeostatic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2013-03-01

    Bistability is a fundamental phenomenon in nature and has a number of fine properties. However, these properties are consequences of bistability at the physiological level, which do not explain why it had to emerge during evolution. Using optimal homeostasis as the first principle and Pontryagin's Maximum Principle as the optimization approach, I find that bistability emerges as an indispensable control mechanism. Because the mathematical model is general and the result is independent of parameters, it is likely that most biological systems use bistability to control homeostasis. Glucose homeostasis represents a good example. It turns out that bistability is the only solution to a dilemma in glucose homeostasis: high insulin efficiency is required for rapid plasma glucose clearance, whereas an insulin sparing state is required to guarantee the brain's safety during fasting. This new perspective can illuminate studies on the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes and the corresponding intervening strategies. For example, overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle may represent sudden environmental changes that cause the lose of optimality, which may contribute to the marked rise of obesity and diabetes in our generation.

  1. Optimal control and cold war dynamics between plant and herbivore.

    PubMed

    Low, Candace; Ellner, Stephen P; Holden, Matthew H

    2013-08-01

    Herbivores eat the leaves that a plant needs for photosynthesis. However, the degree of antagonism between plant and herbivore may depend critically on the timing of their interactions and the intrinsic value of a leaf. We present a model that investigates whether and when the timing of plant defense and herbivore feeding activity can be optimized by evolution so that their interactions can move from antagonistic to neutral. We assume that temporal changes in environmental conditions will affect intrinsic leaf value, measured as potential carbon gain. Using optimal-control theory, we model herbivore evolution, first in response to fixed plant strategies and then under coevolutionary dynamics in which the plant also evolves in response to the herbivore. In the latter case, we solve for the evolutionarily stable strategies of plant defense induction and herbivore hatching rate under different ecological conditions. Our results suggest that the optimal strategies for both plant and herbivore are to avoid direct conflict. As long as the plant has the capability for moderately lethal defense, the herbivore will modify its hatching rate to avoid plant defenses, and the plant will never have to use them. Insights from this model offer a possible solution to the paradox of sublethal defenses and provide a mechanism for stable plant-herbivore interactions without the need for natural enemy control.

  2. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  3. Optimal control and cold war dynamics between plant and herbivore.

    PubMed

    Low, Candace; Ellner, Stephen P; Holden, Matthew H

    2013-08-01

    Herbivores eat the leaves that a plant needs for photosynthesis. However, the degree of antagonism between plant and herbivore may depend critically on the timing of their interactions and the intrinsic value of a leaf. We present a model that investigates whether and when the timing of plant defense and herbivore feeding activity can be optimized by evolution so that their interactions can move from antagonistic to neutral. We assume that temporal changes in environmental conditions will affect intrinsic leaf value, measured as potential carbon gain. Using optimal-control theory, we model herbivore evolution, first in response to fixed plant strategies and then under coevolutionary dynamics in which the plant also evolves in response to the herbivore. In the latter case, we solve for the evolutionarily stable strategies of plant defense induction and herbivore hatching rate under different ecological conditions. Our results suggest that the optimal strategies for both plant and herbivore are to avoid direct conflict. As long as the plant has the capability for moderately lethal defense, the herbivore will modify its hatching rate to avoid plant defenses, and the plant will never have to use them. Insights from this model offer a possible solution to the paradox of sublethal defenses and provide a mechanism for stable plant-herbivore interactions without the need for natural enemy control. PMID:23852361

  4. Structural/control system optimization with variable actuator masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik M.; Sepulveda, Abdon E.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space for structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Nonstructural lumped masses and control system design variables as well as structural sizing variables are all treated equally as independent design variables in the optimization process. Structural and control design variable linking schemes are used in order to avoid a prohibitively large increase in the total number of independent design variables. When actuator masses are treated as nonstructural lumped mass design variables, special consideration is given to the relation between the transient peak responses and the required actuator masses which is formulated as a behavior constraint form. The original nonlinear mathematical programming problem based on a finite element formulation and linear state feedback is replaced by a sequence of explicit approximate problems exploiting various approximation concepts such as design variable linkings, temporary constraint deletion and first order Taylor series expansion of nonlinear behavior constraints in terms of intermediate design variables. Examples which involve a variety of dynamic behavior constraints (including constraints on closed-loop eigenvalues, peak transient displacements, peak actuator forces, and relations between the peak responses and the actuator masses) are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  5. Spacecraft flight control with the new phase space control law and optimal linear jet select

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, E. V.; Croopnick, S. R.; Turkovich, J. J.; Work, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    An autopilot designed for rotation and translation control of a rigid spacecraft is described. The autopilot uses reaction control jets as control effectors and incorporates a six-dimensional phase space control law as well as a linear programming algorithm for jet selection. The interaction of the control law and jet selection was investigated and a recommended configuration proposed. By means of a simulation procedure the new autopilot was compared with an existing system and was found to be superior in terms of core memory, central processing unit time, firings, and propellant consumption. But it is thought that the cycle time required to perform the jet selection computations might render the new autopilot unsuitable for existing flight computer applications, without modifications. The new autopilot is capable of maintaining attitude control in the presence of a large number of jet failures.

  6. Optimized modification of gold nanoparticles with a self-assembled monolayer for suppression of nonspecific binding in DNA assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esashika, Keiko; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    Homogeneous DNA assays using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) require the reduction of nonspecific binding between AuNPs to improve sensitivity in detecting the target molecule. In this study, we employed alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for modifying the AuNP surface to attain both good dispersability and high hybridization efficiency. The alkanethiol SAMs enhance the repulsive interaction between AuNPs, reducing nonspecific binding and promoting the extension of surface-immobilized ssDNA into the solvent, thus enhancing the hybridization process. Introduction of oligoethylene glycol into the alkanethiol prevented nonspecific binding caused by the entanglement of alkane chains. Finally, the conditions were optimized by controlling the surface charge density through the introduction of a COOH group at the alkanethiol terminus, resulting in the complete blocking of nonspecific binding and the maintenance of high hybridization efficiency.

  7. Optimization and Planning of Emergency Evacuation Routes Considering Traffic Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies, especially major ones, happen fast, randomly, as well as unpredictably, and generally will bring great harm to people's life and the economy. Therefore, governments and lots of professionals devote themselves to taking effective measures and providing optimal evacuation plans. This paper establishes two different emergency evacuation models on the basis of the maximum flow model (MFM) and the minimum-cost maximum flow model (MC-MFM), and proposes corresponding algorithms for the evacuation from one source node to one designated destination (one-to-one evacuation). Ulteriorly, we extend our evaluation model from one source node to many designated destinations (one-to-many evacuation). At last, we make case analysis of evacuation optimization and planning in Beijing, and obtain the desired evacuation routes and effective traffic control measures from the perspective of sufficiency and practicability. Both analytical and numerical results support that our models are feasible and practical. PMID:24991636

  8. Optimization and planning of emergency evacuation routes considering traffic control.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies, especially major ones, happen fast, randomly, as well as unpredictably, and generally will bring great harm to people's life and the economy. Therefore, governments and lots of professionals devote themselves to taking effective measures and providing optimal evacuation plans. This paper establishes two different emergency evacuation models on the basis of the maximum flow model (MFM) and the minimum-cost maximum flow model (MC-MFM), and proposes corresponding algorithms for the evacuation from one source node to one designated destination (one-to-one evacuation). Ulteriorly, we extend our evaluation model from one source node to many designated destinations (one-to-many evacuation). At last, we make case analysis of evacuation optimization and planning in Beijing, and obtain the desired evacuation routes and effective traffic control measures from the perspective of sufficiency and practicability. Both analytical and numerical results support that our models are feasible and practical.

  9. Inverse eigenvalue problems in vibration absorption: Passive modification and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Ram, Yitshak M.

    2006-01-01

    The abiding problem of vibration absorption has occupied engineering scientists for over a century and there remain abundant examples of the need for vibration suppression in many industries. For example, in the automotive industry the resolution of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) problems is of extreme importance to customer satisfaction. In rotorcraft it is vital to avoid resonance close to the blade passing speed and its harmonics. An objective of the greatest importance, and extremely difficult to achieve, is the isolation of the pilot's seat in a helicopter. It is presently impossible to achieve the objectives of vibration absorption in these industries at the design stage because of limitations inherent in finite element models. Therefore, it is necessary to develop techniques whereby the dynamic of the system (possibly a car or a helicopter) can be adjusted after it has been built. There are two main approaches: structural modification by passive elements and active control. The state of art of the mathematical theory of vibration absorption is presented and illustrated for the benefit of the reader with numerous simple examples.

  10. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tung O.; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C.; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M.; Armen, Roger S.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B.

    2015-01-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr308 in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr308 dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser473) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr308) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr308 phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin. PMID:26201515

  11. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tung O; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B

    2015-10-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr(308) in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr(308) dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser(473)) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr(308)) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr(308) phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin.

  12. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one. PMID:23091216

  13. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  14. Modelling Optimal Control of Cholera in Communities Linked by Migration.

    PubMed

    Njagarah, J B H; Nyabadza, F

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model for the dynamics of cholera transmission with permissible controls between two connected communities is developed and analysed. The dynamics of the disease in the adjacent communities are assumed to be similar, with the main differences only reflected in the transmission and disease related parameters. This assumption is based on the fact that adjacent communities often have different living conditions and movement is inclined toward the community with better living conditions. Community specific reproduction numbers are given assuming movement of those susceptible, infected, and recovered, between communities. We carry out sensitivity analysis of the model parameters using the Latin Hypercube Sampling scheme to ascertain the degree of effect the parameters and controls have on progression of the infection. Using principles from optimal control theory, a temporal relationship between the distribution of controls and severity of the infection is ascertained. Our results indicate that implementation of controls such as proper hygiene, sanitation, and vaccination across both affected communities is likely to annihilate the infection within half the time it would take through self-limitation. In addition, although an infection may still break out in the presence of controls, it may be up to 8 times less devastating when compared with the case when no controls are in place. PMID:26246850

  15. Optimal control of diarrhea transmission in a flood evacuation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwina, N.; Aldila, D.; Soewono, E.

    2014-03-01

    Evacuation of residents and diarrhea disease outbreak in evacuation zone have become serious problem that frequently happened during flood periods. Limited clean water supply and infrastructure in evacuation zone contribute to a critical spread of diarrhea. Transmission of diarrhea disease can be reduced by controlling clean water supply and treating diarrhea patients properly. These treatments require significant amount of budget, which may not be fulfilled in the fields. In his paper, transmission of diarrhea disease in evacuation zone using SIRS model is presented as control optimum problem with clean water supply and rate of treated patients as input controls. Existence and stability of equilibrium points and sensitivity analysis are investigated analytically for constant input controls. Optimum clean water supply and rate of treatment are found using optimum control technique. Optimal results for transmission of diarrhea and the corresponding controls during the period of observation are simulated numerically. The optimum result shows that transmission of diarrhea disease can be controlled with proper combination of water supply and rate of treatment within allowable budget.

  16. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  17. Optimal control of CPR procedure using hemodynamic circulation model

    DOEpatents

    Lenhart, Suzanne M.; Protopopescu, Vladimir A.; Jung, Eunok

    2007-12-25

    A method for determining a chest pressure profile for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes the steps of representing a hemodynamic circulation model based on a plurality of difference equations for a patient, applying an optimal control (OC) algorithm to the circulation model, and determining a chest pressure profile. The chest pressure profile defines a timing pattern of externally applied pressure to a chest of the patient to maximize blood flow through the patient. A CPR device includes a chest compressor, a controller communicably connected to the chest compressor, and a computer communicably connected to the controller. The computer determines the chest pressure profile by applying an OC algorithm to a hemodynamic circulation model based on the plurality of difference equations.

  18. Hybrid intelligent control concepts for optimal data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, James

    1994-02-01

    In the post-Cold War era, Naval surface ship operations will be largely conducted in littoral waters to support regional military missions of all types, including humanitarian and evacuation activities, and amphibious mission execution. Under these conditions, surface ships will be much more isolated and vulnerable to a variety of threats, including maneuvering antiship missiles. To deal with these threats, the optimal employment of multiple shipborne sensors for maximum vigilance is paramount. This paper characterizes the sensor management problem as one of intelligent control, identifies some of the key issues in controller design, and presents one approach to controller design which is soon to be implemented and evaluated. It is argued that the complexity and hierarchical nature of problem formulation demands a hybrid combination of knowledge-based methods and scheduling techniques from 'hard' real-time systems theory for its solution.

  19. An optimal control problem for ovine brucellosis with culling.

    PubMed

    Nannyonga, B; Mwanga, G G; Luboobi, L S

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is used to study the dynamics of ovine brucellosis when transmitted directly from infected individual, through contact with a contaminated environment or vertically through mother to child. The model developed by Aïnseba et al. [A model for ovine brucellosis incorporating direct and indirect transmission, J. Biol. Dyn. 4 (2010), pp. 2-11. Available at http://www.math.u-bordeaux1.fr/∼pmagal100p/papers/BBM-JBD09.pdf. Accessed 3 July 2012] was modified to include culling and then used to determine important parameters in the spread of human brucellosis using sensitivity analysis. An optimal control analysis was performed on the model to determine the best way to control such as a disease in the population. Three time-dependent controls to prevent exposure, cull the infected and reduce environmental transmission were used to set up to minimize infection at a minimum cost.

  20. Optimizing pain control through the use of implantable pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ilias, Wilfried; Todoroff, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Intrathecal therapy represents an effective and well established treatment of nonmalignant as well as malignant pain. Devices available include mechanical constant flow pumps as well as electronic variable flow pumps with patient-controlled bolus release. The latter provide faster dose finding, individual pain control, and good acceptance by patients. New technologies such as membrane pumps and rechargeable devices are expected to be developed to clinical perfection. The available drugs for intrathecal therapy are listed according to the polyanalgesic consensus on intrathecal therapy. The integration of remote patient-controlled analgesia into electronic implantable devices, and the peptide analgesic ziconotide, have significantly improved intrathecal therapy. Complications include infections, catheter ruptures or disconnections, catheter granulomas, and technical dysfunctions. Further possibilities for optimizing intrathecal therapy include development of new drugs, drug side effects, catheter and pump technologies, and surgical techniques. PMID:22915907

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine: Parasitic Loss Control through Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Farshid Sadeghi; Chin-Pei Wang

    2008-12-31

    This report presents results of our investigation on parasitic loss control through surface modification in reciprocating engine. In order to achieve the objectives several experimental and corresponding analytical models were designed and developed to corroborate our results. Four different test rigs were designed and developed to simulate the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL) contact. The Reciprocating Piston Test Rig (RPTR) is a novel suspended liner test apparatus which can be used to accurately measure the friction force and side load at the piston-cylinder interface. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with the experimental measurements. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results showed good agreement. The results revealed that in the reciprocating engines higher friction occur near TDC and BDC of the stroke due to the extremely low piston speed resulting in boundary lubrication. A Small Engine Dynamometer Test Rig was also designed and developed to enable testing of cylinder liner under motored and fired conditions. Results of this study provide a baseline from which to measure the effect of surface modifications. The Pin on Disk Test Rig (POD) was used in a flat-on-flat configuration to study the friction effect of CNC machining circular pockets and laser micro-dimples. The results show that large and shallow circular pockets resulted in significant friction reduction. Deep circular pockets did not provide much load support. The Reciprocating Liner Test Rig (RLTR) was designed to simplifying the contact at the PRCL interface. Accurate measurement of friction was obtained using 3-axis piezoelectric force transducer. Two fiber optic sensors were used to measure the film thickness precisely. The results show that the friction force is reduced through the use of modified surfaces. The Shear Driven Test Rig (SDTR) was designed to simulate the mechanism of the

  2. Autonomic Effects of Controlled Fine Particulate Exposure in Young Healthy Adults: Effect Modification by Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Asghar A.; Ilic, Ljubomir M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Urch, Bruce; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human controlled-exposure studies have assessed the impact of ambient fine particulate matter on cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability (HRV), but whether these effects are modified by concomitant ozone exposure remains unknown. Objective In this study we assessed the impact of O3 and particulate matter exposure on HRV in humans. Methods In a crossover design, 50 subjects (19–48 years of age) were randomized to 2-hr controlled exposures to filtered air (FA), concentrated ambient particles (CAPs), O3, or combined CAPs and ozone (CAPs + O3). The primary end point was change in HRV between the start and end of exposure. Secondary analyses included blood pressure (BP) responses, and effect modification by asthmatic status. Results Achieved mean CAPs and O3 exposure concentrations were 121.6 ± 48.0 μg/m3 and 113.9 ± 6.6 ppb, respectively. In a categorical analysis, exposure had no consistent effect on HRV indices. However, the dose–response relationship between CAPs mass concentration and HRV indices seemed to vary depending on the presence of O3. This heterogeneity was statistically significant for the low-frequency component of HRV (p = 0.02) and approached significance for the high-frequency component and time-domain measures of HRV. Exposure to CAPs + O3 increased diastolic BP by 2.0 mmHg (SE, 1.2; p = 0.02). No other statistically significant changes in BP were observed. Asthmatic status did not modify these effects. Conclusion The potentiation by O3 of CAPs effects on diastolic BP and possibly HRV is of small magnitude in young adults. Further studies are needed to assess potential effects in more vulnerable populations. PMID:19672410

  3. Finite element approximation of an optimal control problem for the von Karman equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, L. Steven; Turner, James C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with optimal control problems for the von Karman equations with distributed controls. We first show that optimal solutions exist. We then show that Lagrange multipliers may be used to enforce the constraints and derive an optimality system from which optimal states and controls may be deduced. Finally we define finite element approximations of solutions for the optimality system and derive error estimates for the approximations.

  4. Optimal vibration control of curved beams using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushou; Jin, Dongping; Wen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The design of linear quadratic optimal controller using spectral factorization method is studied for vibration suppression of curved beam structures modeled as distributed parameter models. The equations of motion for active control of the in-plane vibration of a curved beam are developed firstly considering its shear deformation and rotary inertia, and then the state space model of the curved beam is established directly using the partial differential equations of motion. The functional gains for the distributed parameter model of curved beam are calculated by extending the spectral factorization method. Moreover, the response of the closed-loop control system is derived explicitly in frequency domain. Finally, the suppression of the vibration at the free end of a cantilevered curved beam by point control moment is studied through numerical case studies, in which the benefit of the presented method is shown by comparison with a constant gain velocity feedback control law, and the performance of the presented method on avoidance of control spillover is demonstrated.

  5. Preparation, characterization and optimization of glipizide controlled release nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Emami, J.; Boushehri, M.S. Shetab; Varshosaz, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop glipizide controlled release nanoparticles using alginate and chitosan thorough ionotropic controlled gelation method. Glipizide is a frequently prescribed second generation sulfonylurea which lowers the blood glucose in type-two diabetics. Quick absorption of the drug from the gastrointestinal tract along with short half- life of elimination makes it a good candidate for controlled release formulations. Alginate-chitosan nanoparticles (ACNP) are convenient controlled delivery systems for glipizide, due to both the release limiting properties of the system, and the bioadhesive nature of the polymers. In the present study, glipizide loaded alginate-chitosan nanoparticles (GlACNP) were prepared, and the particle characteristics including particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), entrapment efficiency (EE%), loading percent (LP), and mean release time (MRT), as well as the morphology of the nanoparticles, the drug-excipient compatibility, and the release kinetics along with the drug diffusion mechanism were evaluated. The results suggested that ionotropic controlled gelation method offers the possibility of preparing the nanoparticles in mild conditions in an aqueous environment, and can lead to the preparation of particles with favorable size, controlled release characteristics, and high entrapment efficiency, serving as a convenient delivery system for glipizide. The particle and release characteristics can be efficiently optimized using the Box-Behnken design. Based on the findings of the present study, it is expected that this novel formulation be a superior therapeutic alternative to the currently available glipizide delivery systems. PMID:25657802

  6. Parallel and vector computation for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    A general method for parallel and vector numerical solutions of stochastic dynamic programming problems is described for optimal control of general nonlinear, continuous time, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by Poisson as well as Gaussian random white noise. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random atmospheric fluctuations. The numerical formulation is highly suitable for a vector multiprocessor or vectorizing supercomputer, and results exhibit high processor efficiency and numerical stability. Advanced computing techniques, data structures, and hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations.

  7. Method for depleting BWRs using optimal control rod patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H. ); Hsiao, M.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    Control rod (CR) programming is an essential core management activity for boiling water reactors (BWRs). After establishing a core reload design for a BWR, CR programming is performed to develop a sequence of exposure-dependent CR patterns that assure the safe and effective depletion of the core through a reactor cycle. A time-variant target power distribution approach has been assumed in this study. The authors have developed OCTOPUS to implement a new two-step method for designing semioptimal CR programs for BWRs. The optimization procedure of OCTOPUS is based on the method of approximation programming and uses the SIMULATE-E code for nucleonics calculations.

  8. Optimal Control Problem of Feeding Adaptations of Daphnia and Neural Network Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ov, Mria

    2010-09-01

    A neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints and open final time. The optimal control problem is transcribed into nonlinear programming problem, which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network [9] and recurrent neural network for solving nonlinear proprojection equations [10]. The proposed simulation methods is illustrated by the optimal control problem of feeding adaptation of filter feeders of Daphnia. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach and neural network solving of nonlinear equations hold promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints and open final time.

  9. Passive Motion Paradigm: An Alternative to Optimal Control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishwanathan; Morasso, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, optimal control theory (OCT) has emerged as the leading approach for investigating neural control of movement and motor cognition for two complementary research lines: behavioral neuroscience and humanoid robotics. In both cases, there are general problems that need to be addressed, such as the “degrees of freedom (DoFs) problem,” the common core of production, observation, reasoning, and learning of “actions.” OCT, directly derived from engineering design techniques of control systems quantifies task goals as “cost functions” and uses the sophisticated formal tools of optimal control to obtain desired behavior (and predictions). We propose an alternative “softer” approach passive motion paradigm (PMP) that we believe is closer to the biomechanics and cybernetics of action. The basic idea is that actions (overt as well as covert) are the consequences of an internal simulation process that “animates” the body schema with the attractor dynamics of force fields induced by the goal and task-specific constraints. This internal simulation offers the brain a way to dynamically link motor redundancy with task-oriented constraints “at runtime,” hence solving the “DoFs problem” without explicit kinematic inversion and cost function computation. We argue that the function of such computational machinery is not only restricted to shaping motor output during action execution but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility, consequence, understanding and meaning of “potential actions.” In this sense, taking into account recent developments in neuroscience (motor imagery, simulation theory of covert actions, mirror neuron system) and in embodied robotics, PMP offers a novel framework for understanding motor cognition that goes beyond the engineering control paradigm provided by OCT. Therefore, the paper is at the same time a review of the PMP rationale, as a computational theory, and a perspective presentation of

  10. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    as well as F+ were evaluated and discussed. The computational model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. It was observed that different angles of attack and flap angles have different requirements for the minimum value of the momentum coefficient, Cμ, in order for the SJA to be effective for control of separation. It was also found that the variation of F + noticeably affects the lift and drag forces acting on the airfoil. The optimum values of parameters during open loop control simulations have been applied in order to introduce the optimal open loop control outcome. An innovative approach has been implemented to formulate optimal frequencies and momentum ratios of vortex shedding which depends on angle of attack and static pressure of the separation zone in the upper chord. Optimal open loop results have been compared with the optimal closed loop results. Cumulative case studies in the matter of angle of attacks, flap angles, Re, Cμ and F+ provide a convincing collection of evidence to the following conclusion. An improvement of a direct closed loop control was demonstrated, and an analytical formula describing the properties of a separated flow and vortex shedding was proposed. Best AFC solutions are offered by providing optimal frequencies and momentum ratios at a variety of flow conditions.

  11. A controller based on Optimal Type-2 Fuzzy Logic: systematic design, optimization and real-time implementation.

    PubMed

    Fayek, H M; Elamvazuthi, I; Perumal, N; Venkatesh, B

    2014-09-01

    A computationally-efficient systematic procedure to design an Optimal Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Controller (OT2FLC) is proposed. The main scheme is to optimize the gains of the controller using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), then optimize only two parameters per type-2 membership function using Genetic Algorithm (GA). The proposed OT2FLC was implemented in real-time to control the position of a DC servomotor, which is part of a robotic arm. The performance judgments were carried out based on the Integral Absolute Error (IAE), as well as the computational cost. Various type-2 defuzzification methods were investigated in real-time. A comparative analysis with an Optimal Type-1 Fuzzy Logic Controller (OT1FLC) and a PI controller, demonstrated OT2FLC׳s superiority; which is evident in handling uncertainty and imprecision induced in the system by means of noise and disturbances.

  12. Optimally controlling the human connectome: the role of network topology

    PubMed Central

    Betzel, Richard F.; Gu, Shi; Medaglia, John D.; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    To meet ongoing cognitive demands, the human brain must seamlessly transition from one brain state to another, in the process drawing on different cognitive systems. How does the brain’s network of anatomical connections help facilitate such transitions? Which features of this network contribute to making one transition easy and another transition difficult? Here, we address these questions using network control theory. We calculate the optimal input signals to drive the brain to and from states dominated by different cognitive systems. The input signals allow us to assess the contributions made by different brain regions. We show that such contributions, which we measure as energy, are correlated with regions’ weighted degrees. We also show that the network communicability, a measure of direct and indirect connectedness between brain regions, predicts the extent to which brain regions compensate when input to another region is suppressed. Finally, we identify optimal states in which the brain should start (and finish) in order to minimize transition energy. We show that the optimal target states display high activity in hub regions, implicating the brain’s rich club. Furthermore, when rich club organization is destroyed, the energy cost associated with state transitions increases significantly, demonstrating that it is the richness of brain regions that makes them ideal targets. PMID:27468904

  13. Optimally controlling the human connectome: the role of network topology.

    PubMed

    Betzel, Richard F; Gu, Shi; Medaglia, John D; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-01-01

    To meet ongoing cognitive demands, the human brain must seamlessly transition from one brain state to another, in the process drawing on different cognitive systems. How does the brain's network of anatomical connections help facilitate such transitions? Which features of this network contribute to making one transition easy and another transition difficult? Here, we address these questions using network control theory. We calculate the optimal input signals to drive the brain to and from states dominated by different cognitive systems. The input signals allow us to assess the contributions made by different brain regions. We show that such contributions, which we measure as energy, are correlated with regions' weighted degrees. We also show that the network communicability, a measure of direct and indirect connectedness between brain regions, predicts the extent to which brain regions compensate when input to another region is suppressed. Finally, we identify optimal states in which the brain should start (and finish) in order to minimize transition energy. We show that the optimal target states display high activity in hub regions, implicating the brain's rich club. Furthermore, when rich club organization is destroyed, the energy cost associated with state transitions increases significantly, demonstrating that it is the richness of brain regions that makes them ideal targets. PMID:27468904

  14. Neural network-based finite horizon stochastic optimal control design for nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    The stochastic optimal control of nonlinear networked control systems (NNCSs) using neuro-dynamic programming (NDP) over a finite time horizon is a challenging problem due to terminal constraints, system uncertainties, and unknown network imperfections, such as network-induced delays and packet losses. Since the traditional iteration or time-based infinite horizon NDP schemes are unsuitable for NNCS with terminal constraints, a novel time-based NDP scheme is developed to solve finite horizon optimal control of NNCS by mitigating the above-mentioned challenges. First, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to approximate the control coefficient matrix that is subsequently utilized in conjunction with the critic and actor NNs to determine a time-based stochastic optimal control input over finite horizon in a forward-in-time and online manner. Eventually, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded with ultimate bounds being a function of initial conditions and final time. Moreover, the approximated control input converges close to optimal value within finite time. The simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:25720004

  15. Multi-model Simulation for Optimal Control of Aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Chen, Guoquan

    2005-05-01

    Flow-generated noise, especially rotorcraft noise has been a serious concern for bothcommercial and military applications. A particular important noise source for rotor-craft is Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI)noise, a high amplitude, impulsive sound thatoften dominates other rotorcraft noise sources. Usually BVI noise is caused by theunsteady flow changes around various rotor blades due to interactions with vorticespreviously shed by the blades. A promising approach for reducing the BVI noise isto use on-blade controls, such as suction/blowing, micro-flaps/jets, and smart struc-tures. Because the design and implementation of such experiments to evaluate suchsystems are very expensive, efficient computational tools coupled with optimal con-trol systems are required to explore the relevant physics and evaluate the feasibilityof using various micro-fluidic devices before committing to hardware.In this thesis the research is to formulate and implement efficient computationaltools for the development and study of optimal control and design strategies for com-plex flow and acoustic systems with emphasis on rotorcraft applications, especiallyBVI noise control problem. The main purpose of aeroacoustic computations is todetermine the sound intensity and directivity far away from the noise source. How-ever, the computational cost of using a high-fidelity flow-physics model across thefull domain is usually prohibitive and itmight also be less accurate because of thenumerical diffusion and other problems. Taking advantage of the multi-physics andmulti-scale structure of this aeroacoustic problem, we develop a multi-model, multi-domain (near-field/far-field) method based on a discontinuous Galerkin discretiza-tion. In this approach the coupling of multi-domains and multi-models is achievedby weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface. For ourinterested aeroacoustics control problem, the adjoint equations that determine thesensitivity of the cost

  16. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-11-12

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems.

  17. Optimization of shared autonomy vehicle control architectures for swarm operations.

    PubMed

    Sengstacken, Aaron J; DeLaurentis, Daniel A; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad R

    2010-08-01

    The need for greater capacity in automotive transportation (in the midst of constrained resources) and the convergence of key technologies from multiple domains may eventually produce the emergence of a "swarm" concept of operations. The swarm, which is a collection of vehicles traveling at high speeds and in close proximity, will require technology and management techniques to ensure safe, efficient, and reliable vehicle interactions. We propose a shared autonomy control approach, in which the strengths of both human drivers and machines are employed in concert for this management. Building from a fuzzy logic control implementation, optimal architectures for shared autonomy addressing differing classes of drivers (represented by the driver's response time) are developed through a genetic-algorithm-based search for preferred fuzzy rules. Additionally, a form of "phase transition" from a safe to an unsafe swarm architecture as the amount of sensor capability is varied uncovers key insights on the required technology to enable successful shared autonomy for swarm operations.

  18. Numerical optimization of laser fields to control molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Haj-Yedder, A.; Auger, A.; Dion, C.M.; Cances, E.; Le Bris, C.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2002-12-01

    A thorough numerical illustration of an optimal control scenario dealing with the laser-induced orientation of a diatomic molecule (LiF) is presented. Special emphasis is laid on the definition of the various targets dealing with different orientation characteristics, identified in terms of maximum efficiency (i.e., molecular axis direction closest to the direction of the laser polarization vector), maximum duration (i.e., the time interval during which this orientation is maintained), or of a compromise between efficiency and duration. Excellent postpulse orientation is achieved by sudden, intense pulses. Thermal effects are also studied with an extension of the control scenarios to Boltzmann averaged orientation dynamics at T=5 K.

  19. Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control for Interplanetary Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englander, Jacob; Vavrina, Matthew; Ghosh, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary design of low-thrust interplanetary missions is a highly complex process. The mission designer must choose discrete parameters such as the number of flybys, the bodies at which those flybys are performed and in some cases the final destination. In addition, a time-history of control variables must be chosen which defines the trajectory. There are often many thousands, if not millions, of possible trajectories to be evaluated. The customer who commissions a trajectory design is not usually interested in a point solution, but rather the exploration of the trade space of trajectories between several different objective functions. This can be a very expensive process in terms of the number of human analyst hours required. An automated approach is therefore very diserable. This work presents such as an approach by posing the mission design problem as a multi-objective hybrid optimal control problem. The method is demonstrated on a hypothetical mission to the main asteroid belt.

  20. A comparison of motor submodels in the optimal control model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancraft, R. E.; Kleinman, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Properties of several structural variations in the neuromotor interface portion of the optimal control model (OCM) are investigated. For example, it is known that commanding control-rate introduces an open-loop pole at S=O and will generate low frequency phase and magnitude characteristics similar to experimental data. However, this gives rise to unusually high sensitivities with respect to motor and sensor noise-ratios, thereby reducing the models' predictive capabilities. Relationships for different motor submodels are discussed to show sources of these sensitivities. The models investigated include both pseudo motor-noise and actual (system driving) motor-noise characterizations. The effects of explicit proprioceptive feedback in the OCM is also examined. To show graphically the effects of each submodel on system outputs, sensitivity studies are included, and compared to data obtained from other tests.

  1. Statistical process control using optimized neural networks: a case study.

    PubMed

    Addeh, Jalil; Ebrahimzadeh, Ata; Azarbad, Milad; Ranaee, Vahid

    2014-09-01

    The most common statistical process control (SPC) tools employed for monitoring process changes are control charts. A control chart demonstrates that the process has altered by generating an out-of-control signal. This study investigates the design of an accurate system for the control chart patterns (CCPs) recognition in two aspects. First, an efficient system is introduced that includes two main modules: feature extraction module and classifier module. In the feature extraction module, a proper set of shape features and statistical feature are proposed as the efficient characteristics of the patterns. In the classifier module, several neural networks, such as multilayer perceptron, probabilistic neural network and radial basis function are investigated. Based on an experimental study, the best classifier is chosen in order to recognize the CCPs. Second, a hybrid heuristic recognition system is introduced based on cuckoo optimization algorithm (COA) algorithm to improve the generalization performance of the classifier. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has high recognition accuracy. PMID:24210290

  2. Optimal control model of arm configuration in a reaching task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Gary T.; Kakavand, Ali

    1996-05-01

    It was hypothesized that the configuration of the upper limb during a hand static positioning task could be predicted using a dynamic musculoskeletal model and an optimal control routine. Both rhesus monkey and human upper extremity models were formulated, and had seven degrees of freedom (7-DOF) and 39 musculotendon pathways. A variety of configurations were generated about a physiologically measured configuration using the dynamic models and perturbations. The pseudoinverse optimal control method was applied to compute the minimum cost C at each of the generated configurations. Cost function C is described by the Crowninshield-Brand (1981) criterion which relates C (the sum of muscle stresses squared) to the endurance time of a physiological task. The configuration with the minimum cost was compared to the configurations chosen by one monkey (four trials) and by eight human subjects (eight trials each). Results are generally good, but not for all joint angles, suggesting that muscular effort is likely to be one major factor in choosing a preferred static arm posture.

  3. An optimal control method for real-time irrigation scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Protopapas, A.L.; Georgakakos, A.P. )

    1990-04-01

    In this paper a systematic methodology for making real-time irrigation decisions is presented. A physically based representation of the dynamics of the soil-crop-atmosphere system is used. The variables characterizing the crop and soil status are concurrently simulated with an integrated state space model. Soil moisture and salinity conditions, which synergistically control the plant water uptake, are obtained by using lumped parameter mass balance models for the root zone. Crop yield is predicted by explicitly modeling the plant growth processes, such as assimilation, respiration, and transpiration, which are driven by the climatic inputs. The control model is an analytical optimization method for multistage multidimensional sequential decision-making problems. It is suitable for systems with nonlinear dynamics and objective functions. The method is based on local iterative approximations of the nonlinear problem with a linear quadratic problem. This approach is evaluated in a series of case studies, where optimal irrigation schedules are obtained on an hourly basis over the growing season.

  4. Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is

  5. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  6. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  7. Optimal reactive power control of grid connected photovoltaic resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Joshua Ryan

    As more photovoltaic distributed generation resources are installed on distribution power systems, selective control of the inverters connecting the DC power sources presents the opportunity to supply both real and reactive power at the point of common coupling. This thesis presents a simulated distribution system with individually controlled PV resources with the objective of minimizing total system losses while operating at the maximum power point and below the simulated rating of the associated inverters. The control strategy assumes the characteristics of the distribution system are known and solves for the optimal power flow operating point. The ability of each PV source to provide real and reactive power varies instantaneously as irradiance changes, so the operating point for each resource must be constantly recalculated and adjusted. The assumption of known system paramaters can be justified in a SmartGrid context, and a solution based on overall system power flow should be considered as a benchmark for any other state estimation or local control approaches.

  8. Optimal SCR Control Using Data-Driven Models

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Lian, Jianming; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Parker, Gordon

    2013-04-16

    We present an optimal control solution for the urea injection for a heavy-duty diesel (HDD) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The approach taken here is useful beyond SCR and could be applied to any system where a control strategy is desired and input-output data is available. For example, the strategy could also be used for the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) system. In this paper, we identify and validate a one-step ahead Kalman state-space estimator for downstream NOx using the bench reactor data of an SCR core sample. The test data was acquired using a 2010 Cummins 6.7L ISB production engine with a 2010 Cummins production aftertreatment system. We used a surrogate HDD federal test procedure (FTP), developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU), which simulates the representative transients of the standard FTP cycle, but has less engine speed/load points. The identified state-space model is then used to develop a tunable cost function that simultaneously minimizes NOx emissions and urea usage. The cost function is quadratic and univariate, thus the minimum can be computed analytically. We show the performance of the closed-loop controller in using a reduced-order discrete SCR simulator developed at MTU. Our experiments with the surrogate HDD-FTP data show that the strategy developed in this paper can be used to identify performance bounds for urea dose controllers.

  9. Combining modalities with different latencies for optimal motor control

    PubMed Central

    Bissmarck, Fredrik; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Doya, Kenji; Hikosaka, Okihide

    2010-01-01

    Feedback signals may be of different modality, latency and accuracy. To learn and control motor tasks the feedback available may be redundant, and it would not be necessary to rely on every accessible feedback loop. Which feedback loops should then be utilized? In this article, we propose that the latency is a critical factor to determine which signals will be influential at different learning stages. We use a computational framework to study the role of feedback modules with different latencies in optimal motor control. Instead of explicit gating between modules, the reinforcement learning algorithm learns to rely on the more useful module. We tested our paradigm for two different implementations, which confirmed our hypthesis. In the first, we examined how feedback latency affects the competitiveness of two identical modules. In the second, we examined an example of visuomotor sequence learning, where a plastic, faster somatosensory module interacts with a preacquired, slower visual module. We found that the overall performance depended on the latency of the faster module alone, while the relative latency determines the independence of the faster from the slower. In the second implementation, the somatosensory module with shorter latency overtook the slower visual module, and realized better overall performance. The visual module played different roles in early and late learning. First, it worked as a guide for the exploration of the somatosensory module. Then, when learning had converged, it contributed to robustness against system noise and external perturbations. Overall, these results demonstrate that our framework successfully learns to utilize the most useful available feedback for optimal control. PMID:18416676

  10. Control system design using frequency domain models and parameter optimization, with application to supersonic inlet controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.; Lehtinen, B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for designing feedback control systems using frequency domain models, a quadratic cost function, and a parameter optimization computer program. FORTRAN listings for the computer program are included. The approach is applied to the design of shock position controllers for a supersonic inlet. Deterministic or random system disturbances, and the presence of random measurement noise are considered. The cost function minimization is formulated in the time domain, but the problem solution is obtained using a frequency domain system description. A scaled and constrained conjugate gradient algorithm is used for the minimization. The approach to a supersonic inlet included the calculations of the optimal proportional-plus integral (PI) and proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controllers. A single-loop PI controller was the most desirable of the designs considered.

  11. A novel trajectory prediction control for proximate time-optimal digital control DC—DC converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Wang; Ning, Chen; Shen, Xu; Weifeng, Sun; Longxing, Shi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a novel trajectory prediction method for proximate time-optimal digital control DC—DC converters. The control method provides pre-estimations of the duty ratio in the next several switching cycles, so as to compensate the computational time delay of the control loop and increase the control loop bandwidth, thereby improving the response speed. The experiment results show that the fastest transient response time of the digital DC—DC with the proposed prediction is about 8 μs when the load current changes from 0.6 to 0.1 A.

  12. Optimal control of open quantum systems: A combined surrogate Hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Erik; Kluener, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate Hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate Hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})=m{sub e}=e=a{sub 0}= 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  13. Optimal control of open quantum systems: a combined surrogate hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Erik; Klüner, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ℏ = m(e) = e = a(0) = 1, have been used unless otherwise stated. PMID:22462846

  14. Optimal control of open quantum systems: A combined surrogate Hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Erik; Klüner, Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate Hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)], 10.1063/1.473950. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998), 10.1063/1.475576; Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)], 10.1063/1.1650297. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate Hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ℏ = me = e = a0 = 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  15. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  16. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with state-control inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the weak Hamiltonian finite-element formulation is amenable to the solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints which are functions of both state and control variables. Difficult problems can be treated on account of the ease with which algebraic equations can be generated before having to specify the problem. These equations yield very accurate solutions. Owing to the sparse structure of the resulting Jacobian, computer solutions can be obtained quickly when the sparsity is exploited.

  17. Control and optimization of apheresis procedures in a COBE 2997 cell separator.

    PubMed

    Wooten, S L; Petersen, J N; Van Wie, B J

    1991-02-01

    To obtain more efficient operation of a COBE Model 2997 clinical cell separator using either a Single Stage II (SS II) or a Dual Stage separation chamber, modifications were made to allow complete computer control. Product cell density was detected using an optical sensor and controlled by automatic feedback through a microcomputer interface. Control was accomplished by automatically adjusting the red blood cell (RBC) and plasma product flow rates using a proportional-integral (PI) algorithm. Results show that, using either chamber, the product cell density can be maintained at a preselected value for extended periods of time without operator intervention. This system allowed investigation of optimal operating regions for plateletpheresis and leukapheresis procedures. The effects of centrifuge rpm and controller set point on centrifuge operation were investigated using a second order factorial experimental design. Theoretical significance of model parameters was assessed with the aid of a hindered settling model and simple reasoning about the interface position relative to the collection port. The results suggest that, in either chamber, the optimum operating region for plateletpheresis procedures occurs at moderate controller set points and high centrifuge rpm. The resultant operating efficiency and product purity values are approximately 63 percent and 0.65 respectively in the SS II chamber and approximately 70 percent and 0.70 respectively in the Dual Chamber. In the SS II, the optimum operating region for leukapheresis procedures occurred at high controller set point values for any centrifuge rpm above 1200 with an operating efficiency near 100 percent. However, in the Dual Chamber, the optimum operating region for leukapheresis procedures occurred at high controller set points and high centrifuge rpm's, again providing an operating efficiency near 100 percent.

  18. Information spread in networks: Games, optimal control, and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafer, Ali

    This thesis focuses on designing efficient mechanisms for controlling information spread in networks. We consider two models for information spread. The first one is the well-known distributed averaging dynamics. The second model is a nonlinear one that describes virus spread in computer and biological networks. We seek to design optimal, robust, and stabilizing controllers under practical constraints. For distributed averaging networks, we study the interaction between a network designer and an adversary. We consider two types of attacks on the network. In Attack-I, the adversary strategically disconnects a set of links to prevent the nodes from reaching consensus. Meanwhile, the network designer assists the nodes in reaching consensus by changing the weights of a limited number of links in the network. We formulate two problems to describe this competition where the order in which the players act is reversed in the two problems. Although the canonical equations provided by the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle (MP) seem to be intractable, we provide an alternative characterization for the optimal strategies that makes connection to potential theory. Further, we provide a sufficient condition for the existence of a saddle-point equilibrium (SPE) for the underlying zero-sum game. In Attack-II, the designer and the adversary are both capable of altering the measurements of all nodes in the network by injecting global signals. We impose two constraints on both players: a power constraint and an energy constraint. We assume that the available energy to each player is not sufficient to operate at maximum power throughout the horizon of the game. We show the existence of an SPE and derive the optimal strategies in closed form for this attack scenario. As an alternative to the "network designer vs. adversary" framework, we investigate the possibility of stabilizing unknown network diffusion processes using a distributed mechanism, where the uncertainty is due to an attack

  19. New attitude penalty functions for spacecraft optimal control problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schaub, H.; Junkins, J.L.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    A solution of a spacecraft optimal control problem, whose cost function relies on an attitude description, usually depends on the choice of attitude coordinates used. A problem could be solved using 3-2-1 Euler angles or using classical Rodriguez parameters and yield two different ``optimal`` solutions, unless the performance index in invariant with respect to the attitude coordinate choice. Another problem arising with many attitude coordinates is that they have no sense of when a body has tumbled beyond 180{degrees} from the reference attitude. In many such cases it would be easier (i.e. cost less) to let the body complete the revolution than to force it to reverse the rotation and return to the desired attitude. This paper develops a universal attitude penalty function g() whose value is independent of the attitude coordinates chosen to represent it. Furthermore, this function will achieve its maximum value only when a principal rotation of {plus_minus}180{degrees} from the target state is performed. This will implicitly permit the g() function to sense the shortest rotational distance back to the reference state. An attitude penalty function which depends on the Modified Rodriguez Parameters (MRP) will also be presented. These recently discovered MRPs are a non-singular three-parameter set which can describe any three-attitude. This MRP penalty function is simpler than the attitude coordinate independent g() function, but retains the useful property of avoiding lengthy principal rotations of more than {plus_minus}180{degrees}.

  20. Optimization of release from magnetically controlled polymeric drug release devices.

    PubMed

    Edelman, E R; Langer, R

    1993-07-01

    Release rates from drug:polymer matrices embedded with small magnets increase in the presence of oscillating magnetic fields. Previous studies of these systems have defined those parameters that determine the extent of the increase in release, and implied that not only was the force generated within the matrix an important determinant of the extent of modulation but also that the greater the amount of matrix actually displaced, the greater the observed modulation. We investigated this possibility in the magnetic system and developed a model taking into account the intersection of the volume of a cylindrical polymer-drug magnet embedded matrix with an imaginary sphere representing the upper limit of matrix deformation by the magnet. The intersection correlated in a linear fashion with the increase in release (slope = 1.16 +/- 0.26, R = 0.864, P = 0.003, s.e.e. = 1.38). Magnet orientation alone was insufficient to explain the data. It appears that a modulated system is optimized when the modulating force overlaps precisely with the maximum amount of matrix drug that can be released. If the size of the matrix, position of the magnet, force generated on the matrix by the magnet, viscoelastic properties of the matrix, etc. are not matched then modulation is inefficient. These results should provide further insight into and a means of optimization for externally regulated controlled release systems.