Science.gov

Sample records for optimal control theory

  1. Optimal Periodic Control Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    are control variables. For many aircraft, this energy state space produces a hodograph which is not convex. The physical explanation for this is that...convexity in the hodograph and preserve an "optimal" steady-state cruise, Schultz and Zagalsky [61 revised the energy state model so that altitude becomes a

  2. AN APPLICATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this article is to show that optimal control theory can be used to develop a control strategy for a practical system, namely a distillation column. The approach will be to model the complex system with a simple model, use optimal control theory to determine a control strategy for the simple model, and then apply the results to the original system. (Author)

  3. Vehicle dynamics applications of optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. S.; Peng, Huei

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to survey the various forms of optimal-control theory which have been applied to automotive problems and to present illustrative examples of applications studies, with assessments of the state of the art and of the contributions made through the use of optimal-control ideas. After a short introduction to the topic mentioning several questions to which optimal-control theory has been addressed, brief reviews of automotive-applicable optimal-control theory are given. There are outlines of the Linear Quadratic Regulator, without and with state reconstruction and then with the addition of disturbance preview, the nonlinear regulator or state-dependent-Riccati equation method, general numerical optimal-control theory including indirect and direct methods, model predictive control and robust control. Applications of the theory to active and semi-active suspension design and performance, worst-case manoeuvring, minimum-time manoeuvring and high-quality driving are then discussed in detail. Application sections describe the problem, the theory that has been used, what has been discovered and what remains to be found. The record of optimal-control theory in aiding the understanding of the various issues, in helping with system designs and knowledge of what is possible, and in guiding future research is assessed. Some ideas about future work are included.

  4. AN INTRODUCTION TO OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report presents an introduction to some of the concepts and results currently popular in optimal control theory . The introduction is intended...for someone acquainted with ordinary differential equations and real variables, but with no prior knowledge of control theory . The material covered

  5. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  6. Optimal control theory for sustainable environmental management.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Yogendra; Diwekar, Urmila; Cabezas, Heriberto

    2008-07-15

    Sustainable ecosystem management aims to promote the structure and operation of the human components of the system while simultaneously ensuring the persistence of the structures and operation of the natural component. Given the complexity of this task owing to the diverse temporal and spatial scales and multidisciplinary interactions, a systems theory approach based on sound mathematical techniques is essential. Two important aspects of this approach are formulation of sustainability-based objectives and development of the management strategies. Fisher information can be used as the basis of a sustainability hypothesis to formulate relevant mathematical objectives for disparate systems, and optimal control theory provides the means to derive time-dependent management strategies. Partial correlation coefficient analysis is an efficient technique to identify the appropriate control variables for policy development. This paper represents a proof of concept for this approach using a model system that includes an ecosystem, humans, a very rudimentary industrial process, and a very simple agricultural system. Formulation and solution of the control problems help in identifying the effective management options which offer guidelines for policies in real systems. The results also emphasize that management using multiple parameters of different nature can be distinctly effective.

  7. Optimal control theory applied to fusion plasma thermal stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.; Miley, G.; Maya, I.

    1985-01-01

    Many authors have investigated stability characteristics and performance of various burn control schemes. The work presented here represents the first application of optimal control theory to the problem of fusion plasma thermal stabilization. The objectives of this initial investigation were to develop analysis methods, demonstrate tractability, and present some preliminary results of optimal control theory in burn control research.

  8. Optimal control theory for unitary transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-12-01

    The dynamics of a quantum system driven by an external field is well described by a unitary transformation generated by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The inverse problem of finding the field that generates a specific unitary transformation is the subject of study. The unitary transformation which can represent an algorithm in a quantum computation is imposed on a subset of quantum states embedded in a larger Hilbert space. Optimal control theory is used to solve the inversion problem irrespective of the initial input state. A unified formalism based on the Krotov method is developed leading to a different scheme. The schemes are compared for the inversion of a two-qubit Fourier transform using as registers the vibrational levels of the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} electronic state of Na{sub 2}. Raman-like transitions through the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} electronic state induce the transitions. Light fields are found that are able to implement the Fourier transform within a picosecond time scale. Such fields can be obtained by pulse-shaping techniques of a femtosecond pulse. Of the schemes studied, the square modulus scheme converges fastest. A study of the implementation of the Q qubit Fourier transform in the Na{sub 2} molecule was carried out for up to five qubits. The classical computation effort required to obtain the algorithm with a given fidelity is estimated to scale exponentially with the number of levels. The observed moderate scaling of the pulse intensity with the number of qubits in the transformation is rationalized.

  9. Helicopter trajectory planning using optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.; Kim, E.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for optimal trajectory planning, useful in the nap-of-the-earth guidance of helicopters, is presented. This approach uses an adjoint-control transformation along with a one-dimensional search scheme for generating the optimal trajectories. In addition to being useful for helicopter nap-of-the-earth guidance, the trajectory planning solution is of interest in several other contexts, such as robotic vehicle guidance and terrain-following guidance for cruise missiles and aircraft. A distinguishing feature of the present research is that the terrain constraint and the threat envelopes are incorporated in the equations of motion. Second-order necessary conditions are examined.

  10. Robust control systems design by H-infinity optimization theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, B. C.; Li, X. P.; Banda, S. S.; Yeh, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, step-by-step procedures of applying the H-infinity theory to robust control systems design are given. The objective of the paper is to eliminate the possible difficulties a control engineer may encounter in applying H-infinity control theory and to clear up some misconceptions about H-infinity theory like high-gain controller and numerical obstacles, etc. An efficient algorithm is used to compute the optimal H-infinity norm. The Glover and Doyle (1988) controller formulas are slightly modified and used to construct an optimal controller without any numerical difficulties.

  11. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of the human and natural systems, taking into account their interactions, has become paramount. To achieve this complex multidisciplinary objective, systems theory based techniques prove useful. The proposed work is a step in that direction. Taking a food w...

  12. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of the human and natural systems, taking into account their interactions, has become paramount. To achieve this complex multidisciplinary objective, systems theory based techniques prove useful. The proposed work is a step in that direction. Taking a food w...

  13. Optimization of microstructure development during hot working using control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, James C.; Frazier, W. Garth; Medina, Enrique A.; Medeiros, Steven; Mullins, W. M.; Chaudhary, Anil; Venugopal, S.; Irwin, R. Dennis; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    1997-09-01

    A new approach for controlling microstructure development during hot working processes is proposed. This approach is based on optimal control theory and involves state-space type models for describing the material behavior and the mechanics of the process. The effect of process control parameters such as strain, strain rate, and temperature on important microstructural features can be systematically formulated and then solved as an optimal control problem. This method has been applied to the optimization of grain size and process parameters such as die geometry and ram velocity during the extrusion of plain carbon steel. Experimental results of this investigation show good agreement with those predicted in the design stage.

  14. Improving Vortex Models via Optimal Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar; Eldredge, Jeff; Speyer, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing kinematics, common in biological flight, can allow for agile flight maneuvers. On the other hand, we currently lack sufficiently accurate low-order models that enable such agility in man-made micro air vehicles. Low-order point vortex models have had reasonable success in predicting the qualitative behavior of the aerodynamic forces resulting from such maneuvers. However, these models tend to over-predict the force response when compared to experiments and high-fidelity simulations, in part because they neglect small excursions of separation from the wing's edges. In the present study, we formulate a constrained minimization problem which allows us to relax the usual edge regularity conditions in favor of empirical determination of vortex strengths. The optimal vortex strengths are determined by minimizing the error with respect to empirical force data, while the vortex positions are constrained to evolve according to the impulse matching model developed in previous work. We consider a flat plate undergoing various canonical maneuvers. The optimized model leads to force predictions remarkably close to the empirical data. Additionally, we compare the optimized and original models in an effort to distill appropriate edge conditions for unsteady maneuvers.

  15. Optimal control theory--closing the gap between theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    von den Hoff, Philipp; Thallmair, Sebastian; Kowalewski, Markus; Siemering, Robert; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-11-14

    Optimal control theory and optimal control experiments are state-of-the-art tools to control quantum systems. Both methods have been demonstrated successfully for numerous applications in molecular physics, chemistry and biology. Modulated light pulses could be realized, driving these various control processes. Next to the control efficiency, a key issue is the understanding of the control mechanism. An obvious way is to seek support from theory. However, the underlying search strategies in theory and experiment towards the optimal laser field differ. While the optimal control theory operates in the time domain, optimal control experiments optimize the laser fields in the frequency domain. This also implies that both search procedures experience a different bias and follow different pathways on the search landscape. In this perspective we review our recent developments in optimal control theory and their applications. Especially, we focus on approaches, which close the gap between theory and experiment. To this extent we followed two ways. One uses sophisticated optimization algorithms, which enhance the capabilities of optimal control experiments. The other is to extend and modify the optimal control theory formalism in order to mimic the experimental conditions.

  16. Optimal control theory applied to fusion plasma thermal stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.; Maya, I.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-07-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to determine feedback control for thermal stability of a driven, subingnition tokamak controlled by fuel injection and additional heating. It was found that the simplifications of the plasma burn dynamics and the control figure of merit required for the synthesis of optimal feedback laws were valid. Control laws were determined which allowed thermal stability in plasmas subject to 10% offset in temperature. The minimum ignition margin (defined as the difference between ignition temperature and the subignition operating point) was found to be 0.95 keV, corresponding to steady state heating requirements of less than 2% of fusion power.

  17. Combining Optimal Control Theory and Molecular Dynamics for Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization - MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages. PMID:22238629

  18. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  19. Neural dynamic optimization for control systems.II. Theory.

    PubMed

    Seong, C Y; Widrow, B

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents neural dynamic optimization (NDO) as a method of optimal feedback control for nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) systems. The main feature of NDO is that it enables neural networks to approximate the optimal feedback solution whose existence dynamic programming (DP) justifies, thereby reducing the complexities of computation and storage problems of the classical methods such as DP. This paper mainly describes the theory of NDO, while the two other companion papers of this topic explain the background for the development of NDO and demonstrate the method with several applications including control of autonomous vehicles and of a robot arm, respectively.

  20. A Control Theory Solution to Optimal Faculty Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Stephen M.; And Others

    This study investigates the resource allocation problem of faculty hiring and promotion patterns using the techniques of optimal control theory. The mathematical structure of an academic faculty is described by a linear dynamic model whose parameters were estimated from actual data by two different techniques. The principal characteristics of the…

  1. Design of a Helicopter Stability and Control Augmentation System Using Optimal Control Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    technique is described for the design of multivariable feedback controllers based upon results in optimal control theory . For a specified performance...helicopter flight envelope. The results show that optimal control theory can be used to design a helicopter stability and control augmentation system

  2. Searching for pathways involving dressed states in optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    von den Hoff, Philipp; Kowalewski, Markus; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Selective population of dressed states has been proposed as an alternative control pathway in molecular reaction dynamics [Wollenhaupt et al., J. Photochem. Photobiol. A: Chem., 2006, 180, 248]. In this article we investigate if, and under which conditions, this strong field pathway is included in the search space of optimal control theory. For our calculations we used the proposed example of the potassium dimer, in which the different target states can be reached via dressed states by resonant transition. Especially, we investigate whether the optimization algorithm is able to find the route involving the dressed states although the target state lies out of resonance in the bare state picture.

  3. Quantum optimal control theory in the linear response formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alberto; Tokatly, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    Quantum optimal control theory (QOCT) aims at finding an external field that drives a quantum system in such a way that optimally achieves some predefined target. In practice, this normally means optimizing the value of some observable, a so-called merit function. In consequence, a key part of the theory is a set of equations, which provides the gradient of the merit function with respect to parameters that control the shape of the driving field. We show that these equations can be straightforwardly derived using the standard linear response theory, only requiring a minor generalization: the unperturbed Hamiltonian is allowed to be time dependent. As a result, the aforementioned gradients are identified with certain response functions. This identification leads to a natural reformulation of QOCT in terms of the Keldysh contour formalism of the quantum many-body theory. In particular, the gradients of the merit function can be calculated using the diagrammatic technique for nonequilibrium Green's functions, which should be helpful in the application of QOCT to computationally difficult many-electron problems.

  4. Acceleration of quantum optimal control theory algorithms with mixing strategies.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Gross, E K U

    2009-05-01

    We propose the use of mixing strategies to accelerate the convergence of the common iterative algorithms utilized in quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). We show how the nonlinear equations of QOCT can be viewed as a "fixed-point" nonlinear problem. The iterative algorithms for this class of problems may benefit from mixing strategies, as it happens, e.g., in the quest for the ground-state density in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We demonstrate, with some numerical examples, how the same mixing schemes utilized in this latter nonlinear problem may significantly accelerate the QOCT iterative procedures.

  5. Quantum optimal control theory applied to transitions in diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysebo, Marius; Veseth, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Quantum optimal control theory is applied to control electric dipole transitions in a real multilevel system. The specific system studied in the present work is comprised of a multitude of hyperfine levels in the electronic ground state of the OH molecule. Spectroscopic constants are used to obtain accurate energy eigenstates and electric dipole matrix elements. The goal is to calculate the optimal time-dependent electric field that yields a maximum of the transition probability for a specified initial and final state. A further important objective was to study the detailed quantum processes that take place during such a prescribed transition in a multilevel system. Two specific transitions are studied in detail. The computed optimal electric fields as well as the paths taken through the multitude of levels reveal quite interesting quantum phenomena.

  6. Optimal guidance law for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Xia, Yuanqing

    2012-08-01

    This article considers the problem of optimal guidance laws for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on the optimal control theory. New guidance laws are presented such that multiple missiles attack a single target simultaneously. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  7. Stabilization of ultracold molecules using optimal control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Christiane P.; Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2004-07-01

    In recent experiments on ultracold matter, molecules have been produced from ultracold atoms by photoassociation, Feshbach resonances, and three-body recombination. The created molecules are translationally cold, but vibrationally highly excited. This will eventually lead them to be lost from the trap due to collisions. We propose shaped laser pulses to transfer these highly excited molecules to their ground vibrational level. Optimal control theory is employed to find the light field that will carry out this task with minimum intensity. We present results for the sodium dimer. The final target can be reached to within 99% provided the initial guess field is physically motivated. We find that the optimal fields contain the transition frequencies required by a good Franck-Condon pumping scheme. The analysis identifies the ranges of intensity and pulse duration which are able to achieve this task before any other competing processes take place. Such a scheme could produce stable ultracold molecular samples or even stable molecular Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Function-valued adaptive dynamics and optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Parvinen, Kalle; Heino, Mikko; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-09-01

    In this article we further develop the theory of adaptive dynamics of function-valued traits. Previous work has concentrated on models for which invasion fitness can be written as an integral in which the integrand for each argument value is a function of the strategy value at that argument value only. For this type of models of direct effect, singular strategies can be found using the calculus of variations, with singular strategies needing to satisfy Euler's equation with environmental feedback. In a broader, more mechanistically oriented class of models, the function-valued strategy affects a process described by differential equations, and fitness can be expressed as an integral in which the integrand for each argument value depends both on the strategy and on process variables at that argument value. In general, the calculus of variations cannot help analyzing this much broader class of models. Here we explain how to find singular strategies in this class of process-mediated models using optimal control theory. In particular, we show that singular strategies need to satisfy Pontryagin's maximum principle with environmental feedback. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by studying the evolution of strategies determining seasonal flowering schedules.

  9. Analysis of modern optimal control theory applied to plasma position and current control in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    The strong compression TFTR discharge has been segmented into regions where linear dynamics can approximate the plasma's interaction with the OH and EF power supply systems. The dynamic equations for these regions are utilized within the linear optimal control theory framework to provide active feedback gains to control the plasma position and current. Methods are developed to analyze and quantitatively evaluate the quality of control in a nonlinear, more realistic simulation. Tests are made of optimal control theory's assumptions and requirements, and the feasibility of this method for TFTR is assessed.

  10. A method for obtaining practical flutter-suppression control laws using results of optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newson, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of optimal control theory are used to synthesize a feedback filter. The feedback filter is used to force the output of the filtered frequency response to match that of a desired optimal frequency response over a finite frequency range. This matching is accomplished by employing a nonlinear programing algorithm to search for the coefficients of the feedback filter that minimize the error between the optimal frequency response and the filtered frequency response. The method is applied to the synthesis of an active flutter-suppression control law for an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. It is shown that the resulting control law suppresses flutter over a wide range of subsonic Mach numbers. This is a promising method for synthesizing practical control laws using the results of optimal control theory.

  11. Optimal control of ICU patient discharge: from theory to implementation.

    PubMed

    Mallor, Fermín; Azcárate, Cristina; Barado, Julio

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the management of scarce health care resources. We consider a control problem in which the objective is to minimize the rate of patient rejection due to service saturation. The scope of decisions is limited, in terms both of the amount of resources to be used, which are supposed to be fixed, and of the patient arrival pattern, which is assumed to be uncontrollable. This means that the only potential areas of control are speed or completeness of service. By means of queuing theory and optimization techniques, we provide a theoretical solution expressed in terms of service rates. In order to make this theoretical analysis useful for the effective control of the healthcare system, however, further steps in the analysis of the solution are required: physicians need flexible and medically-meaningful operative rules for shortening patient length of service to the degree needed to give the service rates dictated by the theoretical analysis. The main contribution of this paper is to discuss how the theoretical solutions can be transformed into effective management rules to guide doctors' decisions. The study examines three types of rules based on intuitive interpretations of the theoretical solution. Rules are evaluated through implementation in a simulation model. We compare the service rates provided by the different policies with those dictated by the theoretical solution. Probabilistic analysis is also included to support rule validity. An Intensive Care Unit is used to illustrate this control problem. The study focuses on the Markovian case before moving on to consider more realistic LoS distributions (Weibull, Lognormal and Phase-type distribution).

  12. Optimization of a photovoltaic pumping system based on the optimal control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Betka, A.; Attali, A.

    2010-07-15

    This paper suggests how an optimal operation of a photovoltaic pumping system based on an induction motor driving a centrifugal pump can be realized. The optimization problem consists in maximizing the daily pumped water quantity via the optimization of the motor efficiency for every operation point. The proposed structure allows at the same time the minimization the machine losses, the field oriented control and the maximum power tracking of the photovoltaic array. This will be attained based on multi-input and multi-output optimal regulator theory. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is described by simulation and the obtained results are compared to those of a system working with a constant air gap flux. (author)

  13. Optimizing SFR transmutation performance through direct adjoining control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeffrey C.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed the CORTANA code to optimize the transmutation performance of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). We obtain the necessary conditions for optimal fuel and burnable absorber loadings using Pontryagin's maximum principle with a direct adjoining approach to explicitly account for either a flat flux or a power peaking inequality constraint providing a set of coupled system, Euler-Lagrange (E-L), and optimality equations which are iteratively solved with the method of conjugate gradients until no further improvement in the objective function is achieved. To satisfy the inequality constraints throughout the operating cycle, we have implemented a backwards diffusion theory (BDT) to establish a relationship between fuel loading and the relative assembly power distribution during the cycle and systematically eliminate the constraint violations with each conjugate gradient iteration. The CORTANA SFR optimization code uses multi-group, three-dimensional neutron diffusion theory, with a microscopic depletion scheme. We solve the system equations in a quasi-static fashion forward in time from beginning-of-cycle (BOC) to end-of-cycle (EOC), while we solve the E-L equations backwards in time from EOC to BOC, reflecting the adjoint nature of the Lagrange multipliers. A two enrichment-zone SFR problem verifies our formulation, yielding a TRU enrichment distribution nearly identical to that of the reference SFR core in the Generation IV Roadmap. Using a full heavy metal recycling mode, we coupled our optimization methodology with the REBUS-3 equilibrium cycle methodology to optimize an SFR operating as a second tier transmuter. We model the system using a three-dimensional triangular-z finite differencing scheme with full core symmetry and a time-independent 33-group microscopic cross section library. Beginning from a uniform TRU distribution, our CORTANA improves the SFR performance by reducing the maximum relative assembly power from 1.7 to 1.25, minimizes

  14. Applications of the theory of optimal control of distributed-parameter systems to structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    An extension of classical methods of optimal control theory for systems described by ordinary differential equations to distributed-parameter systems described by partial differential equations is presented. An application is given involving the minimum-mass design of a simply-supported shear plate with a fixed fundamental frequency of vibration. An optimal plate thickness distribution in analytical form is found. The case of a minimum-mass design of an elastic sandwich plate whose fundamental frequency of free vibration is fixed. Under the most general conditions, the optimization problem reduces to the solution of two simultaneous partial differential equations involving the optimal thickness distribution and the modal displacement. One equation is the uniform energy distribution expression which was found by Ashley and McIntosh for the optimal design of one-dimensional structures with frequency constraints, and by Prager and Taylor for various design criteria in one and two dimensions. The second equation requires dynamic equilibrium at the preassigned vibration frequency.

  15. Optimal control of quantum non-Markovian dissipation: reduced Liouville-space theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruixue; Yan, YiJing; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi; Fujimura, Yuichi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2004-04-08

    An optimal control theory for open quantum systems is constructed containing non-Markovian dissipation manipulated by an external control field. The control theory is developed based on a novel quantum dissipation formulation that treats both the initial canonical ensemble and the subsequent reduced control dynamics. An associated scheme of backward propagation is presented, allowing the efficient evaluation of general optimal control problems. As an illustration, the control theory is applied to the vibration of the hydrogen fluoride molecule embedded in a non-Markovian dissipative medium. The importance of control-dissipation correlation is evident in the results. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  16. Complexity and simplicity of optimal control theory pulses shaped for controlling vibrational qubits.

    PubMed

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-11-21

    In the context of molecular quantum computation the optimal control theory (OCT) is used to obtain shaped laser pulses for high-fidelity control of vibrational qubits. Optimization is done in time domain and the OCT algorithm varies values of electric field in each time step independently, tuning hundreds of thousands of parameters to find one optimal solution. Such flexibility is not available in experiments, where pulse shaping is done in frequency domain and the number of "tuning knobs" is much smaller. The question of possible experimental interpretations of theoretically found OCT solutions arises. In this work we analyze very accurate optimal pulse that we obtained for implementing quantum gate CNOT for the two-qubit system encoded into the exited vibrational states of thiophosgene molecule. Next, we try to alter this pulse by reducing the number of available frequency channels and intentionally introducing systematic and random errors (in frequency domain, by modifying the values of amplitudes and phases of different frequency components). We conclude that a very limited number of frequency components (only 32 in the model of thiophosgene) are really necessary for accurate control of the vibrational two-qubit system, and such pulses can be readily constructed using OCT. If the amplitude and phase errors of different frequency components do not exceed ±3% of the optimal values, one can still achieve accurate transformations of the vibrational two-qubit system, with gate fidelity of CNOT exceeding 0.99.

  17. Reduced state feedback gain computation. [optimization and control theory for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    Because application of conventional optimal linear regulator theory to flight controller design requires the capability of measuring and/or estimating the entire state vector, it is of interest to consider procedures for computing controls which are restricted to be linear feedback functions of a lower dimensional output vector and which take into account the presence of measurement noise and process uncertainty. Therefore, a stochastic linear model that was developed is presented which accounts for aircraft parameter and initial uncertainty, measurement noise, turbulence, pilot command and a restricted number of measurable outputs. Optimization with respect to the corresponding output feedback gains was performed for both finite and infinite time performance indices without gradient computation by using Zangwill's modification of a procedure originally proposed by Powell. Results using a seventh order process show the proposed procedures to be very effective.

  18. Monotonic convergent optimal control theory with strict limitations on the spectrum of optimized laser fields.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Caroline; Kowalewski, Markus; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2008-08-15

    We present a modified optimal control scheme based on the Krotov method, which allows for strict limitations on the spectrum of the optimized laser fields. A frequency constraint is introduced and derived mathematically correct, without losing monotonic convergence of the algorithm. The method guarantees a close link to learning loop control experiments and is demonstrated for the challenging control of nonresonant Raman transitions, which are used to implement a set of global quantum gates for molecular vibrational qubits.

  19. Active control of the spatial MRI phase distribution with optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Pauline M.; Van Reeth, Eric; Ratiney, Hélène; Beuf, Olivier; Brusseau, Elisabeth; Lambert, Simon A.; Glaser, Steffen J.; Sugny, Dominique; Grenier, Denis; Tse Ve Koon, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the use of Optimal Control (OC) theory to design Radio-Frequency (RF) pulses that actively control the spatial distribution of the MRI magnetization phase. The RF pulses are generated through the application of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle and optimized so that the resulting transverse magnetization reproduces various non-trivial and spatial phase patterns. Two different phase patterns are defined and the resulting optimal pulses are tested both numerically with the ODIN MRI simulator and experimentally with an agar gel phantom on a 4.7 T small-animal MR scanner. Phase images obtained in simulations and experiments are both consistent with the defined phase patterns. A practical application of phase control with OC-designed pulses is also presented, with the generation of RF pulses adapted for a Magnetic Resonance Elastography experiment. This study demonstrates the possibility to use OC-designed RF pulses to encode information in the magnetization phase and could have applications in MRI sequences using phase images.

  20. Active control of the spatial MRI phase distribution with optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Pauline M; Van Reeth, Eric; Ratiney, Hélène; Beuf, Olivier; Brusseau, Elisabeth; Lambert, Simon A; Glaser, Steffen J; Sugny, Dominique; Grenier, Denis; Tse Ve Koon, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the use of Optimal Control (OC) theory to design Radio-Frequency (RF) pulses that actively control the spatial distribution of the MRI magnetization phase. The RF pulses are generated through the application of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle and optimized so that the resulting transverse magnetization reproduces various non-trivial and spatial phase patterns. Two different phase patterns are defined and the resulting optimal pulses are tested both numerically with the ODIN MRI simulator and experimentally with an agar gel phantom on a 4.7T small-animal MR scanner. Phase images obtained in simulations and experiments are both consistent with the defined phase patterns. A practical application of phase control with OC-designed pulses is also presented, with the generation of RF pulses adapted for a Magnetic Resonance Elastography experiment. This study demonstrates the possibility to use OC-designed RF pulses to encode information in the magnetization phase and could have applications in MRI sequences using phase images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Theory and Applications of Optimal Control in Aerospace Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    CONTROL OF LINEAR QUADRATIC SYSTEM. Consider, as a particular case of the general problem defined in section 2, a lineal , system with quadratic cost...automatic modes and funcions are immediately switched of f and the control system calculates control sur- face deflections for stabilization of the required

  2. Optimization Of Rolling Schedule Assuring Desired Final Grain Size Using Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro S.

    2004-06-01

    A method of optimal control of the thermomechanical parameters during hot strip rolling processes, based on the modern optimal control theory, is presented in the paper. Optimal parameters are defined from the desired final grain size. The austenite grain size is the criterion of optimization. A state-space model with physical constraints is described. The model is based on the models of rolling process, recrystallization and grain growth, developed for 304L steel. The optimal discrete trajectories for such control parameters as the initial temperature, reductions and interpass time, are to be found. The rolling constrains are applied to the control trajectories (reduction, interpass time) and to state-space trajectories (temperature, rolling force and moment). The results of calculations allow for the design of the optimal rolling schedule.

  3. On the theory of singular optimal controls in dynamic systems with control delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardanov, M. J.; Melikov, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    An optimal control problem with a control delay is considered, and a more broad class of singular (in classical sense) controls is investigated. Various sequences of necessary conditions for the optimality of singular controls in recurrent form are obtained. These optimality conditions include analogues of the Kelley, Kopp-Moyer, R. Gabasov, and equality-type conditions. In the proof of the main results, the variation of the control is defined using Legendre polynomials.

  4. Quantum optimal control theory and dynamic coupling in the spin-boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Jirari, H.; Poetz, W.

    2006-08-15

    A Markovian master equation describing the evolution of open quantum systems in the presence of a time-dependent external field is derived within the Bloch-Redfield formalism. It leads to a system-bath interaction which depends on the control field. Optimal control theory is used to select control fields which allow accelerated or decelerated system relaxation, or suppression of relaxation (dissipation) altogether, depending on the dynamics we impose on the quantum system. The control-dissipation correlation and the nonperturbative treatment of the control field are essential for reaching this goal. The optimal control problem is formulated within Pontryagin's minimum principle and the resulting optimal differential system is solved numerically. As an application, we study the dynamics of a spin-boson model in the strong coupling regime under the influence of an external control field. We show how trapping the system in unstable quantum states and transfer of population can be achieved by optimized control of the dissipative quantum system. We also used optimal control theory to find the driving field that generates the quantum Z gate. In several cases studied, we find that the selected optimal field which reduces the purity loss significantly is a multicomponent low-frequency field including higher harmonics, all of which lie below the phonon cutoff frequency. Finally, in the undriven case we present an analytic result for the Lamb shift at zero temperature.

  5. Aerodynamic shape optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. Recently, the method has been implemented for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. Here results are presented both for the optimization of a swept wing using an analytic mapping, and for the optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using a general mesh.

  6. Designing a robust PID congestion controller supporting TCP flows based on H optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Shi, Zibo; Chen, Kun; Shu, Yantai

    2007-09-01

    A robust PID controller for active queue management (AQM) based on modern H∞ optimal control theory is presented in this paper. Taken both robustness and closed loop performance into consideration, most desirable parameters value can be gotten through some straightforward analytical formulas. Our robust PID controller is determined only by one parameter, other than traditional PID controller is by three or more. Additionally, this new parameters determining method can not only be extended to other AQM controller based on classical control theory or optimal control theory, but also be easily understood and implementation. We evaluate the performances of the controller extensively. The results show that the robust PID congestion controller outperform the existing controller, such as PI, RED, on keeping the router queue size at the target value. The most obvious property of the controller is that it takes on robustness such that it can adapt the network dynamic.

  7. H(Infinity) Optimal Control Theory Over a Finite Horizon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Tactical Air Systems Departmenf 30 Warfare Systems Analysis Department 40 Communication Navigation Technology Department 50 Mission Avionics Technology...W6U 2 ). (8.19) 16 NADC-91077-60 Substituting (8.13) in (8.12), we get U0 = UI-’+ U 2x. (8.20) Substituting (8.20) in (8.13), we get V0 = + V2x ...P - (W 1 + W 2 U2 + W4 1) = 0, P(T) = 0. (8.23) Define the feedback controller and the exogenous input by uo = U, PX + U2 x, (8.24) vo = VI"PX + V2x

  8. Optimal control of open quantum systems: a combined surrogate hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Erik; Klüner, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ℏ = m(e) = e = a(0) = 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  9. Optimal control of open quantum systems: A combined surrogate Hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Erik; Kluener, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate Hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate Hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})=m{sub e}=e=a{sub 0}= 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  10. A comparison of design variables for control theory based airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work in the area it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using either the potential flow or the Euler equations with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. We have also explored three-dimensional extensions of these formulations recently. The goal of our present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the control theory approach by designing airfoils using both Hicks-Henne functions and B-spline control points as design variables. The research also demonstrates that the parameterization of the design space is an open question in aerodynamic design.

  11. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  12. Approximation theory for LQG (Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian) optimal control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Adamian, A.

    1988-01-01

    An approximation theory is presented for the LQG (Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian) optimal control problem for flexible structures whose distributed models have bounded input and output operators. The main purpose of the theory is to guide the design of finite dimensional compensators that approximate closely the optimal compensator. The optimal LQG problem separates into an optimal linear-quadratic regulator problem and an optimal state estimation problem. The solution of the former problem lies in the solution to an infinite dimensional Riccati operator equation. The approximation scheme approximates the infinite dimensional LQG problem with a sequence of finite dimensional LQG problems defined for a sequence of finite dimensional, usually finite element or modal, approximations of the distributed model of the structure. Two Riccati matrix equations determine the solution to each approximating problem. The finite dimensional equations for numerical approximation are developed, including formulas for converting matrix control and estimator gains to their functional representation to allow comparison of gains based on different orders of approximation. Convergence of the approximating control and estimator gains and of the corresponding finite dimensional compensators is studied. Also, convergence and stability of the closed-loop systems produced with the finite dimensional compensators are discussed. The convergence theory is based on the convergence of the solutions of the finite dimensional Riccati equations to the solutions of the infinite dimensional Riccati equations. A numerical example with a flexible beam, a rotating rigid body, and a lumped mass is given.

  13. Auxiliary matrix formalism for interaction representation transformations, optimal control, and spin relaxation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, D. L.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2015-08-28

    Auxiliary matrix exponential method is used to derive simple and numerically efficient general expressions for the following, historically rather cumbersome, and hard to compute, theoretical methods: (1) average Hamiltonian theory following interaction representation transformations; (2) Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory of nuclear and electron relaxation; (3) gradient ascent pulse engineering version of quantum optimal control theory. In the context of spin dynamics, the auxiliary matrix exponential method is more efficient than methods based on matrix factorizations and also exhibits more favourable complexity scaling with the dimension of the Hamiltonian matrix.

  14. Auxiliary matrix formalism for interaction representation transformations, optimal control, and spin relaxation theories.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, D L; Kuprov, Ilya

    2015-08-28

    Auxiliary matrix exponential method is used to derive simple and numerically efficient general expressions for the following, historically rather cumbersome, and hard to compute, theoretical methods: (1) average Hamiltonian theory following interaction representation transformations; (2) Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory of nuclear and electron relaxation; (3) gradient ascent pulse engineering version of quantum optimal control theory. In the context of spin dynamics, the auxiliary matrix exponential method is more efficient than methods based on matrix factorizations and also exhibits more favourable complexity scaling with the dimension of the Hamiltonian matrix.

  15. Shaping femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Schreiber, Michael; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2008-04-21

    Optimal control theory is used to tailor laser pulses which enhance a femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectrum in a certain frequency range. For this aim the optimal control theory has to be applied to a target state distributed in time. Explicit control mechanisms are given for shaping either the Stokes or the probe pulse in the four-wave mixing process. A simple molecule for which highly accurate potential energy surfaces are available, namely molecular iodine, is used to test the procedure. This approach of controlling vibrational motion and delivering higher intensities to certain frequency ranges might also be important for the improvement of CARS microscopy.

  16. ORACLS - A modern control theory design package. [Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program (ORACLS) for implementing the optimal regulator theory approach to the design of controllers for linear time-invariant systems is described. The user-oriented program employs the latest numerical techniques and is applicable to both the digital and continuous control problems.

  17. Credibility theory based dynamic control bound optimization for reservoir flood limited water level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Ping; Ji, Changming; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic control operation of reservoir flood limited water level (FLWL) can solve the contradictions between reservoir flood control and beneficial operation well, and it is an important measure to make sure the security of flood control and realize the flood utilization. The dynamic control bound of FLWL is a fundamental key element for implementing reservoir dynamic control operation. In order to optimize the dynamic control bound of FLWL by considering flood forecasting error, this paper took the forecasting error as a fuzzy variable, and described it with the emerging credibility theory in recent years. By combining the flood forecasting error quantitative model, a credibility-based fuzzy chance constrained model used to optimize the dynamic control bound was proposed in this paper, and fuzzy simulation technology was used to solve the model. The FENGTAN reservoir in China was selected as a case study, and the results show that, compared with the original operation water level, the initial operation water level (IOWL) of FENGTAN reservoir can be raised 4 m, 2 m and 5.5 m respectively in the three division stages of flood season, and without increasing flood control risk. In addition, the rationality and feasibility of the proposed forecasting error quantitative model and credibility-based dynamic control bound optimization model are verified by the calculation results of extreme risk theory.

  18. Optimal control theory for non-scalar-valued performance criteria. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerring, H. P.

    1971-01-01

    The theory of optimal control for nonscalar-valued performance criteria is discussed. In the space, where the performance criterion attains its value, the relations better than, worse than, not better than, and not worse than are defined by a partial order relation. The notion of optimality splits up into superiority and non-inferiority, because worse than is not the complement of better than, in general. A superior solution is better than every other solution. A noninferior solution is not worse than any other solution. Noninferior solutions have been investigated particularly for vector-valued performance criteria. Superior solutions for non-scalar-valued performance criteria attaining their values in abstract partially ordered spaces are emphasized. The main result is the infimum principle which constitutes necessary conditions for a control to be a superior solution to an optimal control problem.

  19. Realization theory and quadratic optimal controllers for systems defined over Banach and Frechet algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that recent work by Kamen (1979) on the stability of half-plane digital filters shows that the problem of the existence of a feedback law also arises for other Banach algebras in applications. This situation calls for a realization theory and stabilizability criteria for systems defined over Banach for Frechet algebra A. Such a theory is developed here, with special emphasis placed on the construction of finitely generated realizations, the existence of coprime factorizations for T(s) defined over A, and the solvability of the quadratic optimal control problem and the associated algebraic Riccati equation over A.

  20. APPLICATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY TO CARDIO-CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The objective of the investigation is the application of, and where necessary, extension of optimal control theory to the synthesis of controllers for such cardio-circulatory assist devices. In particular, the concept of set of attainability is extended to include linear, periodic, bounded control systems and the maximum principle applied to obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for various problems. In addition to several numerical examples, the results of a large-scale hybrid simulation for a cardiovascular model and particular assist device are presented.

  1. New developments in the application of optimal control theory to therapeutic protocols.

    PubMed

    Bayón, L; Otero, J A; Suárez, P M; Tasis, C

    2016-02-01

    Optimal control theory is one of the most important tools in the development of new therapeutic protocols for treating infections. In this work, we present an algorithm able to deal with high-dimensional problems with bounded controls. The optimal solution is obtained by minimizing a positive-definite treatment cost function. Our method, based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle and the coordinate cyclic descent method, allows solving problems of varied nature. In this paper, and by way of example, therapeutic enhancement of the immune response to invasion by pathogenic attack is addressed as an optimal control problem. The generic mathematical model used describes the evolution of the disease by means of four non-linear, ordinary differential equations. The model is characterized by the concentration of pathogens, plasma cells, antibodies and a numerical value that indicates the relative characteristic of an organ damaged by disease. From a system theory point of view, drugs can be interpreted as control inputs. Therapies based on separate application of the agents are presented in previous studies. We shall present the more general problem in this paper, considering combined therapies and bounded controls. Finally, we present several numerical simulations.

  2. Theory of ultrafast nonresonant multiphoton transitions in polyatomic molecules: Basics and application to optimal control theory

    SciTech Connect

    May, Volkhard; Ambrosek, David; Oppel, Markus; Gonzalez, Leticia

    2007-10-14

    A systematic approach is presented to describe nonresonant multiphoton transitions, i.e., transitions between two electronic states without the presence of additional intermediate states resonant with the single-photon energy. The method is well suited to describe femtosecond spectroscopic experiments and, in particular, attempts to achieve laser pulse control of molecular dynamics. The obtained effective time-dependent Schroedinger equation includes effective couplings to the radiation field which combine powers of the field strength and effective transition dipole operators between the initial and final states. To arrive at time-local equations our derivation combines the well-known rotating wave approximation with the approximation of slowly varying amplitudes. Under these terms, the optimal control formalism can be readily extended to also account for nonresonant multiphoton events. Exemplary, nonresonant two- and three-photon processes, similar to those occurring in the recent femtosecond pulse-shaping experiments on CpMn(CO){sub 3}, are treated using related ab initio potential energy surfaces.

  3. Isotope selective photoionization of NaK by optimal control: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Bung, Boris; Bonacić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Sauer, Franziska; Weber, Stefan M; Wöste, Ludger; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2006-12-07

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study of the maximization of the isotopomer ratio (23)Na(39)K(23)Na(41)K using tailored phase-only as well as amplitude and phase modulated femtosecond laser fields obtained in the framework of optimal control theory and closed loop learning (CLL) technique. A good agreement between theoretically and experimentally optimized pulse shapes is achieved which allows to assign the optimized processes directly to the pulse shapes obtained by the experimental isotopomer selective CLL approach. By analyzing the dynamics induced by the optimized pulses we show that the mechanism involving the dephasing of the wave packets between the isotopomers (23)Na (39)K and (23)Na (41)K on the first excited state is responsible for high isotope selective ionization. Amplitude and phase modulated pulses, moreover, allow to establish the connection between the spectral components of the pulse and corresponding occupied vibronic states. It will be also shown that the leading features of the theoretically shaped pulses are independent from the initial conditions. Since the underlying processes can be assigned to the individual features of the shaped pulses, we show that optimal control can be used as a tool for analysis.

  4. Management of redundancy in flight control systems using optimal decision theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The problem of using redundancy that exists between dissimilar systems in aircraft flight control is addressed. That is, using the redundancy that exists between a rate gyro and an accelerometer--devices that have dissimilar outputs which are related only through the dynamics of the aircraft motion. Management of this type of redundancy requires advanced logic so that the system can monitor failure status and can reconfigure itself in the event of one or more failures. An optimal decision theory was tutorially developed for the management of sensor redundancy and the theory is applied to two aircraft examples. The first example is the space shuttle and the second is a highly maneuvering high performance aircraft--the F8-C. The examples illustrate the redundancy management design process and the performance of the algorithms presented in failure detection and control law reconfiguration.

  5. Management of redundancy in flight control systems using optimal decision theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The problem of using redundancy that exists between dissimilar systems in aircraft flight control is addressed. That is, using the redundancy that exists between a rate gyro and an accelerometer--devices that have dissimilar outputs which are related only through the dynamics of the aircraft motion. Management of this type of redundancy requires advanced logic so that the system can monitor failure status and can reconfigure itself in the event of one or more failures. An optimal decision theory was tutorially developed for the management of sensor redundancy and the theory is applied to two aircraft examples. The first example is the space shuttle and the second is a highly maneuvering high performance aircraft--the F8-C. The examples illustrate the redundancy management design process and the performance of the algorithms presented in failure detection and control law reconfiguration.

  6. Free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory in quantum mechanics: application to entanglement generation.

    PubMed

    Mishima, K; Yamashita, K

    2009-01-21

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. As a demonstration, the theory that we have constructed in this paper will be applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of nonlocal interaction such as entangling interaction, which depends crucially on the strength of the interaction or the distance between the two molecules, and other general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions, and so on.

  7. Free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory in quantum mechanics: Application to entanglement generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2009-01-01

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. As a demonstration, the theory that we have constructed in this paper will be applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of nonlocal interaction such as entangling interaction, which depends crucially on the strength of the interaction or the distance between the two molecules, and other general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions, and so on.

  8. Application of optimal control theory to the design of the NASA/JPL 70-meter antenna servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Nickerson, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) techniques to the design of the 70-m axis servos is described. Linear quadratic optimal control and Kalman filter theory are reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal controller and Kalman filter gain vectors were generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select final gain vectors.

  9. Sustainable ecosystem management using optimal control theory: part 1 (deterministic systems).

    PubMed

    Shastri, Y; Diwekar, U

    2006-08-07

    The concept of sustainability, an abstract one by its nature, has been given a mathematical representation through the use of Fisher information as a measure. It is used to propose the sustainability hypotheses for dynamical systems, which has paved the way to achieve sustainable development through externally enforced control schemes. For natural systems, this refers to the task of ecosystem management, which is complicated due the lack of clear objectives. This work attempts to incorporate the idea of sustainability in ecosystem management. The natural regulation of ecosystems suggests two possible control options, top-down control and bottom-up control. A comparison of these two control philosophies is made on generic food chain models using the objectives derived from the sustainability hypotheses. Optimal control theory is used to derive the control profiles to handle the complex nature of the models and the objectives. The results indicate a strong relationship between the hypotheses and the dynamic behavior of the models, supporting the use of Fisher information as a measure. As regards to ecosystem management, it has been observed that top-down control is more aggressive but can result in instability, while bottom-up control is guaranteed to give a stable and improved dynamic response. The results also indicate that bottom-up control is a better option to affect shifts in the dynamic regimes of a system, which may be required to recover the system from a natural disaster like the hurricane Katrina.

  10. Optimal control theory investigation of proprotor/wing response to vertical gust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, J. K. D.; Johnson, W.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is used to design linear state variable feedback to improve the dynamic characteristics of a rotor and cantilever wing representing the tilting proprotor aircraft in cruise flight. The response to a vertical gust and system damping are used as criteria for the open and closed loop performance. The improvement in the dynamic characteristics achievable is examined for a gimballed rotor and for a hingeless rotor design. Several features of the design process are examined, including: (1) using only the wing or only the rotor dynamics in the control system design; (2) the use of a wing flap as well as the rotor controls for inputs; (3) and the performance of the system designed for one velocity at other forward speeds.

  11. Optimal control theory (OWEM) applied to a helicopter in the hover and approach phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, G. J.; Kai, T.

    1975-01-01

    A major difficulty in the practical application of linear-quadratic regulator theory is how to choose the weighting matrices in quadratic cost functions. The control system design with optimal weighting matrices was applied to a helicopter in the hover and approach phase. The weighting matrices were calculated to extremize the closed loop total system damping subject to constraints on the determinants. The extremization is really a minimization of the effects of disturbances, and interpreted as a compromise between the generalized system accuracy and the generalized system response speed. The trade-off between the accuracy and the response speed is adjusted by a single parameter, the ratio of determinants. By this approach an objective measure can be obtained for the design of a control system. The measure is to be determined by the system requirements.

  12. Integration of a fuel cell into the power system using an optimal controller based on disturbance accommodation control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradkar, Aniruddha; Davari, Asad; Feliachi, Ali; Biswas, Tamal

    In this paper, the integration of a fuel cell into the power system is treated as a load frequency control (LFC) problem with the fuel cell acting as a load disturbance source. The integration of a fuel cell into the power system results into a change in real power. But changes in real power affect the system frequency. Thus, the integration will result into a change of frequency of the synchronous machines. Hence, we need to design a control scheme for keeping the system in the steady state. An optimal controller based on the disturbance accommodation control (DAC) theory is proposed for this load frequency control problem. For demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed controller, we have considered a two-area power system with the fuel cell introduced in area 1. The fuel cell is considered as an external disturbance to each subsystem. A mathematical model is derived for each subsystem and based upon these models controllers are designed for keeping each subsystem stable, which in turn stabilizes the overall system. So, the proposed controller is decentralized in nature. To account for the modeling uncertainties, an observer is designed to estimate each subsystem's own and interfacing variables. The controller uses these estimates to optimize a given performance index and allocate generating unit outputs according to the requirements.

  13. Stochastic optimal control as a theory of brain-machine interface operation.

    PubMed

    Lagang, Manuel; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2013-02-01

    The closed-loop operation of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) provides a framework to study the mechanisms behind neural control through a restricted output channel, with emerging clinical applications to stroke, degenerative disease, and trauma. Despite significant empirically driven improvements in closed-loop BMI systems, a fundamental, experimentally validated theory of closed-loop BMI operation is lacking. Here we propose a compact model based on stochastic optimal control to describe the brain in skillfully operating canonical decoding algorithms. The model produces goal-directed BMI movements with sensory feedback and intrinsically noisy neural output signals. Various experimentally validated phenomena emerge naturally from this model, including performance deterioration with bin width, compensation of biased decoders, and shifts in tuning curves between arm control and BMI control. Analysis of the model provides insight into possible mechanisms underlying these behaviors, with testable predictions. Spike binning may erode performance in part from intrinsic control-dependent constraints, regardless of decoding accuracy. In compensating decoder bias, the brain may incur an energetic cost associated with action potential production. Tuning curve shifts, seen after the mastery of a BMI-based skill, may reflect the brain's implementation of a new closed-loop control policy. The direction and magnitude of tuning curve shifts may be altered by decoder structure, ensemble size, and the costs of closed-loop control. Looking forward, the model provides a framework for the design and simulated testing of an emerging class of BMI algorithms that seek to directly exploit the presence of a human in the loop.

  14. Theory of Optimal Human Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Albert Loongtak

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents optimal theories for punching and running. The first is a theory of the optimal karate punch in terms of the duration and the speed of the punch. This theory is solved and compared with experimental data. The theory incorporates the force vs velocity equation (Hill's eq.) and Wilkie's equation for elbow flexation in determining the optimal punch. The time T and the final speed of the punch are dependent on a few physiological parameters for arm muscles. The theoretical punch agrees fairly well with our experiments and other independent experiments. Second, a theory of optimal running is presented, solved and compared with world track records. The theory is similar to Keller's theory for running (1973) except that the power consumed by a runner is assumed to be proportional to the runner's speed v, P = Hv, whereas Keller took P = constant. There are differential equations for velocity and energy, two initial conditions and two constraint inequalities, involving a total of four free parameters. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this problem and minimize the running time T given the race distance D. The resultant predicted times T agree well with the records and the parameter values are consistent with independent physiological measurements.

  15. Control Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by William Glasser's Reality Therapy ideas, Control Theory (CT) is a disciplinary approach that stresses people's ability to control only their own behavior, based on internal motivations to satisfy five basic needs. At one North Dakota high school, CT-trained teachers are the program's best recruiters. (MLH)

  16. Control Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by William Glasser's Reality Therapy ideas, Control Theory (CT) is a disciplinary approach that stresses people's ability to control only their own behavior, based on internal motivations to satisfy five basic needs. At one North Dakota high school, CT-trained teachers are the program's best recruiters. (MLH)

  17. Free-Time and Fixed End-Point Optimal Control Theory in Quantum Mechanics: Application to Entanglement Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Yamashita, Koichi

    2009-03-01

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. Our theory can not only achieve high transition probabilities but also determine exact temporal duration of the laser pulses. As a demonstration, our theory is applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Using the tailored laser pulses, we discuss the fidelity of entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of non-local interaction such as entangling interaction, and other time-sensitive general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions.

  18. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY APPLIED TO SYSTEMS DESCRIBED BY PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. VOL. 1 OF FINAL REPORT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    control theory to systems described by partial differential equations. The intent is not to advance the theory of partial differential equations per se. Thus all considerations will be restricted to the more familiar equations of the type which often occur in mathematical physics. Specifically, the distributed parameter systems under consideration are represented by a set of field

  19. Quantifying uncertainty in partially specified biological models: how can optimal control theory help us?

    PubMed

    Adamson, M W; Morozov, A Y; Kuzenkov, O A

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models in biology are highly simplified representations of a complex underlying reality and there is always a high degree of uncertainty with regards to model function specification. This uncertainty becomes critical for models in which the use of different functions fitting the same dataset can yield substantially different predictions-a property known as structural sensitivity. Thus, even if the model is purely deterministic, then the uncertainty in the model functions carries through into uncertainty in model predictions, and new frameworks are required to tackle this fundamental problem. Here, we consider a framework that uses partially specified models in which some functions are not represented by a specific form. The main idea is to project infinite dimensional function space into a low-dimensional space taking into account biological constraints. The key question of how to carry out this projection has so far remained a serious mathematical challenge and hindered the use of partially specified models. Here, we propose and demonstrate a potentially powerful technique to perform such a projection by using optimal control theory to construct functions with the specified global properties. This approach opens up the prospect of a flexible and easy to use method to fulfil uncertainty analysis of biological models.

  20. Quantifying uncertainty in partially specified biological models: how can optimal control theory help us?

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, M. W.; Kuzenkov, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models in biology are highly simplified representations of a complex underlying reality and there is always a high degree of uncertainty with regards to model function specification. This uncertainty becomes critical for models in which the use of different functions fitting the same dataset can yield substantially different predictions—a property known as structural sensitivity. Thus, even if the model is purely deterministic, then the uncertainty in the model functions carries through into uncertainty in model predictions, and new frameworks are required to tackle this fundamental problem. Here, we consider a framework that uses partially specified models in which some functions are not represented by a specific form. The main idea is to project infinite dimensional function space into a low-dimensional space taking into account biological constraints. The key question of how to carry out this projection has so far remained a serious mathematical challenge and hindered the use of partially specified models. Here, we propose and demonstrate a potentially powerful technique to perform such a projection by using optimal control theory to construct functions with the specified global properties. This approach opens up the prospect of a flexible and easy to use method to fulfil uncertainty analysis of biological models. PMID:27713655

  1. Free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory in dissipative media: application to entanglement generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mishima, K; Yamashita, K

    2009-07-07

    We develop monotonically convergent free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory (OCT) in the density-matrix representation to deal with quantum systems showing dissipation. Our theory is more general and flexible for tailoring optimal laser pulses in order to control quantum dynamics with dissipation than the conventional fixed-time and fixed end-point OCT in that the optimal temporal duration of laser pulses can also be optimized exactly. To show the usefulness of our theory, it is applied to the generation and maintenance of the vibrational entanglement of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the copper (100) surface, CO/Cu(100). We demonstrate the numerical results and clarify how to combat vibrational decoherence as much as possible by the tailored shapes of the optimal laser pulses. It is expected that our theory will be general enough to be applied to a variety of dissipative quantum dynamics systems because the decoherence is one of the quantum phenomena sensitive to the temporal duration of the quantum dynamics.

  2. Optimal control theory determination of feasible return-to-launch-site aborts for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, Kevin E.

    1994-01-01

    The personnel launch system (PLS) being studied by NASA is a system to complement the space shuttle and provide alternative access to space. The PLS consists of a manned spacecraft launched by an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). A candidate for the manned spacecraft is the HL-20 lifting body. In the event of an ELV malfunction during the initial portion of the ascent trajectory, the HL-20 will separate from the rocket and perform an unpowered return to launch site (RTLS) abort. This work details an investigation, using optimal control theory, of the RTLS abort scenario. The objective of the optimization was to maximize final altitude. With final altitude as the cost function, the feasibility of an RTLS abort at different times during the ascent was determined. The method of differential inclusions was used to determine the optimal state trajectories, and the optimal controls were then calculated from the optimal states and state rates.

  3. Optimal control theory determination of feasible return-to-launch-site aborts for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Kevin E.

    1994-07-01

    The personnel launch system (PLS) being studied by NASA is a system to complement the space shuttle and provide alternative access to space. The PLS consists of a manned spacecraft launched by an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). A candidate for the manned spacecraft is the HL-20 lifting body. In the event of an ELV malfunction during the initial portion of the ascent trajectory, the HL-20 will separate from the rocket and perform an unpowered return to launch site (RTLS) abort. This work details an investigation, using optimal control theory, of the RTLS abort scenario. The objective of the optimization was to maximize final altitude. With final altitude as the cost function, the feasibility of an RTLS abort at different times during the ascent was determined. The method of differential inclusions was used to determine the optimal state trajectories, and the optimal controls were then calculated from the optimal states and state rates.

  4. Advanced Quality Control Theory for Training and Education: A Guide to Optimizing Training and Education Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppler, Brad

    2008-01-01

    This is a book about quality and how to control quality through deliberate actions on the part of the professionals developing and implementing the instances of instruction available at an organization. Quality control theory favors no particular learning philosophy and is only directed towards aspects of how, what, where and when measurements are…

  5. Computational design of treatment strategies for proactive therapy on atopic dermatitis using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Hirata, Yoshito; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Danby, Simon G; Cork, Michael J; Williams, Hywel C; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2017-06-28

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease characterized by recurrent skin inflammation and a weak skin barrier, and is known to be a precursor to other allergic diseases such as asthma. AD affects up to 25% of children worldwide and the incidence continues to rise. There is still uncertainty about the optimal treatment strategy in terms of choice of treatment, potency, duration and frequency. This study aims to develop a computational method to design optimal treatment strategies for the clinically recommended 'proactive therapy' for AD. Proactive therapy aims to prevent recurrent flares once the disease has been brought under initial control. Typically, this is done by using an anti-inflammatory treatment such as a potent topical corticosteroid intensively for a few weeks to 'get control', followed by intermittent weekly treatment to suppress subclinical inflammation to 'keep control'. Using a hybrid mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that we recently proposed, we computationally derived the optimal treatment strategies for individual virtual patient cohorts, by recursively solving optimal control problems using a differential evolution algorithm. Our simulation results suggest that such an approach can inform the design of optimal individualized treatment schedules that include application of topical corticosteroids and emollients, based on the disease status of patients observed on their weekly hospital visits. We demonstrate the potential and the gaps of our approach to be applied to clinical settings.This article is part of the themed issue 'Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Computational design of treatment strategies for proactive therapy on atopic dermatitis using optimal control theory

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Hirata, Yoshito; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Danby, Simon G.; Cork, Michael J.; Williams, Hywel C.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic skin disease characterized by recurrent skin inflammation and a weak skin barrier, and is known to be a precursor to other allergic diseases such as asthma. AD affects up to 25% of children worldwide and the incidence continues to rise. There is still uncertainty about the optimal treatment strategy in terms of choice of treatment, potency, duration and frequency. This study aims to develop a computational method to design optimal treatment strategies for the clinically recommended ‘proactive therapy’ for AD. Proactive therapy aims to prevent recurrent flares once the disease has been brought under initial control. Typically, this is done by using an anti-inflammatory treatment such as a potent topical corticosteroid intensively for a few weeks to ‘get control’, followed by intermittent weekly treatment to suppress subclinical inflammation to ‘keep control’. Using a hybrid mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that we recently proposed, we computationally derived the optimal treatment strategies for individual virtual patient cohorts, by recursively solving optimal control problems using a differential evolution algorithm. Our simulation results suggest that such an approach can inform the design of optimal individualized treatment schedules that include application of topical corticosteroids and emollients, based on the disease status of patients observed on their weekly hospital visits. We demonstrate the potential and the gaps of our approach to be applied to clinical settings. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology’. PMID:28507230

  7. Discrete Variational Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Kobilarov, Marin; Martín de Diego, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper develops numerical methods for optimal control of mechanical systems in the Lagrangian setting. It extends the theory of discrete mechanics to enable the solutions of optimal control problems through the discretization of variational principles. The key point is to solve the optimal control problem as a variational integrator of a specially constructed higher dimensional system. The developed framework applies to systems on tangent bundles, Lie groups, and underactuated and nonholonomic systems with symmetries, and can approximate either smooth or discontinuous control inputs. The resulting methods inherit the preservation properties of variational integrators and result in numerically robust and easily implementable algorithms. Several theoretical examples and a practical one, the control of an underwater vehicle, illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  8. UAV path planning using artificial potential field method updated by optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-bo; Luo, Guan-chen; Mei, Yue-song; Yu, Jian-qiao; Su, Xiao-long

    2016-04-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) path planning problem is an important assignment in the UAV mission planning. Based on the artificial potential field (APF) UAV path planning method, it is reconstructed into the constrained optimisation problem by introducing an additional control force. The constrained optimisation problem is translated into the unconstrained optimisation problem with the help of slack variables in this paper. The functional optimisation method is applied to reform this problem into an optimal control problem. The whole transformation process is deduced in detail, based on a discrete UAV dynamic model. Then, the path planning problem is solved with the help of the optimal control method. The path following process based on the six degrees of freedom simulation model of the quadrotor helicopters is introduced to verify the practicability of this method. Finally, the simulation results show that the improved method is more effective in planning path. In the planning space, the length of the calculated path is shorter and smoother than that using traditional APF method. In addition, the improved method can solve the dead point problem effectively.

  9. Cancer treatment as a game: integrating evolutionary game theory into the optimal control of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Paul A; Gatenby, Robert A; Brown, Joel S

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy for metastatic cancer commonly fails due to evolution of drug resistance in tumor cells. Here, we view cancer treatment as a game in which the oncologists choose a therapy and tumors 'choose' an adaptive strategy. We propose the oncologist can gain an upper hand in the game by choosing treatment strategies that anticipate the adaptations of the tumor. In particular, we examine the potential benefit of exploiting evolutionary tradeoffs in tumor adaptations to therapy. We analyze a math model where cancer cells face tradeoffs in allocation of resistance to two drugs. The tumor 'chooses' its strategy by natural selection and the oncologist chooses her strategy by solving a control problem. We find that when tumor cells perform best by investing resources to maximize response to one drug the optimal therapy is a time-invariant delivery of both drugs simultaneously. However, if cancer cells perform better using a generalist strategy allowing resistance to both drugs simultaneously, then the optimal protocol is a time varying solution in which the two drug concentrations negatively covary. However, drug interactions can significantly alter these results. We conclude that knowledge of both evolutionary tradeoffs and drug interactions is crucial in planning optimal chemotherapy schedules for individual patients.

  10. Cancer treatment as a game: integrating evolutionary game theory into the optimal control of chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Paul A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Brown, Joel S.

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy for metastatic cancer commonly fails due to evolution of drug resistance in tumor cells. Here, we view cancer treatment as a game in which the oncologists choose a therapy and tumors ‘choose’ an adaptive strategy. We propose the oncologist can gain an upper hand in the game by choosing treatment strategies that anticipate the adaptations of the tumor. In particular, we examine the potential benefit of exploiting evolutionary tradeoffs in tumor adaptations to therapy. We analyze a math model where cancer cells face tradeoffs in allocation of resistance to two drugs. The tumor ‘chooses’ its strategy by natural selection and the oncologist chooses her strategy by solving a control problem. We find that when tumor cells perform best by investing resources to maximize response to one drug the optimal therapy is a time-invariant delivery of both drugs simultaneously. However, if cancer cells perform better using a generalist strategy allowing resistance to both drugs simultaneously, then the optimal protocol is a time varying solution in which the two drug concentrations negatively covary. However, drug interactions can significantly alter these results. We conclude that knowledge of both evolutionary tradeoffs and drug interactions is crucial in planning optimal chemotherapy schedules for individual patients.

  11. Application of optimal control theory to the design of broadband excitation pulses for high-resolution NMR.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Reiss, Timo O; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2003-07-01

    Optimal control theory is considered as a methodology for pulse sequence design in NMR. It provides the flexibility for systematically imposing desirable constraints on spin system evolution and therefore has a wealth of applications. We have chosen an elementary example to illustrate the capabilities of the optimal control formalism: broadband, constant phase excitation which tolerates miscalibration of RF power and variations in RF homogeneity relevant for standard high-resolution probes. The chosen design criteria were transformation of I(z)-->I(x) over resonance offsets of +/- 20 kHz and RF variability of +/-5%, with a pulse length of 2 ms. Simulations of the resulting pulse transform I(z)-->0.995I(x) over the target ranges in resonance offset and RF variability. Acceptably uniform excitation is obtained over a much larger range of RF variability (approximately 45%) than the strict design limits. The pulse performs well in simulations that include homonuclear and heteronuclear J-couplings. Experimental spectra obtained from 100% 13C-labeled lysine show only minimal coupling effects, in excellent agreement with the simulations. By increasing pulse power and reducing pulse length, we demonstrate experimental excitation of 1H over +/-32 kHz, with phase variations in the spectra <8 degrees and peak amplitudes >93% of maximum. Further improvements in broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP) may be possible by applying more sophisticated implementations of the optimal control formalism.

  12. Design And Verification of Controllers for Coupled Bunch Instabilities Using Optimal Control Theory And Numerical Simulation: Predictions for PEP II

    SciTech Connect

    Hindi, Haitham; Prabhakar, Shyam; Fox, John D.; Linscott, Ivan; Teytelman, Dmitri; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    We present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power - one of the most expensive components of a feedback system - and define the limits of the closed loop system performance. Our design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator uses PEP-II parameters and identifies unstable coupled bunch modes, their growth rates and their damping rates with feedback. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  13. Design and verification of controllers for longitudinal oscillations using optimal control theory and numerical simulation: Predictions for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Hindi, H.; Prabhakar, S.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1997-12-01

    The authors present a technique for the design and verification of efficient bunch-by-bunch controllers for damping longitudinal multibunch instabilities. The controllers attempt to optimize the use of available feedback amplifier power--one of the most expensive components of a feedback system--and define the limits of closed loop system performance. The design technique alternates between analytic computation of single bunch optimal controllers and verification on a multibunch numerical simulator. The simulator identifies unstable coupled bunch modes and predicts their growth and damping rates. The results from the simulator are shown to be in reasonable agreement with analytical calculations based on the single bunch model. The technique is then used to evaluate the performance of a variety of controllers proposed for PEP-II.

  14. Application of Optimal Production Control theory for Home Energy Management in a Micro Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Teja

    2016-01-01

    We consider the optimal stochastic control problem for home energy systems with solar and energy storage devices when the demand is realized from the grid. The demand is subject to Brownian motions with both drift and variance parameters modulated by a continuous-time Markov chain that represents the regime of electricity price. We model the systems as pure stochastic differential equation models, and then we follow the completing square technique to solve the stochastic home energy management problem. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed approach is validated through a simulation example. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those studied here, our results imply the proposed framework could reduce the electricity cost from short-term purchase in peak hour market.

  15. Laser pulse design using optimal control theory-based adaptive simulated annealing technique: vibrational transitions and photo-dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Bikram; Mondal, Chandan Kumar

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and optimised a combined laser pulse using optimal control theory-based adaptive simulated annealing technique for selective vibrational excitations and photo-dissociation. Since proper choice of pulses for specific excitation and dissociation phenomena is very difficult, we have designed a linearly combined pulse for such processes and optimised the different parameters involved in those pulses so that we can get an efficient combined pulse. The technique makes us free from choosing any arbitrary type of pulses and makes a ground to check their suitability. We have also emphasised on how we can improve the performance of simulated annealing technique by introducing an adaptive step length of the different variables during the optimisation processes. We have also pointed out on how we can choose the initial temperature for the optimisation process by introducing heating/cooling step to reduce the annealing steps so that the method becomes cost effective.

  16. A Closed-Loop Optimal Neural-Network Controller to Optimize Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour. Volume 1; Theory and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    2001-01-01

    Given the predicted growth in air transportation, the potential exists for significant market niches for rotary wing subsonic vehicles. Technological advances which optimise rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour can contribute significantly to both their commercial and military development, acceptance, and sales. Examples of the optimisation of rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour which are of interest include the minimisation of vibration and/or loads. The reduction of rotorcraft vibration and loads is an important means to extend the useful life of the vehicle and to improve its ride quality. Although vibration reduction can be accomplished by using passive dampers and/or tuned masses, active closed-loop control has the potential to reduce vibration and loads throughout a.wider flight regime whilst requiring less additional weight to the aircraft man that obtained by using passive methads. It is ernphasised that the analysis described herein is applicable to all those rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour optimisation problems for which the relationship between the harmonic control vector and the measurement vector can be adequately described by a neural-network model.

  17. Wall Models for Large-Eddy Simulation Based on Optimal Control Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    function q control (u, v) inner product of u and v £2 vector space of square integrable functions j functional on Q 6, functional of u D - Fr~ chet ...control algorithm. Taking the Fr~ chet derivative of J with respect to € results in DJ- 2 j 6m(y) D (Y)& + J(y) "-(Y dy, (5.3) where € is an arbitrary...Reynolds number based on friction velocity IR set of all real numbers x, y, z spatial coordiates t time Q spatial domain T terminal time A area of a

  18. Stability and optimal control theory of hereditary systems with applications from oscillating flying vehicles, mechanical systems, and robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chukwu, Ethelbert Nwakuche

    1992-01-01

    The author derives an equation determining the dynamics of the deterministic model of a flying vehicle. He next examines a simplified mechanical problem whose optimal feedback control strategy is investigated. From there robotics are incorporated into the mathematical model to develop an equation describing optimal control of the dynamics.

  19. Stability and optimal control theory of hereditary systems with applications from oscillating flying vehicles, mechanical systems, and robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chukwu, Ethelbert Nwakuche

    1992-01-01

    The author derives an equation determining the dynamics of the deterministic model of a flying vehicle. He next examines a simplified mechanical problem whose optimal feedback control strategy is investigated. From there robotics are incorporated into the mathematical model to develop an equation describing optimal control of the dynamics.

  20. Optimality theory in phonological acquisition.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J A; Gierut, J A

    1999-12-01

    This tutorial presents an introduction to the contemporary linguistic framework known as optimality theory (OT). The basic assumptions of this constraint-based theory as a general model of grammar are first outlined, with formal notation being defined and illustrated. Concepts unique to the theory, including "emergence of the unmarked," are also described. OT is then examined more specifically within the context of phonological acquisition. The theory is applied in descriptions of children's common error patterns, observed inter- and intrachild variation, and productive change over time. The particular error patterns of fronting, stopping, final-consonant deletion, and cluster simplification are considered from an OT perspective. The discussion concludes with potential clinical applications and extensions of the theory to the diagnosis and treatment of children with functional phonological disorders.

  1. Economic policy optimization based on both one stochastic model and the parametric control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashimov, Abdykappar; Borovskiy, Yuriy; Onalbekov, Mukhit

    2016-06-01

    A nonlinear dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model with financial frictions is developed to describe two interacting national economies in the environment of the rest of the world. Parameters of nonlinear model are estimated based on its log-linearization by the Bayesian approach. The nonlinear model is verified by retroprognosis, estimation of stability indicators of mappings specified by the model, and estimation the degree of coincidence for results of internal and external shocks' effects on macroeconomic indicators on the basis of the estimated nonlinear model and its log-linearization. On the base of the nonlinear model, the parametric control problems of economic growth and volatility of macroeconomic indicators of Kazakhstan are formulated and solved for two exchange rate regimes (free floating and managed floating exchange rates)

  2. Phase-only shaped laser pulses in optimal control theory: application to indirect photofragmentation dynamics in the weak-field limit.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels E

    2012-01-28

    We implement phase-only shaped laser pulses within quantum optimal control theory for laser-molecule interaction. This approach is applied to the indirect photofragmentation dynamics of NaI in the weak-field limit. It is shown that optimized phase-modulated pulses with a fixed frequency distribution can substantially modify transient dissociation probabilities as well as the momentum distribution associated with the relative motion of Na and I.

  3. Optimality principles in sensorimotor control.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2004-09-01

    The sensorimotor system is a product of evolution, development, learning and adaptation-which work on different time scales to improve behavioral performance. Consequently, many theories of motor function are based on 'optimal performance': they quantify task goals as cost functions, and apply the sophisticated tools of optimal control theory to obtain detailed behavioral predictions. The resulting models, although not without limitations, have explained more empirical phenomena than any other class. Traditional emphasis has been on optimizing desired movement trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. Recent work has redefined optimality in terms of feedback control laws, and focused on the mechanisms that generate behavior online. This approach has allowed researchers to fit previously unrelated concepts and observations into what may become a unified theoretical framework for interpreting motor function. At the heart of the framework is the relationship between high-level goals, and the real-time sensorimotor control strategies most suitable for accomplishing those goals.

  4. Optimal investment and location decisions of a firm in a flood risk area using Impulse Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, Johanna; Grass, Dieter; Kort, Peter; Prskawetz, Alexia

    2017-04-01

    Flooding events can affect businesses close to rivers, lakes or coasts. This paper provides a partial equilibrium model which helps to understand the optimal location choice for a firm in flood risk areas and its investment strategies. How often, when and how much are firms willing to invest in flood risk protection measures? We apply Impulse Control Theory to solve the model analytically and develop a continuation algorithm to solve the model numerically. Firms always invest in flood defense. The investment increases the higher the flood risk and the more firms also value the future, i.e. the more sustainable they plan. Investments in production capital follow a similar path. Hence, planning in a sustainable way leads to economic growth. Sociohydrological feedbacks are crucial for the location choice of the firm, whereas different economic situations have an impact on investment strategies. If flood defense is already present, e.g. built up by the government, firms move closer to the water and invest less in flood defense, which allows firms to accrue higher expected profits. Firms with a large initial production capital surprisingly try not to keep their market advantage, but rather reduce flood risk by reducing exposed production capital.

  5. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  6. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  7. Optimal Linear Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    OPTIMAL LINEAR CONTROL C.A. HARVEY M.G. SAFO NOV G. STEIN J.C. DOYLE HONEYWELL SYSTEMS & RESEARCH CENTER j 2600 RIDGWAY PARKWAY j [ MINNEAPOLIS...RECIPIENT’S CAT ALC-’ W.IMIJUff’? * J~’ CR2 15-238-4F TP P EI)ŕll * (~ Optimal Linear Control ~iOGRPR UBA m a M.G Lnar o Con_ _ _ _ _ _ R PORT__ _ _ I RE...Characterizations of optimal linear controls have been derived, from which guides for selecting the structure of the control system and the weights in

  8. Optimal control computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solution of the optimal control problem, even with low order dynamical systems, can usually strain the analytical ability of most engineers. The understanding of this subject matter, therefore, would be greatly enhanced if a software package existed that could simulate simple generic problems. Surprisingly, despite a great abundance of commercially available control software, few, if any, address the part of optimal control in its most generic form. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, to present a simple computer program that will perform simulations of optimal control problems that arise from the first necessary condition and the Pontryagin's maximum principle.

  9. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  10. Design of laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H bond of adenine and adenine-thymine base pair using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sitansh; Sharma, Purshotam; Singh, Harjinder; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G

    2009-06-01

    Time dependent quantum dynamics and optimal control theory are used for selective vibrational excitation of the N6-H (amino N-H) bond in free adenine and in the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair. For the N6-H bond in free adenine we have used a one dimensional model while for the hydrogen bond, N6-H(A)...O4(T), present in the A-T base pair, a two mathematical dimensional model is employed. The conjugate gradient method is used for the optimization of the field dependent cost functional. Optimal laser fields are obtained for selective population transfer in both the model systems, which give virtually 100% excitation probability to preselected vibrational levels. The effect of the optimized laser field on the other hydrogen bond, N1(A)...H-N3(T), present in A-T base pair is also investigated.

  11. Optimal control of sun tracking solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1979-01-01

    Application of the modern control theory to derive an optimal sun tracking control for a point focusing solar concentrator is presented. A standard tracking problem converted to regulator problem using a sun rate input achieves an almost zero steady state tracking error with the optimal control formulation. However, these control techniques are costly because optimal type algorithms require large computing systems, thus they will be used mainly as comparison standards for other types of control algorithms and help in their development.

  12. Applications of control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taft, C. K.; Pokoski, J. L.; Murdoch, J. B.; Limbert, D. E.; Alperi, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Applications of control theory are considered in the areas of decoupling and wake steering control of submersibles, a method of electrohydraulic conversion with no moving parts, and socio-economic system modelling.

  13. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOEpatents

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  14. Direct Methods for Predicting Movement Biomechanics Based Upon Optimal Control Theory with Implementation in OpenSim.

    PubMed

    Porsa, Sina; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the computational performances of two direct methods for solving large-scale, nonlinear, optimal control problems in human movement. Direct shooting and direct collocation were implemented on an 8-segment, 48-muscle model of the body (24 muscles on each side) to compute the optimal control solution for maximum-height jumping. Both algorithms were executed on a freely-available musculoskeletal modeling platform called OpenSim. Direct collocation converged to essentially the same optimal solution up to 249 times faster than direct shooting when the same initial guess was assumed (3.4 h of CPU time for direct collocation vs. 35.3 days for direct shooting). The model predictions were in good agreement with the time histories of joint angles, ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns measured for subjects jumping to their maximum achievable heights. Both methods converged to essentially the same solution when started from the same initial guess, but computation time was sensitive to the initial guess assumed. Direct collocation demonstrates exceptional computational performance and is well suited to performing predictive simulations of movement using large-scale musculoskeletal models.

  15. Splines and control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Tomlinson, John; Martin, Clyde

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between splines and the control theory has been analyzed. We show that spline functions can be constructed naturally from the control theory. By establishing a framework based on control theory, we provide a simple and systematic way to construct splines. We have constructed the traditional spline functions including the polynomial splines and the classical exponential spline. We have also discovered some new spline functions such as trigonometric splines and the combination of polynomial, exponential and trigonometric splines. The method proposed in this paper is easy to implement. Some numerical experiments are performed to investigate properties of different spline approximations.

  16. Optimal control of native predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; O'Connell, Allan F.; Kendall, William L.; Runge, Michael C.; Simons, Theodore R.; Waldstein, Arielle H.; Schulte, Shiloh A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Smith, Graham W.; Pinion, Timothy; Rikard, Michael; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply decision theory in a structured decision-making framework to evaluate how control of raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native predator, can promote the conservation of a declining population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Our management objective was to maintain Oystercatcher productivity above a level deemed necessary for population recovery while minimizing raccoon removal. We evaluated several scenarios including no raccoon removal, and applied an adaptive optimization algorithm to account for parameter uncertainty. We show how adaptive optimization can be used to account for uncertainties about how raccoon control may affect Oystercatcher productivity. Adaptive management can reduce this type of uncertainty and is particularly well suited for addressing controversial management issues such as native predator control. The case study also offers several insights that may be relevant to the optimal control of other native predators. First, we found that stage-specific removal policies (e.g., yearling versus adult raccoon removals) were most efficient if the reproductive values among stage classes were very different. Second, we found that the optimal control of raccoons would result in higher Oystercatcher productivity than the minimum levels recommended for this species. Third, we found that removing more raccoons initially minimized the total number of removals necessary to meet long term management objectives. Finally, if for logistical reasons managers cannot sustain a removal program by removing a minimum number of raccoons annually, managers may run the risk of creating an ecological trap for Oystercatchers.

  17. Optimized joystick controller.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Cooper, R A; Spaeth, D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an optimized joystick control interface for electric powered wheelchairs and thus provide safe and effective control of electric powered wheelchairs to people with severe physical disabilities. The interface enables clinicians to tune joystick parameters for each individual subject through selecting templates, dead zones, and bias axes. In terms of hand tremor usually associated with people with traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis, fuzzy logic rules were applied to suppress erratic hand movements and extract the intended motion from the joystick. Simulation results were presented to show the graphical tuning interface as well as the performance of the fuzzy logic controller.

  18. Conference on Operator Theory, Wavelet Theory and Control Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    Bourbaki 662 (1985-1986). [9] Meyer, Y., Ondelettes et operateurs I, Hermann editeurs des sciences et des arts, 1990. [10] Natanson, I. P., Theory of...OPERATOR THEORY , WAVELET THEORY & CONTROL THEORY (U)F 6. AUTHOR(S) 2304/ES Professor Xingde Dai F49620-93-1-0180 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...1STRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED UTL 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The conference on Interaction Between Operator Theory , Wavelet Theory and Control Theory

  19. Optimal control concepts in design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, Ashok D.

    1987-01-01

    A close link is established between open loop optimal control theory and optimal design by noting certain similarities in the gradient calculations. The resulting benefits include a unified approach, together with physical insights in design sensitivity analysis, and an efficient approach for simultaneous optimal control and design. Both matrix displacement and matrix force methods are considered, and results are presented for dynamic systems, structures, and elasticity problems.

  20. Fault Tolerant Optimal Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    i k+l since the cost to be minimized in (D.2.3) increases withXk (for fixed xsk). When we have b k _ x~ ji ] Aj M 2a(j) R(j) x bOk +l x]rkt] -b (j...22, pp. 236-239. 69. D.D.Sworder and L.L. Choi (1976): Stationary Cost Densities for Optimally Controlled Stochastic Systems, IEEE Trans. Automatic

  1. Optimal Control of Evolution Mixed Variational Inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Alduncin, Gonzalo

    2013-12-15

    Optimal control problems of primal and dual evolution mixed variational inclusions, in reflexive Banach spaces, are studied. The solvability analysis of the mixed state systems is established via duality principles. The optimality analysis is performed in terms of perturbation conjugate duality methods, and proximation penalty-duality algorithms to mixed optimality conditions are further presented. Applications to nonlinear diffusion constrained problems as well as quasistatic elastoviscoplastic bilateral contact problems exemplify the theory.

  2. Quantum control implemented as combinatorial optimization.

    PubMed

    Strohecker, Traci; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-01-15

    Optimal control theory provides a general means for designing controls to manipulate quantum phenomena. Traditional implementation requires solving coupled nonlinear equations to obtain the optimal control solution, whereas this work introduces a combinatorial quantum control (CQC) algorithm to avoid this complexity. The CQC technique uses a predetermined toolkit of small time step propagators in conjunction with combinatorial optimization to identify a proper sequence for the toolkit members. Results indicate that the CQC technique exhibits invariance of search effort to the number of system states and very favorable scaling upon comparison to a standard gradient algorithm, taking into consideration that CQC is easily parallelizable.

  3. Optimization Theory in Behavioural Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses variables which determine the strategies animals use to organize their lives. Describes advances in understanding animal behaviors. Shows how game theory has helped to explain the existence of alternative behavioral strategies and the constraints under which organizers exist. (Author/CW)

  4. Transient Growth Theory Prediction of Optimal Placing of Passive and Active Flow Control Devices for Separation Delay in LPT Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. At very low Reynolds numbers, there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  5. Optimal control of HIV/AIDS dynamic: Education and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A mathematical model which describes the transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS is developed. The optimal control representing education and treatment for this model is explored. The existence of optimal Control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations suggest that education and treatment for the infected has a positive impact on HIV/AIDS control.

  6. Decentralized nonlinear optimal excitation control

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q.; Sun, Y.; Xu, Z.; Mochizuki, T.

    1996-11-01

    A design method to lay emphasis on differential geometric approach for decentralized nonlinear optimal excitation control of multimachine systems is suggested in this paper. The control law achieved is implemented via purely local measurements. Moreover, it is independent of the parameters of power networks. Simulations are performed on a six-machine system. It has been demonstrated that the nonlinear optimal excitation control could adapt to the conditions under large disturbances. Besides, this paper has verified that the optimal control in the sense of LQR principle for the linearized system is equivalent to an optimal control in the sense of a quasi-quadratic performance index for the primitive nonlinear control system.

  7. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  8. CHALLENGES OF MODERN CONTROL THEORY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The fundamental objective of the new scientific discipline called ’ control theory ’ is that of modifying the behavior of a system subject to various...possible contributions of modern control theory to the biomedical domain are briefly indicated.

  9. Optimal search behavior and classic foraging theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartumeus, F.; Catalan, J.

    2009-10-01

    Random walk methods and diffusion theory pervaded ecological sciences as methods to analyze and describe animal movement. Consequently, statistical physics was mostly seen as a toolbox rather than as a conceptual framework that could contribute to theory on evolutionary biology and ecology. However, the existence of mechanistic relationships and feedbacks between behavioral processes and statistical patterns of movement suggests that, beyond movement quantification, statistical physics may prove to be an adequate framework to understand animal behavior across scales from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Recently developed random search theory has served to critically re-evaluate classic ecological questions on animal foraging. For instance, during the last few years, there has been a growing debate on whether search behavior can include traits that improve success by optimizing random (stochastic) searches. Here, we stress the need to bring together the general encounter problem within foraging theory, as a mean for making progress in the biological understanding of random searching. By sketching the assumptions of optimal foraging theory (OFT) and by summarizing recent results on random search strategies, we pinpoint ways to extend classic OFT, and integrate the study of search strategies and its main results into the more general theory of optimal foraging.

  10. Automated beam steering using optimal control

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a steering algorithm which, with the aid of a model, allows the user to specify beam behavior throughout a beamline, rather than just at specified beam position monitor (BPM) locations. The model is used primarily to compute the values of the beam phase vectors from BPM measurements, and to define cost functions that describe the steering objectives. The steering problem is formulated as constrained optimization problem; however, by applying optimal control theory we can reduce it to an unconstrained optimization whose dimension is the number of control signals.

  11. Metacognitive Control and Optimal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Lisa K.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    The notion of optimality is often invoked informally in the literature on metacognitive control. We provide a precise formulation of the optimization problem and show that optimal time allocation strategies depend critically on certain characteristics of the learning environment, such as the extent of time pressure, and the nature of the uptake…

  12. Investigating Optimal Foraging Theory in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Siegfried; Grilliot, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory is a principle that is often presented in the community ecology section of biology textbooks, but also can be demonstrated in the laboratory. We introduce a lab activity that uses an interactive strategy to teach high school and/or college students about this ecological concept. The activity is ideal because it engages…

  13. Advanced Topics in Control Systems Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorsa, Antonio; Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, Françoise; Panteley, Elena

    Advanced Topics in Control Systems Theory contains selected contributions written by lecturers at the third (annual) Formation d'Automatique de Paris (FAP) (Graduate Control School in Paris). Following on from the lecture notes from the second FAP (Volume 311 in the same series) it is addressed to graduate students and researchers in control theory with topics touching on a variety of areas of interest to the control community such as nonlinear optimal control, observer design, stability analysis and structural properties of linear systems.

  14. Supercomputer optimizations for stochastic optimal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Siu-Leung; Hanson, Floyd B.; Xu, Huihuang

    1991-01-01

    Supercomputer optimizations for a computational method of solving stochastic, multibody, dynamic programming problems are presented. The computational method is valid for a general class of optimal control problems that are nonlinear, multibody dynamical systems, perturbed by general Markov noise in continuous time, i.e., nonsmooth Gaussian as well as jump Poisson random white noise. Optimization techniques for vector multiprocessors or vectorizing supercomputers include advanced data structures, loop restructuring, loop collapsing, blocking, and compiler directives. These advanced computing techniques and superconducting hardware help alleviate Bellman's curse of dimensionality in dynamic programming computations, by permitting the solution of large multibody problems. Possible applications include lumped flight dynamics models for uncertain environments, such as large scale and background random aerospace fluctuations.

  15. Relaxed controls and the convergence of optimal control algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, L. J.; Polak, E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for the study of the convergence properties of optimal control algorithms and illustrates its use by means of two examples. The framework consists of an algorithm prototype with a convergence theorem, together with some results in relaxed controls theory.

  16. Optimal management strategies in variable environments: Stochastic optimal control methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic optimization was used to investigate the optimal defoliation of salt desert shrubs in north-western Utah. Management was formulated in the context of optimal stochastic control theory, with objective functions composed of discounted or time-averaged biomass yields. Climatic variability and community patterns of salt desert shrublands make the application of stochastic optimal control both feasible and necessary. A primary production model was used to simulate shrub responses and harvest yields under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The simulation results then were used in an optimization model to determine optimal defoliation strategies. The latter model encodes an algorithm for finite state, finite action, infinite discrete time horizon Markov decision processes. Three questions were addressed: (i) What effect do changes in weather patterns have on optimal management strategies? (ii) What effect does the discounting of future returns have? (iii) How do the optimal strategies perform relative to certain fixed defoliation strategies? An analysis was performed for the three shrub species, winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), shadscale (Atriplex confertifolia) and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). In general, the results indicate substantial differences among species in optimal control strategies, which are associated with differences in physiological and morphological characteristics. Optimal policies for big sagebrush varied less with variation in climate, reserve levels and discount rates than did either shadscale or winterfat. This was attributed primarily to the overwintering of photosynthetically active tissue and to metabolic activity early in the growing season. Optimal defoliation of shadscale and winterfat generally was more responsive to differences in plant vigor and climate, reflecting the sensitivity of these species to utilization and replenishment of carbohydrate reserves. Similarities could be seen in the influence of both

  17. Asymptotic controllability and optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.; Rampazzo, F.

    We consider a control problem where the state must approach asymptotically a target C while paying an integral cost with a non-negative Lagrangian l. The dynamics f is just continuous, and no assumptions are made on the zero level set of the Lagrangian l. Through an inequality involving a positive number p and a Minimum Restraint FunctionU=U(x) - a special type of Control Lyapunov Function - we provide a condition implying that (i) the system is asymptotically controllable, and (ii) the value function is bounded by U/p. The result has significant consequences for the uniqueness issue of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Furthermore it may be regarded as a first step in the direction of a feedback construction.

  18. Fuel consumption in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, Jim; Silverberg, Larry

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for comparing three optimal control strategies based on fuel consumption. A general cost function minimization procedure was developed by applying two theorems associated with convex sets. Three cost functions associated with control saturation, pseudofuel, and absolute fuel are introduced and minimized. The first two cost functions led to the bang-bang and continuous control strategies, and the minimization of absolute fuel led to an impulsive strategy. The three control strategies were implemented on two elementary systems and a comparison of fuel consumption was made. The impulse control strategy consumes significantly less fuel than the continuous and bang-bang control strategies. This comparison suggests a potential for fuel savings in higher-order systems using impulsive control strategies. However, since exact solutions to fuel-optimal control for large-order systems are difficult if not impossible to achieve, the alternative is to develop near-optimal control strategies.

  19. Metacognitive control and optimal learning.

    PubMed

    Son, Lisa K; Sethi, Rajiv

    2006-07-08

    The notion of optimality is often invoked informally in the literature on metacognitive control. We provide a precise formulation of the optimization problem and show that optimal time allocation strategies depend critically on certain characteristics of the learning environment, such as the extent of time pressure, and the nature of the uptake function. When the learning curve is concave, optimality requires that items at lower levels of initial competence be allocated greater time. On the other hand, with logistic learning curves, optimal allocations vary with time availability in complex and surprising ways. Hence there are conditions under which optimal strategies will be relatively easy to uncover, and others in which suboptimal time allocation might be expected. The model can therefore be used to address the question of whether and when learners should be able to exercise good metacognitive control in practice.

  20. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory for solving two-point boundary value problems: Theory and numerics with application to spacecraft formation flight, optimal control and the study of phase space structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibout, Vincent M.

    This dissertation has been motivated by the need for new methods to address complex problems that arise in spacecraft formation design. As a direct result of this motivation, a general methodology for solving two-point boundary value problems for Hamiltonian systems has been found. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi theory in conjunction with the canonical transformation induced by the phase flow, it is shown that generating functions solve two-point boundary value problems. Traditional techniques for addressing these problems are iterative and require an initial guess. The method presented in this dissertation solves boundary value problems at the cost of a single function evaluation, although it requires knowledge of at least one generating function. Properties of this method are presented. Specifically, we show that it includes perturbation theory and generalizes it to nonlinear systems. Most importantly, it predicts the existence of multiple solutions and allows one to recover all of these solutions. To demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, an algorithm for computing the generating functions is proposed and its convergence properties are studied. As the method developed in this work is based on the Hamiltonian structure of the problem, particular attention must be paid to the numerics of the algorithm. To address this, a general framework for studying the discretization of certain dynamical systems is developed. This framework generalizes earlier work on discretization of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on tangent and cotangent bundles respectively. In addition, it provides new insights into some symplectic integrators and leads to a new discrete Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Most importantly, it allows one to discretize optimal control problems. In particular, a discrete maximum principle is presented. This dissertation also investigates applications of the proposed method to solve two-point boundary value problems. In particular, new techniques for designing

  1. Dual approximations in optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, W. W.; Ianculescu, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    A dual approximation for the solution to an optimal control problem is analyzed. The differential equation is handled with a Lagrange multiplier while other constraints are treated explicitly. An algorithm for solving the dual problem is presented.

  2. Quantum feedback control and classical control theory

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Andrew C.; Habib, Salman; Jacobs, Kurt; Mabuchi, Hideo; Tan, Sze M.

    2000-07-01

    We introduce and discuss the problem of quantum feedback control in the context of established formulations of classical control theory, examining conceptual analogies and essential differences. We describe the application of state-observer-based control laws, familiar in classical control theory, to quantum systems and apply our methods to the particular case of switching the state of a particle in a double-well potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Optimal control of a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, D. J.; Wilhelm, F. K.

    2014-11-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution toward a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of noncontrollable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a nonunitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to a large measurement contrast close to 99 % . We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 -ns pulses with 98.2 % contrast.

  4. Theory of coherent control with quantum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, Frank; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We develop a coherent control theory for multimode quantum light. It allows us to examine a fundamental problem in quantum optics: what is the optimal pulse form to drive a two-photon-transition? In formulating the question as a coherent control problem, we show that—and quantify how much—the strong frequency quantum correlations of entangled photons enhance the transition compared to shaped classical pulses. In ensembles of collectively driven two-level systems, such enhancement requires nonvanishing interactions.

  5. Dynamic optimization theory with multiple objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Let V(t) be a vector-valued function for t belonging to closed interval a,b open interval, a real interval. The main purpose of this paper is to establish the existence of a closed interval alpha,beta contained in closed interval a,b for which there exists a t(sub O) belonging to closed interval alpha,beta contained in closed interval a,b such that V(t(sub O)) = 0, the zero vector. Use of such information in the dynamic optimization theory with multiple objectives present is needed. Examples of such systems will be given.

  6. Cancer Behavior: An Optimal Control Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Pedro J.; Russo, Irma H.; Russo, J.

    2009-01-01

    With special attention to cancer, this essay explains how Optimal Control Theory, mainly used in Economics, can be applied to the analysis of biological behaviors, and illustrates the ability of this mathematical branch to describe biological phenomena and biological interrelationships. Two examples are provided to show the capability and versatility of this powerful mathematical approach in the study of biological questions. The first describes a process of organogenesis, and the second the development of tumors. PMID:22247736

  7. Optimality principles in sensorimotor control (review)

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    The sensorimotor system is a product of evolution, development, learning, adaptation – processes that work on different time scales to improve behavioral performance. Consequenly, many theories of motor function are based on the notion of optimal performance: they quantify the task goals, and apply the sophisticated tools of optimal control theory to obtain detailed behavioral predictions. The resulting models, although not without limitations, has explained a wider range of empirical phenomena than any other class of models. Traditional emphasis has been on optimizing average trajectories while ignoring sensory feedback. Recent work has redefined optimality on the level of feedback control laws, and focused on the mechanisms that generate behavior online. This has made it possible to fit a number of previously unrelated concepts and observations into what may become a unified theoretical framework for interpreting motor function. At the heart of the framework is the relationship between high-level goals, and the realtime sensorimotor control strategies most suitable for accomplishing those goals. PMID:15332089

  8. Optimization of constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, David D.; Teobaldi, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Constrained density functional theory (cDFT) is a versatile electronic structure method that enables ground-state calculations to be performed subject to physical constraints. It thereby broadens their applicability and utility. Automated Lagrange multiplier optimization is necessary for multiple constraints to be applied efficiently in cDFT, for it to be used in tandem with geometry optimization, or with molecular dynamics. In order to facilitate this, we comprehensively develop the connection between cDFT energy derivatives and response functions, providing a rigorous assessment of the uniqueness and character of cDFT stationary points while accounting for electronic interactions and screening. In particular, we provide a nonperturbative proof that stable stationary points of linear density constraints occur only at energy maxima with respect to their Lagrange multipliers. We show that multiple solutions, hysteresis, and energy discontinuities may occur in cDFT. Expressions are derived, in terms of convenient by-products of cDFT optimization, for quantities such as the dielectric function and a condition number quantifying ill definition in multiple constraint cDFT.

  9. Optimal control of motorsport differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremlett, A. J.; Massaro, M.; Purdy, D. J.; Velenis, E.; Assadian, F.; Moore, A. P.; Halley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modern motorsport limited slip differentials (LSD) have evolved to become highly adjustable, allowing the torque bias that they generate to be tuned in the corner entry, apex and corner exit phases of typical on-track manoeuvres. The task of finding the optimal torque bias profile under such varied vehicle conditions is complex. This paper presents a nonlinear optimal control method which is used to find the minimum time optimal torque bias profile through a lane change manoeuvre. The results are compared to traditional open and fully locked differential strategies, in addition to considering related vehicle stability and agility metrics. An investigation into how the optimal torque bias profile changes with reduced track-tyre friction is also included in the analysis. The optimal LSD profile was shown to give a performance gain over its locked differential counterpart in key areas of the manoeuvre where a quick direction change is required. The methodology proposed can be used to find both optimal passive LSD characteristics and as the basis of a semi-active LSD control algorithm.

  10. Optimal and robust control of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, T. R.; Agarwal, R.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal and robust control theories are used to determine feedback control rules that effectively stabilize a linearly unstable flow in a plane channel. Wall transpiration (unsteady blowing/suction) with zero net mass flux is used as the control. Control algorithms are considered that depend both on full flowfield information and on estimates of that flowfield based on wall skin-friction measurements only. The development of these control algorithms accounts for modeling errors and measurement noise in a rigorous fashion; these disturbances are considered in both a structured (Gaussian) and unstructured ('worst case') sense. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of the eigenmodes of the resulting controlled systems, and the sensitivity of individual eigenmodes to both control and observation is quantified.

  11. Combined control-structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, M.; Salama, M.; Scheid, R. E.; Bruno, R.; Gibson, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to combined control-structural optimization aimed at enhancing early design trade-offs is outlined and illustrated by numerical examples. The approach employs a homotopic strategy and is capable of generating families of designs that can be used in early trade studies. Analytical results are obtained for classes of structure/control objectives with LQG and LQR costs. For these, it is demonstrated that global optima can be computed for small values of the homotopy parameter.

  12. H2-optimal control with generalized state-space models for use in control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Several advances are provided solving combined control-structure optimization problems. The author has extended solutions from H2 optimal control theory to the use of generalized state space models. The generalized state space models preserve the sparsity inherent in finite element models and hence provide some promise for handling very large problems. Also, expressions for the gradient of the optimal control cost are derived which use the generalized state space models.

  13. H2-optimal control with generalized state-space models for use in control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Several advances are provided solving combined control-structure optimization problems. The author has extended solutions from H2 optimal control theory to the use of generalized state space models. The generalized state space models preserve the sparsity inherent in finite element models and hence provide some promise for handling very large problems. Also, expressions for the gradient of the optimal control cost are derived which use the generalized state space models.

  14. Optimal Feedback Control of Thermal Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2003-01-01

    An improved approach to the mathematical modeling of feedback control of thermal networks has been devised. Heretofore software for feedback control of thermal networks has been developed by time-consuming trial-and-error methods that depend on engineers expertise. In contrast, the present approach is a systematic means of developing algorithms for feedback control that is optimal in the sense that it combines performance with low cost of implementation. An additional advantage of the present approach is that a thermal engineer need not be expert in control theory. Thermal networks are lumped-parameter approximations used to represent complex thermal systems. Thermal networks are closely related to electrical networks commonly represented by lumped-parameter circuit diagrams. Like such electrical circuits, thermal networks are mathematically modeled by systems of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) that is, ordinary differential equations subject to a set of algebraic constraints. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on applications in which thermal networks are subject to constant disturbances and, therefore, integral control action is necessary to obtain steady-state responses. The mathematical development of the present approach begins with the derivation of optimal integral-control laws via minimization of an appropriate cost functional that involves augmented state vectors. Subsequently, classical variational arguments provide optimality conditions in the form of the Hamiltonian equations for the standard linear-quadratic-regulator (LQR) problem. These equations are reduced to an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) with respect to the augmented state vector. The solution of the ARE leads to the direct computation of the optimal proportional- and integral-feedback control gains. In cases of very complex networks, large numbers of state variables make it difficult to implement optimal controllers in the manner described in the preceding paragraph.

  15. Social Control Theory and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiatrowski, Michael D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Develops and tests multivariate models of social control theory which simultaneously consider how four bonds to society (attachment, commitment, involvement, and belief) operate in relation to delinquency. Suggests a revised formulation of social control, after adding background factors (measures of social class and ability) to the model.…

  16. Protecting quantum information with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Matthew

    Quantum computation (QC) holds the promise of efficiently solving problems which are practically intractable for classical computers. However, realizing this advantage requires the precise control of a quantum information processor (QIP) and effective protection of this processor from the pernicious inuence of decoherence induced by the surrounding environment. Therefore, the ability to generate high-fidelity logical operations in the presence of environmental coupling is crucial. Methods of optimal control are applied to the field of quantum information processing, providing practical solutions for the generation of logical operations and the suppression of undesired environmental effects. The work contained in this dissertation explores important aspects of system and control design. Results obtained in this work (i) illustrate how practical QC can be greatly facilitated by optimal control theory and (ii) reveal interesting physical insights through the discovery of effective control mechanisms. A special design of the physical structure of quantum information systems is formulated which is naturally immune to certain types of decoherence and yields tremendous flexibility in the construction of logical operations for QC. A fundamental component of this design involves encoding the logical basis states of a quantum bit into multiple physical levels of the corresponding quantum system. This design also makes the QIP better suited for the interaction with ultrafast broadband laser fields used in quantum control applications. Numerical simulations demonstrate the utility of this encoding approach for thermally excited quantum systems. Optimization algorithms are developed which generate controls that protect the QIP from the effects of the environment, with or without the weak-coupling or Born approximation, and simultaneously achieve a target objective, e.g., a state-to-state transition or unitary quantum operation. For the optimal control of quantum operations, a

  17. Unifying process control and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    2005-09-01

    About 40% of US generation is now subject to wholesale competition. To intelligently bid into these new markets, real-time prices must be aligned with real-time costs. It is time to integrate the many advanced applications, sensors, and analyzers used for control, automation, and optimization into a system that reflects process and financial objectives. The paper reports several demonstration projects in the USA revealing what is being done in the area of advanced process optimization (by Alliant Energy, American Electric Power, PacifiCorp, Detroit Edison and Tennessee Valley Authority). In addition to these projects US DOE's NETL has funded the plant environment and cost optimization system, PECOS which combines physical models, neural networks and fuzzy logic control to provide operators with least cost setpoints for controllable variables. At Dynegy Inc's Baldwin station in Illinois the DOE is subsidizing a project where real time, closed-loop IT systems will optimize combustion, soot-blowing and SCR performance as well as unit thermal performance and plant economic performance. Commercial products such as Babcock and Wilcox's Flame Doctor, continuous emissions monitoring systems and various real-time predictive monitoring systems are also available. 4 figs.

  18. Gain optimization with nonlinear controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Kandadai, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the analysis and design of controls for nonlinear systems. The technical approach is to use statistical linearization to model the nonlinear dynamics of a system. A covariance analysis is performed to determine the behavior of the dynamical system and a quadratic cost function. Expressions for the cost function and its derivatives are determined so that numerical optimization techniques can be applied to determine optimal feedback laws. The primary application for this report is centered about the design of controls for nominally linear systems but where the controls are saturated or limited by fixed constraints. The analysis is general however and numerical computation requires only that the specific nonlinearity be considered in the analysis.

  19. Gain optimization with nonlinear controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Kandadai, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the analysis and design of controls for nonlinear systems. The technical approach is to use statistical linearization to model the nonlinear dynamics of a system. A covariance analysis is performed to determine the behavior of the dynamical system and a quadratic cost function. Expressions for the cost function and its derivatives are determined so that numerical optimization techniques can be applied to determine optimal feedback laws. The primary application for this report is centered about the design of controls for nominally linear systems but where the controls are saturated or limited by fixed constraints. The analysis is general however and numerical computation requires only that the specific nonlinearity be considered in the analysis.

  20. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  1. Distributed optimization and flight control using collectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniawski, Stefan Richard

    The increasing complexity of aerospace systems demands new approaches for their design and control. Approaches are required to address the trend towards aerospace systems comprised of a large number of inherently distributed and highly nonlinear components with complex and sometimes competing interactions. This work introduces collectives to address these challenges. Although collectives have been used for distributed optimization problems in computer science, recent developments based upon Probability Collectives (PC) theory enhance their applicability to discrete, continuous, mixed, and constrained optimization problems. Further, they are naturally applied to distributed systems and those involving uncertainty, such as control in the presence of noise and disturbances. This work describes collectives theory and its implementation, including its connections to multi-agent systems, machine learning, statistics, and gradient-based optimization. To demonstrate the approach, two experiments were developed. These experiments built upon recent advances in actuator technology that resulted in small, simple flow control devices. Miniature-Trailing Edge Effectors (MiTE), consisting of a small, 1-5% chord, moveable surface mounted at the wing trailing edge, are used for the experiments. The high bandwidth, distributed placement, and good control authority make these ideal candidates for rigid and flexible mode control of flight vehicles. This is demonstrated in two experiments: flutter suppression of a flexible wing, and flight control of a remotely piloted aircraft. The first experiment successfully increased the flutter speed by over 25%. The second experiment included a novel distributed flight control system based upon the MiTEs that includes distributed sensing, logic, and actuation. Flight tests validated the control capability of the MiTEs and the associated flight control architecture. The collectives approach was used to design controllers for the distributed

  2. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications.

  3. Practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks via optimal pinning control.

    PubMed

    Li, Kezan; Sun, Weigang; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu

    2015-07-01

    We consider practical synchronization on complex dynamical networks under linear feedback control designed by optimal control theory. The control goal is to minimize global synchronization error and control strength over a given finite time interval, and synchronization error at terminal time. By utilizing the Pontryagin's minimum principle, and based on a general complex dynamical network, we obtain an optimal system to achieve the control goal. The result is verified by performing some numerical simulations on Star networks, Watts-Strogatz networks, and Barabási-Albert networks. Moreover, by combining optimal control and traditional pinning control, we propose an optimal pinning control strategy which depends on the network's topological structure. Obtained results show that optimal pinning control is very effective for synchronization control in real applications.

  4. Combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Milman, M.; Bruno, R.; Scheid, R.; Gibson, S.

    1989-01-01

    An approach for combined control-structure optimization keyed to enhancing early design trade-offs is outlined and illustrated by numerical examples. The approach employs a homotopic strategy and appears to be effective for generating families of designs that can be used in these early trade studies. Analytical results were obtained for classes of structure/control objectives with linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) costs. For these, researchers demonstrated that global optima can be computed for small values of the homotopy parameter. Conditions for local optima along the homotopy path were also given. Details of two numerical examples employing the LQR control cost were given showing variations of the optimal design variables along the homotopy path. The results of the second example suggest that introducing a second homotopy parameter relating the two parts of the control index in the LQG/LQR formulation might serve to enlarge the family of Pareto optima, but its effect on modifying the optimal structural shapes may be analogous to the original parameter lambda.

  5. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  6. Transition delay using control theory.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, S; Henningson, D S

    2011-04-13

    This review gives an account of recent research efforts to use feedback control for the delay of laminar-turbulent transition in wall-bounded shear flows. The emphasis is on reducing the growth of small-amplitude disturbances in the boundary layer using numerical simulations and a linear control approach. Starting with the application of classical control theory to two-dimensional perturbations developing in spatially invariant flows, flow control based on control theory has progressed towards more realistic three-dimensional, spatially inhomogeneous flow configurations with localized sensing/actuation. The development of low-dimensional models of the Navier-Stokes equations has played a key role in this progress. Moreover, shortcomings and future challenges, as well as recent experimental advances in this multi-disciplinary field, are discussed.

  7. Investigation, development and application of optimal output feedback theory. Volume 2: Development of an optimal, limited state feedback outer-loop digital flight control system for 3-D terminal area operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Halyo, N.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains the development of a digital outer-loop three dimensional radio navigation (3-D RNAV) flight control system for a small commercial jet transport. The outer-loop control system is designed using optimal stochastic limited state feedback techniques. Options investigated using the optimal limited state feedback approach include integrated versus hierarchical control loop designs, 20 samples per second versus 5 samples per second outer-loop operation and alternative Type 1 integration command errors. Command generator tracking techniques used in the digital control design enable the jet transport to automatically track arbitrary curved flight paths generated by waypoints. The performance of the design is demonstrated using detailed nonlinear aircraft simulations in the terminal area, frequency domain multi-input sigma plots, frequency domain single-input Bode plots and closed-loop poles. The response of the system to a severe wind shear during a landing approach is also presented.

  8. Robust optimization based upon statistical theory.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, B; Söhn, M; Alber, M

    2010-08-01

    Organ movement is still the biggest challenge in cancer treatment despite advances in online imaging. Due to the resulting geometric uncertainties, the delivered dose cannot be predicted precisely at treatment planning time. Consequently, all associated dose metrics (e.g., EUD and maxDose) are random variables with a patient-specific probability distribution. The method that the authors propose makes these distributions the basis of the optimization and evaluation process. The authors start from a model of motion derived from patient-specific imaging. On a multitude of geometry instances sampled from this model, a dose metric is evaluated. The resulting pdf of this dose metric is termed outcome distribution. The approach optimizes the shape of the outcome distribution based on its mean and variance. This is in contrast to the conventional optimization of a nominal value (e.g., PTV EUD) computed on a single geometry instance. The mean and variance allow for an estimate of the expected treatment outcome along with the residual uncertainty. Besides being applicable to the target, the proposed method also seamlessly includes the organs at risk (OARs). The likelihood that a given value of a metric is reached in the treatment is predicted quantitatively. This information reveals potential hazards that may occur during the course of the treatment, thus helping the expert to find the right balance between the risk of insufficient normal tissue sparing and the risk of insufficient tumor control. By feeding this information to the optimizer, outcome distributions can be obtained where the probability of exceeding a given OAR maximum and that of falling short of a given target goal can be minimized simultaneously. The method is applicable to any source of residual motion uncertainty in treatment delivery. Any model that quantifies organ movement and deformation in terms of probability distributions can be used as basis for the algorithm. Thus, it can generate dose

  9. Distributed Cooperative Optimal Control for Multiagent Systems on Directed Graphs: An Inverse Optimal Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaguang; Feng, Tao; Yang, Guang-Hong; Liang, Hongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the inverse optimal approach is employed to design distributed consensus protocols that guarantee consensus and global optimality with respect to some quadratic performance indexes for identical linear systems on a directed graph. The inverse optimal theory is developed by introducing the notion of partial stability. As a result, the necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse optimality are proposed. By means of the developed inverse optimal theory, the necessary and sufficient conditions are established for globally optimal cooperative control problems on directed graphs. Basic optimal cooperative design procedures are given based on asymptotic properties of the resulting optimal distributed consensus protocols, and the multiagent systems can reach desired consensus performance (convergence rate and damping rate) asymptotically. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  10. Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tethers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    left with ( ) ( ) 1 2 1 2 23 3 3 32 1 2 1 2 3 3 ˆ ˆ 2 2 2 ˆ ˆ 6 6 t t t t t t m m m m m T m L m L M M m LM M M MLm M M... Contract RH4-394049, March 1985, p 31. 9 Pelaez, J. and Lorenzini, E. C., “Libration Control of Electrodynamic Tethers in Inclined Orbit,” Journal of...COVERED (From – To) Aug 2006 – Jul 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tethers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  11. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  12. Quasivelocities and Optimal Control for underactuated Mechanical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, L.; Martin de Diego, D.

    2010-07-28

    This paper is concerned with the application of the theory of quasivelocities for optimal control for underactuated mechanical systems. Using this theory, we convert the original problem in a variational second-order lagrangian system subjected to constraints. The equations of motion are geometrically derived using an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk formalism.

  13. Quasivelocities and Optimal Control for underactuated Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, L.; de Diego, D. Martín

    2010-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of the theory of quasivelocities for optimal control for underactuated mechanical systems. Using this theory, we convert the original problem in a variational second-order lagrangian system subjected to constraints. The equations of motion are geometrically derived using an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk formalism.

  14. Approximate Newton-type methods via theory of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Chui Ying; Leong, Wah June

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possible use of control theory, particularly theory on optimal control to derive some numerical methods for unconstrained optimization problems. Based upon this control theory, we derive a Levenberg-Marquardt-like method that guarantees greatest descent in a particular search region. The implementation of this method in its original form requires inversion of a non-sparse matrix or equivalently solving a linear system in every iteration. Thus, an approximation of the proposed method via quasi-Newton update is constructed. Numerical results indicate that the new method is more effective and practical.

  15. Testing Optimal Foraging Theory Using Bird Predation on Goldenrod Galls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    All animals must make choices regarding what foods to eat, where to eat, and how much time to spend feeding. Optimal foraging theory explains these behaviors in terms of costs and benefits. This laboratory exercise focuses on optimal foraging theory by investigating the winter feeding behavior of birds on the goldenrod gall fly by comparing…

  16. Testing Optimal Foraging Theory Using Bird Predation on Goldenrod Galls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahnke, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    All animals must make choices regarding what foods to eat, where to eat, and how much time to spend feeding. Optimal foraging theory explains these behaviors in terms of costs and benefits. This laboratory exercise focuses on optimal foraging theory by investigating the winter feeding behavior of birds on the goldenrod gall fly by comparing…

  17. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  18. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations. PMID:27725688

  19. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems.

    PubMed

    van Frank, S; Bonneau, M; Schmiedmayer, J; Hild, S; Gross, C; Cheneau, M; Bloch, I; Pichler, T; Negretti, A; Calarco, T; Montangero, S

    2016-10-11

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  20. Nonsmooth Optimization Algorithms, System Theory, and Software Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-13

    Solving Optimal Control Problems with...and D. Q. Mayne, "A Method of Centers Based on Barrier Functions for Solving Optimal Control Problems with Continuum State and Con- trol Constraints...Barrier Functions for Solving Optimal Control Problems with Continuum State and Con- trol Constraints", SIAMJ. Control and Opt., Vol.31, No. 1. pp

  1. Optimal control of overdamped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    Nonequilibrium physics encompasses a broad range of natural and synthetic small-scale systems. Optimizing transitions of such systems will be crucial for the development of nanoscale technologies and may reveal the physical principles underlying biological processes at the molecular level. Recent work has demonstrated that when a thermodynamic system is driven away from equilibrium then the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized inverse diffusion tensor. We derive a simple, compact expression for the inverse diffusion tensor that depends solely on equilibrium information for a broad class of potentials. We use this formula to compute the minimal dissipation for two model systems relevant to small-scale information processing and biological molecular motors. In the first model, we optimally erase a single classical bit of information modeled by an overdamped particle in a smooth double-well potential. In the second model, we find the minimal dissipation of a simple molecular motor model coupled to an optical trap. In both models, we find that the minimal dissipation for the optimal protocol of duration τ is proportional to 1 /τ , as expected, though the dissipation for the erasure model takes a different form than what we found previously for a similar system.

  2. An Affect Control Theory of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Affect control theory is a theory of interaction that takes into account cultural meanings. Affect control research has previously considered interaction with technology, but there remains a lack of theorizing about inclusion of technology within the theory. This paper lays a foundation for an affect control theory of technology by addressing key…

  3. HCCI Engine Optimization and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Rolf D. Reitz

    2005-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop methods to optimize and control Homogeneous-Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines, with emphasis on diesel-fueled engines. HCCI offers the potential of nearly eliminating IC engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over Compression Ignition Direct Injection engines (CIDI) by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The project was initiated in January, 2002, and the present report is the final report for work conducted on the project through December 31, 2004. Periodic progress has also been reported at bi-annual working group meetings held at USCAR, Detroit, MI, and at the Sandia National Laboratories. Copies of these presentation materials are available on CD-ROM, as distributed by the Sandia National Labs. In addition, progress has been documented in DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Progress Reports for FY 2002, 2003 and 2004. These reports are included as the Appendices in this Final report.

  4. Aerospace plane guidance using geometric control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Mark A.; Mease, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    A reduced-order method employing decomposition, based on time-scale separation, of the 4-D state space in a 2-D slow manifold and a family of 2-D fast manifolds is shown to provide an excellent approximation to the full-order minimum-fuel ascent trajectory. Near-optimal guidance is obtained by tracking the reduced-order trajectory. The tracking problem is solved as regulation problems on the family of fast manifolds, using the exact linearization methodology from nonlinear geometric control theory. The validity of the overall guidance approach is indicated by simulation.

  5. Pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions and second-order sensitivity relations in optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowska, Hélène; Hoehener, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions for the Mayer problem arising in optimal control theory. We first show that with every optimal trajectory it is possible to associate a solution p (ṡ) of the adjoint system (as in the Pontryagin maximum principle) and a matrix solution W (ṡ) of an adjoint matrix differential equation that satisfy a second-order transversality condition and a second-order maximality condition. These conditions seem to be a natural second-order extension of the maximum principle. We then prove a Jacobson like necessary optimality condition for general control systems and measurable optimal controls that may be only ;partially singular; and may take values on the boundary of control constraints. Finally we investigate the second-order sensitivity relations along optimal trajectories involving both p (ṡ) and W (ṡ).

  6. Dynamics systems vs. optimal control--a unifying view.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Stefan; Mohajerian, Peyman; Ijspeert, Auke

    2007-01-01

    In the past, computational motor control has been approached from at least two major frameworks: the dynamic systems approach and the viewpoint of optimal control. The dynamic system approach emphasizes motor control as a process of self-organization between an animal and its environment. Nonlinear differential equations that can model entrainment and synchronization behavior are among the most favorable tools of dynamic systems modelers. In contrast, optimal control approaches view motor control as the evolutionary or development result of a nervous system that tries to optimize rather general organizational principles, e.g., energy consumption or accurate task achievement. Optimal control theory is usually employed to develop appropriate theories. Interestingly, there is rather little interaction between dynamic systems and optimal control modelers as the two approaches follow rather different philosophies and are often viewed as diametrically opposing. In this paper, we develop a computational approach to motor control that offers a unifying modeling framework for both dynamic systems and optimal control approaches. In discussions of several behavioral experiments and some theoretical and robotics studies, we demonstrate how our computational ideas allow both the representation of self-organizing processes and the optimization of movement based on reward criteria. Our modeling framework is rather simple and general, and opens opportunities to revisit many previous modeling results from this novel unifying view.

  7. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  8. Optimization of structure and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khot, N. S.; Grandhi, Ramana V.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study is the simultaneous design of the structural and control system for space structures. This study is focused on considering the effect of the number and the location of the actuators on the minimum weight of the structure, and the total work done by the actuators for specified constraints and disturbance. The controls approach used is the linear quadratic regulator theory with constant feedback. At the beginning collocated actuators and sensors are provided in all the elements. The actuator doing the least work is removed one at a time, and the structure is optimized for the specified constraints on the closed-loop eigenvalues and the damping parameters. The procedure of eliminating an actuator is continued until an acceptable design satisfying the constraints is obtained. The study draws some conclusions on the trade between the total work done by the actuators, and the optimum weight and the number of actuators.

  9. H-Infinity-Optimal Control for Distributed Parameter Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    F. Callier and C.A. Desoer , "An Algebra of Transfer Functions for Distributed Linear Time-Invariant Systems," IEEE Trans. Circuits Syst., Sept. 1978...neeuey and -f by blog* nu"bM) This report describes progress in the development and application of H-infinity-optimal control theory to distributed...parameter systems. This research is intended to develop both theory and algorithms capable of providing realistic control systems for physical plants which

  10. New Applications of Variational Analysis to Optimization and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordukhovich, Boris S.

    We discuss new applications of advanced tools of variational analysis and generalized differentiation to a number of important problems in optimization theory, equilibria, optimal control, and feedback control design. The presented results are largely based on the recent work by the author and his collaborators. Among the main topics considered and briefly surveyed in this paper are new calculus rules for generalized differentiation of nonsmooth and set-valued mappings; necessary and sufficient conditions for new notions of linear subextremality and suboptimality in constrained problems; optimality conditions for mathematical problems with equilibrium constraints; necessary optimality conditions for optimistic bilevel programming with smooth and nonsmooth data; existence theorems and optimality conditions for various notions of Pareto-type optimality in problems of multiobjective optimization with vector-valued and set-valued cost mappings; Lipschitzian stability and metric regularity aspects for constrained and variational systems.

  11. Fuzzy logic control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng [West Hartford, CT

    2012-04-17

    A control system (300) for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input signal (369) and an output for outputting an output signal (367), and a hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) operably connected to the chemical loop. The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) includes a plurality of fuzzy controllers (330). The hierarchical fuzzy control system (400) receives the output signal (367), optimizes the input signal (369) based on the received output signal (367), and outputs an optimized input signal (369) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  12. Applying new optimization algorithms to more predictive control

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    The connections between optimization and control theory have been explored by many researchers and optimization algorithms have been applied with success to optimal control. The rapid pace of developments in model predictive control has given rise to a host of new problems to which optimization has yet to be applied. Concurrently, developments in optimization, and especially in interior-point methods, have produced a new set of algorithms that may be especially helpful in this context. In this paper, we reexamine the relatively simple problem of control of linear processes subject to quadratic objectives and general linear constraints. We show how new algorithms for quadratic programming can be applied efficiently to this problem. The approach extends to several more general problems in straightforward ways.

  13. Control optimization of the cryoplant warm compressor station for EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, M.; Hu, L. B.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-29

    The cryogenic control system for EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) was designed based on DeltaV DCS of Emerson Corporation. The automatic control of the cryoplant warm compressors has been implemented. However, with ever-degrading performance of critical equipment, the cryoplant operation in the partial design conditions makes the control system fluctuate and unstable. In this paper, the warm compressor control system was optimized to eliminate the pressure oscillation based on the expert PID theory.

  14. Optimal digital redesign of cascaded analogue controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.; Decrocq, B. B.; Zhang, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a new, optimal digital redesign technique for finding an optimal cascaded digital controller from the given continuous-time counterpart by minimizing a quadratic performance index. The control gains can be obtained by solving a set of Liapunov equations. The developed optimal cascaded digital controller enables the state and/or outputs of the digitally controlled closed-loop sampled-data system to optimally match those of the original continuous-time closed-loop system at any instant between sampling periods. The developed control law can be implemented using inexpensive and reliable digital electronics with a relatively long sampling period.

  15. Linear quadratic optimal control for symmetric systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. H.; Martin, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Special symmetries are present in many control problems. This paper addresses the problem of determining linear-quadratic optimal control problems whose solutions preserve the symmetry of the initial linear control system.

  16. The neural optimal control hierarchy for motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, T.; Eliasmith, C.

    2011-10-01

    Our empirical, neuroscientific understanding of biological motor systems has been rapidly growing in recent years. However, this understanding has not been systematically mapped to a quantitative characterization of motor control based in control theory. Here, we attempt to bridge this gap by describing the neural optimal control hierarchy (NOCH), which can serve as a foundation for biologically plausible models of neural motor control. The NOCH has been constructed by taking recent control theoretic models of motor control, analyzing the required processes, generating neurally plausible equivalent calculations and mapping them on to the neural structures that have been empirically identified to form the anatomical basis of motor control. We demonstrate the utility of the NOCH by constructing a simple model based on the identified principles and testing it in two ways. First, we perturb specific anatomical elements of the model and compare the resulting motor behavior with clinical data in which the corresponding area of the brain has been damaged. We show that damaging the assigned functions of the basal ganglia and cerebellum can cause the movement deficiencies seen in patients with Huntington's disease and cerebellar lesions. Second, we demonstrate that single spiking neuron data from our model's motor cortical areas explain major features of single-cell responses recorded from the same primate areas. We suggest that together these results show how NOCH-based models can be used to unify a broad range of data relevant to biological motor control in a quantitative, control theoretic framework.

  17. Nearly optimal quantum control: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Saxena, Avadh; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2017-09-01

    We propose nearly optimal control strategies for changing the states of a quantum system. We argue that quantum control optimization can be studied analytically within some protocol families that depend on a small set of parameters for optimization. This optimization strategy can be preferred in practice because it is physically transparent and does not lead to combinatorial complexity in multistate problems. As a demonstration, we design optimized control protocols that achieve switching between orthogonal states of a naturally biased quantum two-level system.

  18. Neural dynamic optimization for control systems. I. Background.

    PubMed

    Seong, C Y; Widrow, B

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents neural dynamic optimization (NDO) as a method of optimal feedback control for nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) systems. The main feature of NDO is that it enables neural networks to approximate the optimal feedback solution whose existence dynamic programming (DP) justifies, thereby reducing the complexities of computation and storage problems of the classical methods such as DP. This paper mainly describes the background and motivations for the development of NDO, while the two other subsequent papers of this topic present the theory of NDO and demonstrate the method with several applications including control of autonomous vehicles and of a robot arm, respectively.

  19. Stability and optimal parameters for continuous feedback chaos control.

    PubMed

    Kouomou, Y Chembo; Woafo, P

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the conditions under which an optimal continuous feedback control can be achieved. Chaotic oscillations in the single-well Duffing model, with either a positive or a negative nonlinear stiffness term, are tuned to their related Ritz approximation. The Floquet theory enables the stability analysis of the control. Critical values of the feedback control coefficient fulfilling the optimization criteria are derived. The influence of the chosen target orbit, of the feedback coefficient, and of the onset time of control on its duration is discussed. The analytic approach is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  20. Backward bifurcation and optimal control of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria with direct transmission is developed. The model is analyzed using dynamical system techniques and it shows that the backward bifurcation occurs for some range of parameters. The model is extended to assess the impact of time dependent preventive (biological and chemical control) against the mosquitoes and vaccination for susceptible humans, while treatment for infected humans. The existence of optimal control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations of the problem, suggest that applying the four control measure can effectively reduce if not eliminate the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi in a community.

  1. Optimal singular control with applications to trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of the problem of singular control is presented. Singular control enters an optimal trajectory when the so called switching function vanishes identically over a finite time interval. Using the concept of domain of maneuverability, the problem of optical switching is analyzed. Criteria for the optimal direction of switching are presented. The switching, or junction, between nonsingular and singular subarcs is examined in detail. Several theorems concerning the necessary, and also sufficient conditions for smooth junction are presented. The concepts of quasi-linear control and linearized control are introduced. They are designed for the purpose of obtaining approximate solution for the difficult Euler-Lagrange type of optimal control in the case where the control is nonlinear.

  2. Optimal digestion theory does not predict the effect of pathogens on intestinal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Venesky, Matthew D; Hanlon, Shane M; Lynch, Kyle; Parris, Matthew J; Rohr, Jason R

    2013-04-23

    One prediction of optimal digestion theory is that organisms will increase the relative length of their digestive tracts when food resources become limited. We used theory of optimal digestion to test whether tadpoles can adjust the relative length of their intestines when challenged with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). The degree of tadpole mouthpart damage, a symptom of Bd infections that reduces food consumption, was associated positively with the length of tadpole intestines relative to their body size, consistent with optimal digestion theory. After controlling for mouthpart damage, tadpoles exposed to Bd had shorter intestines relative to their body size, opposite to the predictions of optimal digestion theory. One explanation of why tadpoles with higher Bd loads have shorter relative intestinal lengths is that they divert energy from maintaining intestinal and overall growth towards anti-parasite defences.

  3. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  4. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    PubMed Central

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-01-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights. PMID:27067020

  5. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-12

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  6. Optimal control of raw timber production processes

    Treesearch

    Ivan Kolenka

    1978-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the possibility of optimal planning and control of timber harvesting activ-ities with mathematical optimization models. The separate phases of timber harvesting are represented by coordinated models which can be used to select the optimal decision for the execution of any given phase. The models form a system whose components are connected and...

  7. Control Theory for Autonomously Guided Missile Platforms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-15

    Observations," in Advances in Filtering and Optimal Stochastic Control, W. Fleming and L.G. Gorostiza (edts.), Lecture Notes in Control and Information...Coefficients," in Advances in Filtering and Optimal Stochastic Control,4 ’ W. Fleming and L.G. Gorostiza (edts.), Lecture A., Notes in Control and

  8. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  9. Geometric Computational Mechanics and Optimal Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-02

    methods. Further methods that depend on global optimization problems are in development and preliminary versions of these results, many of which...de la Sociedad Espanola de Matimatica Aplicada (SeMA), 50, 2010, pp 61-81. K. Flaßkamp, S. Ober-Blöbaum, M. Kobilarov, Solving optimal control...continuous setting. Consequently, globally optimal methods for computing optimal trajectories for vehicles with complex dynamics were developed. The

  10. Integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition is presented. It is shown that several previously reported methods were actually partial decompositions wherein only the control was decomposed into a subsystem design. One of these partially decomposed problems was selected as a benchmark example for comparison. The present paper fully decomposes the system into structural and control subsystem designs and produces an improved design. Theory, implementation, and results for the method are presented and compared with the benchmark example.

  11. Integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition is presented. It is shown that several previously reported methods were actually partial decompositions wherein only the control was decomposed into a subsystem design. One of these partially decomposed problems was selected as a benchmark example for comparison. The system is fully decomposed into structural and control subsystem designs and an improved design is produced. Theory, implementation, and results for the method are presented and compared with the benchmark example.

  12. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  13. Optimal control of wind turbines in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, optimal control theory was combined with large-eddy simulations to study the optimal control of wind farms and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer. The individual turbine's induction factors were dynamically controlled in time with the aim of increasing overall power extraction. In these studies, wind turbines were represented using an actuator disk method. In the current work, we focus on optimal control on a much finer mesh (and a smaller computational domain), representing turbines with an actuator line method. Similar to Refs., optimization is performed using a gradient-based method, and gradients are obtained employing an adjoint formulation. Different cases are investigated, that include a single and a double turbine case both with uniform inflow, and with turbulent-boundary-layer inflow. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  14. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  15. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  16. Lie Algebroids in Classical Mechanics and Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Eduardo

    2007-03-01

    We review some recent results on the theory of Lagrangian systems on Lie algebroids. In particular we consider the symplectic and variational formalism and we study reduction. Finally we also consider optimal control systems on Lie algebroids and we show how to reduce Pontryagin maximum principle.

  17. Towards a general theory of optimal testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pericchi, Luis R. G.; Pereira, Carlos A. B.

    2012-10-01

    In Pericchi and Pereira [1] it is argued against the traditional way on which testing is based on fixed significance level, either using p-values (with fixed levels of evidence, like the 5% rule) or α values. We instead, follow an approach put forward by [2], on which an optimal test is chosen by minimizing type I and type II errors. Morris DeGroot in his authoritative book [2], Probability and Statistics 2nd Edition, stated that it is more reasonable to minimize a weighted sum of Type I and Type II error than to specify a value of type I error and then minimize Type II error. He showed it beyond reasonable doubt, but only in the very restrictive scenario of simple VS simple hypothesis, and it is not clear how to generalize it. We propose here a very natural generalization for composite hypothesis, by using general weight functions in the parameter space. This was also the position taken by [3, 4, 5]. We show, in a parallel manner to DeGroot's proof and Pereira's discussion, that the optimal test statistics are Bayes Factors, when the weighting functions are priors with mass on the whole parameter space. On the other hand when the weight functions are point masses in specific parameter values of practical significance, then a procedure is designed for which the sum of Type I error and Type II error in the specified points of practical significance is minimized. This can be seen as bridge between Bayesian Statistics and a new version of Hypothesis testing, more in line with statistical consistency and scientific insight.

  18. Optimal emission control strategies for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Costanza, V.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    A study of certain aspects of the selection of reactive hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide emission reductions for photochemical oxidant abatement is carried out. Optimal emission control paths are defined as those minimizing a total cost function consisting of control cost and ozone dosage contributions. Los Angeles County ozone air quality and control cost data are used to formulate an optimal emission reduction path. The analysis is presented primarily to provide insight into the factors involved in designing oxidant control strategies.

  19. Optimal control design of pulse shapes as analytic functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Gershenzon, Naum I

    2010-06-01

    Representing NMR pulse shapes by analytic functions is widely employed in procedures for optimizing performance. Insights concerning pulse dynamics can be applied to the choice of appropriate functions that target specific performance criteria, focusing the solution search and reducing the space of possible pulse shapes that must be considered to a manageable level. Optimal control theory can accommodate significantly larger parameter spaces and has been able to tackle problems of much larger scope than more traditional optimization methods. However, its numerically generated pulses, as currently constructed, do not readily incorporate the capabilities of particular functional forms, and the pulses are not guaranteed to vary smoothly in time, which can be a problem for faithful implementation on older hardware. An optimal control methodology is derived for generating pulse shapes as simple parameterized functions. It combines the benefits of analytic and numerical protocols in a single powerful algorithm that both complements and enhances existing optimization strategies.

  20. Symmetries in the Optimal Control of Solar Sail Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Hall, C. D.

    2005-08-01

    The theory of optimal control is applied to obtain minimum-time trajectories for solar sail spacecraft for interplanetary missions. We consider the gravitational and solar radiation forces due to the Sun. The spacecraft is modelled as a flat sail of mass m and surface area A and is treated dynamically as a point mass. Coplanar circular orbits are assumed for the planets. We obtain optimal trajectories for several interrelated problem families and develop symmetry properties that can be used to simplify the solution-finding process. For the minimum-time planet rendezvous problem we identify different solution branches resulting in multiple solutions to the associated boundary value problem. We solve the optimal control problem via an indirect method using an efficient cascaded computational scheme. The global optimizer uses a technique called Adaptive Simulated Annealing. Newton and Quasi-Newton Methods perform the terminal fine tuning of the optimization parameters.

  1. Time-optimal control of rolling bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perantoni, Giacomo; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2013-11-01

    The brachistochrone problem is usually solved in classical mechanics courses using the calculus of variations, although it is quintessentially an optimal control problem. In this paper, we address the classical brachistochrone problem and two vehicle-relevant generalisations from an optimal control perspective. We use optimal control arguments to derive closed-form solutions for both the optimal trajectory and the minimum achievable transit time for these generalisations. We then study optimal control problems involving a steerable disc rolling between prescribed points on the interior surface of a hemisphere. The effects of boundary and control constraints are examined. For three-dimensional problems of this type, which involve rolling bodies and nonholonomic constraints, numerical solutions are used.

  2. Lie theory and control systems defined on spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that in constructing a theory for the most elementary class of control problems defined on spheres, some results from the Lie theory play a natural role. To understand controllability, optimal control, and certain properties of stochastic equations, Lie theoretic ideas are needed. The framework considered here is the most natural departure from the usual linear system/vector space problems which have dominated control systems literature. For this reason results are compared with those previously available for the finite dimensional vector space case.

  3. Network anomaly detection system with optimized DS evidence theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    Network anomaly detection has been focused on by more people with the fast development of computer network. Some researchers utilized fusion method and DS evidence theory to do network anomaly detection but with low performance, and they did not consider features of network-complicated and varied. To achieve high detection rate, we present a novel network anomaly detection system with optimized Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (ODS) and regression basic probability assignment (RBPA) function. In this model, we add weights for each sensor to optimize DS evidence theory according to its previous predict accuracy. And RBPA employs sensor's regression ability to address complex network. By four kinds of experiments, we find that our novel network anomaly detection model has a better detection rate, and RBPA as well as ODS optimization methods can improve system performance significantly.

  4. Network Anomaly Detection System with Optimized DS Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    Network anomaly detection has been focused on by more people with the fast development of computer network. Some researchers utilized fusion method and DS evidence theory to do network anomaly detection but with low performance, and they did not consider features of network—complicated and varied. To achieve high detection rate, we present a novel network anomaly detection system with optimized Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (ODS) and regression basic probability assignment (RBPA) function. In this model, we add weights for each senor to optimize DS evidence theory according to its previous predict accuracy. And RBPA employs sensor's regression ability to address complex network. By four kinds of experiments, we find that our novel network anomaly detection model has a better detection rate, and RBPA as well as ODS optimization methods can improve system performance significantly. PMID:25254258

  5. Unification theory of optimal life histories and linear demographic models in internal stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Life history of organisms is exposed to uncertainty generated by internal and external stochasticities. Internal stochasticity is generated by the randomness in each individual life history, such as randomness in food intake, genetic character and size growth rate, whereas external stochasticity is due to the environment. For instance, it is known that the external stochasticity tends to affect population growth rate negatively. It has been shown in a recent theoretical study using path-integral formulation in structured linear demographic models that internal stochasticity can affect population growth rate positively or negatively. However, internal stochasticity has not been the main subject of researches. Taking account of effect of internal stochasticity on the population growth rate, the fittest organism has the optimal control of life history affected by the stochasticity in the habitat. The study of this control is known as the optimal life schedule problems. In order to analyze the optimal control under internal stochasticity, we need to make use of "Stochastic Control Theory" in the optimal life schedule problem. There is, however, no such kind of theory unifying optimal life history and internal stochasticity. This study focuses on an extension of optimal life schedule problems to unify control theory of internal stochasticity into linear demographic models. First, we show the relationship between the general age-states linear demographic models and the stochastic control theory via several mathematical formulations, such as path-integral, integral equation, and transition matrix. Secondly, we apply our theory to a two-resource utilization model for two different breeding systems: semelparity and iteroparity. Finally, we show that the diversity of resources is important for species in a case. Our study shows that this unification theory can address risk hedges of life history in general age-states linear demographic models.

  6. Optimal control, optimization and asymptotic analysis of Purcell's microswimmer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiezel, Oren; Or, Yizhar

    2016-11-01

    Purcell's swimmer (1977) is a classic model of a three-link microswimmer that moves by performing periodic shape changes. Becker et al. (2003) showed that the swimmer's direction of net motion is reversed upon increasing the stroke amplitude of joint angles. Tam and Hosoi (2007) used numerical optimization in order to find optimal gaits for maximizing either net displacement or Lighthill's energetic efficiency. In our work, we analytically derive leading-order expressions as well as next-order corrections for both net displacement and energetic efficiency of Purcell's microswimmer. Using these expressions enables us to explicitly show the reversal in direction of motion, as well as obtaining an estimate for the optimal stroke amplitude. We also find the optimal swimmer's geometry for maximizing either displacement or energetic efficiency. Additionally, the gait optimization problem is revisited and analytically formulated as an optimal control system with only two state variables, which can be solved using Pontryagin's maximum principle. It can be shown that the optimal solution must follow a "singular arc". Numerical solution of the boundary value problem is obtained, which exactly reproduces Tam and Hosoi's optimal gait.

  7. Control optimization, stabilization and computer algorithms for aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M. (Editor); Willsky, A. S. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The analysis and design of complex multivariable reliable control systems are considered. High performance and fault tolerant aircraft systems are the objectives. A preliminary feasibility study of the design of a lateral control system for a VTOL aircraft that is to land on a DD963 class destroyer under high sea state conditions is provided. Progress in the following areas is summarized: (1) VTOL control system design studies; (2) robust multivariable control system synthesis; (3) adaptive control systems; (4) failure detection algorithms; and (5) fault tolerant optimal control theory.

  8. Application of ant colony optimization to optimal foragaing theory: comparison of simulation and field results

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) refers to the family of algorithms inspired by the behavior of real ants and used to solve combinatorial problems such as the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP).Optimal Foraging Theory (OFT) is an evolutionary principle wherein foraging organisms or insect parasites seek ...

  9. Optimal Fuel Control of a Casting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, R. T.; Ouellet, R.

    Starting with a 60-equation nonlinear dynamic model of the aluminum casting furnace, a model reduction is carried out to obtain a tenth-order model. Then variational calculus is applied to the reduced model to solve a fuel-optimal control problem. It is shown that for the casting furnace, optimal control is possible through the use of a reduced model and the application of appropriate optimization methods. A fuel economy close to 11% is obtained using the optimal fuel flowrate instead of the conventional constant fuel flowrate.

  10. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  12. Correlations in state space can cause sub-optimal adaptation of optimal feedback control models.

    PubMed

    Aprasoff, Jonathan; Donchin, Opher

    2012-04-01

    Control of our movements is apparently facilitated by an adaptive internal model in the cerebellum. It was long thought that this internal model implemented an adaptive inverse model and generated motor commands, but recently many reject that idea in favor of a forward model hypothesis. In theory, the forward model predicts upcoming state during reaching movements so the motor cortex can generate appropriate motor commands. Recent computational models of this process rely on the optimal feedback control (OFC) framework of control theory. OFC is a powerful tool for describing motor control, it does not describe adaptation. Some assume that adaptation of the forward model alone could explain motor adaptation, but this is widely understood to be overly simplistic. However, an adaptive optimal controller is difficult to implement. A reasonable alternative is to allow forward model adaptation to 're-tune' the controller. Our simulations show that, as expected, forward model adaptation alone does not produce optimal trajectories during reaching movements perturbed by force fields. However, they also show that re-optimizing the controller from the forward model can be sub-optimal. This is because, in a system with state correlations or redundancies, accurate prediction requires different information than optimal control. We find that adding noise to the movements that matches noise found in human data is enough to overcome this problem. However, since the state space for control of real movements is far more complex than in our simple simulations, the effects of correlations on re-adaptation of the controller from the forward model cannot be overlooked.

  13. Optimal birth control of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chan, W L; Guo, B Z

    1989-11-01

    The authors studied optimal birth control policies for an age-structured population of McKendrick type which is a distributed parameter system involving 1st order partial differential equations with nonlocal bilinear boundary control. The functional analytic approach of Dubovitskii and Milyutin is adopted in the investigation. Maximum principles for problems with a free end condition and fixed final horizon are developed, and the time optimal control problems, the problem with target sets, and infinite planning horizon case are investigated.

  14. Optimal Quantum Control Using Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method for optimizing quantum control in experimental systems, using a subset of randomized benchmarking measurements to rapidly infer error. This is demonstrated to improve single- and two-qubit gates, minimize gate bleedthrough, where a gate mechanism can cause errors on subsequent gates, and identify control crosstalk in superconducting qubits. This method is able to correct parameters so that control errors no longer dominate and is suitable for automated and closed-loop optimization of experimental systems.

  15. Optimal magnetic attitude control of small spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinsong

    Spacecraft attitude control, using only magnetic coils, suffers from being unable to apply a torque about the axis defined by the magnetic field of the earth. This lack of controllability results in marginal stability, slow slew maneuvering and convergence to equilibrium positions. Currently available control schemes typically require one or more orbits to finish a large angle attitude maneuver, which severely restricts the application of magnetic control in projects requiring fast attitude maneuvers. In this dissertation, the open-loop time-optimal magnetic control is first presented to show the potential performance increase of the magnetic attitude control method. Nonlinear time-varying models with constrained inputs are considered instead of the linearized model generally used. The results show that time-optimal magnetic attitude control can be considerably faster, than the current available control schemes. The inherent weakness of the open-loop method is its lack of robustness; specifically, its response is sensitive to small changes in the system. Two methods, model predictive control and continuous optimization approach, are presented as closed-loop control strategies to increase the robustness of the time-optimal approach. Simulation results show that these two feedback control schemes effectively improve the robustness of the control system. Finally, magnetic attitude regulation after the time-optimal magnetic control is discussed. The main contribution of this work shows that magnetic attitude control is not necessarily slow, as commonly believed, as long as an appropriate control algorithm is applied. The different time-optimal controllers presented show considerable convergence time reduction for large angle attitude maneuvers; which enables magnetic attitude control to be applied to more time-critical applications.

  16. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  17. A note on the adaptive optimal control of ion accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The application of optimal control theory to the computer control system of an ion accelerator facility is presented. The process is shown to consist of mathematical modeling of the underlying process, parameter identification, as well as some design methods of the optimal computer control and the techniques of realizing adaptive control.

  18. Lessons from the quantum control landscape: Robust optimal control of quantum systems and optimal control of nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David Lance

    The control of quantum systems occurs across a broad range of length and energy scales in modern science, and efforts have demonstrated that locating suitable controls to perform a range of objectives has been widely successful. The justification for this success arises from a favorable topology of a quantum control landscape, defined as a mapping of the controls to a cost function measuring the success of the operation. This is summarized in the landscape principle that no suboptimal extrema exist on the landscape for well-suited control problems, explaining a trend of successful optimizations in both theory and experiment. This dissertation explores what additional lessons may be gleaned from the quantum control landscape through numerical and theoretical studies. The first topic examines the experimentally relevant problem of assessing and reducing disturbances due to noise. The local curvature of the landscape is found to play an important role on noise effects in the control of targeted quantum unitary operations, and provides a conceptual framework for assessing robustness to noise. Software for assessing noise effects in quantum computing architectures was also developed and applied to survey the performance of current quantum control techniques for quantum computing. A lack of competition between robustness and perfect unitary control operation was discovered to fundamentally limit noise effects, and highlights a renewed focus upon system engineering for reducing noise. This convergent behavior generally arises for any secondary objective in the situation of high primary objective fidelity. The other dissertation topic examines the utility of quantum control for a class of nonlinear Hamiltonians not previously considered under the landscape principle. Nonlinear Schrodinger equations are commonly used to model the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), one of the largest known quantum objects. Optimizations of BEC dynamics were performed in which the

  19. Role of controllability in optimizing quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Rebing; Hsieh, Michael A.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-06-15

    This paper reveals an important role that controllability plays in the complexity of optimizing quantum control dynamics. We show that the loss of controllability generally leads to multiple locally suboptimal controls when gate fidelity in a quantum control system is maximized, which does not happen if the system is controllable. Such local suboptimal controls may attract an optimization algorithm into a local trap when a global optimal solution is sought, even if the target gate can be perfectly realized. This conclusion results from an analysis of the critical topology of the corresponding quantum control landscape, which refers to the gate fidelity objective as a functional of the control fields. For uncontrollable systems, due to SU(2) and SU(3) dynamical symmetries, the control landscape corresponding to an implementable target gate is proven to possess multiple locally optimal critical points, and its ruggedness can be further increased if the target gate is not realizable. These results imply that the optimization of quantum dynamics can be seriously impeded when operating with local search algorithms under these conditions, and thus full controllability is demanded.

  20. Optimal energy growth and optimal control in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guégan, Alan; Schmid, Peter J.; Huerre, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    The objective of the study is first to examine the optimal transient growth of Görtler Hämmerlin perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow. This configuration constitutes a model of the flow in the attachment-line boundary layer at the leading-edge of swept wings. The optimal blowing and suction at the wall which minimizes the energy of the optimal perturbations is then determined. An adjoint-based optimization procedure applicable to both problems is devised, which relies on the maximization or minimization of a suitable objective functional. The variational analysis is carried out in the framework of the set of linear partial differential equations governing the chordwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations. Energy amplifications of up to three orders of magnitude are achieved at low spanwise wavenumbers (k {˜} 0.1) and large sweep Reynolds number (textit{Re} {˜} 2000). Optimal perturbations consist of spanwise travelling chordwise vortices, with a vorticity distribution which is inclined against the sweep. Transient growth arises from the tilting of the vorticity distribution by the spanwise shear via a two-dimensional Orr mechanism acting in the basic flow dividing plane. Two distinct regimes have been identified: for k {≤sssim} 0.25, vortex dipoles are formed which induce large spanwise perturbation velocities; for k {gtrsim} 0.25, dipoles are not observed and only the Orr mechanism remains active. The optimal wall blowing control yields for instance an 80% decrease of the maximum perturbation kinetic energy reached by optimal disturbances at textit{Re} {=} 550 and k {=} 0.25. The optimal wall blowing pattern consists of spanwise travelling waves which follow the naturally occurring vortices and qualitatively act in the same manner as a more simple constant gain feedback control strategy.

  1. Performance investigation of multigrid optimization for DNS-based optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Cornelia; Vandewalle, Stefan; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Optimal control theory in Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flow involves large computational cost and memory overhead for the optimization of the controls. In this context, the minimization of the cost functional is typically achieved by employing gradient-based iterative methods such as quasi-Newton, truncated Newton or non-linear conjugate gradient. In the current work, we investigate the multigrid optimization strategy (MGOpt) in order to speed up the convergence of the damped L-BFGS algorithm for DNS-based optimal control problems. The method consists in a hierarchy of optimization problems defined on different representation levels aiming to reduce the computational resources associated with the cost functional improvement on the finest level. We examine the MGOpt efficiency for the optimization of an internal volume force distribution with the goal of reducing the turbulent kinetic energy or increasing the energy extraction in a turbulent wall-bounded flow; problems that are respectively related to drag reduction in boundary layers, or energy extraction in large wind farms. Results indicate that in some cases the multigrid optimization method requires up to a factor two less DNS and adjoint DNS than single-grid damped L-BFGS. The authors acknowledge support from OPTEC (OPTimization in Engineering Center of Excellence, KU Leuven, Grant No PFV/10/002).

  2. Unification Theory of Optimal Life Histories and Linear Demographic Models in Internal Stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Oizumi, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Life history of organisms is exposed to uncertainty generated by internal and external stochasticities. Internal stochasticity is generated by the randomness in each individual life history, such as randomness in food intake, genetic character and size growth rate, whereas external stochasticity is due to the environment. For instance, it is known that the external stochasticity tends to affect population growth rate negatively. It has been shown in a recent theoretical study using path-integral formulation in structured linear demographic models that internal stochasticity can affect population growth rate positively or negatively. However, internal stochasticity has not been the main subject of researches. Taking account of effect of internal stochasticity on the population growth rate, the fittest organism has the optimal control of life history affected by the stochasticity in the habitat. The study of this control is known as the optimal life schedule problems. In order to analyze the optimal control under internal stochasticity, we need to make use of “Stochastic Control Theory” in the optimal life schedule problem. There is, however, no such kind of theory unifying optimal life history and internal stochasticity. This study focuses on an extension of optimal life schedule problems to unify control theory of internal stochasticity into linear demographic models. First, we show the relationship between the general age-states linear demographic models and the stochastic control theory via several mathematical formulations, such as path–integral, integral equation, and transition matrix. Secondly, we apply our theory to a two-resource utilization model for two different breeding systems: semelparity and iteroparity. Finally, we show that the diversity of resources is important for species in a case. Our study shows that this unification theory can address risk hedges of life history in general age-states linear demographic models. PMID:24945258

  3. "Cruel Optimism" and Contemporary Australian Critical Theory in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2015-01-01

    "Cruel optimism" is a term coined by Lauren Berlant. In conceptualizing this term, Berlant draws on the resources of critical theory to interrogate people's desires for things they think may improve their lot, but actually act as obstacles to flourishing. This notion may be useful for analysing the current state of education in…

  4. Evaluating Student Assessments: The Use of Optimal Foraging Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, W. Brian

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of optimal foraging theory and the marginal value theorem are used to investigate possible student behaviour in accruing marks in various forms of assessment. The ideas of predator energy consumption, handling and search times can be evaluated in terms of student behaviour and gaining marks or "attainment". These ideas can…

  5. Minimax D-Optimal Designs for Item Response Theory Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Martjin P. F.; King, C. Y. Joy; Wong, Weng Kee

    2000-01-01

    Proposed minimax designs for item response theory (IRT) models to overcome the problem of local optimality. Compared minimax designs to sequentially constructed designs for the two parameter logistic model. Results show that minimax designs can be nearly as efficient as sequentially constructed designs. (Author/SLD)

  6. What Optimizes Moral Development and Behavior? Where the Theories Converge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Thomas

    This paper attempts to find some similiarities among different theories of moral development, presenting a literature review of research and a comparative analysis of results on three questions. The questions considered are: (1) What is the role of cognitive competence in moral development and what optimizes the cognitive aspects of moral growth?…

  7. Evaluating Student Assessments: The Use of Optimal Foraging Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, W. Brian

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of optimal foraging theory and the marginal value theorem are used to investigate possible student behaviour in accruing marks in various forms of assessment. The ideas of predator energy consumption, handling and search times can be evaluated in terms of student behaviour and gaining marks or "attainment". These ideas can…

  8. "Cruel Optimism" and Contemporary Australian Critical Theory in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2015-01-01

    "Cruel optimism" is a term coined by Lauren Berlant. In conceptualizing this term, Berlant draws on the resources of critical theory to interrogate people's desires for things they think may improve their lot, but actually act as obstacles to flourishing. This notion may be useful for analysing the current state of education in…

  9. Direct Optimal Control of Duffing Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Ramsey, John K.

    2002-01-01

    The "direct control method" is a novel concept that is an attractive alternative and competitor to the differential-equation-based methods. The direct method is equally well applicable to nonlinear, linear, time-varying, and time-invariant systems. For all such systems, the method yields explicit closed-form control laws based on minimization of a quadratic control performance measure. We present an application of the direct method to the dynamics and optimal control of the Duffing system where the control performance measure is not restricted to a quadratic form and hence may include a quartic energy term. The results we present in this report also constitute further generalizations of our earlier work in "direct optimal control methodology." The approach is demonstrated for the optimal control of the Duffing equation with a softening nonlinear stiffness.

  10. A Danger-Theory-Based Immune Network Optimization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Xiao, Xin; Shi, Yuanquan

    2013-01-01

    Existing artificial immune optimization algorithms reflect a number of shortcomings, such as premature convergence and poor local search ability. This paper proposes a danger-theory-based immune network optimization algorithm, named dt-aiNet. The danger theory emphasizes that danger signals generated from changes of environments will guide different levels of immune responses, and the areas around danger signals are called danger zones. By defining the danger zone to calculate danger signals for each antibody, the algorithm adjusts antibodies' concentrations through its own danger signals and then triggers immune responses of self-regulation. So the population diversity can be maintained. Experimental results show that the algorithm has more advantages in the solution quality and diversity of the population. Compared with influential optimization algorithms, CLONALG, opt-aiNet, and dopt-aiNet, the algorithm has smaller error values and higher success rates and can find solutions to meet the accuracies within the specified function evaluation times. PMID:23483853

  11. Optimal control problems with switching points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seywald, Hans

    1991-09-01

    An overview is presented of the problems and difficulties that arise in solving optimal control problems with switching points. A brief discussion of existing optimality conditions is given and a numerical approach for solving the multipoint boundary value problems associated with the first-order necessary conditions of optimal control is presented. Two real-life aerospace optimization problems are treated explicitly. These are altitude maximization for a sounding rocket (Goddard Problem) in the presence of a dynamic pressure limit, and range maximization for a supersonic aircraft flying in the vertical, also in the presence of a dynamic pressure limit. In the second problem singular control appears along arcs with active dynamic pressure limit, which in the context of optimal control, represents a first-order state inequality constraint. An extension of the Generalized Legendre-Clebsch Condition to the case of singular control along state/control constrained arcs is presented and is applied to the aircraft range maximization problem stated above. A contribution to the field of Jacobi Necessary Conditions is made by giving a new proof for the non-optimality of conjugate paths in the Accessory Minimum Problem. Because of its simple and explicit character, the new proof may provide the basis for an extension of Jacobi's Necessary Condition to the case of the trajectories with interior point constraints. Finally, the result that touch points cannot occur for first-order state inequality constraints is extended to the case of vector valued control functions.

  12. Optimal free descriptions of many-body theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Christopher J.; Meichanetzidis, Konstantinos; Papić, Zlatko; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2017-04-01

    Interacting bosons or fermions give rise to some of the most fascinating phases of matter, including high-temperature superconductivity, the fractional quantum Hall effect, quantum spin liquids and Mott insulators. Although these systems are promising for technological applications, they also present conceptual challenges, as they require approaches beyond mean-field and perturbation theory. Here we develop a general framework for identifying the free theory that is closest to a given interacting model in terms of their ground-state correlations. Moreover, we quantify the distance between them using the entanglement spectrum. When this interaction distance is small, the optimal free theory provides an effective description of the low-energy physics of the interacting model. Our construction of the optimal free model is non-perturbative in nature; thus, it offers a theoretical framework for investigating strongly correlated systems.

  13. Charge Optimization Theory for Induced-Fit Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The design of ligands with high affinity and specificity remains a fundamental challenge in understanding molecular recognition and developing therapeutic interventions. Charge optimization theory addresses this problem by determining ligand charge distributions that produce the most favorable electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy. The theory has been applied to the design of binding specificity as well. However, the formulations described only treat a rigid ligand—one that does not change conformation upon binding. Here, we extend the theory to treat induced-fit ligands for which the unbound ligand conformation may differ from the bound conformation. We develop a thermodynamic pathway analysis for binding contributions relevant to the theory, and we illustrate application of the theory using HIV-1 protease with our previously designed and validated subnanomolar inhibitor. Direct application of rigid charge optimization approaches to nonrigid cases leads to very favorable intramolecular electrostatic interactions that are physically unreasonable, and analysis shows the ligand charge distribution massively stabilizes the preconformed (bound) conformation over the unbound. After analyzing this case, we provide a treatment for the induced-fit ligand charge optimization problem that produces physically realistic results. The key factor is introducing the constraint that the free energy of the unbound ligand conformation be lower or equal to that of the preconformed ligand structure, which corresponds to the notion that the unbound structure is the ground unbound state. Results not only demonstrate the applicability of this methodology to discovering optimized charge distributions in an induced-fit model, but also provide some insights into the energetic consequences of ligand conformational change on binding. Specifically, the results show that, from an electrostatic perspective, induced-fit binding is not an adaptation designed to enhance binding

  14. Optimal Corrosion Control Treatment Evaluation Technical Recommendations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides technical recommendations that both systems and primacy agencies can use to comply with LCR CCT requirements and effective evaluation and designation of optimal corrosion control treatment (OCCT).

  15. Optimized chaos control with simple limiters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Stoop, R

    2001-01-01

    We present an elementary derivation of chaos control with simple limiters using the logistic map and the Henon map as examples. This derivation provides conditions for optimal stabilization of unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic attractor.

  16. Parameter optimization in AQM controller design to support TCP traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Oliver W.

    2004-09-01

    TCP congestion control mechanism has been widely investigated and deployed on Internet in preventing congestion collapse. We would like to employ modern control theory to specify quantitatively the control performance of the TCP communication system. In this paper, we make use of a commonly used performance index called the Integral of the Square of the Error (ISE), which is a quantitative measure to gauge the performance of a control system. By applying the ISE performance index into the Proportional-plus-Integral controller based on Pole Placement (PI_PP controller) for active queue management (AQM) in IP routers, we can further tune the parameters for the controller to achieve an optimum control minimizing control errors. We have analyzed the dynamic model of the TCP congestion control under this ISE, and used OPNET simulation tool to verify the derived optimized parameters of the controllers.

  17. Optimal disturbance rejecting control of hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Saroj K.; Ahmed, N. U.

    1994-01-01

    Optimal regulation of hyperbolic systems in the presence of unknown disturbances is considered. Necessary conditions for determining the optimal control that tracks a desired trajectory in the presence of the worst possible perturbations are developed. The results also characterize the worst possible disturbance that the system will be able to tolerate before any degradation of the system performance. Numerical results on the control of a vibrating beam are presented.

  18. Optimal control of systems with capacity: Related noises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruan, Milfang; Choudhury, Ajit K.

    1991-01-01

    In the ordinary theory of optimal control (LQR and Kalman filter), the variances of the actuators and the sensors are assumed to be known (not related to the capacities of the devices). This assumption is not true in practice. Generally, a device with greater capacity to exert actuating forces and a sensor capable of sensing greater sensing range will generate noise of greater power spectral density. When the ordinary theory of optimal control is used to estimate the errors of the outputs in such cases it will lead to faulty results, because the capacities of such devices are unknown before the system is designed. The performance of the system designed by the ordinary theory will not be optimal as the variances of the sensors and the actuators are neither known nor constant. The interaction between the control system and structure could be serious because the ordinary method will lead to greater feedback (Kalman gain) matrices. Methods which can optimize the performance of systems when noises of the actuators and the sensors are related to their capacities are developed. These methods will result in smaller feedback (Kalman gain) matrix.

  19. Neuro-optimal control of helicopter UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodland, David; Ghosh, Arpita; Zargarzadeh, H.; Jagannathan, S.

    2011-05-01

    Helicopter UAVs can be extensively used for military missions as well as in civil operations, ranging from multirole combat support and search and rescue, to border surveillance and forest fire monitoring. Helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems with correspondingly challenging controller designs. This paper presents an optimal controller design for the regulation and vertical tracking of an underactuated helicopter using an adaptive critic neural network framework. The online approximator-based controller learns the infinite-horizon continuous-time Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation and then calculates the corresponding optimal control input that minimizes the HJB equation forward-in-time. In the proposed technique, optimal regulation and vertical tracking is accomplished by a single neural network (NN) with a second NN necessary for the virtual controller. Both of the NNs are tuned online using novel weight update laws. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design in hovering applications.

  20. Vibration and noise control using an optimal output feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Young-Hun; Gopinathan, Senthil V.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper the design of an optimal controller using discretely placed collocated sensor/actuator pairs to control the vibration of a plate structure is presented. Three- dimensional finite elements are used to model the smart structure containing discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators by the use of a combination of solid, transition, and shell elements. Since several discrete piezoelectric patches are spatially distributed in the structure to effectively observe and control the vibration of a structure, the system model is thus utilized to design multi-input-multi- output (MIMO) controller. The output feedback controller is then employed to emulate the optimal controller by solving the Riccati equations from modal space model. An optimal controller design for the vibration suppression of a clamped plate is presented for the steady state excitation case. The reduction in the sound pressure level inside an enclosure radiated from this optimally controlled vibrating plate is also estimated.

  1. Linear quadratic optimal controller for cable-driven parallel robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolshah, Saeed; Shojaei Barjuei, Erfan

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, various cable-driven parallel robots have been investigated for their advantages, such as low structural weight, high acceleration, and large work-space, over serial and conventional parallel systems. However, the use of cables lowers the stiffness of these robots, which in turn may decrease motion accuracy. A linear quadratic (LQ) optimal controller can provide all the states of a system for the feedback, such as position and velocity. Thus, the application of such an optimal controller in cable-driven parallel robots can result in more efficient and accurate motion compared to the performance of classical controllers such as the proportional- integral-derivative controller. This paper presents an approach to apply the LQ optimal controller on cable-driven parallel robots. To employ the optimal control theory, the static and dynamic modeling of a 3-DOF planar cable-driven parallel robot (Feriba-3) is developed. The synthesis of the LQ optimal control is described, and the significant experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Gradient optimization and nonlinear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasdorff, L.

    1976-01-01

    The book represents an introduction to computation in control by an iterative, gradient, numerical method, where linearity is not assumed. The general language and approach used are those of elementary functional analysis. The particular gradient method that is emphasized and used is conjugate gradient descent, a well known method exhibiting quadratic convergence while requiring very little more computation than simple steepest descent. Constraints are not dealt with directly, but rather the approach is to introduce them as penalty terms in the criterion. General conjugate gradient descent methods are developed and applied to problems in control.

  3. Stochastic Optimal Control and Linear Programming Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Buckdahn, R.; Goreac, D.; Quincampoix, M.

    2011-04-15

    We study a classical stochastic optimal control problem with constraints and discounted payoff in an infinite horizon setting. The main result of the present paper lies in the fact that this optimal control problem is shown to have the same value as a linear optimization problem stated on some appropriate space of probability measures. This enables one to derive a dual formulation that appears to be strongly connected to the notion of (viscosity sub) solution to a suitable Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. We also discuss relation with long-time average problems.

  4. Applications of robust control theory - Educational implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorato, P.; Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is made of applications of robust control theory to problems of flight control, control of flexible space structures, and engine control which have appeared in recent conferences and journals. An analysis is made of which theoretical techniques are most commonly used and what implications this has for graduate and undergraduate education in aerospace engineering.

  5. An optimal control approach to probabilistic Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2012-12-01

    External control of some genes in a genetic regulatory network is useful for avoiding undesirable states associated with some diseases. For this purpose, a number of stochastic optimal control approaches have been proposed. Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) as powerful tools for modeling gene regulatory systems have attracted considerable attention in systems biology. In this paper, we deal with a problem of optimal intervention in a PBN with the help of the theory of discrete time Markov decision process. Specifically, we first formulate a control model for a PBN as a first passage model for discrete time Markov decision processes and then find, using a value iteration algorithm, optimal effective treatments with the minimal expected first passage time over the space of all possible treatments. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, an example is also displayed.

  6. Applications of fuzzy theories to multi-objective system optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. S.; Dhingra, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the computer aided design techniques developed so far deal with the optimization of a single objective function over the feasible design space. However, there often exist several engineering design problems which require a simultaneous consideration of several objective functions. This work presents several techniques of multiobjective optimization. In addition, a new formulation, based on fuzzy theories, is also introduced for the solution of multiobjective system optimization problems. The fuzzy formulation is useful in dealing with systems which are described imprecisely using fuzzy terms such as, 'sufficiently large', 'very strong', or 'satisfactory'. The proposed theory translates the imprecise linguistic statements and multiple objectives into equivalent crisp mathematical statements using fuzzy logic. The effectiveness of all the methodologies and theories presented is illustrated by formulating and solving two different engineering design problems. The first one involves the flight trajectory optimization and the main rotor design of helicopters. The second one is concerned with the integrated kinematic-dynamic synthesis of planar mechanisms. The use and effectiveness of nonlinear membership functions in fuzzy formulation is also demonstrated. The numerical results indicate that the fuzzy formulation could yield results which are qualitatively different from those provided by the crisp formulation. It is felt that the fuzzy formulation will handle real life design problems on a more rational basis.

  7. System Optimization by Periodic Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    1979-80 the main thrust was in finding finite step algorithms for the Cesaro average payoffs when the law of motion is completely controlled by one...II be numbered as 1,2,...m and 1,2,...n. Let *ij(s) be the expected Cesaro average income if pure stationary strff9 o 0Ymf!F1P AR*% ’rW by NOTI CE CO

  8. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  9. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  10. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  11. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  12. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  13. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    With growing world population, diminishing resources, and realization of the harmful effects of various pollutants, research focus in environmental management has shifted towards sustainability. The goal of a sustainable management strategy is to promote the structure and operati...

  14. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    With growing world population, diminishing resources, and realization of the harmful effects of various pollutants, research focus in environmental management has shifted towards sustainability. The goal of a sustainable management strategy is to promote the structure and operati...

  15. Stochastic Optimal Control via Bellman's Principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Sun, Jian Q.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a method for finding optimal controls of nonlinear systems subject to random excitations. The method is capable to generate global control solutions when state and control constraints are present. The solution is global in the sense that controls for all initial conditions in a region of the state space are obtained. The approach is based on Bellman's Principle of optimality, the Gaussian closure and the Short-time Gaussian approximation. Examples include a system with a state-dependent diffusion term, a system in which the infinite hierarchy of moment equations cannot be analytically closed, and an impact system with a elastic boundary. The uncontrolled and controlled dynamics are studied by creating a Markov chain with a control dependent transition probability matrix via the Generalized Cell Mapping method. In this fashion, both the transient and stationary controlled responses are evaluated. The results show excellent control performances.

  16. Bifurcation and Optimal Stochastic Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    as soon as luX InW w’(0) n L nis boundeI. To sir.iplity the notations, we denote by u = 1 . Without loss of n generality we may assume that c l...Stochastic Control. F O R M I II I • Il I i ,iii i, DD I JAP7 1473 EDITION OF I NOV S IS OSOLE’TE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE i(,en bot. EntereJ) DAT FILMEI DIC

  17. Optimal-control theoretic methods for optimization and regulation of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Jennifer Dawn

    Optimal control and optimization of distributed parameter systems are discussed in the context of a common control framework. The adjoint method of optimization and the traditional linear quadratic regulator implementation of optimal control both employ adjoint or costate variables in the determination of control variable progression. As well both theories benefit from a reduced order model approximation in their execution. This research aims to draw clear parallels between optimization and optimal control utilizing these similarities. Several applications are presented showing the use of adjoint/costate variables and reduced order models in optimization and optimal control problems. The adjoint method for shape optimization is derived and implemented for the quasi-one-dimensional duct and two variations of a two-dimensional double ramp inlet. All applications are governed by the Euler equations. The quasi-one-dimensional duct is solved first to test the adjoint method and to verify the results against an analytical solution. The method is then adapted to solve the shape optimization of the double ramp inlet. A finite volume solver is tested on the flow equations and then implemented for the corresponding adjoint equations. The gradient of the cost function with respect to the shape parameters is derived based on the computed adjoint variables. The same inlet shape optimization problem is then solved using a reduced order model. The basis functions in the reduced order model are computed using the method of snapshots form of proper orthogonal decomposition. The corresponding weights are derived using an optimization in the design parameter space to match the reduced order model to the original snapshots. A continuous map of these weights in terms of the design variables is obtained via a response surface approximations and artificial neural networks. This map is then utilized in an optimization problem to determine the optimal inlet shape. As in the adjoint method

  18. A reliable algorithm for optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, powerful design tools for linear time-invariant multivariable control systems have been developed based on direct parameter optimization. In this report, an algorithm for reliable optimal control synthesis using parameter optimization is presented. Specifically, a robust numerical algorithm is developed for the evaluation of the H(sup 2)-like cost functional and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The method is specifically designed to handle defective degenerate systems and is based on the well-known Pade series approximation of the matrix exponential. Numerical test problems in control synthesis for simple mechanical systems and for a flexible structure with densely packed modes illustrate positively the reliability of this method when compared to a method based on diagonalization. Several types of cost functions have been considered: a cost function for robust control consisting of a linear combination of quadratic objectives for deterministic and random disturbances, and one representing an upper bound on the quadratic objective for worst case initial conditions. Finally, a framework for multivariable control synthesis has been developed combining the concept of closed-loop transfer recovery with numerical parameter optimization. The procedure enables designers to synthesize not only observer-based controllers but also controllers of arbitrary order and structure. Numerical design solutions rely heavily on the robust algorithm due to the high order of the synthesis model and the presence of near-overlapping modes. The design approach is successfully applied to the design of a high-bandwidth control system for a rotorcraft.

  19. Kalman meets neuron - the intersection of control theory and neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Since the 1950s, we have developed mature theories of modern control theory and computational neuroscience with almost no interaction between these disciplines. With the advent of computationally efficient nonlinear Kalman filtering techniques, along with improved neuroscience models which provide increasingly accurate reconstruction of dynamics in a variety of important normal and disease states in the brain, the prospects for a synergistic interaction between these fields are now strong. I will show recent examples of the use of nonlinear control theory for the assimilation and control of single neuron dynamics, a novel framework for dynamic clamp, the modulation of oscillatory wave dynamics in brain cortex, a control framework for Parkinsonian dynamics and seizures, and the use of optimized parameter model networks to assimilate complex network data.

  20. The synthesis of optimal controls for linear, time-optimal problems with retarded controls.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Jacobs, M. Q.; Latina, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Optimization problems involving linear systems with retardations in the controls are studied in a systematic way. Some physical motivation for the problems is discussed. The topics covered are: controllability, existence and uniqueness of the optimal control, sufficient conditions, techniques of synthesis, and dynamic programming. A number of solved examples are presented.

  1. Product Distribution Theory for Control of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chia Fan; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Product Distribution (PD) theory is a new framework for controlling Multi-Agent Systems (MAS's). First we review one motivation of PD theory, as the information-theoretic extension of conventional full-rationality game theory to the case of bounded rational agents. In this extension the equilibrium of the game is the optimizer of a Lagrangian of the (probability distribution of) the joint stare of the agents. Accordingly we can consider a team game in which the shared utility is a performance measure of the behavior of the MAS. For such a scenario the game is at equilibrium - the Lagrangian is optimized - when the joint distribution of the agents optimizes the system's expected performance. One common way to find that equilibrium is to have each agent run a reinforcement learning algorithm. Here we investigate the alternative of exploiting PD theory to run gradient descent on the Lagrangian. We present computer experiments validating some of the predictions of PD theory for how best to do that gradient descent. We also demonstrate how PD theory can improve performance even when we are not allowed to rerun the MAS from different initial conditions, a requirement implicit in some previous work.

  2. Optimal control of the sweeping process over polyhedral controlled sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, G.; Henrion, R.; Nguyen, D. Hoang; Mordukhovich, B. S.

    2016-02-01

    The paper addresses a new class of optimal control problems governed by the dissipative and discontinuous differential inclusion of the sweeping/Moreau process while using controls to determine the best shape of moving convex polyhedra in order to optimize the given Bolza-type functional, which depends on control and state variables as well as their velocities. Besides the highly non-Lipschitzian nature of the unbounded differential inclusion of the controlled sweeping process, the optimal control problems under consideration contain intrinsic state constraints of the inequality and equality types. All of this creates serious challenges for deriving necessary optimality conditions. We develop here the method of discrete approximations and combine it with advanced tools of first-order and second-order variational analysis and generalized differentiation. This approach allows us to establish constructive necessary optimality conditions for local minimizers of the controlled sweeping process expressed entirely in terms of the problem data under fairly unrestrictive assumptions. As a by-product of the developed approach, we prove the strong W 1 , 2-convergence of optimal solutions of discrete approximations to a given local minimizer of the continuous-time system and derive necessary optimality conditions for the discrete counterparts. The established necessary optimality conditions for the sweeping process are illustrated by several examples.

  3. Optimal control alleviation of tilting proprotor gust response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to the design of a control system for alleviation of the gust response of tilting proprotor aircraft. Using a proprotor and cantilever wing analytical model, the uncontrolled and controlled gust response is examined over the entire operating range of the aircraft except for hover: helicopter mode, conversion, and airplane mode flight. Substantial improvements in the loads, ride quality, and aeroelastic stability are possible with a properly designed controller. A single controller, nominally optimal only at the design point speed (160 knots here), operated efficiently over the entire speed range, with the possible exception of very low speed in helicopter mode. Kalman-Bucy filters were used as compensation networks to provide state estimates from various measurements in the wing motion, rotor speed perturbation, and tip-path-plane tilt.

  4. Genetic optimization of fuzzy fractional PD+I controllers.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Isabel S; Barbosa, Ramiro S

    2015-07-01

    Fractional order calculus is a powerful emerging mathematical tool in science and engineering. There is currently an increasing interest in generalizing classical control theories and developing novel control strategies. The genetic algorithms (GA) are a stochastic search and optimization methods based on the reproduction processes found in biological systems, used for solving engineering problems. In the context of process control, the fuzzy logic usually means variables that are described by imprecise terms, and represented by quantities that are qualitative and vague. In this article we consider the development of an optimal fuzzy fractional PD+I controller in which the parameters are tuned by a GA. The performance of the proposed fuzzy fractional control is illustrated through some application examples. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated monotonic convergence of optimal control over quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-08-01

    The control of quantum dynamics is often concerned with finding time-dependent optimal control fields that can take a system from an initial state to a final state to attain the desired value of an observable. This paper presents a general method for formulating monotonically convergent algorithms to iteratively improve control fields. The formulation is based on a two-point boundary-value quantum control paradigm (TBQCP) expressed as a nonlinear integral equation of the first kind arising from dynamical invariant tracking control. TBQCP is shown to be related to various existing techniques, including local control theory, the Krotov method, and optimal control theory. Several accelerated monotonic convergence schemes for iteratively computing control fields are derived based on TBQCP. Numerical simulations are compared with the Krotov method showing that the new TBQCP schemes are efficient and remain monotonically convergent over a wide range of the iteration step parameters and the control pulse lengths, which is attributable to the trap-free character of the transition probability quantum dynamics control landscape.

  6. Computational Methods for Design, Control and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    34scenario" that applies to channel flows ( Poiseuille flows , Couette flow ) and pipe flows . Over the past 75 years many complex "transition theories" have... Simulation of Turbulent Flows , Springer Verlag, 2005. Additional Publications Supported by this Grant 1. J. Borggaard and T. Iliescu, Approximate Deconvolution...rigorous analysis of design algorithms that combine numerical simulation codes, approximate sensitivity calculations and optimization codes. The fundamental

  7. Centralized Stochastic Optimal Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV operation as a controlled Markov chain using the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion online. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The highly variable and intermittent pollutant concentrations and flowrates associated with wet-weather events in combined sewersheds necessitates the use of storage-treatment systems to control pollution.An optimized combined-sewer-overflow (CSO) control system requires a manage...

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The highly variable and intermittent pollutant concentrations and flowrates associated with wet-weather events in combined sewersheds necessitates the use of storage-treatment systems to control pollution.An optimized combined-sewer-overflow (CSO) control system requires a manage...

  10. Quantum parameter estimation with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-07-01

    A pivotal task in quantum metrology, and quantum parameter estimation in general, is to design schemes that achieve the highest precision with the given resources. Standard models of quantum metrology usually assume that the dynamics is fixed and that the highest precision is achieved by preparing the optimal probe states and performing optimal measurements. However, in many practical experimental settings, additional controls are usually available to alter the dynamics. Here we propose to use optimal control methods for further improvement of the precision limit of quantum parameter estimation. We show that, by exploring the additional degree of freedom offered by the controls, a higher-precision limit can be achieved. In particular, we show that the precision limit under the controlled schemes can go beyond the constraints put by the coherent time, which is in contrast with the standard scheme where the precision limit is always bounded by the coherent time.

  11. Control theory and psychopathology: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Warren

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual control theory (PCT; Powers, 1973) is presented and adapted as a framework to understand the causes, maintenance, and treatment of psychological disorders. PCT provides dynamic, working models based on the principle that goal-directed activity arises from a hierarchy of negative feedback loops that control perception through control of the environment. The theory proposes that psychological distress arises from the unresolved conflict between goals. The present paper integrates PCT, control theory, and self-regulatory approaches to psychopathology and psychotherapy and recent empirical findings, particularly in the field of cognitive therapy. The approach aims to offer fresh insights into the role of goal conflict, automatic processes, imagery, perceptual distortion, and loss of control in psychological disorders. Implications for psychological therapy are discussed, including an integration of the existing work on the assessment of control profiles and the use of assertive versus yielding modes of control.

  12. Quantitative Robust Control Engineering: Theory and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    1992). Discrete quantitative feedback technique, Capítulo 16 en el libro : Digital Control Systems: theory, hardware, software, 2ª edicion. McGraw...Rasmussen S.J., Garcia-Sanz, M. (2001, 2005), Software de diseño del libro Quantitative Feedback Theory: Fundamentals and Applications. Edición 2ª. CRCPress

  13. Multiobjective Optimization of Low-Energy Trajectories Using Optimal Control on Dynamical Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, Thomas M.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a computational method to design efficient low-energy trajectories by extracting initial solutions from dynamical channels formed by invariant manifolds, and improving these solutions through variational optimal control. We consider trajectories connecting two unstable periodic orbits in the circular restricted 3-body problem (CR3BP). Our method leverages dynamical channels to generate a range of solutions, and approximates the areto front for impulse and time of flight through a multiobjective optimization of these solutions based on primer vector theory. We demonstrate the application of our method to a libration orbit transfer in the Earth-Moon system.

  14. Multiobjective Optimization of Low-Energy Trajectories Using Optimal Control on Dynamical Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffee, Thomas M.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a computational method to design efficient low-energy trajectories by extracting initial solutions from dynamical channels formed by invariant manifolds, and improving these solutions through variational optimal control. We consider trajectories connecting two unstable periodic orbits in the circular restricted 3-body problem (CR3BP). Our method leverages dynamical channels to generate a range of solutions, and approximates the areto front for impulse and time of flight through a multiobjective optimization of these solutions based on primer vector theory. We demonstrate the application of our method to a libration orbit transfer in the Earth-Moon system.

  15. Mathematical theory of a relaxed design problem in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Noboru; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Various attempts have been made to construct a rigorous mathematical theory of optimization for size, shape, and topology (i.e. layout) of an elastic structure. If these are represented by a finite number of parametric functions, as Armand described, it is possible to construct an existence theory of the optimum design using compactness argument in a finite dimensional design space or a closed admissible set of a finite dimensional design space. However, if the admissible design set is a subset of non-reflexive Banach space such as L(sup infinity)(Omega), construction of the existence theory of the optimum design becomes suddenly difficult and requires to extend (i.e. generalize) the design problem to much more wider class of design that is compatible to mechanics of structures in the sense of variational principle. Starting from the study by Cheng and Olhoff, Lurie, Cherkaev, and Fedorov introduced a new concept of convergence of design variables in a generalized sense and construct the 'G-Closure' theory of an extended (relaxed) optimum design problem. A similar attempt, but independent in large extent, can also be found in Kohn and Strang in which the shape and topology optimization problem is relaxed to allow to use of perforated composites rather than restricting it to usual solid structures. An identical idea is also stated in Murat and Tartar using the notion of the homogenization theory. That is, introducing possibility of micro-scale perforation together with the theory of homogenization, the optimum design problem is relaxed to construct its mathematical theory. It is also noted that this type of relaxed design problem is perfectly matched to the variational principle in structural mechanics.

  16. Optimal control for Rydberg quantum technology building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Matthias M.; Pichler, Thomas; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    We consider a platform for quantum technology based on Rydberg atoms in optical lattices where each atom encodes one qubit of information and external lasers can manipulate their state. We demonstrate how optimal control theory enables the functioning of two specific building blocks on this platform: We engineer an optimal protocol to perform a two-qubit phase gate and to transfer the information within the lattice among specific sites. These two elementary operations allow to design very general operations like storage of atoms and entanglement purification as, for example, needed for quantum repeaters.

  17. Solving inverse problems of identification type by optimal control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S.; Protopopescu, V.; Jiongmin Yong

    1997-06-01

    Inverse problems of identification type for nonlinear equations are considered within the framework of optimal control theory. The rigorous solution of any particular problem depends on the functional setting, type of equation, and unknown quantity (or quantities) to be determined. Here the authors present only the general articulations of the formalism. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g. Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach presents several advantages, namely: (i) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type; (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution; and (iii) a convenient numerical solution of these approximations.

  18. Monotonically convergent optimization in quantum control using Krotov's method.

    PubMed

    Reich, Daniel M; Ndong, Mamadou; Koch, Christiane P

    2012-03-14

    The non-linear optimization method developed by A. Konnov and V. Krotov [Autom. Remote Cont. (Engl. Transl.) 60, 1427 (1999)] has been used previously to extend the capabilities of optimal control theory from the linear to the non-linear Schrödinger equation [S. E. Sklarz and D. J. Tannor, Phys. Rev. A 66, 053619 (2002)]. Here we show that based on the Konnov-Krotov method, monotonically convergent algorithms are obtained for a large class of quantum control problems. It includes, in addition to nonlinear equations of motion, control problems that are characterized by non-unitary time evolution, nonlinear dependencies of the Hamiltonian on the control, time-dependent targets, and optimization functionals that depend to higher than second order on the time-evolving states. We furthermore show that the nonlinear (second order) contribution can be estimated either analytically or numerically, yielding readily applicable optimization algorithms. We demonstrate monotonic convergence for an optimization functional that is an eighth-degree polynomial in the states. For the "standard" quantum control problem of a convex final-time functional, linear equations of motion and linear dependency of the Hamiltonian on the field, the second-order contribution is not required for monotonic convergence but can be used to speed up convergence. We demonstrate this by comparing the performance of first- and second-order algorithms for two examples.

  19. Monotonically convergent optimization in quantum control using Krotov's method

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.; Ndong, Mamadou

    2012-03-14

    The non-linear optimization method developed by A. Konnov and V. Krotov [Autom. Remote Cont. (Engl. Transl.) 60, 1427 (1999)] has been used previously to extend the capabilities of optimal control theory from the linear to the non-linear Schroedinger equation [S. E. Sklarz and D. J. Tannor, Phys. Rev. A 66, 053619 (2002)]. Here we show that based on the Konnov-Krotov method, monotonically convergent algorithms are obtained for a large class of quantum control problems. It includes, in addition to nonlinear equations of motion, control problems that are characterized by non-unitary time evolution, nonlinear dependencies of the Hamiltonian on the control, time-dependent targets, and optimization functionals that depend to higher than second order on the time-evolving states. We furthermore show that the nonlinear (second order) contribution can be estimated either analytically or numerically, yielding readily applicable optimization algorithms. We demonstrate monotonic convergence for an optimization functional that is an eighth-degree polynomial in the states. For the ''standard'' quantum control problem of a convex final-time functional, linear equations of motion and linear dependency of the Hamiltonian on the field, the second-order contribution is not required for monotonic convergence but can be used to speed up convergence. We demonstrate this by comparing the performance of first- and second-order algorithms for two examples.

  20. Control theory meets synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Dy, Aaron J; Qian, Yili

    2016-07-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology.

  1. Control theory meets synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology. PMID:27440256

  2. Integration of Large-Scale Optimization and Game Theory for Sustainable Water Quality Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, J.; Li, J.; Chou, C.; Tung, C.

    2009-12-01

    Sustainable water quality management requires total mass control in pollutant discharge based on both the principles of not exceeding assimilative capacity in a river and equity among generations. The stream assimilative capacity is the carrying capacity of a river for the maximum waste load without violating the water quality standard and the spirit of total mass control is to optimize the waste load allocation in subregions. For the goal of sustainable watershed development, this study will use large-scale optimization theory to optimize the profit, and find the marginal values of loadings as reference of the fair price and then the best way to get the equilibrium by water quality trading for the whole of watershed will be found. On the other hand, game theory plays an important role to maximize both individual and entire profits. This study proves the water quality trading market is available in some situation, and also makes the whole participants get a better outcome.

  3. Advanced rotorcraft control using parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters is presented. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for an optimal linear dynamic output feedback controller that minimizes a finite time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of a accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  4. Neural dynamic optimization for control systems.III. Applications.

    PubMed

    Seong, C Y; Widrow, B

    2001-01-01

    For pt.II. see ibid., p. 490-501. The paper presents neural dynamic optimization (NDO) as a method of optimal feedback control for nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) systems. The main feature of NDO is that it enables neural networks to approximate the optimal feedback solution whose existence dynamic programming (DP) justifies, thereby reducing the complexities of computation and storage problems of the classical methods such as DP. This paper demonstrates NDO with several applications including control of autonomous vehicles and of a robot-arm, while the two other companion papers of this topic describes the background for the development of NDO and present the theory of the method, respectively.

  5. Optimal control of systems with intermediate phase constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichenko, S.B.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, we derive necessary conditions of minimum for the general optimal control problem with the following characteristics: the trajectory is corrected at intermediate time instants using matching relationships; the system dynamics may vary in each time interval; the optimand functional and the functional constraints depend on the intermediate time instants, the momenta, and the phase coordinates of the trajectories. The result is derived by the methods of modern optimization theory and nonsmooth analysis. It is presented in the form of a maximum principle. The specific solution scheme for this problem has been developed in greater detail elsewhere for systems of the form x{sub i}={line_integral}{sub i}(t, x{sub i}). Much of the previous manipulations and results on the structure of the conjugate cone and the form of the directional derivatives are used also in this paper. This is legitimate because the optimized parameters and controls are independent.

  6. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  7. Optimal active control for Burgers equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    A method for active fluid flow control based on control theory is discussed. Dynamic programming and fixed point successive approximations are used to accommodate the nonlinear control problem. The long-term goal of this project is to establish an effective method applicable to complex flows such as turbulence and jets. However, in this report, the method is applied to stochastic Burgers equation as an intermediate step towards this goal. Numerical results are compared with those obtained by gradient search methods.

  8. Multimodel methods for optimal control of aeroacoustics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guoquan; Collis, Samuel Scott

    2005-01-01

    A new multidomain/multiphysics computational framework for optimal control of aeroacoustic noise has been developed based on a near-field compressible Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a far-field linearized Euler solver both based on a discontinuous Galerkin formulation. In this approach, the coupling of near- and far-field domains is achieved by weakly enforcing continuity of normal fluxes across a coupling surface that encloses all nonlinearities and noise sources. For optimal control, gradient information is obtained by the solution of an appropriate adjoint problem that involves the propagation of adjoint information from the far-field to the near-field. This computational framework has been successfully applied to study optimal boundary-control of blade-vortex interaction, which is a significant noise source for helicopters on approach to landing. In the model-problem presented here, the noise propagated toward the ground is reduced by 12dB.

  9. Optimal, real-time control--colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1991-05-01

    With reasonable definitions, optimal control is possible for both classical and quantal systems with new approaches called PISC(Parallel) and NISC(Neural) from analogy with RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing). If control equals interaction, observation and comparison to some figure of merit with interaction via external fields, then optimization comes from varying these fields to give design or operating goals. Structural stability can then give us tolerance and design constraints. But simulations use simplified models, are not in real-time and assume fixed or stationary conditions, so optimal control goes far beyond convergence rates of algorithms. It is inseparable from design and this has many implications for colliders. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Optimal pulse design in quantum control: A unified computational method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jr-Shin; Ruths, Justin; Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Many key aspects of control of quantum systems involve manipulating a large quantum ensemble exhibiting variation in the value of parameters characterizing the system dynamics. Developing electromagnetic pulses to produce a desired evolution in the presence of such variation is a fundamental and challenging problem in this research area. We present such robust pulse designs as an optimal control problem of a continuum of bilinear systems with a common control function. We map this control problem of infinite dimension to a problem of polynomial approximation employing tools from geometric control theory. We then adopt this new notion and develop a unified computational method for optimal pulse design using ideas from pseudospectral approximations, by which a continuous-time optimal control problem of pulse design can be discretized to a constrained optimization problem with spectral accuracy. Furthermore, this is a highly flexible and efficient numerical method that requires low order of discretization and yields inherently smooth solutions. We demonstrate this method by designing effective broadband π/2 and π pulses with reduced rf energy and pulse duration, which show significant sensitivity enhancement at the edge of the spectrum over conventional pulses in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy experiments. PMID:21245345

  11. Quadratic optimal cooperative control synthesis with flight control application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1984-01-01

    An optimal control-law synthesis approach is presented that involves simultaneous solution for two cooperating controllers operating in parallel. One controller's structure includes stochastic state estimation and linear feedback of the state estimates, while the other controller involves direct linear feedback of selected system output measurements. This structure is shown to be optimal under the constraint of linear feedback of system outputs in one controller. Furthermore, it is appropriate for flight control synthesis where the full-state optimal stochastic controller can be adjusted to be representative of an optimal control model of the human pilot in a stochastic regulation task. The method is experimentally verified in the case of the selection of pitch-damper gain for optimum pitch tracking, where optimum implies the best subjective pilot rating in the task. Finally, results from application of the method to synthesize a controller for a multivariable fighter aircraft are presented, and implications of the results of this method regarding the optimal plant dynamics for tracking are discussed.

  12. An information theory account of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory. PMID:25228875

  13. An information theory account of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

  14. Optimal Control for Stochastic Delay Evolution Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingxin; Shen, Yang

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate a class of infinite-dimensional optimal control problems, where the state equation is given by a stochastic delay evolution equation with random coefficients, and the corresponding adjoint equation is given by an anticipated backward stochastic evolution equation. We first prove the continuous dependence theorems for stochastic delay evolution equations and anticipated backward stochastic evolution equations, and show the existence and uniqueness of solutions to anticipated backward stochastic evolution equations. Then we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality of the control problem in the form of Pontryagin’s maximum principles. To illustrate the theoretical results, we apply stochastic maximum principles to study two examples, an infinite-dimensional linear-quadratic control problem with delay and an optimal control of a Dirichlet problem for a stochastic partial differential equation with delay. Further applications of the two examples to a Cauchy problem for a controlled linear stochastic partial differential equation and an optimal harvesting problem are also considered.

  15. Integrated control-system design via generalized LQG (GLQG) theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Hyland, David C.; Richter, Stephen; Haddad, Wassim M.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty years of control systems research has produced an enormous body of theoretical results in feedback synthesis. Yet such results see relatively little practical application, and there remains an unsettling gap between classical single-loop techniques (Nyquist, Bode, root locus, pole placement) and modern multivariable approaches (LQG and H infinity theory). Large scale, complex systems, such as high performance aircraft and flexible space structures, now demand efficient, reliable design of multivariable feedback controllers which optimally tradeoff performance against modeling accuracy, bandwidth, sensor noise, actuator power, and control law complexity. A methodology is described which encompasses numerous practical design constraints within a single unified formulation. The approach, which is based upon coupled systems or modified Riccati and Lyapunov equations, encompasses time-domain linear-quadratic-Gaussian theory and frequency-domain H theory, as well as classical objectives such as gain and phase margin via the Nyquist circle criterion. In addition, this approach encompasses the optimal projection approach to reduced-order controller design. The current status of the overall theory will be reviewed including both continuous-time and discrete-time (sampled-data) formulations.

  16. Optimal control design of preparation pulses for contrast optimization in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Reeth, Eric; Ratiney, Hélène; Tesch, Michael; Grenier, Denis; Beuf, Olivier; Glaser, Steffen J.; Sugny, Dominique

    2017-06-01

    This work investigates the use of MRI radio-frequency (RF) pulses designed within the framework of optimal control theory for image contrast optimization. The magnetization evolution is modeled with Bloch equations, which defines a dynamic system that can be controlled via the application of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle (PMP). This framework allows the computation of optimal RF pulses that bring the magnetization to a given state to obtain the desired contrast after acquisition. Creating contrast through the optimal manipulation of Bloch equations is a new way of handling contrast in MRI, which can explore the theoretical limits of the system. Simulation experiments carried out on-resonance quantify the contrast improvement when compared to standard T1 or T2 weighting strategies. The use of optimal pulses is also validated for the first time in both in vitro and in vivo experiments on a small-animal 4.7 T MR system. Results demonstrate their robustness to static field inhomogeneities as well as the fact that they can be embedded in standard imaging sequences without affecting standard parameters such as slice selection or echo type. In vivo results on rat and mouse brains illustrate the ability of optimal contrast pulses to create non-trivial contrasts on well-studied structures (white matter versus gray matter).

  17. Digital robust control law synthesis using constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivekananda

    1989-01-01

    Development of digital robust control laws for active control of high performance flexible aircraft and large space structures is a research area of significant practical importance. The flexible system is typically modeled by a large order state space system of equations in order to accurately represent the dynamics. The active control law must satisy multiple conflicting design requirements and maintain certain stability margins, yet should be simple enough to be implementable on an onboard digital computer. Described here is an application of a generic digital control law synthesis procedure for such a system, using optimal control theory and constrained optimization technique. A linear quadratic Gaussian type cost function is minimized by updating the free parameters of the digital control law, while trying to satisfy a set of constraints on the design loads, responses and stability margins. Analytical expressions for the gradients of the cost function and the constraints with respect to the control law design variables are used to facilitate rapid numerical convergence. These gradients can be used for sensitivity study and may be integrated into a simultaneous structure and control optimization scheme.

  18. Optimal control of anthracnose using mixed strategies.

    PubMed

    Fotsa Mbogne, David Jaures; Thron, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose and study a spatial diffusion model for the control of anthracnose disease in a bounded domain. The model is a generalization of the one previously developed in [15]. We use the model to simulate two different types of control strategies against anthracnose disease. Strategies that employ chemical fungicides are modeled using a continuous control function; while strategies that rely on cultivational practices (such as pruning and removal of mummified fruits) are modeled with a control function which is discrete in time (though not in space). For comparative purposes, we perform our analyses for a spatially-averaged model as well as the space-dependent diffusion model. Under weak smoothness conditions on parameters we demonstrate the well-posedness of both models by verifying existence and uniqueness of the solution for the growth inhibition rate for given initial conditions. We also show that the set [0, 1] is positively invariant. We first study control by impulsive strategies, then analyze the simultaneous use of mixed continuous and pulse strategies. In each case we specify a cost functional to be minimized, and we demonstrate the existence of optimal control strategies. In the case of pulse-only strategies, we provide explicit algorithms for finding the optimal control strategies for both the spatially-averaged model and the space-dependent model. We verify the algorithms for both models via simulation, and discuss properties of the optimal solutions.

  19. Optimal control in NMR spectroscopy: numerical implementation in SIMPSON.

    PubMed

    Tosner, Zdenek; Vosegaard, Thomas; Kehlet, Cindie; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2009-04-01

    We present the implementation of optimal control into the open source simulation package SIMPSON for development and optimization of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for a wide range of applications, including liquid- and solid-state NMR, magnetic resonance imaging, quantum computation, and combinations between NMR and other spectroscopies. Optimal control enables efficient optimization of NMR experiments in terms of amplitudes, phases, offsets etc. for hundreds-to-thousands of pulses to fully exploit the experimentally available high degree of freedom in pulse sequences to combat variations/limitations in experimental or spin system parameters or design experiments with specific properties typically not covered as easily by standard design procedures. This facilitates straightforward optimization of experiments under consideration of rf and static field inhomogeneities, limitations in available or desired rf field strengths (e.g., for reduction of sample heating), spread in resonance offsets or coupling parameters, variations in spin systems etc. to meet the actual experimental conditions as close as possible. The paper provides a brief account on the relevant theory and in particular the computational interface relevant for optimization of state-to-state transfer (on the density operator level) and the effective Hamiltonian on the level of propagators along with several representative examples within liquid- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  20. Research on optimal control, stabilization and computational algorithms for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1984-01-01

    The research carried out in the areas of optimal control and estimation theory and its applications under this grant is reviewed. A listing of the 257 publications that document the research results is presented.

  1. Research on optimal control, stabilization and computational algorithms for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1985-01-01

    The research carried out in the areas of optimal control and estimation theory and its applications under this grant is reviewed. A listing of the 257 publications that document the research results is presented.

  2. Lagrange Duality Theory for Convex Control Problems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    to be optimal is also given. The dual variables p and v corresponding to the system dynamics and state constraints are proved to be of bounded ... variation while the multiplier corresponding to the control constraints is proved to lie in 1. Finally, a control and state minimum principle is proved. If

  3. Optimal control of gypsy moth populations.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Andrew; Lenhart, Suzanne; White, K A J

    2008-02-01

    This study investigates an optimal strategy for the cost effective control of gypsy moth populations. Gypsy moth populations cycle between low sparse numbers to high outbreak levels and it is during the outbreak levels that the moths cause extensive damage to plant foliage which can lead to deforestation. Deforestation can result in significant economic damage to infested areas, and consequently, there have been many efforts to control moth populations. One effective method of control is the use of the biocontrol agent, Gypchek, but its production is costly. We develop a mathematical model which combines population dynamics and optimal control of the moth population to explore strategies by which the total cost of the gypsy moth problem (economic damage and cost of Gypchek) can be minimized.

  4. Theory of cellwise optimization for solar central receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    Cost effective optimization of the solar central receiver system is primarily concerned with the distribution of heliostats in the collector field, including the boundaries of the field. The cellwise optimization procedure determines the optimum cell usage and heliostat spacing parameters for each cell in the collector field. Spacing parameters determine the heliostat density and neighborhood structure uniformly in each cell. Consequently, the cellwise approach ignores heliostat mismatch at cell boundaries. Ignoring the cell boundary problem permits an easy solution for the optimum in terms of appropriately defined annual average data. Insolation, receiver interception, shading and blocking, cosine effects, and the cost parameters combine to control the optimum. Many trade offs are represented. Outputs include the receiver flux density distribution for design time, coefficients for an actual layout, the optimum boundary and various performance and cost estimates for the optimum field. It is also possible to optimize receiver size and tower height by a repeated application of the field optimization procedure.

  5. Optimal control solutions to sodic soil reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2016-05-01

    We study the reclamation process of a sodic soil by irrigation with water amended with calcium cations. In order to explore the entire range of time-dependent strategies, this task is framed as an optimal control problem, where the amendment rate is the control and the total rehabilitation time is the quantity to be minimized. We use a minimalist model of vertically averaged soil salinity and sodicity, in which the main feedback controlling the dynamics is the nonlinear coupling of soil water and exchange complex, given by the Gapon equation. We show that the optimal solution is a bang-bang control strategy, where the amendment rate is discontinuously switched along the process from a maximum value to zero. The solution enables a reduction in remediation time of about 50%, compared with the continuous use of good-quality irrigation water. Because of its general structure, the bang-bang solution is also shown to work for the reclamation of other soil conditions, such as saline-sodic soils. The novelty in our modeling approach is the capability of searching the entire "strategy space" for optimal time-dependent protocols. The optimal solutions found for the minimalist model can be then fine-tuned by experiments and numerical simulations, applicable to realistic conditions that include spatial variability and heterogeneities.

  6. Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Yilmaz; Mark Christie; Anna Stefanopoulou

    2010-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a true Flex Fuel Vehicle capable of running on any blend of ethanol from 0 to 85% with reduced penalty in usable vehicle range. A research and development program, targeting 10% improvement in fuel economy using a direct injection (DI) turbocharged spark ignition engine was conducted. In this project a gasoline-optimized high-technology engine was considered and the hardware and configuration modifications were defined for the engine, fueling system, and air path. Combined with a novel engine control strategy, control software, and calibration this resulted in a highly efficient and clean FFV concept. It was also intended to develop robust detection schemes of the ethanol content in the fuel integrated with adaptive control algorithms for optimized turbocharged direct injection engine combustion. The approach relies heavily on software-based adaptation and optimization striving for minimal modifications to the gasoline-optimized engine hardware system. Our ultimate objective was to develop a compact control methodology that takes advantage of any ethanol-based fuel mixture and not compromise the engine performance under gasoline operation.

  7. Optimal control of circular cylinder wakes using long control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinois, Thibault L. B.; Colonius, Tim

    2015-08-01

    The classical problem of suppressing vortex shedding in the wake of a circular cylinder by using body rotation is revisited in an adjoint-based optimal control framework. The cylinder's unsteady and fully unconstrained rotation rate is optimized at Reynolds numbers between 75 and 200 and over horizons that are longer than in previous studies, where they are typically of the order of a vortex shedding period or shorter. In the best configuration, the drag is reduced by 19%, the vortex shedding is effectively suppressed, and this low drag state is maintained with minimal cylinder rotation after transients. Unlike open-loop control, the optimal control is shown to maintain a specific phase relationship between the actuation and the shedding in order to stabilize the wake. A comparison is also given between the performance of optimizations for different Reynolds numbers, cost functions, and horizon lengths. It is shown that the long horizons used are necessary in order to stabilize the vortex shedding efficiently.

  8. Flocking in Distributed Control and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    of the agents are nonlinear, nonidentical, unknown, and subject to external disturbances. Distributed neural networks are used to approximate the...convex nutrient profiles. These results suggest that swarming-like approaches for the control of networked agents may provide an additional level of...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0309 Flocking in Distributed Control and Optimization Alfredo Garcia UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Final Report 06/01/2015

  9. Linear stochastic optimal control and estimation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.; Lehtinen, F. K. B.

    1980-01-01

    Problem involves design of controls for linear time-invariant system disturbed by white noise. Solution is Kalman filter coupled through set of optimal regulator gains to produce desired control signal. Key to solution is solving matrix Riccati differential equation. LSOCE effectively solves problem for wide range of practical applications. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on IBM 360.

  10. Optimization-based controller design for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsing, N.-K.; Fan, M. K. H.; Barlow, J.; Tits, A. L.; Tischler, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An optimization-based methodology for linear control system design is outlined by considering the design of a controller for a UH-60 rotorcraft in hover. A wide range of design specifications is taken into account: internal stability, decoupling between longitudinal and lateral motions, handling qualities, and rejection of windgusts. These specifications are investigated while taking into account physical limitations in the swashplate displacements and rates of displacement. The methodology crucially relies on user-machine interaction for tradeoff exploration.

  11. Stochastic Linear Quadratic Optimal Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Yong, J.

    2001-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the stochastic linear quadratic optimal control problem (LQ problem, for short) for which the coefficients are allowed to be random and the cost functional is allowed to have a negative weight on the square of the control variable. Some intrinsic relations among the LQ problem, the stochastic maximum principle, and the (linear) forward-backward stochastic differential equations are established. Some results involving Riccati equation are discussed as well.

  12. High-fidelity quantum state preparation using neighboring optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuchen; Gaitan, Frank

    2017-10-01

    We present an approach to single-shot high-fidelity preparation of an n-qubit state based on neighboring optimal control theory. This represents a new application of the neighboring optimal control formalism which was originally developed to produce single-shot high-fidelity quantum gates. To illustrate the approach, and to provide a proof-of-principle, we use it to prepare the two-qubit Bell state |β _{01}\\rangle = (1/√{2})[ |01\\rangle + |10\\rangle ] with an error probability ɛ ˜ 10^{-6} (10^{-5}) for ideal (non-ideal) control. Using standard methods in the literature, these high-fidelity Bell states can be leveraged to fault-tolerantly prepare the logical state |\\overline{β }_{01}\\rangle.

  13. Solving the optimal control problem of the parabolic PDEs in exploitation of oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effati, S.; Janfada, M.; Esmaeili, M.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, the optimal control problem is governed by weak coupled parabolic PDEs and involves pointwise state and control constraints. We use measure theory method for solving this problem. In order to use the weak solution of problem, first problem has been transformed into measure form. This problem is reduced to a linear programming problem. Then we obtain an optimal measure which is approximated by a finite combination of atomic measures. We find piecewise-constant optimal control functions which are an approximate control for the original optimal control problem.

  14. Adaptive control based on retrospective cost optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillo, Mario A.

    This dissertation studies adaptive control of multi-input, multi-output, linear, time-invariant, discrete-time systems that are possibly unstable and nonminimum phase. We consider both gradient-based adaptive control as well as retrospective-cost-based adaptive control. Retrospective cost optimization is a measure of performance at the current time based on a past window of data and without assumptions about the command or disturbance signals. In particular, retrospective cost optimization acts as an inner loop to the adaptive control algorithm by modifying the performance variables based on the difference between the actual past control inputs and the recomputed past control inputs based on the current control law. We develop adaptive control algorithms that are effective for systems that are nonminimum phase. We consider discrete-time adaptive control since these control laws can be implemented directly in embedded code without requiring an intermediate discretization step. Furthermore, the adaptive controllers in this dissertation are developed under minimal modeling assumptions. In particular, the adaptive controllers require knowledge of the sign of the high-frequency gain and a sufficient number of Markov parameters to approximate the nonminimum-phase zeros (if any). No additional modeling information is necessary. The adaptive controllers presented in this dissertation are developed for full-state-feedback stabilization, static-output-feedback stabilization, as well as dynamic compensation for stabilization, command following, disturbance rejection, and model reference adaptive control. Lyapunov-based stability and convergence proofs are provided for special cases. We present numerical examples to illustrate the algorithms' effectiveness in handling systems that are unstable and/or nonminimum phase and to provide insight into the modeling information required for controller implementation.

  15. Optimal singular control for nonlinear semistabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Afflitto, Andrea; Haddad, Wassim M.

    2016-06-01

    The singular optimal control problem for asymptotic stabilisation has been extensively studied in the literature. In this paper, the optimal singular control problem is extended to address a weaker version of closed-loop stability, namely, semistability, which is of paramount importance for consensus control of network dynamical systems. Three approaches are presented to address the nonlinear semistable singular control problem. Namely, a singular perturbation method is presented to construct a state-feedback singular controller that guarantees closed-loop semistability for nonlinear systems. In this approach, we show that for a non-negative cost-to-go function the minimum cost of a nonlinear semistabilising singular controller is lower than the minimum cost of a singular controller that guarantees asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system. In the second approach, we solve the nonlinear semistable singular control problem by using the cost-to-go function to cancel the singularities in the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For this case, we show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Finally, we provide a framework based on the concepts of state-feedback linearisation and feedback equivalence to solve the singular control problem for semistabilisation of nonlinear dynamical systems. For this approach, we also show that the minimum value of the singular performance measure is zero. Three numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed singular semistabilisation frameworks.

  16. Age-structured optimal control in population economics.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Gustav; Prskawetz, Alexia; Veliov, Vladimir M

    2004-06-01

    This paper brings both intertemporal and age-dependent features to a theory of population policy at the macro-level. A Lotka-type renewal model of population dynamics is combined with a Solow/Ramsey economy. We consider a social planner who maximizes an aggregate intertemporal utility function which depends on per capita consumption. As control policies we consider migration and saving rate (both age-dependent). By using a new maximum principle for age-structured control systems we derive meaningful results for the optimal migration and saving rate in an aging population. The model used in the numerical calculations is calibrated for Austria.

  17. Application of quadratic optimization to supersonic inlet control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Zeller, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The application of linear stochastic optimal control theory to the design of the control system for the air intake (inlet) of a supersonic air-breathing propulsion system is discussed. The controls must maintain a stable inlet shock position in the presence of random airflow disturbances and prevent inlet unstart. Two different linear time invariant control systems are developed. One is designed to minimize a nonquadratic index, the expected frequency of inlet unstart, and the other is designed to minimize the mean square value of inlet shock motion. The quadratic equivalence principle is used to obtain the best linear controller that minimizes the nonquadratic performance index. The two systems are compared on the basis of unstart prevention, control effort requirements, and sensitivity to parameter variations.

  18. A detection method of signal frequency based on optimization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Chunyan; Shi, Yaowu; Wang, Zhuwen; Guo, Bin

    2006-11-01

    The sensitive characteristic to initial value of chaos system and the immunity to noise sufficiently demonstrate the superiority in weak signal detection. In this paper Duffing equation is used as system detection model, on the basis of optimization theory, a most optimization searching method, which takes the variance of output X as the detected value is present. The basic principle and the theoretical algorithm about detecting the weak signal with this method are proposed. At the same time, the simulation experiments and the result analysis are given. The results indicated this method is rapidly, simple, convenient and the accuracy is high, which is a novel detecting frequency method. If this method were applied in signal processing field or other application field, it would have practical significance.

  19. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  20. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  1. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-02-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  2. Gain optimization with non-linear controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Kandadai, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the analysis and design of controls for non-linear systems. The technical approach is to use statistical linearization to model the non-linear dynamics of a system by a quasi-Gaussian model. A covariance analysis is performed to determine the behavior of the dynamical system and a quadratic cost function. Expressions for the cost function and its derivatives are determined so that numerical optimization techniques can be applied to determine optimal feedback laws. The primary application for this paper is centered about the design of controls for nominally linear systems but where the controls are saturated or limited by fixed constraints. The analysis is general, however, and numerical computation requires only that the specific non-linearity be considered in the analysis.

  3. Modal methods in optimal control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, A. E., Jr.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for solving linear smoother-follower problems with quadratic criteria are presented. For time-invariant systems, the algorithm consists of one backward integration of a linear vector equation and one forward integration of another linear vector equation. Furthermore, the backward and forward Riccati matrices can be expressed in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Euler-Lagrange equations. Hence, the gains of the forward and backward Kalman-Bucy filters and of the optimal state-feedback regulator can be determined without integration of matrix Riccati equations. A computer program has been developed, based on this method of determining the gains, to synthesize the optimal time-invariant compensator in the presence of random disturbance inputs and random measurement errors. The program also computes the rms state and control variables of the optimal closed-loop system.

  4. Vision-controlled paint spray optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettinger, Gary; Christian, Donald J.

    1992-04-01

    This paper is a case history of spray paint optimization system based on machine vision technology in a factory automation application. The system is implemented as an industrial control for a reciprocating electrostatic sprayer used for priming and painting of armor plate for military ground vehicles. Incoming plates are highly variable in size, shape, and orientation, and are processes in very small production lots. A laser imager is used to digitize visual cross sections of each plate one line at a time. The raster lines are then assembled into a two dimensional image and processed. The spray pattern is optimized for precise paint coverage with minimum overspray. The paint optimizer system has yielded a measured 25 percent savings in bulk paint use, resulting in less booth and equipment maintenance, reduced paint fumes in the atmosphere, and reduced waste disposal, and now has several months of successful production history.

  5. Optimal controllers for finite wordlength implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K.; Skelton, R.

    1991-01-01

    When a controller is implemented in a digital computer, with A/D and D/A conversion, the numerical errors of the computation can drastically affect the performance of the control system. There exists realizations of a given controller transfer function yielding arbitrarily large effects from computational errors. Since, in general, there is no upper bound, it is important to have a systematic way of reducing these effects. Optimum controller designs are developed which take account of the digital round-off errors in the controller implementation and in the A/D and D/A converters. These results provide a natural extension to the Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory since they reduce to the standard LQG controller when infinite precision computation is used. But for finite precision the separation principle does not hold.

  6. Optimal control in a noisy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenjo, F.; Toledo, B. A.; Muñoz, V.; Rogan, J.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    We describe a simple method to control a known unstable periodic orbit (UPO) in the presence of noise. The strategy is based on regarding the control method as an optimization problem, which allows us to calculate a control matrix A. We illustrate the idea with the Rossler system, the Lorenz system, and a hyperchaotic system that has two exponents with positive real parts. Initially, a UPO and the corresponding control matrix are found in the absence of noise in these systems. It is shown that the strategy is useful even if noise is added as control is applied. For low noise, it is enough to find a control matrix such that the maximum Lyapunov exponent λmax<0, and with a single non-null entry. If noise is increased, however, this is not the case, and the full control matrix A may be required to keep the UPO under control. Besides the Lyapunov spectrum, a characterization of the control strategies is given in terms of the average distance to the UPO and the control effort required to keep the orbit under control. Finally, particular attention is given to the problem of handling noise, which can affect considerably the estimation of the UPO itself and its exponents, and a cleaning strategy based on singular value decomposition was developed. This strategy gives a consistent manner to approach noisy systems, and may be easily adapted as a parametric control strategy, and to experimental situations, where noise is unavoidable.

  7. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  8. Optimal Control via Self-Generated Stochasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    The problem of global maxima of functionals has been examined. Mathematical roots of local maxima are the same as those for a much simpler problem of finding global maximum of a multi-dimensional function. The second problem is instability even if an optimal trajectory is found, there is no guarantee that it is stable. As a result, a fundamentally new approach is introduced to optimal control based upon two new ideas. The first idea is to represent the functional to be maximized as a limit of a probability density governed by the appropriately selected Liouville equation. Then, the corresponding ordinary differential equations (ODEs) become stochastic, and that sample of the solution that has the largest value will have the highest probability to appear in ODE simulation. The main advantages of the stochastic approach are that it is not sensitive to local maxima, the function to be maximized must be only integrable but not necessarily differentiable, and global equality and inequality constraints do not cause any significant obstacles. The second idea is to remove possible instability of the optimal solution by equipping the control system with a self-stabilizing device. The applications of the proposed methodology will optimize the performance of NASA spacecraft, as well as robot performance.

  9. Sub-optimal control of unsteady boundary layer separation and optimal control of Saltzman-Lorenz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Chetan R.

    The primary objective of this research is to explore the application of optimal control theory in nonlinear, unsteady, fluid dynamical settings. Two problems are considered: (1) control of unsteady boundary-layer separation, and (2) control of the Saltzman-Lorenz model. The unsteady boundary-layer equations are nonlinear partial differential equations that govern the eruptive events that arise when an adverse pressure gradient acts on a boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers. The Saltzman-Lorenz model consists of a coupled set of three nonlinear ordinary differential equations that govern the time-dependent coefficients in truncated Fourier expansions of Rayleigh-Renard convection and exhibit deterministic chaos. Variational methods are used to derive the nonlinear optimal control formulations based on cost functionals that define the control objective through a performance measure and a penalty function that penalizes the cost of control. The resulting formulation consists of the nonlinear state equations, which must be integrated forward in time, and the nonlinear control (adjoint) equations, which are integrated backward in time. Such coupled forward-backward time integrations are computationally demanding; therefore, the full optimal control problem for the Saltzman-Lorenz model is carried out, while the more complex unsteady boundary-layer case is solved using a sub-optimal approach. The latter is a quasi-steady technique in which the unsteady boundary-layer equations are integrated forward in time, and the steady control equation is solved at each time step. Both sub-optimal control of the unsteady boundary-layer equations and optimal control of the Saltzman-Lorenz model are found to be successful in meeting the control objectives for each problem. In the case of boundary-layer separation, the control results indicate that it is necessary to eliminate the recirculation region that is a precursor to the unsteady boundary-layer eruptions. In the case of the

  10. A model for HIV/AIDS pandemic with optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is pandemic. It has affected nearly 60 million people since the detection of the disease in 1981 to date. In this paper basic deterministic HIV/AIDS model with mass action incidence function are developed. Stability analysis is carried out. And the disease free equilibrium of the basic model was found to be locally asymptotically stable whenever the threshold parameter (RO) value is less than one, and unstable otherwise. The model is extended by introducing two optimal control strategies namely, CD4 counts and treatment for the infective using optimal control theory. Numerical simulation was carried out in order to illustrate the analytic results.

  11. Optimal control and optimal trajectories of regional macroeconomic dynamics based on the Pontryagin maximum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, V. K.; Strigunov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The Pontryagin maximum principle is used to prove a theorem concerning optimal control in regional macroeconomics. A boundary value problem for optimal trajectories of the state and adjoint variables is formulated, and optimal curves are analyzed. An algorithm is proposed for solving the boundary value problem of optimal control. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by computing an optimal control and the corresponding optimal trajectories.

  12. Optimal Control of Magnetization Dynamics in Ferromagnetic Materials using TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Peter; Krieger, Kevin; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-03-01

    Recently intense laser-field induced ultrafast demagnetization was observed in ab-initio simulations using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) for various ferromagnetic materials (Fe,Co,Ni). From a practical and technological viewpoint, it is useful if the induced dynamics (e.g. of the total magnetic moment) are controllable. In this talk we apply optimal control theory together with TDDFT calculations to tailor the intense laser pulses so as to achieve a particular outcome (e.g. maximize the total moment lost) while also including any required constraints (e.g pulse duration, pulse frequencies, maximum fluence, etc). Support from European Communities FP7, through the CRONOS project Grant No. 280879.

  13. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  14. Optimal control of multiplicative control systems arising from cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K.; Kim, M.

    1975-01-01

    This study deals with ways of curtailing the rapid growth of cancer cell populations. The performance functional that measures the size of the population at the terminal time as well as the control effort is devised. With use of the discrete maximum principle, the Hamiltonian for this problem is determined and the condition for optimal solutions are developed. The optimal strategy is shown to be a bang-bang control. It is shown that the optimal control for this problem must be on the vertices of an N-dimensional cube contained in the N-dimensional Euclidean space. An algorithm for obtaining a local minimum of the performance function in an orderly fashion is developed. Application of the algorithm to the design of antitumor drug and X-irradiation schedule is discussed.

  15. The Research on Optimization of Edge Drop Control for Cold Tandem Rolling Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao-Min; Yue, Xiao-Xue

    2016-05-01

    The cold tandem rolling of metal strip presents a significant control challenge because of nonlinearities and process complexities. And reducing edge drop of cold rolling strips and meeting uniform thickness will be a new tough shape theories and technologies. In this paper, the existing edge drop control are analyzed and optimized. The simulation results and practical data show that the optimized control system can effectively control the edge drop.

  16. Intermittent locomotion as an optimal control strategy.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, P; Mahadevan, L

    2014-04-08

    Birds, fish and other animals routinely use unsteady effects to save energy by alternating between phases of active propulsion and passive coasting. Here, we construct a minimal model for such behaviour that can be couched as an optimal control problem via an analogy to travelling with a rechargeable battery. An analytical solution of the optimal control problem proves that intermittent locomotion has lower energy requirements relative to steady-state strategies. Additional realistic hypotheses, such as the assumption that metabolic cost at a given power should be minimal (the fixed gear hypothesis), a nonlinear dependence of the energy storage rate on propulsion and/or a preferred average speed, allow us to generalize the model and demonstrate the flexibility of intermittent locomotion with implications for biological and artificial systems.

  17. Intermittent locomotion as an optimal control strategy

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Birds, fish and other animals routinely use unsteady effects to save energy by alternating between phases of active propulsion and passive coasting. Here, we construct a minimal model for such behaviour that can be couched as an optimal control problem via an analogy to travelling with a rechargeable battery. An analytical solution of the optimal control problem proves that intermittent locomotion has lower energy requirements relative to steady-state strategies. Additional realistic hypotheses, such as the assumption that metabolic cost at a given power should be minimal (the fixed gear hypothesis), a nonlinear dependence of the energy storage rate on propulsion and/or a preferred average speed, allow us to generalize the model and demonstrate the flexibility of intermittent locomotion with implications for biological and artificial systems. PMID:24711718

  18. Quantum computing gates via optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of optimal control to design two entropy-manipulating quantum gates which are more complex than the corresponding, commonly used, gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli (CCNOT): A two-qubit gate called polarization exchange (PE) and a three-qubit gate called polarization compression (COMP) were designed using GRAPE, an optimal control algorithm. Both gates were designed for a three-spin system. Our design provided efficient and robust nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency (RF) pulses for 13C2-trichloroethylene (TCE), our chosen three-spin system. We then experimentally applied these two quantum gates onto TCE at the NMR lab. Such design of these gates and others could be relevant for near-future applications of quantum computing devices.

  19. Primer Vector Optimization: Survey of Theory, new Analysis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman

    This paper presents a preliminary study in developing a set of optimization tools for orbit rendezvous, transfer and station keeping. This work is part of a large scale effort undergoing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a.i. solutions, Inc. to build generic methods, which will enable missions with tight fuel budgets. Since no single optimization technique can solve efficiently all existing problems, a library of tools where the user could pick the method most suited for the particular mission is envisioned. The first trajectory optimization technique explored is Lawden's primer vector theory [Ref. 1]. Primer vector theory can be considered as a byproduct of applying Calculus of Variations (COV) techniques to the problem of minimizing the fuel usage of impulsive trajectories. For an n-impulse trajectory, it involves the solution of n-1 two-point boundary value problems. In this paper, we look at some of the different formulations of the primer vector (dependent on the frame employed and on the force model). Also, the applicability of primer vector theory is examined in effort to understand when and why the theory can fail. Specifically, since COV is based on "small variations", singularities in the linearized (variational) equations of motion along the arcs must be taken into account. These singularities are a recurring problem in analyzes that employ "small variations" [Refs. 2, 3]. For example, singularities in the (2-body problem) variational equations along elliptic arcs occur when [Ref. 4], 1) the difference between the initial and final times is a multiple of the reference orbit period, 2) the difference between the initial and final true anomalies are given by k, for k= 0, 1, 2, 3,..., note that this cover the 3) the time of flight is a minimum for the given difference in true anomaly. For the N-body problem, the situation is more complex and is still under investigation. Several examples, such as the initialization of an orbit (ascent trajectory) and

  20. Augmented Lagrangian method for optimal laser control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hai; Dussault, Jean-Pierre; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    1994-06-01

    We use penalty methods derived from Augmented Lagrangians coupled with unitary exponential operator methods to solve the optimal control problem for molecular time-dependent Schodinger equations involving laser pulse excitations. A stable numerical algorithm is presented which propagates directly from initial states to given final states. Results are reported for an analytically solvable model for the complete inversion of a three-state system.

  1. Optimal strategy for controlling the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria: Treatment and culling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, Mohammed Baba; Hasan, Yahya Abu; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2015-05-01

    Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria is a parasitic mosquito-borne disease caused by a eukaryotic protist of genus Plasmodium Knowlesi transmitted by mosquito, Anopheles leucosphyrus to human and macaques. We developed and analyzed a deterministic Mathematical model for the transmission of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria in human and macaques. The optimal control theory is applied to investigate optimal strategies for controlling the spread of Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria using treatment and culling as control strategies. The conditions for optimal control of the Plasmodium Knowlesi malaria are derived using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Finally, numerical simulations suggested that the combination of the control strategies is the best way to control the disease in any community.

  2. Optimal Control and Identification of Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-21

    primary application to large flexible space structures. The research has developed both mathematical theory and numerical methods for design of control laws ...90089 ,J., ()This research was supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under contract No. AFOSR-84-0309. (**)This research was...supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under contract No. AFOSR-84-0393. (’[Part of this research was carried out while the

  3. Optimal multiplexed sensing: bounds, conditions and a graph theory link.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Netanel; Schechner, Yoav Y; Goldberg, Felix

    2007-12-10

    Measuring an array of variables is central to many systems, including imagers (array of pixels), spectrometers (array of spectral bands) and lighting systems. Each of the measurements, however, is prone to noise and potential sensor saturation. It is recognized by a growing number of methods that such problems can be reduced by multiplexing the measured variables. In each measurement, multiple variables (radiation channels) are mixed (multiplexed) by a code. Then, after data acquisition, the variables are decoupled computationally in post processing. Potential benefits of the use of multiplexing include increased signal-to-noise ratio and accommodation of scene dynamic range. However, existing multiplexing schemes, including Hadamard-based codes, are inhibited by fundamental limits set by sensor saturation and Poisson distributed photon noise, which is scene dependent. There is thus a need to find optimal codes that best increase the signal to noise ratio, while accounting for these effects. Hence, this paper deals with the pursuit of such optimal measurements that avoid saturation and account for the signal dependency of noise. The paper derives lower bounds on the mean square error of demultiplexed variables. This is useful for assessing the optimality of numerically-searched multiplexing codes, thus expediting the numerical search. Furthermore, the paper states the necessary conditions for attaining the lower bounds by a general code.We show that graph theory can be harnessed for finding such ideal codes, by the use of strongly regular graphs.

  4. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  5. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  6. Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

  7. Anxiety and cognitive performance: attentional control theory.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, Michael W; Derakshan, Nazanin; Santos, Rita; Calvo, Manuel G

    2007-05-01

    Attentional control theory is an approach to anxiety and cognition representing a major development of Eysenck and Calvo's (1992) processing efficiency theory. It is assumed that anxiety impairs efficient functioning of the goal-directed attentional system and increases the extent to which processing is influenced by the stimulus-driven attentional system. In addition to decreasing attentional control, anxiety increases attention to threat-related stimuli. Adverse effects of anxiety on processing efficiency depend on two central executive functions involving attentional control: inhibition and shifting. However, anxiety may not impair performance effectiveness (quality of performance) when it leads to the use of compensatory strategies (e.g., enhanced effort; increased use of processing resources). Directions for future research are discussed.

  8. Optimal Control of Quantum Measurement for Superconducting Phase Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank; Egger, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution towards a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of non-controllable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the GRAPE algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a non-unitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a phase qubit measurement pulse. We show how this technique can lead to large measurement contrast close to 99%. We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 ns pulses with 98.2% contrast. Work posted at arXiv:1408.6086, in press at Physical Review A Supported by the EU through SCALEQIT.

  9. Passive Motion Paradigm: An Alternative to Optimal Control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishwanathan; Morasso, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, optimal control theory (OCT) has emerged as the leading approach for investigating neural control of movement and motor cognition for two complementary research lines: behavioral neuroscience and humanoid robotics. In both cases, there are general problems that need to be addressed, such as the “degrees of freedom (DoFs) problem,” the common core of production, observation, reasoning, and learning of “actions.” OCT, directly derived from engineering design techniques of control systems quantifies task goals as “cost functions” and uses the sophisticated formal tools of optimal control to obtain desired behavior (and predictions). We propose an alternative “softer” approach passive motion paradigm (PMP) that we believe is closer to the biomechanics and cybernetics of action. The basic idea is that actions (overt as well as covert) are the consequences of an internal simulation process that “animates” the body schema with the attractor dynamics of force fields induced by the goal and task-specific constraints. This internal simulation offers the brain a way to dynamically link motor redundancy with task-oriented constraints “at runtime,” hence solving the “DoFs problem” without explicit kinematic inversion and cost function computation. We argue that the function of such computational machinery is not only restricted to shaping motor output during action execution but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility, consequence, understanding and meaning of “potential actions.” In this sense, taking into account recent developments in neuroscience (motor imagery, simulation theory of covert actions, mirror neuron system) and in embodied robotics, PMP offers a novel framework for understanding motor cognition that goes beyond the engineering control paradigm provided by OCT. Therefore, the paper is at the same time a review of the PMP rationale, as a computational theory, and a perspective presentation of

  10. Analysis, Control and Inverse Theory of Fluids,Waves, Materials Structures, and theirInteractions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    dimensional problem) C) Area concerning Inverse Theory of Partial Differential Equations ; more precisely, coefficient recovery via just one boundary...stability of a wave equation with strong damping and dynamic boundary conditions, Evolution Equations and Control Theory , Vol 2, Nr 4, pp 631-667, 2013...specialization of the known optimal control or min-max game theory of parabolic problems of the literature B) Area concerning flow-structure interaction

  11. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  12. Control theory for scanning probe microscopy revisited.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model for studying SPM feedback in the context of control theory. Previous models presented in the literature that apply standard models for proportional-integral-derivative controllers predict a highly unstable feedback environment. This model uses features specific to the SPM implementation of the proportional-integral controller to give realistic feedback behaviour. As such the stability of SPM feedback for a wide range of feedback gains can be understood. Further consideration of mechanical responses of the SPM system gives insight into the causes of exciting mechanical resonances of the scanner during feedback operation.

  13. Optimal Mass Transport for Statistical Estimation, Image Analysis, Information Geometry, and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-10

    years has increasingly impacted a large number of other fields (probability theory, partial differential equations, physics, meteorology ). We have...in recent years has increasingly impacted a large number of other fields (probability theory, partial differential equations, physics, meteorology ...econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, transportation, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology [52, 68]. The problem

  14. Coherent optimal control of photosynthetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, F.; Montangero, S.; Calarco, T.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that open-loop quantum optimal control techniques can provide efficient tools for the verification of various quantum coherent transport mechanisms in natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes under realistic experimental conditions. To assess the feasibility of possible biocontrol experiments, we introduce the main settings and derive optimally shaped and robust laser pulses that allow for the faithful preparation of specified initial states (such as localized excitation or coherent superposition, i.e., propagating and nonpropagating states) of the photosystem and probe efficiently the subsequent dynamics. With these tools, different transport pathways can be discriminated, which should facilitate the elucidation of genuine quantum dynamical features of photosystems and therefore enhance our understanding of the role that coherent processes may play in actual biological complexes.

  15. Methods for combined control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, M.; Scheid, R. E.; Salama, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of methods for the combined control-structure optimization of physical systems encountered in the technology of large space structures. The objective of the approach taken in this paper is not to produce the 'best' optimized design, but rather to efficiently produce a family of design options so as to asist in early trade studies, typically before hard design constraints are imposed. The philosophy is that these are candidate designs to be passed on for further consideration, and their function is more to guide the development of the system design rather than to represent the ultimate product. A homotopy approach involving multi-objective functions is developed for this purpose, and a numerical example is presented.

  16. Approximation of the optimal-time problem for controlled differential inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Otakulov, S.

    1995-01-01

    One of the common methods for numerical solution of optimal control problems constructs an approximating sequence of discrete control problems. The approximation method is also attractive because it can be used as an effective tool for analyzing optimality conditions and other topics in optimization theory. In this paper, we consider the approximation of optimal-time problems for controlled differential inclusions. The sequence of approximating problems is constructed using a finite-difference scheme, i.e., the differential inclusions are replaced with difference inclusions.

  17. Optimal control for a tuberculosis model with reinfection and post-exposure interventions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cristiana J; Torres, Delfim F M

    2013-08-01

    We apply optimal control theory to a tuberculosis model given by a system of ordinary differential equations. Optimal control strategies are proposed to minimize the cost of interventions, considering reinfection and post-exposure interventions. They depend on the parameters of the model and reduce effectively the number of active infectious and persistent latent individuals. The time that the optimal controls are at the upper bound increase with the transmission coefficient. A general explicit expression for the basic reproduction number is obtained and its sensitivity with respect to the model parameters is discussed. Numerical results show the usefulness of the optimization strategies.

  18. Optimal threshold estimation for binary classifiers using game theory

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ignacio Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Many bioinformatics algorithms can be understood as binary classifiers. They are usually compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic ( ROC) curve. On the other hand, choosing the best threshold for practical use is a complex task, due to uncertain and context-dependent skews in the abundance of positives in nature and in the yields/costs for correct/incorrect classification. We argue that considering a classifier as a player in a zero-sum game allows us to use the minimax principle from game theory to determine the optimal operating point. The proposed classifier threshold corresponds to the intersection between the ROC curve and the descending diagonal in ROC space and yields a minimax accuracy of 1-FPR. Our proposal can be readily implemented in practice, and reveals that the empirical condition for threshold estimation of “specificity equals sensitivity” maximizes robustness against uncertainties in the abundance of positives in nature and classification costs. PMID:28003875

  19. Evaluating critical exponents in the optimized perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Sena, Paulo J.

    2004-11-01

    We use the optimized perturbation theory, or linear δ expansion, to evaluate the critical exponents in the critical 3d O( N) invariant scalar field model. Regarding the implementation procedure, this is the first successful attempt to use the method in this type of evaluation. We present and discuss all the associated subtleties producing a prescription which can, in principle, be extended to higher orders in a consistent way. Numerically, our approach, taken at the lowest nontrivial order (second order) in the δ expansion produces a modest improvement in comparison to mean field values for the anomalous dimension η and correlation length ν critical exponents. However, it nevertheless points to the right direction of the values obtained with other methods, like the ε-expansion. We discuss the possibilities of improving over our lowest-order results and on the convergence to the known values when extending the method to higher orders.

  20. Optimal threshold estimation for binary classifiers using game theory.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ignacio Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Many bioinformatics algorithms can be understood as binary classifiers. They are usually compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic ( ROC) curve. On the other hand, choosing the best threshold for practical use is a complex task, due to uncertain and context-dependent skews in the abundance of positives in nature and in the yields/costs for correct/incorrect classification. We argue that considering a classifier as a player in a zero-sum game allows us to use the minimax principle from game theory to determine the optimal operating point. The proposed classifier threshold corresponds to the intersection between the ROC curve and the descending diagonal in ROC space and yields a minimax accuracy of 1-FPR. Our proposal can be readily implemented in practice, and reveals that the empirical condition for threshold estimation of "specificity equals sensitivity" maximizes robustness against uncertainties in the abundance of positives in nature and classification costs.

  1. Analytic theory of optimal plane change by low aerodynamic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Wu, Chi-Hang; Vinh, Nguyen X.

    The properites of the optimal and sub-optimal solutions to multiple-pass aeroassisted plane change were previously studied in terms of the trajectory variables. The solutions show the strong orbital nature. Then, it is proposed to obtain the variational equations of the orbital elements. We shall use these equations and the approximate control derived in Vinh and Ma (1990) to calculate the trajectories. In this respect, the approximate control law and the transversality condition are transformed in terms of the orbital elements. Following the above results, we can reduce the computational task by further simplification. Within omega and Omega being small and returning to the value of zero after each revolution, we neglect the equations for omega, and Omega. Also, since omega approximately equal to 0, that is alpha approximately equal to f, we can neglect the equation for the alpha and have only three state equations for the integration. Still the computation over several revolutions is long since it is performed using the eccentric anomaly along the osculating orbit as the independent variable. Here, we shall use the method of averaging as applied to the problem of orbit contraction to solve the problem of optimal plane change. This will lead to the integration of a reduced set of two nonlinear equations.

  2. Age-Related Differences in Goals: Testing Predictions from Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Theory and Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penningroth, Suzanna L.; Scott, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Two prominent theories of lifespan development, socioemotional selectivity theory and selection, optimization, and compensation theory, make similar predictions for differences in the goal representations of younger and older adults. Our purpose was to test whether the goals of younger and older adults differed in ways predicted by these two…

  3. Age-Related Differences in Goals: Testing Predictions from Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Theory and Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penningroth, Suzanna L.; Scott, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Two prominent theories of lifespan development, socioemotional selectivity theory and selection, optimization, and compensation theory, make similar predictions for differences in the goal representations of younger and older adults. Our purpose was to test whether the goals of younger and older adults differed in ways predicted by these two…

  4. Analytical and experimental performance of optimal controller designs for a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Lehtinen, B.; Geyser, L. C.; Batterton, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of modern optimal control theory were applied to the design of a control system for a supersonic inlet. The inlet control problem was approached as a linear stochastic optimal control problem using as the performance index the expected frequency of unstarts. The details of the formulation of the stochastic inlet control problem are presented. The computational procedures required to obtain optimal controller designs are discussed, and the analytically predicted performance of controllers designed for several different inlet conditions is tabulated. The experimental implementation of the optimal control laws is described, and the experimental results obtained in a supersonic wind tunnel are presented. The control laws were implemented with analog and digital computers. Comparisons are made between the experimental and analytically predicted performance results. Comparisons are also made between the results obtained with continuous analog computer controllers and discrete digital computer versions.

  5. Optimal finite horizon control in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2013-06-01

    As a paradigm for modeling gene regulatory networks, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) form a subclass of Markov genetic regulatory networks. To date, many different stochastic optimal control approaches have been developed to find therapeutic intervention strategies for PBNs. A PBN is essentially a collection of constituent Boolean networks via a probability structure. Most of the existing works assume that the probability structure for Boolean networks selection is known. Such an assumption cannot be satisfied in practice since the presence of noise prevents the probability structure from being accurately determined. In this paper, we treat a case in which we lack the governing probability structure for Boolean network selection. Specifically, in the framework of PBNs, the theory of finite horizon Markov decision process is employed to find optimal constituent Boolean networks with respect to the defined objective functions. In order to illustrate the validity of our proposed approach, an example is also displayed.

  6. Optimal tuning of a control system for a second-order plant with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinko, I. M.

    2014-07-01

    An engineering method for optimizing the parameters of PI and PID controllers for a second-order controlled plant with time delay is considered. An integral quality criterion involving minimization of the control output is proposed for optimizing the control system, which differs from the existing ones in that the effect the control output has on the technological process is taken into account in a correct way. The use of such control makes it possible to minimize the expenditure of material and/or energy resources, to limit the wear, and to increase the service life of the control devices. The unimodal nature of the proposed quality criterion for solving optimal controller tuning problems is numerically confirmed using the optimization theory. A functional correlation between the optimal controller parameters and dynamic properties of a controlled plant is determined for a single-loop control system with the use of calculation methods. The results from simulating the transients in the control system using the proposed and existing functional dependences are compared. The proposed calculation formulas differ from the existing ones by having simple structure, high accuracy of searching for the optimal controller parameters; they allow efficient control to be obtained and can be used for tuning automatic control systems in a wide range of controlled plant dynamic properties. The obtained calculation formulas are recommended for being used by engineers specializing in automation for designing new and optimizing the existing control systems.

  7. An integrated optimal control algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear stochastic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Sie Long; Lay Teo, Kok; Mohd Ismail, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Consider a discrete-time nonlinear system with random disturbances appearing in the real plant and the output channel where the randomly perturbed output is measurable. An iterative procedure based on the linear quadratic Gaussian optimal control model is developed for solving the optimal control of this stochastic system. The optimal state estimate provided by Kalman filtering theory and the optimal control law obtained from the linear quadratic regulator problem are then integrated into the dynamic integrated system optimisation and parameter estimation algorithm. The iterative solutions of the optimal control problem for the model obtained converge to the solution of the original optimal control problem of the discrete-time nonlinear system, despite model-reality differences, when the convergence is achieved. An illustrative example is solved using the method proposed. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the algorithm proposed.

  8. Optimal diet theory: behavior of a starved predatory snail.

    PubMed

    Perry, D M

    1987-06-01

    The tenets of optimal foraging theory are used to contrast the behavior of the predatory snail Acantina spirata when feeding on the barnacles Balanus glandula and Chthamalus fissus under conditions of satiation and starvation. As predicted in optimal diet models, A. spirata is less selective (ratio of attack frequency on a prey species to number of individuals available) when the higher ranking prey has low abundance. When given a choice, starved snails attack both barnacle species equally, whereas satiated individuals preferentially attack B. glandula, the more profitable prey (ash-free dry weight of barnacles ingested per unit handling time). Under starvation conditions, equal attack frequency does not result in equal prey species consumption because Acanthina spirata is more successful at attacking C. fissus than B. glandula.The assumption of constant prey encounter rates in optimal diet models is not met when A. spirata goes from a state of satiation to starvation. The encounter rate on B. glandula is lowered due to a decrease in attack success. A loss of feeding skills in starved A. spirata is responsible for the greater difficulty snails have in gaining access through the opercular plates of B. glandula.Behavioral changes in A. spirata as snails pass from satiation to hunger translate into an energetic disadvantage during feeding for hungry snails for two reasons. First, higher prey handling times result in a decreased rate of biomass intake. Second, alteration in the relative attack frequency between barnacle species, combined with a decrease in attack success on the more profitable prey leads to more frequent ingestion of the less profitable prey.

  9. Optimal control of Rydberg lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jian; van Bijnen, Rick; Pohl, Thomas; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso

    2017-09-01

    We present optimal control protocols to prepare different many-body quantum states of Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Specifically, we show how to prepare highly ordered many-body ground states, GHZ states as well as some superposition of symmetric excitation number Fock states, that inherit the translational symmetry from the Hamiltonian, within sufficiently short excitation times minimising detrimental decoherence effects. For the GHZ states, we propose a two-step detection protocol to experimentally verify the optimised preparation of the target state based only on standard measurement techniques. Realistic experimental constraints and imperfections are taken into account by our optimisation procedure making it applicable to ongoing experiments.

  10. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    forces from 25 to 2.5% for lower zones and cavitation was avoided for zone 8. Tachometer feedback was shown to be effective for low zones. The...concept of feedback control system coupled with optimization procedure to design recoil mechanisms was demonstrated to be an efficient and very effective ...122o •nl260 .01300 .01340 .01380 • ouzo #01460 •01500 •01540 •01580 •0162" .0166 i 309o,6 504P.6 9964.5 10075,9 39121.5 75397.3

  11. Quantum gate and quantum state preparation through neighboring optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuchen

    Successful implementation of fault-tolerant quantum computation on a system of qubits places severe demands on the hardware used to control the many-qubit state. It is known that an accuracy threshold Pa exists for any quantum gate that is to be used for such a computation to be able to continue for an unlimited number of steps. Specifically, the error probability Pe for such a gate must fall below the accuracy threshold: Pe < Pa. Estimates of Pa vary widely, though Pa ˜ 10-4 has emerged as a challenging target for hardware designers. I present a theoretical framework based on neighboring optimal control that takes as input a good quantum gate and returns a new gate with better performance. I illustrate this approach by applying it to a universal set of quantum gates produced using non-adiabatic rapid passage. Performance improvements are substantial comparing to the original (unimproved) gates, both for ideal and non-ideal controls. Under suitable conditions detailed below, all gate error probabilities fall by 1 to 4 orders of magnitude below the target threshold of 10-4. After applying the neighboring optimal control theory to improve the performance of quantum gates in a universal set, I further apply the general control theory in a two-step procedure for fault-tolerant logical state preparation, and I illustrate this procedure by preparing a logical Bell state fault-tolerantly. The two-step preparation procedure is as follow: Step 1 provides a one-shot procedure using neighboring optimal control theory to prepare a physical qubit state which is a high-fidelity approximation to the Bell state |beta 01> = 1/√2(|01> + |10>). I show that for ideal (non-ideal) control, an approximate |beta01> state could be prepared with error probability epsilon ˜ 10-6 (10-5) with one-shot local operations. Step 2 then takes a block of p pairs of physical qubits, each prepared in |beta 01> state using Step 1, and fault-tolerantly prepares the logical Bell state for the C4

  12. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  13. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  14. Hybrid intelligent control concepts for optimal data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, James

    1994-02-01

    In the post-Cold War era, Naval surface ship operations will be largely conducted in littoral waters to support regional military missions of all types, including humanitarian and evacuation activities, and amphibious mission execution. Under these conditions, surface ships will be much more isolated and vulnerable to a variety of threats, including maneuvering antiship missiles. To deal with these threats, the optimal employment of multiple shipborne sensors for maximum vigilance is paramount. This paper characterizes the sensor management problem as one of intelligent control, identifies some of the key issues in controller design, and presents one approach to controller design which is soon to be implemented and evaluated. It is argued that the complexity and hierarchical nature of problem formulation demands a hybrid combination of knowledge-based methods and scheduling techniques from 'hard' real-time systems theory for its solution.

  15. The effects of initial conditions and control time on optimal actuator placement via a max-min Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.

    1993-07-01

    This paper examines the role of the control objective and the control time in determining fuel-optimal actuator placement for structural vibration suppression. A general theory is developed that can be easily extended to include alternative performance metrics such as energy and time-optimal control. The performance metric defines a convex admissible control set which leads to a max-min optimization problem expressing optimal location as a function of initial conditions and control time. A solution procedure based on a nested Genetic Algorithm is presented and applied to an example problem. Results indicate that the optimal locations vary widely as a function of control time and initial conditions.

  16. Local control theory applied to molecular photoassociation.

    PubMed

    Marquetand, Philipp; Engel, Volker

    2007-08-28

    Local control theory (LCT) is employed to achieve molecular photoassociation with shaped laser pulses. Within LCT, the control fields are constructed from the response of the system to the perturbation which makes them accessible to a straightforward interpretation. This is shown regarding the ground-state collision of H+F and H+I atoms. Different objectives are defined, which aim at the formation of vibrational cold or hot associated molecules, respectively. Results are presented for s-wave scattering, where the rotational degree of freedom is ignored and also for full scale calculations including rotations, in order to describe more realistic conditions.

  17. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  18. Optimal second order sliding mode control for nonlinear uncertain systems.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhulika; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a chattering free optimal second order sliding mode control (OSOSMC) method is proposed to stabilize nonlinear systems affected by uncertainties. The nonlinear optimal control strategy is based on the control Lyapunov function (CLF). For ensuring robustness of the optimal controller in the presence of parametric uncertainty and external disturbances, a sliding mode control scheme is realized by combining an integral and a terminal sliding surface. The resulting second order sliding mode can effectively reduce chattering in the control input. Simulation results confirm the supremacy of the proposed optimal second order sliding mode control over some existing sliding mode controllers in controlling nonlinear systems affected by uncertainty.

  19. Hypersonic Vehicle Trajectory Optimization and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, S. N.; Shen, J.; Grohs, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Two classes of neural networks have been developed for the study of hypersonic vehicle trajectory optimization and control. The first one is called an 'adaptive critic'. The uniqueness and main features of this approach are that: (1) they need no external training; (2) they allow variability of initial conditions; and (3) they can serve as feedback control. This is used to solve a 'free final time' two-point boundary value problem that maximizes the mass at the rocket burn-out while satisfying the pre-specified burn-out conditions in velocity, flightpath angle, and altitude. The second neural network is a recurrent network. An interesting feature of this network formulation is that when its inputs are the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices, the network outputs are the Kalman sequences (with a quadratic cost function); the same network is also used for identifying the coefficients of the dynamics and control matrices. Consequently, we can use it to control a system whose parameters are uncertain. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the potential of these methods.

  20. Application of queuing theory in production-inventory optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Reza; Hoseini, Seyed Farzad; Gholamian, M. R.; Feizabadi, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for an inventory control system in which customers' demands and suppliers' service time are considered as stochastic parameters. The proposed problem is solved through queuing theory for a single item. In this case, transitional probabilities are calculated in steady state. Afterward, the model is extended to the case of multi-item inventory systems. Then, to deal with the complexity of this problem, a new heuristic algorithm is developed. Finally, the presented bi-level inventory-queuing model is implemented as a case study in Electroestil Company.

  1. Optimization methods in control of electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, Thomas S.; Kleinman, Ralph E.

    1991-05-01

    This program is developing constructive methods for certain constrained optimization problems arising in the design and control of electromagnetic fields and in the identification of scattering objects. The problems addressed fall into three categories: (1) the design of antennas with optimal radiation characteristics measured in terms of directivity; (2) the control of the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of an object, in particular the minimization of its radar cross section, by the choice of material properties; and (3) the determination of the shape of scattering objects with various electromagnetic properties from scattered field data. The main thrust of the program is toward the development of constructive methods based on the use of complete families of solutions of the time-harmonic Maxwell equations in the infinite domain exterior to the radiating or scattering body. During the course of the work an increasing amount of attention has been devoted to the use of iterative methods for the solution of various direct and inverse problems. The continued investigation and development of these methods and their application in parameter identification has become a significant part of the program.

  2. Feedback Implementation of Zermelo's Optimal Control by Sugeno Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, C.; Homaifax, A.; Bikdash, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to implement optimal control laws of nonlinear systems in real time. Our methodology does not require solving two-point boundary value problems online and may not require it off-line either. The optimal control law is learned using the original Sugeno controller (OSC) from a family of optimal trajectories. We compare the trajectories generated by the OSC and the trajectories yielded by the optimal feedback control law when applied to Zermelo's ship steering problem.

  3. Theory of optimal beam splitting by phase gratings. I. One-dimensional gratings.

    PubMed

    Romero, Louis A; Dickey, Fred M

    2007-08-01

    We give an analytical basis for the theory of optimal beam splitting by one-dimensional gratings. In particular, we use methods from the calculus of variations to derive analytical expressions for the optimal phase function.

  4. Vehicular Slip Ratio Control Using Nonlinear Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Chida, Yuichi

    In this paper, we discuss integrated vehicle slip ratio control under both deceleration and acceleration without the need for controller switching, and also propose a design method for such an integrated slip ratio controller based on the slip ratio dynamics. When a vehicle switches from acceleration to deceleration and vice versa, the slip ratio varies discontinuously. Here, the slip ratio is approximated to a continuous function by using a sigmoid function. And a controller is then designed by using feedback linearization based on the approximated slip ratio. The stability of the designed control system is proven by Lyapunov stability theorem. Furthermore, we propose a robust control method based on a disturbance observer and sliding mode control theory. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control method is verified through numerical simulation.

  5. Neural network-based finite horizon stochastic optimal control design for nonlinear networked control systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-03-01

    The stochastic optimal control of nonlinear networked control systems (NNCSs) using neuro-dynamic programming (NDP) over a finite time horizon is a challenging problem due to terminal constraints, system uncertainties, and unknown network imperfections, such as network-induced delays and packet losses. Since the traditional iteration or time-based infinite horizon NDP schemes are unsuitable for NNCS with terminal constraints, a novel time-based NDP scheme is developed to solve finite horizon optimal control of NNCS by mitigating the above-mentioned challenges. First, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to approximate the control coefficient matrix that is subsequently utilized in conjunction with the critic and actor NNs to determine a time-based stochastic optimal control input over finite horizon in a forward-in-time and online manner. Eventually, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded with ultimate bounds being a function of initial conditions and final time. Moreover, the approximated control input converges close to optimal value within finite time. The simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  6. An introduction to stochastic control theory, path integrals and reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2007-02-01

    Control theory is a mathematical description of how to act optimally to gain future rewards. In this paper I give an introduction to deterministic and stochastic control theory and I give an overview of the possible application of control theory to the modeling of animal behavior and learning. I discuss a class of non-linear stochastic control problems that can be efficiently solved using a path integral or by MC sampling. In this control formalism the central concept of cost-to-go becomes a free energy and methods and concepts from statistical physics can be readily applied.

  7. Verification and optimal control of context-sensitive probabilistic Boolean networks using model checking and polynomial optimization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    One of the significant topics in systems biology is to develop control theory of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). In typical control of GRNs, expression of some genes is inhibited (activated) by manipulating external stimuli and expression of other genes. It is expected to apply control theory of GRNs to gene therapy technologies in the future. In this paper, a control method using a Boolean network (BN) is studied. A BN is widely used as a model of GRNs, and gene expression is expressed by a binary value (ON or OFF). In particular, a context-sensitive probabilistic Boolean network (CS-PBN), which is one of the extended models of BNs, is used. For CS-PBNs, the verification problem and the optimal control problem are considered. For the verification problem, a solution method using the probabilistic model checker PRISM is proposed. For the optimal control problem, a solution method using polynomial optimization is proposed. Finally, a numerical example on the WNT5A network, which is related to melanoma, is presented. The proposed methods provide us useful tools in control theory of GRNs.

  8. Verification and Optimal Control of Context-Sensitive Probabilistic Boolean Networks Using Model Checking and Polynomial Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    One of the significant topics in systems biology is to develop control theory of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). In typical control of GRNs, expression of some genes is inhibited (activated) by manipulating external stimuli and expression of other genes. It is expected to apply control theory of GRNs to gene therapy technologies in the future. In this paper, a control method using a Boolean network (BN) is studied. A BN is widely used as a model of GRNs, and gene expression is expressed by a binary value (ON or OFF). In particular, a context-sensitive probabilistic Boolean network (CS-PBN), which is one of the extended models of BNs, is used. For CS-PBNs, the verification problem and the optimal control problem are considered. For the verification problem, a solution method using the probabilistic model checker PRISM is proposed. For the optimal control problem, a solution method using polynomial optimization is proposed. Finally, a numerical example on the WNT5A network, which is related to melanoma, is presented. The proposed methods provide us useful tools in control theory of GRNs. PMID:24587766

  9. Continuous Control Artificial Potential Function Methods and Optimal Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    and Optimal Control R. Andrew Fields, BSAE Civ, USAF Approved: //signed// 12 March 2014 Lt Col J. Agte , PhD, (Chairman) date //signed// 12 March 2014...like to thank my research advisor, Lt. Col. Jeremy Agte . Without the countless conversations and whiteboard drawings in Lt. Col. Agte’s office, this...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 84 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Lt. Col Jeremy Agte (ENY) REPORT U

  10. Optimal Feedback Controlled Assembly of Perfect Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xun; Rupp, Bradley; Yang, Yuguang; Edwards, Tara D; Grover, Martha A; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-07-26

    Perfectly ordered states are targets in diverse molecular to microscale systems involving, for example, atomic clusters, protein folding, protein crystallization, nanoparticle superlattices, and colloidal crystals. However, there is no obvious approach to control the assembly of perfectly ordered global free energy minimum structures; near-equilibrium assembly is impractically slow, and faster out-of-equilibrium processes generally terminate in defective states. Here, we demonstrate the rapid and robust assembly of perfect crystals by navigating kinetic bottlenecks using closed-loop control of electric field mediated crystallization of colloidal particles. An optimal policy is computed with dynamic programming using a reaction coordinate based dynamic model. By tracking real-time stochastic particle configurations and adjusting applied fields via feedback, the evolution of unassembled particles is guided through polycrystalline states into single domain crystals. This approach to controlling the assembly of a target structure is based on general principles that make it applicable to a broad range of processes from nano- to microscales (where tuning a global thermodynamic variable yields temporal control over thermal sampling of different states via their relative free energies).

  11. An express method for optimally tuning an analog controller with respect to integral quality criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinko, I. M.; Kovrigo, Yu. M.; Kubrak, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    An express method for optimally tuning analog PI and PID controllers is considered. An integral quality criterion with minimizing the control output is proposed for optimizing control systems. The suggested criterion differs from existing ones in that the control output applied to the technological process is taken into account in a correct manner, due to which it becomes possible to maximally reduce the expenditure of material and/or energy resources in performing control of industrial equipment sets. With control organized in such manner, smaller wear and longer service life of control devices are achieved. A unimodal nature of the proposed criterion for optimally tuning a controller is numerically demonstrated using the methods of optimization theory. A functional interrelation between the optimal controller parameters and dynamic properties of a controlled plant is numerically determined for a single-loop control system. The results obtained from simulation of transients in a control system carried out using the proposed and existing functional dependences are compared with each other. The proposed calculation formulas differ from the existing ones by a simple structure and highly accurate search for the optimal controller tuning parameters. The obtained calculation formulas are recommended for being used by specialists in automation for design and optimization of control systems.

  12. Optimal control and cold war dynamics between plant and herbivore.

    PubMed

    Low, Candace; Ellner, Stephen P; Holden, Matthew H

    2013-08-01

    Herbivores eat the leaves that a plant needs for photosynthesis. However, the degree of antagonism between plant and herbivore may depend critically on the timing of their interactions and the intrinsic value of a leaf. We present a model that investigates whether and when the timing of plant defense and herbivore feeding activity can be optimized by evolution so that their interactions can move from antagonistic to neutral. We assume that temporal changes in environmental conditions will affect intrinsic leaf value, measured as potential carbon gain. Using optimal-control theory, we model herbivore evolution, first in response to fixed plant strategies and then under coevolutionary dynamics in which the plant also evolves in response to the herbivore. In the latter case, we solve for the evolutionarily stable strategies of plant defense induction and herbivore hatching rate under different ecological conditions. Our results suggest that the optimal strategies for both plant and herbivore are to avoid direct conflict. As long as the plant has the capability for moderately lethal defense, the herbivore will modify its hatching rate to avoid plant defenses, and the plant will never have to use them. Insights from this model offer a possible solution to the paradox of sublethal defenses and provide a mechanism for stable plant-herbivore interactions without the need for natural enemy control.

  13. Manual control theory and applications. [physiological and neurological applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoff, M.; Repa, B.

    1974-01-01

    Control theory, including manual control theory, and a review of some previous physiological and neurological applications of control theory and associated engineering concepts are reported. The discussion includes a specially tailored battery of critical control tasks that are being developed to monitor astronaut performance in long term orbital flight. The application of these concepts and tasks to patients with various neurological disorders is considered.

  14. Optimal digital control of a Stirling cycle cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, J.; Feeley, P.; Langford, G.

    1990-01-01

    This short paper describes work in progress on the conceptual design of a control system for a cryogenic cooler intended for use aboard spacecraft. The cooler will produce 5 watts of cooling at 65 K and will be used to support experiments associated with the following: earth observation; atmospheric measurements; infrared, x-ray, and gamma-ray astronomy; and magnetic field characterization. The cooler has been designed and constructed for NASA/GSFC by Philips Laboratories and is described in detail. The cooler has a number of unique design features intended to enhance long life and maintenance free operation in space including use of the high efficiency Stirling thermodynamic refrigeration cycle, linear magnetic motors, clearance-seals, and magnetic bearings. The proposed control system design is based on optimal control theory and is targeted for custom integrated circuit implementation. The resulting control system will meet the following mission requirements: efficiency, reliability, optimal thermodynamic, electrical, and mechanical performance; freedom from operator intervention; light weight; and small size.

  15. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  16. Inverse optimal sliding mode control of spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukdeboon, Chutiphon

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes two robust inverse optimal control schemes for spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics in the presence of external disturbances. For the first controller, an inverse optimal control law is designed based on Sontag-type formula and the control Lyapunov function. Then a robust inverse optimal position and attitude controller is designed by using a new second-order integral sliding mode control method to combine a sliding mode control with the derived inverse optimal control. The global asymptotic stability of the proposed control law is proved by using the second method of Lyapunov. For the other control law, a nonlinear H∞ inverse optimal controller for spacecraft position and attitude tracking motion is developed to achieve the design conditions of controller gains that the control law becomes suboptimal H∞ state feedback control. The ultimate boundedness of system state is proved by using the Lyapunov stability theory. Both developed robust inverse optimal controllers can minimise a performance index and ensure the stability of the closed-loop system and external disturbance attenuation. An example of position and attitude tracking manoeuvres is presented and simulation results are included to show the performance of the proposed controllers.

  17. Optimal control of thermally coupled Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.; Tran, Hien T.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal boundary temperature control of the stationary thermally coupled incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is considered. Well-posedness and existence of the optimal control and a necessary optimality condition are obtained. Optimization algorithms based on the augmented Lagrangian method with second order update are discussed. A test example motivated by control of transport process in the high pressure vapor transport (HVPT) reactor is presented to demonstrate the applicability of our theoretical results and proposed algorithm.

  18. Optimal Control for the Degenerate Elliptic Logistic Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, M.

    2002-06-05

    We consider the optimal control of harvesting the diffusive degenerate elliptic logistic equation. Under certain assumptions, we prove the existence and uniqueness of an optimal control. Moreover, the optimality system and a characterization of the optimal control are also derived. The sub-supersolution method, the singular eigenvalue problem and differentiability with respect to the positive cone are the techniques used to obtain our results.

  19. Optimal temperature control in laser hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Douglas R.; Swift, Carrie-Lynne; Siwek, Rosemarie A.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1990-07-01

    Interstitial laser hypefthezmia is a tecbnique for the treatment of malignant tumors that involves heating a tumor volume by directing infrared laser light, usually from an Nd: YZG laser, into the volume through interstitially iirlanted optical fibers . We have developed a multi-source, multi-sensor corruter controlled laser hyperthermia system similar to that first described by Daikuzono et al .' In this system, irrlanted inicrothermocouple sensors provide internal terrerature feedback to an algorithm that dynamically deteimines how much light should be directed into the various optical fiber sources, in order to maintain a spatially and tenporally unifoirn teriperature distribution in a tumor volume. This algorithm allows for the tissue thermal response to light to change over time (nonlinear system) , for exarrle, as tissue terterature increases or as tissue damage is incurred. The algorithm eiiploys an original nonlinear system control method that involves a periodic and indirect determination of how each microthermocouple responds to a unit irrulse of light directed down each fiber. Initial testing of the system in a ground beef phantom is described. By accommodating a nonlinear system, our irrlementation of laser hyperthermia should allow for optimal teirerature control.

  20. Optimal control with nonadiabatic molecular dynamics: Application to the Coulomb explosion of sodium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Pueyo, Adrián; Budagosky M., Jorge A.; Castro, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    We present an implementation of optimal control theory for the first-principles nonadiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics model, which describes a condensed matter system by considering classical point-particle nuclei, and quantum electrons, handled in our case with time-dependent density-functional theory. The scheme is demonstrated by optimizing the Coulomb explosion of small sodium clusters: the algorithm is set to find the optimal femtosecond laser pulses that disintegrate the clusters, for a given total duration, fluence, and cutoff frequency. We describe the numerical details and difficulties of the method.

  1. Numerical methods for control optimization in linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyatyushkin, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical methods are considered for solving optimal control problems in linear systems, namely, terminal control problems with control and phase constraints and time-optimal control problems. Several algorithms with various computer storage requirements are proposed for solving these problems. The algorithms are intended for finding an optimal control in linear systems having certain features, for example, when the reachable set of a system has flat faces.

  2. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  3. Linear control theory for gene network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Bleris, Leonidas

    2010-09-16

    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims at understanding complex interactions in cells. Here we demonstrate that linear control theory can provide valuable insight and practical tools for the characterization of complex biological networks. We provide the foundation for such analyses through the study of several case studies including cascade and parallel forms, feedback and feedforward loops. We reproduce experimental results and provide rational analysis of the observed behavior. We demonstrate that methods such as the transfer function (frequency domain) and linear state-space (time domain) can be used to predict reliably the properties and transient behavior of complex network topologies and point to specific design strategies for synthetic networks.

  4. Towards Quantum Cybernetics:. Optimal Feedback Control in Quantum Bio Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavkin, V. P.

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for the purpose of optimal control in quantum cybernetics with convex constraints and cońcave cost and bequest functions of the quantum state is given. Consideration is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme with continuous observations we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects for quantum stochastic micro-dynamics of the total system. This allows to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to only Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. A controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  5. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  6. The quality control theory of aging.

    PubMed

    Ladiges, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The quality control (QC) theory of aging is based on the concept that aging is the result of a reduction in QC of cellular systems designed to maintain lifelong homeostasis. Four QC systems associated with aging are 1) inadequate protein processing in a distressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER); 2) histone deacetylase (HDAC) processing of genomic histones and gene silencing; 3) suppressed AMPK nutrient sensing with inefficient energy utilization and excessive fat accumulation; and 4) beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR) signaling and environmental and emotional stress. Reprogramming these systems to maintain efficiency and prevent aging would be a rational strategy for increased lifespan and improved health. The QC theory can be tested with a pharmacological approach using three well-known and safe, FDA-approved drugs: 1) phenyl butyric acid, a chemical chaperone that enhances ER function and is also an HDAC inhibitor, 2) metformin, which activates AMPK and is used to treat type 2 diabetes, and 3) propranolol, a beta blocker which inhibits BAR signaling and is used to treat hypertension and anxiety. A critical aspect of the QC theory, then, is that aging is associated with multiple cellular systems that can be targeted with drug combinations more effectively than with single drugs. But more importantly, these drug combinations will effectively prevent, delay, or reverse chronic diseases of aging that impose such a tremendous health burden on our society.

  7. Adaptive Control and Guidance for Tactical Missiles. Volume 1: Parts 1 and 2. Introduction and Adaptive Control Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    varying airframe dynamics. Guidance techniques for tactical missiles are also reviewed and a number of steering laws, derived from optimal control ... theory , are evaluated. Quantitative comparisons are made between different guidance laws on the basis of intercept accuracy and control effort expended.

  8. A new linear quadratic optimal controller for the 34-meter high efficiency antenna position loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a new position loop controller for the 34-meter High Efficiency Deep Space antennas using linear quadratic (LQ) optimal control techniques is discussed. The LQ optimal control theory is reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal gain vectors are generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select a final gain vector. Estimator dynamics were selected and the corresponding gain vectors were computed. Final estimator selection was based on position, commanded rate, and estimator error responses.

  9. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-02-10

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice.

  10. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-02-01

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice.

  11. Web malware spread modelling and optimal control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanping; Zhong, Shouming

    2017-01-01

    The popularity of the Web improves the growth of web threats. Formulating mathematical models for accurate prediction of malicious propagation over networks is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to understand the propagation mechanisms of web malware and the impact of human intervention on the spread of malicious hyperlinks. Considering the characteristics of web malware, a new differential epidemic model which extends the traditional SIR model by adding another delitescent compartment is proposed to address the spreading behavior of malicious links over networks. The spreading threshold of the model system is calculated, and the dynamics of the model is theoretically analyzed. Moreover, the optimal control theory is employed to study malware immunization strategies, aiming to keep the total economic loss of security investment and infection loss as low as possible. The existence and uniqueness of the results concerning the optimality system are confirmed. Finally, numerical simulations show that the spread of malware links can be controlled effectively with proper control strategy of specific parameter choice. PMID:28186203

  12. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, Daniela; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2015-10-15

    We consider a non-quadratic optimal control problem associated to a nonlinear elliptic variational inequality, where the obstacle is the control itself. We show that, fixed a desired profile, there exists an optimal solution which is not far from it. Detailed characterizations of the optimal solution are given, also in terms of approximating problems.

  13. Can We Control Contaminant Transport In Hydrologic Networks? Application Of Control Theory Concepts To Watershed Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazarian, L.; Riasi, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Although controlling the level of contamination everywhere in the surface water network may not be feasible, it is vital to maintain safe water quality levels in specific areas, e.g. recreational waters. The question then is "what is the most efficient way to fully/partially control water quality in surface water networks?". This can be posed as a control problem where the goal is to efficiently drive the system to a desired state by manipulating few input variables. Such problems reduce to (1) finding the best control locations in the network to influence the state of the system; and (2) choosing the time-variant inputs at the control locations to achieve the desired state of the system with minimum effort. We demonstrate that the optimal solution to control the level of contamination in the network can be found through application of control theory concepts to transport in dendritic surface water networks.

  14. Behavior-Specific Social Support for Healthy Behaviors among African American Church Members: Applying Optimal Matching Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrasher, James F.; Campbell, Marci Kramish; Oates, Veronica

    2004-01-01

    This study used data from 850 African Americans to test optimal matching theory (OMT). OMT predicts that (1) the most important dimensions of social support depend on the controllability of the behavior and (2) different network members often provide support across health behaviors. Data were gathered on social support source for physical…

  15. Behavior-Specific Social Support for Healthy Behaviors among African American Church Members: Applying Optimal Matching Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrasher, James F.; Campbell, Marci Kramish; Oates, Veronica

    2004-01-01

    This study used data from 850 African Americans to test optimal matching theory (OMT). OMT predicts that (1) the most important dimensions of social support depend on the controllability of the behavior and (2) different network members often provide support across health behaviors. Data were gathered on social support source for physical…

  16. Frequency domain quantum optimal control under multiple constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-03-01

    Optimal control of quantum systems with complex constrained external fields is one of the longstanding theoretical and numerical challenges at the frontier of quantum control research. Here, we present a theoretical method that can be utilized to optimize the control fields subject to multiple constraints while guaranteeing monotonic convergence towards desired physical objectives. This optimization method is formulated in the frequency domain in line with the current ultrafast pulse shaping technique, providing the possibility for performing quantum optimal control simulations and experiments in a unified fashion. For illustrations, this method is successfully employed to perform multiple constraint spectral-phase-only optimization for maximizing resonant multiphoton transitions with desired pulses.

  17. Differentiating a Finite Element Biodegradation Simulation Model for Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, Barbara S.; Shoemaker, Christine A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimal control model for improving the design of in situ bioremediation of groundwater has been developed. The model uses a finite element biodegradation simulation model called Bio2D to find optimal pumping strategies. Analytical derivatives of the bioremediation finite element model are derived; these derivatives must be computed for the optimal control algorithm. The derivatives are complex and nonlinear; the bulk of the computational effort in solving the optimal control problem is required to calculate the derivatives. An overview of the optimal control and simulation model formulations is also given.

  18. Skinner Rusk unified formalism for optimal control systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero-Liñán, María; Echeverría-Enríquez, Arturo; Martín de Diego, David; Muñoz-Lecanda, Miguel C.; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2007-10-01

    A geometric approach to time-dependent optimal control problems is proposed. This formulation is based on the Skinner and Rusk formalism for Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems. The corresponding unified formalism developed for optimal control systems allows us to formulate geometrically the necessary conditions given by a weak form of Pontryagin's maximum principle, provided that the differentiability with respect to controls is assumed and the space of controls is open. Furthermore, our method is also valid for implicit optimal control systems and, in particular, for the so-called descriptor systems (optimal control problems including both differential and algebraic equations).

  19. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ova, Maria

    2009-09-09

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  20. Feed Forward Neural Network and Optimal Control Problem with Control and State Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ová, Mária

    2009-09-01

    A feed forward neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The paper extends adaptive critic neural network architecture proposed by [5] to the optimal control problems with control and state constraints. The optimal control problem is transcribed into a nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. The proposed simulation method is illustrated by the optimal control problem of nitrogen transformation cycle model. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  1. Optimal control of a dynamical system representing a gantry crane

    SciTech Connect

    Karihaloo, B.L.; Parbery, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    Problems arising in the optimal control of gantry crane installations are considered. Continuous controls to minimize a control squared objective function are obtained. The amplitude of in-plane oscillations of the suspended mass is assumed small. The optimal controls are sufficiently simple for practical realization.

  2. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  3. Optimizing performance through intrinsic motivation and attention for learning: The OPTIMAL theory of motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Gabriele; Lewthwaite, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Effective motor performance is important for surviving and thriving, and skilled movement is critical in many activities. Much theorizing over the past few decades has focused on how certain practice conditions affect the processing of task-related information to affect learning. Yet, existing theoretical perspectives do not accommodate significant recent lines of evidence demonstrating motivational and attentional effects on performance and learning. These include research on (a) conditions that enhance expectancies for future performance, (b) variables that influence learners' autonomy, and (c) an external focus of attention on the intended movement effect. We propose the OPTIMAL (Optimizing Performance through Intrinsic Motivation and Attention for Learning) theory of motor learning. We suggest that motivational and attentional factors contribute to performance and learning by strengthening the coupling of goals to actions. We provide explanations for the performance and learning advantages of these variables on psychological and neuroscientific grounds. We describe a plausible mechanism for expectancy effects rooted in responses of dopamine to the anticipation of positive experience and temporally associated with skill practice. Learner autonomy acts perhaps largely through an enhanced expectancy pathway. Furthermore, we consider the influence of an external focus for the establishment of efficient functional connections across brain networks that subserve skilled movement. We speculate that enhanced expectancies and an external focus propel performers' cognitive and motor systems in productive "forward" directions and prevent "backsliding" into self- and non-task focused states. Expected success presumably breeds further success and helps consolidate memories. We discuss practical implications and future research directions.

  4. Optimally controlling the human connectome: the role of network topology

    PubMed Central

    Betzel, Richard F.; Gu, Shi; Medaglia, John D.; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    To meet ongoing cognitive demands, the human brain must seamlessly transition from one brain state to another, in the process drawing on different cognitive systems. How does the brain’s network of anatomical connections help facilitate such transitions? Which features of this network contribute to making one transition easy and another transition difficult? Here, we address these questions using network control theory. We calculate the optimal input signals to drive the brain to and from states dominated by different cognitive systems. The input signals allow us to assess the contributions made by different brain regions. We show that such contributions, which we measure as energy, are correlated with regions’ weighted degrees. We also show that the network communicability, a measure of direct and indirect connectedness between brain regions, predicts the extent to which brain regions compensate when input to another region is suppressed. Finally, we identify optimal states in which the brain should start (and finish) in order to minimize transition energy. We show that the optimal target states display high activity in hub regions, implicating the brain’s rich club. Furthermore, when rich club organization is destroyed, the energy cost associated with state transitions increases significantly, demonstrating that it is the richness of brain regions that makes them ideal targets. PMID:27468904

  5. Optimal and suboptimal control technique for aircraft spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic investigation has been made of procedures for effecting recovery from equilibrium spin conditions for three assumed aircraft configurations. Three approaches which utilize conventional aerodynamic controls are investigated. Included are a constant control recovery mode, optimal recoveries, and a suboptimal control logic patterned after optimal recovery results. The optimal and suboptimal techniques are shown to yield a significant improvement in recovery performance over that attained by using a constant control recovery procedure.

  6. Optimal control of a supersonic inlet to minimize frequency of inlet unstart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Zeller, J. R.; Geyser, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the use of modern control theory for the design of controls for a supersonic inlet is described. In particular, the task of controlling a mixed-compression supersonic inlet is formulated as a linear optimal stochastic control and estimation problem. An inlet can exhibit an undesirable instability due to excessive inlet normal shock motion. For the optimal control formulation of the inlet problem, a non quadratic performance index, which is equal to the expected frequency of inlet unstarts, is used. This physically meaningful performance index is minimized for a range of inlet disturbance and measurement noise covariances.

  7. Global optimization strategies for high-performance controls

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, T.B.

    1995-12-31

    The current trend of extending digital heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting controls to terminal devices has had an enormous impact on the role of global strategies for energy and comfort optimization. In some respects optimization algorithms are becoming simpler because more complete information about conditions throughout the building is now available to the control system. However, the task of analyzing this information often adds a new layer of complexity to the process of developing these algorithms. Also, the extension of direct digital control (DDC) to terminal devices offers new energy and comfort control optimization opportunities that require additional global optimization algorithms. This paper discusses the changing role of global optimization strategies as the integration of DDC systems is extended to terminal equipment. The discussion offers suggestions about how the development of more powerful global optimization strategies needs to be considered in the design of the mechanical equipment. Specifically, four areas of global optimization are discussed: optimization of variable-air-volume (VAV) airflow, optimization of lighting level via dimming ballasts, optimization of space temperature setpoint, and optimization of chiller and boiler operation. In each of these categories, a control philosophy employing global optimization is discussed, sample control algorithms are provided, and a discussion of the implication of these new control opportunities on the design of the mechanical components is included.

  8. Recent experience in simultaneous control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Ramaker, R.; Milman, M.

    1989-01-01

    To show the feasibility of simultaneous optimization as design procedure, low order problems were used in conjunction with simple control formulations. The numerical results indicate that simultaneous optimization is not only feasible, but also advantageous. Such advantages come at the expense of introducing complexities beyond those encountered in structure optimization alone, or control optimization alone. Examples include: larger design parameter space, optimization may combine continuous and combinatoric variables, and the combined objective function may be nonconvex. Future extensions to include large order problems, more complex objective functions and constraints, and more sophisticated control formulations will require further research to ensure that the additional complexities do not outweigh the advantages of simultaneous optimization. Some areas requiring more efficient tools than currently available include: multiobjective criteria and nonconvex optimization. Efficient techniques to deal with optimization over combinatoric and continuous variables, and with truncation issues for structure and control parameters of both the model space as well as the design space need to be developed.

  9. Testing optimal foraging theory in a penguin–krill system

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y.; Ito, Motohiro; Takahashi, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Food is heterogeneously distributed in nature, and understanding how animals search for and exploit food patches is a fundamental challenge in ecology. The classic marginal value theorem (MVT) formulates optimal patch residence time in response to patch quality. The MVT was generally proved in controlled animal experiments; however, owing to the technical difficulties in recording foraging behaviour in the wild, it has been inadequately examined in natural predator–prey systems, especially those in the three-dimensional marine environment. Using animal-borne accelerometers and video cameras, we collected a rare dataset in which the behaviour of a marine predator (penguin) was recorded simultaneously with the capture timings of mobile, patchily distributed prey (krill). We provide qualitative support for the MVT by showing that (i) krill capture rate diminished with time in each dive, as assumed in the MVT, and (ii) dive duration (or patch residence time, controlled for dive depth) increased with short-term, dive-scale krill capture rate, but decreased with long-term, bout-scale krill capture rate, as predicted from the MVT. Our results demonstrate that a single environmental factor (i.e. patch quality) can have opposite effects on animal behaviour depending on the time scale, emphasizing the importance of multi-scale approaches in understanding complex foraging strategies. PMID:24478293

  10. Testing optimal foraging theory in a penguin-krill system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Ito, Motohiro; Takahashi, Akinori

    2014-03-22

    Food is heterogeneously distributed in nature, and understanding how animals search for and exploit food patches is a fundamental challenge in ecology. The classic marginal value theorem (MVT) formulates optimal patch residence time in response to patch quality. The MVT was generally proved in controlled animal experiments; however, owing to the technical difficulties in recording foraging behaviour in the wild, it has been inadequately examined in natural predator-prey systems, especially those in the three-dimensional marine environment. Using animal-borne accelerometers and video cameras, we collected a rare dataset in which the behaviour of a marine predator (penguin) was recorded simultaneously with the capture timings of mobile, patchily distributed prey (krill). We provide qualitative support for the MVT by showing that (i) krill capture rate diminished with time in each dive, as assumed in the MVT, and (ii) dive duration (or patch residence time, controlled for dive depth) increased with short-term, dive-scale krill capture rate, but decreased with long-term, bout-scale krill capture rate, as predicted from the MVT. Our results demonstrate that a single environmental factor (i.e. patch quality) can have opposite effects on animal behaviour depending on the time scale, emphasizing the importance of multi-scale approaches in understanding complex foraging strategies.

  11. Optimizing Computer Assisted Instruction By Applying Principles of Learning Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas O.

    The development of learning theory and its application to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) are described. Among the early theoretical constructs thought to be important are E. L. Thorndike's concept of learning connectisms, Neal Miller's theory of motivation, and B. F. Skinner's theory of operant conditioning. Early devices incorporating those…

  12. Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols - GOAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assémat, Elie; Machnes, Shai; Tannor, David; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank

    Quantum optimal control becomes a necessary step in a number of studies in the quantum realm. Recent experimental advances showed that superconducting qubits can be controlled with an impressive accuracy. However, most of the standard optimal control algorithms are not designed to manage such high accuracy. To tackle this issue, a novel quantum optimal control algorithm have been introduced: the Gradient Optimization for Analytic conTrols (GOAT). It avoids the piecewise constant approximation of the control pulse used by standard algorithms. This allows an efficient implementation of very high accuracy optimization. It also includes a novel method to compute the gradient that provides many advantages, e.g. the absence of backpropagation or the natural route to optimize the robustness of the control pulses. This talk will present the GOAT algorithm and a few applications to transmons systems.

  13. Robust and optimal attitude control of spacecraft with disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yonmook

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a robust and optimal attitude control design that uses the Euler angles and angular velocities feedback is presented for regulation of spacecraft with disturbances. In the control design, it is assumed that the disturbance signal has the information of the system state. In addition, it is assumed that the disturbance signal tries to maximise the same performance index that the control input tries to minimise. After proposing a robust attitude control law that can stabilise the complete attitude motion of spacecraft with disturbances, the optimal attitude control problem of spacecraft is formulated as the optimal game-theoretic problem. Then it is shown that the proposed robust attitude control law is the optimal solution of the optimal game-theoretic problem. The stability of the closed-loop system for the proposed robust and optimal control law is proven by the LaSalle invariance principle. The theoretical results presented in this paper are illustrated by a numerical example.

  14. A Transformation Approach to Optimal Control Problems with Bounded State Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanafy, Lawrence Hanafy

    1971-01-01

    A technique is described and utilized in the study of the solutions to various general problems in optimal control theory, which are converted in to Lagrange problems in the calculus of variations. This is accomplished by mapping certain properties in Euclidean space onto closed control and state regions. Nonlinear control problems with a unit m cube as control region and unit n cube as state region are considered.

  15. A Multiobjective Optimization Framework for Stochastic Control of Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Maroulas, Vasileios; Xiong, Professor Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of minimizing the long-run expected average cost of a complex system consisting of subsystems that interact with each other and the environment. We treat the stochastic control problem as a multiobjective optimization problem of the one-stage expected costs of the subsystems, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution is an optimal control policy that minimizes the average cost criterion for the entire system. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that the Pareto control policy may be of value in deriving online an optimal control policy in complex systems.

  16. Two level optimization of a redundant linear control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. F.; Harding, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A linear system with two sets of controls, one primary and the other redundant, is considered. A two level optimization procedure is used to control the system and to maintain maximal availability of the primary control.

  17. Mesh refinement strategy for optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. T.; Fontes, F. A. C. C.

    2013-10-01

    Direct methods are becoming the most used technique to solve nonlinear optimal control problems. Regular time meshes having equidistant spacing are frequently used. However, in some cases these meshes cannot cope accurately with nonlinear behavior. One way to improve the solution is to select a new mesh with a greater number of nodes. Another way, involves adaptive mesh refinement. In this case, the mesh nodes have non equidistant spacing which allow a non uniform nodes collocation. In the method presented in this paper, a time mesh refinement strategy based on the local error is developed. After computing a solution in a coarse mesh, the local error is evaluated, which gives information about the subintervals of time domain where refinement is needed. This procedure is repeated until the local error reaches a user-specified threshold. The technique is applied to solve the car-like vehicle problem aiming minimum consumption. The approach developed in this paper leads to results with greater accuracy and yet with lower overall computational time as compared to using a time meshes having equidistant spacing.

  18. Time optimal controls of the linear Fitzhugh–Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kunisch, Karl; Wang, Lijuan

    2012-01-01

    Time optimal control governed by the internally controlled linear Fitzhugh–Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraint is considered. Making use of Ekeland’s variational principle, we obtain Pontryagin’s maximum principle for a time optimal control problem. Using the maximum principle, the bang–bang property of the optimal controls is established under appropriate assumptions. PMID:23576818

  19. Time optimal controls of the linear Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraints.

    PubMed

    Kunisch, Karl; Wang, Lijuan

    2012-11-01

    Time optimal control governed by the internally controlled linear Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation with pointwise control constraint is considered. Making use of Ekeland's variational principle, we obtain Pontryagin's maximum principle for a time optimal control problem. Using the maximum principle, the bang-bang property of the optimal controls is established under appropriate assumptions.

  20. Optimal and robust control of invasive alien species spreading in homogeneous landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, L. R.; Baker, R.; MacLeod, A.; Knight, J. D.; Mumford, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Government agencies lack robust modelling tools to manage the spread of invasive alien species (IAS). In this paper, we combine optimal control and simulation methods with biological invasion spread theory to estimate the type of optimal policy and switching point of control efforts against a spreading IAS. We employ information-gap (info-gap) theory to assess how the optimal solutions differ from a policy that is most robustly immune to unacceptable outcomes. The model is applied to the potential invasion of the Colorado potato beetle in the UK. Under no uncertainty, we demonstrate that for many of the parameter combinations the optimal control policy corresponds to slowing down the invasion. The info-gap analysis shows that eradication policies identified as optimal under no uncertainty are robustly the best policies even under severe uncertainty, i.e. even if they are likely to turn into slowing down policies. We also show that the control of satellite colonies, if identified as optimal under no uncertainty, will also be a robust slowing down policy for IAS that can spread by long distance dispersal even for relatively ineffective control measures. The results suggest that agencies adopt management strategies that are robustly optimal, despite the severe uncertainties they face. PMID:19740923

  1. Optimal Control for a Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-yun; Guan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is put forward in a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator (PHHE). A power-train mathematical model of PHHE is illustrated along with the analysis of components' parameters. Then, the optimal control problem is addressed, and PSO algorithm is introduced to deal with this nonlinear optimal problem which contains lots of inequality/equality constraints. Then, the comparisons between the optimal control and rule-based one are made, and the results show that hybrids with the optimal control would increase fuel economy. Although PSO algorithm is off-line optimization, still it would bring performance benchmark for PHHE and also help have a deep insight into hybrid excavators. PMID:23818832

  2. Optimal control for a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator using particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-yun; Guan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is put forward in a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator (PHHE). A power-train mathematical model of PHHE is illustrated along with the analysis of components' parameters. Then, the optimal control problem is addressed, and PSO algorithm is introduced to deal with this nonlinear optimal problem which contains lots of inequality/equality constraints. Then, the comparisons between the optimal control and rule-based one are made, and the results show that hybrids with the optimal control would increase fuel economy. Although PSO algorithm is off-line optimization, still it would bring performance benchmark for PHHE and also help have a deep insight into hybrid excavators.

  3. Optimal spacecraft attitude control using collocation and nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, A. L.; Conway, B. A.

    1992-10-01

    Direct collocation with nonlinear programming (DCNLP) is employed to find the optimal open-loop control histories for detumbling a disabled satellite. The controls are torques and forces applied to the docking arm and joint and torques applied about the body axes of the OMV. Solutions are obtained for cases in which various constraints are placed on the controls and in which the number of controls is reduced or increased from that considered in Conway and Widhalm (1986). DCLNP works well when applied to the optimal control problem of satellite attitude control. The formulation is straightforward and produces good results in a relatively small amount of time on a Cray X/MP with no a priori information about the optimal solution. The addition of joint acceleration to the controls significantly reduces the control magnitudes and optimal cost. In all cases, the torques and acclerations are modest and the optimal cost is very modest.

  4. Aircraft nonlinear optimal control using fuzzy gain scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusyirwan, I. F.; Kung, Z. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Fuzzy gain scheduling is a common solution for nonlinear flight control. The highly nonlinear region of flight dynamics is determined throughout the examination of eigenvalues and the irregular pattern of root locus plots that show the nonlinear characteristic. By using the optimal control for command tracking, the pitch rate stability augmented system is constructed and the longitudinal flight control system is established. The outputs of optimal control for 21 linear systems are fed into the fuzzy gain scheduler. This research explores the capability in using both optimal control and fuzzy gain scheduling to improve the efficiency in finding the optimal control gains and to achieve Level 1 flying qualities. The numerical simulation work is carried out to determine the effectiveness and performance of the entire flight control system. The simulation results show that the fuzzy gain scheduling technique is able to perform in real time to find near optimal control law in various flying conditions.

  5. Optimality Conditions for Semilinear Hyperbolic Equations with Controls in Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bo; Lou Hongwei

    2012-06-15

    An optimal control problem for semilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations is considered. The control variable appears in coefficients. Necessary conditions for optimal controls are established by method of two-scale convergence and homogenized spike variation. Results for problems with state constraints are also stated.

  6. Stochastic Real-Time Optimal Control: A Pseudospectral Approach for Bearing-Only Trajectory Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    York, NY, 1992. [5] A.V. Savkin, P.N. Pathirana, nd F. Faruqi. The problem of precision missile guidance: LQR and H 00 control frameworks. IEEE...STOCHASTIC REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL : A PSEUDOSPECTRAL APPROACH FOR BEARING-ONLY TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION DISSERTATION Steven M. Ross, Lieutenant...the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/DS/ENY/11-24 STOCHASTIC REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL : A

  7. Computer simulation for time optimal or energy optimal attitude control of spin-stabilized spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, R. D.; Werking, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    An original technique for determining the optimal magnetic torque strategy for control of the attitude of spin stabilized spacecraft is presented. By employing Lagrange multipliers and the Calculus of Variations, optimal control equations are derived which define minimum time and minimum energy attitude maneuvers. Computer program algorithms to numerically solve these optimal control equations are also described. The performance of this technique is compared with a commonly employed planning method.

  8. Optimal control of nonlinear continuous-time systems in strict-feedback form.

    PubMed

    Zargarzadeh, Hassan; Dierks, Travis; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimal tracking control scheme for nonlinear continuous-time systems in strict-feedback form with uncertain dynamics. The optimal tracking problem is transformed into an equivalent optimal regulation problem through a feedforward adaptive control input that is generated by modifying the standard backstepping technique. Subsequently, a neural network-based optimal control scheme is introduced to estimate the cost, or value function, over an infinite horizon for the resulting nonlinear continuous-time systems in affine form when the internal dynamics are unknown. The estimated cost function is then used to obtain the optimal feedback control input; therefore, the overall optimal control input for the nonlinear continuous-time system in strict-feedback form includes the feedforward plus the optimal feedback terms. It is shown that the estimated cost function minimizes the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman estimation error in a forward-in-time manner without using any value or policy iterations. Finally, optimal output feedback control is introduced through the design of a suitable observer. Lyapunov theory is utilized to show the overall stability of the proposed schemes without requiring an initial admissible controller. Simulation examples are provided to validate the theoretical results.

  9. Stochastic optimal controller design for uncertain nonlinear networked control system via neuro dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2013-03-01

    The stochastic optimal controller design for the nonlinear networked control system (NNCS) with uncertain system dynamics is a challenging problem due to the presence of both system nonlinearities and communication network imperfections, such as random delays and packet losses, which are not unknown a priori. In the recent literature, neuro dynamic programming (NDP) techniques, based on value and policy iterations, have been widely reported to solve the optimal control of general affine nonlinear systems. However, for realtime control, value and policy iterations-based methodology are not suitable and time-based NDP techniques are preferred. In addition, output feedback-based controller designs are preferred for implementation. Therefore, in this paper, a novel NNCS representation incorporating the system uncertainties and network imperfections is introduced first by using input and output measurements for facilitating output feedback. Then, an online neural network (NN) identifier is introduced to estimate the control coefficient matrix, which is subsequently utilized for the controller design. Subsequently, the critic and action NNs are employed along with the NN identifier to determine the forward-in-time, time-based stochastic optimal control of NNCS without using value and policy iterations. Here, the value function and control inputs are updated once a sampling instant. By using novel NN weight update laws, Lyapunov theory is used to show that all the closed-loop signals and NN weights are uniformly ultimately bounded in the mean while the approximated control input converges close to its target value with time. Simulation results are included to show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. RTM And VARTM Design, Optimization, And Control With SLIC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-02

    UD-CCM l 2 July 2003 1 RTM AND VARTM DESIGN, OPTIMIZATION, AND CONTROL WITH SLIC Kuang-Ting Hsiao UD-CCM Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RTM And VARTM Design, Optimization, And Control With SLIC 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...ONR Workshop - 5 Simulation-based Liquid Injection Control: Philosophy SLIC Artificial Intelligence Optimized Design For RTM / VARTM Sensors

  11. Optimal stochastic control in natural resource management: Framework and examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1982-01-01

    A framework is presented for the application of optimal control methods to natural resource problems. An expression of the optimal control problem appropriate for renewable natural resources is given and its application to Markovian systems is presented in some detail. Three general approaches are outlined for determining optimal control of infinite time horizon systems and three examples from the natural resource literature are used for illustration.

  12. Optimal control of a fed-batch fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dekkers, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The common cultivation of bakers' yeast is an aerobic fed-batch fermentation under sugar-limited growth. The ultimate objective of on-line computer control is to optimize the process through maximizing the productivity of biomass formation while minimizing the consumption of raw materials for the product. Results obtained on the optimal control of a fed-batch fermentation are given. The aspects to be considered are instrumentation, state estimation, optimization and process control.

  13. Theory and Algorithms for Global/Local Design Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-29

    algorithm with memory for optimal design of laminated sandwich composite panels ", Composite Structures, 58 (2002) 513-520. V. B. Gantovnik, Z. Giirdal, L...34, AIAA J., 43 (2005) 1844-1849. D. B. Adams, L. T. Watson, and Z. Gilrdal, " Optimization and blending of composite laminates using genetic algorithms ...Anderson-Cook, " Genetic algorithm optimization and blending of composite laminates by locally

  14. Searching for quantum optimal controls under severe constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Riviello, Gregory; Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Brif, Constantin; Long, Ruixing; Wu, Re-Bing; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-04-06

    The success of quantum optimal control for both experimental and theoretical objectives is connected to the topology of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local traps if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is of full rank, and (3) there are no constraints on the control field. This paper investigates how the violation of assumption (3) affects gradient searches for globally optimal control fields. The satisfaction of assumptions (1) and (2) ensures that the control landscape lacks fundamental traps, but certain control constraints can still prevent successful optimization of the objective. Using optimal control simulations, we show that the most severe field constraints are those that limit essential control resources, such as the number of control variables, the control duration, and the field strength. Proper management of these resources is an issue of great practical importance for optimization in the laboratory. For each resource, we show that constraints exceeding quantifiable limits can introduce artificial traps to the control landscape and prevent gradient searches from reaching a globally optimal solution. These results demonstrate that careful choice of relevant control parameters helps to eliminate artificial traps and facilitate successful optimization.

  15. Searching for quantum optimal controls under severe constraints

    DOE PAGES

    Riviello, Gregory; Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Brif, Constantin; ...

    2015-04-06

    The success of quantum optimal control for both experimental and theoretical objectives is connected to the topology of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local traps if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is of full rank, and (3) there are no constraints on the control field. This paper investigates how the violation of assumption (3) affects gradient searches for globally optimal control fields. The satisfaction of assumptions (1) and (2) ensures that the control landscape lacks fundamental traps, butmore » certain control constraints can still prevent successful optimization of the objective. Using optimal control simulations, we show that the most severe field constraints are those that limit essential control resources, such as the number of control variables, the control duration, and the field strength. Proper management of these resources is an issue of great practical importance for optimization in the laboratory. For each resource, we show that constraints exceeding quantifiable limits can introduce artificial traps to the control landscape and prevent gradient searches from reaching a globally optimal solution. These results demonstrate that careful choice of relevant control parameters helps to eliminate artificial traps and facilitate successful optimization.« less

  16. Near-Optimal Tracking Control of Mobile Robots Via Receding-Horizon Dual Heuristic Programming.

    PubMed

    Lian, Chuanqiang; Xu, Xin; Chen, Hong; He, Haibo

    2016-11-01

    Trajectory tracking control of wheeled mobile robots (WMRs) has been an important research topic in control theory and robotics. Although various tracking control methods with stability have been developed for WMRs, it is still difficult to design optimal or near-optimal tracking controller under uncertainties and disturbances. In this paper, a near-optimal tracking control method is presented for WMRs based on receding-horizon dual heuristic programming (RHDHP). In the proposed method, a backstepping kinematic controller is designed to generate desired velocity profiles and the receding horizon strategy is used to decompose the infinite-horizon optimal control problem into a series of finite-horizon optimal control problems. In each horizon, a closed-loop tracking control policy is successively updated using a class of approximate dynamic programming algorithms called finite-horizon dual heuristic programming (DHP). The convergence property of the proposed method is analyzed and it is shown that the tracking control system based on RHDHP is asymptotically stable by using the Lyapunov approach. Simulation results on three tracking control problems demonstrate that the proposed method has improved control performance when compared with conventional model predictive control (MPC) and DHP. It is also illustrated that the proposed method has lower computational burden than conventional MPC, which is very beneficial for real-time tracking control.

  17. Optimal defense theory explains deviations from latitudinal herbivory defense hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kooyers, Nicholas J; Blackman, Benjamin K; Holeski, Liza M

    2017-04-01

    The latitudinal herbivory defense hypothesis (LHDH) postulates that the prevalence of species interactions, including herbivory, is greater at lower latitudes, leading to selection for increased levels of plant defense. While latitudinal defense clines may be caused by spatial variation in herbivore pressure, optimal defense theory predicts that clines could also be caused by ecogeographic variation in the cost of defense. For instance, allocation of resources to defense may not increase plant fitness when growing seasons are short and plants must reproduce quickly. Here we use a common garden experiment to survey genetic variation for constitutive and induced phenylpropanoid glycoside (PPG) concentrations across 35 Mimulus guttatus populations over a ~13° latitudinal transect. Our sampling regime is unique among studies of the LHDH in that it allows us to disentangle the effects of growing season length from those of latitude, temperature, and elevation. For five of the seven PPGs surveyed, we find associations between latitude and plant defense that are robust to population structure. However, contrary to the LHDH, only two PPGs were found at higher levels in low latitude populations, and total PPG concentrations were higher at higher latitudes. PPG levels are strongly correlated with growing season length, with higher levels of PPGs in plants from areas with longer growing seasons. Further, flowering time is positively correlated with the concentration of nearly all PPGs, suggesting that there may be a strong trade-off between development time and defense production. Our results reveal that ecogeographic patterns in plant defense may reflect variation in the cost of producing defense compounds in addition to variation in herbivore pressure. Thus, the biogeographic pattern predicted by the LHDH may not be accurate because the underlying factors driving variation in defense, in this case, growing season length, are not always associated with latitude in the same

  18. Factorization and reduction methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Chandrasekhar-type factorization method is applied to the linear-quadratic optimal control problem for distributed parameter systems. An aeroelastic control problem is used as a model example to demonstrate that if computationally efficient algorithms, such as those of Chandrasekhar-type, are combined with the special structure often available to a particular problem, then an abstract approximation theory developed for distributed parameter control theory becomes a viable method of solution. A numerical scheme based on averaging approximations is applied to hereditary control problems. Numerical examples are given.

  19. Theory and Computation of Optimal Low- and Medium- Thrust Orbit Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodson, Troy D.; Chuang, Jason C. H.; Ledsinger, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents new theoretical results which lead to new algorithms for the computation of fuel-optimal multiple-burn orbit transfers of low and medium thrust. Theoretical results introduced herein show how to add burns to an optimal trajectory and show that the traditional set of necessary conditions may be replaced with a much simpler set of equations. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the utility of the theoretical results and the new algorithms. Two indirect methods from the literature are shown to be effective for the optimal orbit transfer problem with relatively small numbers of burns. These methods are the Minimizing Boundary Condition Method (MBCM) and BOUNDSCO. Both of these methods make use of the first-order necessary conditions exactly as derived by optimal control theory. Perturbations due to Earth's oblateness and atmospheric drag are considered. These perturbations are of greatest interest for transfers that take place between low Earth orbit altitudes and geosynchronous orbit altitudes. Example extremal solutions including these effects and computed by the aforementioned methods are presented. An investigation is also made into a suboptimal multiple-burn guidance scheme. The FORTRAN code developed for this study has been collected together in a package named ORBPACK. ORBPACK's user manual is provided as an appendix to this report.

  20. Optimization of hydrometric monitoring network in urban drainage systems using information theory.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, J

    2017-10-01

    Regular and continuous monitoring of urban runoff in both quality and quantity aspects is of great importance for controlling and managing surface runoff. Due to the considerable costs of establishing new gauges, optimization of the monitoring network is essential. This research proposes an approach for site selection of new discharge stations in urban areas, based on entropy theory in conjunction with multi-objective optimization tools and numerical models. The modeling framework provides an optimal trade-off between the maximum possible information content and the minimum shared information among stations. This approach was applied to the main surface-water collection system in Tehran to determine new optimal monitoring points under the cost considerations. Experimental results on this drainage network show that the obtained cost-effective designs noticeably outperform the consulting engineers' proposal in terms of both information contents and shared information. The research also determined the highly frequent sites at the Pareto front which might be important for decision makers to give a priority for gauge installation on those locations of the network.

  1. React or wait: which optimal culling strategy to control infectious diseases in wildlife.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, Luca; Tessoni, Valentina; Groppi, Maria; De Leo, Giulio A

    2014-10-01

    We applied optimal control theory to an SI epidemic model to identify optimal culling strategies for diseases management in wildlife. We focused on different forms of the objective function, including linear control, quadratic control, and control with limited amount of resources. Moreover, we identified optimal solutions under different assumptions on disease-free host dynamics, namely: self-regulating logistic growth, Malthusian growth, and the case of negligible demography. We showed that the correct characterization of the disease-free host growth is crucial for defining optimal disease control strategies. By analytical investigations of the model with negligible demography, we demonstrated that the optimal strategy for the linear control can be either to cull at the maximum rate at the very beginning of the epidemic (reactive culling) when the culling cost is low, or never to cull, when culling cost is high. On the other hand, in the cases of quadratic control or limited resources, we demonstrated that the optimal strategy is always reactive. Numerical analyses for hosts with logistic growth showed that, in the case of linear control, the optimal strategy is always reactive when culling cost is low. In contrast, if the culling cost is high, the optimal strategy is to delay control, i.e. not to cull at the onset of the epidemic. Finally, we showed that for diseases with the same basic reproduction number delayed control can be optimal for acute infections, i.e. characterized by high disease-induced mortality and fast dynamics, while reactive control can be optimal for chronic ones.

  2. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  3. Action Theory, Control and Motivation: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckensberger, L. H.; Meacham, J. A., Eds.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the symposium on action theory presented at the 1983 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development in Munich. The symposium included reactions to action theory from a variety of theoretical perspectives. (Author/RH)

  4. Adaptive and Optimal Control of Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-14

    control and stochastic differential games . Stochastic linear-quadratic, continuous time, stochastic control problems are solved for systems with noise...control problems for systems with arbitrary correlated n 15. SUBJECT TERMS Adaptive control, optimal control, stochastic differential games 16. SECURITY...explicit results have been obtained for problems of stochastic control and stochastic differential games . Stochastic linear- quadratic, continuous time

  5. EDITORIAL: Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza; Tannor, David

    2011-08-01

    , quantum control of chemical reactions or high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy); on the other hand, an unprecedented demand for close coupling between theory and experiment, with theoretical developments becoming more and more attuned to and driven by experimental advances as different quantum technologies continue to evolve at an impressive pace in the laboratory. Altogether, these two trends account for several of the recurrent themes in this volume, as well as in the current quantum control literature as a whole: namely, the quest for control strategies that can attain the highest degree of precision and robustness possible, while striving for efficiency and, ultimately, optimality in achieving the intended control task under realistic operational constraints. From a theory standpoint, this makes it imperative to take into account increasingly more realistic control settings; to assess the quantitative impact of limited control resources and/or system knowledge; and to provide a rigorous and general foundation for existing experimental approaches in order to further enhance applicability and performance. From an experimental standpoint, renewed emphasis is in turn placed on validating theoretical predictions and benchmarking performance, so that the limiting constraints can be singled out for additional theoretical analysis and guidance. This ongoing cross-talk is clearly reflected in this collection, which brings together theoreticians and experimentalists, with a significant fraction of the papers reporting on combined quantum control theory-experiment efforts. While a precise categorization would neither be possible nor desirable, contributions to this volume have been loosely grouped into five broad sections. This grouping has been made in the hope that connections between different problems and/or technical approaches will become more transparent, facilitating the transfer of concepts and methods. The special issue opens with a section devoted to open

  6. A Nonlinear Physics-Based Optimal Control Method for Magnetostrictive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a nonlinear optimal control methodology for magnetostrictive actuators. At moderate to high drive levels, the output from these actuators is highly nonlinear and contains significant magnetic and magnetomechanical hysteresis. These dynamics must be accommodated by models and control laws to utilize the full capabilities of the actuators. A characterization based upon ferromagnetic mean field theory provides a model which accurately quantifies both transient and steady state actuator dynamics under a variety of operating conditions. The control method consists of a linear perturbation feedback law used in combination with an optimal open loop nonlinear control. The nonlinear control incorporates the hysteresis and nonlinearities inherent to the transducer and can be computed offline. The feedback control is constructed through linearization of the perturbed system about the optimal system and is efficient for online implementation. As demonstrated through numerical examples, the combined hybrid control is robust and can be readily implemented in linear PDE-based structural models.

  7. Minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Lu, Xiwen

    2013-12-01

    In the literatures, to transfer the Boolean control network from the initial state to the desired state, the expenditure of energy has been rarely considered. Motivated by this, this Letter investigates the minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network. Based on the semi-tensor product of matrices and Floyd's algorithm, minimum energy, constrained minimum energy and optimal-satisfactory control design for Boolean control network are given respectively. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  8. Conditions for continuation of the efficient curve for multi-objective control-structure optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakowska, Joanna

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the conditions for continuation of the efficient curve for bi-objective control-structure optimization of a ten-bar truss with two collocated sensors and actuators. The curve has been obtained with an active set algorithm using a homotopy method. The curve is discontinuous. A general stability theory has been implemented to determine sufficient conditions for the persistence of minima, and bifurcation theory has been used to characterize the possible points of discontinuity of the path.

  9. Alternative Solutions for Optimization Problems in Generalizability Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    1992-01-01

    Presents solutions for the problem of maximizing the generalizability coefficient under a budget constraint. Shows that the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality can be applied to derive optimal continuous solutions for the number of conditions of each facet. Illustrates the formal similarity between optimization problems in survey sampling and…

  10. Alternative Solutions for Optimization Problems in Generalizability Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    1992-01-01

    Presents solutions for the problem of maximizing the generalizability coefficient under a budget constraint. Shows that the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality can be applied to derive optimal continuous solutions for the number of conditions of each facet. Illustrates the formal similarity between optimization problems in survey sampling and…

  11. Nonlinear model predictive control based on collective neurodynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    In general, nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) entails solving a sequential global optimization problem with a nonconvex cost function or constraints. This paper presents a novel collective neurodynamic optimization approach to NMPC without linearization. Utilizing a group of recurrent neural networks (RNNs), the proposed collective neurodynamic optimization approach searches for optimal solutions to global optimization problems by emulating brainstorming. Each RNN is guaranteed to converge to a candidate solution by performing constrained local search. By exchanging information and iteratively improving the starting and restarting points of each RNN using the information of local and global best known solutions in a framework of particle swarm optimization, the group of RNNs is able to reach global optimal solutions to global optimization problems. The essence of the proposed collective neurodynamic optimization approach lies in the integration of capabilities of global search and precise local search. The simulation results of many cases are discussed to substantiate the effectiveness and the characteristics of the proposed approach.

  12. Optimal and robust control and estimation of transition, convection, and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Thomas Robinson

    The large increases in drag, cyclic structural loading, internal stresses, mixing, and heat transfer caused by turbulence in flows of engineering interest have motivated engineers to study turbulence and attempt to alter its effects. Recent advances in MEMS capabilities may soon make it possible to measure small-scale turbulent fluctuations of a flow and, subsequently, to apply coordinated small-scale forcing to the flow in order to achieve a desired large-scale effect. The present work attempts to develop techniques to derive the necessary control strategies for such control problems from first principles, leveraging our knowledge of the Navier-Stokes equation which governs these flows and our ability to simulate this equation accurately in simple configurations. By so doing, we bypass the ad hoc assumptions about the turbulence dynamics often used to determine such control strategies and develop several new tools for analysis of flow systems in the control setting. Approaching this difficult problem in steps of gradually increasing complexity, optimal and robust control theories are used in the present work to derive and demonstrate effective control and estimation strategies for three important model problems in fluid mechanics. The model problems considered are: (1)the application of linear optimal/robust control theory to the linear paths to transition in a plane channel, (2)the application of linear optimal/robust control theory to a low-order nonlinear chaotic convection problem, and (3)the application of optimal control theory in a DNS-based predictive control setting to the fully nonlinear problem of turbulence. In order to develop feedback algorithms for practical (disturbed) environments, it is recognized that a degree of robustness will be necessary in the control rules. In the final section of this work, a general framework for robust control for problems governed by the Navier-Stokes equation is established by mathematical analysis, laying the

  13. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  14. Optimal exploitation strategies for an animal population in a Markovian environment: A theory and an example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal exploitation strategies were studied for an animal population in a Markovian (stochastic, serially correlated) environment. This is a general case and encompasses a number of important special cases as simplifications. Extensive empirical data on the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) were used as an example of general theory. The number of small ponds on the central breeding grounds was used as an index to the state of the environment. A general mathematical model was formulated to provide a synthesis of the existing literature, estimates of parameters developed from an analysis of data, and hypotheses regarding the specific effect of exploitation on total survival. The literature and analysis of data were inconclusive concerning the effect of exploitation on survival. Therefore, two hypotheses were explored: (1) exploitation mortality represents a largely additive form of mortality, and (2) exploitation mortality is compensatory with other forms of mortality, at least to some threshold level. Models incorporating these two hypotheses were formulated as stochastic dynamic programming models and optimal exploitation strategies were derived numerically on a digital computer. Optimal exploitation strategies were found to exist under the rather general conditions. Direct feedback control was an integral component in the optimal decision-making process. Optimal exploitation was found to be substantially different depending upon the hypothesis regarding the effect of exploitation on the population. If we assume that exploitation is largely an additive force of mortality in Mallards, then optimal exploitation decisions are a convex function of the size of the breeding population and a linear or slight concave function of the environmental conditions. Under the hypothesis of compensatory mortality forces, optimal exploitation decisions are approximately linearly related to the size of the Mallard breeding population. Dynamic programming is suggested as a very general

  15. Optimizing Sensor and Actuator Arrays for ASAC Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of an approach to optimizing the locations for arrays of sensors and actuators in active noise control systems. A type of directed combinatorial search, called Tabu Search, is used to select an optimal configuration from a much larger set of candidate locations. The benefit of using an optimized set is demonstrated. The importance of limiting actuator forces to realistic levels when evaluating the cost function is discussed. Results of flight testing an optimized system are presented. Although the technique has been applied primarily to Active Structural Acoustic Control systems, it can be adapted for use in other active noise control implementations.

  16. Optimal speech motor control and token-to-token variability: a Bayesian modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Patri, Jean-François; Diard, Julien; Perrier, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable capacity of the speech motor system to adapt to various speech conditions is due to an excess of degrees of freedom, which enables producing similar acoustical properties with different sets of control strategies. To explain how the central nervous system selects one of the possible strategies, a common approach, in line with optimal motor control theories, is to model speech motor planning as the solution of an optimality problem based on cost functions. Despite the success of this approach, one of its drawbacks is the intrinsic contradiction between the concept of optimality and the observed experimental intra-speaker token-to-token variability. The present paper proposes an alternative approach by formulating feedforward optimal control in a probabilistic Bayesian modeling framework. This is illustrated by controlling a biomechanical model of the vocal tract for speech production and by comparing it with an existing optimal control model (GEPPETO). The essential elements of this optimal control model are presented first. From them the Bayesian model is constructed in a progressive way. Performance of the Bayesian model is evaluated based on computer simulations and compared to the optimal control model. This approach is shown to be appropriate for solving the speech planning problem while accounting for variability in a principled way.

  17. Receding horizon online optimization for torque control of gasoline engines.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mingxin; Shen, Tielong

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a model-based nonlinear receding horizon optimal control scheme for the engine torque tracking problem. The controller design directly employs the nonlinear model exploited based on mean-value modeling principle of engine systems without any linearizing reformation, and the online optimization is achieved by applying the Continuation/GMRES (generalized minimum residual) approach. Several receding horizon control schemes are designed to investigate the effects of the integral action and integral gain selection. Simulation analyses and experimental validations are implemented to demonstrate the real-time optimization performance and control effects of the proposed torque tracking controllers. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Robustified time-optimal control of uncertain structural dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Qiang; Wie, Bong

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for computing open-loop time-optimal control inputs for uncertain linear dynamical systems is developed. In particular, the single-axis, rest-to-rest maneuvering problem of flexible spacecraft in the presence of uncertainty in model parameters is considered. Robustified time-optimal control inputs are obtained by solving a parameter optimization problem subject to robustness constraints. A simple dynamical system with a rigid-body mode and one flexible mode is used to illustrate the concept.

  19. Attitude Control Optimization for ROCSAT-2 Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Wu, A.-M.

    one revolution. The purpose of this paper is to present the attitude control design optimization such that the maximum solar energy is ingested while minimum maneuvering energy is dissipated. The strategy includes the maneuvering sequence design, the minimization of angular path, the sizing of three magnetic torquers, and the trade-off of the size, number and orientations arrangement of momentum wheels.

  20. A Framework for Optimal Control Allocation with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Jutte, Christine V.; Burken, John J.; Trinh, Khanh V.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aircraft generally employ mixing algorithms or lookup tables to determine control surface deflections needed to achieve moments commanded by the flight control system. Control allocation is the problem of converting desired moments into control effector commands. Next generation aircraft may have many multipurpose, redundant control surfaces, adding considerable complexity to the control allocation problem. These issues can be addressed with optimal control allocation. Most optimal control allocation algorithms have control surface position and rate constraints. However, these constraints are insufficient to ensure that the aircraft's structural load limits will not be exceeded by commanded surface deflections. In this paper, a framework is proposed to enable a flight control system with optimal control allocation to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints. A proof of concept simulation that demonstrates the framework in a simulation of a generic transport aircraft is presented.