Science.gov

Sample records for optimal mass flow

  1. Optimizing SVE Remediation With Subsurface Flow and Mass Transfer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spansky, M. C.; Riha, B. D.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Dixon, K. L.; Nichols, R. L.

    2002-05-01

    The 5.9-acre A-Area Miscellaneous Rubble Pile (ARP) at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) was created in the 1950s as a general disposal area. An aerial photograph from 1953 shows evidence of disposal activities; however, the exact materials disposed and dates of operation at ARP remain unknown. Within the larger ARP unit exists an approximately 2-acre T-shaped trench filled with ash debris to a depth of 10-14 feet. Soil sampling analysis of the ARP trench indicates the presence of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) trichloroethelyne (TCE) and tetrachloroetheylene (PCE). TCE and PCE contamination in the trench has the potential to migrate and poses a groundwater contamination risk. Several remediation options have been considered at ARP to date. The first, passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE), uses barometric pressure fluctuations to create a differential pressure between subsurface soil vapors and the atmosphere. Five wells were installed along the axes of the ARP trench. Differential pressure in the wells was monitored to determine the potential for PSVE. Results showed that the ash formation was too shallow and permeable to create pressure gradients sufficient for effective PSVE. The addition of a temporary cap over the formation did little to improve the differential pressure. Two pumping tests were subsequently conducted at the ARP trench. Air was pumped from two separate wells and drawdowns recorded at three observation wells. Data from the tests were used to model permeability of the ash unit and to estimate the zone of influence for the proposed active soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. Results indicate a high permeability for the ash. Contaminant concentrations were monitored with a portable infrared photoacoustic multigas monitor during continuous, pulsed, and variable flow rate scenarios. The concentration and flow data were used to evaluate mass transfer limitations of the system and to optimize the full-scale SVE remediation.

  2. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  3. Optimization of Tangential Mass Injection for Minimizing Flow Separation in a Scramjet Inlet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    thank John Brohas of the AFIT Model Shop for crafting such a complex model, John Leugers of the Wright Laboratory for his advice on structural design...separation. The wind tunnel model was also limited to 2-D. Sidewalls ,.ould only have increased the tunnel blockage and added complexity to the flow analysis...model centerline downstream. The tangential mass injection piece (see Figure 17) was the most complex part of the model. An injection Mach number of 3

  4. Optimal Flow Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian; Owens, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft concept, a new flow control hybrid vane/jet design has been developed for use in a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) offset inlet in transonic flows. This inlet flow control is designed to minimize the engine fan-face distortion levels and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes while maximizing the inlet pressure recovery. This concept represents a potentially enabling technology for quieter and more environmentally friendly transport aircraft. An optimum vane design was found by minimizing the engine fan-face distortion, DC60, and the first five Fourier harmonic half amplitudes, while maximizing the total pressure recovery. The optimal vane design was then used in a BLI inlet wind tunnel experiment at NASA Langley's 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel. The experimental results demonstrated an 80-percent decrease in DPCPavg, the reduction in the circumferential distortion levels, at an inlet mass flow rate corresponding to the middle of the operational range at the cruise condition. Even though the vanes were designed at a single inlet mass flow rate, they performed very well over the entire inlet mass flow range tested in the wind tunnel experiment with the addition of a small amount of jet flow control. While the circumferential distortion was decreased, the radial distortion on the outer rings at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) increased. This was a result of the large boundary layer being distributed from the bottom of the AIP in the baseline case to the outer edges of the AIP when using the vortex generator (VG) vane flow control. Experimental results, as already mentioned, showed an 80-percent reduction of DPCPavg, the circumferential distortion level at the engine fan-face. The hybrid approach leverages strengths of vane and jet flow control devices, increasing inlet performance over a broader operational range with significant reduction in mass flow requirements. Minimal distortion level requirements

  5. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  6. Optimization of plasma sampling depth and aerosol gas flow rates for single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Kálomista, Ildikó; Kéri, Albert; Galbács, Gábor

    2017-09-01

    We performed experiments to assess the separate and also the combined effect of the sampling depth and the aerosol gas flow rates on the signal formation in single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) measurements by using dispersions containing Ag and Au NPs. It was found that the NP signal can significantly be improved by the optimization of the sampling depth. With respect to the "robust" setting, a signal improvement of nearly 100% could be achieved, which translates into a 25-30% improvement in size detection limits. It was also found that the shape of the spICP-MS signal histograms also change with the change of the plasma sampling depth. It was demonstrated that nanoparticle peak separation can also be significantly enhanced by using sampling depth optimization. The effect of the aerosol dilution gas flow, now standard in most ICP-MS instruments, on the spICP-MS signal formation was also studied for the first time in the literature, as this flow was hoped to make spICP-MS measurements more practical and faster via the on-line dilution of the aerosol generated from nano-dispersions. Our experimental results revealed that the dilution gas flow can only be used for a moderate aerosol dilution in spICP-MS measurements, if the gas flow going to the pneumatic nebulizer is proportionally lowered at the same time. This however was found to cause a significant worsening in the operation of the sample introduction system, which gives rise to a strong NP signal loss. Thus it was concluded that the use of the aerosol dilution gas flow, in its present form, can not be suggested for spICP-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  8. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  9. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    von Reden, K F; Roberts, M L; Burton, J R; Beaupré, S R

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C × C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO(2) samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 μl∕min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 μA of negative (12)C current after the C × C, leading to about 400 (14)C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  10. AC Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-04

    In this work, we have implemented and developed the simulation software to implement the mathematical model of an AC Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The objective function is to minimize the total cost of generation subject to constraints of node power balance (both real and reactive) and line power flow limits (MW, MVAr, and MVA). We have currently implemented the polar coordinate version of the problem. In the present work, we have used the optimization solver, Knitro (proprietary and not included in this software) to solve the problem and we have kept option for both the native numerical derivative evaluation (working satisfactorily now) as well as for analytical formulas corresponding to the derivatives being provided to Knitro (currently, in the debugging stage). Since the AC OPF is a highly non-convex optimization problem, we have also kept the option for a multistart solution. All of these can be decided by the user during run-time in an interactive manner. The software has been developed in C++ programming language, running with GCC compiler on a Linux machine. We have tested for satisfactory results against Matpower for the IEEE 14 bus system.

  11. Optimal Power Flow Pursuit

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano

    2016-08-01

    Past works that focused on addressing power-quality and reliability concerns related to renewable energy resources (RESs) operating with business-as-usual practices have looked at the design of Volt/VAr and Volt/Watt strategies to regulate real or reactive powers based on local voltage measurements, so that terminal voltages are within acceptable levels. These control strategies have the potential of operating at the same time scale of distribution-system dynamics, and can therefore mitigate disturbances precipitated fast time-varying loads and ambient conditions; however, they do not necessarily guarantee system-level optimality, and stability claims are mainly based on empirical evidences. On a different time scale, centralized and distributed optimal power flow (OPF) algorithms have been proposed to compute optimal steady-state inverter setpoints, so that power losses and voltage deviations are minimized and economic benefits to end-users providing ancillary services are maximized. However, traditional OPF schemes may offer decision making capabilities that do not match the dynamics of distribution systems. Particularly, during the time required to collect data from all the nodes of the network (e.g., loads), solve the OPF, and subsequently dispatch setpoints, the underlying load, ambient, and network conditions may have already changed; in this case, the DER output powers would be consistently regulated around outdated setpoints, leading to suboptimal system operation and violation of relevant electrical limits. The present work focuses on the synthesis of distributed RES-inverter controllers that leverage the opportunities for fast feedback offered by power-electronics interfaced RESs. The overarching objective is to bridge the temporal gap between long-term system optimization and real-time control, to enable seamless RES integration in large scale with stability and efficiency guarantees, while congruently pursuing system-level optimization objectives. The

  12. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations.

  13. Texture Mapping via Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the “earth-mover’s metric”). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  14. Numerical optimization using flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punk, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    We develop a method for multidimensional optimization using flow equations. This method is based on homotopy continuation in combination with a maximum entropy approach. Extrema of the optimizing functional correspond to fixed points of the flow equation. While ideas based on Bayesian inference such as the maximum entropy method always depend on a prior probability, the additional step in our approach is to perform a continuous update of the prior during the homotopy flow. The prior probability thus enters the flow equation only as an initial condition. We demonstrate the applicability of this optimization method for two paradigmatic problems in theoretical condensed matter physics: numerical analytic continuation from imaginary to real frequencies and finding (variational) ground states of frustrated (quantum) Ising models with random or long-range antiferromagnetic interactions.

  15. Numerical optimization using flow equations.

    PubMed

    Punk, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    We develop a method for multidimensional optimization using flow equations. This method is based on homotopy continuation in combination with a maximum entropy approach. Extrema of the optimizing functional correspond to fixed points of the flow equation. While ideas based on Bayesian inference such as the maximum entropy method always depend on a prior probability, the additional step in our approach is to perform a continuous update of the prior during the homotopy flow. The prior probability thus enters the flow equation only as an initial condition. We demonstrate the applicability of this optimization method for two paradigmatic problems in theoretical condensed matter physics: numerical analytic continuation from imaginary to real frequencies and finding (variational) ground states of frustrated (quantum) Ising models with random or long-range antiferromagnetic interactions.

  16. Application and optimization of input parameter spaces in mass flow modelling: a case study with r.randomwalk and r.ranger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Julia; Zangerl, Christian; Mergili, Martin

    2017-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional, conceptual open source model application for forward and backward analyses of the propagation of mass flows. It relies on a set of empirically derived, uncertain input parameters. In contrast to many other tools, r.randomwalk accepts input parameter ranges (or, in case of two or more parameters, spaces) in order to directly account for these uncertainties. Parameter spaces represent a possibility to withdraw from discrete input values which in most cases are likely to be off target. r.randomwalk automatically performs multiple calculations with various parameter combinations in a given parameter space, resulting in the impact indicator index (III) which denotes the fraction of parameter value combinations predicting an impact on a given pixel. Still, there is a need to constrain the parameter space used for a certain process type or magnitude prior to performing forward calculations. This can be done by optimizing the parameter space in terms of bringing the model results in line with well-documented past events. As most existing parameter optimization algorithms are designed for discrete values rather than for ranges or spaces, the necessity for a new and innovative technique arises. The present study aims at developing such a technique and at applying it to derive guiding parameter spaces for the forward calculation of rock avalanches through back-calculation of multiple events. In order to automatize the work flow we have designed r.ranger, an optimization and sensitivity analysis tool for parameter spaces which can be directly coupled to r.randomwalk. With r.ranger we apply a nested approach where the total value range of each parameter is divided into various levels of subranges. All possible combinations of subranges of all parameters are tested for the performance of the associated pattern of III. Performance indicators are the area under the ROC curve (AUROC) and the factor of conservativeness (FoC). This

  17. Flow optimization in diving helmets

    SciTech Connect

    Camperman, J.M.; Tennant, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    Improved carbon dioxide transport from the annular space between the head and helmet is necessary to reduce fresh gas flow and associated noise. This paper gives an overview of new techniques for investigating this transport, and for optimizing helmet flow to remove CO{sub 2}. An analytical model predicts inhaled carbon dioxide fraction in terms of helmet and respiration characteristics. Fundamental behavior over a wide range of helmet parameters is computed. An experimental model uses Reynolds scaling with water and dye to simulate fresh gas and carbon dioxide respectively. The water/dye model supports measurement of inhaled dye concentration, and flow visualization. Detailed behavior is investigated for one helmet with air/CO{sub 2} and water/dye experiments. Results support validity of the analytic and water models, provide new insight to CO{sub 2} transport mechanisms, and suggest directions for optimizing helmet design.

  18. Evaluation of a mass flow sensor at a gin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom-built mass flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the sensor patented by Thomasson and Sui. The optical and ele...

  19. Optimization of Ramified Flow Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Martin; Hubler, Alfred; Heiss, Gregor

    2009-03-01

    A class of Ramified graphs (RG) is introduced as Iterated Function Systems (IFS) to optimally design networks for efficient reverse osmosis desalination in deep seawater. Ramified flow networks of absorbers, ranging from simple structures with constant weights, branch angles, and branch ratios, to fully optimized binary networks are considered. A contracting IFS with fixed overall length is presented for the generation of RG's which serve as candidates for optimality in terms of desalination performance criteria. Using the analogy to electrostatics, the diffusion equation is solved for the desalination systems under three different boundary conditions, i) all nodes having the same pressure difference across the absorbers, ii) all nodes producing permeate at identical rates, and iii) each node having the same salinity. Optimal branching angles and branch length ratios will be found by phase-space methods for each boundary condition, which either maximize production of permeate or minimize expenditure of energy for different fixed numbers of absorbers. For constant salinity absorbers, we give the total water production rate as functions of branching angle and branching ratio for up to 10 branching generations. Both optimal angle and optimal ratios are found to be decreasing functions of generation for constant salinity absorbers.

  20. Flow optimization in vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Cascaval, Radu C; D'Apice, Ciro; D'Arienzo, Maria Pia; Manzo, Rosanna

    2017-06-01

    The development of mathematical models for studying phenomena observed in vascular networks is very useful for its potential applications in medicine and physiology. Detailed 3D studies of flow in the arterial system based on the Navier-Stokes equations require high computational power, hence reduced models are often used, both for the constitutive laws and the spatial domain. In order to capture the major features of the phenomena under study, such as variations in arterial pressure and flow velocity, the resulting PDE models on networks require appropriate junction and boundary conditions. Instead of considering an entire network, we simulate portions of the latter and use inflow and outflow conditions which realistically mimic the behavior of the network that has not been included in the spatial domain. The resulting PDEs are solved numerically using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme for the spatial and Adam-Bashforth method for the temporal discretization. The aim is to study the effect of truncation to the flow in the root edge of a fractal network, the effect of adding or subtracting an edge to a given network, and optimal control strategies on a network in the event of a blockage or unblockage of an edge or of an entire subtree.

  1. Economics-based optimization of unstable flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, B. A.; Helbing, D.

    1999-07-01

    As an example for the optimization of unstable flows, we present an economics-based method for deciding the optimal rates at which vehicles are allowed to enter a highway. It exploits the naturally occurring fluctuations of traffic flow and is flexible enough to adapt in real time to the transient flow characteristics of road traffic. Simulations based on realistic parameter values show that this strategy is feasible for naturally occurring traffic, and that even far from optimality, injection policies can improve traffic flow. Moreover, the same method can be applied to the optimization of flows of gases and granular media.

  2. Development report, mass flow controller PN 5716068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W.

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and manufacture of an all mechanical mass flow controller are discussed. A test program was conducted using inert gas as the test medium. The unit controlled the pressure within plus of minus one percent. An analytical method is presented for relating the control pressure error with error in mass flow.

  3. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  4. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification.

    PubMed

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-14

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.10(8) for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  5. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    PubMed Central

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells. PMID:27841303

  6. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-15

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, “Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192–225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., “Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos,” J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415–443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for “real” (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  7. Traffic Flow Management and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio

    2014-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) research at NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Rios will focus on his work developing a large-scale, parallel approach to solving traffic flow management problems in the national airspace. In support of this talk, Dr. Rios will provide some background on operational aspects of TFM as well a discussion of some of the tools needed to perform such work including a high-fidelity airspace simulator. Current, on-going research related to TFM data services in the national airspace system and general aviation will also be presented.

  8. Venturi Tube with Varying Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regenscheit, B.

    1948-01-01

    Measurements on three tubes with flow regulated by suction at the trainling edge of the tube are described. It was possible to vary the mass of air flowing through the tube over a large range. Such tubes could be used for shrouded propellers.

  9. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  10. Optimal flow for brown trout: Habitat - prey optimization.

    PubMed

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Cabrini, Riccardo; Sartori, Laura; Marazzi, Francesca; Canobbio, Sergio; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The correct definition of ecosystem needs is essential in order to guide policy and management strategies to optimize the increasing use of freshwater by human activities. Commonly, the assessment of the optimal or minimum flow rates needed to preserve ecosystem functionality has been done by habitat-based models that define a relationship between in-stream flow and habitat availability for various species of fish. We propose a new approach for the identification of optimal flows using the limiting factor approach and the evaluation of basic ecological relationships, considering the appropriate spatial scale for different organisms. We developed density-environment relationships for three different life stages of brown trout that show the limiting effects of hydromorphological variables at habitat scale. In our analyses, we found that the factors limiting the densities of trout were water velocity, substrate characteristics and refugia availability. For all the life stages, the selected models considered simultaneously two variables and implied that higher velocities provided a less suitable habitat, regardless of other physical characteristics and with different patterns. We used these relationships within habitat based models in order to select a range of flows that preserve most of the physical habitat for all the life stages. We also estimated the effect of varying discharge flows on macroinvertebrate biomass and used the obtained results to identify an optimal flow maximizing habitat and prey availability.

  11. Sensitivity Optimization in Continuous-Flow FTNMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Albert, Klaus; Bachovchin, William W.

    Equations simulating the steady-state magnetization of liquids in continuous-flow FTNMR are derived using a classical vector model, assuming plug flow. These equations are applied to calculation of ( S/ N) t, the relative signal/noise per unit time of any nucleus undergoing any degree of Overhauser enhancement either in the detection cell or upstream, or both, and to optimization of experimental conditions, including pulse repetition time Trep, pulse angle β, and flow rate. Ideal parameters include a pulse angle of 90° and a Trepvalue equal to sample residence time in the NMR detection cell. Optimal flow rates are directly proportional to the premagnetization volume (the portion of sample equilibrated with the magnetic field prior to detection) and inversely proportional to spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Optimal premagnetization times are smaller than previously assumed, varying from about 1.1 to 1.9 T1values. ( S/ N) tfor static FTNMR is discussed in some detail, and a new graphical method is presented for its optimization. Flow advantage, the ( S/ N) tof optimized flow FTNMR experiments compared to that of static FTNMR in a given detection cell, is proportional to the square root of the ratio of premagnetization to detection cell volumes, and virtually independent of[formula]where[formula]is the apparent transverse-relaxation time. The theory is applied to examples from recent literature, including dynamic electron-nuclear polarization, and the literature is critically reviewed. The analysis shows that claims by previous authors of recycled flow FTNMR by itself leading to increased ( S/ N) tfor slowly relaxing resonances are misleading, owing to underdetermination of ( S/ N) tin static measurements and failure to account for greater sample sizes required in flow experiments. For monitoring and control of chemical processes, the theory presented here enables the first rational basis for the design of a flow FTNMR apparatus and for the selection of acquisition

  12. Apparent mass in viscous, vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio

    2001-11-01

    The concept of added, virtual, apparent, or additional mass is well known in potential flow theory. It is added mass (or more exactly, the time derivative of virtual momentum) that wholly contributes to fluid dynamic forces in unsteady, potential flow configurations. While the force contribution from added mass can be easily evaluated in potential flows, it has always been thought that in real (vortical and viscous) flows, the contribution of added mass to the fluid dynamic force is intertwined in a complex way with the force resulting from wake and boundary layer vorticity. Recently, Shiels, Leonard, and Roshko (Journal of Fluids and Structures, vol 15, pp 3-21, 2001) [henceforth SLR] showed that the fluid dynamic lift force on a circular cylinder performing transverse oscillations in a steady stream can actually be decomposed into a lift force due to apparent mass (as evaluated from potential theory) and a ``wake'' force resulting from frictional as well as altered pressure forces caused by the boundary layer and wake growth in viscous flow. Through a rigorous formalism analogous to SLR’s, we will confirm that the SLR decomposition is correct and valid for any body shape in arbitrary motion. The SLR decomposition is a seminal discovery in the science of unsteady aero/hydrodynamics, as it allows to clearly distinguish the force contributions from added mass and from the ``wake''. The result is particularly important for understanding the flight and swimming mechanics of animals.

  13. Mass flow in loop type coronal transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzer, U.; Poland, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    Coronal transients having characteristics of a well-defined loop structure are examined, particularly with respect to temporal changes in the density and mass per unit length along the loop over periods of several days after the initial eruption. Measurements of mass distributions as a function of time are presented for eight transients, and one particular transient with a fairly simple configuration is investigated in more detail. Theoretical calculations are combined with the masses and densities derived from the observations to obtain estimates of the material flow in the transients; this flow is modeled on the assumption that magnetic forces drive and confine the loop. The flow field is found to be diverging everywhere, indicating that the density decreases in time. It is inferred that the transient legs are approximately in hydrostatic equilibrium and that most of the mass of the transient is lost from the sun during the initial phase.

  14. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  15. Mission analysis flow sequencing optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, M.

    1986-01-01

    This investigation is an extension of a project dealing with the problem of optimal use of ground resources for future space missions. This problem was formulated as a linear programming problem using an indirect approach. Instead of minimizing the inventory level of needed ground resources, the overlapping periods during which the same types of resources are used by various flights are minimized. The model was built upon the assumption that during the time interval under consideration, the costs of various needed resources remain constant. Under other assumptions concerning costs of resources, the objective function, in general, assumes a non-linear form. In this study, one case where the form of the objective function turns out to be quadratic is considered. Also, disadvantages and limitations of the approach used are briefly discussed.

  16. Mass Flow through Gaps in Circumbinary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel; Lubow, Stephen H.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate through smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that a circumbinary disk can supply mass to the central binary through gas streams that penetrate the disk gap without closing it. The conditions for an efficient flow typically require the disk thickness-to-radius ratio z/r >~ 0.05, if the turbulent viscosity parameter alpha is greater than 0.01. This mass flow may be important for both the individual systems and their statistics. It occurs preferentially onto the lower mass object and acts toward equalization of component masses. The less massive component may be more luminous and easier to detect, owing to its larger accretion luminosity. For eccentric binaries, the mass flow is strongly modulated in time, providing diagnostics for both the disk and the binary. In the protostellar disks, the flow could be detected as shock emission phased with the binary orbit, resulting from stream impact with the circumstellar disks and/or the young stars. In the (super)massive black hole binaries in nuclei of galaxies, the flow may result from the surrounding interstellar medium and produce nearly periodic emission, as observed in quasar OJ 287. For star-planet-disk systems, our results show that the opening of a gap around a planet is not always sufficient for the termination of its growth. This suggests that planets supplied by gas streams from protoplanetary disks may outgrow Jupiter to become "superplanets" with properties heretofore reserved for stars.

  17. Optimal energy growth and optimal control in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guégan, Alan; Schmid, Peter J.; Huerre, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    The objective of the study is first to examine the optimal transient growth of Görtler Hämmerlin perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow. This configuration constitutes a model of the flow in the attachment-line boundary layer at the leading-edge of swept wings. The optimal blowing and suction at the wall which minimizes the energy of the optimal perturbations is then determined. An adjoint-based optimization procedure applicable to both problems is devised, which relies on the maximization or minimization of a suitable objective functional. The variational analysis is carried out in the framework of the set of linear partial differential equations governing the chordwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations. Energy amplifications of up to three orders of magnitude are achieved at low spanwise wavenumbers (k {˜} 0.1) and large sweep Reynolds number (textit{Re} {˜} 2000). Optimal perturbations consist of spanwise travelling chordwise vortices, with a vorticity distribution which is inclined against the sweep. Transient growth arises from the tilting of the vorticity distribution by the spanwise shear via a two-dimensional Orr mechanism acting in the basic flow dividing plane. Two distinct regimes have been identified: for k {≤sssim} 0.25, vortex dipoles are formed which induce large spanwise perturbation velocities; for k {gtrsim} 0.25, dipoles are not observed and only the Orr mechanism remains active. The optimal wall blowing control yields for instance an 80% decrease of the maximum perturbation kinetic energy reached by optimal disturbances at textit{Re} {=} 550 and k {=} 0.25. The optimal wall blowing pattern consists of spanwise travelling waves which follow the naturally occurring vortices and qualitatively act in the same manner as a more simple constant gain feedback control strategy.

  18. Investigation of flow structures in supersonic flow with mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, A.; Das, P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, three-dimensional simulations are performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methodology, while the dynamic sub-grid scale eddy viscosity model is invoked to numerically investigate the evolution of flow structures in supersonic base flow with mass bleed. Mean flow field properties obtained from numerical simulations, such as axial velocity, pressure on the base surface, have been compared with the experimental measurements in order to show that LES is able to predict the mean flow properties with acceptable accuracy. The data obtained from LES has been further analyzed to understand the evolution of coherent structures in the flow field. Periodical shedding of vortical structures from the outer shear layer has been observed and it has also been found that this vortex shedding is associated with the flapping of the outer shear layer.

  19. Mass flow in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The manner of mass flow in close binary systems is examined with a special view to the role of the so-called critical Roche (or Jacobian) lobe, taking into consideration relevant physical conditions such as radiation pressure that may affect the restricted three-body problem treatment. The mass does not necessarily flow from component one to component two through the L1 point to form a gaseous ring surrounding the latter. These considerations are applied to X-ray binaries with early-type optical components, such as Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and 3U 1700 - 37 (HD 153919). In the two bright close binary systems Beta Lyr and UW CMa, which are believed to be undergoing dynamic mass transfer, recent Copernicus observations show that the gas giving rise to the prominent ultraviolet emission lines surrounds the entire binary system rather than merely component two. Implications of these observations are also discussed.

  20. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y.; van der Heijden, Godfried W.; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells’ similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult murine testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying meiotic prophase I. PMID:24664803

  1. Graphical models for optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Vuffray, Marc; Misra, Sidhant

    2016-09-13

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithm for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary tree-structured distribution networks and handle mixed-integer optimization problems. Further, it can be implemented in a distributed message-passing fashion that is scalable and is suitable for “smart grid” applications like control of distributed energy resources. In conclusion, numerical evaluations on several benchmark networks show that practical OPF problems can be solved effectively using this approach.

  2. Graphical models for optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Vuffray, Marc; Misra, Sidhant

    2016-09-13

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithm for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary tree-structured distribution networks and handle mixed-integer optimization problems. Further, it can be implemented in a distributed message-passing fashion that is scalable and is suitable for “smart grid” applications like control of distributed energy resources. In conclusion, numerical evaluations on several benchmark networks show that practical OPF problems can be solved effectively using this approach.

  3. Graphical models for optimal power flow

    DOE PAGES

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; ...

    2016-09-13

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithmmore » for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary tree-structured distribution networks and handle mixed-integer optimization problems. Further, it can be implemented in a distributed message-passing fashion that is scalable and is suitable for “smart grid” applications like control of distributed energy resources. In conclusion, numerical evaluations on several benchmark networks show that practical OPF problems can be solved effectively using this approach.« less

  4. Evaluation of an experimental mass-flow sensor of cotton-lint at the gin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom built mass-flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass-flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the senor patented by Thomasson and Sui (2004). The optical a...

  5. Mass flow sensor utilizing a resistance bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Hwang, Danny P. (Inventor); Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A mass flow sensor to be mounted within a duct and measures the mass flow of a fluid stream moving through the duct. The sensor is an elongated thin quartz substrate having a plurality of platinum strips extending in a parallel relationship on the strip, with certain of the strips being resistors connected to an excitation voltage. The resistors form the legs of a Wheatstone bridge. The resistors are spaced a sufficient distance inwardly from the leading and trailing edges of the substrate to lie within the velocity recovery region so that the measured flow is the same as the actual upstream flow. The resistor strips extend at least half-way through the fluid stream to include a substantial part of the velocity profile of the stream. Certain of the resistors detect a change in temperature as the fluid stream moves across the substrate to provide an output signal from the Wheatstone bridge which is representative of the fluid flow. A heater is located in the midst of the resistor array to heat the air as it passes over the array.

  6. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  7. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  8. Solids mass flow indication with radiation

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.; Estriplet, Isnard

    1985-06-04

    Method and apparatus for indicating mass flow of a solid particulate material through a rotary feeder. A radiation source and detector are positioned in a manner whereby radiation flux is directed through, and attenuated by, particulate material contained in rotating pockets. A Cesium-137 gamma source can be mounted within the shaft of the feeder, and one or more detectors can be mounted outside of the feeder housing. The detected signal is indicative of the mass of particulate material contained within a given pocket rotating within the feeder.

  9. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  10. Optimal Control of Mixing in Stokes Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, George; Mezic, Igor; Grivopoulos, Symeon; Vaidya, Umesh; Petzold, Linda

    2006-11-01

    Motivated by the problem of microfluidic mixing, the problem of optimal control of advective mixing in Stokes fluid flows is considered. The velocity field is assumed to be induced by a finite set of spatially distributed force fields that can be modulated arbitrarily with time and a passive material is advected by the flow. To quantify the degree of mixedness of a density field, we use a Sobolev space norm of negative index. We pose a finite-time optimal control problem where we aim to achieve the best mixing for a fixed value of the action (time integral of the kinetic energy of the fluid body) per unit mass. We derive the first order necessary conditions for optimality that can be expressed as a two point boundary value problem and we discuss some elementary properties that the optimal controls need to satisfy. A conjugate gradient descent method is used to solve the optimal control problem and we present numerical results for two problems involving arrays of vortices. A comparison of the mixing performance shows that optimal aperiodic inputs can do better than periodic inputs.

  11. Optical flow optimization using parallel genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Romero, Olmo; Botella, Guillermo; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Meyer Base, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    A new approach to optimize the parameters of a gradient-based optical flow model using a parallel genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed. The main characteristics of the optical flow algorithm are its bio-inspiration and robustness against contrast, static patterns and noise, besides working consistently with several optical illusions where other algorithms fail. This model depends on many parameters which conform the number of channels, the orientations required, the length and shape of the kernel functions used in the convolution stage, among many more. The GA is used to find a set of parameters which improve the accuracy of the optical flow on inputs where the ground-truth data is available. This set of parameters helps to understand which of them are better suited for each type of inputs and can be used to estimate the parameters of the optical flow algorithm when used with videos that share similar characteristics. The proposed implementation takes into account the embarrassingly parallel nature of the GA and uses the OpenMP Application Programming Interface (API) to speedup the process of estimating an optimal set of parameters. The information obtained in this work can be used to dynamically reconfigure systems, with potential applications in robotics, medical imaging and tracking.

  12. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  13. Small Scale Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model in the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. Effects of boundary layer growth and the reduction in cross-sectional flow area are calculated using an in- integral method. A CFD calibration is shown to be of lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35%, and slower by a factor of 100. Effects of total pressure distortion are taken into account in the experiment. Distortion creates a loss in flow rate and can be characterized by two different distortion descriptors.

  14. Mass and energy flow near sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, Alan; Bruning, David; Labonte, Barry J.

    1988-01-01

    Sunspots block the flow of energy to the solar surface. The blocked energy heats the volume beneath the spot, producing a pressure excess which drives an outflow of mass. Linear numerical models of the mass and energy flow around spots were constructed to estimate the predictions of this physical picture against the observed properties of sunspot bright rings and moat flows. The width of the bright ring and moat are predicted to be proportional to the depth of the spot penumbra, in conflict with the observed proportionality of the moat width to the spot diameter. Postulating that spot depths are proportional to spot diameters would bury the moat flow too deeply to be observed, because the radial velocity at the surface is found to be inversely proportional to the depth of the spot penumbra. The radial velocity at the surface is of order a few hundred meters per second after 1 day, in agreement with the observed excess of moat velocities over supergranule velocities.

  15. [Mass optimization of thermal network model of coupled dual-loop thermal control system in spacecraft].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X R; Ren, J X; Xu, X H; Liang, X G

    2001-08-01

    To deal with the mass optimization of thermal control system as well as environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) of manned spacecraft. The thermo-hydraulic network composed of coupled liquid dual-loop and gas loops was studied. Physical and mathematical models were established and used for flow, heat transfer and mass calculation in the network. The influences of various operational and structural parameters on the mass were analyzed. There were optimal pipe diameters for internal loop and external loop; there existed an upper limit of flow rate in the internal loop and lower limit in the external loop; there were also optimal flow rates in the loops and optimal exit temperature of the radiator. Reasonable design of these parameters were very important for reducing the system mass.

  16. Underground stope optimization with network flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaoyu; Marcotte, Denis; Simon, Richard

    2013-03-01

    A new algorithm to optimize stope design for the sublevel stoping mining method is described. The model is based on a cylindrical coordinate defined around the initial vertical raise. Geotechnical constraints on hanging wall and footwall slopes are translated as precedence relations between blocks in the cylindrical coordinate system. Two control parameters with clear engineering meaning are defined to further constrain the solution: (a) the maximum distance of a block from the raise and (b) the horizontal width required to bring the farthest block to the raise. The graph obtained is completed by the addition of a source and a sink node allowing to transform the optimization program to a problem of maximum flow over the graph. The (conditional) optimal stope corresponding to the current raise location and height is obtained. The best location and height for the raise are determined by global optimization. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated with three simple synthetic deposits and one real deposit. Comparison is made with the floating stope technique. The results show that the algorithm effectively meets the geotechnical constraints and control parameters, and produce realistic optimal stope for engineering use.

  17. Optimal energy growth in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, Alan; Huerre, Patrick; Schmid, Peter

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown in Gu'egan, Schmid & Huerre 2006 that the kinetic energy of optimal G"ortler-H"ammerlin (GH) perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow can be transiently amplified by two orders of magnitude at Reynolds numbers ranging from 400 to 1000 and spanwise wavenumbers from 0.1 to 0.5. In this configuration an array of counter-rotating chordwise vortices is compressed by the spanwise shear, as in the well-known Orr mechanism. We show that stronger transient growth can be achieved when the GH assumption is relaxed. In this case the optimal initial perturbation consists in vorticity sheets stacked in the chordwise direction, at a small angle from the symmetry plane of the base flow. Although the spatial structure of the GH perturbations is lost, wall-normal-spanwise plane cuts show that the amplification mechanism is mostly unchanged. The GH assumption thus provides a reasonably good estimate for transient energy amplification levels in swept Hiemenz flow. Extension of this analysis to the spatial growth problem is under way and preliminary results will be shown.

  18. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  19. Multicriteria optimization of gluconic acid production using net flow.

    PubMed

    Halsall-Whitney, H; Taylor, D; Thibault, J

    2003-03-01

    The biochemical process industry is often confronted with the challenge of making decisions in an atmosphere of multiple and conflicting objectives. Recent innovations in the field of operations research and systems science have yielded rigorous multicriteria optimization techniques that can be successfully applied to the field of biochemical engineering. These techniques incorporate the expert's experience into the optimization routine and provide valuable information about the zone of possible solutions. This paper presents a multicriteria optimization strategy that generates a Pareto domain, given a set of conflicting objective criteria, and determines the optimal operating region for the production of gluconic acid using the net flow method (NFM). The objective criteria include maximizing the productivity and concentration of gluconic acid, while minimizing the residual substrate. Three optimization strategies are considered. The first two strategies identify the optimal operating region for the process inputs. The results yielded an acceptable compromise between productivity, gluconic acid concentration and residual substrate concentration. Fixing the process inputs representing the batch time, initial substrate concentration and initial biomass equal to their optimal values, the remaining simulations were used to study the sensitivity of the optimum operating region to changes in the oxygen mass transfer coefficient, K(L) a, by utilizing a multi-level K(L) a strategy. The results show that controlling K(L) a during the reaction reduced the production of biomass, which in turn resulted in increased productivity and concentration of gluconic acid above that of a fixed K(L) a.

  20. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, James D.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Bouten, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity. PMID:25056213

  1. Optimal orientation in flows: providing a benchmark for animal movement strategies.

    PubMed

    McLaren, James D; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Dokter, Adriaan M; Klaassen, Raymond H G; Bouten, Willem

    2014-10-06

    Animal movements in air and water can be strongly affected by experienced flow. While various flow-orientation strategies have been proposed and observed, their performance in variable flow conditions remains unclear. We apply control theory to establish a benchmark for time-minimizing (optimal) orientation. We then define optimal orientation for movement in steady flow patterns and, using dynamic wind data, for short-distance mass movements of thrushes (Turdus sp.) and 6000 km non-stop migratory flights by great snipes, Gallinago media. Relative to the optimal benchmark, we assess the efficiency (travel speed) and reliability (success rate) of three generic orientation strategies: full compensation for lateral drift, vector orientation (single-heading movement) and goal orientation (continually heading towards the goal). Optimal orientation is characterized by detours to regions of high flow support, especially when flow speeds approach and exceed the animal's self-propelled speed. In strong predictable flow (short distance thrush flights), vector orientation adjusted to flow on departure is nearly optimal, whereas for unpredictable flow (inter-continental snipe flights), only goal orientation was near-optimally reliable and efficient. Optimal orientation provides a benchmark for assessing efficiency of responses to complex flow conditions, thereby offering insight into adaptive flow-orientation across taxa in the light of flow strength, predictability and navigation capacity.

  2. Optimal Micro-Jet Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-jet secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-jet secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low mass" micro-jet array designs. The term "low mass" micro-jet may refers to fluidic jets with total (integrated) mass flow ratios between 0.10 and 1.0 percent of the engine face mass flow. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-jet array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  3. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-04-28

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance.

  4. Tsunamis generated by subaerial mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, S.J.; Watts, P.; Sorensen, O.E.; Janssen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Tsunamis generated in lakes and reservoirs by subaerial mass flows pose distinctive problems for hazards assessment because the domain of interest is commonly the "near field," beyond the zone of complex splashing but close enough to the source that wave propagation effects are not predominant. Scaling analysis of the equations governing water wave propagation shows that near-field wave amplitude and wavelength should depend on certain measures of mass flow dynamics and volume. The scaling analysis motivates a successful collapse (in dimensionless space) of data from two distinct sets of experiments with solid block "wave makers." To first order, wave amplitude/water depth is a simple function of the ratio of dimensionless wave maker travel time to dimensionless wave maker volume per unit width. Wave amplitude data from previous laboratory investigations with both rigid and deformable wave makers follow the same trend in dimensionless parameter space as our own data. The characteristic wavelength/water depth for all our experiments is simply proportional to dimensionless wave maker travel time, which is itself given approximately by a simple function of wave maker length/water depth. Wave maker shape and rigidity do not otherwise influence wave features. Application of the amplitude scaling relation to several historical events yields "predicted" near-field wave amplitudes in reasonable agreement with measurements and observations. Together, the scaling relations for near-field amplitude, wavelength, and submerged travel time provide key inputs necessary for computational wave propagation and hazards assessment.

  5. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers.

  6. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  7. Optimizing information flow in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, William

    2009-03-01

    The generation of physicists who turned to the phenomena of life in the 1930s realized that to understand these phenomena one would need to track not just the flow of energy (as in inanimate systems) but also the flow of information. It would take more than a decade before Shannon provided the tools to formalize this intuition, making precise the connection between entropy and information. Since Shannon, many investigators have explored the possibility that biological mechanisms are selected to maximize the efficiency with which information is transmitted or represented, subject to fundamental physical constraints. I will survey these efforts, emphasizing that the same principles are being used in thinking about biological systems at very different levels of organization, from bacteria to brains. Although sometimes submerged under concerns about particular systems, the idea that information flow is optimized provides us with a candidate for a real theory of biological networks, rather than just a collection of parameterized models. I will try to explain why I think the time is right to focus on this grand theoretical goal, pointing to some key open problems and opportunities for connection to emerging experiments.

  8. Development of a miniaturized mass-flow meter for an axial flow blood pump based on computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In order to monitor the condition of patients with implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVAS), it is important to measure pump flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to measure the pump flow rate, especially in an implantable axial flow blood pump, because the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with regard to the pump flow rate. In this study, a miniaturized mass-flow meter for discharged patients with an implantable axial blood pump was developed on the basis of computational analysis, and was evaluated in in-vitro tests. The mass-flow meter makes use of centrifugal force produced by the mass-flow rate around a curved cannula. An optimized design was investigated by use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. On the basis of the computational analysis, a miniaturized mass-flow meter made of titanium alloy was developed. A strain gauge was adopted as a sensor element. The first strain gauge, attached to the curved area, measured both static pressure and centrifugal force. The second strain gauge, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure. By subtracting the output of the second strain gauge from the output of the first strain gauge, the mass-flow rate was determined. In in-vitro tests using a model circulation loop, the mass-flow meter was compared with a conventional flow meter. Measurement error was less than ±0.5 L/min and average time delay was 0.14 s. We confirmed that the miniaturized mass-flow meter could accurately measure the mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively.

  9. CFFF low mass flow DCW generator operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineberry, J. T.; Galanga, F. L.; Frazier, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of testing of the low mass flow diagonal conducting sidewall MHD generator in the CFFF is given. These summaries include details of the powered generator tests conducted during the 1985 LMF4 test series. A presentation of experimental generator electrical data collected during these tests is included. The quality of these data is discussed and a review of representative data presentations is made as a means of identifying phenomena associated with coal-fired MHD generators. Unique characteristics of coal slag effects upon electrical performance are seen in the voltage profiles and power characteristics for the generator. Fundamental theoretical analyses of the generator are used to qualify the levels of generator performance that were demonstrated during testing. These analyses are directed at isolating possible sources that have caused performance deficiencies and anomalies seen in the test data.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  11. Calculation of Optimal Coordinates for Two-Dimensional Incompressible Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    a vertical wall, commonly known as Hiemenz flow and 8 - 0 represents the flow past a parabolic cylinder. Plots of the pressure gradient parameter 81...corresponds to increasing the downstream asymptotic wedge angle. If the downstream wedge angle is increased to 90, the Hiemenz flow or the flow past...thickness is constant for flow past a vertical wall ( Hiemenz flow). The condition for optimal coordinates requires that the displacement thickness should be

  12. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  13. Numerical modeling of flow in a differential chamber of the gas-dynamic interface of a portable mass-spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarova, E. A.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    Mathematical modeling of flow in the differential chamber of the gas-dynamic interface of a portable mass-spectrometer was carried out to comprehensively study the flow structure and make recommendations for the optimization of the gas-dynamic interface. Modeling was performed using an OpenFOAM open computational platform. Conditions for an optimal operating mode of the differential chamber were determined.

  14. Calibration measurements using the ORNL fissile mass flow monitor

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.; Uckan, T.; Sumner, J.; Mattingly, J.; Mihalczo, J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of fissile-mass-flow measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This Flow Monitor is part of a Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) that will be installed in at least two Russian Federation (R.F.) blending facilities. The key objectives of the demonstration of the ORNL Flow Monitor are two: (a) demonstrate that the ORNL Flow Monitor equipment is capable of reliably monitoring the mass flow rate of {sup 235}UF{sub 6} gas, and (b) provide a demonstration of ORNL Flow Monitor system in operation with UF{sub 6} flow for a visiting R.F. delegation. These two objectives have been met by the PGDP demonstration, as presented in this paper.

  15. Transport phenomena in subsonic and supersonic flows in a duct with mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Shyang-Lin

    1994-01-01

    Film cooling effects have always been crucial for the engine/rocket/ramjet propulsion systems. Knowing the pressure and temperature distribution of the flow is very important for both system and structural analyses to find optimal design. An efficient time dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes solver using higher order accuracy algorithms employing the finite-volume method is developed. The physics inside the flow field with a cooler secondary mass stream injected into the channel is studied. The results showed that for subsonic main flow, the injected mass stream will bend and accelerate in the downstream direction, creating a region of lower temperature near the downstream walls. This lower temperature region also exists even if there is a heat flux added to the flow system. Therefore, film cooling effect exists for the subsonic flow. For supersonic flow, however, the injected mass flow, instead of bending toward the downstream wall in order to have a cooling effect, is bent toward upstream direction and retards the main flow, resulting in a stagnant flow region. The temperature in the entire flow field is found to increase an appreciable amount even though the temperature in the stagnant region is found to be relatively lower than other areas. Therefore, there is no film cooling effect observed for supersonic flow. These phenomena have been verified by the experimental work. For subsonic flow, the acoustical wave is found to travel forwards and backwards in the field system while the pressure gradient is favorable for the whole flow field. For supersonic flow, there is always an adverse pressure gradient region formed near the walls upstream of the mass-injection location. Inside this adverse pressure gradient region, an air bubble is usually found to exist. The flow interactions between the main stream and secondary stream increase the flow vorticity. This vorticity is found to travel in the downstream direction for subsonic flow. However, for supersonic flow

  16. A sensitivity equation approach to shape optimization in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1994-01-01

    A sensitivity equation method to shape optimization problems is applied. An algorithm is developed and tested on a problem of designing optimal forebody simulators for a 2D, inviscid supersonic flow. The algorithm uses a BFGS/Trust Region optimization scheme with sensitivities computed by numerically approximating the linear partial differential equations that determine the flow sensitivities. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  17. Global Optimization Techniques for Fluid Flow and Propulsion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, Wei; Papila, Nilay; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Tucker, Kevin; Griffin, Lisa; Dorney, Dan; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of global optimization techniques for fluid flow and propulsion devices. Details are given on the need, characteristics, and techniques for global optimization. The techniques include response surface methodology (RSM), neural networks and back-propagation neural networks, design of experiments, face centered composite design (FCCD), orthogonal arrays, outlier analysis, and design optimization.

  18. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP.

  19. Dose-mass inverse optimization for minimally moving thoracic lesions.

    PubMed

    Mihaylov, I B; Moros, E G

    2015-05-21

    In the past decade, several different radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation and optimization schemes have been proposed as viable approaches, aiming for dose escalation or an increase of healthy tissue sparing. In particular, it has been argued that dose-mass plan evaluation and treatment plan optimization might be viable alternatives to the standard of care, which is realized through dose-volume evaluation and optimization. The purpose of this investigation is to apply dose-mass optimization to a cohort of lung cancer patients and compare the achievable healthy tissue sparing to that one achievable through dose-volume optimization. Fourteen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plans were studied retrospectively. The range of tumor motion was less than 0.5 cm and motion management in the treatment planning process was not considered. For each case, dose-volume (DV)-based and dose-mass (DM)-based optimization was performed. Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT was used, with all of the optimization parameters kept the same between DV and DM optimizations. Commonly used dosimetric indices (DIs) such as dose to 1% the spinal cord volume, dose to 50% of the esophageal volume, and doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung volumes were used for cross-comparison. Similarly, mass-based indices (MIs), such as doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung masses, 1% of spinal cord mass, and 33% of heart mass, were also tallied. Statistical equivalence tests were performed to quantify the findings for the entire patient cohort. Both DV and DM plans for each case were normalized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescribed dose. DM optimization resulted in more organs at risk (OAR) sparing than DV optimization. The average sparing of cord, heart, and esophagus was 23, 4, and 6%, respectively. For the majority of the DIs, DM optimization resulted in lower lung doses. On average, the doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung were lower by approximately 3 and 4%, whereas lung

  20. Dose-mass inverse optimization for minimally moving thoracic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Moros, E. G.

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, several different radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation and optimization schemes have been proposed as viable approaches, aiming for dose escalation or an increase of healthy tissue sparing. In particular, it has been argued that dose-mass plan evaluation and treatment plan optimization might be viable alternatives to the standard of care, which is realized through dose-volume evaluation and optimization. The purpose of this investigation is to apply dose-mass optimization to a cohort of lung cancer patients and compare the achievable healthy tissue sparing to that one achievable through dose-volume optimization. Fourteen non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient plans were studied retrospectively. The range of tumor motion was less than 0.5 cm and motion management in the treatment planning process was not considered. For each case, dose-volume (DV)-based and dose-mass (DM)-based optimization was performed. Nine-field step-and-shoot IMRT was used, with all of the optimization parameters kept the same between DV and DM optimizations. Commonly used dosimetric indices (DIs) such as dose to 1% the spinal cord volume, dose to 50% of the esophageal volume, and doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung volumes were used for cross-comparison. Similarly, mass-based indices (MIs), such as doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung masses, 1% of spinal cord mass, and 33% of heart mass, were also tallied. Statistical equivalence tests were performed to quantify the findings for the entire patient cohort. Both DV and DM plans for each case were normalized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescribed dose. DM optimization resulted in more organs at risk (OAR) sparing than DV optimization. The average sparing of cord, heart, and esophagus was 23, 4, and 6%, respectively. For the majority of the DIs, DM optimization resulted in lower lung doses. On average, the doses to 20 and 30% of healthy lung were lower by approximately 3 and 4%, whereas lung

  1. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  2. New views of granular mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Vallance, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Concentrated grain-fluid mixtures in rock avalanches, debris flows, and pyroclastic flows do not behave as simple materials with fixed rheologies. Instead, rheology evolves as mixture agitation, grain concentration, and fluid-pressure change during flow initiation, transit, and deposition. Throughout a flow, however, normal forces on planes parallel to the free upper surface approximately balance the weight of the superincumbent mixture, and the Coulomb friction rule describes bulk intergranular shear stresses on such planes. Pore-fluid pressure can temporarily or locally enhance mixture mobility by reducing Coulomb friction and transferring shear stress to the fluid phase. Initial conditions, boundary conditions, and grain comminution and sorting can influence pore-fluid pressures and cause variations in flow dynamics and deposits.

  3. Optimal planar flow network designs for tissue engineered constructs with built-in vasculature.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Vijayakumar; Mathur, Kamlesh; Baskaran, Harihara

    2007-03-01

    Convective delivery of nutrients is important to enhance mass transport within tissue engineered (TE) products. Depending on the target tissue, an ideal TE product will have an integrated microvasculature that will eliminate mass transport limitations that can occur during product growth in vitro and integration in vivo. A synthetic approach to develop microvasculature involves development of network designs with efficient mass transfer characteristics. In this paper, utilizing a planar bifurcating network as a basis, we develop an approach to design optimal flow networks that have maximum mass transport efficiency for a given pressure drop. We formulated the optimization problem for a TE skin product, incorporating two types of duct flow, rectangular and square, and solved using a generalized reduced gradient algorithm. Under the conditions of this study, we found that rectangular ducts have superior mass transport characteristics than square ducts. Microvascular area per volume values obtained in this work are significantly greater than those reported in the literature. We discuss the effect of network variables such as porosity and generations on the optimal designs. This research forms the engineering basis for the rational development of TE products with built-in microvasculature and will pave the way to design complex flow networks with optimal mass transfer characteristics.

  4. Optimal Planar Flow Network Designs for Tissue Engineered Constructs with Built-in Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Janakiraman, Vijayakumar; Mathur, Kamlesh; Baskaran, Harihara

    2008-01-01

    Convective delivery of nutrients is important to enhance mass transport within tissue engineered (TE) products. Depending on the target tissue, an ideal TE product will have an integrated microvasculature that will eliminate mass transport limitations that can occur during product growth in vitro and integration in vivo. A synthetic approach to develop microvasculature involves development of network designs with efficient mass transfer characteristics. In this paper, utilizing a planar bifurcating network as a basis, we develop an approach to design optimal flow networks that have maximum mass transport efficiency for a given pressure drop. We formulated the optimization problem for a TE skin product, incorporating two types of duct flow, rectangular and square, and solved using a generalized reduced gradient algorithm. Under the conditions of this study, we found that rectangular ducts have superior mass transport characteristics than square ducts. Microvascular area per volume values obtained in this work are significantly greater than those recorded in the literature. We discuss the effect of network variables such as porosity and generations on the optimal designs. This research forms the engineering basis for the rational development of TE products with built-in microvasculature and will pave the way to design complex flow networks with optimal mass transfer characteristics. PMID:17203399

  5. Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chunjun; Zhang, Yingzi; Ma, Tengcai

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicated flow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phase flow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, temperature and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration is proposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improved conversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used to simulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulation system can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

  6. Fluorochemical Mass Flows in a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facility

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Huset, Carin A.; Luthy, Richard G.; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Field, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorochemicals have widespread applications and are released into municipal wastewater treatment plants via domestic wastewater. A field study was conducted at a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant to determine the mass flows of selected fluorochemicals. Flow-proportional, 24-h samples of raw influent, primary effluent, trickling filter effluent, secondary effluent, and final effluent and grab samples of primary, thickened, activated, and anaerobically-digested sludge were collected over ten days and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Significant decreases in the mass flows of perfluorohexane sulfonate and perfluorodecanoate occurred during trickling filtration and primary clarification, while activated sludge treatment decreased the mass flow of perfluorohexanoate. Mass flows of the 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate were unchanged as a result of wastewater treatment, which indicates that conventional wastewater treatment is not effective for removal of these compounds. A net increase in the mass flows for perfluorooctane and perfluorodecane sulfonates occurred from trickling filtration and activated sludge treatment. Mass flows for perfluoroalkylsulfonamides and perfluorononanoate also increased during activated sludge treatment and are attributed to degradation of precursor molecules. PMID:17180988

  7. Optimal design of multi-conditions for axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L. J.; Tang, F. P.; Liu, C.; Xie, R. S.; Zhang, W. P.

    2016-11-01

    Passage components of the pump device will have a negative flow state when axial pump run off the design condition. Combined with model tests of axial flow pump, this paper use numerical simulation and numerical optimization techniques, and change geometric design parameters of the impeller to optimal design of multi conditions for Axial Flow Pump, in order to improve the efficiency of non-design conditions, broad the high efficient district and reduce operating cost. The results show that, efficiency curve of optimized significantly wider than the initial one without optimization. The efficiency of low flow working point increased by about 2.6%, the designed working point increased by about 0.5%, and the high flow working point increased the most, about 7.4%. The change range of head is small, so all working point can meet the operational requirements. That will greatly reduce operating costs and shorten the period of optimal design. This paper adopted the CFD simulation as the subject analysis, combined with experiment study, instead of artificial way of optimization design with experience, which proves the reliability and efficiency of the optimization design of multi-operation conditions of axial-flow pump device.

  8. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

    1980-04-23

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  9. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Dacus, Michael W.; Cole, Jack H.

    1982-01-01

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  10. A flow path model for regional water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2009-09-01

    We develop a flow path model for the optimization of a regional water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationship between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery network. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationship between suppliers and receivers. The physical part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The flow path model can be used to optimize not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information concerning water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water rights owner, water quantity, water location, and associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely as an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. We first verify the proposed methodology on a hypothetical water distribution system. Then we apply the methodology to the water distribution system associated with the Tou-Qian River basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model can be used to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow path, and the water trade and transfer strategy.

  11. Mass and energy flow in the solar chromosphere and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Noyes, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The work reviews some investigations into the mass and energy flow in the solar chromosphere and corona; the objective of these investigations is the development of a physical model that will not only account for the physical conditions in the outer atmosphere of the sun, but can also be applied to the study of the outer atmospheres of other stars. Particular attention is given to mass and energy flow in regions with weak and strong magnetic fields, to observational evidence for wave heating and systematic mass flows, and to heating mechanisms. Consideration is given throughout to mechanisms of energy input and energy loss.

  12. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  13. Measurement and visualization of mass transport for the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient mass-spectrometry source.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  14. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  15. Unsteady flow sensing and optimal sensor placement using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaan, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Machine learning is used to estimate the flow state and to determine the optimal sensor placement over a two-dimensional (2D) airfoil equipped with a Coanda actuator. The analysis is based on flow field data obtained from 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (uRANS) simulations with different jet blowing intensities and actuation frequencies, characterizing different flow separation states. This study shows how the "random forests" algorithm is utilized beyond its typical usage in fluid mechanics estimating the flow state to determine the optimal sensor placement. The results are compared against the current de-facto standard of maximum modal amplitude location and against a brute force approach that scans all possible sensor combinations. The results show that it is possible to simultaneously infer the state of flow and to determine the optimal sensor location without the need to perform proper orthogonal decomposition. Collaborative Research Center (CRC) 880, DFG.

  16. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  17. Bayesian inference in mass flow simulations - from back calculation to prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Hellweger, Valentin; Huber, Andreas; Mergili, Martin; Pudasaini, Shiva; Fellin, Wolfgang; Oberguggenberger, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Mass flow simulations are an integral part of hazard assessment. Determining the hazard potential requires a multidisciplinary approach, including different scientific fields such as geomorphology, meteorology, physics, civil engineering and mathematics. An important task in snow avalanche simulation is to predict process intensities (runout, flow velocity and depth, ...). The application of probabilistic methods allows one to develop a comprehensive simulation concept, ranging from back to forward calculation and finally to prediction of mass flow events. In this context optimized parameter sets for the used simulation model or intensities of the modeled mass flow process (e.g. runout distances) are represented by probability distributions. Existing deterministic flow models, in particular with respect to snow avalanche dynamics, contain several parameters (e.g. friction). Some of these parameters are more conceptual than physical and their direct measurement in the field is hardly possible. Hence, parameters have to be optimized by matching simulation results to field observations. This inverse problem can be solved by a Bayesian approach (Markov chain Monte Carlo). The optimization process yields parameter distributions, that can be utilized for probabilistic reconstruction and prediction of avalanche events. Arising challenges include the limited amount of observations, correlations appearing in model parameters or observed avalanche characteristics (e.g. velocity and runout) and the accurate handling of ensemble simulations, always taking into account the related uncertainties. Here we present an operational Bayesian simulation framework with r.avaflow, the open source GIS simulation model for granular avalanches and debris flows.

  18. Profile Optimization Method for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization in Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Simulation results obtained by using FUN2D for robust airfoil shape optimization in transonic viscous flow are included to show the potential of the profile optimization method for generating fairly smooth optimal airfoils with no off-design performance degradation.

  19. Overexcitability and Optimal Flow in Talented Dancers, Singers, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Overexcitability (OE) and optimal flow are variables shared by talented individuals. This study demonstrated that the dancer (n = 86) and opera singer (n = 61) groups shared higher OE profiles compared to the athlete group (n = 50). Two self-report instruments assessed flow (global and subscales) and the five OE dimensions. All groups endorsed…

  20. Overexcitability and Optimal Flow in Talented Dancers, Singers, and Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Overexcitability (OE) and optimal flow are variables shared by talented individuals. This study demonstrated that the dancer (n = 86) and opera singer (n = 61) groups shared higher OE profiles compared to the athlete group (n = 50). Two self-report instruments assessed flow (global and subscales) and the five OE dimensions. All groups endorsed…

  1. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  2. Noninvasive miniaturized mass-flow meter using a curved cannula for implantable axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Blood flow should be measured to monitor conditions of patients with implantable artificial hearts continuously and noninvasively. We have developed a noninvasive miniaturized mass-flow meter using a curved cannula for an axial flow blood pump. The mass-flow meter utilized centrifugal force generated by the mass-flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. Based on the numerical analysis, the first gauge, attached to the curved area, measured static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure for static pressure compensation. The mass-flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. To compensate for the inertia force under the pulsatile flow, a 0.75-Hz low-pass filter was added to the electrical circuit. In the evaluation tests, numerical analysis and an actual measurement test using bovine blood were performed to evaluate the measurement performances. As a result, in the numerical analysis, the relationship between the differential pressure caused by centrifugal force and the flow rate was verified. In the actual measurement test, measurement error was less than ± 0.5 L/min, and the time delay was 0.12 s. We confirmed that the developed mass-flow meter was able to measure mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively.

  3. A Mass Tracking Formulation for Bubbles in Incompressible Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-14

    marching method proposed in [23]. The treatment of viscosity for multiphase incompressible flow with appropriate jump conditions at the interface is...A Mass Tracking Formulation for Bubbles in Incompressible Flow Mridul Aanjaneya∗, Saket Patkar∗, Ronald Fedkiw∗ Stanford University, 353 Serra Mall...Gates Computer Science Room 207, Stanford, CA 94305 Abstract We devise a novel method for treating bubbles in incompressible flow that relies on the

  4. Parametric excitation of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogendijk, H.; Groenesteijn, J.; Haneveld, J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Lötters, J. C.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor can be excited in its torsional movement by applying parametric excitation. Using AC-bias voltages for periodic electrostatic spring softening, the flow-filled tube exhibits a steady vibration at suitable voltage settings. Measurements show that the sensor for this type of excitation can be used to measure water flow rates within a range of 0 ± 500 μl/h with an accuracy of 1% full scale error.

  5. Increasing Wind Turbine Power Generation Through Optimized Flow Control Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John; Williams, Theodore; Corke, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    A practical, validated methodology is outlined for implementing flow control systems into wind turbine designs to maximize power generation. This approach involves determining optimal flow control strategies to minimize aerodynamic losses for horizontal axis wind turbines during Region II operation. A quantitative design optimization (QDO) process is completed for the wind turbine utilized in the Notre Dame Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Research. QDO utilizes CFD simulations and shape optimization tools to maximize effectiveness of flow control. Here, only flow control schemes that could be retrofitted on the existing turbine were explored. The final geometry is discussed along with accompanying validations of the predicted performance from wind tunnel experiments at full-scale conditions. Field data from the wind energy laboratory is included.

  6. A generalized flow path model for water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N.; Cheng, W.; Yeh, W. W.

    2008-12-01

    A generalized flow path model is developed for optimizing a water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationships between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery system. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model to clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationships between suppliers and receivers. The second part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The advantages of the proposed model are that: (1) it is a generalized methodology to optimize water distribution, delivery scheduling, water trade, water transfer, and water exchange under existing reservoir operation rules, contracts, and agreements; (2) it can consider water as multiple commodities if needed; and (3) no simplifications are made for either the physical system or the delivery relationships. The model can be used as a tool for decision making for scheduling optimization. The model optimizes not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information of water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water right owner, water quantity and its associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. The proposed model is first verified by a hypothetical water distribution system. Then, the model is applied to the water distribution system of the Tou-Qian River Basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model has the ability to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow paths of the delivery, and the strategies of water transfer while considering

  7. An image morphing technique based on optimal mass preserving mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-06-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L(2) mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods.

  8. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  9. Flow of sand and a variable mass Atwood machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, José; Solovey, Guillermo; Gil, Salvador

    2003-07-01

    We discuss a simple and inexpensive apparatus that lets us measure the instantaneous flow rate of granular media, such as sand, in real time. The measurements allow us to elucidate the phenomenological laws that govern the flow of granular media through an aperture. We use this apparatus to construct a variable mass system and study the motion of an Atwood machine with one weight changing in time in a controlled manner. The study illustrates Newton's second law for variable mass systems and lets us investigate the dependence of the flow rate on acceleration.

  10. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  11. Nonlinear optimization of buoyancy-driven ventilation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Saleh; Grover, Piyush; Caulfield, C. P.

    2016-11-01

    We consider the optimization of buoyancy-driven flows governed by Boussinesq equations using the Direct-Adjoint-Looping method. We use incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, derive the corresponding adjoint equations and solve the resulting sensitivity equations with respect to inlet conditions. For validation, we solve a series of inverse-design problems, for which we recover known globally optimal solutions. For a displacement ventilation scenario with a line source, the numerical results are compared with analytically obtained optimal inlet conditions available from classical plume theory. Our results show that depending on Archimedes number, defined as the ratio of the inlet Reynolds number to the Rayleigh number associated with the plume, qualitatively different optimal solutions are obtained. For steady and transient plumes, and subject to an enthalpy constraint on the incoming flow, we identify boundary conditions leading to 'optimal' temperature distributions in the occupied zone.

  12. A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. H.

    2010-09-15

    Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

  13. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  14. Fluid flow through seamounts and implications for global mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert N.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Chapman, David S.

    2004-08-01

    Seamounts contribute to globally significant hydrothermal fluxes, but the dynamics and impacts of fluid flow through these features are poorly understood. Numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow illustrate how seamounts induce local convection in the oceanic crust. We consider idealized axisymmetric seamounts and calculate mass and heat fluxes by using a coupled heat- and fluid-flow model. By using P. Wessel's global database of ˜15,000 seamounts identified through satellite gravimetry, we estimate that the mass flux associated with seamounts is ˜1014 kg/yr, a number comparable to estimated regional mass fluxes through mid-ocean ridges and flanks. In addition, the seamount-generated advective heat flux may be locally significant well beyond the 65 Ma average age at which advective lithospheric heat loss on ridge flanks ends. These flows may be important for facilitating geochemical exchange between the crust and ocean and may affect subseafloor microbial ecosystems.

  15. Probe measures gas and liquid mass flux in high mass flow ratio two-phase flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Deceleration probe constructed of two concentric tubes with separator inlet operates successfully in flow fields where ratio of droplet flow rate to gas flow rate ranges from 1.0 to 20, and eliminates problems of local flow field disturbances and flooding. Probe is effective tool for characterization of liquid droplet/gas spray fields.

  16. Optimal Actuator Dimensions for Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, L. M.; Haritonidis, J. H.; Herbert, Th.

    1996-11-01

    By using a local source, we produce wave trains and wave packets that develop in a strongly unstable laminar boundary layer. Computer simulations and wind-tunnel experiments show that these disturbances can be attenuated by a membrane actuator via wave superposition. Using DNS, we optimize actuators to generate specific single mode disturbances. This optimization is important for the integration of multiple actuators into an array which cancels more general, in particular natural disturbances. We investigate actuators in continuous sinusoidal motion to determine dimensions which most accurately reproduce the streamwise velocity profiles of naturally occuring disturbances and generate the largest streamwise velocity perturbations downstream of the actuator. The computational results are compared with experimental data. This comparison validates the computational design procedure for efficient actuators which is essential for the implementation of our ``smart wall'' concept^1 to delay transition in laminar boundary layers. ^1 X. Fan, L. M. Hofmann, Th. Herbert, AIAA 93-3273, 1993 ^ Supported by AFOSR Contract F49620-93-1-0135.

  17. Optimized boundary driven flows for dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Cooper, C. M.; Weisberg, D. B.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-11-15

    We perform numerical optimization of the axisymmetric flows in a sphere to minimize the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr} required for dynamo onset. The optimization is done for the class of laminar incompressible flows of von Karman type satisfying the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation. Such flows are determined by equatorially antisymmetric profiles of driving azimuthal (toroidal) velocity specified at the spherical boundary. The model is relevant to the Madison plasma dynamo experiment, whose spherical boundary is capable of differential driving of plasma in the azimuthal direction. We show that the dynamo onset in this system depends strongly on details of the driving velocity profile and the fluid Reynolds number Re. It is found that the overall lowest Rm{sub cr} Almost-Equal-To 200 is achieved at Re Almost-Equal-To 240 for the flow, which is hydrodynamically marginally stable. We also show that the optimized flows can sustain dynamos only in the range Rm{sub cr}optimized flows and the corresponding dynamo fields are presented.

  18. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  19. Information flow and optimization in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Tkacik, Gasper; Callan, Curtis G; Bialek, William

    2008-08-26

    In the simplest view of transcriptional regulation, the expression of a gene is turned on or off by changes in the concentration of a transcription factor (TF). We use recent data on noise levels in gene expression to show that it should be possible to transmit much more than just one regulatory bit. Realizing this optimal information capacity would require that the dynamic range of TF concentrations used by the cell, the input/output relation of the regulatory module, and the noise in gene expression satisfy certain matching relations, which we derive. These results provide parameter-free, quantitative predictions connecting independently measurable quantities. Although we have considered only the simplified problem of a single gene responding to a single TF, we find that these predictions are in surprisingly good agreement with recent experiments on the Bicoid/Hunchback system in the early Drosophila embryo and that this system achieves approximately 90% of its theoretical maximum information transmission.

  20. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Depending on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.

  1. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE PAGES

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; ...

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance <(Map - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore » on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  2. Area-preservation mapping using optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Su, Zhengyu; Gu, Xianfeng David; Kaufman, Arie; Sun, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel area-preservation mapping/flattening method using the optimal mass transport technique, based on the Monge-Brenier theory. Our optimal transport map approach is rigorous and solid in theory, efficient and parallel in computation, yet general for various applications. By comparison with the conventional Monge-Kantorovich approach, our method reduces the number of variables from O(n2) to O(n), and converts the optimal mass transport problem to a convex optimization problem, which can now be efficiently carried out by Newton's method. Furthermore, our framework includes the area weighting strategy that enables users to completely control and adjust the size of areas everywhere in an accurate and quantitative way. Our method significantly reduces the complexity of the problem, and improves the efficiency, flexibility and scalability during visualization. Our framework, by combining conformal mapping and optimal mass transport mapping, serves as a powerful tool for a broad range of applications in visualization and graphics, especially for medical imaging. We provide a variety of experimental results to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness and efficacy of our novel framework.

  3. Calculation of 3-dimensional choking mass flow in turbomachinery with 2-dimensional flow models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.

    1977-01-01

    An approach is considered for obtaining an approximate flow solution in the case of a cross-sectional flow surface within a guided channel, taking into account a pair of typical turbine blades with three-dimensional orthogonal surfaces across the flow passage, the calculation of the mass flow across the throat in the case of a 2-D passage with curved walls, and the determination of the choking mass flow. It is pointed out that the choking solution for a three-dimensional guided passage in a blade row can be obtained in a very similar manner by satisfying momentum equations for the blade-to-blade and the hub-to-tip direction. A considered example involves the calculation of the choking mass flow for a centrifugal compressor impeller in an automotive application.

  4. Analytical Tools to Improve Optimization Procedures for Lateral Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Helen V.; Dantzler, Jeffrey L.; Weigl, Bernhard H.

    2017-01-01

    Immunochromatographic or lateral flow assays (LFAs) are inexpensive, easy to use, point-of-care medical diagnostic tests that are found in arenas ranging from a doctor’s office in Manhattan to a rural medical clinic in low resource settings. The simplicity in the LFA itself belies the complex task of optimization required to make the test sensitive, rapid and easy to use. Currently, the manufacturers develop LFAs by empirical optimization of material components (e.g., analytical membranes, conjugate pads and sample pads), biological reagents (e.g., antibodies, blocking reagents and buffers) and the design of delivery geometry. In this paper, we will review conventional optimization and then focus on the latter and outline analytical tools, such as dynamic light scattering and optical biosensors, as well as methods, such as microfluidic flow design and mechanistic models. We are applying these tools to find non-obvious optima of lateral flow assays for improved sensitivity, specificity and manufacturing robustness. PMID:28555034

  5. Analytical Tools to Improve Optimization Procedures for Lateral Flow Assays.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Helen V; Dantzler, Jeffrey L; Weigl, Bernhard H

    2017-05-28

    Immunochromatographic or lateral flow assays (LFAs) are inexpensive, easy to use, point-of-care medical diagnostic tests that are found in arenas ranging from a doctor's office in Manhattan to a rural medical clinic in low resource settings. The simplicity in the LFA itself belies the complex task of optimization required to make the test sensitive, rapid and easy to use. Currently, the manufacturers develop LFAs by empirical optimization of material components (e.g., analytical membranes, conjugate pads and sample pads), biological reagents (e.g., antibodies, blocking reagents and buffers) and the design of delivery geometry. In this paper, we will review conventional optimization and then focus on the latter and outline analytical tools, such as dynamic light scattering and optical biosensors, as well as methods, such as microfluidic flow design and mechanistic models. We are applying these tools to find non-obvious optima of lateral flow assays for improved sensitivity, specificity and manufacturing robustness.

  6. AN EFFICIENT NUMERICAL METHOD FOR THE SOLUTION OF THE L2 OPTIMAL MASS TRANSFER PROBLEM*

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Eldad; Rehman, Tauseef; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for the computation of the optimal L2 mass transport mapping. In contrast to the integration of a time dependent partial differential equation proposed in [S. Angenent, S. Haker, and A. Tannenbaum, SIAM J. Math. Anal., 35 (2003), pp. 61–97], we employ in the present work a direct variational method. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on both real and synthetic data. PMID:21278828

  7. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach.

  8. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  9. Multiscale computations of mass accumulation effect on mass transfer in bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-11-01

    Mass transfer in bubbly flow generally takes place on a much smaller length and time scale than the length and time scale of the momentum flow, resulting in a thin mass boundary layer around the bubbles. We developed a multiscale model to solve a boundary layer equation for the mass boundary layer next to the bubble interface, assuming zero mass concentration in the far field, which couples with the rest of domain using a source/sink term. Here, we extend our model to account for non-zero concentration next to the mass boundary layer. Comparison of simple case studies in 1D and 2D problems show good agreement between the fully resolved solution and the solution on a much coarser grid using our model. We study the effect of mass accumulation in a domain and also the effect of bubble moving into the wake of another bubble on the mass transfer. This study was funded by NSF Grant CBET-1132410.

  10. Discrete shunt controls in a Newton optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.H.E. ); Papa Iexopoulos, A.D. )

    1992-11-01

    Efficient and effective methods are needed for modeling discrete control actions in optimal power flow algorithms. Modeling discrete controls as continuous variables and rounding them off to the nearest steps is not satisfactory for controls with large step sizes such as shunt capacitors and reactors because it can significantly degrade optimality. Rigorous solution with discrete controls would involve a combinatorial research procedure which would be unacceptably slow for real-time applications. In this paper a penalty based discretization algorithm is proposed. The algorithm consistently provides a near optimal discrete solution for shunt controls without combinatorial search. It has been implemented in a production grade Newton optimal power flow program and tested on two actual power networks. Test results are reported.

  11. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  12. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    The application of conventional optimization schemes to aerodynamic design problems leads to inner-outer iterative procedures that are very costly. An alternative approach is presented based on the idea of updating the flow variable iterative solutions and the design parameter iterative solutions simultaneously. Two schemes based on this idea are applied to problems of correcting wind tunnel wall interference and optimizing advanced propeller designs. The first of these schemes is applicable to a limited class of two-design-parameter problems with an equality constraint. It requires the computation of a single flow solution. The second scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic problems. It requires the computation of several flow solutions in parallel. In both schemes, the design parameters are updated as the iterative flow solutions evolve. Computations are performed to test the schemes' efficiency, accuracy, and sensitivity to variations in the computational parameters.

  13. Optimal schooling formations using a potential flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, Andrew; Gazzola, Mattia; de Brauer, Alexia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A self-propelled, two-dimensional, potential flow model for agent-based swimmers is used to examine how fluid coupling affects schooling formation. The potential flow model accounts for fluid-mediated interactions between swimmers. The model is extended to include individual agent actions by means of modifying the circulation of each swimmer. A reinforcement algorithm is applied to allow the swimmers to learn how to school in specified lattice formations. Lastly, schooling lattice configurations are optimized by combining reinforcement learning and evolutionary optimization to minimize total control effort and energy expenditure.

  14. Examining the Bernstein global optimization approach to optimal power flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Bhagyesh V.; Sampath, L. P. M. I.; Krishnan, Ashok; Ling, K. V.; Gooi, H. B.

    2016-10-01

    This work addresses a nonconvex optimal power flow problem (OPF). We introduce a `new approach' in the context of OPF problem based on the Bernstein polynomials. The applicability of the approach is studied on a real-world 3-bus power system. The numerical results obtained with this new approach for a 3-bus system reveal a satisfactory improvement in terms of optimality. The results are found to be competent with generic global optimization solvers BARON and COUENNE.

  15. On-line Monitoring of Continuous Flow Chemical Synthesis Using a Portable, Small Footprint Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Tony W. T.; Ray, Andrew D.; O'Kearney-McMullan, Anne; Lim, Louise; McCullough, Bryan; Zammataro, Alessio

    2014-10-01

    For on-line monitoring of chemical reactions (batch or continuous flow), mass spectrometry (MS) can provide data to (1) determine the fate of starting materials and reagents, (2) confirm the presence of the desired product, (3) identify intermediates and impurities, (4) determine steady state conditions and point of completion, and (5) speed up process optimization. Recent developments in small footprint atmospheric pressure ionization portable mass spectrometers further enable this coupling, as the mass spectrometer can be easily positioned with the reaction system to be studied. A major issue for this combination is the transfer of a sample that is representative of the reaction and also compatible with the mass spectrometer. This is particularly challenging as high concentrations of reagents and products can be encountered in organic synthesis. The application of a portable mass spectrometer for on-line characterization of flow chemical synthesis has been evaluated by coupling a Microsaic 4000 MiD to the Future Chemistry Flow Start EVO chemistry system. Specifically, the Hofmann rearrangement has been studied using the on-line mass spectrometry approach. Sample transfer from the flow reactor is achieved using a mass rate attenuator (MRA) and a sampling make-up flow from a high pressure pump. This enables the appropriate sample dilution, transfer, and preparation for electrospray ionization. The capability of this approach to provide process understanding is described using an industrial pharmaceutical process that is currently under development. The effect of a number of key experimental parameters, such as the composition of the sampling make-up flow and the dilution factor on the mass spectrometry data, is also discussed.

  16. Optimal Shape Design of a Plane Diffuser in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokhyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    Stratford (1959) experimentally designed an optimal shape of plane diffuser for maximum pressure recovery by having zero skin friction throughout the region of pressure rise. In the present study, we apply an algorithm of optimal shape design developed by Pironneau (1973, 1974) and Cabuk & Modi (1992) to a diffuser in turbulent flow, and show that maintaining zero skin friction in the pressure-rise region is an optimal condition for maximum pressure recovery at the diffuser exit. For turbulence model, we use the k-ɛ-v^2-f model by Durbin (1995) which is known to accurately predict flow with separation. Our results with this model agree well with the previous experimental and LES results for a diffuser shape tested by Obi et al. (1993). From this initial shape, an optimal diffuser shape for maximum pressure recovery is obtained through an iterative procedure. The optimal diffuser has indeed zero skin friction throughout the pressure-rise region, and thus there is no separation in the flow. For the optimal diffuser shape obtained, an LES is being conducted to investigate the turbulence characteristics near the zero-skin-friction wall. A preliminary result of LES will also be presented.

  17. Numerical optimization of conical flow waveriders including detailed viscous effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcutt, Kevin G.; Anderson, John D., Jr.; Capriotti, Diego

    1987-01-01

    A family of optimized hypersonic waveriders is generated and studied wherein detailed viscous effects are included within the optimization process itself. This is in contrast to previous optimized waverider work, wherein purely inviscid flow is used to obtain the waverider shapes. For the present waveriders, the undersurface is a streamsurface of an inviscid conical flowfield, the upper surface is a streamsurface of the inviscid flow over a tapered cylinder (calculated by the axisymmetric method of characteristics), and the viscous effects are treated by integral solutions of the boundary layer equations. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow is included within the viscous calculations. The optimization is carried out using a nonlinear simplex method. The resulting family of viscous hypersonic waveriders yields predicted high values of lift/drag, high enough to break the L/D barrier based on experience with other hypersonic configurations. Moreover, the numerical optimization process for the viscous waveriders results in distinctly different shapes compared to previous work with inviscid-designed waveriders. Also, the fine details of the viscous solution, such as how the shear stress is distributed over the surface, and the location of transition, are crucial to the details of the resulting waverider geometry. Finally, the moment coefficient variations and heat transfer distributions associated with the viscous optimized waveriders are studied.

  18. Helium mass flow through a solid-superfluid-solid junction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi Gang; Beamish, John; Fefferman, Andrew D; Souris, Fabien; Balibar, Sébastien; Dauvois, Vincent

    2015-04-24

    We report the results of flow experiments in which two chambers containing solid ^{4}He are connected by a superfluid Vycor channel. At low temperatures and pressures, mechanically squeezing the solid in one chamber produced a pressure increase in the second chamber, a measure of mass transport through our solid-superfluid-solid junction. This pressure response is very similar to the flow seen in recent experiments at the University of Massachusetts: it began around 600 mK, increased as the temperature was reduced, then decreased dramatically at a temperature, T_{d}, which depended on the ^{3}He impurity concentration. Our experiments indicate that the flow is limited by mass transfer across the solid-liquid interface near the Vycor ends, where the ^{3}He collects at low temperature, rather than by flow paths within the solid ^{4}He.

  19. Blood flow and mass transfer regulation of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Neeves, Keith B.

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulates coagulation and fibrin formation by controlling the transport, or mass transfer, of zymogens, co-factors, enzymes, and inhibitors to, from, and within a growing thrombus. The rate of mass transfer of these solutes relative to their consumption or production by coagulation reactions determines, in part, the rate of thrombin generation, fibrin deposition, and thrombi growth. Experimental studies on the influence of blood flow on specific coagulation reactions are reviewed here, along with a theoretical framework that predicts how flow influences surface-bound coagulation binding and enzymatic reactions. These flow-mediated transport mechanisms are also used to interpret the role of binding site densities and injury size on initiating coagulation and fibrin deposition. The importance of transport of coagulation proteins within the interstitial spaces of thrombi is shown to influence thrombi architecture, growth, and arrest. PMID:27133256

  20. A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Identifying the optimal segmentors for mass classification in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Tomuro, Noriko; Furst, Jacob; Raicu, Daniela S.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our investigation on identifying the optimal segmentor(s) from an ensemble of weak segmentors, used in a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) system which classifies suspicious masses in mammograms as benign or malignant. This is an extension of our previous work, where we used various parameter settings of image enhancement techniques to each suspicious mass (region of interest (ROI)) to obtain several enhanced images, then applied segmentation to each image to obtain several contours of a given mass. Each segmentation in this ensemble is essentially a "weak segmentor" because no single segmentation can produce the optimal result for all images. Then after shape features are computed from the segmented contours, the final classification model was built using logistic regression. The work in this paper focuses on identifying the optimal segmentor(s) from an ensemble mix of weak segmentors. For our purpose, optimal segmentors are those in the ensemble mix which contribute the most to the overall classification rather than the ones that produced high precision segmentation. To measure the segmentors' contribution, we examined weights on the features in the derived logistic regression model and computed the average feature weight for each segmentor. The result showed that, while in general the segmentors with higher segmentation success rates had higher feature weights, some segmentors with lower segmentation rates had high classification feature weights as well.

  2. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass transfer to blood flowing through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifuddin; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2009-03-01

    The present investigation deals with a mathematical model representing the mass transfer to blood streaming through the arteries under stenotic condition. The mass transport refers to the movement of atherogenic molecules, that is, blood-borne components, such as oxygen and low-density lipoproteins from flowing blood into the arterial walls or vice versa. The blood flowing through the artery is treated to be Newtonian and the arterial wall is considered to be rigid having differently shaped stenoses in its lumen arising from various types of abnormal growth or plaque formation. The nonlinear unsteady pulsatile flow phenomenon unaffected by concentration-field of the macromolecules is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations together with the equation of continuity while that of mass transfer is controlled by the convection-diffusion equation. The governing equations of motion accompanied by appropriate choice of the boundary conditions are solved numerically by MAC(Marker and Cell) method and checked numerical stability with desired degree of accuracy. The quantitative analysis carried out finally includes the respective profiles of the flow-field and concentration along with their distributions over the entire arterial segment as well. The key factors like the wall shear stress and Sherwood number are also examined for further qualitative insight into the flow and mass transport phenomena through arterial stenosis. The present results show quite consistency with several existing results in the literature which substantiate sufficiently to validate the applicability of the model under consideration.

  4. Mass and Volume Optimization of Space Flight Medical Kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, A. B.; Foy, Millennia Hope; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Resource allocation is a critical aspect of space mission planning. All resources, including medical resources, are subject to a number of mission constraints such a maximum mass and volume. However, unlike many resources, there is often limited understanding in how to optimize medical resources for a mission. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that estimates medical event occurrences and mission outcomes for different mission profiles. IMM simulates outcomes and describes the impact of medical events in terms of lost crew time, medical resource usage, and the potential for medically required evacuation. Previously published work describes an approach that uses the IMM to generate optimized medical kits that maximize benefit to the crew subject to mass and volume constraints. We improve upon the results obtained previously and extend our approach to minimize mass and volume while meeting some benefit threshold. METHODS We frame the medical kit optimization problem as a modified knapsack problem and implement an algorithm utilizing dynamic programming. Using this algorithm, optimized medical kits were generated for 3 mission scenarios with the goal of minimizing the medical kit mass and volume for a specified likelihood of evacuation or Crew Health Index (CHI) threshold. The algorithm was expanded to generate medical kits that maximize likelihood of evacuation or CHI subject to mass and volume constraints. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In maximizing benefit to crew health subject to certain constraints, our algorithm generates medical kits that more closely resemble the unlimited-resource scenario than previous approaches which leverage medical risk information generated by the IMM. Our work here demonstrates that this algorithm provides an efficient and effective means to objectively allocate medical resources for spaceflight missions and provides an effective means of addressing tradeoffs in medical resource allocations and crew mission success

  5. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in swirling flows (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, A. I.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Popov, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Research results of Russian and foreign scientists of heat and mass transfer in whirling flows, swirling effect, superficial vortex generators, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscales, burning at swirl of the flow, and technologies and apparatuses with the use of whirling currents for industry and power generation were presented and discussed at the "Heat and Mass Transfer in Whirling Currents" 5th International Conference. The choice of rational forms of the equipment flow parts when using whirling and swirling flows to increase efficiency of the heat-power equipment and of flow regimes and burning on the basis of deep study of the flow and heat transfer local parameters was set as the main research prospect. In this regard, there is noticeable progress in research methods of whirling and swirling flows. The number of computational treatments of swirling flows' local parameters has been increased. Development and advancement of the up to date computing models and national productivity software are very important for this process. All experimental works are carried out with up to date research methods of the local thermoshydraulic parameters, which enable one to reveal physical mechanisms of processes: PIV and LIV visualization techniques, high-speed and infrared photography, high speed registration of parameters of high-speed processes, etc. There is a problem of improvement of researchers' professional skills in the field of fluid mechanics to set adequately mathematics and physics problems of aerohydrodynamics for whirling and swirling flows and numerical and pilot investigations. It has been pointed out that issues of improvement of the cooling system and thermal protection effectiveness of heat-power and heat-transfer equipment units are still actual. It can be solved successfully using whirling and swirling flows as simple low power consumption exposing on the flow method and heat transfer augmentation.

  6. Optimization of an Extrusion Die for Polymer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, Y. Chahbani; Graebling, D.; Boujelbene, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we used the CFD software PolyFlow to optimize the extrusion process of polystyrene flow. In this process, the flow of the molten polymer through the die can be viewed as a critical step for the material in terms of shear rate, self heating by viscous dissipation and temperature reached. The simulation is focused on the flow and heat transfer in the die to obtain a uniform velocity profile and a uniform temperature profile. The rheological behavior of polymer melt was described by the nonlinear Giesekus model. The dependence of the viscosity has also to be taken into account for a correct description of the flow. The design of the die has been validated by our numerical simulation.

  7. Mass conservation: 1-D open channel flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Lewis L.

    1989-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulation in natural rivers is often complicated by meandering channels of compound section. Hydraulic properties and the length of the wetted channel may vary significantly as a meandering river inundates its adjacent floodplain. The one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel flow equations can be extended to simulate floods in channels of compound section. It will be shown that equations derived from the addition of differential equations individually describing flow in main and overbank channels do not in general conserve mass when overbank and main channels are of different lengths.

  8. Optimal Power Flow for Distribution Systems under Uncertain Forecasts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Baker, Kyri; Summers, Tyler

    2016-12-01

    The paper focuses on distribution systems featuring renewable energy sources and energy storage devices, and develops an optimal power flow (OPF) approach to optimize the system operation in spite of forecasting errors. The proposed method builds on a chance-constrained multi-period AC OPF formulation, where probabilistic constraints are utilized to enforce voltage regulation with a prescribed probability. To enable a computationally affordable solution approach, a convex reformulation of the OPF task is obtained by resorting to i) pertinent linear approximations of the power flow equations, and ii) convex approximations of the chance constraints. Particularly, the approximate chance constraints provide conservative bounds that hold for arbitrary distributions of the forecasting errors. An adaptive optimization strategy is then obtained by embedding the proposed OPF task into a model predictive control framework.

  9. Optimal Power Flow for Distribution Systems under Uncertain Forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Baker, Kyri; Summers, Tyler

    2016-12-29

    The paper focuses on distribution systems featuring renewable energy sources and energy storage devices, and develops an optimal power flow (OPF) approach to optimize the system operation in spite of forecasting errors. The proposed method builds on a chance-constrained multi-period AC OPF formulation, where probabilistic constraints are utilized to enforce voltage regulation with a prescribed probability. To enable a computationally affordable solution approach, a convex reformulation of the OPF task is obtained by resorting to i) pertinent linear approximations of the power flow equations, and ii) convex approximations of the chance constraints. Particularly, the approximate chance constraints provide conservative bounds that hold for arbitrary distributions of the forecasting errors. An adaptive optimization strategy is then obtained by embedding the proposed OPF task into a model predictive control framework.

  10. Mass flow and evolution of UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Rahe, J.

    1979-01-01

    The far-UV spectrum of the eclipsing binary UW CMa (O7f + O-B) had earlier been utilized to derive a mass-loss rate of about 0.000001 to 0.00001 solar mass per year. The mass flow seems to be basically in the form of a stellar wind emanating from the O7f primary component, with radiation pressure as the controlling factor. The main characteristics that make UW CMa a possible progenitor of a Wolf-Rayet system are discussed.

  11. Mass flow and evolution of UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Rahe, J.

    1979-01-01

    The far-UV spectrum of the eclipsing binary UW CMa (O7f + O-B) had earlier been utilized to derive a mass-loss rate of about 0.000001 to 0.00001 solar mass per year. The mass flow seems to be basically in the form of a stellar wind emanating from the O7f primary component, with radiation pressure as the controlling factor. The main characteristics that make UW CMa a possible progenitor of a Wolf-Rayet system are discussed.

  12. Distribution-Agnostic Stochastic Optimal Power Flow for Distribution Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Kyri; Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Summers, Tyler

    2016-11-21

    This paper outlines a data-driven, distributionally robust approach to solve chance-constrained AC optimal power flow problems in distribution networks. Uncertain forecasts for loads and power generated by photovoltaic (PV) systems are considered, with the goal of minimizing PV curtailment while meeting power flow and voltage regulation constraints. A data- driven approach is utilized to develop a distributionally robust conservative convex approximation of the chance-constraints; particularly, the mean and covariance matrix of the forecast errors are updated online, and leveraged to enforce voltage regulation with predetermined probability via Chebyshev-based bounds. By combining an accurate linear approximation of the AC power flow equations with the distributionally robust chance constraint reformulation, the resulting optimization problem becomes convex and computationally tractable.

  13. Fe/V Redox Flow Battery Electrolyte Investigation and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Li, Liyu; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Luo, Qingtao; Yang, Zhenguo; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-05-01

    Recently invented Fe/V redox flow battery (IVBs) system has attracted more and more attentions due to its long-term cycling stability. In this paper, the factors (such as compositions, state of charge (SOC) and temperatures) influencing the stability of electrolytes in both positive and negative half-cells were investigated by an extensive matrix study. Thus an optimized electrolyte, which can be operated in the temperature ranges from -5oC to 50oC without any precipitations, was identified. The Fe/V flow cells using the optimized electrolytes and low-cost membranes exhibited satisfactory cycling performances at different temperatures. The efficiencies, capacities and energy densities of flow batteries with varying temperatures were discussed in detail.

  14. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Caner Yurteri

    2001-08-20

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

  16. Calibration of nozzle for air mass flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Jan; Kanta, Lukáš

    2017-09-01

    The effort to make calibration measurement of mass flow through a nozzle was not satisfying. Traversing across the pipe radius with Pitot probe was done. The presence of overshoot behind the bend in the pipe was found. The overshoot led to an asymmetric velocity profile.

  17. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  18. A 3-dimensional mass conserving element for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Suri, M.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of finite element schemes has been used in the numerical approximation of compressible flows particularly in underwater acoustics. In many instances instabilities have been generated due to the lack of mass conservation. Two- and three-dimensional elements are developed which avoid these problems.

  19. Optimization of Feedback Control of Flow over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Euiyoung; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    We perform a feedback gain optimization of the proportional-integral-differential (PID) control for flow over a circular cylinder at Re = 60 and 100. We measure the transverse velocity at a centerline location in the wake as a sensing variable and provide blowing and suction at the upper and lower slots on the cylinder surface as an actuation. The cost function to minimize is defined as the mean square of the sensing variable, and the PID control gains are optimized by iterative feedback tuning method which is a typical model free gain optimization method. In this method, the control gains are iteratively updated by the gradient of cost function until the control system satisfies a certain stopping criteria. The PID control with optimal control gains successfully reduces the velocity fluctuations at the sensing location and attenuates (or annihilates) vortex shedding in the wake, resulting in the reduction in the mean drag and lift fluctuations. Supported by the NRF Program (2011-0028032).

  20. Mass flow and thrust performance of nozzles with mixed and unmixed nonuniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Decher, R.

    1995-12-01

    The calculated thrust and mass flow rate of a nozzle depend on the uniformity of the entering flow. The one-dimensional flow equations are extended to arrive at analytic expressions for the predicted performance of a nozzle processing two streams whose properties are determined ahead of the throat. The analysis approach forms the basis for the understanding of flows which have more complex distributions of total pressure and temperature. The uncertainty associated with mixing is examined by the consideration of the two limiting cases: compound flow with no mixing and completely mixed flow. Nozzle discharge and velocity coefficients accounting for non-uniformity are derived. The methodology can be extended to experimentally measured variations of flow properties so that proper geometric design variables may be obtained.

  1. Optimal transient growth in flow past a slanted surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Afonso, Marco; Meliga, Philippe; Serre, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We investigate numerically and theoretically the flow past a slanted surface inclined at 25 degrees, mimicking the rear part of a simplified ground-vehicle geometry of the bluff-body type. We are interested in how to reduce the flow separation by the upward generation of contra-rotating longitudinal vortices developing into longitudinal streaks through the lift-up effect. Upon introducing a volumic forcing or a wall velocity perturbation, we use gradients computed with the adjoint method to optimize the energy gain in the domain. Such an analysis is undertaken as a function of the Reynolds number, the wavelength of the perturbation in the transverse direction, and the size and location of the domain over which the gain is estimated. If time permits, we will also perform nonlinear numerical simulations of the controlled flow to assess the nonlinear interaction of the induced perturbation with the natural flow instabilities.

  2. Design optimization of axisymmetric bodies in nonuniform transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    An inviscid transonic code capable of designing an axisymmetric body in a uniform or nonuniform flow was developed. The design was achieved by direct optimiation by coupling an analysis code with an optimizer. Design examples were provided for axisymmetric bodies with fineness ratios of 8.33 and 5 at different Mach numbers. It was shown that by reducing the nose radius and increasing the afterbody thickness of initial shapes obtained from symmetric NACA four-digit airfoil contours, wave drag could be reduced by 29 percent for a body of fineness ratio 8.33 in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.98 to 0.995. The reduction was 41 percent for a body of fineness ratio 5 in a uniform transonic flow of M = 0.925 and 65 percent for the same body but in a nonuniform transonic flow of M = 0.90 to 0.95.

  3. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  4. Optimized open-flow mixing: insights from microbubble streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Microbubble streaming has been developed into a robust and powerful flow actuation technique in microfluidics. Here, we study it as a paradigmatic system for microfluidic mixing under a continuous throughput of fluid (open-flow mixing), providing a systematic optimization of the device parameters in this practically important situation. Focusing on two-dimensional advective stirring (neglecting diffusion), we show through numerical simulation and analytical theory that mixing in steady streaming vortices becomes ineffective beyond a characteristic time scale, necessitating the introduction of unsteadiness. By duty cycling the streaming, such unsteadiness is introduced in a controlled fashion, leading to exponential refinement of the advection structures. The rate of refinement is then optimized for particular parameters of the time modulation, i.e. a particular combination of times for which the streaming is turned ``on'' and ``off''. The optimized protocol can be understood theoretically using the properties of the streaming vortices and the throughput Poiseuille flow. We can thus infer simple design principles for practical open flow micromixing applications, consistent with experiments. Current Address: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University.

  5. Optimization of the Mini-Flo flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, Mukund C.

    1996-06-01

    A new method of collecting light scattering from a liquid flow cytometer has been proposed; this apparatus is named the Mini-Flo flow cytometer. The Mini-Flo uses a high numerical aperture collection immersed in the flow stream. The collector consists of a conically tipped fiber optic pipe and terminating optical detector. This study was performed to improve the signal/noise ration and optimize the Mini-Flo`s performance for HIV blood detection applications. Experiments were performed to gauge the effects of Raman scattering, lens/filter fluorescence, and fiber optic fluorescence on the Mini-Flo`s performance and signal/noise ratio. Results indicated that the fiber optic was a major source of fluorescence noise and reducing its length from 33 cm to 10 cm increased the signal noise ratio from 8 to 75. Therefore, one of the key issues in optimizing the Mini-Flo`s performance is a redesign of the holding structure such that the fiber optic length is minimized. Further improvements of the Mini-Flo`s performance can be achieved by studying the polish of the fiber optic, the flow over the fiber optics`s conical tip, and the optimal particle rates.

  6. Innovative model-based flow rate optimization for vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, S.; Suriyah, M. R.; Leibfried, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach is presented to optimize the flow rate of a 6-kW vanadium redox flow battery with realistic stack dimensions. Efficiency is derived using a multi-physics battery model and a newly proposed instantaneous efficiency determination technique. An optimization algorithm is applied to identify optimal flow rates for operation points defined by state-of-charge (SoC) and current. The proposed method is evaluated against the conventional approach of applying Faraday's first law of electrolysis, scaled to the so-called flow factor. To make a fair comparison, the flow factor is also optimized by simulating cycles with different charging/discharging currents. It is shown through the obtained results that the efficiency is increased by up to 1.2% points; in addition, discharge capacity is also increased by up to 1.0 kWh or 5.4%. Detailed loss analysis is carried out for the cycles with maximum and minimum charging/discharging currents. It is shown that the proposed method minimizes the sum of losses caused by concentration over-potential, pumping and diffusion. Furthermore, for the deployed Nafion 115 membrane, it is observed that diffusion losses increase with stack SoC. Therefore, to decrease stack SoC and lower diffusion losses, a higher flow rate during charging than during discharging is reasonable.

  7. A note on optimal transient growth in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujals, Gregory; García-Villalba, Manuel; Cossu, Carlo; Depardon, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    We compute the optimal transient growth of perturbations sustained by a turbulent channel flow following the same approach recently used by del Álamo and Jiménez [J. Fluid Mech. 559, 205 (2006)]. Contrary to this previous analysis, we use generalized Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire operators consistent with previous investigations of mean flows with variable viscosity. The optimal perturbations are streamwise vortices evolving into streamwise streaks. In accordance with del Álamo and Jiménez, it is found that for very elongated structures and for sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, the optimal energy growth presents a primary peak in the spanwise wavelength, scaling in outer units, and a secondary peak scaling in inner units and corresponding to λz+≈100. Contrary to the previous results, however, it is found that the maximum energy growth associated with the primary peak increases with the Reynolds number. This growth, in a first approximation, scales linearly with an effective Reynolds number based on the centerline velocity, the channel half width and the maximum eddy viscosity associated. The optimal streaks associated with the primary peak have an optimal spacing of λz=4h and scale in outer units in the outer region and in wall units in the near wall region, where they still have up to 50% of their maximum amplitude near y+=10.

  8. Optimization of micropillar sequences for fluid flow sculpting

    SciTech Connect

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-15

    Inertial fluid flow deformation around pillars in a microchannel is a new method for controlling fluid flow. Sequences of pillars have been shown to produce a rich phase space with a wide variety of flow transformations. Previous work has successfully demonstrated manual design of pillar sequences to achieve desired transformations of the flow cross section, with experimental validation. However, such a method is not ideal for seeking out complex sculpted shapes as the search space quickly becomes too large for efficient manual discovery. We explore fast, automated optimization methods to solve this problem. We formulate the inertial flow physics in microchannels with different micropillar configurations as a set of state transition matrix operations. These state transition matrices are constructed from experimentally validated streamtraces for a fixed channel length per pillar. This facilitates modeling the effect of a sequence of micropillars as nested matrix-matrix products, which have very efficient numerical implementations. With this new forward model, arbitrary micropillar sequences can be rapidly simulated with various inlet configurations, allowing optimization routines quick access to a large search space. We integrate this framework with the genetic algorithm and showcase its applicability by designing micropillar sequences for various useful transformations. We computationally discover micropillar sequences for complex transformations that are substantially shorter than manually designed sequences. We also determine sequences for novel transformations that were difficult to manually design. Finally, we experimentally validate these computational designs by fabricating devices and comparing predictions with the results from confocal microscopy.

  9. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Debaillon-Vesque, François P.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1–2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs. PMID:25192936

  10. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Fernandez, Vicente I; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Debaillon-Vesque, François P; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-09-16

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1-2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs.

  11. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  12. Mass flow-rate control through time periodic electro-osmotic flows in circular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Ray, Subhashis

    2008-08-01

    The present study is directed towards devising a scientific strategy for obtaining controlled time-periodic mass flow-rate characteristics through the employment of pulsating electric fields in circular microchannels by exploiting certain intrinsic characteristics of periodic electro-osmosis phenomenon. Within the assumption of thin electrical double layers, the governing equations for potential distribution and fluid flow are derived, corresponding to a steady base state and a time-varying perturbed state, by assuming periodic forms of the imposed electrical fields and the resultant velocity fields. For sinusoidal pulsations of the electric field superimposed over its mean, a signature map depicting the amplitudes of the mass flow rate and the electrical field as well as their phase differences is obtained from the theoretical analysis as a function of a nondimensional frequency parameter for different ratios of the characteristic electric double layer thickness relative to the microchannel radius. Distinctive characteristics in the signature profiles are obtained for lower and higher frequencies, primarily attributed to the finite time scale for momentum propagation away from the walls. The signature characteristics, obtained from the solution of the prescribed sinusoidal electric field, are subsequently used to solve the "inverse" problem, where the mass flow rate is prescribed in the form of sinusoidal pulsations and the desired electric fields that would produce the required mass flow-rate variations are obtained. The analysis is subsequently extended for controlled triangular and trapezoidal pulsations in the mass flow rate and the required electric fields are successfully obtained. It is observed that the higher the double layer thickness is in comparison to the channel radius, the more prominent is the deviation of the shape of the required electric field pulsation from the desired transience in the mass flow-rate characteristics. Possible extensions of the

  13. Optimization of a synthetic jet actuator for flow control around an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazer, E.; Mirzaei, M.; Salami, E.; Ward, T. A.; Romli, F. I.; Kazi, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the optimization of a synthetic jet actuator parameters in the control flow around the NACA0015 airfoil at two angles of attack: 13° (i.e. the stall angle of NACA0015) and 16° (i.e. the post stall angle of NACA0015) to maximize the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. Synthetic jet actuator is a zero mass flux-active flow control device that alternately injects and removes fluid through a small slot at the input movement frequency of a diaphragm. The movement of the diaphragm and also the external flow around the airfoil were simulated using numerical approach. The objective of the optimization process function was maximum lift-drag ratio (L/D) and the optimization variables were jet frequency, length of the jet slot and jet location along the chord. The power coefficient of the jet was considered as a constraint. The response surface optimization method was employed to achieve the optimal parameters. The results showed that the actuator is more effective for post stall angles of attack that can lead to an enhancement of 66% in L/D.

  14. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  15. Artificial bee colony algorithm for solving optimal power flow problem.

    PubMed

    Le Dinh, Luong; Vo Ngoc, Dieu; Vasant, Pandian

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for solving optimal power flow (OPF) problem. The objective of the OPF problem is to minimize total cost of thermal units while satisfying the unit and system constraints such as generator capacity limits, power balance, line flow limits, bus voltages limits, and transformer tap settings limits. The ABC algorithm is an optimization method inspired from the foraging behavior of honey bees. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the IEEE 30-bus, 57-bus, and 118-bus systems. The numerical results have indicated that the proposed algorithm can find high quality solution for the problem in a fast manner via the result comparisons with other methods in the literature. Therefore, the proposed ABC algorithm can be a favorable method for solving the OPF problem.

  16. A factorial design for optimizing a flow injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Luna, J R; Ovalles, J F; León, A; Buchheister, M

    2000-05-01

    The use of a factorial design for the response exploration of a flow injection (FI) system is described and illustrated by FI spectrophotometric determination of paraquat. Variable response (absorbance) is explored as a function of the factors flow rate and length of the reaction coil. The present study was found to be useful to detect and estimate any interaction among the factors that may affect the optimal conditions for the maximal response in the optimization of the FI system, which is not possible with a univariate design. In addition, this study showed that factorial experiments enable economy of experimentation and yield results of high precision due to the use of the whole data for calculating the effects.

  17. Shape optimization of multi-chamber cross-flow mufflers by SA optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Min-Chie; Chang, Ying-Chun

    2008-05-01

    It is essential when searching for an efficient acoustical mechanism to have an optimally shaped muffler designed specially for the constrained space found in today's plants. Because the research work of optimally shaped straight silencers in conjunction with multi-chamber cross-flow perforated ducts is rarely addressed, this paper will not only analyze the sound transmission loss (STL) of three kinds of cross-flow perforated mufflers but also will analyze the optimal design shape within a limited space. In this paper, the four-pole system matrix used in evaluating acoustic performance is derived by using the decoupled numerical method. Moreover, a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, a robust scheme in searching for the global optimum by imitating the softening process of metal, has been adopted during shape optimization. To reassure SA's correctness, the STL's maximization of three kinds of muffles with respect to one-tone and dual-tone noise is exemplified. Furthermore, the optimization of mufflers with respect to an octave-band fan noise by the simulated algorithm has been introduced and fully discussed. Before the SA operation can be carried out, an accuracy check of the mathematical model with respect to cross-flow perforated mufflers has to be performed by Munjal's analytical data and experimental data. The optimal result in eliminating broadband noise reveals that the cross-flow perforated muffler with more chambers is far superior at noise reduction than a muffler with fewer chambers. Consequently, the approach used for the optimal design of noise elimination proposed in this study is certainly easy and efficient.

  18. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  19. Smooth information flow in temperature climate network reflects mass transport.

    PubMed

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nikola; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    A directed climate network is constructed by Granger causality analysis of air temperature time series from a regular grid covering the whole Earth. Using winner-takes-all network thresholding approach, a structure of a smooth information flow is revealed, hidden to previous studies. The relevance of this observation is confirmed by comparison with the air mass transfer defined by the wind field. Their close relation illustrates that although the information transferred due to the causal influence is not a physical quantity, the information transfer is tied to the transfer of mass and energy.

  20. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  1. Boundary condition optimal control problem in lava flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry; Melnik, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    We study a problem of steady-state fluid flow with known thermal conditions (e.g., measured temperature and the heat flux at the surface of lava flow) at one segment of the model boundary and unknown conditions at its another segment. This problem belongs to a class of boundary condition optimal control problems and can be solved by data assimilation from one boundary to another using direct and adjoint models. We derive analytically the adjoint model and test the cost function and its gradient, which minimize the misfit between the known thermal condition and its model counterpart. Using optimization algorithms, we iterate between the direct and adjoint problems and determine the missing boundary condition as well as thermal and dynamic characteristics of the fluid flow. The efficiency of optimization algorithms - Polak-Ribiere conjugate gradient and the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithms - have been tested with the aim to get a rapid convergence to the solution of this inverse ill-posed problem. Numerical results show that temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy in the case of smooth input data. A noise imposed on the input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level.

  2. Continuous flow reaction monitoring using an on-line miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Browne, Duncan L; Wright, Steven; Deadman, Benjamin J; Dunnage, Samantha; Baxendale, Ian R; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2012-09-15

    A recently developed miniature electrospray ionisation mass spectrometer has been coupled to a preparative flow chemistry system in order to monitor reactive intermediates and competing reaction paths, screen starting materials, and optimise reaction conditions. Although ideally suited to the application, mass spectrometers have rarely been used in this way, as traditional instruments are too bulky to be conveniently coupled to flow chemistry platforms. A six-port switching valve fitted with a 5 μL loop was used to periodically sample the flow stream leaving the reactor coil. Mass spectra corresponding to the sample loop contents were observed approximately 10 s after activating the valve. High fluidic pressure was maintained throughout to ensure that gaseous products remained in solution. As an illustrative example of how this apparatus can be employed, the generation of benzyne and its subsequent reaction with furan were investigated. Benzyne was prepared via diazotisation of anthranilic acid using tert-butyl nitrite. Unexpectedly, the explosive diazotised intermediate was detected by the mass spectrometer at low coil temperatures or short residence times. The optimum reactor temperature and residence time for production of the desired Diels-Alder product are 50 °C and 3-5 min, respectively. There are competing reaction pathways leading to the formation of acridone and several other by-products. On-line mass spectrometry allowed the flow conditions to be quickly tuned for safe operation and optimal generation of the desired product. The validity of this approach was corroborated by off-line liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of flow samples. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Analysis of the Hessian for Aerodynamic Optimization: Inviscid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Ta'asan, Shlomo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze inviscid aerodynamic shape optimization problems governed by the full potential and the Euler equations in two and three dimensions. The analysis indicates that minimization of pressure dependent cost functions results in Hessians whose eigenvalue distributions are identical for the full potential and the Euler equations. However the optimization problems in two and three dimensions are inherently different. While the two dimensional optimization problems are well-posed the three dimensional ones are ill-posed. Oscillations in the shape up to the smallest scale allowed by the design space can develop in the direction perpendicular to the flow, implying that a regularization is required. A natural choice of such a regularization is derived. The analysis also gives an estimate of the Hessian's condition number which implies that the problems at hand are ill-conditioned. Infinite dimensional approximations for the Hessians are constructed and preconditioners for gradient based methods are derived from these approximate Hessians.

  4. Resistive Network Optimal Power Flow: Uniqueness and Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CW; Cai, DWH; Lou, X

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem minimizes the power loss in an electrical network by optimizing the voltage and power delivered at the network buses, and is a nonconvex problem that is generally hard to solve. By leveraging a recent development on the zero duality gap of OPF, we propose a second-order cone programming convex relaxation of the resistive network OPF, and study the uniqueness of the optimal solution using differential topology, especially the Poincare-Hopf Index Theorem. We characterize the global uniqueness for different network topologies, e.g., line, radial, and mesh networks. This serves as a starting point to design distributed local algorithms with global behaviors that have low complexity, are computationally fast, and can run under synchronous and asynchronous settings in practical power grids.

  5. Aerodynamic shape optimization of Airfoils in 2-D incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangasamy, Srinivethan; Upadhyay, Harshal; Somasekaran, Sandeep; Raghunath, Sreekanth

    2010-11-01

    An optimization framework was developed for maximizing the region of 2-D airfoil immersed in laminar flow with enhanced aerodynamic performance. It uses genetic algorithm over a population of 125, across 1000 generations, to optimize the airfoil. On a stand-alone computer, a run takes about an hour to obtain a converged solution. The airfoil geometry was generated using two Bezier curves; one to represent the thickness and the other the camber of the airfoil. The airfoil profile was generated by adding and subtracting the thickness curve from the camber curve. The coefficient of lift and drag was computed using potential velocity distribution obtained from panel code, and boundary layer transition prediction code was used to predict the location of onset of transition. The objective function of a particular design is evaluated as the weighted-average of aerodynamic characteristics at various angles of attacks. Optimization was carried out for several objective functions and the airfoil designs obtained were analyzed.

  6. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyze and improve the mass flow rate in urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Frawley, Patrick; Geron, Marco

    2009-08-01

    The urinary catheter is a thin plastic tube that has been designed to empty the bladder artificially, effortlessly, and with minimum discomfort. The current CH14 male catheter design was examined with a view to optimizing the mass flow rate. The literature imposed constraints to the analysis of the urinary catheter to ensure that a compromise between optimal flow, patient comfort, and everyday practicality from manufacture to use was achieved in the new design. As a result a total of six design characteristics were examined. The input variables in question were the length and width of eyelets 1 and 2 (four variables), the distance between the eyelets, and the angle of rotation between the eyelets. Due to the high number of possible input combinations a structured approach to the analysis of data was necessary. A combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and design of experiments (DOE) has been used to evaluate the "optimal configuration." The use of CFD couple with DOE is a novel concept, which harnesses the computational power of CFD in the most efficient manner for prediction of the mass flow rate in the catheter.

  7. An introduction to optimal power flow: Theory, formulation, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Stephen; Rebennack, Steffen

    2016-05-21

    The set of optimization problems in electric power systems engineering known collectively as Optimal Power Flow (OPF) is one of the most practically important and well-researched subfields of constrained nonlinear optimization. OPF has enjoyed a rich history of research, innovation, and publication since its debut five decades ago. Nevertheless, entry into OPF research is a daunting task for the uninitiated--both due to the sheer volume of literature and because OPF's ubiquity within the electric power systems community has led authors to assume a great deal of prior knowledge that readers unfamiliar with electric power systems may not possess. This article provides an introduction to OPF from an operations research perspective; it describes a complete and concise basis of knowledge for beginning OPF research. The discussion is tailored for the operations researcher who has experience with nonlinear optimization but little knowledge of electrical engineering. Topics covered include power systems modeling, the power flow equations, typical OPF formulations, and common OPF extensions.

  8. Self-Contained Automated Methodology for Optimal Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, Roy A.; Erlebacherl, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for active flow control which couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields and controls (e.g., actuators), may be determined. The problem of boundary layer instability suppression through wave cancellation is used as the initial validation case to test the methodology. Here, the objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc. The present methodology has been extended to three dimensions and may potentially be applied to separation control, re-laminarization, and turbulence control applications using one to many sensors and actuators.

  9. Diffusive heat and mass transfer in oscillatory pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Jalil, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    The enhancement of axial heat and mass transfer by laminar flow oscillation in pipes with axial gradients in temperature and concentration has been studied analytically for the cases of insulated and conducting walls. The axial diffusivity can exceed its molecular counterpart by many orders of magnitude, with a quadratic scaling on the pressure-gradient amplitude and the Prandtl or Schmidt number, and is a bimodal function of oscillatory frequency: quasi-steady behavior at low frequencies and a power-law decay at high frequencies. When the pipe wall is conductive and of sufficient thickness, and the flow oscillation is quasi-steady, the axial diffusivity may be enhanced by a further factor of about ten as a result of increased radial diffusion, for liquid and gas flows in pipes with walls with a wide range of thermal conductivities. Criteria for the wall thickness required to achieve this additional enhancement and for the limits placed on the validity of these solutions by viscous dissipation are also deduced. When the heat transfer per unit flow work achieved by oscillatory pipe flow is contrasted with that of a conventional parallel-flow heat exchanger, it is found to be of comparable size and the ratio of the two is shown to be a function only of the pipe geometry, heat-exchanger mean velocity, and fluid viscosity.

  10. A monolithic mass tracking formulation for bubbles in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aanjaneya, Mridul Patkar, Saket Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-08-15

    We devise a novel method for treating bubbles in incompressible flow that relies on the conservative advection of bubble mass and an associated equation of state in order to determine pressure boundary conditions inside each bubble. We show that executing this algorithm in a traditional manner leads to stability issues similar to those seen for partitioned methods for solid–fluid coupling. Therefore, we reformulate the problem monolithically. This is accomplished by first proposing a new fully monolithic approach to coupling incompressible flow to fully nonlinear compressible flow including the effects of shocks and rarefactions, and then subsequently making a number of simplifying assumptions on the air flow removing not only the nonlinearities but also the spatial variations of both the density and the pressure. The resulting algorithm is quite robust, has been shown to converge to known solutions for test problems, and has been shown to be quite effective on more realistic problems including those with multiple bubbles, merging and pinching, etc. Notably, this approach departs from a standard two-phase incompressible flow model where the air flow preserves its volume despite potentially large forces and pressure differentials in the surrounding incompressible fluid that should change its volume. Our bubbles readily change volume according to an isothermal equation of state.

  11. Mass flow velocity distribution in the solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A study of chromospheric lines (those of Si-II and Si-III) was made using the data from high resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS). The optically thick line profiles such as lambda 1206 due to Si-III and lambda 1265 and lambda 1533 due to Si-II were to be investigated in detail using the techniques of spectrum synthesis in an attempt to model the mass flow velocity distribution in the region of the solar atmosphere.

  12. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  13. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  14. Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow with FACTS Devices Using Modified Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, P.; Muthuselvan, N. B.

    This paper presents new computationally efficient improved Particle Swarm algorithms for solving Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (SCOPF) in power systems with the inclusion of FACTS devices. The proposed algorithms are developed based on the combined application of Gaussian and Cauchy Probability distribution functions incorporated in Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The power flow algorithm with the presence of Static Var Compensator (SVC) Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC) and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC), has been formulated and solved. The proposed algorithms are tested on standard IEEE 30-bus system. The analysis using PSO and modified PSO reveals that the proposed algorithms are relatively simple, efficient, reliable and suitable for real-time applications. And these algorithms can provide accurate solution with fast convergence and have the potential to be applied to other power engineering problems.

  15. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flows with several recirculated flow eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, E.; Nacke, B.; Jakovics, A.; Umbrashko, A.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the concentration and temperature distribution in axial symmetrical systems with several recirculated flow eddies, which is based on various 2D stationary k-ɛ models and commercial codes, e.g. ANSYS and FLUENT, leads to results, which are significantly different from experimental data. Therefore additional user-defined subroutines were included in the commercial program code to improve the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the zone between the recirculated flow eddies. In addition transient 3D calculations were performed to investigate scientifically the flow dynamics. Figs 9, Refs 8.

  16. Use of greatly-reduced gas flows in flow-modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2014-09-12

    The present research is specifically based on the use of greatly-reduced gas flows, in flow-modulator (FM) comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography systems. In particular, focus of the present research is directed to FM devices characterized by an accumulation stage, and a much briefer re-injection step. It has been widely accepted that the operation of such FM systems requires high gas flows (≥20mL/min), to re-inject the gas-phase contents of sample (or accumulation) loops, onto the second column. On the contrary, it will be herein demonstrated that much lower gas flows (≈ 6-8mL/min) can efficiently perform the modulation step of re-injection. The possibility of using such improved operational conditions is given simply by a fine optimization of the processes of accumulation and re-injection. The application of lower gas flows not only means that second-dimension separations are carried out under better analytical conditions, but, even more importantly, greatly reduces problems which arise when using mass spectrometry (i.e., sensitivity and instrumental pumping capacity).

  17. Mass-flow-rate-controlled fluid flow in nanochannels by particle insertion and deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Paul L.; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2016-12-01

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method to induce fluid flow in nanochannels, the insertion-deletion method (IDM), is introduced. IDM inserts and deletes particles within distinct regions in the domain, creating locally high and low pressures. The benefits of IDM are that it directly controls a physically meaningful quantity, the mass flow rate, allows for pressure and density gradients to develop in the direction of flow, and permits treatment of complex aperiodic geometries. Validation of IDM is performed, yielding good agreement with the analytical solution of Poiseuille flow in a planar channel. Comparison of IDM to existing methods indicates that it is best suited for gases, both because it intrinsically accounts for compressibility effects on the flow and because the computational cost of particle insertion is lowest for low-density fluids.

  18. Mass-flow-rate-controlled fluid flow in nanochannels by particle insertion and deletion.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Paul L; Lukes, Jennifer R

    2016-12-01

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method to induce fluid flow in nanochannels, the insertion-deletion method (IDM), is introduced. IDM inserts and deletes particles within distinct regions in the domain, creating locally high and low pressures. The benefits of IDM are that it directly controls a physically meaningful quantity, the mass flow rate, allows for pressure and density gradients to develop in the direction of flow, and permits treatment of complex aperiodic geometries. Validation of IDM is performed, yielding good agreement with the analytical solution of Poiseuille flow in a planar channel. Comparison of IDM to existing methods indicates that it is best suited for gases, both because it intrinsically accounts for compressibility effects on the flow and because the computational cost of particle insertion is lowest for low-density fluids.

  19. Analyzing Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization Problems Via Multicommodity Flows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Kleinberg, Robert D

    2009-11-28

    Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems concern the minimization of quadratic polynomials in n {0, 1}-valued variables. These problems are NP-complete, but prior work has identified a sequence of polynomial-time computable lower bounds on the minimum value, denoted by C(2), C(3), C(4),…. It is known that C(2) can be computed by solving a maximum-flow problem, whereas the only previously known algorithms for computing C(k) (k > 2) require solving a linear program. In this paper we prove that C(3) can be computed by solving a maximum multicommodity flow problem in a graph constructed from the quadratic function. In addition to providing a lower bound on the minimum value of the quadratic function on {0, 1}(n), this multicommodity flow problem also provides some information about the coordinates of the point where this minimum is achieved. By looking at the edges that are never saturated in any maximum multicommodity flow, we can identify relational persistencies: pairs of variables that must have the same or different values in any minimizing assignment. We furthermore show that all of these persistencies can be detected by solving single-commodity flow problems in the same network.

  20. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  1. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, Ramy

    To ensure the long-term sustainability of aviation, serious effort is underway to mitigate the escalating economic, environmental, and social concerns of the industry. Significant improvement to the energy efficiency of air transportation is required through the research and development of advanced and unconventional airframe and engine technologies. In the quest to reduce airframe drag, this thesis is concerned with the development and demonstration of an effective design tool for improving the aerodynamic efficiency of subsonic and transonic airfoils. The objective is to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization by incorporating and exploiting the phenomenon of laminar-turbulent transition in an efficient manner. A framework for the design and optimization of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) airfoils is developed and demonstrated with transition prediction capable of accounting for the effects of Reynolds number, freestream turbulence intensity, Mach number, and pressure gradients. First, a two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver has been extended to incorporate an iterative laminar-turbulent transition prediction methodology. The natural transition locations due to Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities are predicted using the simplified eN envelope method of Drela and Giles or, alternatively, the compressible form of the Arnal-Habiballah-Delcourt criterion. The boundary-layer properties are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes flow solution, and the transition to turbulent flow is modeled using an intermittency function in conjunction with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The RANS solver is subsequently employed in a gradient-based sequential quadratic programming shape optimization framework. The laminar-turbulent transition criteria are tightly coupled into the objective and gradient evaluations. The gradients are obtained using a new augmented discrete-adjoint formulation for non-local transition

  2. OPTICAL MASS FLOW DIAGNOSTICS IN HERBIG AE/BE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1–2 R{sub *}). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  3. Optical Mass Flow Diagnostics in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1-2 R*). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  4. Multimodal Registration of White Matter Brain Data via Optimal Mass Transport.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Tauseefur; Haber, Eldad; Pohl, Kilian M; Haker, Steven; Halle, Mike; Talos, Florin; Wald, Lawrence L; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2008-09-01

    The elastic registration of medical scans from different acquisition sequences is becoming an important topic for many research labs that would like to continue the post-processing of medical scans acquired via the new generation of high-field-strength scanners. In this note, we present a parameter-free registration algorithm that is well suited for this scenario as it requires no tuning to specific acquisition sequences. The algorithm encompasses a new numerical scheme for computing elastic registration maps based on the minimizing flow approach to optimal mass transport. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. We apply the algorithm to register the white matter folds of two different scans and use the results to parcellate the cortex of the target image. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the optimal mass transport function has been applied to register large 3D multimodal data sets.

  5. Multimodal Registration of White Matter Brain Data via Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Tauseefur; Haber, Eldad; Pohl, Kilian M.; Haker, Steven; Halle, Mike; Talos, Florin; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The elastic registration of medical scans from different acquisition sequences is becoming an important topic for many research labs that would like to continue the post-processing of medical scans acquired via the new generation of high-field-strength scanners. In this note, we present a parameter-free registration algorithm that is well suited for this scenario as it requires no tuning to specific acquisition sequences. The algorithm encompasses a new numerical scheme for computing elastic registration maps based on the minimizing flow approach to optimal mass transport. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. We apply the algorithm to register the white matter folds of two different scans and use the results to parcellate the cortex of the target image. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the optimal mass transport function has been applied to register large 3D multimodal data sets. PMID:28626844

  6. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  7. Digital image processing based mass flow rate measurement of gas/solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ding; Peng, Lihui; Lu, Geng; Yang, Shiyuan; Yan, Yong

    2009-02-01

    With the rapid growth of the process industry, pneumatic conveying as a tool for the transportation of a wide variety of pulverized and granular materials has become widespread. In order to improve plant control and operational efficiency, it is essential to know the parameters of the particle flow. This paper presents a digital imaging based method which is capable of measuring multiple flow parameters, including volumetric concentration, velocity and mass flow rate of particles in the gas/solid two phase flow. The measurement system consists of a solid state laser for illumination, a low-cost CCD camera for particle image acquisition and a microcomputer with bespoke software for particle image processing. The measurements of particle velocity and volumetric concentration share the same sensing hardware but use different exposure time and different image processing methods. By controlling the exposure time of the camera a clear image and a motion blurred image are obtained respectively. The clear image is thresholded by OTSU method to identify the particles from the dark background so that the volumetric concentration is determined by calculating the ratio between the particle area and the total area. Particle velocity is derived from the motion blur length, which is estimated from the motion blurred images by using the travelling wave equation method. The mass flow rate of particles is calculated by combining the particle velocity and volumetric concentration. Simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is promising for the measurement of multiple parameters of gas/solid two-phase flow.

  8. Photovoltaic Inverter Controllers Seeking AC Optimal Power Flow Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Dhople, Sairaj V.; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers future distribution networks featuring inverter-interfaced photovoltaic (PV) systems, and addresses the synthesis of feedback controllers that seek real- and reactive-power inverter setpoints corresponding to AC optimal power flow (OPF) solutions. The objective is to bridge the temporal gap between long-term system optimization and real-time inverter control, and enable seamless PV-owner participation without compromising system efficiency and stability. The design of the controllers is grounded on a dual ..epsilon..-subgradient method, while semidefinite programming relaxations are advocated to bypass the non-convexity of AC OPF formulations. Global convergence of inverter output powers is analytically established for diminishing stepsize rules for cases where: i) computational limits dictate asynchronous updates of the controller signals, and ii) inverter reference inputs may be updated at a faster rate than the power-output settling time.

  9. Incorporating User Preferences Within an Optimal Traffic Flow Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio; Sheth, Kapil S.; Guiterrez-Nolasco, Sebastian Armardo

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of future decision support tools for Traffic Flow Management in the National Airspace System will depend on two major factors: computational burden and collaboration. Previous research has focused separately on these two aspects without consideration of their interaction. In this paper, their explicit combination is examined. It is shown that when user preferences are incorporated with an optimal approach to scheduling, runtime is not adversely affected. A benefit-cost ratio is used to measure the influence of user preferences on an optimal solution. This metric shows user preferences can be accommodated without inordinately, negatively affecting the overall system delay. Specifically, incorporating user preferences will increase delays proportionally to increased user satisfaction.

  10. Optimal Spatial Scale for Curvature Calculations in Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senecal, Jacob; Owkes, Mark

    2016-11-01

    In gas-liquid flows, the surface tension force often controls the dynamics of the flow and an accurate calculation of this force is necessary for predictive simulations. The surface tension force is directly proportional to the curvature of the gas-liquid interface, making accurate curvature calculations an essential consideration. Multiple methods have been developed to calculate the curvature of volume of fluid (VoF) interface capturing schemes, such as the height function method. These methods have been extensively tested. However, the impact of the scale or size of computational stencil on which the curvature is computed, has not been correlated with the rate at which interface perturbations relax under the surface tension force. In this work, the effect of varying the scale on which the curvature is computed has been tested and quantified. An optimal curvature scale is identified that leads to accurate and converging curvatures, and accurate timescales for surface tension induced, interface dynamics.

  11. Optimized cross-slot flow geometry for microfluidic extensional rheometry.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; Oliveira, Mónica S N; Alves, Manuel A; McKinley, Gareth H

    2012-09-21

    A precision-machined cross-slot flow geometry with a shape that has been optimized by numerical simulation of the fluid kinematics is fabricated and used to measure the extensional viscosity of a dilute polymer solution. Full-field birefringence microscopy is used to monitor the evolution and growth of macromolecular anisotropy along the stagnation point streamline, and we observe the formation of a strong and uniform birefringent strand when the dimensionless flow strength exceeds a critical Weissenberg number Wi(crit) ≈ 0.5. Birefringence and bulk pressure drop measurements provide self-consistent estimates of the planar extensional viscosity of the fluid over a wide range of deformation rates (26 s(-1) ≤ ε ≤ 435 s(-1)) and are also in close agreement with numerical simulations performed by using a finitely extensible nonlinear elastic dumbbell model.

  12. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  13. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  14. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  15. Comparison of turbine annulus mass flow computed by one- and two-dimensional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.; Glassman, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Variations in specific heat ratio, flow angle, critical velocity ratio, swirl distribution exponent, and radius ratio were considered in computing the mass flow. Variations in specific heat ratio had no significant effect and variations in critical velocity ratio had only small effect on computed mass flow between a one- and two-dimensional analysis. All non-free-vortex cases considered showed larger differences in computed mass flow between one- and two-dimensional analysis than for free vortex flow. For the non-free-vortex cases, decreasing radius ratio and increasing flow angle resulted in larger differences in mass flow as computed by the two methods.

  16. Mass flow and its pulsation measurements in supersonic wing wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. S.; Shevchenko, A. M.; Yatskikh, A. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental study of the flow in the wing wake are presented. Experiments were carried out in supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM SB RAS. Rectangle half-wing with sharp edges with a chord length of 30 mm and semispan of 95 mm was used to generate vortex wake. Experimental data were obtained in the cross section located 6 chord length downstream of the trailing edge at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4 and at wing angles of attack of 4 and 10 degrees. Constant temperature hot-wire anemometer was used to measure disturbances in supersonic flow. Hot-wire was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 10 μm and length of 1.5 mm. Shlieren flow visualization were performed. As a result, the position and size of the vortex core in the wake of a rectangular wing were determined. For the first time experimental data on the mass flow distribution and its pulsations in the supersonic longitudinal vortex were obtained.

  17. Hydromagnetic free convection flow with Hall effect and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) deals with the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an electromagnetic field, which has many applications in astrophysics, geophysics and engineering. Objective of the present study in this paper is to consider the effect of dissipation and Hall current on the MHD free convection flow with mass transfer in a porous vertical channel. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained by solving the complex variables. The effect of Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), and Concentration parameter (Sc) on the velocity and temperature of the fluid is studied. Simulation results show that the shear stress of primary and secondary velocity for the lower plate increases with increase in the strength of Hall parameter (m) and decreases with increase in Hartmann number (M) and concentration parameter (Sc).

  18. Mass flow in the interacting binary TX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Mccluskey, C. P. S.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-two far-ultraviolet and 23 near-ultraviolet high resolution IUE spectra of the interactive Algol-type binary TX Ursae Majoris (B8 V + F-K III-IV) were analyzed in order to determine the nature of the mass flow occurring in this system. Absorption features due to high-temperature ions of Si IV, C IV, and N V are always present. The resonance lines of Al III, Fe II, Mg II and Si IV show strong phase and secular variations indicative of gas streaming and circumstellar/circumbinary material. Radial velocities as high as 500 to 600 km/sec are present. The gas flow is particularly prominent in 1985 between phases 0.7 and 0.0. The system is more active than U Sagittae and as active as U Cephei.

  19. Mass-Flow-Meter Leak-Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Eric B.; Polidori, Andre V.; Heman, Joe R.; Dresser, Holland L.; Hellum, John

    1996-01-01

    Improved leak-testing system incorporates mass-flow meter as primary sensor for measurement of leakage rate. System easier to use and more reliable and enables leak tests to be completed in less time. Produces test data more plentiful, more accurate, and better suited to leak detection and diagnosis. Operates over range of test conditions, including pressures from atmospheric to 1,000 psi, temperatures from 50 to 120 degrees F and volumes from less than 1 in.(sup3) to 22 in.(sup3). Sensitive enough to measure absorbed gas seeping from O-ring seals after test pressure released.

  20. Heat and mass transfer in porous cavity: Assisting flow

    SciTech Connect

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out. The governing partial differential equations are non-dimensionalised and solved using finite element method. The left vertical surface of the cavity is maintained at constant temperature and concentration which are higher than the ambient temperature and concentration applied at right vertical surface. The top and bottom walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Heat transfer is assumed to take place by natural convection and radiation. The investigation is carried out for assisting flow when buoyancy and gravity force act in same direction.

  1. Seasonal source influence on river mass flows of benzotriazoles.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Aliz; Fries, Elke

    2012-02-01

    The anticorrosive agents 1H-benzotriazole (1H-BT), 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4 Me-BT) and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5 Me-BT), which are usually added to dishwasher detergents, automotive antifreeze formulations and aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs), were measured in river water. Samples were collected from 15 sampling sites in the mainstream and selected tributaries of a medium-sized catchment area during summer and winter periods. The aim of this study was to assess a seasonal source influence on mass flows of benzotriazoles (BTs). The study area was representatively selected for an area with a possible influence of airport surface runoff. River discharge measurements were also performed. Moreover, BT concentrations were measured in an anti-icing and a de-icing fluid used at German airports as well as in several dishwasher detergents. The highest concentrations of all three compounds in river water were measured during the winter seasons. The maximum BT mass flows were calculated for all three substances in January when the mean monthly air temperature was the lowest; mass flows were the lowest in July when the mean monthly air temperature was the highest. A significant seasonal influence on BT mass flows in river water was observed for monitoring stations with a possible influence of airport surface runoff and for sampling locations where such an influence could be excluded. This indicates an input of BTs from other temperature-dependent applications, e.g. the use of antifreeze formulations in automotive windscreen wiper or cooling systems. 1H-BT was detected in two dishwasher tablets; 4 Me-BT and 5 Me-BT were not detected. BTs were measured in the anti-icing fluid with concentrations of 715 ng g(-1) (1H-BT), 1425 ng g(-1) (4 Me-BT) and 536 ng g(-1) (5 Me-BT); none of the BTs were detected in the de-icing fluid. Distribution patterns of BTs in ADAF and dishwasher detergents differed from those in river water.

  2. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  3. Acton mass flow system applied to PFBC feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homburg, E.

    1977-01-01

    Dense phase pneumatic conveying and the Acton Mass Flow concept are defined with emphasis on the specific advantages to the coal and dolomite feed to the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor. The transport and feed functions are explored with a comparison of designing the process for a combined function or for individual functions. The equipment required to accomplish these functions is described together with a typical example of sizing and air or gas requirements. A general outline of the control system required to obtain a uniform feed rate is provided. The condition of the coal and dolomite and conveying gas as required to obtain reliable transport and feed will be discussed.

  4. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  5. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets.

  6. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  7. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  8. The optimization on flow scheme of helium liquefier with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Liu, L. Q.

    2017-01-01

    There are several ways to organize the flow scheme of the helium liquefiers, such as arranging the expanders in parallel (reverse Brayton stage) or in series (modified Brayton stages). In this paper, the inlet mass flow and temperatures of expanders in Collins cycle are optimized using genetic algorithm (GA). Results show that maximum liquefaction rate can be obtained when the system is working at the optimal parameters. However, the reliability of the system is not well due to high wheel speed of the first turbine. Study shows that the scheme in which expanders are arranged in series with heat exchangers between them has higher operation reliability but lower plant efficiency when working at the same situation. Considering both liquefaction rate and system stability, another flow scheme is put forward hoping to solve the dilemma. The three configurations are compared from different aspects, they are respectively economic cost, heat exchanger size, system reliability and exergy efficiency. In addition, the effect of heat capacity ratio on heat transfer efficiency is discussed. A conclusion of choosing liquefier configuration is given in the end, which is meaningful for the optimal design of helium liquefier.

  9. Design, analysis, optimization and control of rotor tip flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesschalck, Cis Guy M. De

    Developments in turbomachinery focus on efficiency and reliability enhancements, while reducing the production costs. In spite of the many noteworthy experimental and numerical investigations over the past decades, the turbine tip design presents numerous challenges to the engine manufacturers, and remains the primary factor defining the machine durability for the periodic removal of the turbine components during overhaul. Due to the hot gases coming from the upstream combustion chamber, the turbine blades are subjected to temperatures far above the metal creep temperature, combined with severe thermal stresses induced within the blade material. Inadequate designs cause early tip burnouts leading to considerable performance degradations, or even a catastrophic turbine failure. Moreover, the leakage spillage, nowadays often exceeding the transonic regime, generates large aerodynamic penalties which are responsible for about one third of the turbine losses. In this view, the current doctoral research exploits the potential through the modification and optimization of the blade tip shape as a means to control the tip leakage flow aerodynamics and manage the heat load distribution over the blade profile to improve the turbine efficiency and durability. Three main design strategies for unshrouded turbine blade tips were analyzed and optimized: tight running clearances, blade tip contouring and the use of complex squealer-like geometries. The altered overtip flow physics and heat transfer characteristics were simulated for tight gap sizes as low as 0.5% down to 0.1% of the blade height, occurring during engine transients and soon to be expected due to recent developments in active clearance control strategies. The potential of fully 3D contoured blade top surfaces, allowing to adapt the profile locally to the changing flow conditions throughout the camberline, is quantified. First adopting a quasi-3D approach and subsequently using a full 3D optimization. For the

  10. Inverse model of fully coupled fluid flow and stress in fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Rutqvist, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to reflect the real behavior of the seepage field and deformation field during the environment change and construction process£¬the basic equations and FEM methods for fully coupled analysis of fluid flow and stress are developed£¬based on the assumptions of small deformation and incompressible water flow in complicated fractured rock masses. Both the equivalent continuum media model and the discrete media model are adopted. And the modified initial flow method is used to deal with the free surface of unconfined seepage. Due to the difficulty in determining the parameters of water flow field, stress field and their coupling relations, an inverse model is presented for the fully coupled problem in which both the data of water head and displacement are taken into consideration. Objective function is defined based on sensitivity analysis of parameters, and the relative values of water head, displacement on parameters are adopted in the establishment of objective function. A hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed as optimization method. The probability of crossover and mutation is determined according to chromosome fitness and a concept of self- adaptive probability is given. In addition, simplex method is also applied to increase the ability of local search, the operation of accelerated cycle is used in order to decrease optimization time.

  11. Optimizing the simulation of riverine species flow preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Jens; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Kakouei, Karan; Jähnig, Sonja C.; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Riverine biota have distinct demands on the discharge regime. To quantify these demands, discharge time series are translated to ecohydrological indicators, e.g. magnitude, timing or duration of baseflow or peak flow events. These indicators are then related to species occurrence and/or absence to establish the feedback response of aquatic species to hydrological conditions. These links can be used in conjunction with hydrological simulations for predictions of species occurrences. If differences between observed and simulated ecohydrological indicator values are too high, such predictions can be wrong. Indicator differences can be due to poor input data quality and simplified model algorithms, but also depend on how the model was optimized. For instance, in case the model was optimised towards a single objective function, e.g. minimizing the difference between simulated and observed Q95, differences between simulated and observed high flow indicators will be smaller as compared to baseflow indicators. In this study, we are working towards assessing this error depending on the optimisation of the model. This assessment is based on a multi-objective vs. single-objective model optimization which we have realised in the following four-step approach: (1) sets of highly relevant ecohydrological indicators are defined; (2) the hydrologic model is optimised using a multi-objective function that combines all indicators; (3) the hydrologic model is optimised using single-objective functions with one optimisation round for each indicator and (4) the differences between all optimisation methods are calculated. By assessing these absolute (simulated vs observed) and relative (simulated vs simulated) differences, we can evaluate the magnitude of the possible error band when optimising a hydrological model towards different ecohydrological indicators. This assessment can be used to optimize hydrological models for depicting preferences of riverine biota more effectively and

  12. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  13. [Research on optimization of mathematical model of flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Ya-Bing; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Dai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was a widely used method in the industries of health, environmental, geological and metallurgical fields for the merit of high sensitivity, wide measurement range and fast analytical speed. However, optimization of this method was too difficult as there exist so many parameters affecting the sensitivity and broadening. Generally, the optimal conditions were sought through several experiments. The present paper proposed a mathematical model between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients using the law of conservation of mass according to the characteristics of hydride chemical reaction and the composition of the system, which was proved to be accurate as comparing the theoretical simulation and experimental results through the test of arsanilic acid standard solution. Finally, this paper has put a relation map between the parameters and sensitivity/broadening coefficients, and summarized that GLS volume, carrier solution flow rate and sample loop volume were the most factors affecting sensitivity and broadening coefficients. Optimizing these three factors with this relation map, the relative sensitivity was advanced by 2.9 times and relative broadening was reduced by 0.76 times. This model can provide a theoretical guidance for the optimization of the experimental conditions.

  14. Nonlinear optimal control of bypass transition in a boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dandan; Papadakis, George

    2017-05-01

    The central aim of the paper is to apply and assess a nonlinear optimal control strategy to suppress bypass transition, due to bimodal interactions [T. A. Zaki and P. A. Durbin, "Mode interaction and the bypass route to transition," J. Fluid Mech. 531, 85 (2005)] in a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. To this end, a Lagrange variational formulation is employed that results in a set of adjoint equations. The optimal wall actuation (blowing and suction from a control slot) is found by solving iteratively the nonlinear Navier-Stokes and the adjoint equations in a forward/backward loop using direct numerical simulation. The optimization is performed in a finite time horizon. Large values of optimization horizon result in the instability of the adjoint equations. The control slot is located exactly in the region of transition. The results show that the control is able to significantly reduce the objective function, which is defined as the spatial and temporal integral of the quadratic deviation from the Blasius profile plus a term that quantifies the control cost. The physical mechanism with which the actuation interacts with the flow field is investigated and analysed in relation to the objective function employed. Examination of the joint probability density function shows that the control velocity is correlated with the streamwise velocity in the near wall region but this correlation is reduced as time elapses. The spanwise averaged velocity is distorted by the control action, resulting in a significant reduction of the skin friction coefficient. Results are presented with and without zero-net mass flow constraint of the actuation velocity. The skin friction coefficient drops below the laminar value if there is no mass constraint; it remains however larger than laminar when this constraint is imposed. Results are also compared with uniform blowing using the same time-average velocity obtained from the nonlinear optimal algorithm.

  15. Optimal control of an asymptotic model of flow separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Ubaid; Schmid, Peter; LFC-UK Team

    2015-11-01

    In the presence of surface imperfections, the boundary layer developing over an aircraft wing can separate and reattach, leading to a small separation bubble. We are interested in developing a low-order model that can be used to control the onset of separation at high Reynolds numbers typical of aircraft flight. In contrast to previous studies, we use a high Reynolds number asymptotic description of the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the motion of motion of the fluid. We obtain a steady solution to the nonlinear triple-deck equations for the separated flow over a small bump at high Reynolds numbers. We derive for the first time the adjoint of the nonlinear triple-deck equations and use it to study optimal control of the separated flow. We calculate the sensitivity of the properties of the separation bubble to local base flow modifications and steady forcing. We assess the validity of using this simplified asymptotic model by comparing our results with those obtained using the full Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. Mass and Energy Flow Through the Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    We a simple model of the flow of mass and energy through the jovian magnetosphere based on Voyager, Galileo and Cassini data. Combining the observed distribution of mass with conservation of the ~500 kg/s flux of Iogenic material we derive net radial flows that reach the local Alfven speed around 50-60 Rj. Estimates of mass ejected down the magnetotail in plasmoids only add up to a few percent of the source, suggesting most of the material must either be lost as a steady drizzle down the tail or leak out of the magnetopause. Approximately 230 tons of solar wind protons bombard the magnetopause each second. Thus, only a few percent leaking into the magnetosphere would swamp the mass source at Io. The dominance of sulfur and oxygen ions in the inner and middle magnetosphere indicate that little of such a solar wind source penetrates far into the magnetosphere. But mixing of iogenic and solar wind plasma (such as via Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) may be prevalent in the outer regions. The flow of energy through the system is not so clear to understand. Models of the physical chemistry of the Io plasma torus are consistent with a substantial source of energy from ion pick-up. But additional energy must also be pumped into the population of hot electrons (perhaps via plasma waves or as a dissipative by-product of fluxtube interchange motions). Most of the power going into the torus is radiated as UV line emission (1.2-2.5 TW) with only a little being carried by the outwardly diffusing plasma. As the plasma expands out into the large volumes of the middle and outer magnetosphere one would expect the plasma to cool. But the plasma temperature is observed to increase with distance and one of the major unresolved mysteries of the magnetosphere is how the plasma is in fact heated as it moves outwards. Approximately 0.6-3 TW of kinetic energy and 2.7-15 TW of thermal energy must be added to the plasma in the plasma disk. The ultimate source of this energy is likely Jupiter

  17. Mass transport enhancement in redox flow batteries with corrugated fluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, Kleber Marques; Marschewski, Julian; Ebejer, Neil; Ruch, Patrick; Cotta, Renato Machado; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-08-01

    We propose a facile, novel concept of mass transfer enhancement in flow batteries based on electrolyte guidance in rationally designed corrugated channel systems. The proposed fluidic networks employ periodic throttling of the flow to optimally deflect the electrolytes into the porous electrode, targeting enhancement of the electrolyte-electrode interaction. Theoretical analysis is conducted with channels in the form of trapezoidal waves, confirming and detailing the mass transport enhancement mechanism. In dilute concentration experiments with an alkaline quinone redox chemistry, a scaling of the limiting current with Re0.74 is identified, which compares favourably against the Re0.33 scaling typical of diffusion-limited laminar processes. Experimental IR-corrected polarization curves are presented for high concentration conditions, and a significant performance improvement is observed with the narrowing of the nozzles. The adverse effects of periodic throttling on the pumping power are compared with the benefits in terms of power density, and an improvement of up to 102% in net power density is obtained in comparison with the flow-by case employing straight parallel channels. The proposed novel concept of corrugated fluidic networks comes with facile fabrication and contributes to the improvement of the transport characteristics and overall performance of redox flow battery systems.

  18. Flow Optimization in the Princeton MRI Experiment and Zonal Flow Generation in HTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, Kyle; Burin, Michael; Gilson, Erik; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; McNulty, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Sloboda, Peter; Wei, Xing

    2015-11-01

    The Princeton Magneto-Rotational Instability (MRI) experiment and the Hydrodynamic Turbulence Experiment (HTX) are a pair of modified Taylor-Couette devices which explore rotating magnetohydrodynamic and hydrodynamic flows. The Princeton MRI experiment uses a GaInSn working fluid and was designed to study the MRI, which is believed to be the mechanism responsible for the rapid accretion rate observed in some magnetized accretion disks. The experiment utilizes ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to measure velocity profiles and a newly installed suite of hall sensors on the inner and outer cylinders to characterize the magnetic field. Results are presented from experiments which seek to optimize the flow by varying the inner ring speed for a given magnetic field strength. In HTX, we explore the generation of zonal flows from turbulence by flow jets with water as the working fluid. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the mean and fluctuating velocity. The generation of anisotropic mean flow by means of beta plane turbulence is investigated through the use of a sloped end-cap. The impact of varying the end cap slope, fluid height and jet flow rate will be discussed.

  19. Optimal-Flow Minimum-Cost Correspondence Assignment in Particle Flow Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Matov, Alexandre; Edvall, Marcus M.; Yang, Ge; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2011-01-01

    A diversity of tracking problems exists in which cohorts of densely packed particles move in an organized fashion, however the stability of individual particles within the cohort is low. Moreover, the flows of cohorts can regionally overlap. Together, these conditions yield a complex tracking scenario that can not be addressed by optical flow techniques that assume piecewise coherent flows, or by multiparticle tracking techniques that suffer from the local ambiguity in particle assignment. Here, we propose a graph-based assignment of particles in three consecutive frames to recover from image sequences the instantaneous organized motion of groups of particles, i.e. flows. The algorithm makes no a priori assumptions on the fraction of particles participating in organized movement, as this number continuously alters with the evolution of the flow fields in time. Graph-based assignment methods generally maximize the number of acceptable particles assignments between consecutive frames and only then minimize the association cost. In dense and unstable particle flow fields this approach produces many false positives. The here proposed approach avoids this via solution of a multi-objective optimization problem in which the number of assignments is maximized while their total association cost is minimized at the same time. The method is validated on standard benchmark data for particle tracking. In addition, we demonstrate its application to live cell microscopy where several large molecular populations with different behaviors are tracked. PMID:21720496

  20. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  1. Mechanisms of flow and water mass variability in Denmark Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Martin; Jochumsen, Kerstin; Quadfasel, Detlef; Mashayekh Poul, Hossein; Käse, Rolf H.

    2017-04-01

    The dense water export through Denmark Strait contributes significantly to the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Overflow water is transported southwestward not only in the deep channel of the Strait, but also within a thin bottom layer on the Greenland shelf. The flow on the shelf is mainly weak and barotropic, exhibiting many recirculations, but may eventually contribute to the overflow layer in the Irminger Basin by spilling events in the northern Irminger Basin. Especially the circulation around Dohrn Bank and the Kangerdlussuaq Trough contribute to the shelf-basin exchange. Moored observations show the overflow in Denmark Strait to be stable during the last 20 years (1996-2016). Nevertheless, flow variability was noticed on time scales of eddies and beyond, i.e. on weekly and interannual scales. Here, we use a combination of mooring data and shipboard hydrographic and current data to address the dominant modes of variability in the overflow, which are (i) eddies, (ii) barotropic pulsations of the plume, (iii) lateral shifts of the plume core position, and (iv) variations in vertical extension, i.e. varying overflow thickness. A principle component analysis is carried out and related to variations in sea surface height and wind stress, derived from satellite measurements. Furthermore, a test for topographic waves is performed. Shelf contributions to the overflow core in the Irminger Basin are identified from measurements of temperature and salinity, as well as velocity, which were obtained during recent cruises in the region. The flow and water mass pattern obtained from the observational data is compared to simulations in a high resolution regional model (ROMS), where tracer release experiments and float deployments were carried out. The modelling results allow a separation between different atmospheric forcing modes (NAO+ vs NAO- situations), which impact the water mass distribution and alter the dense water pathways on the

  2. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  3. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  4. Vortex boundary layer flow over a disk with mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surma Devi, C. D.; Nath, G.

    The effects of rigid-body and potential-vortex flows at large distances on the steady laminar incompressible axisymmetric boundary-layer flow (with or without mass transfer) on a stationary disk of infinite extent are investigated analytically. A set of nonlinear partial differential equations with three independent variables is derived and solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference scheme using Newton linearization and full integration starting from the edge, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Radial flow is found to be in the direction of the axis in all cases; as the axis is approached, the boundary layer becomes rapidly thicker and appears to develop a double-scaled structure, the radial-direction wall shear remains approximately constant, the tangential-direction skin-friction parameter decreases, and the radial-direction skin-friction decreases at first and then increases. These results are considered to be of interest to the study of atmospheric phenomena such as hurricanes and tornados.

  5. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  6. Mass Flow in the Close Binary V342 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, C. N.; Polidan, R. S.; Welty, A.; Wade, R.; Etzel, P. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.

    1995-12-01

    Preliminary analysis of the eclipsing binary V342 Aquilae indicates it is undergoing an extremely active phase of mass flow. Three observational datasets provide complete orbital phase coverage of the 3.39 day period across a wide band; IUE spectroscopic data, photometric uvbyRI data, and optical spectroscopy data. IUE observations made in 1991, 1993 and 1995 include 88 low resolution SWP and LWP spectra spanning from 1150 to 3200 Angstroms. The uvbyRI optical photometry data (P. Etzel) were obtained simultaneously with the 1993 IUE observations. Limited KPNO 2.1 meter telescope optical data (A. Welty) covering from 3840 to 9000 Angstroms were taken in 1994. Our UV spectra show very pronounced Fe II absorption lines arising from ground and metastable levels, indicating an extensive circumstellar shell in the system. The strength of this absorption shows both an orbital and a cycle-to-cycle variability. The eclipse spectra display very strong emission from lines such as C II at 1335 Angstroms, Si IV at 1400 Angstroms, and C IV at 1550 Angstroms, with a striking similarity to the eclipse spectra of TT Hydrae. Based upon these data, we have deduced the effective temperatures, spectral types and orbital geometry of the two stars. The UV spectra show the primary is approximately a late B star and the secondary is a late G star. We also present velocity curve results from the optical data along with the resulting mass ratio estimate. Our ongoing analysis aims to understand the unusually large rate of mass flow occuring in V342 Aquilae. P.B.E. acknowledges support under NSF grant AST-9115104.

  7. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG) †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Peng; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG), a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs). Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s) and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance. PMID:27136557

  8. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  9. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Andrew P.; Zeiri, Offer M.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data.

  10. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power, or fixed palenstrophy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.

    2012-11-01

    We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with fixed power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.

  11. Simultaneous Moisture Content and Mass Flow Measurements in Wood Chip Flows Using Coupled Dielectric and Impact Sensors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pengmin; McDonald, Timothy; Fulton, John; Via, Brian; Hung, John

    2016-12-23

    An 8-electrode capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor was built and used to measure moisture content (MC) and mass flow of pine chip flows. The device was capable of directly measuring total water quantity in a sample but was sensitive to both dry matter and moisture, and therefore required a second measurement of mass flow to calculate MC. Two means of calculating the mass flow were used: the first being an impact sensor to measure total mass flow, and the second a volumetric approach based on measuring total area occupied by wood in images generated using the capacitance sensor's tomographic mode. Tests were made on 109 groups of wood chips ranging in moisture content from 14% to 120% (dry basis) and wet weight of 280 to 1100 g. Sixty groups were randomly selected as a calibration set, and the remaining were used for validation of the sensor's performance. For the combined capacitance/force transducer system, root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for wet mass flow and moisture content were 13.42% and 16.61%, respectively. RMSEP using the combined volumetric mass flow/capacitance sensor for dry mass flow and moisture content were 22.89% and 24.16%, respectively. Either of the approaches was concluded to be feasible for prediction of moisture content in pine chip flows, but combining the impact and capacitance sensors was easier to implement. In situations where flows could not be impeded, however, the tomographic approach would likely be more useful.

  12. Simultaneous Moisture Content and Mass Flow Measurements in Wood Chip Flows Using Coupled Dielectric and Impact Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pengmin; McDonald, Timothy; Fulton, John; Via, Brian; Hung, John

    2016-01-01

    An 8-electrode capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor was built and used to measure moisture content (MC) and mass flow of pine chip flows. The device was capable of directly measuring total water quantity in a sample but was sensitive to both dry matter and moisture, and therefore required a second measurement of mass flow to calculate MC. Two means of calculating the mass flow were used: the first being an impact sensor to measure total mass flow, and the second a volumetric approach based on measuring total area occupied by wood in images generated using the capacitance sensor’s tomographic mode. Tests were made on 109 groups of wood chips ranging in moisture content from 14% to 120% (dry basis) and wet weight of 280 to 1100 g. Sixty groups were randomly selected as a calibration set, and the remaining were used for validation of the sensor’s performance. For the combined capacitance/force transducer system, root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for wet mass flow and moisture content were 13.42% and 16.61%, respectively. RMSEP using the combined volumetric mass flow/capacitance sensor for dry mass flow and moisture content were 22.89% and 24.16%, respectively. Either of the approaches was concluded to be feasible for prediction of moisture content in pine chip flows, but combining the impact and capacitance sensors was easier to implement. In situations where flows could not be impeded, however, the tomographic approach would likely be more useful. PMID:28025536

  13. An Integrated Control and Minimum Mass Structural Optimization Algorithm for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.; Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is discussed for solving dual structural control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures, where reduced-order structural models are employed and minimum mass designs are sought. For a given initial structural design, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the structural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns, using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. The minimum mass design is obtained by solving a sequence of neighboring optimal constant mass designs, where the sequence of optimal performance indices has a minimum at the optimal minimum mass design. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  14. Improved peptide mass fingerprinting matches via optimized sample preparation in MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Padliya, Neerav D; Wood, Troy D

    2008-10-03

    Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) is a powerful technique in which experimentally measured m/z values of peptides resulting from a protein digest form the basis for a characteristic fingerprint of the intact protein. Due to its propensity to generate singly charged ions, along with its relative insensitivity to salts and buffers, matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) is the MS method of choice for PMF. The qualitative features of the mass spectrum can be selectively tuned by employing different methods to prepare the protein digest and matrix for MALDI-TOFMS. The selective tuning of MALDI mass spectra in order to optimize PMF is addressed here. Bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase, cytochrome c, hemoglobin alpha- and beta-chain, and myoglobin were digested with trypsin and then analyzed by MALDI-TOFMS. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) were prepared using six different sample preparation methods: dried droplet, application of protein digest on MALDI plate followed by addition of matrix, dried droplet with vacuum drying, overlayer, sandwich, and dried droplet with heating. Improved results were obtained for the matrix alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid using a modification of the died droplet method in which the MALDI plate was heated to 80 degrees C prior to matrix application, which is supported by observations from scanning electron microscopy. Although each protein was found to have a different optimum sample preparation method for PMF, in general higher sequence coverage for PMF was obtained using DHB. The best PMF results were obtained when all of the mass spectral data for a particular protein digest was convolved together.

  15. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  16. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  17. Improving Emergency Department flow through optimized bed utilization.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Lucas Brien; Simoes, Licinia; Kuipers, Meredith; McGovern, Barb

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, patient volumes in the emergency department (ED) have grown disproportionately compared to the increase in staffing and resources at the Toronto Western Hospital, an academic tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. The resultant congestion has spilled over to the ED waiting room, where medically undifferentiated and potentially unstable patients must wait until a bed becomes available. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the 90th percentile of wait time between triage and bed assignment (time-to-bed) by half, from 120 to 60 minutes, for our highest acuity patients. We engaged key stakeholders to identify barriers and potential strategies to achieve optimal flow of patients into the ED. We first identified multiple flow-interrupting challenges, including operational bottlenecks and cultural issues. We then generated change ideas to address two main underlying causes of ED congestion: unnecessary patient utilization of ED beds and communication breakdown causing bed turnaround delays. We subsequently performed seven tests of change through sequential plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles. The most significant gains were made by improving communication strategies: small gains were achieved through the optimization of in-house digital information management systems, while significant improvements were achieved through the implementation of a low-tech direct contact mechanism (a two-way radio or walkie-talkie). In the post-intervention phase, time-to-bed for the 90th percentile of high-acuity patients decreased from 120 minutes to 66 minutes, with special cause variation showing a significant shift in the weekly measurements.

  18. Improving Emergency Department flow through optimized bed utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas Brien; Simoes, Licinia; Kuipers, Meredith; McGovern, Barb

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, patient volumes in the emergency department (ED) have grown disproportionately compared to the increase in staffing and resources at the Toronto Western Hospital, an academic tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. The resultant congestion has spilled over to the ED waiting room, where medically undifferentiated and potentially unstable patients must wait until a bed becomes available. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the 90th percentile of wait time between triage and bed assignment (time-to-bed) by half, from 120 to 60 minutes, for our highest acuity patients. We engaged key stakeholders to identify barriers and potential strategies to achieve optimal flow of patients into the ED. We first identified multiple flow-interrupting challenges, including operational bottlenecks and cultural issues. We then generated change ideas to address two main underlying causes of ED congestion: unnecessary patient utilization of ED beds and communication breakdown causing bed turnaround delays. We subsequently performed seven tests of change through sequential plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles. The most significant gains were made by improving communication strategies: small gains were achieved through the optimization of in-house digital information management systems, while significant improvements were achieved through the implementation of a low-tech direct contact mechanism (a two-way radio or walkie-talkie). In the post-intervention phase, time-to-bed for the 90th percentile of high-acuity patients decreased from 120 minutes to 66 minutes, with special cause variation showing a significant shift in the weekly measurements. PMID:27752312

  19. Pulsed pumping process optimization using a potential flow model.

    PubMed

    Tenney, C M; Lastoskie, C M

    2007-08-15

    A computational model is applied to the optimization of pulsed pumping systems for efficient in situ remediation of groundwater contaminants. In the pulsed pumping mode of operation, periodic rather than continuous pumping is used. During the pump-off or trapping phase, natural gradient flow transports contaminated groundwater into a treatment zone surrounding a line of injection and extraction wells that transect the contaminant plume. Prior to breakthrough of the contaminated water from the treatment zone, the wells are activated and the pump-on or treatment phase ensues, wherein extracted water is augmented to stimulate pollutant degradation and recirculated for a sufficient period of time to achieve mandated levels of contaminant removal. An important design consideration in pulsed pumping groundwater remediation systems is the pumping schedule adopted to best minimize operational costs for the well grid while still satisfying treatment requirements. Using an analytic two-dimensional potential flow model, optimal pumping frequencies and pumping event durations have been investigated for a set of model aquifer-well systems with different well spacings and well-line lengths, and varying aquifer physical properties. The results for homogeneous systems with greater than five wells and moderate to high pumping rates are reduced to a single, dimensionless correlation. Results for heterogeneous systems are presented graphically in terms of dimensionless parameters to serve as an efficient tool for initial design and selection of the pumping regimen best suited for pulsed pumping operation for a particular well configuration and extraction rate. In the absence of significant retardation or degradation during the pump-off phase, average pumping rates for pulsed operation were found to be greater than the continuous pumping rate required to prevent contaminant breakthrough.

  20. Energetic correlation of local mass transfer in swirling pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yapici, S.

    1999-04-01

    Mass transfer measurements in a decaying swirl flow in a pipe were carried out, using the electrochemical limiting diffusion current technique. The measurements were taken from local electrodes of 1 mm diameter without a developing concentration boundary layer around. Swirl was generated using short helical guide-vanes with vane angles between 15 and 60 at the outer edge of the vanes to the duct axis. The pressure drop measurements were also taken to perform an energy analysis. For a Reynolds number range of 1700--10,000, the overall energy correlation for a representative length of 36.5 diameter were evaluated to be Sh{sub s}(Sc){sup {minus}0.33} = 0.3705(1 + tan {theta}{sub o}){sup {minus}0.120} X{sup 0.236}, where {theta}{sub o} is the vane angle at the outer edge of the helical swirler and X is the energy dissipation parameter.

  1. The automation of an inlet mass flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supplee, Frank; Tcheng, Ping; Weisenborn, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a closed-loop computer controlled system for the inlet mass flow system (IMFS) developed for a wind tunnel facility at Langley Research Center is presented. This new PC based control system is intended to replace the manual control system presently in use in order to fully automate the plug positioning of the IMFS during wind tunnel testing. Provision is also made for communication between the PC and a host-computer in order to allow total animation of the plug positioning and data acquisition during the complete sequence of predetermined plug locations. As extensive running time is programmed for the IMFS, this new automated system will save both manpower and tunnel running time.

  2. Considerations about optimization of the flow into a blending tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, Mariana; Panaitescu, Fanel-Viorel; Anton, Iulia-Alina

    2016-12-01

    In this paper is studying multi-phase fluid flow simulation in a blending tank, which involve air and water. It aims to use a model of the turbulence of the fluid, addicted to set different options for each fluid turbulence. It used for simulation the equations and tools from program ANSYS 13.0. The system is composed of a tank, a pipe of air injection, four baffles, a rotor, and a vertical shaft passing through the vessel. Data entry: the rotation frequency of the rotor on axis Ox (89 rotations/min(rpm)), the speed of the air which is injected into the container (5 m/s ), diameter pipe at entry (0.0248 m).The study assumptions are: a) the temperature of the water and the air remain constant (25 °C) and that the air is incompressible, with a density equal to that at 25 0 C and 1 Pa; b) the bubbles have 3 mm diameter. The mixture requires two domains: a domain for rotor and stationary tank area. Both areas contain water as a continuous phase and air as the dispersion phase. The fields will shape buoyancy, turbulence and the forces of the fluid. In the paper are presented the details of flow analysis for: dispersed fluid in the impeller region of mixing device and of continuous fluid in the same region, with corresponding parameters, after this for tank and the boundary conditions for each studied assumptions. Flow simulation in blending tank help to optimize the shape of tank and reducing the hydraulic losses due to fouling the solid borders.

  3. Optimal channels of the Garvey-Kelson mass relations in extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Man; He, Zeng; Cheng, YiYuan; Zhao, YuMin; Arima, Akito

    2017-02-01

    Garvey-Kelson mass relations connect nuclear masses of neighboring nuclei within high accuracy, and provide us with convenient tools in predicting unknown masses by extrapolations from existent experimental data. In this paper we investigate optimal "channels" of the Garvey-Kelson relations in extrapolation to the unknown regions, and tabulate our predicted masses by using these optimized channels of the Garvey-Kelson relations.

  4. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  5. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  6. Integration of continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry with chromatography and mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Liberman, Rosa G; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2008-07-01

    Physical combination of an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) instrument with a conventional gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) is described. The resulting hybrid instrument (GC/MS/AMS) was used to monitor mass chromatograms and radiochromatograms simultaneously when (14)C-labeled compounds were injected into the gas chromatograph. Combination of the two instruments was achieved by splitting the column effluent and directing half to the mass spectrometer and half to a flow-through CuO reactor in line with the gas-accepting AMS ion source. The reactor converts compounds in the GC effluent to CO2 as required for function of the ion source. With cholesterol as test compound, the limits of quantitation were 175 pg and 0.00175 dpm injected. The accuracy achieved in analysis of five nonzero calibration standards and three quality control standards, using cholesterol-2,2,3,4,4,6-d6 as injection standard, was 100 +/- 11.8% with selected ion monitoring and 100 +/- 16% for radiochromatography. Respective values for interday precision were 1.0-3.2 and 22-32%. Application of GC/MS/AMS to a current topic of interest was demonstrated in a model metabolomic study in which cultured primary hepatocytes were given [(14)C]glucose and organic acids excreted into the culture medium were analyzed.

  7. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cc. with a constant time interval between respirations. (ii) At cabin pressure altitudes above 18,500... between respirations. (2) For each flight crewmember, the minimum mass flow may not be less than the flow... interval between respirations. (3) The minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen supplied for each user...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cc. with a constant time interval between respirations. (ii) At cabin pressure altitudes above 18,500... between respirations. (2) For each flight crewmember, the minimum mass flow may not be less than the flow... interval between respirations. (3) The minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen supplied for each user...

  9. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    The comprehensive MS analysis of the peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and its utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation and related platforms, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however, an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we began by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines, including MS-GF+, SEQUEST, and MS-Align+, for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our results demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing data for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage. Taken together, we propose an optimized informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT tag) approaches for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  10. An Optimized Informatics Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Monroe, Matthew E.; Xu, Zhe; Slysz, Gordon W.; Payne, Samuel H.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-12-26

    Comprehensive MS analysis of peptidome, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide novel insights on endogenous proteolytic processing and their utility in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Along with the advances in MS instrumentation, a plethora of proteomics data analysis tools have been applied for direct use in peptidomics; however an evaluation of the currently available informatics pipelines for peptidomics data analysis has yet to be reported. In this study, we set off by evaluating the results of several popular MS/MS database search engines including MS-GF+, SEQUEST and MS-Align+ for peptidomics data analysis, followed by identification and label-free quantification using the well-established accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and newly developed informed quantification (IQ) approaches, both based on direct LC-MS analysis. Our result demonstrated that MS-GF+ outperformed both SEQUEST and MS-Align+ in identifying peptidome peptides. Using a database established from the MS-GF+ peptide identifications, both the AMT tag and IQ approaches provided significantly deeper peptidome coverage and less missing value for each individual data set than the MS/MS methods, while achieving robust label-free quantification. Besides having an excellent correlation with the AMT tag quantification results, IQ also provided slightly higher peptidome coverage than AMT. Taken together, we propose an optimal informatics pipeline combining MS-GF+ for initial database searching with IQ (or AMT) for identification and label-free quantification for high-throughput, comprehensive and quantitative peptidomics analysis.

  11. Structural-acoustic optimization of structures excited by turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Micah R.

    In order to reduce noise radiation of aircraft or marine panels, a general structural-acoustic optimization technique is presented. To compute the structural-acoustic response, a modal approach based on finite element / boundary element analysis is used which can easily incorporate fluid loading, added structures and static pre-loads. Simple deterministic or complex random forcing functions are included in the analysis by transforming their cross-spectral density matrices to modal space. Particular emphasis is placed in this dissertation on structures excited by the fluctuating pressures due to turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow. An efficient frequency-spacing is also used to minimize evaluation time but ensure accuracy. The response from the structural-acoustic analysis is coupled to an evolutionary strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES) to find the best design for low noise and weight. CMA-ES, a stochastic optimizer with robust search properties, samples candidate solutions from a multi-variate normal distribution and adapts the covariance matrix to favor good solutions. The optimization procedure is validated by minimizing the sound radiated by a point-driven ribbed panel and comparing the optimization results to an exhaustive search of the design space. Structural-acoustic optimization is then performed on a curved marine panel with heavy fluid loading excited by slow TBL flow. A weighted combination of noise radiation and mass are minimized by changing the thickness of strips and patches of elements. An uncorrelated pressure approximation is used to estimate the modal force due to TBL flow thus reducing the evaluation time required to compute the objective function. The results show that the best noise reduction is achieved by minimizing the modal acceptance of energy by the panel. This is equivalent to pushing the structural modes away from the peak frequency range of the forcing function. Additionally, the Pareto trade-off curve between total

  12. Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway Modeled by Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4 min over ∼3 hrs in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. PMID:28323163

  13. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-03-18

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins.

  14. GHRS observations of mass-loaded flows in Abell 78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 78 were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the vicinity of the C IV lambda 1548.2, 1550.8 doublet. We find a series of narrow absorption features superposed on the broad, P Cygni stellar wind profile. These features are seen in both components of the doublet at heliocentric radial velocities of -18, -71, -131, and -192 km/s. At higher velocities, individual components are no longer distinct but, rather, merge into a continuous absorption extending to approximately -385 km/s. This is among the highest velocities ever detected for gas in a planetary nebula. The -18 km/s feature originates in an outer envelope of normal composition, while the -71 km/s feature is produced in the wind-swept shell encircling an irregular wind-blown bubble in the planetary nebula center. The hydrogen-poor ejecta of Abell 78, consisting of dense knots with wind-blown tails, are located in the bubble's interior, in the vicinity of the stellar wind termination shock. The high-velocity C IV lambda 154 absorption features can be explained as due to parcels of ejecta being accelerated to high velocities as they are swept up by the stellar wind during its interaction with dense condensations of H-poor ejecta. As the ablated material is accelerated, it will partially mix with the stellar wind, creating a mass-loaded flow. The abundance anomalies seen at the rim of the bubble attest to the transport of H-poor knot material by such a flow.

  15. Adjoint-based constrained topology optimization for viscous flows, including heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoleontos, E. A.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Zymaris, A. S.; Papadimitriou, D. I.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2013-08-01

    In fluid mechanics, topology optimization is used for designing flow passages, connecting predefined inlets and outlets, with optimal performance based on selected criteria. In this article, the continuous adjoint approach to topology optimization in incompressible ducted flows with heat transfer is presented. A variable porosity field, to be determined during the optimization, is the means to define the optimal topology. The objective functions take into account viscous losses and the amount of heat transfer. Turbulent flows are handled using the Spalart-Allmaras model and the proposed adjoint is exact, i.e. the adjoint to the turbulence model equation is formulated and solved, too. This is an important novelty in this article which extends the porosity-based method to account for heat transfer flow problems in turbulent flows. In problems such as the design of manifolds, constraints on the outlet flow direction, rates and mean outlet temperatures are imposed.

  16. Corner flow control in high through-flow axial commercial fan/booster using blade 3-D optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fang; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin

    2012-02-01

    This study is aimed at using blade 3-D optimization to control corner flows in the high through-flow fan/booster of a high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. Two kinds of blade 3-D optimization, end-bending and bow, are focused on. On account of the respective operation mode and environment, the approach to 3-D aerodynamic modeling of rotor blades is different from stator vanes. Based on the understanding of the mechanism of the corner flow and the consideration of intensity problem for rotors, this paper uses a variety of blade 3-D optimization approaches, such as loading distribution optimization, perturbation of departure angles and stacking-axis manipulation, which are suitable for rotors and stators respectively. The obtained 3-D blades and vanes can improve the corner flow features by end-bending and bow effects. The results of this study show that flows in corners of the fan/booster, such as the fan hub region, the tip and hub of the vanes of the booster, are very complex and dominated by 3-D effects. The secondary flows there are found to have a strong detrimental effect on the compressor performance. The effects of both end-bending and bow can improve the flow separation in corners, but the specific ways they work and application scope are somewhat different. Redesigning the blades via blade 3-D optimization to control the corner flow has effectively reduced the loss generation and improved the stall margin by a large amount.

  17. Automatic OPC repair flow: optimized implementation of the repair recipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnas, Mohamed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Word, James

    2007-10-01

    Virtual manufacturing that is enabled by rapid, accurate, full-chip simulation is a main pillar in achieving successful mask tape-out in the cutting-edge low-k1 lithography. It facilitates detecting printing failures before a costly and time-consuming mask tape-out and wafer print occur. The OPC verification step role is critical at the early production phases of a new process development, since various layout patterns will be suspected that they might to fail or cause performance degradation, and in turn need to be accurately flagged to be fed back to the OPC Engineer for further learning and enhancing in the OPC recipe. At the advanced phases of the process development, there is much less probability of detecting failures but still the OPC Verification step act as the last-line-of-defense for the whole RET implemented work. In recent publication the optimum approach of responding to these detected failures was addressed, and a solution was proposed to repair these defects in an automated methodology and fully integrated and compatible with the main RET/OPC flow. In this paper the authors will present further work and optimizations of this Repair flow. An automated analysis methodology for root causes of the defects and classification of them to cover all possible causes will be discussed. This automated analysis approach will include all the learning experience of the previously highlighted causes and include any new discoveries. Next, according to the automated pre-classification of the defects, application of the appropriate approach of OPC repair (i.e. OPC knob) on each classified defect location can be easily selected, instead of applying all approaches on all locations. This will help in cutting down the runtime of the OPC repair processing and reduce the needed number of iterations to reach the status of zero defects. An output report for existing causes of defects and how the tool handled them will be generated. The report will with help further learning

  18. Environmental optimization of continuous flow ozonation for urban wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio; Muñoz, Iván; Perdigón-Melón, José A; Carbajo, José B; Martínez, María J; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rosal, Roberto

    2012-10-15

    Wastewater samples from the secondary clarifier of two treatment plants were spiked in the microgram-to-tens-of-microgram per liter range with diuron (herbicide), ibuprofen and diclofenac (anti-inflammatory drugs), sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin (antibiotics), bezafibrate and gemfibrozil (lipid regulators), atenolol (β-blocker), carbamazepine (anti-epileptic), hydrochlorothiazide (diuretic), caffeine (stimulant) and N-acetyl-4-amino-antipiryne, a metabolite of the antipyretic drug dypirone. They were subsequently ozonated in continuous flow using 1.2L lab-scale bubble columns. The concentration of all spiking compounds was monitored in the outlet stream. The effects of varying ozone input, expressed as energy per unit volume, and water flow rate, and of using single or double column were studied in relation to the efficiency of ozone usage and the ratio of pollutant depletion. The ozone dosage required to treat both wastewaters with pollutant depletion of >90% was in the 5.5-8.5 mg/L range with ozone efficiencies greater than 80% depending on the type of wastewater and the operating conditions. This represented 100-200 mol of ozone transferred per mole of pollutant removed. Direct and indirect environmental impacts of ozonation were assessed according to Life Cycle Assessment, a technique that helped identify the most effective treatments in terms of potential toxicity reduction, as well as of toxicity reduction per unit mass of greenhouse-gas emissions, which were used as an indicator of environmental efficiency. A trade-off between environmental effectiveness (toxicity reduction) and greenhouse-gas emissions was observed since maximizing toxicity removal led to higher greenhouse-gas emissions, due to the latter's relatively high ozone requirements. Also, there is an environmental trade-off between effectiveness and efficiency. Our results indicate that an efficient use of ozone was not compatible with a full pollutant removal.

  19. Fluorescence intensity analysis through simplex optimization in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Takase, K; Iwaki, K; Gunji, T; Yata, J

    1989-03-10

    Fluorescence intensity analysis in flow cytometric surface immunophenotyping has recently been appreciated in clinical applications. A curve fitting method to estimate the mean and SD values of fluorescence intensity is described in this report. A Gaussian distribution is aimed to be adapted for a specified distribution in logarithmically scaled histogram data through the simplex optimization, one of the non-linear least squares methods. In comparison with the conventional methods which include the detection of peak point and the direct calculation, this fitting method has demonstrated exceeding precisions in the estimation of both parameters with limited involved cell counts in typical lymphocytic phenotyping. The actual estimation for a precise SD value will develop the quality control approaches based on the fluorescence intensity analysis. While this method is not suitable for distributions that involve extremely small cell counts or that deviate markedly from a symmetric Gaussian, it has additional advantages of loose requirements, namely, narrow fitting regions, ordinarily small cell counts, practical computational periods and a simple programming.

  20. Comprehensive mass flow analysis of Swedish sludge contaminants.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ulrika; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Kylin, Henrik; Haglund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A screening of metals, persistent organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and other organic contaminants in sludge from seven Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) was performed in this study. This extensive screening provides information on mass flows of 282 compounds used in the Swedish society to sewage sludge. It reveals constant relative contaminant concentrations (ng mg kg(-1) d.w.), except for some pesticides and perfluorinated compounds, indicating that these originate from broad usage and diffuse dispersion rather than (industrial) point sources. There was a five order of magnitude difference in the sum concentrations of the most and least abundant species (metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans, respectively). Lower total concentrations were found in sludge from STPs processing primarily food industry or household sewage. Proportions of the amounts used (in Sweden) found in sludge were lower for compounds that are present in consumer goods or are diffusely dispersed into the environment (0.01-1% recovered in sludge) than for compounds used as detergents or PPCPs (17-63%). In some cases, the recovery seemed to be affected by evaporation (e.g. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) or biotransformation (e.g. adipates) losses, while polychlorinated alkanes and brominated diphenyl ethers were recovered to disproportionately high degree (ca. 4%); likely due to incomplete statistics for imported goods.

  1. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGES

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  2. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  3. Stochastic structural and reliability based optimization of tuned mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrabet, E.; Guedri, M.; Ichchou, M. N.; Ghanmi, S.

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the current work is to present and discuss a technique for optimizing the parameters of a vibration absorber in the presence of uncertain bounded structural parameters. The technique used in the optimization is an interval extension based on a Taylor expansion of the objective function. The technique permits the transformation of the problem, initially non-deterministic, into two independents deterministic sub-problems. Two optimization strategies are considered: the Stochastic Structural Optimization (SSO) and the Reliability Based Optimization (RBO). It has been demonstrated through two different structures that the technique is valid for the SSO problem, even for high levels of uncertainties and it is less suitable for the RBO problem, especially when considering high levels of uncertainties.

  4. Optimal Controller for Turbulent Flow Over an Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-17

    and multiple-output ( MIMO ) setting. This is an issue since turbulent flow is a distributed system and some standard techniques developed for lumped...directions follow. 7.1 Flow Simulation An efficient computational code for the simulation of turbulent separated flow utilizing massively parallel...LES interface 84 for massively separated flows, especially those whose separation point is set by geometry, than for wall-bounded channel flows

  5. Simultaneous moisture content and mass flow measurements in wood chip flows using coupled dielectric and impact sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Pengmin; McDonald, Timothy; Fulton, John; ...

    2016-12-23

    An 8-electrode capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor was built and used to measure moisture content (MC) and mass flow of pine chip flows. The device was capable of directly measuring total water quantity in a sample but was sensitive to both dry matter and moisture, and therefore required a second measurement of mass flow to calculate MC. Two means of calculating the mass flow were used: the first being an impact sensor to measure total mass flow, and the second a volumetric approach based on measuring total area occupied by wood in images generated using the capacitance sensor’s tomographic mode. Testsmore » were made on 109 groups of wood chips ranging in moisture content from 14% to 120% (dry basis) and wet weight of 280 to 1100 g. Sixty groups were randomly selected as a calibration set, and the remaining were used for validation of the sensor’s performance. For the combined capacitance/force transducer system, root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for wet mass flow and moisture content were 13.42% and 16.61%, respectively. RMSEP using the combined volumetric mass flow/capacitance sensor for dry mass flow and moisture content were 22.89% and 24.16%, respectively. Either of the approaches was concluded to be feasible for prediction of moisture content in pine chip flows, but combining the impact and capacitance sensors was easier to implement. As a result, in situations where flows could not be impeded, however, the tomographic approach would likely be more useful.« less

  6. Simultaneous moisture content and mass flow measurements in wood chip flows using coupled dielectric and impact sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Pengmin; McDonald, Timothy; Fulton, John; Via, Brian; Hung, John

    2016-12-23

    An 8-electrode capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor was built and used to measure moisture content (MC) and mass flow of pine chip flows. The device was capable of directly measuring total water quantity in a sample but was sensitive to both dry matter and moisture, and therefore required a second measurement of mass flow to calculate MC. Two means of calculating the mass flow were used: the first being an impact sensor to measure total mass flow, and the second a volumetric approach based on measuring total area occupied by wood in images generated using the capacitance sensor’s tomographic mode. Tests were made on 109 groups of wood chips ranging in moisture content from 14% to 120% (dry basis) and wet weight of 280 to 1100 g. Sixty groups were randomly selected as a calibration set, and the remaining were used for validation of the sensor’s performance. For the combined capacitance/force transducer system, root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for wet mass flow and moisture content were 13.42% and 16.61%, respectively. RMSEP using the combined volumetric mass flow/capacitance sensor for dry mass flow and moisture content were 22.89% and 24.16%, respectively. Either of the approaches was concluded to be feasible for prediction of moisture content in pine chip flows, but combining the impact and capacitance sensors was easier to implement. As a result, in situations where flows could not be impeded, however, the tomographic approach would likely be more useful.

  7. Optimization of the shapes of obstacles in jet-separation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhov, V. N.; Gubkina, E. V.

    2007-05-01

    The model of an ideal incompressible fluid is used to study the solvability of optimal control problems for the shape of a nozzle which discharges free-boundary fluid flow with and without accounting for gravity (internal aerodynamics) and shape optimization problems for an obstacle with jet separation (external aerodynamics). The qualitative properties of such flows are studied.

  8. Superfluidlike Mass Flow Through 8  μm Thick Solid ^{4}He Samples.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Duk Y; Haziot, Ariel; Chan, Moses H W

    2017-06-09

    We report the observation of superfluidlike mass flow through coin-shaped 8  μm thick solid ^{4}He samples sandwiched between superfluid leads. Mass flow is found from the melting pressure to at least 30 bar with a concomitant decrease in the onset temperature from 1 to 0.25 K. The mass-flow rate is found to be sample dependent and can be enhanced by thermal annealing. The flow rate decreases with temperature and decays nearly exponentially with the pressure of the samples. The dissipation associated with the mass flow decreases with temperature and becomes superfluidlike near 0.1 K. In contrast to earlier studies on centimeter-thick samples, we do not see a sharp cutoff in the mass-flow rate at low temperature.

  9. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  10. Method for (236)U Determination in Seawater Using Flow Injection Extraction Chromatography and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Nielsen, Sven; Golser, Robin

    2015-07-21

    An automated analytical method implemented in a flow injection (FI) system was developed for rapid determination of (236)U in 10 L seawater samples. (238)U was used as a chemical yield tracer for the whole procedure, in which extraction chromatography (UTEVA) was exploited to purify uranium, after an effective iron hydroxide coprecipitation. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for quantifying the (236)U/(238)U ratio, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used to determine the absolute concentration of (238)U; thus, the concentration of (236)U can be calculated. The key experimental parameters affecting the analytical effectiveness were investigated and optimized in order to achieve high chemical yields and simple and rapid analysis as well as low procedure background. Besides, the operational conditions for the target preparation prior to the AMS measurement were optimized, on the basis of studying the coprecipitation behavior of uranium with iron hydroxide. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is simple and robust, providing satisfactory chemical yields (80-100%) and high analysis speed (4 h/sample), which could be an appealing alternative to conventional manual methods for (236)U determination in its tracer application.

  11. Evolutionary mass-flow megaturbidites in interplate basin: example of the North Pyrenean basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bourrouilh, R.

    1986-05-01

    The Cretaceous North Pyrenean interplate basin develops in close relationship with the opening of the Bay of Biscay. The basin margins and its gravity sedimentary filling are related to differential movements of Iberian and European plates. Optimal climatic and morphologic conditions allow large amounts of carbonates to be deposited on its margins, major factors provoked the sedimentary and tectonic instability of the basin shelf and slope, particularly by reactivating a deep, ancient fault network. These events generated a single event or a series of successive autosuspended mass flows, which differentiate into megaturbidites, spreading over large areas of the basin floor. This large distribution of instantaneous evolutionary mass-flow megaturbidites, which pertain to the normal carbonate gravity sedimentation of the basin, allows us to determine: (1) paleoenvironments such as areas of paleoslopes; (2) the sedimentary and tectonic migration of the shelf break and of the basinal depocenter, and the relation of migration to regional plate tectonics; (3) evolution of local areas of special interest (petroleum geology), or evolution of the interplate basin, especially when it becomes a single trough (birth of first regional linear sequences); (4) interference of local centered transfer system (i.e., canyon fan or point slope fan) and regional linear transfer system (i.e., shelf break and slope).

  12. Optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations in flow over an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Sean; Blackburn, Hugh; Mao, Xuerui

    2013-11-01

    Linear transient growth analysis has identified various key mechanisms in transition due to free-stream turbulence in canonical flow open flow configurations (Durbin & Wu, 2007). In the present work, the role of inflow disturbances in promoting transition for flow over airfoil type geometries is examined. Using an optimal control based methodology, optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations for linear transient energy growth are computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil at 4° angle of attack. At various low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the flow response to optimal two-dimensional inflow perturbations with varying streamwise length scale is analysed. The relationship between the flow physics induced by optimal inflow perturbations, optimal initial perturbations and leading linear instability modes is then examined. Durbin P & Wu X (2007), Transition beneath vortical disturbances, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 39: 107. Supported by Australian Research Council grant DP1094851.

  13. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Matimati, Ignatious; Verboom, G Anthony; Cramer, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed 'mass-flow' treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed 'interception' treatment). 'Mass-flow' plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (gs), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (Ci), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than 'interception' plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, gs, and Ci first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of 'interception' plants. 'Mass-flow' plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties.

  14. Energy flows in rock mass under tidal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishin, SV; Revuzhenko, AF

    2017-02-01

    Under analysis is the stress state of an elliptical domain under varying loading conditions. The energy flow lines are plotted. The paper demonstrates the effect of the boundary conditions on the shape of the flow lines.

  15. Optimization design of vibration characteristics of ship composite brace with rigid vibration isolation mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangyong; Yao, Xiongliang; Yu, Danzhu; Pang, Fuzhen

    2011-06-01

    In considering the theory of structural dynamic optimization design, a design method of the structural style of ship composite brace with rigid vibration isolation mass was studied. Two kinds of structural dynamic optimization formulations minimizing the vibration acceleration of the non-pressure hull on the restraining condition of the gross weight of the ship cabin were established: 1) dynamic optimization of the sectional dimensions of the rigid vibration isolation mass in the composite brace; 2) dynamic optimization of the arranging position of the rigid vibration isolation mass. Through the optimization results, sectional dimensions and the arranging position of the rigid vibration isolation mass with better performance in reducing vibration were gained, and some reference was provided for practical engineering designs as well as enrichment of the design method of a novel ship vibration-isolation brace.

  16. Semi-automated tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) triple quadrupole operating parameter optimization for high-throughput MS/MS detection workflows.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Kristin; Adamson, Gary; Dube, Neal; Crathern, Susan; King, Richard C

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes an automated workflow for the determination of selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions and optimum mass spectrometric (MS) instrument parameters. The approach uses a Nanomate from Advion Biosciences for automated infusion of small amounts of sample in combination with Automaton optimization software from Sciex. The results are stored in the Analyst software Compound Database for automated acquisition method building. Comparisons are presented between the more traditional optimization methods of manual flow injection optimization, Autotune infusion optimization, Automaton flow injection optimization and the Nanomate-Automaton optimization approach. Data is also presented to show that acquisition methods developed on the Sciex model API3000 instrument can be effectively transferred to the Sceix API4000 and API5000 model instruments. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Optimized anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Hickner, Michael A; Agar, Ertan; Kumbur, E Caglan

    2013-08-14

    In order to understand the properties of low vanadium permeability anion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs), quaternary ammonium functionalized Radel (QA-Radel) membranes with three ion exchange capacities (IECs) from 1.7 to 2.4 mequiv g(-1) were synthesized and 55-60 μm thick membrane samples were evaluated for their transport properties and in-cell battery performance. The ionic conductivity and vanadium permeability of the membranes were investigated and correlated to the battery performance through measurements of Coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency and energy efficiency in single cell tests, and capacity fade during cycling. Increasing the IEC of the QA-Radel membranes increased both the ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability. The 1.7 mequiv g(-1) IEC QA-Radel had the highest Coulombic efficiency and best cycling capacity maintenance in the VRFB, while the cell's voltage efficiency was limited by the membrane's low ionic conductivity. Increasing the IEC resulted in higher voltage efficiency for the 2.0 and 2.4 mequiv g(-1) samples, but the cells with these membranes displayed reduced Coulombic efficiency and faster capacity fade. The QA-Radel with an IEC of 2.0 mequiv g(-1) had the best balance of ionic conductivity and VO(2+) permeability, achieving a maximum power density of 218 mW cm(-2) which was higher than the maximum power density of a VRFB assembled with a Nafion N212 membrane in our system. While anion exchange membranes are under study for a variety of VRFB applications, this work demonstrates that the material parameters must be optimized to obtain the maximum cell performance.

  18. Pulsatile flow and mass transport past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Suresh, Vinod; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The mass transport of a pulsatile free-stream flow past a single circular cylinder is investigated as a building block for an artificial lung device. The free stream far from the cylinder is represented by a time-periodic (sinusoidal) component superimposed on a steady velocity. The dimensionless parameters of interest are the steady Reynolds number (Re), Womersley parameter (α), sinusoidal amplitude (A), and the Schmidt number (Sc). The ranges investigated in this study are 5⩽Re⩽40, 0.25⩽α⩽4, 0.25⩽A⩽0.75, and Sc =1000. A pair of vortices downstream of the cylinder is observed in almost all cases investigated. These vortices oscillate in size and strength as α and A are varied. For α <αc, where αc=0.005A-1.13Re1.33, the vortex is always attached to the cylinder (persistent); while for α >αc, the vortex is attached to the cylinder only during part of a time cycle (intermittent). The time-averaged Sherwood number, Sh̿, is found to be largely influenced by the steady Reynolds number, increasing approximately as Re1/2. For α =0.25, Sh̿ is less than the steady (α =0, A =0) value and decreases with increasing A. For α =2 and α =4, Sh̿ is greater than the steady value and increases with increasing A. These qualitatively opposite effects of pulsatility are discussed in terms of quasisteady versus unsteady transport. The maximum increase over steady transport due to pulsatility varies between 14.4% and 20.9% for Re =10-40, α =4, and A =0.75.

  19. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  20. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  1. Influence of Reduced Mass Flow Rate and Chamber Backpressure on Swirl Injector Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R Jeremy; Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Industry interest in variable-thrust liquid rocket engines places a demand on engine injector technology to operate over a wide range of liquid mass flow rates and chamber backpressures. One injection technology of current interest for variable thrust applications is an injector design with swirled fluids. Current swirl injector design methodologies do not take into account how swirl injector design parameters respond to elevated chamber backpressures at less than design mass flow rates. The current work was created to improve state-of-the-art swirl injector design methods in this area. The specific objective was to study the effects of elevated chamber backpressure and off-design mass flow rates on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a backpressure chamber with optical access, water was flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates. The film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section was measured through a transparent nozzle section of the injector. High speed video showed measurable increases in the film thickness profile with application of chamber backpressure and mass flow rates less than design. At prescribed combinations of chamber backpressure and injected mass flow rate, a discrete change in the film thickness profile was observed. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber backpressure at low mass flow rates as opposed to near-design mass flow rates. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber backpressure decreased the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. Experimental measurements and discussion of these results are reported in this paper.

  2. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  3. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The ob...

  4. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across the Blowbox: Gin Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox usi...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tidal volume of 700cc with a constant time interval between respirations. (ii) At cabin pressure... time interval between respirations. (2) For each flight crewmember, the minimum mass flow may not be... constant time interval between respirations. (3) The minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen supplied...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tidal volume of 700cc with a constant time interval between respirations. (ii) At cabin pressure... time interval between respirations. (2) For each flight crewmember, the minimum mass flow may not be... constant time interval between respirations. (3) The minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen supplied...

  7. Determining seed cotton mass flow rate by pressure drop across a blowbox

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A seed cotton mass flow rate sensor would offer useful feedback for gin managers and provide a critical input for advanced process control systems. Several designs of seed cotton mass flow rate sensors have been evaluated in the laboratory, but none have found acceptance in commercial gins. The obje...

  8. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  9. Lean Flow: Optimizing Cardiopulmonary Bypass Equipment and Flow for Obese Patients-A Technique Article.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Joshua M; Riley, Jeffrey B

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this chart review was to investigate the use of down-sized cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits for obese patients. The effects of transitioning from larger to smaller oxygenators, reservoirs, and arteriovenous tubing loops were evaluated through a retrospective review of 2,816 adult non-congenital procedure perfusion records. This technique report and case series is a continuation of our original prescriptive CPB circuit quality improvement project. An algorithm was derived to adjust body surface area (BSA) to lower body mass index (BMI) to provide down-sized extracorporeal circuit components capable of meeting the metabolic needs of the patient. As a result of using smaller circuits, decreased priming volumes led to significantly increased hemoglobin (HB) nadirs (p < .05) leading to significant decreases in homologous donor blood product exposures (p < .05). Patients with large BSAs were supported safely with smaller circuits by using lean body mass (LBM)-adjusted BSA and target blood flow algorithm. Based on this case series, large BMI patients may be safely supported with smaller circuits selected based on BSAs adjusted more toward LBM. Use of smaller circuits in high BMI patients led to higher HB nadirs and less donor blood components during the surgical procedure. Renal function and hospital stay were not affected by this approach.

  10. Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization of explosives and narcotics for ambient pressure mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Brewer, Tim M; Gillen, Greg

    2013-10-07

    Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI), a desorption-based ambient ion source, was developed, characterized, and evaluated as a possible source for field deployable ambient pressure mass spectrometry (APMS). DEFFI, based on an electro-flow focusing system, provides a unique configuration for the generation of highly charged energetic droplets for sample analysis and ionization. A concentrically flowing carrier gas focuses the liquid emanating from a capillary through a small orifice, generating a steady fluid jet. An electric field is applied across this jet formation region, producing high velocity charged droplets that impinge on an analyte laden surface. This configuration separates the jet charging region from the external environment, eliminating detrimental effects from droplet space charge or target surface charging. The sample desorption and ionization processes operate similar to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). DEFFI demonstrated strong signal intensities and improved signal-to-noise ratios in both positive and negative mode mass spectrometry for narcotics, i.e., cocaine, and explosives, i.e., cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), respectively. A characterization of DEFFI ionization mechanisms identified operation regimes of both electrospray and corona discharge based analyte ionization, as well as limitations in overall signal. In addition, the DEFFI response was directly compared to DESI-MS under similar operating conditions. This comparison established a wider and more stable optimal operating range, while requiring an order of magnitude lower applied gas pressure and applied potential for DEFFI than DESI. These reductions are due to the physical mode of jet formation and geometric configuration differences between DEFFI and DESI, pointing to a potential benefit of DEFFI-MS for field implementation.

  11. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  12. An experimental design approach for optimizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in contaminated soil by pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buco, S; Moragues, M; Sergent, M; Doumenq, P; Mille, G

    2007-06-01

    Pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil without preliminary extraction. Experimental research methodology was used to obtain optimal performance of the system. After determination of the main factors (desorption time, Curie point temperature, carrier gas flow), modeling was done using a Box-Behnken matrix. Study of the response surface led to factor values that optimize the experimental response and achieve better chromatographic results.

  13. Development and evaluation of virtual refrigerant mass flow sensors for fault detection and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woohyun; Braun, J.

    2016-03-05

    Refrigerant mass flow rate is an important measurement for monitoring equipment performance and enabling fault detection and diagnostics. However, a traditional mass flow meter is expensive to purchase and install. A virtual refrigerant mass flow sensor (VRMF) uses a mathematical model to estimate flow rate using low-cost measurements and can potentially be implemented at low cost. This study evaluates three VRMFs for estimating refrigerant mass flow rate. The first model uses a compressor map that relates refrigerant flow rate to measurements of inlet and outlet pressure, and inlet temperature measurements. The second model uses an energy-balance method on the compressor that uses a compressor map for power consumption, which is relatively independent of compressor faults that influence mass flow rate. The third model is developed using an empirical correlation for an electronic expansion valve (EEV) based on an orifice equation. The three VRMFs are shown to work well in estimating refrigerant mass flow rate for various systems under fault-free conditions with less than 5% RMS error. Each of the three mass flow rate estimates can be utilized to diagnose and track the following faults: 1) loss of compressor performance, 2) fouled condenser or evaporator filter, 3) faulty expansion device, respectively. For example, a compressor refrigerant flow map model only provides an accurate estimation when the compressor operates normally. When a compressor is not delivering the expected flow due to a leaky suction or discharge valve or other internal fault, the energy-balance or EEV model can provide accurate flow estimates. In this paper, the flow differences provide an indication of loss of compressor performance and can be used for fault detection and diagnostics.

  14. Optimization of strut placement in flow diverter stents for four different aneurysm configurations.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Hitomi; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Chopard, Bastien; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Makoto

    2014-06-01

    A modern technique for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms involves insertion of a flow diverter stent. Flow stagnation, produced by the fine mesh structure of the diverter, is thought to promote blood clotting in an aneurysm. However, apart from its effect on flow reduction, the insertion of the metal device poses the risk of occlusion of a parent artery. One strategy for avoiding the risk of arterial occlusion is the use of a device with a higher porosity. To aid the development of optimal stents in the view point of flow reduction maintaining a high porosity, we used lattice Boltzmann flow simulations and simulated annealing optimization to investigate the optimal placement of stent struts. We constructed four idealized aneurysm geometries that resulted in four different inflow characteristics and employed a stent model with 36 unconnected struts corresponding to the porosity of 80%. Assuming intracranial flow, steady flow simulation with Reynolds number of 200 was applied for each aneurysm. Optimization of strut position was performed to minimize the average velocity in an aneurysm while maintaining the porosity. As the results of optimization, we obtained nonuniformed structure as optimized stent for each aneurysm geometry. And all optimized stents were characterized by denser struts in the inflow area. The variety of inflow patterns that resulted from differing aneurysm geometries led to unique strut placements for each aneurysm type.

  15. Development of Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) for a Quantitative Characterization of Microbial Mass in Flow Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Prasad; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-03-16

    We report on a new Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) method, for a simple, non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results show that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass results in its retardation during flow, which is a good, quantitative measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. No such methods are currently available for a quantitative characterization of cell mass.

  16. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Storey, Andrew P; Zeiri, Offer M; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Principles of Emergency Department facility design for optimal management of mass-casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Pinchas; Goldberg, Scott A; Keng, Jimmy G; Koenig, Kristi L

    2012-04-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is the triage, stabilization and disposition unit of the hospital during a mass-casualty incident (MCI). With most EDs already functioning at or over capacity, efficient management of an MCI requires optimization of all ED components. While the operational aspects of MCI management have been well described, the architectural/structural principles have not. Further, there are limited reports of the testing of ED design components in actual MCI events. The objective of this study is to outline the important infrastructural design components for optimization of ED response to an MCI, as developed, implemented, and repeatedly tested in one urban medical center. In the authors' experience, the most important aspects of ED design for MCI have included external infrastructure and promoting rapid lockdown of the facility for security purposes; an ambulance bay permitting efficient vehicle flow and casualty discharge; strategic placement of the triage location; patient tracking techniques; planning adequate surge capacity for both patients and staff; sufficient command, control, communications, computers, and information; well-positioned and functional decontamination facilities; adequate, well-located and easily distributed medical supplies; and appropriately built and functioning essential services. Designing the ED to cope well with a large casualty surge during a disaster is not easy, and it may not be feasible for all EDs to implement all the necessary components. However, many of the components of an appropriate infrastructural design add minimal cost to the normal expenditures of building an ED. This study highlights the role of design and infrastructure in MCI preparedness in order to assist planners in improving their ED capabilities. Structural optimization calls for a paradigm shift in the concept of structural and operational ED design, but may be necessary in order to maximize surge capacity, department resilience, and patient and

  18. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  19. Optimal hydrograph separation using a recursive digital filter constrained by chemical mass balance, with application to selected Chesapeake Bay watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Baker, Anna C.; Blomquist, Joel D.; Hopple, Jessica A.

    2017-06-26

    Quantitative estimates of base flow are necessary to address questions concerning the vulnerability and response of the Nation’s water supply to natural and human-induced change in environmental conditions. An objective of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Project is to determine how hydrologic systems are affected by watershed characteristics, including land use, land cover, water use, climate, and natural characteristics (geology, soil type, and topography). An important component of any hydrologic system is base flow, generally described as the part of streamflow that is sustained between precipitation events, fed to stream channels by delayed (usually subsurface) pathways, and more specifically as the volumetric discharge of water, estimated at a measurement site or gage at the watershed scale, which represents groundwater that discharges directly or indirectly to stream reaches and is then routed to the measurement point.Hydrograph separation using a recursive digital filter was applied to 225 sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The recursive digital filter was chosen for the following reasons: it is based in part on the assumption that groundwater acts as a linear reservoir, and so has a physical basis; it has only two adjustable parameters (alpha, obtained directly from recession analysis, and beta, the maximum value of the base-flow index that can be modeled by the filter), which can be determined objectively and with the same physical basis of groundwater reservoir linearity, or that can be optimized by applying a chemical-mass-balance constraint. Base-flow estimates from the recursive digital filter were compared with those from five other hydrograph-separation methods with respect to two metrics: the long-term average fraction of streamflow that is base flow, or base-flow index, and the fraction of days where streamflow is entirely base flow. There was generally good correlation between the methods, with some biased

  20. Designing Optimal Flow Patterns for Fall Chinook Salmon in a Central Valley, California River

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, H.I.

    2003-01-01

    Widespread declines in stocks of Pacific salmon in the genus Oncorhynchus highlight the need for research to find new and effective management strategies for recovery. Two recovery objectives are (1) to ensure that recruitment is adequate to rebuild self-sustaining populations and (2) to maintain phenotypic diversity. This study seeks to understand how seasonal flow patterns in a flow-regulated California river might be managed to attain each of these recovery objectives, specifically for the fall and late-fall runs of chinook salmon O. tshawytscha. We ask two questions: (1) Does the optimal pattern of seasonal flows change as the amount of water available is constrained by droughts or diversions of flows? and (2) How do optimal flow regimes designed for the two conservation objectives differ? We coupled simulated annealing with a recruitment model to find flow regimes that maximize either the number of smolt out-migrant ‘‘recruits’’ (MR) or the variation in spawning times among recruits (MV). Optimal flow regimes identified for both the MR and MV objectives changed as we increased the annual quantity of water available, allocating higher flows during the spring and fall seasons. Flow regimes that optimized the MR and MV objectives were different. For example, the MV flow regime with unlimited annual flow provided a pulse of high flow 2 weeks before the peak spawning date of the minority late-fall run. Simulated recruits produced by MV flow regimes were fewer in number—and had parents that spawned later and over a wider range of dates—than recruits produced by MR flow regimes. Although these results have not been verified by empirical studies, they demonstrate the potential for managing species with special conservation status by combining state-of-the-art numerical optimization methods with mechanistic ecological models.

  1. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  2. Impact of Organic-Liquid Distribution and Flow-Field Heterogeneity on Reductions in Mass Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, Erica L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-06-07

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of organic-liquid distribution and flow-field heterogeneity on the relationship between source-zone mass removal and reductions in contaminant mass flux from the source zone. Changes in source-zone architecture were quantified using image analysis, allowing explicit examination of their impact on the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior. The results showed that there was minimal reduction in mass flux until a large fraction of mass was removed for systems wherein organic liquid was present solely as residual saturation in regions that were hydraulically accessible. Conversely, significant reductions in mass flux occurred with relatively minimal mass removal for systems wherein organic liquid was present at both residual and higher saturations. The latter systems exhibited multi-step mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, and characterization of the organic-liquid saturation distribution throughout flushing allowed identification of the cause of the nonideal behavior. The age of the source zone (time from initial emplacement to time of initial characterization) significantly influenced the observed mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior. The results of this study illustrate the impact of both organic-liquid distribution and flow-field heterogeneity on mass-removal and mass-flux processes.

  3. Optimization of orthotropic distributed-mode loudspeaker using attached masses and multi-exciters.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guochao; Shen, Yong; Liu, Ziyun

    2012-02-01

    Based on the orthotropic model of the plate, the method to optimize the sound response of the distributed-mode loudspeaker (DML) using the attached masses and the multi-exciters has been investigated. The attached masses method will rebuild the modes distribution of the plate, based on which multi-exciter method will smooth the sound response. The results indicate that the method can be used to optimize the sound response of the DML. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  4. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  5. Calculation and optimization of parameters in low-flow pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeva, E. M.; Masich, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    The materials on balance tests of high-speed centrifugal pumps with low flow rate are presented. On the bases of analysis and research synthesis, we demonstrate the rational use of impellers of semi-open and open types providing high values for energy parameters of feed system of low-flow pumps.

  6. Nitrogen regulation of transpiration controls mass-flow acquisition of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Matimati, Ignatious

    2014-01-01

    Transpiration may enhance mass-flow of nutrients to roots, especially in low-nutrient soils or where the root system is not extensively developed. Previous work suggested that nitrogen (N) may regulate mass-flow of nutrients. Experiments were conducted to determine whether N regulates water fluxes, and whether this regulation has a functional role in controlling the mass-flow of nutrients to roots. Phaseolus vulgaris were grown in troughs designed to create an N availability gradient by restricting roots from intercepting a slow-release N source, which was placed at one of six distances behind a 25 μm mesh from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (termed ‘mass-flow’ treatment). Control plants had the N source supplied directly to their root zone so that N was available through interception, mass-flow, and diffusion (termed ‘interception’ treatment). ‘Mass-flow’ plants closest to the N source exhibited 2.9-fold higher transpiration (E), 2.6-fold higher stomatal conductance (g s), 1.2-fold higher intercellular [CO2] (C i), and 3.4-fold lower water use efficiency than ‘interception’ plants, despite comparable values of photosynthetic rate (A). E, g s, and C i first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the N source to values even lower than those of ‘interception’ plants. ‘Mass-flow’ plants accumulated phosphorus and potassium, and had maximum concentrations at 10mm from the N source. Overall, N availability regulated transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients from substrate zones that were inaccessible to roots. Thus when water is available, mass-flow may partially substitute for root density in providing access to nutrients without incurring the costs of root extension, although the efficacy of mass-flow also depends on soil nutrient retention and hydraulic properties. PMID:24231035

  7. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, J. T.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of the jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. The emergence of NO(x) regulations for stationary gas turbines and the anticipation of aero-engine regulations requires an improved understanding of jet mixing as new combustor concepts are introduced. For example, the success of the staged combustor to reduce the emission of NO(x) is almost entirely dependent upon the rapid and complete dilution of the rich zone products within the mixing section. It is these mixing challenges to which the present study is directed. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of a conventional design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice length-to- width ratio, and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that the best mixing orifice geometry tested involves eight orifices with a long-to-short side aspect ratio of 3.5 at a twenty-three degree inclination from the center-line of the mixing section.

  8. Optimization of Orifice Geometry for Cross-Flow Mixing in a Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowa, W. A.; Kroll, J. T.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing of gaseous jets in a cross-flow has significant applications in engineering, one example of which is the dilution zone of a gas turbine combustor. Despite years of study, the design of jet injection in combustors is largely based on practical experience. A series of experiments was undertaken to delineate the optimal mixer orifice geometry. A cross-flow to core-flow momentum-flux ratio of 40 and a mass flow ratio of 2.5 were selected as representative of an advanced design. An experimental test matrix was designed around three variables: the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio (long-to-short dimension), and the orifice angle. A regression analysis was performed on the data to arrive at an interpolating equation that predicted the mixing performance of orifice geometry combinations within the range of the test matrix parameters. Results indicate that mixture uniformity is a non-linear function of the number of orifices, the orifice aspect ratio, and the orifice angle. Optimum mixing occurs when the asymptotic mean jet trajectories are in the range of 0.35 less than r/R less than 0.5 (where r = 0 is at the mixer wall) at z/R = 1.0. At the optimum number of orifices, the difference between shallow-angled slots with large aspect ratios and round holes is minimal and either approach will lead to good mixing performance. At the optimum number of orifices, it appears possible to have two local optimums where one corresponds to an aspect ratio of 1.0 and the other to a high aspect ratio.

  9. Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0431 TITLE: Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast 5b. GRANT NUMBER...progress has been made for the breast tomosynthesis , there are still some issues should be addressed before it becomes suitable for routine clinical use: (1

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert P.; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  11. Cooling of a Hot Stretching Surface in the Presence of Across Mass Transfer Phenomenon in a Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Munawar, Sufian; Ali, Asif

    2014-02-01

    This is an attempt to investigate the best possible flow situation in order to optimize the rate of heat exchange between the stretching plate and the ambient fluid. The generalized three-dimensional channel flow of an incompressible viscous fluid has been considered where both the walls of the channel are assumed to be porous and the lower wall stretching in two lateral directions at different rates. The effect of simultaneous suction and injection at the lower and upper walls, respectively (and vice versa), have been studied in detail. It is named as across mass transfer phenomenon (AMT). It is observed that even in the presence of viscous dissipation the across mass transfer increases the rate of heat exchange from plate to fluid. A purely analytic solution has been obtained by homotopy analysis method and results are also compared with a numerical technique. Results are discussed through graphs.

  12. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  13. Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P.; Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K. l

    2004-01-13

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

  14. Optimal detumbling of a large manned spacecraft using an internal moving mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunciw, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The use of a movable mass control system to stabilize an arbitrarily tumbling asymmetric vehicle about the maximum inertia axis is considered. A first-order gradient optimization technique is used to minimize angular velocity components along the intermediate and minimum inertia axes. This method permits a wide range of initial guesses for mass position history. Motion of the control mass is along a linear track fixed in the vehicle. The control variable is taken as mass acceleration with respect to body coordinates. Motion is limited to defined quantities and a penalty function is used to insure a given range of positions. Numerical solutions of the optimization equations verify that minimum time detumbling is achieved with the largest permissible movable mass, length of linear track, and positions of the mass on the two coordinates perpendicular to the linear motion.

  15. Renormalized entanglement entropy flow in mass-deformed ABJM theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Kiu; Kwon, O.-Kab; Park, Chanyong; Shin, Hyeonjoon

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a mass deformation effect on the renormalized entanglement entropy (REE) near the UV fixed point in (2+1)-dimensional field theory. In the context of the gauge/gravity duality, we use the Lin-Lunin-Maldacena geometries corresponding to the vacua of the mass-deformed ABJM theory. We analytically compute the small mass effect for various droplet configurations and show in holographic point of view that the REE is monotonically decreasing, positive, and stationary at the UV fixed point. These properties of the REE in (2+1)-dimensions are consistent with the Zamolodchikov c-function proposed in (1+1)-dimensional conformal field theory.

  16. Optimal power flow calculation for power system with UPFC considering load rate equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiankun; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qingsong

    2017-06-01

    Unified power flow controller (UPFC) device can change system electrical quantity (such as voltage, impedance, phase angle, etc.) rapidly and flexibly under the premise of maintain security, stability and reliability of power system, thus can improve the transmission power and transmission line utilization, so as to enhance the power supply capacity of the power grid. Based on a thorough study of the steady-state model of UPFC, taking load rate equalization as objective function, the optimal power flow model is established with UPFC, and simplified interior point method is used to solve it. Finally, optimal power flow of 24 continuous sections actual data is calculated on a typical day of Nanjing network. The results show that the optimal power flow calculation with UPFC can optimize the load rate equalization on the basis of eliminating line overload, improving the voltage level of local power network.

  17. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are presented for the reduction of helicopter rotor blade vibration through a formal mathematical optimization technique determination of optimum tuning mass sizes and locations; these are used as design variables that are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without large mass penalty. Matrix expressions are obtained for the modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude that are required for FEM structural analysis of the blade as well as the optimization formulation. Sensitivity derivatives are also obtained. Three different optimization strategies are developed and tested.

  18. Optimal placement of tuning masses on truss structures by genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponslet, Eric; Haftka, Raphael T.; Cudney, Harley H.

    1993-01-01

    Optimal placement of tuning masses, actuators and other peripherals on large space structures is a combinatorial optimization problem. This paper surveys several techniques for solving this problem. The genetic algorithm approach to the solution of the placement problem is described in detail. An example of minimizing the difference between the two lowest frequencies of a laboratory truss by adding tuning masses is used for demonstrating some of the advantages of genetic algorithms. The relative efficiencies of different codings are compared using the results of a large number of optimization runs.

  19. Optimization of hydrogen dispersion in thermophilic up-flow reactors for ex situ biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Treu, Laura; Porté, Hugo; Campanaro, Stefano; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of four novel up-flow reactors for ex situ biogas upgrading converting externally provided CO2 and H2 to CH4, via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The gases were injected through stainless steel diffusers combined with alumina ceramic sponge or through alumina ceramic membranes. Pore size, input gas loading and gas recirculation flow rate were modulated to optimize gas-liquid mass transfer, and thus methanation efficiency. Results showed that larger pore size diffusion devices achieved the best kinetics and output-gas quality converting all the injected H2 and CO2, up to 3.6L/LREACTOR·d H2 loading rate. Specifically, reactors' CH4 content increased from 23 to 96% and the CH4 yield reached 0.25LCH4/LH2. High throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed predominance of bacteria belonging to Anaerobaculum genus and to uncultured order MBA08. Additionally, the massive increase of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, such as Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, and syntrophic bacteria demonstrates the selection-effect of H2 on community composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Infrared Renormalization-Group Flow for Heavy-Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2008-10-10

    A short-distance heavy-quark mass depends on two parameters: the renormalization scale {mu} and a scale R controlling the absorption of infrared fluctuations. The radius for perturbative corrections that build up the mass beyond its pointlike definition in the pole scheme is {approx}1/R. Treating R as a variable gives a renormalization-group equation. R evolution improves the stability of conversion between short-distance mass schemes, allowing us to avoid large logs and the renormalon. R evolution can also be used to study IR renormalons without using bubble chains, yielding a convergent sum rule for the coefficient of the O({lambda}{sub QCD}) renormalon ambiguity of the pole mass.

  1. The mass movement routing tool r.randomwalk and its functionalities for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Julia; Mergili, Martin

    2016-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional conceptual tool for mass movement routing. Starting from one to many release points or release areas, mass points are routed down through the digital elevation model until a defined break criterion is reached. Break criteria are defined by the user and may consist in an angle of reach or a related parameter (empirical-statistical relationships), in the drop of the flow velocity to zero (two-parameter friction model), or in the exceedance of a maximum runup height. Multiple break criteria may be combined. A constrained random walk approach is applied for the routing procedure, where the slope and the perpetuation of the flow direction determine the probability of the flow to move in a certain direction. r.randomwalk is implemented as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software and, as such, is open source. It can be obtained from http://www.mergili.at/randomwalk.html. Besides other innovative functionalities, r.randomwalk serves with built-in functionalities for the derivation of an impact indicator index (III) map with values in the range 0-1. III is derived from multiple model runs with different combinations of input parameters varied in a random or controlled way. It represents the fraction of model runs predicting an impact at a given pixel and is evaluated against the observed impact area through an ROC Plot. The related tool r.ranger facilitates the automated generation and evaluation of many III maps from a variety of sets of parameter combinations. We employ r.randomwalk and r.ranger for parameter optimization and sensitivity analysis. Thereby we do not focus on parameter values, but - accounting for the uncertainty inherent in all parameters - on parameter ranges. In this sense, we demonstrate two strategies for parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization. We avoid to (i) use one-at-a-time parameter testing which would fail to account for interdependencies of the parameters, and (ii) to explore all possible

  2. Optimization of jet parameters to control the flow on a ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmineau, Emmanuel; Duvigneau, Régis; Labroquère, Jérémie

    2014-06-01

    This study deals with the use of optimization algorithms to determine efficient parameters of flow control devices. To improve the performance of systems characterized by detached flows and vortex shedding, the use of flow control devices such as oscillatory jets are intensively studied. However, the determination of efficient control parameters is still a bottleneck for industrial problems. Therefore, we propose to couple a global optimization algorithm with an unsteady flow simulation to derive efficient flow control rules. We consider as a test case a backward-facing step with a slope of 25°, including a synthetic jet actuator. The aim is to reduce the time-averaged recirculation length behind the step by optimizing the jet blowing/suction amplitude and frequency.

  3. Composition pulse time-of-flight mass flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Harnett, Cindy K.; Crocker, Robert W.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Caton, Pamela F.; Stamps, James F.

    2007-06-05

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 2,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined. A pair of spaced apart electrodes can be used to produce the electrochemical pulse. In those instances where it is desired to measure a wide range of fluid flow rates a three electrode configuration in which the electrodes are spaced at unequal distances has been found to be desirable.

  4. Mass-based design and optimization of wave rotors for gas turbine engine enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Liu, H.

    2017-03-01

    An analytic method aiming at mass properties was developed for the preliminary design and optimization of wave rotors. In the present method, we introduce the mass balance principle into the design and thus can predict and optimize the mass qualities as well as the performance of wave rotors. A dedicated least-square method with artificial weighting coefficients was developed to solve the over-constrained system in the mass-based design. This method and the adoption of the coefficients were validated by numerical simulation. Moreover, the problem of fresh air exhaustion (FAE) was put forward and analyzed, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated. Parameter analyses and optimization elucidated which designs would not only achieve the best performance, but also operate with minimum EGR and no FAE.

  5. Mass flow measurement of liquid cryogens using the triboelectric effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechene, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    A cross correlator technique using triboelectric technology has been shown to be a feasible method to measure liquid flow rate for liquid nitrogen and JP4 jet fuel. This technology, invented and pioneered by Auburn International, Inc., is also expected to be suitable for use with all other insulating liquids and cryogens. The technology described is particularly well suited for cryogenic use, since the sensor is non-contacting and non-intrusive, and therefore, causes no additional pressure drop within the flow stream. Further development of the in-line sensor is required to produce a prototypical version for the test purposes under SSME fuel flow conditions. However, with the knowledge gained from this feasibility study, it is very likely that an acceptable sensor design for a full test bed evaluation could be produced.

  6. Flow-Dependent Mass Transfer May Trigger Endothelial Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades. PMID:22558132

  7. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  8. Flow simulation and shape optimization for aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Norbert; Gauger, Nicolas R.; Brezillon, Joel; Dwight, Richard; Fazzolari, Antonio; Vollmer, Daniel; Becker, Klaus; Barnewitz, Holger; Schulz, Volker; Hazra, Subhendu

    2007-06-01

    Within the framework of the German aerospace research program, the CFD project MEGADESIGN was initiated. The main goal of the project is the development of efficient numerical methods for shape design and optimization. In order to meet the requirements of industrial implementations a co-operative effort has been set up which involves the German aircraft industry, the DLR, several universities and some small enterprises specialized in numerical optimization. This paper outlines the planned activities within MEGADESIGN, the status at the beginning of the project and it presents some early results achieved in the project.

  9. High-throughput chemical residue analysis by fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C

    2011-01-21

    Fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry (FED-FI-MS) is presented as a technique to increase throughput in quantitative multiresidue screening in complex matrices, while meeting current analytical method quality requirements.

  10. Differentiating organic and conventional sage by chromatographic and mass spectrometry flow-injection fingerprints

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and flow injection electrospray ionization with ion trap mass spectrometry (FIMS) fingerprints combined with the principal component analysis (PCA) were examined for their potential in differentiating commercial organic and conventional sage samples. The...

  11. Fabrication of microfluidic architectures for optimal flow rate and concentration measurement for lab on chip application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    Optimum flow in micro channel for sensing purpose is challenging. In this study, The optimizations of the fluid sample flows are made through the design and characterization of the novel microfluidics' architectures to achieve the optimal flow rate in the micro channels. The biocompatibility of the Polydimetylsiloxane (Sylgard 184 silicon elastomer) polymer used to fabricate the device offers avenue for the device to be implemented as the universal fluidic delivery system for bio-molecules sensing in various bio-medical applications. The study uses the following methodological approaches, designing a novel microfluidics' architectures by integrating the devices on a single 4 inches silicon substrate, fabricating the designed microfluidic devices using low-cost solution soft lithography technique, characterizing and validating the flow throughput of urine samples in the micro channels by generating pressure gradients through the devices' inlets. The characterization on the urine samples flow in the micro channels have witnessed the constant flow throughout the devices.

  12. Effect of Reynolds number on flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Ikarashi, Yuya; Yamagata, Takayuki; Taguchi, Syoichi

    2016-11-01

    The flow and mass transfer characteristics of a 90 degree elbow was studied experimentally by using the mass transfer measurement by plaster dissolution method, the surface flow visualization by oil film method and stereo PIV measurement. The experiments are carried out in a water tunnel of a circular pipe of 56mm in diameter with a working fluid of water. The Reynolds number was varied from 30000 to 200000. The experimental result indicated the change of the mass transfer coefficient distribution in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds number. This phenomenon is further examined by the surface flow visualization and measurement of secondary flow pattern in the elbow, and the results showed the suggested change of the secondary flow pattern in the elbow with increasing the Reynolds numbers.

  13. [Optimization of aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Min; Shan, Shi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies showed that setting aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments in the subsurface constructed wetlands (SFCWs) can improve the COD, NH4(+)-N, and TN removal rate, whereas the oxygen enrichment environment which produced by the artificial aeration could restrain the NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N removal process, and to a certain extent, inhibit the denitrification in SFCWs Therefore, in this research the structure and technology of SFCW with aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments were optimized, by using the multi-point water inflow and setting the corresponding section for the extra pollutant removal. Results showed that with the hydraulic load of 0.06 m3 x (m2 x d)(-1), the COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies in the optimized SFCW achieved 91.6%, 100% and 87.7% respectively. COD/N increased to 10 speedily after the inflow supplement. The multi-point water inflow could add carbon sources, and simultaneously maximum utilization of wetland to remove pollutants. The optimized SFCW could achieve the purposes of purification process optimization, and provide theoretical basis and application foundation for improving the total nitrogen removal efficiency.

  14. Optimal ranking regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100 year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western U.S. streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method’s ability t...

  15. Mass Spectrometric Measurements of the Concentrations of Gaseous Species in Reactive Flow Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    concentrations of gaseous species in the ramjet combustor flow field under simulated combustion conditions. The goal of this effort was to study fuel-air... field patterns, all of which affect the operation of the mass spectrometer, a continously operating built-in calibration system must be utilized in order...sampling probe was first allowed to traverse the combustor flow field , into which only pure air had been injected. The mass spectrometer system was

  16. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  17. Optimizing advanced propeller designs by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  18. Design and optimization of a back-flow limiter for the high performance light water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Kai; Laurien, Eckart; Claas, Andreas G.; Schulenberg, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Design and Analysis of a back-flow limiter are presented, which is implemented as a safety device in the four inlet lines of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). As a passive component, the back-flow limiter has no moving parts and belongs to the group of fluid diodes. It has low flow resistance for regular operation condition and a high flow resistance when the flow direction is reversed which is the case if a break of the feedwater line occurs. The increased flow resistance is due to a substantially increased swirl for reverse flow condition. The design is optimized employing 1D flow analyses in combination with 3D CFD analyses with respect to geometrical modifications, like the nozzle shape and swirler angles. (authors)

  19. Energetically optimal running requires torques about the centre of mass.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James R; Hubel, Tatjana Y

    2012-08-07

    Bipedal animals experience ground reaction forces (GRFs) that pass close to the centre of mass (CoM) throughout stance, first decelerating the body, then re-accelerating it during the second half of stance. This results in fluctuations in kinetic energy, requiring mechanical work from the muscles. However, here we show analytically that, in extreme cases (with a very large body pitch moment of inertia), continuous alignment of the GRF through the CoM requires greater mechanical work than a maintained vertical force; we show numerically that GRFs passing between CoM and vertical throughout stance are energetically favourable under realistic conditions; and demonstrate that the magnitude, if not the precise form, of actual CoM-torque profiles in running is broadly consistent with simple mechanical work minimization for humans with appropriate pitch moment of inertia. While the potential energetic savings of CoM-torque support strategies are small (a few per cent) over the range of human running, their importance increases dramatically at high speeds and stance angles. Fast, compliant runners or hoppers would benefit considerably from GRFs more vertical than the zero-CoM-torque strategy, especially with bodies of high pitch moment of inertia--suggesting a novel advantage to kangaroos of their peculiar long-head/long-tail structure.

  20. Test of pressure transducer for measuring cotton-mass flow

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, a cotton harvester yield monitor was developed based on the relationship between air pressure and the mass of seed cotton conveyed. The sensor theory was verified by laboratory tests. The sensor was tested on a cotton picker with seed cotton at two moisture contents, 5.9% and 8.5% we...

  1. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  2. Optimal Power Flow Solution Using GA-Fuzzy and PSO-Fuzzy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Chaturvedi, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The power flow problem deals with certain controllable variables that are adjusted to minimize operating costs, while satisfying operating limits on various controls, dependent variables and function of variables. This paper presents an efficient and reliable nature inspired based approach to solve the optimal power flow (OPF) problems. The proposed approach employs the integration of Fuzzy Systems with genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for optimal setting of OPF problem control variables. The proposed approach has been applied on the modified IEEE 30-bus test system with minimizing the operating costs of system. The results have been compared with the results reported in the literature.

  3. Fluid-Dynamic Optimal Design of Helical Vascular Graft for Stenotic Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Choi, Woo-Rak; Baek, Jehyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn*) of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft. PMID:25360705

  4. Effects of fluid recirculation on mass transfer from the arterial surface to flowing blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Wen; Liu, Ying-Xi

    2012-06-01

    The effect of disturbed flow on the mass transfer from arterial surface to flowing blood was studied numerically, and the results were compared with that of our previous work. The arterial wall was assumed to be viscoelastic and the blood was assumed to be incompressible and non-Newtonian fluid, which is more close to human arterial system. Numerical results indicated that the mass transfer from the arterial surface to flowing blood in regions of disturbed flow is positively related with the wall shear rates and it is significantly enhanced in regions of disturbed flow with a local minimum around the reattachment point which is higher than the average value of the downstream. Therefore, it may be implied that the accumulation of cholesterol or lipids within atheromatous plaques is not caused by the reduced efflux of cholesterol or lipids, but by the infiltration of the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) from the flowing blood to the arterial wall.

  5. Optimal design and uncertainty quantification in blood flow simulations for congenital heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Recent work has demonstrated substantial progress in capabilities for patient-specific cardiovascular flow simulations. Recent advances include increasingly complex geometries, physiological flow conditions, and fluid structure interaction. However inputs to these simulations, including medical image data, catheter-derived pressures and material properties, can have significant uncertainties associated with them. For simulations to predict clinically useful and reliable output information, it is necessary to quantify the effects of input uncertainties on outputs of interest. In addition, blood flow simulation tools can now be efficiently coupled to shape optimization algorithms for surgery design applications, and these tools should incorporate uncertainty information. We present a unified framework to systematically and efficient account for uncertainties in simulations using adaptive stochastic collocation. In addition, we present a framework for derivative-free optimization of cardiovascular geometries, and layer these tools to perform optimization under uncertainty. These methods are demonstrated using simulations and surgery optimization to improve hemodynamics in pediatric cardiology applications.

  6. New directions in the psychology of optimal performance in sport: flow and clutch states.

    PubMed

    Swann, Christian; Crust, Lee; Vella, Stewart A

    2017-08-01

    Csikszentmihalyi's conceptualisation of flow is the primary framework for understanding the psychology of optimal experience and performance in sport. However, emerging evidence suggests a more dynamic, multi-state perspective. This review focuses primarily on recent studies highlighting a second, overlapping 'clutch' state which - in addition to flow - underlies optimal performance in sport. We also examine how the nature of goals ('open' or 'fixed') athletes pursue influence the experience of flow and clutch respectively. This new, integrated model of psychological states underlying optimal performance raises questions around conceptualisation and methodology employed in the field to date. These implications are outlined, and recommendations are provided for more critical and accurate measurement of both flow and clutch as overlapping, yet distinct, states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal Micro-Vane Flow Control for Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Addington, Gregory A.; Agrell, Johan

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-vane secondary flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimally design micro-vane secondary flow control arrays, and to establish that the aeromechanical effects of engine face distortion can also be included in the design and optimization process. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the design characteristics of "low unit strength" micro-effector arrays. "Low unit strength" micro-effectors are micro-vanes set at very low angles-of-incidence with very long chord lengths. They were designed to influence the near wall inlet flow over an extended streamwise distance, and their advantage lies in low total pressure loss and high effectiveness in managing engine face distortion. Therefore, this report examines optimal micro-vane secondary flow control array designs for compact inlets through a Response Surface Methodology.

  8. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme.

  9. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  10. Modeling Vertical Flow Treatment Wetland Hydraulics to Optimize Treatment Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    wetlands. Ecological Engineering. 35: 754-768, 2009. Lorah, M.M., E.H. Majcher, E.J. Jones, and M.A. Voytek. Microbial Consortia Development and...Abstract An upward Vertical Flow Treatment Wetland (uVFTW) has been designed to use anaerobic and aerobic microbial processes to bioremediate...Wetland (uVFTW) has been designed to use anaerobic and aerobic microbial processes to bioremediate groundwater contaminated with chlorinated

  11. An empirical method for estimating travel times for wet volcanic mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Travel times for wet volcanic mass flows (debris avalanches and lahars) can be forecast as a function of distance from source when the approximate flow rate (peak discharge near the source) can be estimated beforehand. The near-source flow rate is primarily a function of initial flow volume, which should be possible to estimate to an order of magnitude on the basis of geologic, geomorphic, and hydrologic factors at a particular volcano. Least-squares best fits to plots of flow-front travel time as a function of distance from source provide predictive second-degree polynomial equations with high coefficients of determination for four broad size classes of flow based on near-source flow rate: extremely large flows (>1 000 000 m3/s), very large flows (10 000–1 000 000 m3/s), large flows (1000–10 000 m3/s), and moderate flows (100–1000 m3/s). A strong nonlinear correlation that exists between initial total flow volume and flow rate for "instantaneously" generated debris flows can be used to estimate near-source flow rates in advance. Differences in geomorphic controlling factors among different flows in the data sets have relatively little effect on the strong nonlinear correlations between travel time and distance from source. Differences in flow type may be important, especially for extremely large flows, but this could not be evaluated here. At a given distance away from a volcano, travel times can vary by approximately an order of magnitude depending on flow rate. The method can provide emergency-management officials a means for estimating time windows for evacuation of communities located in hazard zones downstream from potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  12. Measuring and Optimizing flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. Z.; Clark, M.; Forest, C. B.; Kaplan, E. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rasmus, A. M.; Rahbarnia, K.

    2012-10-01

    In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. One of the goals of the experiment is to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in the flow. The enormous Reynolds number of the experiment and its two vortex geometry leads to a large turbulent EMF. This poster presents results from the MDE after several upgrades were made. First, an equatorial baffle was installed to stabilize the position of the shear layer between the two counterrotating hemispheres. This reduced the scale of the largest eddies in the experiment, lowering the effective resistivity due to turbulence. Next, a probe was used to measure both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields, enabling a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF. This EMF is anti-parallel to the mean current, consistent with an enhanced resistivity predicted by mean field theory. Finally, vanes with adjustable orientation were installed on the vessel wall, allowing the pitch of the helical flow to be altered. Computational fluid dynamics simulations and inversion of the measured induced magnetic field are used to determine the optimum angle of these vanes to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs.

  13. A review of mass and energy flow through a lava flow system: insights provided from a non-equilibrium perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2017-08-01

    A simple formula relates lava discharge rate to the heat radiated per unit time from the surface of active lava flows (the "thermal proxy"). Although widely used, the physical basis of this proxy is still debated. In the present contribution, lava flows are approached as open, dissipative systems that, under favorable conditions, can attain a non-equilibrium stationary state. In this system framework, the onset, growth, and demise of lava flow units can be explained as a self-organization phenomenon characterized by a given temporal frequency defined by the average life span of active lava flow units. Here, I review empirical, physical, and experimental models designed to understand and link the flow of mass and energy through a lava flow system, as well as measurements and observations that support a "real-world" view. I set up two systems: active lava flow system (or ALFS) for flowing, fluid lava and a lava deposit system for solidified, cooling lava. The review highlights surprising similarities between lava flows and electric currents, which typically work under stationary conditions. An electric current propagates almost instantaneously through an existing circuit, following the Kirchhoff law (a least dissipation principle). Flowing lavas, in contrast, build up a slow-motion "lava circuit" over days, weeks, or months by following a gravity-driven path down the steepest slopes. Attainment of a steady-state condition is hampered (and the classic thermal proxy does not hold) if the supply stops before completion of the "lava circuit." Although gravity determines initial flow path and extension, the least dissipation principle means that subsequent evolution of mature portions of the active lava flow system is controlled by increasingly insulated conditions.

  14. Studies on pressure losses and flow rate optimization in vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ao; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Premature voltage cut-off in the operation of the vanadium redox flow battery is largely associated with the rise in concentration overpotential at high state-of-charge (SOC) or state-of-discharge (SOD). The use of high constant volumetric flow rate will reduce concentration overpotential, although potentially at the cost of consuming excessive pumping energy which in turn lowers system efficiency. On the other hand, any improper reduction in flow rate will also limit the operating SOC and lead to deterioration in battery efficiency. Pressure drop losses are further exacerbated by the need to reduce shunt currents in flow battery stacks that requires the use of long, narrow channels and manifolds. In this paper, the concentration overpotential is modelled as a function of flow rate in an effort to determine an appropriate variable flow rate that can yield high system efficiency, along with the analysis of pressure losses and total pumping energy. Simulation results for a 40-cell stack under pre-set voltage cut-off limits have shown that variable flow rates are superior to constant flow rates for the given system design and the use of a flow factor of 7.5 with respect to the theoretical flow rate can reach overall high system efficiencies for different charge-discharge operations.

  15. Measuring Cerebral Blood Flow in Moyamoya Angiopathy by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Angiography Noninvasive Optimal Vessel Analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nadia; Lober, Robert M; Ostergren, Lauren; Petralia, Jacob; Bell-Stephens, Teresa; Navarro, Ramon; Feroze, Abdullah; Steinberg, Gary K

    2017-02-14

    Moyamoya disease causes progressive occlusion of the supraclinoidal internal carotid artery, and middle, anterior, and less frequently the posterior cerebral arteries, carrying the risk of stroke. Blood flow is often partially reconstituted by compensatory moyamoya collaterals and sometimes the posterior circulation. Cerebral revascularization can further augment blood flow. These changes to blood flow within the cerebral vessels, however, are not well characterized. To evaluate blood flow changes resulting from the disease process and revascularization surgery using quantitative magnetic resonance angiography with noninvasive optimal vessel analysis (NOVA). We retrospectively analyzed 190 preoperative and postoperative imaging scans in 66 moyamoya patients after revascularization surgery. Images were analyzed for blood flow using NOVA and compared with preoperative angiographic staging and postoperative blood flow. Blood flow rates within superficial temporal artery grafts were compared based on angiographic evidence of patency. Diseased vessels had lower blood flow, correlating with angiographic staging. Flow in posterior cererbal and basilar arteries increased with disease severity, particularly when both the anterior and middle cerebral arteries were occluded. Basilar artery flow and ipsilateral internal carotid artery flow decreased after surgery. Flow rates were different between angiographically robust and poor direct bypass grafts, as well as between robust and patent grafts. Preoperative changes in cerebral vessel flow as measured by NOVA correlated with angiographic disease progression. NOVA demonstrated that preoperative augmentation of the posterior circulation decreased after surgery. This report is the first to quantify the shift in collateral supply from the posterior circulation to the bypass graft.

  16. Pump-and-treat optimization using analytic element method flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. Shawn; Rabideau, Alan J.; Craig, James R.

    2006-05-01

    Plume containment using pump-and-treat (PAT) technology continues to be a popular remediation technique for sites with extensive groundwater contamination. As such, optimization of PAT systems, where cost is minimized subject to various remediation constraints, is the focus of an important and growing body of research. While previous pump-and-treat optimization (PATO) studies have used discretized (finite element or finite difference) flow models, the present study examines the use of analytic element method (AEM) flow models. In a series of numerical experiments, two PATO problems adapted from the literature are optimized using a multi-algorithmic optimization software package coupled with an AEM flow model. The experiments apply several different optimization algorithms and explore the use of various pump-and-treat cost and constraint formulations. The results demonstrate that AEM models can be used to optimize the number, locations and pumping rates of wells in a pump-and-treat containment system. Furthermore, the results illustrate that a total outflux constraint placed along the plume boundary can be used to enforce plume containment. Such constraints are shown to be efficient and reliable alternatives to conventional particle tracking and gradient control techniques. Finally, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is identified as an effective algorithm for solving pump-and-treat optimization problems. A parallel version of the PSO algorithm is shown to have linear speedup, suggesting that the algorithm is suitable for application to problems that are computationally demanding and involve large numbers of wells.

  17. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2003-07-15

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  18. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Karapetian, Emil; Aguilar, Guillermo; Kimel, Sol; Lavernia, Enrique J; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux.

  19. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  20. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig; Wix, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include the width of the channels in the gas distributor and the area in front of the parallel channels. The flow of the optimized design is found to have a flow uniformity index value of 0.978. The effects of deviations from the assumptions used in the modelling (isothermal and non-reacting flow) are evaluated and it is found that a temperature gradient along the parallel channels does not affect the flow uniformity, whereas a temperature difference between the channels does. The impact of the flow distribution on the maximum obtainable conversion during operation is also investigated and the obtainable overall conversion is found to be directly proportional to the flow uniformity. Finally the effect of manufacturing errors is investigated. The design is shown to be robust towards deviations from design dimensions of at least ±0.1 mm which is well within obtainable tolerances.

  1. Low pressure gas flow analysis through an effusive inlet using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method for analyzing flow past and through an effusive inlet designed for use on the tethered satellite and other entering vehicles is discussed. Source stream concentrations of species in a gaseous mixture are determined using a calibration of measured mass spectral intensities versus source stream pressure for standard gas mixtures and pure gases. Concentrations are shown to be accurate within experimental error. Theoretical explanations for observed mass discrimination effects as they relate to the various flow situations in the effusive inlet and the experimental apparatus are discussed.

  2. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  3. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  4. Going against the flow: finding the optimal path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Julian

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the optimum path of a boat traversing a straight in a current. The path of the shortest time is found using the calculus of variations with the constraint that the boat must land directly opposite to its starting point. We compare the optimal trajectory with that where the boat's local orientation is always directed to the arrival point. When analytical solutions cannot be found we use numerical methods. The level of the exposition is suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and general physicists.

  5. Shape optimization of a pressure vessel under plastic flow, plastic instability, weight and fatigue life criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Abdi, R.; Touratier, M.; Convert, P.; Lalanne, B.

    1994-06-01

    The structural shape optimization of a complex shell under complex criteria is presented. The shell is one of various cases of a turboshaft, and optimization criteria are associated with the cost, the technology, and above all the working conditions for the turboshaft. Optimization criteria involved are of course the weight of the structure, but also the plastic flow, plastic instability and fatigue life. The fatigue life criterion is an extension to the three-dimensional state of the one-dimensional Lemaitre-Chaboche rule, taking into account the elasto-plastic Neuber correction. All computations have been made with the ANSYS finite element program in which an optimization module exists.

  6. A Space-Time Flow Optimization Model for Neighborhood Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    We model the minimum cost evacuation behavior through time with formulation SPACETIME below. Index Sets i L Locations (alias j) t T...and ensures that there are no negative flows. C. THE MISSION CANYON EXAMPLE We apply model SPACETIME to the Mission Canyon neighborhood. We use a...11:00 1000 21:54 19:10 15:10 19:00 15:00 1200 26:53 22:50 21:40 22:40 21:40 1400 32:45 28:20 28:20 28:10 28:20 Vital Report SPACETIME SPACETIME

  7. Heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. W.; Pan, Z. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper investigates the transient heat and mass transfer in liquid desiccant air-conditioning process at low flow conditions. Using local volumetric average approach, one-dimensional non-equilibrium heat and mass transfer models are developed to describe the humid air and liquid desiccant interaction at counter flow configuration. Using triethylene glycol solution as desiccant, some experimental studies are completed. Experimental results are used to justify the numerical models. Numerical results are then obtained to demonstrate process characteristics. The models include a transient desiccant flow model for initial liquid desiccant building-up process, empirical wetted specific surface ratio for mass transfer, and heat and mass transfer coefficients. The objective of this research is to develop a process analytical tool for liquid desiccant air-conditioner design.

  8. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  9. Sediment mass-flow processes on a depositional lobe, outer Mississippi Fan

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; Lee, H.J.; Nelson, C.H.; McArthur, W.G.; Locat, J.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1996-09-01

    As exploration for hydrocarbons moves toward subtler traps, channel-end sand deposits of deep-sea fans and related turbidite systems are among the key targets. SeaMARC 1A sidescan-sonar imagery and cores from the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized mass flow as the dominant mechanism for transport of silt and sand during the formation of this part of the fan. Sediments in these flows were rapidly deposited once outside of their confining channels. The depositional lobe is formed of a series of long, narrow sublobes composed of thin-bedded turbidites (normally graded siliciclastic sand and silt, 20 cm thick on average), debris-flow deposits (soft clay clasts up to 5 cm in diameter in a siliciclastic silt matrix, 48 cm thick on average), and background-sedimentation hemipelagic muds. The mass flows most likely originated from slope failure at the head of the Mississippi Canyon or on the outer continental shelf and flowed approximately 500 km to the distal reaches of the fan, with debris flow being the dominant flow type. An analysis that uses the geometry of the confining channels and strength properties of the debris-flow material shows that these thin debris flows could have traveled hundreds of kilometers on extremely small sea-floor slopes at low velocities if the flowing medium behaved as Bingham fluids and were steady-state phenomena.

  10. Axiomatic Design of a Framework for the Comprehensive Optimization of Patient Flows in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Matt, Dominik T.

    2017-01-01

    Lean Management and Six Sigma are nowadays applied not only to the manufacturing industry but also to service industry and public administration. The manifold variables affecting the Health Care system minimize the effect of a narrow Lean intervention. Therefore, this paper aims to discuss a comprehensive, system-based approach to achieve a factual holistic optimization of patient flows. This paper debates the efficacy of Lean principles applied to the optimization of patient flows and related activities, structures, and resources, developing a theoretical framework based on the principles of the Axiomatic Design. The demand for patient-oriented and efficient health services leads to use these methodologies to improve hospital processes. In the framework, patients with similar characteristics are clustered in families to achieve homogeneous flows through the value stream. An optimization checklist is outlined as the result of the mapping between Functional Requirements and Design Parameters, with the right sequence of the steps to optimize the patient flow according to the principles of Axiomatic Design. The Axiomatic Design-based top-down implementation of Health Care evidence, according to Lean principles, results in a holistic optimization of hospital patient flows, by reducing the complexity of the system.

  11. Computational optimization of a pneumatic forebody flow control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Tavella, Domingo; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft forebody is analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The flow about a fighter forebody is computed using a multiple-zone, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code. Tangential slot blowing is modeled by the use of an actuator plane. The effects of slot location and slot length on the efficiency of the system are analyzed. Results of the study indicate that placement of the slot near the nose of the aircraft greatly enhances the efficiency of the system, while the length and circumferential location of the slot are of secondary importance. Efficiency is defined by the amount of side force or yawing moment obtained per unit blowing coefficient. The effect of sideslip on the system is also analyzed. The system is able to generate incremental changes in forces and moments in flows with sideslip angles up to 10 deg comparable to those obtained at zero sideslip. These results are used to determine a baseline configuration for an experimental study of the tangential slot blowing concept.

  12. Optimization of protein electroextraction from microalgae by a flow process.

    PubMed

    Coustets, Mathilde; Joubert-Durigneux, Vanessa; Hérault, Josiane; Schoefs, Benoît; Blanckaert, Vincent; Garnier, Jean-Pierre; Teissié, Justin

    2015-06-01

    Classical methods, used for large scale treatments such as mechanical or chemical extractions, affect the integrity of extracted cytosolic protein by releasing proteases contained in vacuoles. Our previous experiments on flow processes electroextraction on yeasts proved that pulsed electric field technology allows preserving the integrity of released cytosolic proteins, by not affecting vacuole membranes. Furthermore, large cell culture volumes are easily treated by the flow technology. Based on this previous knowledge, we developed a new protocol in order to electro-extract total cytoplasmic proteins from microalgae (Nannochloropsis salina, Chlorella vulgaris and Haematococcus pluvialis). Given that induction of electropermeabilization is under the control of target cell size, as the mean diameter for N. salina is only 2.5 μm, we used repetitive 2 ms long pulses of alternating polarities with stronger field strengths than previously described for yeasts. The electric treatment was followed by a 24h incubation period in a salty buffer. The amount of total protein release was observed by a classical Bradford assay. A more accurate evaluation of protein release was obtained by SDS-PAGE. Similar results were obtained with C. vulgaris and H. pluvialis under milder electrical conditions as expected from their larger size.

  13. Computational optimization of a pneumatic forebody flow control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Tavella, Domingo; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft forebody is analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The flow about a fighter forebody is computed using a multiple-zone, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code. Tangential slot blowing is modeled by the use of an actuator plane. The effects of slot location and slot length on the efficiency of the system are analyzed. Results of the study indicate that placement of the slot near the nose of the aircraft greatly enhances the efficiency of the system, while the length and circumferential location of the slot are of secondary importance. Efficiency is defined by the amount of side force or yawing moment obtained per unit blowing coefficient. The effect of sideslip on the system is also analyzed. The system is able to generate incremental changes in forces and moments in flows with sideslip angles up to 10 deg comparable to those obtained at zero sideslip. These results are used to determine a baseline configuration for an experimental study of the tangential slot blowing concept.

  14. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  15. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  16. Unstable mass-outflows in geometrically thick accretion flows around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Toru; Das, Santabrata

    2015-10-01

    Accretion flows around black holes generally result in mass-outflows that exhibit irregular behaviour quite often. Using 2D time-dependent hydrodynamical calculations, we show that the mass-outflow is unstable in the cases of thick accretion flows such as the low angular momentum accretion flow and the advection-dominated accretion flow. For the low angular momentum flow, the inward accreting matter on the equatorial plane interacts with the outflowing gas along the rotational axis and the centrifugally supported oblique shock is formed at the interface of both the flows, when the viscosity parameter α is as small as α ≤ 10-3. The hot and rarefied blobs, which result in the eruptive mass-outflow, are generated in the inner shocked region and grow up towards the outer boundary. The advection-dominated accretion flow attains finally in the form of a torus disc with the inner edge of the disc at 3Rg ≤ r ≤ 6Rg and the centre at 6Rg ≤ r ≤ 10Rg, and a series of hot blobs is intermittently formed near the inner edge of the torus and grows up along the outer surface of the torus. As a result, the luminosity and the mass-outflow rate are modulated irregularly where the luminosity is enhanced by 10-40 per cent and the mass-outflow rate is increased by a factor of few up to 10. We interpret the unstable nature of the outflow to be due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, examining the Richardson number for the Kelvin-Helmholtz criterion in the inner region of the flow. We propose that the flare phenomena of Sgr A* may be induced by the unstable mass-outflow as is found in this work.

  17. Sedimentary history and mass flow structures of Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic mapping and crater counting in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae (GAP) reveal five major sedimentary deposits of Hesperian to Early Amazonian age, including (1) a mass flow deposited during the Early Hesperian near Deuteronilus Mensae (northeast of the map region) that may have resulted from the carving of Kasei Valles, >3000 km southwest of the exposed part of the deposit; (2) knobby plains material consisting of channel (likely; from Simud and Tiu Valles and possibly Ares and Shalbatana Valles) and mass-wasting deposits in central and eastern CAP; (3) material largely from Maja and Ares Valles emplaced in at least western and southern CAP (outcrops in southern Chryse Planitia developed thermokarst); (4) a thin mass flow covering much of southern Chryse Planitia that emanated from Simud and Tiu Valles; and (5) a thick, extensive (perhaps >3500 km across) mass flow deposit in central and northern CAP derived from accumulation and backflow of the preceding thin mass flow or perhaps melting of polar deposits. Other possible deposits may not be recognizable owing to burial by younger materials or a lack of morphologic signature. Various associated landforms appear to be consistent with the mass flow interpretations, including lobate and linear scarps along deposit edges, fractures related to desiccation of thick sediments, troughs, and ridges near the edges of the deposit indicative of secondary mass movement and deformation, pitted domes and fissure-fed flows possibly formed by sedimentary (mud) eruptions, and longitudinal channel grooves perhaps formed by roller vortices. No convincing evidence for paleoshorelines or stagnant ice sheets is found in CAP. These findings suggest that mass flow and hyperconcentrated flooding may have been the predominant processes of outflow-channel dissection in CAP. Elsewhere in the northern plains, similar landforms are prevalent. The mass flow interpretation does not require either multiple episodes of extraordinarily high

  18. Particle size-segregation and roll waves in geophysical mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Edwards, Andrew; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2014-05-01

    Particle size-segregation in geophysical mass flows can have a profound feedback on their local mobility, leading to the formation of resistive bouldery flow fronts, which spontaneously degenerate into leveed channels [1,2] that constrain the flow and enhance run-out. By including particle segregation [3], a composition dependent frictional coupling can be incorporated into depth-averaged geophysical mass flow models to capture both levee formation and flow fingering [4]. However, the channel wavelengths are crucially dependent on the underlying rheology of the flow, which is a second order effect that is still not fully understood. In this paper we analyze a simpler, but closely related, mono-disperse flow in which the granular rheology plays a crucial part in the formation, growth and coarsening of roll waves. Two regimes have been found experimentally:- (i) a classical continuous roll wave regime, and (ii) a novel discrete roll wave regime where the troughs between the wave peaks become completely stationary. This latter behaviour has been observed in debris flows in Fully, Switzerland, and the Jiangjia Gully, China. Grain-size segregation and levee formation in geophysical mass flows, Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P., Iverson, R.M., Logan, M., LaHusen, R.G. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Geophys. Res. 117, F01032. Fine-grained linings of leveed channels facilitate runout of granular flows, Kokelaar, B.P., Graham, R.L., Gray, J.M.N.T. & Vallance, J.W. (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 385, 172-180. Large particle segregation, transport and accumulation in granular free-surface flows. Gray, J.M.N.T. & Kokelaar, B.P. (2010) J. Fluid Mech. 652, 105-137. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows, Woodhouse, M.J., Thornton, A.R., Johnson, C.G., Kokelaar, B.P. & Gray, J.M.N.T. (2012) J. Fluid Mech. 709, 543-580.

  19. Multiobjective genetic algorithm conjunctive use optimization for production, cost, and energy with dynamic return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Richard C.; Forghani, Ali; Fayad, Hala

    2014-04-01

    Many real water resources optimization problems involve conflicting objectives for which the main goal is to find a set of optimal solutions on, or near to the Pareto front. E-constraint and weighting multiobjective optimization techniques have shortcomings, especially as the number of objectives increases. Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms (MGA) have been previously proposed to overcome these difficulties. Here, an MGA derives a set of optimal solutions for multiobjective multiuser conjunctive use of reservoir, stream, and (un)confined groundwater resources. The proposed methodology is applied to a hydraulically and economically nonlinear system in which all significant flows, including stream-aquifer-reservoir-diversion-return flow interactions, are simulated and optimized simultaneously for multiple periods. Neural networks represent constrained state variables. The addressed objectives that can be optimized simultaneously in the coupled simulation-optimization model are: (1) maximizing water provided from sources, (2) maximizing hydropower production, and (3) minimizing operation costs of transporting water from sources to destinations. Results show the efficiency of multiobjective genetic algorithms for generating Pareto optimal sets for complex nonlinear multiobjective optimization problems.

  20. High-throughput quantification of stabilizers in polymeric materials by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beißmann, Susanne; Reisinger, Michael; Reimann, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian W; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2014-04-30

    High-throughput methods for identification and quantification of stabilizers in plastic materials are of significant importance in order to evaluate the suitability of materials of unknown origin for specific application areas, to clarify reasons for failure of materials, or for comparison of materials from different sources. In the present study, a highly sensitive and rapid flow injection method coupled to selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MS) for comprehensive analysis of 21 polymer stabilizers in polyolefins is demonstrated. A critical factor for this approach is the choice of ionization mode, as no separation was performed prior to MS detection. Differences between several ionization techniques regarding matrix effects are reported. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was found to be the most suitable ionization technique, with no significant matrix effects observed. The developed method has a linear dynamic range over two to three orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients better than 0.99 for all studied analytes. Following a multistep sample preparation protocol, the method allowed quantification down to minimum values of between 0.0001 and 0.04 wt% depending on the type of stabilizer. Results were compared to an established chromatographic approach and showed very good correlation (bias below 7.5%). The applicability of the optimized method could be demonstrated for both the qualitative and quantitative determination of polymer stabilizers in polyolefins. Furthermore, the described approach yields a complete analysis in a much shorter time than can be achieved with commonly applied chromatographic methods. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Label free screening of enzyme inhibitors at femtomole scale using segmented flow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuwen; Slaney, Thomas R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2012-07-03

    Droplet-based microfluidics is an attractive platform for screening and optimizing chemical reactions. Using this approach, it is possible to reliably manipulate nanoliter volume samples and perform operations such as reagent addition with high precision, automation, and throughput. Most studies using droplet microfluidics have relied on optical techniques to detect the reaction; however, this requires engineering color or fluorescence change into the reaction being studied. In this work, we couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to nanoliter scale segmented flow reactions to enable direct (label-free) analysis of reaction products. The system is applied to a screen of inhibitors for cathepsin B. In this approach, solutions of test compounds (including three known inhibitors) are arranged as an array of nanoliter droplets in a tube segmented by perfluorodecalin. The samples are pumped through a series of tees to add enzyme, substrate (peptides), and quenchant. The resulting reaction mixtures are then infused into a metal-coated, fused silica ESI emitter for MS analysis. The system has potential for high-throughput as reagent addition steps are performed at 0.7 s per sample and ESI-MS at up to 1.2 s per sample. Carryover is inconsequential in the ESI emitter and between 2 and 9% per reagent addition depending on the tee utilized. The assay was reliable with a Z-factor of ~0.8. The method required 0.8 pmol of test compound, 1.6 pmol of substrate, and 5 fmol of enzyme per reaction. Segmented flow ESI-MS allows direct, label free screening of reactions at good throughput and ultralow sample consumption.

  2. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  3. Optimizing information flow in small genetic networks. IV. Spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-06-01

    We typically think of cells as responding to external signals independently by regulating their gene expression levels, yet they often locally exchange information and coordinate. Can such spatial coupling be of benefit for conveying signals subject to gene regulatory noise? Here we extend our information-theoretic framework for gene regulation to spatially extended systems. As an example, we consider a lattice of nuclei responding to a concentration field of a transcriptional regulator (the input) by expressing a single diffusible target gene. When input concentrations are low, diffusive coupling markedly improves information transmission; optimal gene activation functions also systematically change. A qualitatively different regulatory strategy emerges where individual cells respond to the input in a nearly steplike fashion that is subsequently averaged out by strong diffusion. While motivated by early patterning events in the Drosophila embryo, our framework is generically applicable to spatially coupled stochastic gene expression models.

  4. Grid sensitivity for aerodynamic optimization and flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    After reviewing relevant literature, it is apparent that one aspect of aerodynamic sensitivity analysis, namely grid sensitivity, has not been investigated extensively. The grid sensitivity algorithms in most of these studies are based on structural design models. Such models, although sufficient for preliminary or conceptional design, are not acceptable for detailed design analysis. Careless grid sensitivity evaluations, would introduce gradient errors within the sensitivity module, therefore, infecting the overall optimization process. Development of an efficient and reliable grid sensitivity module with special emphasis on aerodynamic applications appear essential. The organization of this study is as follows. The physical and geometric representations of a typical model are derived in chapter 2. The grid generation algorithm and boundary grid distribution are developed in chapter 3. Chapter 4 discusses the theoretical formulation and aerodynamic sensitivity equation. The method of solution is provided in chapter 5. The results are presented and discussed in chapter 6. Finally, some concluding remarks are provided in chapter 7.

  5. Stochastic Switching and Optimal Vehicle Navigation in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kularatne, D.; Hsieh, M. Y. A.; Forgoston, E.; Yecko, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Noise plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of physical systems. In recent years, researchers have identified situations where noise can induce a large fluctuation that leads to switching between metastable states of the system. In this work, we show how large fluctuation theory and information on Lagrangian coherent structures can be used to control autonomous mobile sensing resources in stochastic ocean-like flows. We show how even sensors with limited actuation capabilities can effectively manipulate the probability of a large fluctuation in order to modify the stochastic escape times from one gyre to another through control. This results in a navigation strategy that effectively leverages the surrounding fluid dynamics and inherent environmental noise. We show simulation and experimental results that validate the proposed strategy.

  6. Matched filter optimization of kSZ measurements with a reconstructed cosmological flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Angulo, R. E.; White, S. D. M.; Jasche, J.

    2014-09-01

    We develop and test a new statistical method to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. A sample of independently detected clusters is combined with the cosmic flow field predicted from a galaxy redshift survey in order to derive a matched filter that optimally weights the kSZ signal for the sample as a whole given the noise involved in the problem. We apply this formalism to realistic mock microwave skies based on cosmological N-body simulations, and demonstrate its robustness and performance. In particular, we carefully assess the various sources of uncertainty, cosmic microwave background primary fluctuations, instrumental noise, uncertainties in the determination of the velocity field, and effects introduced by miscentring of clusters and by uncertainties of the mass-observable relation (normalization and scatter). We show that available data (Planck maps and the MaxBCG catalogue) should deliver a 7.7σ detection of the kSZ. A similar cluster catalogue with broader sky coverage should increase the detection significance to ˜13σ. We point out that such measurements could be binned in order to study the properties of the cosmic gas and velocity fields, or combined into a single measurement to constrain cosmological parameters or deviations of the law of gravity from General Relativity.

  7. Studies on Mixed-Gas Plasmas and Segmented Flow Injection for Use with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jane Mary

    In this thesis, mixed gas plasmas and flow injection into air bubbles were investigated for use with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in order to improve the technique's analytical capabilities. The mixed gas plasmas were created in two different ways: (i) by adding another gas, either argon, nitrogen, or hydrogen, to the nebulizer gas flow using a sheathing device or (ii) by adding nitrogen to the plasma gas flow. The introduction of each sheathing gas led to degraded analyte sensitivity but generally improved plasma stability, resulting in improved detection limits for a few elements. Introduction of nitrogen into the plasma gas, under the same operating conditions used for an all-argon plasma, resulted in degraded sensitivity but improved signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios for Cr, Fe, and Se. The tolerance of ICP-MS to effects caused by the concomitant elements Na and K was improved by addition of nitrogen to the plasma gas flow. Flow injection using a segmented air/water carrier resulted in improved precision, sensitivity, and detection limits compared to those obtained using an all-water carrier. The enhancement in sensitivity was found to be mass dependent and was attributable to more than simply a reduction in dispersion. Under optimized operating conditions, using segmented flow injection resulted in similar or improved detection limits for all analytes except Se when compared to those obtained using continuous nebulization. Changing the gas used to segment the carrier stream did not result in appreciable changes in analyte signals or positions of maximum ionization within the plasma, indicating that the fundamental properties of the plasma did not change. The tolerance of ICP-MS to effects caused by the concomitant elements Na and Ca was not improved by using a segmented carrier compared to that experienced using an all-water carrier.

  8. Dynamic characteristics of a two-stage variable-mass flexible missile with internal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Bankovskis, J.

    1972-01-01

    A general formulation of the dynamical problems associated with powered flight of a two stage flexible, variable-mass missile with internal flow, discrete masses, and aerodynamic forces is presented. The formulation comprises six ordinary differential equations for the rigid body motion, 3n ordinary differential equations for the n discrete masses and three partial differential equations with the appropriate boundary conditions for the elastic motion. This set of equations is modified to represent a single stage flexible, variable-mass missile with internal flow and aerodynamic forces. The rigid-body motion consists then of three translations and three rotations, whereas the elastic motion is defined by one longitudinal and two flexural displacements, the latter about two orthogonal transverse axes. The differential equations are nonlinear and, in addition, they possess time-dependent coefficients due to the mass variation.

  9. Gradual conditioning of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields to flow and mass transport data: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, José E.; Llopis-Albert, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe paper presents a new stochastic inverse method for the simulation of transmissivity ( T) fields conditional to T measurements, secondary information obtained from expert judgement and geophysical surveys, transient piezometric and solute concentration measurements, and travel time data. The formulation of the method is simple and derived from the gradual deformation method. It basically consists of an iterative optimization procedure in which successive combinations of T fields, that honour T measurements and soft data (secondary data obtained from expert judgement and/or geophysical surveys), gradually lead to a simulated T field conditional to flow and mass transport data. Every combination of fields requires minimizing a penalty function that penalizes the difference between computed and measured conditioning data. This penalty function depends on only one parameter. Travel time conditioning data are considered by means of a backward-in-time probabilistic model, which extends the potential applications of the method to the characterization of groundwater contamination sources. In order to solve the mass transport equation, the method implements a Lagrangian approach that allows avoiding numerical problems usually found in Eulerian methods. Besides, to deal with highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian media, being able to reproduce anomalous breakthrough curves, a dual-domain approach is implemented with a first-order mass transfer approach. To determine the particle distribution between the mobile domain and the immobile domain the method uses a Bernoulli trial on the appropriate phase transition probabilities, derived using the normalized zeroth spatial moments of the multirate transport equations. The presented method does not require assuming the classical multiGaussian hypothesis thus easing the reproduction of T spatial patterns where extreme values of T show high connectivity. This feature allows the reproduction of a property found in real

  10. Optimization and evolution in metabolic pathways: global optimization techniques in Generalized Mass Action models.

    PubMed

    Sorribas, Albert; Pozo, Carlos; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Guillén-Gosálbez, Gonzalo; Jiménez, Laureano; Alves, Rui

    2010-09-01

    Cells are natural factories that can adapt to changes in external conditions. Their adaptive responses to specific stress situations are a result of evolution. In theory, many alternative sets of coordinated changes in the activity of the enzymes of each pathway could allow for an appropriate adaptive readjustment of metabolism in response to stress. However, experimental and theoretical observations show that actual responses to specific changes follow fairly well defined patterns that suggest an evolutionary optimization of that response. Thus, it is important to identify functional effectiveness criteria that may explain why certain patterns of change in cellular components and activities during adaptive response have been preferably maintained over evolutionary time. Those functional effectiveness criteria define sets of physiological requirements that constrain the possible adaptive changes and lead to different operation principles that could explain the observed response. Understanding such operation principles can also facilitate biotechnological and metabolic engineering applications. Thus, developing methods that enable the analysis of cellular responses from the perspective of identifying operation principles may have strong theoretical and practical implications. In this paper we present one such method that was designed based on nonlinear global optimization techniques. Our methodology can be used with a special class of nonlinear kinetic models known as GMA models and it allows for a systematic characterization of the physiological requirements that may underlie the evolution of adaptive strategies.

  11. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  12. Determination of the optimal mesh parameters for Iguassu centrifuge flow and separation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanihin, S. M.; Tronin, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    We present the method and the results of the determination for optimal computational mesh parameters for axisymmetric modeling of flow and separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge. The aim of this work was to determine the mesh parameters which provide relatively low computational cost whithout loss of accuracy. We use direct search optimization algorithm to calculate optimal mesh parameters. Obtained parameters were tested by the calculation of the optimal working regime of the Iguasu GC. Separative power calculated using the optimal mesh parameters differs less than 0.5% from the result obtained on the detailed mesh. Presented method can be used to determine optimal mesh parameters of the Iguasu GC with different rotor speeds.

  13. Left ventricular mass and incident hypertension in individuals with initial optimal blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    de Simone, Giovanni; Devereux, Richard B.; Chinali, Marcello; Roman, Mary J.; Welty, Thomas K.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Metabolic abnormalities have been shown to predict 8-year incident arterial hypertension in individuals with optimal blood pressure. As echocardiographic left ventricular mass has also been reported to predict incident hypertension in individuals with baseline blood pressure of less than 140/90 mmHg, we determined whether left ventricular mass predicts 4-year incident hypertension also in individuals with initial optimal blood pressure (<120/80 mmHg), independent of metabolic factors influencing blood pressure. Methods We studied 777 of 3257 members of the American Indian population-based Strong Heart Study cohort with optimal blood pressure (34% men, 45% obese, and 35% diabetic), aged 57 ± 7 years, and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results Over 4 years, 159 individuals (20%, group H) developed hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg). They had a greater baseline BMI, waist girth, and blood pressure (112/69 vs. 109/68 mmHg, all P<0.03) than those remaining normotensive (group N), with similar lipid profile and renal function. At baseline, left ventricular mass was significantly greater in group H than in group N (P<0.004). The difference in left ventricular mass was confirmed after controlling for initial BMI, systolic blood pressure, homeostatic model assessment index, and diabetes. The probability of incident hypertension increased by 36% for each standard deviation of left ventricular mass index (P=0.006), independent of covariates. Participants with left ventricular mass of more than 159 g (75th percentile of distribution) had 2.5-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.6; P<0.001) higher adjusted risk of incident hypertension than those below this value. Conclusion Left ventricular mass predicts incident arterial hypertension in individuals with initially optimal blood pressure. This association is independent of body build, prevalent diabetes, and initial blood pressure. PMID:18698223

  14. Remote-controlled stop of phloem mass flow by biphasic occlusion in Cucurbita maxima

    PubMed Central

    Furch, Alexandra C. U.; Zimmermann, Matthias R.; Will, Torsten; Hafke, Jens B.; van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between damage-induced electropotential waves (EPWs), sieve tube occlusion, and stop of mass flow were investigated in intact Cucurbita maxima plants. After burning leaf tips, EPWs propagating along the phloem of the main vein were recorded by extra- and intracellular microelectrodes. The respective EPW profiles (a steep hyperpolarization/depolarization peak followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization/depolarization) probably reflect merged action and variation potentials. A few minutes after passage of the first EPW peak, sieve tubes gradually became occluded by callose, with maximum synthesis occurring ∼10 min after burning. Early stop of mass flow, well before completion of callose deposition, pointed to an occlusion mechanism preceding callose deposition. This obstruction of mass flow was inferred from the halt of carboxyfluorescein movement in sieve tubes and intensified secretion of aqueous saliva by feeding aphids. The early occlusion is probably due to proteins, as indicated by a dramatic drop in soluble sieve element proteins and a simultaneous coagulation of sieve element proteins shortly after the burning stimulus. Mass flow resumed 30–40 min after burning, as demonstrated by carboxyfluorescein movement and aphid activities. Stop of mass flow by Ca2+-dependent occlusion mechanisms is attributed to Ca2+ influx during EPW passage; the reversibility of the occlusion is explained by removal of Ca2+ ions. PMID:20584788

  15. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Optimal Experience and Optimal Identity: A Multinational Study of the Associations Between Flow and Social Identity

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanhui; Roberts, Scott; Pagliaro, Stefano; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly; Bonaiuto, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Eudaimonistic identity theory posits a link between activity and identity, where a self-defining activity promotes the strength of a person’s identity. An activity engaged in with high enjoyment, full involvement, and high concentration can facilitate the subjective experience of flow. In the present paper, we hypothesized in accordance with the theory of psychological selection that beyond the promotion of individual development and complexity at the personal level, the relationship between flow and identity at the social level is also positive through participation in self-defining activities. Three different samples (i.e., American, Chinese, and Spanish) filled in measures for flow and social identity, with reference to four previously self-reported activities, characterized by four different combinations of skills (low vs. high) and challenges (low vs. high). Findings indicated that flow was positively associated with social identity across each of the above samples, regardless of participants’ gender and age. The results have implications for increasing social identity via participation in self-defining group activities that could facilitate flow. PMID:26924995

  17. Optimal Experience and Optimal Identity: A Multinational Study of the Associations Between Flow and Social Identity.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yanhui; Roberts, Scott; Pagliaro, Stefano; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly; Bonaiuto, Marino

    2016-01-01

    Eudaimonistic identity theory posits a link between activity and identity, where a self-defining activity promotes the strength of a person's identity. An activity engaged in with high enjoyment, full involvement, and high concentration can facilitate the subjective experience of flow. In the present paper, we hypothesized in accordance with the theory of psychological selection that beyond the promotion of individual development and complexity at the personal level, the relationship between flow and identity at the social level is also positive through participation in self-defining activities. Three different samples (i.e., American, Chinese, and Spanish) filled in measures for flow and social identity, with reference to four previously self-reported activities, characterized by four different combinations of skills (low vs. high) and challenges (low vs. high). Findings indicated that flow was positively associated with social identity across each of the above samples, regardless of participants' gender and age. The results have implications for increasing social identity via participation in self-defining group activities that could facilitate flow.

  18. Structural optimization of porous media for fast and controlled capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Fan, Jintu

    2015-05-01

    A general quantitative model of capillary flow in homogeneous porous media with varying cross-sectional sizes is presented. We optimize the porous structure for the minimization of the penetration time under global constraints. Programmable capillary flows with constant volumetric flow rate and linear evolution of flow distance to time are also obtained. The controlled innovative flow behaviors are derived based on a dynamic competition between capillary force and viscous resistance. A comparison of dynamic transport on the basis of the present design with Washburn's equation is presented. The regulation and maximization of flow velocity in porous materials is significant for a variety of applications including biomedical diagnostics, oil recovery, microfluidic transport, and water management of fabrics.

  19. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Described are methods for reducing vibration in helicopter rotor blades by determining optimum sizes and locations of tuning masses through formal mathematical optimization techniques. An optimization procedure is developed which employs the tuning masses and corresponding locations as design variables which are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without a large mass penalty. The finite-element structural analysis of the blade and the optimization formulation require development of discretized expressions for two performance parameters: modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude. Matrix expressions for both quantities and their sensitivity derivatives are developed. Three optimization strategies are developed and tested. The first is based on minimizing the modal shaping parameter which indirectly reduces the modal shear amplitudes corresponding to each harmonic of airload. The second strategy reduces these amplitudes directly, and the third strategy reduces the shear as a function of time during a revolution of the blade. The first strategy works well for reducing the shear for one mode responding to a single harmonic of the airload, but has been found in some cases to be ineffective for more than one mode. The second and third strategies give similar results and show excellent reduction of the shear with a low mass penalty.

  20. The simplicity of fractal-like flow networks for effective heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, Deborah

    2010-05-15

    A variety of applications using disk-shaped fractal-like flow networks and the status of one and two-dimensional predictive models for these applications are summarized. Applications discussed include single-phase and two-phase heat sinks and heat exchangers, two-phase flow separators, desorbers, and passive micromixers. Advantages of using these fractal-like flow networks versus parallel-flow networks include lower pressure drop, lower maximum wall temperature, inlet plenum symmetry, alternate flow paths, and pressure recovery at the bifurcation. The compact nature of microscale fractal-like branching heat exchangers makes them ideal for modularity. Differences between fractal-like and constructal approaches applied to disk-shaped heat sink designs are highlighted, and the importance of including geometric constraints, including fabrication constraints, in flow network design optimization is discussed. Finally, a simple pencil and paper procedure for designing single-phase heat sinks with fractal-like flow networks based solely on geometric constraints is outlined. Benefit-to-cost ratios resulting from geometric-based designs are compared with those from flow networks determined using multivariable optimization. Results from the two network designs are within 11%. (author)

  1. Multi-objective optimal power flow for active distribution network considering the stochastic characteristic of photovoltaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bao-Rong; Liu, Si-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Yi, Ying-Qi; Lin, Xiao-Ming

    2017-05-01

    To mitigate the impact on the distribution networks caused by the stochastic characteristic and high penetration of photovoltaic, a multi-objective optimal power flow model is proposed in this paper. The regulation capability of capacitor, inverter of photovoltaic and energy storage system embedded in active distribution network are considered to minimize the expected value of active power the T loss and probability of voltage violation in this model. Firstly, a probabilistic power flow based on cumulant method is introduced to calculate the value of the objectives. Secondly, NSGA-II algorithm is adopted for optimization to obtain the Pareto optimal solutions. Finally, the best compromise solution can be achieved through fuzzy membership degree method. By the multi-objective optimization calculation of IEEE34-node distribution network, the results show that the model can effectively improve the voltage security and economy of the distribution network on different levels of photovoltaic penetration.

  2. Shape optimization in unsteady blood flow: a numerical study of non-Newtonian effects.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Feby; Behr, Marek; Heinkenschloss, Matthias

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of non-Newtonian effects on the solution of shape optimization problems involving unsteady pulsatile blood flow. We consider an idealized two dimensional arterial graft geometry. Our computations are based on the Navier-Stokes equations generalized to non-Newtonian fluid, with the modified Cross model employed to account for the shear-thinning behavior of blood. Using a gradient-based optimization algorithm, we compare the optimal shapes obtained using both the Newtonian and generalized Newtonian constitutive equations. Depending on the shear rate prevalent in the domain, substantial differences in the flow as well as in the computed optimal shape are observed when the Newtonian constitutive equation is replaced by the modified Cross model. By varying a geometric parameter in our test case, we investigate the influence of the shear rate on the solution.

  3. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation.

    PubMed

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality.

  4. An Efficacious Multi-Objective Fuzzy Linear Programming Approach for Optimal Power Flow Considering Distributed Generation

    PubMed Central

    Warid, Warid; Hizam, Hashim; Mariun, Norman; Abdul-Wahab, Noor Izzri

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new formulation for the multi-objective optimal power flow (MOOPF) problem for meshed power networks considering distributed generation. An efficacious multi-objective fuzzy linear programming optimization (MFLP) algorithm is proposed to solve the aforementioned problem with and without considering the distributed generation (DG) effect. A variant combination of objectives is considered for simultaneous optimization, including power loss, voltage stability, and shunt capacitors MVAR reserve. Fuzzy membership functions for these objectives are designed with extreme targets, whereas the inequality constraints are treated as hard constraints. The multi-objective fuzzy optimal power flow (OPF) formulation was converted into a crisp OPF in a successive linear programming (SLP) framework and solved using an efficient interior point method (IPM). To test the efficacy of the proposed approach, simulations are performed on the IEEE 30-busand IEEE 118-bus test systems. The MFLP optimization is solved for several optimization cases. The obtained results are compared with those presented in the literature. A unique solution with a high satisfaction for the assigned targets is gained. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed MFLP technique in terms of solution optimality and rapid convergence. Moreover, the results indicate that using the optimal DG location with the MFLP algorithm provides the solution with the highest quality. PMID:26954783

  5. Optimization of a direct analysis in real time/time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for rapid serum metabolomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Manshui; McDonald, John F; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomic fingerprinting of bodily fluids can reveal the underlying causes of metabolic disorders associated with many diseases, and has thus been recognized as a potential tool for disease diagnosis and prognosis following therapy. Here we report a rapid approach in which direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and hybrid quadrupole TOF (Q-TOF) MS is used as a means for metabolomic fingerprinting of human serum. In this approach, serum samples are first treated to precipitate proteins, and the volatility of the remaining metabolites increased by derivatization, followed by DART MS analysis. Maximum DART MS performance was obtained by optimizing instrumental parameters such as ionizing gas temperature and flow rate for the analysis of identical aliquots of a healthy human serum samples. These variables were observed to have a significant effect on the overall mass range of the metabolites detected as well as the signal-to-noise ratios in DART mass spectra. Each DART run requires only 1.2 min, during which more than 1500 different spectral features are observed in a time-dependent fashion. A repeatability of 4.1% to 4.5% was obtained for the total ion signal using a manual sampling arm. With the appealing features of high-throughput, lack of memory effects, and simplicity, DART MS has shown potential to become an invaluable tool for metabolomic fingerprinting. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Discrete bat algorithm for optimal problem of permutation flow shop scheduling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qifang; Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Ma, Mingzhi; Li, Liangliang

    2014-01-01

    A discrete bat algorithm (DBA) is proposed for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem (PFSP). Firstly, the discrete bat algorithm is constructed based on the idea of basic bat algorithm, which divide whole scheduling problem into many subscheduling problems and then NEH heuristic be introduced to solve subscheduling problem. Secondly, some subsequences are operated with certain probability in the pulse emission and loudness phases. An intensive virtual population neighborhood search is integrated into the discrete bat algorithm to further improve the performance. Finally, the experimental results show the suitability and efficiency of the present discrete bat algorithm for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem.

  7. Discrete Bat Algorithm for Optimal Problem of Permutation Flow Shop Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qifang; Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Ma, Mingzhi; Li, Liangliang

    2014-01-01

    A discrete bat algorithm (DBA) is proposed for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem (PFSP). Firstly, the discrete bat algorithm is constructed based on the idea of basic bat algorithm, which divide whole scheduling problem into many subscheduling problems and then NEH heuristic be introduced to solve subscheduling problem. Secondly, some subsequences are operated with certain probability in the pulse emission and loudness phases. An intensive virtual population neighborhood search is integrated into the discrete bat algorithm to further improve the performance. Finally, the experimental results show the suitability and efficiency of the present discrete bat algorithm for optimal permutation flow shop scheduling problem. PMID:25243220

  8. Generalized Flows for Optimal Inference in Higher Order MRF-MAP.

    PubMed

    Arora, Chetan; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kalra, Prem Kumar; Maheshwari, S N

    2015-07-01

    Use of higher order clique potentials in MRF-MAP problems has been limited primarily because of the inefficiencies of the existing algorithmic schemes. We propose a new combinatorial algorithm for computing optimal solutions to 2 label MRF-MAP problems with higher order clique potentials. The algorithm runs in time O(2(k)n(3)) in the worst case (k is size of clique and n is the number of pixels). A special gadget is introduced to model flows in a higher order clique and a technique for building a flow graph is specified. Based on the primal dual structure of the optimization problem, the notions of the capacity of an edge and a cut are generalized to define a flow problem. We show that in this flow graph, when the clique potentials are submodular, the max flow is equal to the min cut, which also is the optimal solution to the problem. We show experimentally that our algorithm provides significantly better solutions in practice and is hundreds of times faster than solution schemes like Dual Decomposition [1], TRWS [2] and Reduction [3], [4], [5]. The framework represents a significant advance in handling higher order problems making optimal inference practical for medium sized cliques.

  9. An analytic study of near terminal area optimal sequencing and flow control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Straeter, T. A.; Hogge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Optimal flow control and sequencing of air traffic operations in the near terminal area are discussed. The near terminal area model is based on the assumptions that the aircraft enter the terminal area along precisely controlled approach paths and that the aircraft are segregated according to their near terminal area performance. Mathematical models are developed to support the optimal path generation, sequencing, and conflict resolution problems.

  10. Determination of cholesterol and triglycerides in serum lipoproteins using flow field-flow fractionation coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Rashid Nazir; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Schoenmakers, Peter J; Kok, Wim Th

    2011-11-14

    Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) was combined with pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometry for a sized based fractionation and a detailed compositional study of the triglycerides and cholesterol associated with the various lipoprotein subclasses present in human serum. Serum samples were injected in the AsFlFFF instrument and fractionated with a time-delayed exponential decay cross flow program. The fractions collected after AsFlFFF elution were injected into a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) GC-injector, containing a fritted liner. A temperature and split-flow program for the PTV injector was optimized for the thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation of the compounds of interest. The resulting fatty acid and cholesterol methyl esters were separated by GC and characteristic fragment ions were detected by MS. The system was optimized and calibrated with triglyceride and cholesterol standards for quantitative analysis. The possible interference by phospholipids with the quantitative results was investigated and found to be of minor importance. The concentrations and lipoprotein profiles of triglycerides and cholesterol were determined in a pooled serum sample of healthy volunteers and a serum sample of a sepsis patient. The results obtained with the GC-MS approach were compared with those of a previously developed method based on AsFlFFF with a dual enzymatic reaction detection system. A good agreement of the profiles was found, for cholesterol as well as for the triglycerides, even when the GC-MS method quantifies the fatty acids while with the enzymatic reaction method the glycerol concentrations are determined. Total cholesterol and triglyceride concentration values for the serum samples showed good agreement with the results of the standard enzymatic method as used in practice in the university hospital. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-10-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass.

  12. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes—phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass. PMID:26465336

  13. The respective roles of bulk friction and slip velocity during a granular mass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic granular mass flows form an important natural hazard. Mitigation has motivated numerous studies on the properties of natural granular flows, and in particular, their ability to travel long distances away from the release point. The mobility of granular flows is commonly characterised through the definition of rheological properties and effective friction. Yet, it is widely accepted that the description in term of effective friction may include various lubrication effects, softening at the base of the flow and large slip velocities being a most likely one. In this case, flow bulk properties may obliterate the flow boundary conditions. In this contribution, we investigate how disentangling bulk properties from boundary conditions may improve our understanding of the flow. Using discrete simulations, we induce increasing slip velocities in different flow configurations. We show that increased mobility may be achieved without changing bulk properties. The results are interpreted in terms of a Robin-Navier slip condition and implemented in a continuum Navier-Stokes solver. We quantify the respective role of rheological bulk properties and boundary conditions in the general behaviour of a transient mass flow. We show that omitting the description of boundary conditions leads to misinterpretation of the flow properties. The outcome is discussed in terms of models reliability. References P.-Y. Lagrée et al, The granular column collapse as a continuum: validity of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes model with the mu(I) rheology, J. Fluid Mech. 686, 378-408 (2011) L. Staron and E. Lajeunesse, Understanding how the volume affects the mobility of dry debris flows, Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L12402 (2009) L. Staron, Mobility of long-runout rock flows: a discrete numerical investigation, Geophys. J. Int. 172, 455-463 (2008)

  14. Mass transfer to reactive boundaries from steady three-dimensional flows in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Joseph D.; McGraw, Gregory J.; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the effect of transverse secondary flows on mass transfer to reactive boundaries in microchannels. The geometry considered is relevant to surface catalyzed reactions, fuel cells, biochemical sensors, and other microreactor applications. The 3D flows that we consider approximate flows that are experimentally achievable through topographical patterning of one wall of a microchannel, as in the Staggered Herringbone Mixer (SHM) and similar geometries. We simulate a mass transfer process using passive tracers to model reactive solute molecules in a Stokes flow (Reynolds number, Re =0) over a range of Péclet number, 102⩽Pe⩽105, with instantaneous kinetics at the reactive boundary. Our simulation allows for the evaluation of the local Sherwood number produced by a uniaxial Poiseuille flow and several chaotic and nonchaotic 3D flows. In chaotic flows, the local Sherwood number evolves in a simple manner that shares features with the classic Graetz solution for transfer from a uniaxial pipe flow: an entrance region with cube-root scaling in the Graetz number and a constant asymptotic value. This "Modified Graetz" behavior also differs in important ways from the standard case: the entrance length is Pe independent and the asymptotic rate of transfer is Pe dependent and potentially much greater than in the uniaxial case. We develop a theoretical model of the transfer process; the predictions of this model compare well with simulation results. We use our results to develop a correlation for the mass transfer in laminar channel flows, to elucidate the importance of chaos in defining transfer in these flows, and to provide design rules for microreactors with a single reactive wall.

  15. Time-optimal path planning in dynamic flows using level set equations: theory and schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolla, Tapovan; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Ueckermann, Mattheus P.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2014-10-01

    We develop an accurate partial differential equation-based methodology that predicts the time-optimal paths of autonomous vehicles navigating in any continuous, strong, and dynamic ocean currents, obviating the need for heuristics. The goal is to predict a sequence of steering directions so that vehicles can best utilize or avoid currents to minimize their travel time. Inspired by the level set method, we derive and demonstrate that a modified level set equation governs the time-optimal path in any continuous flow. We show that our algorithm is computationally efficient and apply it to a number of experiments. First, we validate our approach through a simple benchmark application in a Rankine vortex flow for which an analytical solution is available. Next, we apply our methodology to more complex, simulated flow fields such as unsteady double-gyre flows driven by wind stress and flows behind a circular island. These examples show that time-optimal paths for multiple vehicles can be planned even in the presence of complex flows in domains with obstacles. Finally, we present and support through illustrations several remarks that describe specific features of our methodology.

  16. Interactive breast mass segmentation using a convex active contour model with optimal threshold values.

    PubMed

    Acho, Sussan Nkwenti; Rae, William Ian Duncombe

    2016-10-01

    A convex active contour model requires a predefined threshold value to determine the global solution for the best contour to use when doing mass segmentation. Fixed thresholds or manual tuning of threshold values for optimum mass boundary delineation are impracticable. A proposed method is presented to determine an optimized mass-specific threshold value for the convex active contour derived from the probability matrix of the mass with the particle swarm optimization method. We compared our results with the Chan-Vese segmentation and a published global segmentation model on masses detected on direct digital mammograms. The regional term of the convex active contour model maximizes the posterior partitioning probability for binary segmentation. Suppose the probability matrix is binary thresholded using the particle swarm optimization to obtain a value T1, we define the optimal threshold value for the global minimizer of the convex active contour as the mean intensity of all pixels whose probabilities are greater than T1. The mean Jaccard similarity indices were 0.89±0.07 for the proposed/Chan-Vese method and 0.88±0.06 for the proposed/published segmentation model. The mean Euclidean distance between Fourier descriptors of the segmented areas was 0.05±0.03 for the proposed/Chan-Vese method and 0.06±0.04 for the proposed/published segmentation model. This efficient method avoids problems of initial level set contour placement and contour re-initialization. Moreover, optimum segmentation results are realized for all masses improving on the fixed threshold value of 0.5 proposed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A robust thermal microstructure for mass flow rate measurement in steady and unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, R.; Talbi, A.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.; Frankiewicz, C.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Preobrazhensky, V.

    2013-06-01

    A silicon micro-machined thermal gas flow sensor operating in anemometric mode has been designed, fabricated and investigated for continuous and pulsatile flows. The sensor is specifically designed to achieve high sensitivity, fast response time and high robustness. It is composed of four metallic resistors interconnected to form a Wheatstone bridge. Two of them act simultaneously as the heating and sensing elements and the two others are used as a temperature reference. The heating element consists of a metallic wire of platinum Pt (2 µm width, 2 mm length) maintained on each lateral side by periodic silicon oxide SiO2 micro-bridges. Finite element simulations show that this structure achieves a fast thermal response time of 200 µs in constant current operating mode and a coefficient of temperature rise close to 25 °C/120 µW based on bulk electrical resistivity and when the Pt wire and SiO2 thicknesses are close to 100 nm and 500 nm, respectively. This design allows the fabrication of a robust thermal flow sensor with heating elements as long as possible, which enables accurate measurements with high signal to noise ratio. The sensor is then characterised experimentally; its electrical and thermal properties are obtained in the absence of fluid flow. These results confirm the effectiveness of the thermal insulation as predicted by the simulations. In a second step, the fluidic characterizations are reported and discussed for both continuous and pulsatile flows. In continuous mode, the sensor response was studied for gas flow rate ranging from 0 L min-1 to 10 L min-1. In pulsatile mode, the sensor is integrated inside a channel of a micro-valve actuated at 200 Hz. The measurements are compared with those obtained by a classical commercial hot wire.

  18. A Numerical Methodology for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Turbulent Flow Enabling Large Geometric Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osusky, Lana Maria

    The increase in the availability and power of computational resources over the last fifteen years has contributed to the development of many different types of numerical optimization methods and created a large area of research focussed on numerical aerodynamic shape optimization and, more recently, high-fidelity multidisciplinary optimization. Numerical optimization provides dramatic savings when designing new aerodynamic configurations, as it allows the designer to focus more on the development of a well-posed design problem rather than on performing an exhaustive search of the design space via the traditional cut-and-try approach, which is expensive and time-consuming. It also reduces the dependence on the designer's experience and intuition, which can potentially lead to more optimal designs. Numerical optimization methods are particularly attractive when designing novel, unconventional aircraft for which the designer has no pre-existing studies or experiences from which to draw; these methods have the potential to discover new designs that might never have been arrived at without optimization. This work presents an extension of an efficient gradient-based numerical aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm to enable optimization in turbulent flow. The algorithm includes an integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement scheme, an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur algorithm for solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, which are fully coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, and a discrete-adjoint gradient evaluation. In order to develop an efficient methodology for optimization in turbulent flows, the viscous and turbulent terms in the ii governing equations were linearized by hand. Additionally, a set of mesh refinement tools was introduced in order to obtain both an acceptable control volume mesh and a sufficiently refined computational mesh from an initial coarse mesh. A series of drag minimization

  19. Effective management of patients with acute ischemic stroke based on lean production on thrombolytic flow optimization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhuoyuan; Ren, Lijie; Wang, Ting; Hu, Huoyou; Li, Weiping; Wang, Yaping; Liu, Dehong; Lie, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) decreases when the administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is delayed. Derived from Toyota Production System, lean production aims to create top-quality products with high-efficiency procedures, a concept that easily applies to emergency medicine. In this study, we aimed to determine whether applying lean principles to flow optimization could hasten the initiation of thrombolysis. A multidisciplinary team (Stroke Team) was organized to implement an ongoing, continuous loop of lean production that contained the following steps: decomposition, recognition, intervention, reengineering and assessment. The door-to-needle time (DNT) and the percentage of patients with DNT ≤ 60 min before and after the adoption of lean principles were used to evaluate the efficiency of our flow optimization. Thirteen patients with AIS in the pre-lean period and 43 patients with AIS in the lean period (23 in lean period I and 20 patients in lean period II) were consecutively enrolled in our study. After flow optimization, we reduced DNT from 90 to 47 min (p < 0.001(¤)). In addition, the percentage of patients treated ≤60 min after hospital arrival increased from 38.46 to 75.0 % (p = 0.015(¤)). Adjusted analysis of covariance confirmed a significant influence of optimization on delay of tPA administration (p < 0.001). The patients were more likely to have a good prognosis (mRS ≤ 2 at 90 days) after the flow optimization (30.77-75.00 %, p = 0.012(¤)). Our study may offer an effective approach for optimizing the thrombolytic flow in the management of AIS.

  20. Optimization of flow modeling in fractured media with discrete fracture network via percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Pardo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fractured media are very heterogeneous systems where occur complex physical and chemical processes to model. One of the possible approaches to conceptualize this type of massifs is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Donado et al., modeled flow and transport in a granitic batholith based on this approach and found good fitting with hydraulic and tracer tests, but the computational cost was excessive due to a gigantic amount of elements to model. We present in this work a methodology based on percolation theory for reducing the number of elements and in consequence, to reduce the bandwidth of the conductance matrix and the execution time of each network. DFN poses as an excellent representation of all the set of fractures of the media, but not all the fractures of the media are part of the conductive network. Percolation theory is used to identify which nodes or fractures are not conductive, based on the occupation probability or percolation threshold. In a fractured system, connectivity determines the flow pattern in the fractured rock mass. This volume of fluid is driven through connection paths formed by the fractures, when the permeability of the rock is negligible compared to the fractures. In a population of distributed fractures, each of this that has no intersection with any connected fracture do not contribute to generate a flow field. This algorithm also permits us to erase these elements however they are water conducting and hence, refine even more the backbone of the network. We used 100 different generations of DFN that were optimized in this study using percolation theory. In each of the networks calibrate hydrodynamic parameters as hydraulic conductivity and specific storage coefficient, for each of the five families of fractures, yielding a total of 10 parameters to estimate, at each generation. Since the effects of the distribution of fault orientation changes the value of the percolation threshold, but not the universal laws of classical

  1. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Method of measuring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D.

    1978-04-11

    This invention relates to an improved method of monitoring the mass flow rate of a substance entering a cocurrent fluid stream. The method very basically consists of heating equal sections of the fluid stream above and below the point of entry of the substance to be monitored, and measuring and comparing the resulting change in temperature of the sections. Advantage is taken of the difference in thermal characteristics of the fluid and the substance to be measured to correlate temperature differences in the sections above and below the substance feed point for providing an indication of the mass flow rate of the substance.

  3. Mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three-dimensional micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianzheng; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    An effective method to predict the mass flow rate and pressure distribution of gas through three dimensional micro-channels with different cross-section shapes has been proposed. For rectangular cross sections often employed in experiment, the present solutions versus measured data of Zohar et al. (2002) show that the side walls significantly affect the mass flow rates as the aspect ratio is smaller than 10, whereas the non-dimensional pressure distributions, mainly determined by the inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio, are insensitive to the aspect ratio.

  4. Reactor mass flow data base prepared for the nonproliferation alternative systems assessment program

    SciTech Connect

    Primm III, R.T.C

    1981-02-01

    This report presents charge and discharge mass flow data for reactors judged to have received sufficient technical development to enable them to be demonstrated or commercially available by the year 2000. Brief descriptions of the reactors and fuel cycles evaluated are presented. A discussion of the neutronics methods used to produce the mass flow data is provided. Detailed charge and discharge fuel isotopics are presented. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, separative work, and fissile material requirements are computed and provided for each fuel cycle.

  5. Use of Generalized Network Flow Programming in Solving the Optimal Power Flow Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    program that runs on a CDC/Dual Cyber 170/750 that takes the system’s data and performs a Gauss-Seidel ( GS ) iterative scheme to solve the load flow...admittance and the diagonal elements are the sum of the line admittances. With these voltages and the admittance matrix (used In GS ), the program computes...the bus voltages, the direction of flow, and the gain factors ak and ak’ according to Equations 4. 10 and 4. 1 5. The GS iterative solution technique

  6. Using the NOABL flow model and mathematical optimization as a micrositing tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wegley, H.L.; Barnard, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    This report describes the use of an improved mass-consistent model that is intended for diagnosing wind fields in complex terrain. The model was developed by merging an existing mass-consistent model, the NOABL model, with an optimization procedure. The optimization allows objective calculation of important model input parameters that previously had been supplied through guesswork; in this manner, the accuracy of the calculated winds has been greatly increased. The report covers such topics as the software structure of the model, assembling an input file, processing the model's output, and certain cautions about the model's operation. The use of the model is illustrated by a test case.

  7. Taphonomic implications from Upper Triassic mass flow deposits: 2-dimensional reconstructions of an ammonoid mass occurrence (Carnian, Taurus Mountains, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer, Susanne; Mayrhofer, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Ammonoid mass occurrences of Late Triassic age were investigated in sections from A şağlyaylabel and Yukarlyaylabel, which are located in the Taurus Platform-Units of eastern Turkey. The cephalopod beds are almost monospecific, with > 99.9 % of individuals from the ceratitic genus Kasimlarceltites, which comprises more than hundreds of millions of ammonoid specimens. The ontogenetic composition of the event fauna varies from bed to bed, suggesting that these redeposited shell-rich sediments had different source areas. The geographical extent of the mass occurrence can be traced over large areas up to 10 km2. Each of the Early Carnian (Julian 2) ammonoid mass occurrences signifies a single storm (e.g. storm-wave action) or tectonic event (e.g. earthquake) that caused gravity flows and turbidity currents. Three types of ammonoid accumulation deposits are distinguished by their genesis: 1) matrix-supported floatstones, produced by low density debris flows, 2) mixed floatstones and packstones formed by high density debris flows, and 3) densely ammonoid shell-supported packstones which result from turbidity currents. Two-dimensional calculations on the mass occurrences, based on sectioning, reveal aligned ammonoid shells, implying transport in a diluted sediment. The ammonoid shells are predominantely redeposited, preserved as mixed autochthonous/parautochnonous/ allochthonous communities based on biogenic and sedimentological concentration mechanisms ( = in-situ or post-mortem deposited). This taphonomic evaluation of the Kasimlarceltites beds thus reveals new insights into the environment of deposition of the Carnian section, namely that it had a proximal position along a carbonate platform edge that was influenced by a nearby shallow water regime. The Kasimlarceltites-abundance zone is a marker-zone in the study area, developed during the drowning of a shallow water platform, which can be traceable over long distances.

  8. Influence of relative air/water flow velocity on oxygen mass transfer in gravity sewers.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Lucie; Springer, Fanny; Lipeme-Kouyi, Gislain; Buffiere, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Problems related to hydrogen sulfide may be serious for both network stakeholders and the public in terms of health, sustainability of the sewer structure and urban comfort. H2S emission models are generally theoretical and simplified in terms of environmental conditions. Although air transport characteristics in sewers must play a role in the fate of hydrogen sulfide, only a limited number of studies have investigated this issue. The aim of this study was to better understand H2S liquid to gas transfer by highlighting the link between the mass transfer coefficient and the turbulence in the air flow and the water flow. For experimental safety reasons, O2 was taken as a model compound. The oxygen mass transfer coefficients were obtained using a mass balance in plug flow. The mass transfer coefficient was not impacted by the range of the interface air-flow velocity values tested (0.55-2.28 m·s(-1)) or the water velocity values (0.06-0.55 m·s(-1)). Using the ratio between kL,O2 to kL,H2S, the H2S mass transfer behavior in a gravity pipe in the same hydraulic conditions can be predicted.

  9. Optimization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell flow channels using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlin, Glenn; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    The design of the flow channels in PEM fuel cells directly impacts the transport of reactant gases to the electrodes and affects cell performance. This paper presents results from a study to optimize the geometry of the flow channels in a PEM fuel cell. The optimization process implements a genetic algorithm to rapidly converge on the channel geometry that provides the highest net power output from the cell. In addition, this work implements a method for the automatic generation of parameterized channel domains that are evaluated for performance using a commercial computational fluid dynamics package from ANSYS. The software package includes GAMBIT as the solid modeling and meshing software, the solver FLUENT, and a PEMFC Add-on Module capable of modeling the relevant physical and electrochemical mechanisms that describe PEM fuel cell operation. The result of the optimization process is a set of optimal channel geometry values for the single-serpentine channel configuration. The performance of the optimal geometry is contrasted with a sub-optimal one by comparing contour plots of current density, oxygen and hydrogen concentration. In addition, the role of convective bypass in bringing fresh reactant to the catalyst layer is examined in detail. The convergence to the optimal geometry is confirmed by a bracketing study which compares the performance of the best individual to those of its neighbors with adjacent parameter values.

  10. A quantitative study on accumulation of age mass around stagnation points in nested flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Ge, Shemin; Cao, Guo-Liang; Hou, Guang-Cai; Hu, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong; Liang, Si-Hai

    2012-12-01

    The stagnant zones in nested flow systems have been assumed to be critical to accumulation of transported matter, such as metallic ions and hydrocarbons in drainage basins. However, little quantitative research has been devoted to prove this assumption. In this paper, the transport of age mass is used as an example to demonstrate that transported matter could accumulate around stagnation points. The spatial distribution of model age is analyzed in a series of drainage basins of different depths. We found that groundwater age has a local or regional maximum value around each stagnation point, which proves the accumulation of age mass. In basins where local, intermediate and regional flow systems are all well developed, the regional maximum groundwater age occurs at the regional stagnation point below the basin valley. This can be attributed to the long travel distances of regional flow systems as well as stagnancy of the water. However, when local flow systems dominate, the maximum groundwater age in the basin can be located around the local stagnation points due to stagnancy, which are far away from the basin valley. A case study is presented to illustrate groundwater flow and age in the Ordos Plateau, northwestern China. The accumulation of age mass around stagnation points is confirmed by tracer age determined by 14C dating in two boreholes and simulated age near local stagnation points under different dispersivities. The results will help shed light on the relationship between groundwater flow and distributions of groundwater age, hydrochemistry, mineral resources, and hydrocarbons in drainage basins.

  11. A new two-phase erosion-deposition model for mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transports. The model enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by introducing a two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology. The adaptive basal morphology allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. With rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions and losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent description of erosion-entrainment-deposition processes. Simulation indicates a sharp erosion-front and steady-state-rear erosion depth. The model appropriately captures the emergence and propagation of complex frontal surge dynamics associated with the frontal ambient-drag which is a new hypothesis associated with erosion. The novel enhanced real two-phase model also allows for simulating fluid-run-off during the deposition process. The model resembles laboratory experiments for particle-fluid mixture flows and reveals some major aspects of the mechanics associated with erosion, entrainment and deposition. Reference: Shiva P. Pudasaini (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  12. An automatic CFD-based flow diverter optimization principle for patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor; Daróczy, László; Berg, Philipp; Thévenin, Dominique; Skalej, Martin; Beuing, Oliver

    2015-11-05

    The optimal treatment of intracranial aneurysms using flow diverting devices is a fundamental issue for neuroradiologists as well as neurosurgeons. Due to highly irregular manifold aneurysm shapes and locations, the choice of the stent and the patient-specific deployment strategy can be a very difficult decision. To support the therapy planning, a new method is introduced that combines a three-dimensional CFD-based optimization with a realistic deployment of a virtual flow diverting stent for a given aneurysm. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method, it was applied to a patient-specific intracranial giant aneurysm that was successfully treated using a commercial flow diverter. Eight treatment scenarios with different local compressions were considered in a fully automated simulation loop. The impact on the corresponding blood flow behavior was evaluated qualitatively as well as quantitatively, and the optimal configuration for this specific case was identified. The virtual deployment of an uncompressed flow diverter reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 24.4% compared to the untreated case. Depending on the positioning of the local stent compression below the ostium, blood flow reduction could vary between 27.3% and 33.4%. Therefore, a broad range of potential treatment outcomes was identified, illustrating the variability of a given flow diverter deployment in general. This method represents a proof of concept to automatically identify the optimal treatment for a patient in a virtual study under certain assumptions. Hence, it contributes to the improvement of virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms and can support physicians during therapy planning in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary Optimization for Spring-Run Chinook Salmon Environmental Flows in Lassen Foothill Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, J.; Kelsey, R.; Howard, J.; Hall, M.; Lund, J. R.; Viers, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stream flow controls physical and ecological processes in rivers that support freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity vital for services that humans depend on. This master variable has been impaired by human activities like dam operations, water diversions, and flood control infrastructure. Furthermore, increasing water scarcity due to rising water demands and droughts has further stressed these systems, calling for the need to find better ways to identify and allocate environmental flows. In this study, a linear optimization model was developed for environmental flows in river systems that have minimal or no regulation from dam operations, but still exhibit altered flow regimes due to surface water diversions and groundwater abstraction. Flow regime requirements for California Central Valley spring-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) life history were used as a test case to examine how alterations to the timing and magnitude of water diversions meet environmental flow objectives while minimizing impact to local water supply. The model was then applied to Mill Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River, in northern California, and its altered flow regime that currently impacts adult spring-run Chinook spawning and migration. The resulting optimized water diversion schedule can be used to inform water management decisions that aim to maximize benefit for the environment while meeting local water demands.

  14. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate bacterium-substratum interactions, understanding of bacterial mass transport is necessary. Comparisons of experimentally observed initial deposition rates with mass transport rates in parallel-plate-flow-chambers (PPFC) predicted by convective-diffusion yielded deposition efficiencies above unity, despite electrostatic repulsion. It is hypothesized that sedimentation is the major mass transport mechanism in a PPFC. The contribution of sedimentation to the mass transport in a PPFC was experimentally investigated by introducing a novel microscopy-based method. First, height-dependent bacterial concentrations were measured at different times and flow rates and used to calculate bacterial sedimentation velocities. For Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, a sedimentation velocity of 240 μm h(-1) was obtained. Therewith, sedimentation appeared as the predominant contribution to mass transport in a PPFC. Also in the current study, deposition efficiencies of S. aureus ATCC 12600 with respect to the Smoluchowski-Levich solution of the convective-diffusion equation were four-to-five fold higher than unity. However, calculation of deposition efficiencies with respect to sedimentation were below unity and decreased from 0.78 to 0.36 when flow rates increased from 0.017 to 0.33 cm(3) s(-1). The proposed analysis of bacterial mass transport processes is simple, does not require additional equipment and yields a more reasonable interpretation of bacterial deposition in a PPFC.

  15. Laboratory procedures and data reduction techniques to determine rheologic properties of mass flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, R.R.; Huizinga, R.J.; Brown, S.M.; Jobson, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the rheologic properties of coarse- grained mass flows is an important step to mathematically simulate potential inundation zones. Using the vertically rotating flume designed and built by the U.S. Geological Survey, laboratory procedures and subsequent data reduction have been developed to estimate shear stresses and strain rates of various flow materials. Although direct measurement of shear stress and strain rate currently (1992) are not possible in the vertically rotating flume, methods were derived to estimate these values from measurements of flow geometry, surface velocity, and flume velocity.

  16. Dynamic interaction of two-phase debris flow with pyramidal defense structures: An optimal strategy to efficiently protecting the desired area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattel, Parameshwari; Kafle, Jeevan; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Mergili, Martin; Tuladhar, Bhadra Man; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we analyze the dynamic interaction of two phase debris flows with pyramidal obstacles. To simulate the dynamic interaction of two-phase debris flow (a mixture of solid particles and viscous fluid) with obstacles of different dimensions and orientations, we employ the general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012). The model consists of highly non-linear partial differential equations representing the mass and momentum conservations for both solid and fluid. Besides buoyancy, the model includes some dominant physical aspects of the debris flows such as generalized drag, virtual mass and non-Newtonian viscous stress as induced by the gradient of solid-volume-fraction. Simulations are performed with high-resolution numerical schemes to capture essential dynamics, including the strongly re-directed flow with multiple stream lines, mass arrest and debris-vacuum generation when the rapidly cascading debris mass suddenly encounters the obstacle. The solid and fluid phases show fundamentally different interactions with obstacles, flow spreading and dispersions, run-out dynamics, and deposition morphology. A forward-facing pyramid deflects the mass wider, and a rearward-facing pyramid arrests a portion of solid-mass at its front. Our basic study reveals that appropriately installed obstacles, their dimensions and orientations have a significant influence on the flow dynamics, material redistribution and redirection. The precise knowledge of the change in dynamics is of great importance for the optimal and effective protection of designated areas along the mountain slopes and the runout zones. Further important results are, that specific installations lead to redirect either solid, or fluid, or both, in the desired amounts and directions. The present method of the complex interactions of real two-phase mass flows with the obstacles may help us to construct defense structures and to design advanced and physics-based engineering solutions for the prevention

  17. Simulation based flow distribution network optimization for vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Ting; Devillard, Mathieu; Advani, Suresh G.

    2004-05-01

    In the vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) process, using a flow distribution network such as flow channels and high permeability fabrics can accelerate the resin infiltration of the fibre reinforcement during the manufacture of composite parts. The flow distribution network significantly influences the fill time and fill pattern and is essential for the process design. The current practice has been to cover the top surface of the fibre preform with the distribution media with the hope that the resin will flood the top surface immediately and penetrate through the thickness. However, this approach has some drawbacks. One is when the resin finds its way to the vent before it has penetrated the preform entirely, which results in a defective part or resin wastage. Also, if the composite structure contains ribs or inserts, this approach invariably results in dry spots. Instead of this intuitive approach, we propose a science-based approach to design the layout of the distribution network. Our approach uses flow simulation of the resin into the network and the preform and a genetic algorithm to optimize the flow distribution network. An experimental case study of a co-cured rib structure is conducted to demonstrate the design procedure and validate the optimized flow distribution network design. Good agreement between the flow simulations and the experimental results was observed. It was found that the proposed design algorithm effectively optimized the flow distribution network of the part considered in our case study and hence should prove to be a useful tool to extend the VARTM process to manufacture of complex structures with effective use of the distribution network layup.

  18. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China.

  19. CFD Assessment of Orifice Aspect Ratio and Mass Flow Ratio on Jet Mixing in Rectangular Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, D. B.; Smith, C. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Isothermal CFD analysis was performed on axially opposed rows of jets mixing with cross flow in a rectangular duct. Laterally, the jets' centerlines were aligned with each other on the top and bottom walls. The focus of this study was to characterize the effects of orifice aspect ratio and jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio on jet penetration and mixing. Orifice aspect ratios (L/W) of 4-to-1, 2-to-1, and 1-to-1, along with circular holes, were parametrically analyzed. Likewise, jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratios (MR) of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.25 were systematically investigated. The jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio (J) was maintained at 36 for all cases, and the orifice spacing-to-duct height (S/H) was varied until optimum mixing was attained for each configuration. The numerical results showed that orifice aspect ratio (and likewise orifice blockage) had little effect on jet penetration and mixing. Based on mixing characteristics alone, the 4-to-1 slot was comparable to the circular orifice. The 4-to-1 slot has a smaller jet wake which may be advantageous for reducing emissions. However, the axial length of a 4-to-1 slot may be prohibitively long for practical application, especially for MR of 2.0. The jet-to-mainstream mass flow ratio had a more significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. For a 4-to-1 aspect ratio orifice, the design correlating parameter for optimum mixing (C = (S/H)(sq. root J)) varied from 2.25 for a mass flow ratio of 2.0 to 1.5 for a mass flow ratio of 0.25.

  20. Does Body Mass Index Influence Behavioral Regulations, Dispositional Flow and Social Physique Anxiety in Exercise Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Ersöz, Gözde; Altiparmak, Ersin; Aşçı, F. Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow, social physique anxiety of exercisers in terms of body mass index (BMI). 782 university students participated in this study. Dispositional Flow State Scale-2, Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, Social Physique Anxiety Scale and Physical Activity Stages of Change Questionnaire were administered to participants. After controlling for gender, analysis indicated significant differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow and social physique anxiety of exercise participants with regards to BMI. In summary, the findings demonstrate that normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons while underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Additionally, participants who are underweight had higher dispositional flow and lower social physique anxiety scores than other BMI classification. Key points Normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons. Underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Underweighted participants had higher dispositional flow. Underweighted participants have lower social physique anxiety scores than normal weighted, overweight and obese participants. PMID:27274667

  1. Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-02-23

    Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

  2. Numerical Optimization Strategy for Determining 3D Flow Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Alex; Sigurdson, Marin; Mezic, Igor; Meinhart, Carl

    2015-11-01

    We present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for generating 3D flow fields from 2D PIV experimental data. An optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based simulation of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved representation of 3D steady state flow conditions. These results can be used to investigate mixing phenomena. Experimental conditions were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the temperature and velocity fields, as well as the quasi-static electric fields. The governing equations were based on a theoretical model for ac electrothermal flows. A Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm was used to achieve a better fit by minimizing the error between 2D PIV experimental velocity data and numerical simulation results at the measurement plane. By applying this hybrid method, the normalized RMS velocity error between the simulation and experimental results was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The optimization algorithm altered 3D fluid circulation patterns considerably, providing a more accurate representation of the 3D experimental flow field. This method can be generalized to a wide variety of flow problems. This research was supported by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office.

  3. Flow pattern and mass transfer characteristics of valve tray in absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurkhamidah, Siti; Altway, Ali; Wulansari, Ayu Savitri; Khanifah, Evi Fitriyah

    2015-12-01

    The flow pattern characteristics of valve tray in absorption process which is expressed in pressure drop and the number of equivalent tank in series (N) has an important role to know the efficiency and performance of a process. This study has been done in the absorption column by using water and air as liquid and gas phase, respectively. To observe pressure drop and flow pattern in the column, flow rate of liquid and air has been variated. Flow pattern has been determined by using pulse method and using NaCl as tracer. The experiment results show that the column pressure drop is mainly influenced by the liquid height on the tray. When the water flow rate is high, liquid height on the tray is higher so that the column pressure drops increases. Flow pattern characteristic of fluid on valve tray is affected by water and air flowrates. For high water flow rate, the residence time distribution (RTD) curve is sharper and the number of N is greater and the flow pattern tends to a plug flow. However, the number of N decreases when the air flowrate increases. The liquid-side mass transfer coefficient (kLa') is shown by the following empirical relationship kLa' = 2,607QL0,202Qv0,456.

  4. Robust optimal control of material flows in demand-driven supply networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumanns, Marco; Lefeber, Erjen

    2006-04-01

    We develop a model based on stochastic discrete-time controlled dynamical systems in order to derive optimal policies for controlling the material flow in supply networks. Each node in the network is described as a transducer such that the dynamics of the material and information flows within the entire network can be expressed by a system of first-order difference equations, where some inputs to the system act as external disturbances. We apply methods from constrained robust optimal control to compute the explicit control law as a function of the current state. For the numerical examples considered, these control laws correspond to certain classes of optimal ordering policies from inventory management while avoiding, however, any a priori assumptions about the general form of the policy.

  5. A nonlinear optimization approach for UPFC power flow control and voltage security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyani, Radha Padma

    This dissertation provides a nonlinear optimization algorithm for the long term control of Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) to remove overloads and voltage violations by optimized control of power flows and voltages in the power network. It provides a control strategy for finding the long term control settings of one or more UPFCs by considering all the possible settings and all the (N-1) topologies of a power network. Also, a simple evolutionary algorithm (EA) has been proposed for the placement of more than one UPFC in large power systems. In this publication dissertation, Paper 1 proposes the algorithm and provides the mathematical and empirical evidence. Paper 2 focuses on comparing the proposed algorithm with Linear Programming (LP) based corrective method proposed in literature recently and mitigating cascading failures in larger power systems. EA for placement along with preliminary results of the nonlinear optimization is given in Paper 3.

  6. Optimized and validated flow-injection spectrophotometric analysis of topiramate, piracetam and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ghada M; Abdel-Salam, Randa A; Emara, Samy

    2011-12-01

    Application of a sensitive and rapid flow injection analysis (FIA) method for determination of topiramate, piracetam, and levetiracetam in pharmaceutical formulations has been investigated. The method is based on the reaction with ortho-phtalaldehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol in a basic buffer and measurement of absorbance at 295 nm under flow conditions. Variables affecting the determination such as sample injection volume, pH, ionic strength, reagent concentrations, flow rate of reagent and other FIA parameters were optimized to produce the most sensitive and reproducible results using a quarter-fraction factorial design, for five factors at two levels. Also, the method has been optimized and fully validated in terms of linearity and range, limit of detection and quantitation, precision, selectivity and accuracy. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

  7. Distribution-Agnostic Stochastic Optimal Power Flow for Distribution Grids: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Kyri; Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Summers, Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This paper outlines a data-driven, distributionally robust approach to solve chance-constrained AC optimal power flow problems in distribution networks. Uncertain forecasts for loads and power generated by photovoltaic (PV) systems are considered, with the goal of minimizing PV curtailment while meeting power flow and voltage regulation constraints. A data- driven approach is utilized to develop a distributionally robust conservative convex approximation of the chance-constraints; particularly, the mean and covariance matrix of the forecast errors are updated online, and leveraged to enforce voltage regulation with predetermined probability via Chebyshev-based bounds. By combining an accurate linear approximation of the AC power flow equations with the distributionally robust chance constraint reformulation, the resulting optimization problem becomes convex and computationally tractable.

  8. A Practically Validated Intelligent Calibration Circuit Using Optimized ANN for Flow Measurement by Venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata, Santhosh Krishnan; Roy, Binoy Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Design of an intelligent flow measurement technique using venturi flow meter is reported in this paper. The objectives of the present work are: (1) to extend the linearity range of measurement to 100 % of full scale input range, (2) to make the measurement technique adaptive to variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio of venturi nozzle and pipe (β), liquid density, and liquid temperature, and (3) to achieve the objectives (1) and (2) using an optimized neural network. The output of venturi flow meter is differential pressure. It is converted to voltage by using a suitable data conversion unit. A suitable optimized artificial neural network (ANN) is added, in place of conventional calibration circuit. ANN is trained, tested with simulated data considering variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio between venturi nozzle and pipe, liquid density, and liquid temperature. The proposed technique is then subjected to practical data for validation. Results show that the proposed technique has fulfilled the objectives.

  9. Spatially distributed control for optimal drag reduction of the flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, Philippe; Hildebrand, Roland; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We report high drag reduction in direct numerical simulations of controlled flows past circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers of 300 and 1000. The flow is controlled by the azimuthal component of the tangential velocity of the cylinder surface. Starting from a spanwise-uniform velocity profile that leads to high drag reduction, the optimization procedure identifies, for the same energy input, spanwise-varying velocity profiles that lead to higher drag reduction. The three-dimensional variations of the velocity field, corresponding to modes A and B of three-dimensional wake instabilities, are largely responsible for this drag reduction. The spanwise wall velocity variations introduce streamwise vortex braids in the wake that are responsible for reducing the drag induced by the primary spanwise vortices shed by the cylinder. The results demonstrate that extending two-dimensional controllers to three-dimensional flows is not optimal as three-dimensional control strategies can lead efficiently to higher drag reduction.

  10. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  11. Pareto-optimal solutions for environmental flow schemes incorporating the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2007-06-01

    The temporal variations of natural flows are essential elements for preserving the ecological health of a river which are addressed in this paper by the environmental flow schemes that incorporate the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime. We present an optimization framework to find the Pareto-optimal solutions for various flow schemes. The proposed framework integrates (1) the range of variability approach for evaluating the hydrologic alterations; (2) the standardized precipitation index approach for establishing the variation criteria for the wet, normal, and dry years; (3) a weir operation model for simulating the system of flows; and (4) a multiobjective optimization genetic algorithm for search of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The proposed framework is applied to the Kaoping diversion weir in Taiwan. The results reveal that the time-varying schemes incorporating the intra-annual variability in the environmental flow prescriptions promote the ecosystem and human needs fitness. Incorporation of the interannual flow variability using different criteria established for three types of water year further promotes both fitnesses. The merit of incorporating the interannual variability may be superimposed on that of incorporating only the intra-annual flow variability. The Pareto-optimal solutions searched with a limited range of flows replicate satisfactorily those obtained with a full search range. The limited-range Pareto front may be used as a surrogate of the full-range one if feasible prescriptions are to be found among the regular flows.

  12. Differential mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry history, theory, design optimization, simulations, and applications.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bradley B; Nazarov, Erkinjon G; Londry, Frank; Vouros, Paul; Covey, Thomas R

    2016-10-01

    This review of differential mobility spectrometry focuses primarily on mass spectrometry coupling, starting with the history of the development of this technique in the Soviet Union. Fundamental principles of the separation process are covered, in addition to efforts related to design optimization and advancements in computer simulations. The flexibility of differential mobility spectrometry design features is explored in detail, particularly with regards to separation capability, speed, and ion transmission. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:687-737, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. XAFSmass: a program for calculating the optimal mass of XAFS samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Chernikov, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new implementation of the XAFSmass program that calculates the optimal mass of XAFS samples. It has several improvements as compared to the old Windows based program XAFSmass: 1) it is truly platform independent, as provided by Python language, 2) it has an improved parser of chemical formulas that enables parentheses and nested inclusion-to-matrix weight percentages. The program calculates the absorption edge height given the total optical thickness, operates with differently determined sample amounts (mass, pressure, density or sample area) depending on the aggregate state of the sample and solves the inverse problem of finding the elemental composition given the experimental absorption edge jump and the chemical formula.

  14. Study of mass consistency LES/FDF techniques for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Cesar; Figueira da Silva, Luís Fernando

    2015-07-01

    A hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered density function (LES/FDF) approach is used for studying chemically reacting flows with detailed chemistry. In particular, techniques utilised for ensuring a mass consistent coupling between LES and FDF are discussed. The purpose of these techniques is to maintain a correct spatial distribution of the computational particles representing specified amounts of fluid. A particular mass consistency technique due to Y.Z. Zhang and D.C. Haworth (A general mass consistency algorithm for hybrid particle/finite-volume PDF methods, J. Comput. Phys. 194 (2004), pp. 156-193) and their associated algorithms are implemented in a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics code suitable for the simulation of variable density flows, representative of those encountered in actual combustion applications. To assess the effectiveness of the referenced technique for enforcing LES/FDF mass consistency, two- and three-dimensional simulations of a temporal mixing layer using detailed and reduced chemistry mechanisms are carried out. The parametric analysis performed focuses on determining the influence on the level of mass consistency errors of parameters such as the initial number of particles per cell and the initial density ratio of the mixing layers. Particular emphasis is put on the computational burden that represents the use of such a mass consistency technique. The results show the suitability of this type of technique for ensuring the mass consistency required when utilising hybrid LES/FDF approaches. The level of agreement of the computed results with experimental data is also illustrated.

  15. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  16. Modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneveld, J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; de Boer, M. J.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Mehendale, A.; Lötters, J. C.; Dijkstra, M.; Wiegerink, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, design and realization of micromachined Coriolis mass flow sensors. A lumped element model is used to analyze and predict the sensor performance. The model is used to design a sensor for a flow range of 0-1.2 g h-1 with a maximum pressure drop of 1 bar. The sensor was realized using semi-circular channels just beneath the surface of a silicon wafer. The channels have thin silicon nitride walls to minimize the channel mass with respect to the mass of the moving fluid. Special comb-shaped electrodes are integrated on the channels for capacitive readout of the extremely small Coriolis displacements. The comb-shaped electrode design eliminates the need for multiple metal layers and sacrificial layer etching methods. Furthermore, it prevents squeezed film damping due to a thin layer of air between the capacitor electrodes. As a result, the sensor operates at atmospheric pressure with a quality factor in the order of 40 and does not require vacuum packaging like other micro Coriolis flow sensors. Measurement results using water, ethanol, white gas and argon are presented, showing that the sensor measures true mass flow. The measurement error is currently in the order of 1% of the full scale of 1.2 g h-1.

  17. Effects of orbit squeezing on poloidal mass flow and bootstrap current in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C. ); Hsu, C.T. ); Hazeltine, R.D. )

    1994-10-01

    It is shown, by solving the drift kinetic equation, that the asymptotic values of the poloidal mass flow and the bootstrap current in the banana regime of large-aspect-ratio tokamak plasmas are not affected by orbit squeezing. However, because the definition of ion collisionality [upsilon][sub *[ital i

  18. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of this calculation document is to develop the bases for the material balances of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Level 1 Process Flow Diagram (PFD). The attached mass balances support revision two of the PFD for the MCO and provide future reference.

  20. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β}-plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  1. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FI...

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-05-11

    The purpose of these calculations is to develop the material balances for documentation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Process Flow Diagram (PFD) and future reference. The attached mass balances were prepared to support revision two of the PFD for the CSB. The calculations refer to diagram H-2-825869.

  3. Emissions of OTNE (Iso-E-super) - mass flows in sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Bester, Kai; Klasmeier, Jörg; Kupper, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    The fate and mass flows of OTNE ([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-2,3,8,8-tetramethylnaphthalen-2yl]ethan-1-one) which is commercialized as Iso-E-Super were studied in three large scale sewage treatment plants (STPs) in detail. The results are compared to 14 smaller ones located in Germany and Switzerland. OTNE inflow concentrations ranged from 4000 to 13,000 ngl(-1) while the effluent concentrations ranged from 500 to 6,900 ngl(-1). It is eliminated from the waste water with 56-64% during waste water treatment. High OTNE concentrations in sewage sludge showed that the elimination was mainly driven by sorption to sludge. This complies with major elimination in the first settling basins (primary settling tanks) while it was removed to a lesser extent in the aeration basin of the activated sludge treatment or in successive biofilters. The mass flows of OTNE in the influent of the German STPs were between 0.9 and 1.9 g per inhabitant and year. In the annual effluents mass flows of OTNE ranged between 0.2 and 0.8 g per inhabitant which complies with data measured in 13 smaller STPs from Switzerland. The similarity of data suggests that the observed mass flow data might be extrapolated to other European regions.

  4. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  5. Optimal partitioning theory revisited: nonstructural carbohydrates dominate root mass responses to nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Richard K; Iyer, Meera; Walters, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Under optimal partitioning theory (OPT), plants preferentially allocate biomass to acquire the resource that most limits growth. Within this framework, higher root mass under low nutrients is often assumed to reflect an allocation response to build more absorptive surface. However, higher root mass also could result from increased storage of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) without an increase in non-storage mass or root surface area. To test the relative contributions of TNC and non-storage mass as components of root mass responses to resources, we grew seedlings of seven northern hardwood tree species (black, red, and white oak, sugar and red maple, American beech, and black cherry) in a factorial light x nitrogen (N) greenhouse experiment. Because root mass is a coarse metric of absorptive surface, we also examined treatment effects on fine-root surface area (FRSA). Consistent with OPT, total root mass as a proportion of whole-plant mass generally was greater in low vs. high N. However, changes in root mass were influenced by TNC mass in all seven species and were especially strong in the three oak species. In contrast, non-storage mass contributed to increased total root mass under low N in three of the seven species. Root morphology also responded, with higher fine-root surface area (normalized to root mass) under low vs. high N in four species. Although biomass partitioning responses to resources were consistent with OPT, our results challenge the implicit assumption that increases in root mass under low nutrient levels primarily reflect allocation shifts to build more root surface area. Rather, root responses to low N included increases in: TNC, non-storage mass and fine-root surface area, with increases in TNC being the largest and most consistent of these responses. The greatest TNC accumulation occurred when C was abundant relative to N. Total nonstructural carbohydrates storage could provide seedlings a carbon buffer when respiratory or growth

  6. Mass transfer in a flow past a non-porous catalyst sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2015-11-01

    Mass transfer in a flow past a particle with a surface chemical reaction occurs in applications involving catalytic reaction. This type of the mass transfer problem has been analyzed by solving the convection-diffusion equation for Stokes flow (Acrivos et al., 1962) or flow at low Reynolds number (Taylor 1963, Gupalo et al., 1972). The objective of this study is to extend our understanding of this mass transfer problem to higher Reynolds number (up to 100) and assemblies of several particles by using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of gas-solid flow. A uniform flow past a non-porous spherical particle with a first-order surface reaction is simulated. The non-dimensional reaction rate constant is the important parameter in the single particle case. The PR-DNS results at low Reynolds number for a single particle are first compared with 2D analytical solutions for concentration fields and the Sherwood number. Finally, the dependence of the concentration field on the non-dimensional reaction rate constant, and comparison of PR-DNS results with other Sherwood number correlations that use the Reynolds analogy to adapt Nusselt number correlations (which do not explicitly account for surface reactions) are explored at high Reynolds number. CBET 1034307, CBET 1336941.

  7. Superconductivity. Quasiparticle mass enhancement approaching optimal doping in a high-T(c) superconductor.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, B J; Sebastian, S E; McDonald, R D; Day, James; Tan, B S; Zhu, Z; Betts, J B; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Harrison, N

    2015-04-17

    In the quest for superconductors with higher transition temperatures (T(c)), one emerging motif is that electronic interactions favorable for superconductivity can be enhanced by fluctuations of a broken-symmetry phase. Recent experiments have suggested the existence of the requisite broken-symmetry phase in the high-T(c) cuprates, but the impact of such a phase on the ground-state electronic interactions has remained unclear. We used magnetic fields exceeding 90 tesla to access the underlying metallic state of the cuprate YBa2Cu3O(6+δ) over a wide range of doping, and observed magnetic quantum oscillations that reveal a strong enhancement of the quasiparticle effective mass toward optimal doping. This mass enhancement results from increasing electronic interactions approaching optimal doping, and suggests a quantum critical point at a hole doping of p(crit) ≈ 0.18. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Quasiparticle mass enhancement approaching optimal doping in a high-Tc superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Ramshaw, B. J.; Sebastian, S. E.; McDonald, R. D.; ...

    2015-03-26

    In the quest for superconductors with higher transition temperatures (Tc), one emerging motif is that electronic interactions favorable for superconductivity can be enhanced by fluctuations of a broken-symmetry phase. In recent experiments it is suggested that the existence of the requisite broken-symmetry phase in the high-Tc cuprates, but the impact of such a phase on the ground-state electronic interactions has remained unclear. Here, we used magnetic fields exceeding 90 tesla to access the underlying metallic state of the cuprate YBa2Cu3O6+δ over a wide range of doping, and observed magnetic quantum oscillations that reveal a strong enhancement of the quasiparticle effectivemore » mass toward optimal doping. Finally, this mass enhancement results from increasing electronic interactions approaching optimal doping, and suggests a quantum critical point at a hole doping of pcrit ≈ 0.18.« less

  9. Optimization of a Breast Mass Classifier for Computer-Aided Ultrasound Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrè, M. P.; Galperin, M.; Contro, G.; Omid, N.; Olson, L.

    The goal of this research was to optimize performance of a Computer-Aided Diagnostic system to identify, analyze and compare breast masses based on parameters measured in the ultrasound image. We compared case-based reasoning using Relative Similarity to an Artificial Neural Network in order to implement an objective form of the ACR BIRADS scheme to describe and score breast masses. The image feature set was reduced to nine including margins, shape, echogenicity, echo texture, orientation and posterior acoustic attenuation. Both classifiers performed well with a high ROC AZ although RS performed significantly better than the ANN in Specificity, PPV and achieved the goal of very high Specificity without a reduction in Sensitivity. Compared to a preliminary version of the RS classifier this optimized version of RS has significantly higher AZ (0.96 vs. 0.93)

  10. A simulation of gas flow: The dependence of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient on molecular mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, William W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; McKenzie, David R.

    2016-09-01

    The tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) influences the rate of pressure driven flow of a gas in a channel. The manner in which TMAC depends on the molecular mass is of importance as it influences the extent to which gas flow rates are affected by their mass, but there are conflicting opinions in the literature concerning the extent and even the sign of this dependence. We simulate the flow of the noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using molecular dynamics with Lennard-Jones potentials. The interaction with the wall is made realistic by simulating five layers of mobile atoms and allowing for adsorbed gas on the wall. With increasing mass of the gas, the TMAC exhibits asymptotic behaviour in approaching the value assumed to apply for an entrapped atom. Either increasing or decreasing TMAC with respect to an increasing molecular mass is produced, depending on the assumed TMAC of an entrapped atom. This resolves a conflict in the literature, where both increasing and decreasing trends are observed with mass.

  11. Mass Conservative and Total Variation Diminishing Implementation of Various Hydrological Flow Routing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanenberg, Dirk; Alvarado Montero, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological flow routing methods are widely used as components of distributed hydrological models and in operational flow forecasting systems, often in combination with data assimilation and predictive control techniques. The most popular ones such as the Muskingum-Cunge approach implement variable parameters to relate the storage to the topology of the river reach and numerical parameters of the schematization. Although this often increases the accuracy of the approach, it may also lead to mass errors and other numerical issues. Whereas fixes for the mass error has been previously discussed by several authors, the numerical robustness is still not properly addressed. We present a novel approach to reformulate hydrological routing schemes as a cascade of implicit pool routing models. Its numerical implementation is mass conservative and total variation diminishing, i.e. the solution does not oscillate or overshoot, for arbitrary time steps. It is shown that these numerical properties are achieved regardless of the accuracy of the scheme and its physical routing characteristics. Numerical experiments compare the computational performance and accuracy of the novel, reformulated approach with existing schemes including linear reservoir routing, nonlinear reservoir routing, and the original Muskingum-Cunge method. We show that the approach can reproduce the original schemes, if these are already mass conservative, otherwise fixes the mass conservation in the reformulated version and improves the solution at sharp gradients by suppressing numerical oscillations, overshooting or negative flows.

  12. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  13. Calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  14. Calibration of the NASA GRC 16 In. Mass-Flow Plug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Friedlander, David J.; Saunders, J. David; Frate, Franco C.; Foster, Lancert E.

    2012-01-01

    The results of an experimental calibration of the NASA Glenn Research Center 16 in. Mass-Flow Plug (MFP) are presented and compared to a previously obtained calibration of a 15 in. Mass-Flow Plug. An ASME low-beta, long-radius nozzle was used as the calibration reference. The discharge coefficient for the ASME nozzle was obtained by numerically simulating the flow through the nozzle from the WIND-US code. The results showed agreement between the 15 in. and 16 in. MFPs for area ratios (MFP to pipe area ratio) greater than 0.6 but deviate at area ratios below this value for reasons that are not fully understood. A general uncertainty analysis was also performed and indicates that large uncertainties in the calibration are present for low MFP area ratios.

  15. Stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder.

    PubMed

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md; Ishak, Anuar

    2014-02-26

    This paper is about the stagnation point flow and mass transfer with chemical reaction past a stretching/shrinking cylinder. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformation. The transformed equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, Schmidt number, velocity profiles as well as concentration profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Schmidt number on the flow and mass transfer characteristics are examined. The study indicates that dual solutions exist for the shrinking cylinder but for the stretching cylinder, the solution is unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and the mass transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases.

  16. Optimization and Comparison of Multiple MALDI Matrix Application Methods for Small Molecule Mass Spectrometric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The matrix application technique is critical to the success of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) experiment. This work presents a systematic study aiming to evaluate three different matrix application techniques for MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) of endogenous metabolites from legume plant, Medicago truncatula, root nodules. Airbrush, automatic sprayer, and sublimation matrix application methods were optimized individually for detection of metabolites in the positive ionization mode exploiting the two most widely used MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Analytical reproducibility and analyte diffusion were examined and compared side-by-side for each method. When using DHB, the optimized method developed for the automatic matrix sprayer system resulted in approximately double the number of metabolites detected when compared to sublimation and airbrush. The automatic sprayer method also showed more reproducible results and less analyte diffusion than the airbrush method. Sublimation matrix deposition yielded high spatial resolution and reproducibility but fewer analytes in the higher m/z range (500–1000 m/z). When the samples were placed in a humidity chamber after sublimation, there was enhanced detection of higher mass metabolites but increased analyte diffusion in the lower mass range. When using CHCA, the optimized automatic sprayer method and humidified sublimation method resulted in double the number of metabolites detected compared to standard airbrush method. PMID:25331774

  17. Optimization and comparison of multiple MALDI matrix application methods for small molecule mass spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Rawson, Stephanie; Li, Lingjun

    2014-10-21

    The matrix application technique is critical to the success of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) experiment. This work presents a systematic study aiming to evaluate three different matrix application techniques for MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) of endogenous metabolites from legume plant, Medicago truncatula, root nodules. Airbrush, automatic sprayer, and sublimation matrix application methods were optimized individually for detection of metabolites in the positive ionization mode exploiting the two most widely used MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Analytical reproducibility and analyte diffusion were examined and compared side-by-side for each method. When using DHB, the optimized method developed for the automatic matrix sprayer system resulted in approximately double the number of metabolites detected when compared to sublimation and airbrush. The automatic sprayer method also showed more reproducible results and less analyte diffusion than the airbrush method. Sublimation matrix deposition yielded high spatial resolution and reproducibility but fewer analytes in the higher m/z range (500-1000 m/z). When the samples were placed in a humidity chamber after sublimation, there was enhanced detection of higher mass metabolites but increased analyte diffusion in the lower mass range. When using CHCA, the optimized automatic sprayer method and humidified sublimation method resulted in double the number of metabolites detected compared to standard airbrush method.

  18. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  19. A multi-agent technique for contingency constrained optimal power flows

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, S.; Ramesh, V.C. . Engineering Design Research Center)

    1994-05-01

    This paper does three things. First, it proposes that each critical contingency in a power system be represented by a correction time'' (the time required to eliminate the violations produced by the contingency), rather than by a set of hard constraints. Second, it adds these correction times to an optimal power flow and decomposes the resulting problem into a number of smaller optimization problems. Third, it proposes a multiagent technique for solving the smaller problems in parallel. The agents encapsulate traditional optimization algorithms as well as a new algorithm, called the voyager, that generates starting points for the traditional algorithms. All the agents communicate asynchronously, meaning that they can work in parallel without ever interrupting or delaying one another. The resulting scheme has potential for handling power system contingencies and other difficult global optimization problems.

  20. Squire's transformation and 3D Optimal Perturbations in Bounded Parallel Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Soundar Jerome, J. John

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this short communication is to present the implication of Squire's transformation on the optimal transient growth of arbitrary 3D disturbances in parallel shear flow bounded in the cross-stream direction. To our best knowledge this simple property has never been discussed before. In particular it allows to express the long-time optimal growth for perturbations of arbitrary wavenumbers as the product of the gains from the 2D optimal at a lower Reynolds number itself due to the Orr-mechanism by a term that may be identified as due to the lift-up mechanism. This property predict scalings for the 3D optimal perturbation well verified by direct computation. It may be extended to take into account buoyancy effect.