Science.gov

Sample records for optimal sites selection

  1. Optimizing Site Selection for HEDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    MSP 2001 will be conducting environmental assessment for the Human exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Program in order to safeguard future human exploration of the planet, in addition to geological studies being addressed by the APEX payload. In particular, the MECA experiment (see other abstracts, this volume), will address chemical toxicity of the soil, the presence of adhesive or abrasive soil dust components, and the geoelectrical-triboelectrical character of the surface environment. The attempt will be to quantify hazards to humans and machinery structures deriving from compounds that poison, corrode, abrade, invade (lungs or machinery), contaminate, or electrically interfere with the human presence. The DART experiment, will also address the size and electrical nature of airborne dust. Photo-imaging of the local scene with RAC and Pancam will be able to assess dust raising events such as local thermal vorticity-driven dust devils. The need to introduce discussion of HEDS landing site requirements stems from potential conflict, but also potential synergism with other '01 site requirements. In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) mission components desire as much solar radiation as possible, with some very limited amount of dust available; the planetary-astrobiology mission component desires sufficient rock abundance without inhibiting rover activities (and an interesting geological niche if available), the radiation component may again have special requirements, as will the engineers concerned with mission safety and mission longevity. The '01 mission affords an excellent opportunity to emphasize HEDS landing site requirements, given the constraint that both recent missions (Pathfinder, Mars '98) and future missions (MSP '03 & '05) have had or will have strong geological science drivers in the site selection process. What type of landing site best facilitates investigation of the physical, chemical, and behavioral properties of soil and dust? There are

  2. Optimizing Site Selection in Urban Areas in Northern Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkers, K.; Kraft, T.; Bethmann, F.; Husen, S.; Schnellmann, M.

    2012-04-01

    There is a need to observe weak seismic events (M<2) in areas close to potential nuclear-waste repositories or nuclear power plants, in order to analyze the underlying seismo-tectonic processes and estimate their seismic hazard. We are therefore densifying the existing Swiss Digital Seismic Network in northern Switzerland by additional 20 stations. The new network that will be in operation by the end of 2012, aims at observing seismicity in northern Switzerland with a completeness of M_c=1.0 and a location error < 0.5 km in epicenter and < 2 km in focal depth. Monitoring of weak seismic events in this region is challenging, because the area of interest is densely populated and geology is dominated by the Swiss molasse basin. A optimal network-design and a thoughtful choice for station-sites is, therefore, mandatory. To help with decision making we developed a step-wise approach to find the optimum network configuration. Our approach is based on standard network optimization techniques regarding the localization error. As a new feature, our approach uses an ambient noise model to compute expected signal-to-noise ratios for a given site. The ambient noise model uses information on land use and major infrastructures such as highways and train lines. We ran a series of network optimizations with increasing number of stations until the requirements regarding localization error and magnitude of completeness are reached. The resulting network geometry serves as input for the site selection. Site selection is done by using a newly developed multi-step assessment-scheme that takes into account local noise level, geology, infrastructure, and costs necessary to realize the station. The assessment scheme is weighting the different parameters and the most promising sites are identified. In a first step, all potential sites are classified based on information from topographic maps and site inspection. In a second step, local noise conditions are measured at selected sites. We

  3. A scenario optimization model for dynamic reserve site selection

    Treesearch

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Robert G. Haight; Charles S. ReVelle

    2004-01-01

    Conservation planners are called upon to make choices and trade-offs about the preservation of natural areas for the protection of species in the face of development pressures. We addressed the problem of selecting sites for protection over time with the objective of maximizing species representation, with uncertainty about future site development, and with periodic...

  4. Optimizing landfill site selection by using land classification maps.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, M; Homaee, M; Mahmoodi, S; Pazira, E; Van Genuchten, M Th

    2015-05-01

    Municipal solid waste disposal is a major environmental concern throughout the world. Proper landfill siting involves many environmental, economic, technical, and sociocultural challenges. In this study, a new quantitative method for landfill siting that reduces the number of evaluation criteria, simplifies siting procedures, and enhances the utility of available land evaluation maps was proposed. The method is demonstrated by selecting a suitable landfill site near the city of Marvdasht in Iran. The approach involves two separate stages. First, necessary criteria for preliminary landfill siting using four constraints and eight factors were obtained from a land classification map initially prepared for irrigation purposes. Thereafter, the criteria were standardized using a rating approach and then weighted to obtain a suitability map for landfill siting, with ratings in a 0-1 domain and divided into five suitability classes. Results were almost identical to those obtained with a more traditional environmental landfill siting approach. Because of far fewer evaluation criteria, the proposed weighting method was much easier to implement while producing a more convincing database for landfill siting. The classification map also considered land productivity. In the second stage, the six best alternative sites were evaluated for final landfill siting using four additional criteria. Sensitivity analyses were furthermore conducted to assess the stability of the obtained ranking. Results indicate that the method provides a precise siting procedure that should convince all pertinent stakeholders.

  5. Risk based treatment selection and optimization of contaminated site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Scholz, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    During the past few years numerous remediation technologies for the cleanup of contaminated sites have been developed. Because of the associated uncertainties concerning treatment reliability it is important to develop strategies to characterize their risks to achieve the cleanup requirements. For this purpose it is necessary to integrate existing knowledge on treatment efficacy and efficiency into the planning process for the management of contaminated sites. Based on field-scale experience data for the remediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, two treatment technologies, biological land treatment and phyisco-chemical soil washing, were analyzed with respect to their general performance risks to achieve given cleanup standards. For a specific contamination scenario, efficient application ranges were identified using the method of linear optimization in combination with sensitivity analysis. Various constraints including cleanup standards, available financial budget, amount of contamination and others were taken into account. While land treatment was found to be most efficient at higher cleanup standards and less contaminated soils, soil washing exhibited better efficiency at lower cleanup standards and higher contaminated soils. These results compare favorably with practical experiences and indicate the utility of this approach to support decision making and planning processes for the general management of contaminated sites. In addition, the method allows for the simultaneous integration of various aspects such as risk based characteristics of treatment technologies, cleanup standards and more general ecological and economical remedial action objectives.

  6. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  7. Optimal landing site selection based on safety index during planetary descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pingyuan; Ge, Dantong; Gao, Ai

    2017-03-01

    Landing safety is the prior concern in planetary exploration missions. With the development of precise landing technology, future missions require vehicles to land on places of great scientific interest which are usually surrounded by rocks and craters. In order to perform a safe landing, the vehicle should be capable of detecting hazards, estimating its fuel consumption as well as touchdown performance, and locating a safe spot to land. The landing site selection process can be treated as an optimization problem which, however, cannot be efficiently solved through traditional optimization methods due to its complexity. Hence, the paper proposes a synthetic landing area assessment criterion, safety index, as a solution of the problem, which selects the best landing site by assessing terrain safety, fuel consumption and touchdown performance during descent. The computation effort is cut down after reducing the selection scope and the optimal landing site is found through a quick one-dimensional search. A typical example based on the Mars Science Laboratory mission is simulated to demonstrate the capability of the method. It is proved that the proposed strategy manages to pick out a safe landing site for the mission effectively. The safety index can be applied in various planetary descent phases and provides reference for future mission designs.

  8. Analysis Methodology for Optimal Selection of Ground Station Site in Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, J.; Farjas, M.; Martínez, R.

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of ground station sites is especially important in complex missions that include several small satellites (clusters or constellations) such as the QB50 project, where one ground station would be able to track several spatial vehicles, even simultaneously. In this regard the design of the communication system has to carefully take into account the ground station site and relevant signal phenomena, depending on the frequency band. To propose the optimal location of the ground station, these aspects become even more relevant to establish a trusted communication link due to the ground segment site in urban areas and/or selection of low orbits for the space segment. In addition, updated cartography with high resolution data of the location and its surroundings help to develop recommendations in the design of its location for spatial vehicles tracking and hence to improve effectiveness. The objectives of this analysis methodology are: completion of cartographic information, modelling the obstacles that hinder communication between the ground and space segment and representation in the generated 3D scene of the degree of impairment in the signal/noise of the phenomena that interferes with communication. The integration of new technologies of geographic data capture, such as 3D Laser Scan, determine that increased optimization of the antenna elevation mask, in its AOS and LOS azimuths along the horizon visible, maximizes visibility time with spatial vehicles. Furthermore, from the three-dimensional cloud of points captured, specific information is selected and, using 3D modeling techniques, the 3D scene of the antenna location site and surroundings is generated. The resulting 3D model evidences nearby obstacles related to the cartographic conditions such as mountain formations and buildings, and any additional obstacles that interfere with the operational quality of the antenna (other antennas and electronic devices that emit or receive in the same bandwidth

  9. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

    2004-11-30

    While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

  10. Selection of optimal recording sites for limited lead body surface potential mapping: A sequential selection based approach

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Dewar D; Nugent, Chris D; Donnelly, Mark P; Lux, Robert L; McCullagh, Paul J; Black, Norman D

    2006-01-01

    Background In this study we propose the development of a new algorithm for selecting optimal recording sites for limited lead body surface potential mapping. The proposed algorithm differs from previously reported methods in that it is based upon a simple and intuitive data driven technique that does not make any presumptions about deterministic characteristics of the data. It uses a forward selection based search technique to find the best combination of electrocardiographic leads. Methods The study was conducted using a dataset consisting of body surface potential maps (BSPM) recorded from 116 subjects which included 59 normals and 57 subjects exhibiting evidence of old Myocardial Infarction (MI). The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using spatial RMS voltage error and correlation coefficient to compare original and reconstructed map frames. Results In all, three configurations of the algorithm were evaluated and it was concluded that there was little difference in the performance of the various configurations. In addition to observing the performance of the selection algorithm, several lead subsets of 32 electrodes as chosen by the various configurations of the algorithm were evaluated. The rationale for choosing this number of recording sites was to allow comparison with a previous study that used a different algorithm, where 32 leads were deemed to provide an acceptable level of reconstruction performance. Conclusion It was observed that although the lead configurations suggested in this study were not identical to that suggested in the previous work, the systems did bear similar characteristics in that recording sites were chosen with greatest density in the precordial region. PMID:16503972

  11. Using maximum entropy modeling for optimal selection of sampling sites for monitoring networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Kumar, Sunil; Barnett, David T.; Evangelista, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring programs must efficiently describe state shifts. We propose using maximum entropy modeling to select dissimilar sampling sites to capture environmental variability at low cost, and demonstrate a specific application: sample site selection for the Central Plains domain (453,490 km2) of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). We relied on four environmental factors: mean annual temperature and precipitation, elevation, and vegetation type. A “sample site” was defined as a 20 km × 20 km area (equal to NEON’s airborne observation platform [AOP] footprint), within which each 1 km2 cell was evaluated for each environmental factor. After each model run, the most environmentally dissimilar site was selected from all potential sample sites. The iterative selection of eight sites captured approximately 80% of the environmental envelope of the domain, an improvement over stratified random sampling and simple random designs for sample site selection. This approach can be widely used for cost-efficient selection of survey and monitoring sites.

  12. Wind data for wind driven plant. [site selection for optimal performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stodhart, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Simple, averaged wind velocity data provide information on energy availability, facilitate generator site selection and enable appropriate operating ranges to be established for windpowered plants. They also provide a basis for the prediction of extreme wind speeds.

  13. Selective Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    optimization solvers, they typically exhibit extremely poor performance . We develop a variety of effective model and algorithm enhancement techniques...commercial optimization solvers, they typically exhibit extremely poor performance . We develop a variety of effective model and algorithm enhancement ...class of problems, and developed strengthened formulations and algorithmic techniques which perform significantly better than standard MIP

  14. Optimizing nest survival and female survival: Consequences of nest site selection for Canada Geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Grand, J.B.; Fondell, T.F.; Anthony, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between attributes of nest sites used by Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, and patterns in nest and female survival. We aimed to determine whether nest site attributes related to nest and female survival differed and whether nest site attributes related to nest survival changed within and among years. Nest site attributes that we examined included vegetation at and surrounding the nest, as well as associations with other nesting birds. Optimal nest site characteristics were different depending on whether nest survival or female survival was examined. Prior to 25 May, the odds of daily survival for nests in tall shrubs and on islands were 2.92 and 2.26 times greater, respectively, than for nests in short shrub sites. Bald Eagles (Halieaeetus leucocephalus) are the major predator during the early breeding season and their behavior was likely important in determining this pattern. After 25 May, when eagle predation is limited due to the availability of alternative prey, no differences in nest survival among the nest site types were found. In addition, nest survival was positively related to the density of other Canada Goose nests near the nest site. Although the number of detected mortalities for females was relatively low, a clear pattern was found, with mortality three times more likely at nest sites dominated by high shrub density within 50 m than at open sites dominated by low shrub density. The negative relationship of nest concealment and adult survival is consistent with that found in other studies of ground-nesting birds. Physical barriers that limited access to nest sites by predators and sites that allowed for early detection of predators were important characteristics of nest site quality for Canada Geese and nest site quality shifted within seasons, likely as a result of shifting predator-prey interactions.

  15. Optimal site selection for a high resolution ice core record in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, T.; Roberts, J.; Moy, A.; Curran, M.; Tozer, C.; Gallant, A.; Abram, N.; van Ommen, T.; Young, D.; Grima, C.; Blankenship, D.; Siegert, M.

    2015-11-01

    Ice cores provide some of the best dated and most comprehensive proxy records, as they yield a vast and growing array of proxy indicators. Selecting a site for ice core drilling is nonetheless challenging, as the assessment of potential new sites needs to consider a variety of factors. Here, we demonstrate a systematic approach to site selection for a new East Antarctic high resolution ice core record. Specifically, seven criteria are considered: (1) 2000 year old ice at 300 m depth, (2) above 1000 m elevation, (3) a minimum accumulation rate of 250 mm yr-1 IE, (4) minimal surface re-working to preserve the deposited climate signal, (5) a site with minimal displacement or elevation change of ice at 300 m depth, (6) a strong teleconnection to mid-latitude climate and (7) an appropriately complementary relationship to the existing Law Dome record (a high resolution record in East Antarctica). Once assessment of these physical characteristics identified promising regions, logistical considerations (for site access and ice core retrieval) were briefly considered. We use Antarctic surface mass balance syntheses, along with ground-truthing of satellite data by airborne radar surveys to produce all-of-Antarctica maps of surface roughness, age at specified depth, elevation and displacement change and surface air temperature correlations to pinpoint promising locations. We also use the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast ERA 20th Century reanalysis (ERA-20C) to ensure a site complementary to the Law Dome record is selected. We find three promising sites in the Indian Ocean sector of East Antarctica in the coastal zone from Enderby Land to the Ingrid Christensen Coast (50-100° E). Although we focus on East Antarctica for a new ice core site, the methodology is more generally applicable and we include key parameters for all of Antarctica which may be useful for ice core site selection elsewhere and/or for other purposes.

  16. Optimal site selection for a high-resolution ice core record in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Tessa R.; Roberts, Jason L.; Moy, Andrew D.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Tozer, Carly R.; Gallant, Ailie J. E.; Abram, Nerilie J.; van Ommen, Tas D.; Young, Duncan A.; Grima, Cyril; Blankenship, Don D.; Siegert, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Ice cores provide some of the best-dated and most comprehensive proxy records, as they yield a vast and growing array of proxy indicators. Selecting a site for ice core drilling is nonetheless challenging, as the assessment of potential new sites needs to consider a variety of factors. Here, we demonstrate a systematic approach to site selection for a new East Antarctic high-resolution ice core record. Specifically, seven criteria are considered: (1) 2000-year-old ice at 300 m depth; (2) above 1000 m elevation; (3) a minimum accumulation rate of 250 mm years-1 IE (ice equivalent); (4) minimal surface reworking to preserve the deposited climate signal; (5) a site with minimal displacement or elevation change in ice at 300 m depth; (6) a strong teleconnection to midlatitude climate; and (7) an appropriately complementary relationship to the existing Law Dome record (a high-resolution record in East Antarctica). Once assessment of these physical characteristics identified promising regions, logistical considerations (for site access and ice core retrieval) were briefly considered. We use Antarctic surface mass balance syntheses, along with ground-truthing of satellite data by airborne radar surveys to produce all-of-Antarctica maps of surface roughness, age at specified depth, elevation and displacement change, and surface air temperature correlations to pinpoint promising locations. We also use the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast ERA 20th Century reanalysis (ERA-20C) to ensure that a site complementary to the Law Dome record is selected. We find three promising sites in the Indian Ocean sector of East Antarctica in the coastal zone from Enderby Land to the Ingrid Christensen Coast (50-100° E). Although we focus on East Antarctica for a new ice core site, the methodology is more generally applicable, and we include key parameters for all of Antarctica which may be useful for ice core site selection elsewhere and/or for other purposes.

  17. Optimal Site Characterization and Selection Criteria for Oyster Restoration using Multicolinear Factorial Water Quality Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.

    2015-12-01

    Elevated levels of nutrient loadings have enriched the Chesapeake Bay estuaries and coastal waters via point and nonpoint sources and the atmosphere. Restoring oyster beds is considered a Best Management Practice (BMP) to improve the water quality as well as provide physical aquatic habitat and a healthier estuarine system. Efforts include declaring sanctuaries for brood-stocks, supplementing hard substrate on the bottom and aiding natural populations with the addition of hatchery-reared and disease-resistant stocks. An economic assessment suggests that restoring the ecological functions will improve water quality, stabilize shorelines, and establish a habitat for breeding grounds that outweighs the value of harvestable oyster production. Parametric factorial models were developed to investigate multicolinearities among in situ water quality and oyster restoration activities to evaluate posterior success rates upon multiple substrates, and physical, chemical, hydrological and biological site characteristics to systematically identify significant factors. Findings were then further utilized to identify the optimal sites for successful oyster restoration augmentable with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and BMPs. Factorial models evaluate the relationship among the dependent variable, oyster biomass, and treatments of temperature, salinity, total suspended solids, E. coli/Enterococci counts, depth, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, nitrogen and phosphorus, and blocks consist of alternative substrates (oyster shells versus riprap, granite, cement, cinder blocks, limestone marl or combinations). Factorial model results were then compared to identify which combination of variables produces the highest posterior biomass of oysters. Developed Factorial model can facilitate maximizing the likelihood of successful oyster reef restoration in an effort to establish a healthier ecosystem and to improve overall estuarine water quality in the Chesapeake Bay estuaries.

  18. Study for the selection of optimal site in northeastern, Mexico for wind power generation using genetic algorithms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, T.; Ruvalcaba, A.; Oliver, L.

    2016-12-01

    The electricity generation from renewable resources has acquired a leading role. Mexico particularrly it has great interest in renewable natural resources for power generation, especially wind energy. Therefore, the country is rapidly entering in the development of wind power generators sites. The development of a wind places as an energy project, does not have a standardized methodology. Techniques vary according to the developer to select the best place to install a wind turbine system. Generally to install the system the developers consider three key factors: 1) the characteristics of the wind, 2) the potential distribution of electricity and 3) transport access to the site. This paper presents a study with a different methodology which is carried out in two stages: the first at regional scale uses "space" and "natural" criteria in order to select a region based on its cartographic features such as politics and physiographic division, location of conservation natural areas, water bodies, urban criteria; and natural criteria such as the amount and direction of the wind, the type and land use, vegetation, topography and biodiversity of the site. The result of the application of these criteria, gives a first optimal selection area. The second part of the methodology includes criteria and variables on detail scale. The analysis of all data information collected will provide new parameters (decision variables) for the site. The overall analysis of the information, based in these criteria, indicates that the best location that the best location of the field would be the southern Coahuila and the central part of Nuevo Leon. The wind power site will contribute to the economy grow of important cities including Monterrey. Finally, computational model of genetic algorithm will be used as a tool to determine the best site selection depending on the parameters considered.

  19. Use of technical and economic analysis for optimizing technology selection and remedial design for contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hardisty, P.E.; Brown, A.

    1996-12-01

    The decision to remediate a contaminated site can be seen from the macroeconomic and microeconomic viewpoints. Macroeconomics can be used to plan and account for the overall cost of pollution as part of a firm`s production, and thus make overall decisions on the real cost of pollution and the level of clean-up which may be called for. Valuation of damaged resources, option values and intrinsic worth is an important part of this process. Once the decision to remediate has been taken, the question becomes how best to remediate. Microeconomic analysis deals with providing efficient allocative decisions for reaching specified goals. it is safe to say that cost is one of the single most important factors in site clean-up decision making. A basic rule of remediation is often taken to be the maximization of contaminant mass removed per dollar spent. However, remediation may also be governed by other objectives and constraints. In some situations, minimization of time, rather than cost, could be the constraint. Or perhaps the objective could be to achieve a set level of clean-up for the lowest possible cost, even if a large program would result in unit-cost reductions. Evaluation of the economics of a clean-up project is directly linked to the objectives of the site owner, and the constraints within which the remediation is to be performed. Economic analysis of remedial options for containment of a 350,000 L hydrocarbon spill migrating through fractured rock into a river in Alberta, Canada, clear direction to the site owner.

  20. Field site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, D. E.; Ellefsen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Several general guidelines should be kept in mind when considering the selection of field sites for teaching remote sensing fundamentals. Proximity and vantage point are two very practical considerations. Only through viewing a broad enough area to place the site in context can one make efficient use of a site. The effects of inclement weather when selecting sites should be considered. If field work is to be an effective tool to illustrate remote sensing principles, the following criteria are critical: (1) the site must represent the range of class interest; (2) the site must have a theme or add something no other site offers; (3) there should be intrasite variation within the theme; (4) ground resolution and spectral signature distinction should be illustrated; and (5) the sites should not be ordered sequentially.

  1. Selecting an optimal number of binding site waters to improve virtual screening enrichments against the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody; van Vlijmen, Herman W T; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2014-06-23

    A major challenge in structure-based virtual screening (VS) involves the treatment of explicit water molecules during docking in order to improve the enrichment of active compounds over decoys. Here we have investigated this in the context of the adenosine A2A receptor, where water molecules have previously been shown to be important for achieving high enrichment rates with docking, and where the positions of some binding site waters are known from a high-resolution crystal structure. The effect of these waters (both their presence and orientations) on VS enrichment was assessed using a carefully curated set of 299 high affinity A2A antagonists and 17,337 decoys. We show that including certain crystal waters greatly improves VS enrichment and that optimization of water hydrogen positions is needed in order to achieve the best results. We also show that waters derived from a molecular dynamics simulation - without any knowledge of crystallographic waters - can improve enrichments to a similar degree as the crystallographic waters, which makes this strategy applicable to structures without experimental knowledge of water positions. Finally, we used decision trees to select an ensemble of structures with different water molecule positions and orientations that outperforms any single structure with water molecules. The approach presented here is validated against independent test sets of A2A receptor antagonists and decoys from the literature. In general, this water optimization strategy could be applied to any target with waters-mediated protein-ligand interactions.

  2. Selective pacing sites.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; La Greca, C; Corrado, E; Ajello, L; Nogara, A; Ciaramitaro, G; Augugliaro, S; Novo, G; Novo, S; Assennato, P

    2015-04-01

    bundle fibrous area, higher pacing thresholds are required, causing accelerated battery depletion. For all these reasons, PHP could be considered an important alternative to DHBP, to be used on a large scale. Finally, bifocal pacing in CRT candidates, provides better acute hemodynamic performance than RVA pacing, derived from a minor intra- and interventricular dyssynchrony, expressed also by the QRS shortening. Then, bifocal pacing could be taken into account when RVA pacing is likely to be the origin of serious mechanical and electrical dyssynchrony or when CRT is contraindicated or technically impossible. So, whatever chosen as selective pacing site, you must look also at safety, effectiveness and necessary equipment for an optimal pacing site.

  3. Optimal site selection for sitting a solar park using multi-criteria decision analysis and geographical information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Skarlatos, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Among the renewable power sources, solar power is rapidly becoming popular because it is inexhaustible, clean, and dependable. It has also become more efficient since the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells has increased. Following these trends, solar power will become more affordable in years to come and considerable investments are to be expected. Despite the size of solar plants, the sitting procedure is a crucial factor for their efficiency and financial viability. Many aspects influence such a decision: legal, environmental, technical, and financial to name a few. This paper describes a general integrated framework to evaluate land suitability for the optimal placement of photovoltaic solar power plants, which is based on a combination of a geographic information system (GIS), remote sensing techniques, and multi-criteria decision-making methods. An application of the proposed framework for the Limassol district in Cyprus is further illustrated. The combination of a GIS and multi-criteria methods produces an excellent analysis tool that creates an extensive database of spatial and non-spatial data, which will be used to simplify problems as well as solve and promote the use of multiple criteria. A set of environmental, economic, social, and technical constrains, based on recent Cypriot legislation, European's Union policies, and expert advice, identifies the potential sites for solar park installation. The pairwise comparison method in the context of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is applied to estimate the criteria weights in order to establish their relative importance in site evaluation. In addition, four different methods to combine information layers and check their sensitivity were used. The first considered all the criteria as being equally important and assigned them equal weight, whereas the others grouped the criteria and graded them according to their objective perceived importance. The overall suitability of the study

  4. Site selection for Mars exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J.; Des Marais, D.; Greeley, R.; Landheim, R.; Klein, H.

    1995-01-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refined site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog (MLSC) resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  5. Site selection for Mars exobiology.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J; Des Marais, D; Greeley, R; Landheim, R; Klein, H

    1995-03-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refine site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  6. Jamestown: A Site Selection Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victory, James

    1982-01-01

    Describes a secondary, U.S. history simulation of the settlement of the Jamestown colony. Students are provided with a map and asked to decide where the fort and colony should be set up. They must state reasons for selecting a particular site and reasons for rejecting others. (AM)

  7. SCHOOL SITES. SELECTION AND DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REIDA, G.W.

    CERTAIN CRITICAL CRITERIA SHOULD BE CONSIDERED IN SELECTING THE SCHOOL SITE. IMPORTANT IS THE STUDY OF SUCH FACTORS AS PRESENT AND PROJECTED PUPIL POPULATION, THE SCHOOL MASTER PLAN, MAIN THOROUGHFARES, DWELLINGS, LAND USE, SOILS, (SHOWN BY SERVICE MAPS), EXISTING SCHOOL FACILITIES AND ATTENDANCE, BOUNDARIES, UTILITY SERVICES AND FLOOD CONTROLS.…

  8. Viking site selection and certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    The landing site selection and certification effort for the Viking mission to Mars is reviewed from the premission phase through the acquisition of data and decisions during mission operations and the immediate postlanding evaluation. The utility and limitations of the orbital television and infrared data and ground based radar observation of candidate and actual landing sites are evaluated. Additional instruments and types of observations which would have been useful include higher resolution cameras, radar altimeters, and terrain hazard avoidance capability in the landing system. Suggestions based on this experience that might be applied to future missions are included.

  9. Optimization under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, Julian; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  10. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Zahle, F.

    2016-10-03

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. Lastly, if there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  11. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Zahle, F.

    2016-09-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  12. SCHOOL SITE STANDARDS AND SITE SELECTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SITE DEVELOPMENT DATA COMPILED BY THE DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES PLANNING, NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ENROLLMENT FIGURES USED REPRESENT THE ULTIMATE SIZE OF THE SCHOOLS. THE STANDARDS ARE MINIMUM FOR THE STATE OF NEW YORK WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SITES BASED ON THREE ACRES PLUS…

  13. How to Optimize Your Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dysart, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Given Google's growing market share--69% of all searches by the close of 2007--it's absolutely critical for any school on the Web to ensure its site is Google-friendly. A Google-optimized site ensures that students and parents can quickly find one's district on the Web even if they don't know the address. Plus, good search optimization simply…

  14. How to Optimize Your Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dysart, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Given Google's growing market share--69% of all searches by the close of 2007--it's absolutely critical for any school on the Web to ensure its site is Google-friendly. A Google-optimized site ensures that students and parents can quickly find one's district on the Web even if they don't know the address. Plus, good search optimization simply…

  15. School Site Selection and Approval Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of School Facilities Planning.

    This guide is designed to assist school districts in selecting school sites that provide both a safe and supportive environment for the instructional program and the learning process, and gain state approval for the selected sites. The guide includes a set of selection criteria that have proven helpful to site selection teams, information about…

  16. Optimize facility-siting evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.J.; Hunter, B.L. )

    1994-05-01

    Case histories show how to combine hazard-evaluation tools that effectively assess facility siting. Depending on the complexity of the process and equipment, more than one tool and hazard analysis method (HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) may be needed. Operating facilities must use all possible resources such as checklists, plot plans/elevation drawings, models, tours, etc., when performing a process hazard analysis (PHA). More importantly, the facility-siting evaluation techniques must be cost-effective, user friendly and results oriented. Facility siting, mandated by federal regulation (OSHA 1910.119), calls for a how to methodology. Because it is an interpretation of risk due to location, facility siting has no single correct method. Operating companies must equip their PHA teams with an optimum combination of hazard-evaluation methods that address actual process consequences and their effects on worker safety. This paper discusses the use of these resources in hazard analysis, then illustrates the methods with several case histories from a refinery, a papermill, and a manufacturing facility.

  17. Differential-Evolution algorithm based optimization for the site selection of groundwater production wells with the consideration of the vulnerability concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, Alper; Ayvaz, M. Tamer

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to present an optimization approach to determine locations of new groundwater production wells, where groundwater is relatively less susceptible to groundwater contamination (i.e. more likely to obtain clean groundwater), the pumping rate is maximum or the cost of well installation and operation is minimum for a prescribed set of constraints. The approach also finds locations that are in suitable areas for new groundwater exploration with respect to land use. A regional-scale groundwater flow model is coupled with a hybrid optimization model that uses the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm and the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method as the global and local optimizers, respectively. Several constraints such as the depth to the water table, total well length and the restriction of seawater intrusion are considered in the optimization process. The optimization problem can be formulated either as the maximization of the pumping rate or as the minimization of total costs of well installation and pumping operation from existing and new wells. Pumping rates of existing wells that are prone to seawater intrusion are optimized to prevent groundwater flux from the shoreline towards these wells. The proposed simulation-optimization model is demonstrated on an existing groundwater flow model for the Tahtalı watershed in Izmir-Turkey. The model identifies for the demonstration study locations and pumping rates for up to four new wells and one new well in the cost minimization and maximization problem, respectively. All new well locations in the optimized solution coincide with areas of relatively low groundwater vulnerability. Considering all solutions of the demonstration study, groundwater vulnerability indices for new well locations range from 29.64 to 40.48 (on a scale of 0-100, where 100 indicates high vulnerability). All identified wells are located relatively close to each other. This implies that the method pinpoints the

  18. Anterior wrist and medial malleolus: the optimal sites for tissue selection in electric death through hand-to-foot circuit pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangtao; Su, Ruibing; Lv, Junyao; Lai, Xiaoping; Li, Xianxian; Wu, Jiayan; Hu, Bo; Xu, Long; Shen, Ruilin; Gu, Jiang; Yu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    Specific morphological changes may be absent in some cases of electrocution shocked by the voltage of 220 V or lower. In this study, we attempted to demonstrate that the anterior wrist and medial malleolus were the optimal sites with promising and significant changes in electric death through the hand-to-foot circuit pathway. We established an electric shock rat model and observed histopathologic changes in the anterior wrist and medial malleolus. The results showed that the current intensities in the left anterior wrist and right medial malleolus were remarkably higher than those in the other sites, and the nuclei long/short (L/S) axis ratios of the arterial endotheliocyte and the skeletal muscle cell in these two areas were significantly higher than those in other parts of the body. These findings suggested that the anterior wrist and/or medial malleolus soft tissues as the narrowest parts of the limbs could be used as promising and useful sites for the assessment of electrical shock death, especially in forensic pathologic evaluation.

  19. SLS Test Stand Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Kathryn; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Test site selection is a critical element of the design, development and production of a new system. With the advent of the new Space Launch System (SLS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had a number of test site selection decisions that needed to be made early enough in the Program to support the planned Launch Readiness Date (LRD). This case study focuses on decisions that needed to be made in 2011 and 2012 in preparation for the April 2013 DPMC decision about where to execute the Main Propulsion Test that is commonly referred to as "Green Run." Those decisions relied upon cooperative analysis between the Program, the Test Lab and Center Operations. The SLS is a human spaceflight vehicle designed to carry a crew farther into space than humans have previously flown. The vehicle consists of four parts: the crew capsule, the upper stage, the core stage, and the first stage solid rocket boosters. The crew capsule carries the astronauts, while the upper stage, the core stage, and solid rocket boosters provide thrust for the vehicle. In other words, the stages provide the "lift" part of the lift vehicle. In conjunction with the solid rocket boosters, the core stage provides the initial "get-off-the-ground" thrust to the vehicle. The ignition of the four core stage engines and two solid rocket boosters is the first step in the launch portion of the mission. The solid rocket boosters burn out after about 2 minutes of flight, and are then jettisoned. The core stage provides thrust until the vehicle reaches a specific altitude and speed, at which point the core stage is shut off and jettisoned, and the upper stage provides vehicle thrust for subsequent mission trajectories. The integrated core stage primarily consists of a liquid oxygen tank, a liquid hydrogen tank, and the four core stage engines. For the SLS program, four RS-25 engines were selected as the four core stage engines. The RS-25 engine is the same engine that was used for Space

  20. Criteria for School Site Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    An outline of the factors and conditions affecting the desirability of a specific building site. The primary factor headings are--(1) availability, (2) location, (3) environment, (4) accessibility, (5) size, (6) shape, (7) topography, (8) acquisition, (9) cost of land, (10) soil condition, (11) sub-surface condition, (12) site preparation, (13)…

  1. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    DOE PAGES

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. Lastly, if there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtainedmore » with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.« less

  2. NGNP Site Selection Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Holbrook

    2006-12-01

    This report provides an overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process, the preliminary site activities that have taken place in the current fiscal year (FY-06), and the site-related plans for FY-07. The NRC maintains oversight of the construction and operation of a facility throughout its lifetime to assure compliance with the Commission's regulations for the protection of public health and safety, the common defense and security, and the environment. To implement this process, all nuclear power plant applications must undergo a safety review, an environmental review, and antitrust review by the NRC.

  3. 40 CFR 240.202 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Site selection. 240.202 Section 240.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.202 Site selection. ...

  4. KAUAI COMMUNITY COLLEGE, SITE SELECTION REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOGI, HITOSHI

    THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO AID IN THE SELECTION OF A MORE SUITABLE SITE FOR THE KAUAI COMMUNITY COLLEGE. FOURTEEN SITES FULFILLED THE GENERAL SIZE, ENVIRONMENT AND ADATABILITY REQUIREMENTS. THE SCREENING CRITERIA APPLIED TO THESE SITES WERE ACCESSIBILITY, ENVIRONMENT, ECONOMY IN DEVELOPMENT, AND POSSIBILITY FOR FUTURE EXPANSION. THE RECOMMENDED…

  5. Chemical site-selective prenylation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gamblin, David P; van Kasteren, Sander; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Chalker, Justin M; Oldham, Neil J; Fairbanks, Antony J; Davis, Benjamin G

    2008-06-01

    A direct thionation procedure allows conversion of allylic alcohols into the corresponding thiols, the products of which are immediately compatible with one-pot site-selective selenenyl sulfide mediated protein conjugation.

  6. Strategy for selecting Mars Pathfinder landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kuzmin, Ruslin O.

    1994-01-01

    A strategy for Pathfinder site selection must be developed that is fundamentally different from most previous considerations. At least two approaches can be identified. In one approach, the objective is to select a site representing a key geologic unit on Mars, i.e., a unit that is widespread, easily recognized, and used frequently as a datum in various investigations. The second approach is to select a site that potentially affords access to a wide variety of rock types. Because rover range is limited, rocks from a variety of sources must be assembled in a small area for sampling. Regardless of the approach taken in site selection, the Pathfinder site should include eolian deposits and provisions should be made to obtain measurements on soils. A recommended approach for selecting the Mars Pathfinder landing site is to identify a deltaic deposit, composed of sediments derived from sources of various ages and geologic units that shows evidence of eolian activity. The site should be located as close as possible to the part of the outwash where rapid deposition occurred because the likelihood of 'sorting' by size and composition increases with distance, decreasing the probability of heterogeneity. In addition, it is recommended that field operation tests be conducted to gain experience and insight into conducting science with Pathfinder.

  7. 40 CFR 240.202 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Site selection. 240.202 Section 240.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.202 Site...

  8. 40 CFR 240.202 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Site selection. 240.202 Section 240.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.202 Site...

  9. 40 CFR 240.202 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Site selection. 240.202 Section 240.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.202 Site...

  10. The School Site Planner. Land for Learning. Site Selection, Site Planning, Playgrounds, Recreation, and Athletic Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of School Support.

    The selection and planning of sites for school facilities can be critical and difficult due to the varied and complex demands schools must satisfy. This publication addresses the many factors that need consideration during the process of site selection, planning, development, and use. The report examines not only the site selection and planning…

  11. Site selection and containment evaluation for LLNL nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1993-06-01

    During approximately the past decade, the site selection process at LLNL has evolved as the Test Program needs and resources have changed, containment practices have been modified, and the DOE and other regulatory agencies have become more restrictive. Throughout this period the Containment Program and the Field Operations Program at LLNL have managed a cooperative effort to improve site selection. The site selection process actually is three inter-related tasks, namely, selection of a stockpile hole for a specific nuclear test, selection of a drill site for a stockpile hole, and selection of a new drill site for a specific test. Each proposed site is carefully reviewed for known or projected geologic structure and medium properties, nearby holes, containment experience in the region, likelihood of drilling problems, programmatic need for a given depth of hole, and scheduling of Test Program events and resources. By using our data bank, our general knowledge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) geology, and other information sources, as well as our background in drilling large diameter holes at the NTS, we have been able to optimize our use of NTS real estate and programmatic resources. The containment evaluation of a site is facilitated by considering the location before the hole is drilled. Discuss imposed restraints and our criteria and guidelines for site selection and assignment of events to specific holes, along with the factors that influence selection of a Working Point (WP) depth. Since siting and containment evaluation are strongly related, most major factors related to the containment evaluation process will also be reviewed.

  12. One- and two-objective approaches to an area-constrained habitat reserve site selection problem

    Treesearch

    Stephanie Snyder; Charles ReVelle; Robert Haight

    2004-01-01

    We compare several ways to model a habitat reserve site selection problem in which an upper bound on the total area of the selected sites is included. The models are cast as optimization coverage models drawn from the location science literature. Classic covering problems typically include a constraint on the number of sites that can be selected. If potential reserve...

  13. Birds of the Hanford site: nest site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, W.H.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    At least 62 species of birds regularly nest on the 1400 km/sup 2/ Hanford Site in the semi-arid interior of southcentral Washington. Birds showed nesting preferences for different kinds of vegetation, special natural landscape features and certain kinds of man-made structures. Vegetational nest site preferences were categorized as shrubsteppe, natural coppice, planted trees and cattail-reed marsh. The nonvegetational nest-site preferences were categorized as cliff, rock talus, riverine islands and industrial structures. Natural coppice vegetation was preferred by colorful passerine birds. Planted trees were selected by raptors, crows, ravens, herons and magpies. Shrubsteppe plant communities occupy most of the land area of the Hanford Site; only thirteen species of birds chose to nest in them. Nest-site selection by birds can be used for wildlife mitigation practices associated with the siting, construction and operation of energy related industries on the Hanford Site and in other undeveloped semi-arid regions in the western United States. 22 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Site-optimization of wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, T.J. de; Thillerup, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Danish Company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2500 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 450 MW. The opening up of new and widely divergent markets has demanded an extremely flexible approach towards wind turbine construction. The Nordtank product range has expanded considerable in recent years, with the main objective to develop wind energy conversion machines that can run profitable in any given case. This paper will describe site optimization of Nordtank wind turbines. Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/750 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Through this flexible design, the 500/750 turbine line can adjust the rotor diameter, tower height and many other components to optimally fit the turbine to each specific project. This design philosophy will be illustrated with some case histories of recently completed projects.

  15. Jointly optimizing selection of fuel treatments and siting of forest biomass-based energy production facilities for landscape-scale fire hazard reduction.

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Daugherty; Jeremy S. Fried

    2007-01-01

    Landscape-scale fuel treatments for forest fire hazard reduction potentially produce large quantities of material suitable for biomass energy production. The analytic framework FIA BioSum addresses this situation by developing detailed data on forest conditions and production under alternative fuel treatment prescriptions, and computes haul costs to alternative sites...

  16. Site Optimization Tracker: Crossley Farm Superfund Site, Hereford and Washington Townships, Berks County, Pennsylvania

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pilot Region-Based Optimization Program for Fund-Lead Sites in EPA Region 3. Site Optimization Tracking information for Crossley Farm Superfund Site, Hereford and Washington Townships, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

  17. The Viking landing sites: Selection and certification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N.L.

    1976-01-01

    During the past several years the Viking project developed plans to use Viking orbiter instruments and Earth-based radar to certify the suitability of the landing sites selected as the safest and most scientifically rewarding using Mariner 9 data. During June and July 1976, the Earth-based radar and orbital spacecraft observations of some of the prime and backup sites were completed. The results of these combined observations indicated that the Viking 1 prime landing area in the Chryse region of Mars is geologically varied and possibly more hazardous than expected, and was not certifiable as a site for the Viking 1 landing. Consequently, the site certification effort had to be drastically modified and lengthened to search for a site that might be safe enough to attempt to land. The selected site considered at 47.5??W,22.4??N represented a compromise between desirable characteristics observed with visual images and those inferred from Earth-based radar. It lies in the Chryse region about 900 kilometers northwest of the original site. Viking 1 landed successfully at this site on 20 July 1976.

  18. Lunar resource evaluation and mine site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bence, A. Edward

    1992-01-01

    Two scenarios in this evaluation of lunar mineral resources and the selection of possible mining and processing sites are considered. The first scenario assumes that no new surface or near-surface data will be available before site selection (presumably one of the Apollo sites). The second scenario assumes that additional surface geology data will have been obtained by a lunar orbiter mission, an unmanned sample return mission (or missions), and followup manned missions. Regardless of the scenario, once a potentially favorable mine site has been identified, a minimum amount of fundamental data is needed to assess the resources at that site and to evaluate its suitability for mining and downstream processing. Since much of the required data depends on the target mineral(s), information on the resource, its beneficiation, and the refining, smelting, and fabricating processes must be factored into the evaluation. The annual capacity and producing lifetime of the mine and its associated processing plant must be estimated before the resource reserves can be assessed. The available market for the product largely determines the capacity and lifetime of the mine. The Apollo 17 site is described as a possible mining site. The use of new sites is briefly addressed.

  19. A perspective of landing-site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    The problems that now confront Mars Pathfinder are much the same as those that confronted Viking, but more and better information exists today. Like Viking, Mars Pathfinder must select a landing site compatible with lander and rover designs as evidenced by available data (Viking images, radar and thermal observations, albedo and color observations, visible-infrared spectra, etc.). Most regions at low elevations probably contain favorable sites, but some sites at low elevations with weak quasispecular echoes and low thermal inertias may be unfavorable.

  20. Strong Purifying Selection at Synonymous Sites in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lawrie, David S.; Messer, Philipp W.; Hershberg, Ruth; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous sites are generally assumed to be subject to weak selective constraint. For this reason, they are often neglected as a possible source of important functional variation. We use site frequency spectra from deep population sequencing data to show that, contrary to this expectation, 22% of four-fold synonymous (4D) sites in Drosophila melanogaster evolve under very strong selective constraint while few, if any, appear to be under weak constraint. Linking polymorphism with divergence data, we further find that the fraction of synonymous sites exposed to strong purifying selection is higher for those positions that show slower evolution on the Drosophila phylogeny. The function underlying the inferred strong constraint appears to be separate from splicing enhancers, nucleosome positioning, and the translational optimization generating canonical codon bias. The fraction of synonymous sites under strong constraint within a gene correlates well with gene expression, particularly in the mid-late embryo, pupae, and adult developmental stages. Genes enriched in strongly constrained synonymous sites tend to be particularly functionally important and are often involved in key developmental pathways. Given that the observed widespread constraint acting on synonymous sites is likely not limited to Drosophila, the role of synonymous sites in genetic disease and adaptation should be reevaluated. PMID:23737754

  1. Selected site contamination history. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    This is the Final Report that contains the ``Selected Site Contamination History`` for the project titled ``Development of an On-line, Real-time Alpha Radiation Monitor for Liquid Streams.`` It consists of a summary of sampling data for nine locations at the Oak Ridge Reservation. These nine locations were chosen to be representative of those expected across the DOE Complex, and were selected from three distinct Oak Ridge facilities: the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); the Y-12 Plant; the K-25 Plant (the old Gaseous Diffusion Plant). The location selected from ORNL is the influent to the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP). This location is representative of those Wastewater Treatment Plants that process water that is known to be radionuclide-containing. The location selected from the Y-12 Plant is the City Flow Monitoring Station. This location represents those sanitary sewer discharges from the DOE Complex that are routed off-site to a civilian waste water treatment plant. The seven locations selected from the K-25 Plant consist of various storm drains and surface waters that are tested during the normal course of K-25`s environmental monitoring program. These locations represent the varied surface waters that are tested for radioactivity levels across the DOE Complex. Final ranking and prioritization of these sites will result in a final selection of at least four sites for testing of the Thermo Alpha Monitor during Phase 2 (the Optional Phase) of the current program. It is anticipated that testing will include the ORNL, PWTP, the Y-12 City Flow Monitoring Station, and two of the K-25 surface water sites.

  2. Detecting Amino Acid Sites Under Positive Selection and Purifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Massingham, Tim; Goldman, Nick

    2005-01-01

    An excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitution at individual amino acid sites is an important indicator that positive selection has affected the evolution of a protein between the extant sequences under study and their most recent common ancestor. Several methods exist to detect the presence, and sometimes location, of positively selected sites in alignments of protein-coding sequences. This article describes the “sitewise likelihood-ratio” (SLR) method for detecting nonneutral evolution, a statistical test that can identify sites that are unusually conserved as well as those that are unusually variable. We show that the SLR method can be more powerful than currently published methods for detecting the location of positive selection, especially in difficult cases where the strength of selection is low. The increase in power is achieved while relaxing assumptions about how the strength of selection varies over sites and without elevated rates of false-positive results that have been reported with some other methods. We also show that the SLR method performs well even under circumstances where the results from some previous methods can be misleading. PMID:15654091

  3. Self-extinction through optimizing selection

    PubMed Central

    Parvinen, Kalle; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary suicide is a process in which selection drives a viable population to extinction. So far, such selection-driven self-extinction has been demonstrated in models with frequency-dependent selection. This is not surprising, since frequency-dependent selection can disconnect individual-level and population-level interests through environmental feedback. Hence it can lead to situations akin to the tragedy of the commons, with adaptations that serve the selfish interests of individuals ultimately ruining a population. For frequency-dependent selection to play such a role, it must not be optimizing. Together, all published studies of evolutionary suicide have created the impression that evolutionary suicide is not possible with optimizing selection. Here we disprove this misconception by presenting and analyzing an example in which optimizing selection causes self-extinction. We then take this line of argument one step further by showing, in a further example, that selection-driven self-extinction can occur even under frequency-independent selection. PMID:23583808

  4. Self-extinction through optimizing selection.

    PubMed

    Parvinen, Kalle; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-09-21

    Evolutionary suicide is a process in which selection drives a viable population to extinction. So far, such selection-driven self-extinction has been demonstrated in models with frequency-dependent selection. This is not surprising, since frequency-dependent selection can disconnect individual-level and population-level interests through environmental feedback. Hence it can lead to situations akin to the tragedy of the commons, with adaptations that serve the selfish interests of individuals ultimately ruining a population. For frequency-dependent selection to play such a role, it must not be optimizing. Together, all published studies of evolutionary suicide have created the impression that evolutionary suicide is not possible with optimizing selection. Here we disprove this misconception by presenting and analyzing an example in which optimizing selection causes self-extinction. We then take this line of argument one step further by showing, in a further example, that selection-driven self-extinction can occur even under frequency-independent selection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crustal dynamics project site selection criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R.

    1983-01-01

    The criteria for selecting site locations and constructing observing pads and monuments for the Mobile VLB1 and the satellite laser ranging systems used in the NASA/GSFC Crustal Dynamics Project are discussed. Gross system characteristics (size, shape, weight, power requirement, foot prints, etc.) are given for the Moblas, MV-1 through 3, TLRS-1 through 4 and Series instruments.

  6. 40 CFR 240.202 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Site selection. 240.202 Section 240.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.202...

  7. 32 CFR 644.22 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HANDBOOK Project Planning Military (army and Air Force) and Other Federal Agencies § 644.22 Site selection... projects and available lands under the control of other departments and agencies, suitable for the desired... Engineer to prepare a Real Estate Planning Report or Real Estate Summary, making reference to the...

  8. 32 CFR 644.22 - Site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HANDBOOK Project Planning Military (army and Air Force) and Other Federal Agencies § 644.22 Site selection... projects and available lands under the control of other departments and agencies, suitable for the desired... Engineer to prepare a Real Estate Planning Report or Real Estate Summary, making reference to the...

  9. Optimal selection of biochars for remediating metals ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Approximately 500,000 abandoned mines across the U.S. pose a considerable, pervasive risk to human health and the environment due to possible exposure to the residuals of heavy metal extraction. Historically, a variety of chemical and biological methods have been used to reduce the bioavailability of the metals at mine sites. Biochar with its potential to complex and immobilize heavy metals, is an emerging alternative for reducing bioavailability. Furthermore, biochar has been reported to improve soil conditions for plant growth and can be used for promoting the establishment of a soil-stabilizing native plant community to reduce offsite movement of metal-laden waste materials. Because biochar properties depend upon feedstock selection, pyrolysis production conditions, and activation procedures used, they can be designed to meet specific remediation needs. As a result biochar with specific properties can be produced to correspond to specific soil remediation situations. However, techniques are needed to optimally match biochar characteristics with metals contaminated soils to effectively reduce metal bioavailability. Here we present experimental results used to develop a generalized method for evaluating the ability of biochar to reduce metals in mine spoil soil from an abandoned Cu and Zn mine. Thirty-eight biochars were produced from approximately 20 different feedstocks and produced via slow pyrolysis or gasification, and were allowed to react with a f

  10. Replacement Power Facility site selection report

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.; Toole, G.L.; Specht, W.L.

    1992-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of a Replacement Power Facility (RPF) for supplementing and replacing existing sources of steam and possibly electricity at the Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this project As part of the impact analysis of the proposed action, the EIS will include a detailed description of the environment where the RPF will be constructed. This description must be specific to the recommended site at SRS, which contains more than 300 square miles of land including streams, lakes, impoundments, wetlands, and upland areas. A formal site-selection process was designed and implemented to identify the preferred RPF site.

  11. Optimel: Software for selecting the optimal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Olga; Popov, Boris; Romanov, Dmitry; Evseeva, Marina

    Optimel: software for selecting the optimal method automates the process of selecting a solution method from the optimization methods domain. Optimel features practical novelty. It saves time and money when conducting exploratory studies if its objective is to select the most appropriate method for solving an optimization problem. Optimel features theoretical novelty because for obtaining the domain a new method of knowledge structuring was used. In the Optimel domain, extended quantity of methods and their properties are used, which allows identifying the level of scientific studies, enhancing the user's expertise level, expand the prospects the user faces and opening up new research objectives. Optimel can be used both in scientific research institutes and in educational institutions.

  12. Texas site selection and licensing status

    SciTech Connect

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1989-11-01

    Texas has identified a potential site in Hudspeth County in far West Texas near the town of Fort Hancock. Over the past year the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has been conducting detailed geology, hydrology, meteorology, soils, and flora and fauna evaluations. An authorization by the Board of Directors of the Authority to proceed with a license application, assuming that the detailed evaluation indicates that the site is suitable, is expected by September. A prototype license has been prepared in anticipation of the order to proceed with licensing, and the formal license application is expected to be submitted to the Texas Department of Health-Bureau of Radiation Control in December, meeting the license application milestone. Although site selection processes in all siting areas across the country have experienced organized opposition, El Paso County has funded a particularly well-organized, well-financed program to legally and technically stop consideration of the Fort Hancock site prior to the licensing process. Many procedural, regulatory, and technical issues have been raised which have required responses from the Authority in order to proceed with licensing. This has provided a unique perspective of what to expect from well-organized opposition at the licensing stage. This paper presents an update on the Texas siting activity with detailed information on the site evaluation and license application. Experience of dealing with issues raised by opposition relating to NRC guidelines and rules is also discussed.

  13. Site Selection for Mars Exopaleontology in 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack

    1998-01-01

    floors of some impact craters on Mars, such as "White Rock" and Bequeral Crater (see Oxia Palus NE, Site 148), have floor deposits that could be evaporites, inclusive of carbonates. Evaporite minerals possess characteristic spectral signatures in the infrared and could similarly be identified from Mars orbit using high resolution remote sensing methods. Clearly, utilization of TES data will be important for optimizing site selection for Exopaleontology, and every effort should be made to benefit from that data before a final decision is made.

  14. Site Selection for Mars Exopaleontology in 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack

    1998-01-01

    floors of some impact craters on Mars, such as "White Rock" and Bequeral Crater (see Oxia Palus NE, Site 148), have floor deposits that could be evaporites, inclusive of carbonates. Evaporite minerals possess characteristic spectral signatures in the infrared and could similarly be identified from Mars orbit using high resolution remote sensing methods. Clearly, utilization of TES data will be important for optimizing site selection for Exopaleontology, and every effort should be made to benefit from that data before a final decision is made.

  15. Feature Selection via Chaotic Antlion Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zawbaa, Hossam M.; Emary, E.; Grosan, Crina

    2016-01-01

    Background Selecting a subset of relevant properties from a large set of features that describe a dataset is a challenging machine learning task. In biology, for instance, the advances in the available technologies enable the generation of a very large number of biomarkers that describe the data. Choosing the more informative markers along with performing a high-accuracy classification over the data can be a daunting task, particularly if the data are high dimensional. An often adopted approach is to formulate the feature selection problem as a biobjective optimization problem, with the aim of maximizing the performance of the data analysis model (the quality of the data training fitting) while minimizing the number of features used. Results We propose an optimization approach for the feature selection problem that considers a “chaotic” version of the antlion optimizer method, a nature-inspired algorithm that mimics the hunting mechanism of antlions in nature. The balance between exploration of the search space and exploitation of the best solutions is a challenge in multi-objective optimization. The exploration/exploitation rate is controlled by the parameter I that limits the random walk range of the ants/prey. This variable is increased iteratively in a quasi-linear manner to decrease the exploration rate as the optimization progresses. The quasi-linear decrease in the variable I may lead to immature convergence in some cases and trapping in local minima in other cases. The chaotic system proposed here attempts to improve the tradeoff between exploration and exploitation. The methodology is evaluated using different chaotic maps on a number of feature selection datasets. To ensure generality, we used ten biological datasets, but we also used other types of data from various sources. The results are compared with the particle swarm optimizer and with genetic algorithm variants for feature selection using a set of quality metrics. PMID:26963715

  16. Site Selection for Hvdc Ground Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, P. F.; Pereira, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission systems are composed of a bipole transmission line with a converter substation at each end. Each substation may be equipped with a HVDC ground electrode, which is a wide area (up to 1 km Ø) and deep (from 3 to 100m) electrical grounding. When in normal operation, the ground electrode will dissipate in the soil the unbalance of the bipole (~1.5% of the rated current). When in monopolar operation with ground return, the HVDC electrode will inject in the soil the nominal pole continuous current, of about 2000 to 3000 Amperes, continuously for a period up to a few hours. HVDC ground electrodes site selection is a work based on extensive geophysical and geological surveys, in order to attend the desired design requirements established for the electrodes, considering both its operational conditions (maximum soil temperature, working life, local soil voltage gradients etc.) and the interference effects on the installations located up to 50 km away. This poster presents the geophysical investigations conducted primarily for the electrodes site selection, and subsequently for the development of the crust resistivity model, which will be used for the interference studies. A preliminary site selection is conducted, based on general geographical and geological criteria. Subsequently, the geology of each chosen area is surveyed in detail, by means of electromagnetic/electrical geophysical techniques, such as magnetotelluric (deep), TDEM (near-surface) and electroresistivity (shallow). Other complementary geologic and geotechnical surveys are conducted, such as wells drilling (for geotechnical characterization, measurement of the water table depth and water flow, and electromagnetic profiling), and soil and water sampling (for measurement of thermal parameters and evaluation of electrosmosis risk). The site evaluation is a dynamic process along the surveys, and some sites will be discarded. For the two or three final sites, the

  17. Molecular mechanisms of retroviral integration site selection

    PubMed Central

    Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Sharma, Amit; Larue, Ross C.; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through an obligate integrated DNA provirus, making retroviral vectors attractive vehicles for human gene-therapy. Though most of the host cell genome is available for integration, the process of integration site selection is not random. Retroviruses differ in their choice of chromatin-associated features and also prefer particular nucleotide sequences at the point of insertion. Lentiviruses including HIV-1 preferentially integrate within the bodies of active genes, whereas the prototypical gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) favors strong enhancers and active gene promoter regions. Integration is catalyzed by the viral integrase protein, and recent research has demonstrated that HIV-1 and MoMLV targeting preferences are in large part guided by integrase-interacting host factors (LEDGF/p75 for HIV-1 and BET proteins for MoMLV) that tether viral intasomes to chromatin. In each case, the selectivity of epigenetic marks on histones recognized by the protein tether helps to determine the integration distribution. In contrast, nucleotide preferences at integration sites seem to be governed by the ability for the integrase protein to locally bend the DNA duplex for pairwise insertion of the viral DNA ends. We discuss approaches to alter integration site selection that could potentially improve the safety of retroviral vectors in the clinic. PMID:25147212

  18. Optimizing Clinical Research Participant Selection with Informatics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua

    2015-11-01

    Clinical research participants are often not reflective of real-world patients due to overly restrictive eligibility criteria. Meanwhile, unselected participants introduce confounding factors and reduce research efficiency. Biomedical informatics, especially Big Data increasingly made available from electronic health records, offers promising aids to optimize research participant selection through data-driven transparency.

  19. Site Selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, J.B.; Rueter, K.J.; Morin, J.P.

    2000-11-15

    A site selection study was conducted to identify a suitable location for the construction and operation of a new Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility to be sited is a single processing facility and support buildings that could house either of three technology alternatives being developed by the High Level Waste Systems Engineering Team: Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation, Crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange or Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. A fourth alternative, Direct Disposal in grout, is not part of the site selection study because a location has been identified that is unique to this technology (i.e., Z-Area). Facility site selection at SRS is a formal, documented process that seeks to optimize siting of new facilities with respect to facility-specific engineering requirements, sensitive environmental resources, and applicable regulatory requirements. In this manner, the prime objectives of cost minimization, environmental protection, and regulatory compliance are achieved. The results from this geotechnical characterization indicated that continued consideration be given to Site B for the proposed SDF. Suitable topography, the lack of surface hydrology and floodplain issues, no significant groundwater contamination, the presence of minor soft zones along the northeast portion of footprint, and no apparent geological structure in the Gordon Aquitard support this recommendation.

  20. Occluded object imaging via optimal camera selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Yanning; Tong, Xiaomin; Ma, Wenguang; Yu, Rui

    2013-12-01

    High performance occluded object imaging in cluttered scenes is a significant challenging task for many computer vision applications. Recently the camera array synthetic aperture imaging is proved to be an effective way to seeing object through occlusion. However, the imaging quality of occluded object is often significantly decreased by the shadows of the foreground occluder. Although some works have been presented to label the foreground occluder via object segmentation or 3D reconstruction, these methods will fail in the case of complicated occluder and severe occlusion. In this paper, we present a novel optimal camera selection algorithm to solve the above problem. The main characteristics of this algorithm include: (1) Instead of synthetic aperture imaging, we formulate the occluded object imaging problem as an optimal camera selection and mosaicking problem. To the best of our knowledge, our proposed method is the first one for occluded object mosaicing. (2) A greedy optimization framework is presented to propagate the visibility information among various depth focus planes. (3) A multiple label energy minimization formulation is designed in each plane to select the optimal camera. The energy is estimated in the synthetic aperture image volume and integrates the multi-view intensity consistency, previous visibility property and camera view smoothness, which is minimized via Graph cuts. We compare our method with the state-of-the-art synthetic aperture imaging algorithms, and extensive experimental results with qualitative and quantitative analysis demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of our approach.

  1. Active Learning With Optimal Instance Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yifan; Zhu, Xingquan; Elmagarmid, A K

    2013-04-01

    Active learning (AL) traditionally relies on some instance-based utility measures (such as uncertainty) to assess individual instances and label the ones with the maximum values for training. In this paper, we argue that such approaches cannot produce good labeling subsets mainly because instances are evaluated independently without considering their interactions, and individuals with maximal ability do not necessarily form an optimal instance subset for learning. Alternatively, we propose to achieve AL with optimal subset selection (ALOSS), where the key is to find an instance subset with a maximum utility value. To achieve the goal, ALOSS simultaneously considers the following: 1) the importance of individual instances and 2) the disparity between instances, to build an instance-correlation matrix. As a result, AL is transformed to a semidefinite programming problem to select a k-instance subset with a maximum utility value. Experimental results demonstrate that ALOSS outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for AL.

  2. Optimization methods for activities selection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahad, Nor Faradilah; Alias, Suriana; Yaakop, Siti Zulaika; Arshad, Norul Amanina Mohd; Mazni, Elis Sofia

    2017-08-01

    Co-curriculum activities must be joined by every student in Malaysia and these activities bring a lot of benefits to the students. By joining these activities, the students can learn about the time management and they can developing many useful skills. This project focuses on the selection of co-curriculum activities in secondary school using the optimization methods which are the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Zero-One Goal Programming (ZOGP). A secondary school in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia was chosen as a case study. A set of questionnaires were distributed randomly to calculate the weighted for each activity based on the 3 chosen criteria which are soft skills, interesting activities and performances. The weighted was calculated by using AHP and the results showed that the most important criteria is soft skills. Then, the ZOGP model will be analyzed by using LINGO Software version 15.0. There are two priorities to be considered. The first priority which is to minimize the budget for the activities is achieved since the total budget can be reduced by RM233.00. Therefore, the total budget to implement the selected activities is RM11,195.00. The second priority which is to select the co-curriculum activities is also achieved. The results showed that 9 out of 15 activities were selected. Thus, it can concluded that AHP and ZOGP approach can be used as the optimization methods for activities selection problem.

  3. Optimized periocular template selection for human recognition.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Sambit; Sa, Pankaj K; Majhi, Banshidhar

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for selecting a rectangular template around periocular region optimally potential for human recognition is proposed. A comparatively larger template of periocular image than the optimal one can be slightly more potent for recognition, but the larger template heavily slows down the biometric system by making feature extraction computationally intensive and increasing the database size. A smaller template, on the contrary, cannot yield desirable recognition though the smaller template performs faster due to low computation for feature extraction. These two contradictory objectives (namely, (a) to minimize the size of periocular template and (b) to maximize the recognition through the template) are aimed to be optimized through the proposed research. This paper proposes four different approaches for dynamic optimal template selection from periocular region. The proposed methods are tested on publicly available unconstrained UBIRISv2 and FERET databases and satisfactory results have been achieved. Thus obtained template can be used for recognition of individuals in an organization and can be generalized to recognize every citizen of a nation.

  4. Optimal remediation policy selection under general conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Zheng, C.

    1997-09-01

    A new simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal design of ground-water remediation systems under a variety of field conditions. The model couples genetic algorithm (GA), a global search technique inspired by biological evolution, with MODFLOW and MT3D, two commonly used ground-water flow and solute transport codes. The model allows for multiple management periods in which optimal pumping/injection rates vary with time to reflect the changes in the flow and transport conditions during the remediation process. The objective function of the model incorporates multiple cost terms including the drilling cost, the installation cost, and the costs to extract and treat the contaminated ground water. The simulation-optimization model is first applied to a typical two-dimensional pump-and-treat example with one and three management periods to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the new model. The model is then applied to a large-scale three-dimensional field problem to determine the minimum pumping needed to contain an existing contaminant plume. The optimal solution as determined in this study is compared with a previous solution based on trial-and-error selection.

  5. Optimization of solar-selective paint coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McChesney, M. A.; Zimmer, P. B.; Lin, R. J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The objective was the development of low-cost, high-performance, solar-selective paint coatings for solar flat-plate collector (FPC) use and passive thermal wall application. Thickness-sensitive selective paint coating development was intended to demonstrate large scale producibility. Thickness-insensitive selective paint (TISP) coating development was intended to develop and optimize the coating for passive solar systems and FPC applications. Low-cost, high-performance TSSP coatings and processes were developed to demonstrate large-scale producibility and meet all program goals. Dip, spray, roll, laminating and gravure processes were investigated and used to produce final samples. High-speed gravure coating was selected as the most promising process for solar foil fabrication. Development and optimization of TISP coatings was not completely successful. A variation in reflective metal pigment was suspected of being the primary problem, although other variables may have contributed. Consistent repeating of optical properties of these coatings achieved on the previous program was not achieved.

  6. Optimal Sensor Selection for Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael; Sowers, T. Shane; Aguilar, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    Sensor data are the basis for performance and health assessment of most complex systems. Careful selection and implementation of sensors is critical to enable high fidelity system health assessment. A model-based procedure that systematically selects an optimal sensor suite for overall health assessment of a designated host system is described. This procedure, termed the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4), was developed at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in order to enhance design phase planning and preparations for in-space propulsion health management systems (HMS). Information and capabilities required to utilize the S4 approach in support of design phase development of robust health diagnostics are outlined. A merit metric that quantifies diagnostic performance and overall risk reduction potential of individual sensor suites is introduced. The conceptual foundation for this merit metric is presented and the algorithmic organization of the S4 optimization process is described. Representative results from S4 analyses of a boost stage rocket engine previously under development as part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program are presented.

  7. Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2008-10-01

    In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

  8. Selectively-informed particle swarm optimization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Du, Wenbo; Yan, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a nature-inspired algorithm that has shown outstanding performance in solving many realistic problems. In the original PSO and most of its variants all particles are treated equally, overlooking the impact of structural heterogeneity on individual behavior. Here we employ complex networks to represent the population structure of swarms and propose a selectively-informed PSO (SIPSO), in which the particles choose different learning strategies based on their connections: a densely-connected hub particle gets full information from all of its neighbors while a non-hub particle with few connections can only follow a single yet best-performed neighbor. Extensive numerical experiments on widely-used benchmark functions show that our SIPSO algorithm remarkably outperforms the PSO and its existing variants in success rate, solution quality, and convergence speed. We also explore the evolution process from a microscopic point of view, leading to the discovery of different roles that the particles play in optimization. The hub particles guide the optimization process towards correct directions while the non-hub particles maintain the necessary population diversity, resulting in the optimum overall performance of SIPSO. These findings deepen our understanding of swarm intelligence and may shed light on the underlying mechanism of information exchange in natural swarm and flocking behaviors. PMID:25787315

  9. Selectively-informed particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Du, Wenbo; Yan, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a nature-inspired algorithm that has shown outstanding performance in solving many realistic problems. In the original PSO and most of its variants all particles are treated equally, overlooking the impact of structural heterogeneity on individual behavior. Here we employ complex networks to represent the population structure of swarms and propose a selectively-informed PSO (SIPSO), in which the particles choose different learning strategies based on their connections: a densely-connected hub particle gets full information from all of its neighbors while a non-hub particle with few connections can only follow a single yet best-performed neighbor. Extensive numerical experiments on widely-used benchmark functions show that our SIPSO algorithm remarkably outperforms the PSO and its existing variants in success rate, solution quality, and convergence speed. We also explore the evolution process from a microscopic point of view, leading to the discovery of different roles that the particles play in optimization. The hub particles guide the optimization process towards correct directions while the non-hub particles maintain the necessary population diversity, resulting in the optimum overall performance of SIPSO. These findings deepen our understanding of swarm intelligence and may shed light on the underlying mechanism of information exchange in natural swarm and flocking behaviors.

  10. Protein pharmacophore selection using hydration-site analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bingjie; Lill, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual screening using pharmacophore models is an efficient method to identify potential lead compounds for target proteins. Pharmacophore models based on protein structures are advantageous because a priori knowledge of active ligands is not required and the models are not biased by the chemical space of previously identified actives. However, in order to capture most potential interactions between all potentially binding ligands and the protein, the size of the pharmacophore model, i.e. number of pharmacophore elements, is typically quite large and therefore reduces the efficiency of pharmacophore based screening. We have developed a new method to select important pharmacophore elements using hydration-site information. The basic premise is that ligand functional groups that replace water molecules in the apo protein contribute strongly to the overall binding affinity of the ligand, due to the additional free energy gained from releasing the water molecule into the bulk solvent. We computed the free energy of water released from the binding site for each hydration site using thermodynamic analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Pharmacophores which are co-localized with hydration sites with estimated favorable contributions to the free energy of binding are selected to generate a reduced pharmacophore model. We constructed reduced pharmacophore models for three protein systems and demonstrated good enrichment quality combined with high efficiency. The reduction in pharmacophore model size reduces the required screening time by a factor of 200–500 compared to using all protein pharmacophore elements. We also describe a training process using a small set of known actives to reliably select the optimal set of criteria for pharmacophore selection for each protein system. PMID:22397751

  11. Spatially-Correlated Risk in Nature Reserve Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Heidi J.; Busby, Gwenlyn M.; Hamaide, Bertrand; Ando, Amy W.; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Establishing nature reserves protects species from land cover conversion and the resulting loss of habitat. Even within a reserve, however, many factors such as fires and defoliating insects still threaten habitat and the survival of species. To address the risk to species survival after reserve establishment, reserve networks can be created that allow some redundancy of species coverage to maximize the expected number of species that survive in the presence of threats. In some regions, however, the threats to species within a reserve may be spatially correlated. As examples, fires, diseases, and pest infestations can spread from a starting point and threaten neighboring parcels’ habitats, in addition to damage caused at the initial location. This paper develops a reserve site selection optimization framework that compares the optimal reserve networks in cases where risks do and do not reflect spatial correlation. By exploring the impact of spatially-correlated risk on reserve networks on a stylized landscape and on an Oregon landscape, this analysis demonstrates an appropriate and feasible method for incorporating such post-reserve establishment risks in the reserve site selection literature as an additional tool to be further developed for future conservation planning. PMID:26789127

  12. Spatially-Correlated Risk in Nature Reserve Site Selection.

    PubMed

    Albers, Heidi J; Busby, Gwenlyn M; Hamaide, Bertrand; Ando, Amy W; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Establishing nature reserves protects species from land cover conversion and the resulting loss of habitat. Even within a reserve, however, many factors such as fires and defoliating insects still threaten habitat and the survival of species. To address the risk to species survival after reserve establishment, reserve networks can be created that allow some redundancy of species coverage to maximize the expected number of species that survive in the presence of threats. In some regions, however, the threats to species within a reserve may be spatially correlated. As examples, fires, diseases, and pest infestations can spread from a starting point and threaten neighboring parcels' habitats, in addition to damage caused at the initial location. This paper develops a reserve site selection optimization framework that compares the optimal reserve networks in cases where risks do and do not reflect spatial correlation. By exploring the impact of spatially-correlated risk on reserve networks on a stylized landscape and on an Oregon landscape, this analysis demonstrates an appropriate and feasible method for incorporating such post-reserve establishment risks in the reserve site selection literature as an additional tool to be further developed for future conservation planning.

  13. Optimizing Restriction Site Placement for Synthetic Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Pablo; Memelli, Heraldo; Ward, Charles; Kim, Joondong; Mitchell, Joseph S. B.; Skiena, Steven

    Restriction enzymes are the workhorses of molecular biology. We introduce a new problem that arises in the course of our project to design virus variants to serve as potential vaccines: we wish to modify virus-length genomes to introduce large numbers of unique restriction enzyme recognition sites while preserving wild-type function by substitution of synonymous codons. We show that the resulting problem is NP-Complete, give an exponential-time algorithm, and propose effective heuristics, which we show give excellent results for five sample viral genomes. Our resulting modified genomes have several times more unique restriction sites and reduce the maximum gap between adjacent sites by three to nine-fold.

  14. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  15. Selection of Luna-25 landing sites in the South Polar Region of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djachkova, M. V.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Sanin, A. B.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a brief description of the spatial analysis method developed at the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences for the landing site selection on the Moon's surface for the Luna-25 lander. Preconditions for the selection of the South Polar Region of the Moon as the main exploration area using automatic spacecraft are considered. The main characteristics of the Luna-25 lander and the main factors influencing the landing site selection on the Moon's surface are listed. The data used are described. Eleven landing site candidates obtained by the method are proposed and prioritized. Detailed characteristics are given for the three optimal sites.

  16. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  17. Optimal test selection for prediction uncertainty reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Mullins, Joshua; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Urbina, Angel

    2016-12-02

    Economic factors and experimental limitations often lead to sparse and/or imprecise data used for the calibration and validation of computational models. This paper addresses resource allocation for calibration and validation experiments, in order to maximize their effectiveness within given resource constraints. When observation data are used for model calibration, the quality of the inferred parameter descriptions is directly affected by the quality and quantity of the data. This paper characterizes parameter uncertainty within a probabilistic framework, which enables the uncertainty to be systematically reduced with additional data. The validation assessment is also uncertain in the presence of sparse and imprecisemore » data; therefore, this paper proposes an approach for quantifying the resulting validation uncertainty. Since calibration and validation uncertainty affect the prediction of interest, the proposed framework explores the decision of cost versus importance of data in terms of the impact on the prediction uncertainty. Often, calibration and validation tests may be performed for different input scenarios, and this paper shows how the calibration and validation results from different conditions may be integrated into the prediction. Then, a constrained discrete optimization formulation that selects the number of tests of each type (calibration or validation at given input conditions) is proposed. Furthermore, the proposed test selection methodology is demonstrated on a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) example.« less

  18. Optimal test selection for prediction uncertainty reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, Joshua; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Urbina, Angel

    2016-12-02

    Economic factors and experimental limitations often lead to sparse and/or imprecise data used for the calibration and validation of computational models. This paper addresses resource allocation for calibration and validation experiments, in order to maximize their effectiveness within given resource constraints. When observation data are used for model calibration, the quality of the inferred parameter descriptions is directly affected by the quality and quantity of the data. This paper characterizes parameter uncertainty within a probabilistic framework, which enables the uncertainty to be systematically reduced with additional data. The validation assessment is also uncertain in the presence of sparse and imprecise data; therefore, this paper proposes an approach for quantifying the resulting validation uncertainty. Since calibration and validation uncertainty affect the prediction of interest, the proposed framework explores the decision of cost versus importance of data in terms of the impact on the prediction uncertainty. Often, calibration and validation tests may be performed for different input scenarios, and this paper shows how the calibration and validation results from different conditions may be integrated into the prediction. Then, a constrained discrete optimization formulation that selects the number of tests of each type (calibration or validation at given input conditions) is proposed. Furthermore, the proposed test selection methodology is demonstrated on a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) example.

  19. Selecting the Right Site: 10 Considerations to Chart the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehlke, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    When considering a new school construction project, the site selection and evaluation process is a critical step in early planning. Selecting the right site is paramount to the project and can have a major impact on the outcome of a referendum. Careful consideration and thoughtful attention to site-related issues and details can set the course not…

  20. Selecting the Right Site: 10 Considerations to Chart the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehlke, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    When considering a new school construction project, the site selection and evaluation process is a critical step in early planning. Selecting the right site is paramount to the project and can have a major impact on the outcome of a referendum. Careful consideration and thoughtful attention to site-related issues and details can set the course not…

  1. Detecting Individual Sites Subject to Episodic Diversifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Ben; Wertheim, Joel O.; Moola, Sasha; Weighill, Thomas; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.

    2012-01-01

    The imprint of natural selection on protein coding genes is often difficult to identify because selection is frequently transient or episodic, i.e. it affects only a subset of lineages. Existing computational techniques, which are designed to identify sites subject to pervasive selection, may fail to recognize sites where selection is episodic: a large proportion of positively selected sites. We present a mixed effects model of evolution (MEME) that is capable of identifying instances of both episodic and pervasive positive selection at the level of an individual site. Using empirical and simulated data, we demonstrate the superior performance of MEME over older models under a broad range of scenarios. We find that episodic selection is widespread and conclude that the number of sites experiencing positive selection may have been vastly underestimated. PMID:22807683

  2. Selecting optimal partitioning schemes for phylogenomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Lanfear, Robert; Calcott, Brett; Kainer, David; Mayer, Christoph; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2014-04-17

    Partitioning involves estimating independent models of molecular evolution for different subsets of sites in a sequence alignment, and has been shown to improve phylogenetic inference. Current methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes, however, are only computationally feasible with datasets of fewer than 100 loci. This is a problem because datasets with thousands of loci are increasingly common in phylogenetics. We develop two novel methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes on large phylogenomic datasets: strict and relaxed hierarchical clustering. These methods use information from the underlying data to cluster together similar subsets of sites in an alignment, and build on clustering approaches that have been proposed elsewhere. We compare the performance of our methods to each other, and to existing methods for selecting partitioning schemes. We demonstrate that while strict hierarchical clustering has the best computational efficiency on very large datasets, relaxed hierarchical clustering provides scalable efficiency and returns dramatically better partitioning schemes as assessed by common criteria such as AICc and BIC scores. These two methods provide the best current approaches to inferring partitioning schemes for very large datasets. We provide free open-source implementations of the methods in the PartitionFinder software. We hope that the use of these methods will help to improve the inferences made from large phylogenomic datasets.

  3. Sequence determinants in human polyadenylation site selection.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Gautheret, Daniel

    2003-02-25

    Differential polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism in higher eukaryotes producing mRNAs with different 3' ends in different contexts. This involves several alternative polyadenylation sites in the 3' UTR, each with its specific strength. Here, we analyze the vicinity of human polyadenylation signals in search of patterns that would help discriminate strong and weak polyadenylation sites, or true sites from randomly occurring signals. We used human genomic sequences to retrieve the region downstream of polyadenylation signals, usually absent from cDNA or mRNA databases. Analyzing 4956 EST-validated polyadenylation sites and their -300/+300 nt flanking regions, we clearly visualized the upstream (USE) and downstream (DSE) sequence elements, both characterized by U-rich (not GU-rich) segments. The presence of a USE and a DSE is the main feature distinguishing true polyadenylation sites from randomly occurring A(A/U)UAAA hexamers. While USEs are indifferently associated with strong and weak poly(A) sites, DSEs are more conspicuous near strong poly(A) sites. We then used the region encompassing the hexamer and DSE as a training set for poly(A) site identification by the ERPIN program and achieved a prediction specificity of 69 to 85% for a sensitivity of 56%. The availability of complete genomes and large EST sequence databases now permit large-scale observation of polyadenylation sites. Both U-rich sequences flanking both sides of poly(A) signals contribute to the definition of "true" sites. However, the downstream U-rich sequences may also play an enhancing role. Based on this information, poly(A) site prediction accuracy was moderately but consistently improved compared to the best previously available algorithm.

  4. Sequence determinants in human polyadenylation site selection

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Matthieu; Gautheret, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Background Differential polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism in higher eukaryotes producing mRNAs with different 3' ends in different contexts. This involves several alternative polyadenylation sites in the 3' UTR, each with its specific strength. Here, we analyze the vicinity of human polyadenylation signals in search of patterns that would help discriminate strong and weak polyadenylation sites, or true sites from randomly occurring signals. Results We used human genomic sequences to retrieve the region downstream of polyadenylation signals, usually absent from cDNA or mRNA databases. Analyzing 4956 EST-validated polyadenylation sites and their -300/+300 nt flanking regions, we clearly visualized the upstream (USE) and downstream (DSE) sequence elements, both characterized by U-rich (not GU-rich) segments. The presence of a USE and a DSE is the main feature distinguishing true polyadenylation sites from randomly occurring A(A/U)UAAA hexamers. While USEs are indifferently associated with strong and weak poly(A) sites, DSEs are more conspicuous near strong poly(A) sites. We then used the region encompassing the hexamer and DSE as a training set for poly(A) site identification by the ERPIN program and achieved a prediction specificity of 69 to 85% for a sensitivity of 56%. Conclusion The availability of complete genomes and large EST sequence databases now permit large-scale observation of polyadenylation sites. Both U-rich sequences flanking both sides of poly(A) signals contribute to the definition of "true" sites. However, the downstream U-rich sequences may also play an enhancing role. Based on this information, poly(A) site prediction accuracy was moderately but consistently improved compared to the best previously available algorithm. PMID:12600277

  5. Investigation of a novel approach for aquaculture site selection.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Lynne; Telfer, Trevor C; Ross, Lindsay G

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the potential use of two "species distribution models" (SDMs), Mahalanobis Typicality and Maxent, for aquaculture site selection. SDMs are used in ecological studies to predict the spatial distribution of species based on analysis of conditions at locations of known presence or absence. Here the input points are aquaculture sites, rather than species occurrence, thus the models evaluate the parameters at the sites and identify similar areas across the rest of the study area. This is a novel approach that avoids the need for data reclassification and weighting which can be a source of conflict and uncertainty within the commonly used multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) technique. Using pangasius culture in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, as a case study, Mahalanobis Typicality and Maxent SDMs were evaluated against two models developed using the MCE approach. Mahalanobis Typicality and Maxent assess suitability based on similarity to existing farms, while the MCE approach assesses suitability using optimal values for culture. Mahalanobis Typicality considers the variables to have equal importance whereas Maxent analyses the variables to determine those which influence the distribution of the input data. All of the models indicate there are suitable areas for culture along the two main channels of the Mekong River which are currently used to farm pangasius and also inland in the north and east of the study area. The results show the Mahalanobis Typicality model had more high scoring areas and greater overall similarity than Maxent to the MCE outputs, suggesting, for this case study, it was the most appropriate SDM for aquaculture site selection. With suitable input data, a combined SDM and MCE model would overcome limitations of the individual approaches, allowing more robust planning and management decisions for aquaculture, other stakeholders and the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radioactive waste repository site selection in the Republic of Slovenia

    SciTech Connect

    Jeran, M.; Duhovnik, B.

    1993-12-31

    The report shows the procedure for the low and intermediate level radwaste (LLW and ILW) repository site selection and the work performed up to the present. The procedure for the repository site selection is divided into four steps. In the first step the unsuitable areas are excluded by taking into consideration the rough exclusion criteria. In the second step, the remaining suitable areas are screened to identify the potential sites with respect to preference criteria. In the third step three to five candidate sites were assessed and selected among the potential sites. In the final, the fourth step, detailed site investigation and confirmation of one or two most suitable sites will follow. In Slovenia the 1st, the 2nd and the 3rd step of site selection have been completed, while step 4 is now in progress.

  7. Factors concerned with sanitary landfill site selection: General discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, W. J.; Stone, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A general view of factors affecting site selection for sanitary landfill sites is presented. Examinations were made of operational methods, possible environment pollution, types of waste to be disposed, base and cover materials, and the economics involved in the operation.

  8. Brownfields Technology Primer: Selecting and Using Phytoremediation for Site Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This primer explains the phytoremediation process, discusses the potential advantages and considerations in selecting phytoremediation to clean up brownfields sites, and provides information on additional resources about phytoremediation.

  9. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  10. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2015-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a 'Color-Enhanced' sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  11. Urban Rain Gauge Siting Selection Based on Gis-Multicriteria Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanli; Jing, Changfeng; Du, Mingyi

    2016-06-01

    With the increasingly rapid growth of urbanization and climate change, urban rainfall monitoring as well as urban waterlogging has widely been paid attention. In the light of conventional siting selection methods do not take into consideration of geographic surroundings and spatial-temporal scale for the urban rain gauge site selection, this paper primarily aims at finding the appropriate siting selection rules and methods for rain gauge in urban area. Additionally, for optimization gauge location, a spatial decision support system (DSS) aided by geographical information system (GIS) has been developed. In terms of a series of criteria, the rain gauge optimal site-search problem can be addressed by a multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). A series of spatial analytical techniques are required for MCDA to identify the prospective sites. With the platform of GIS, using spatial kernel density analysis can reflect the population density; GIS buffer analysis is used to optimize the location with the rain gauge signal transmission character. Experiment results show that the rules and the proposed method are proper for the rain gauge site selection in urban areas, which is significant for the siting selection of urban hydrological facilities and infrastructure, such as water gauge.

  12. A Site Selection Technique for Martian Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Mark E.

    2004-02-01

    The human exploration of Mars will require the identification of a region that includes the largest number of beneficial sites and properties. Because of the numerous relevant parameters and the complexity of the Martian surface an automated technique was tested using Ian L. McHarg's (1969) sieve mapping method. Beginning with a global inventory of features areas of interest were determined by astrobiology, geology and other mission parameters, with the goal of finding a series of possible habitat sites to support a traverse mission through Utopia Planitia, Isidis, and Elysium Planitia. We identified important occurrences of hydrogen isotopes, centers of past volcanic activity, significant impact craters and possible evidence of past and present water and superimposed these locations to determine the best site for the habitat, which is situated between the Elysium volcanoes, Isidis, Gale Crater.

  13. THE SCHOOL SITE--ITS SELECTION, ANALYSIS, DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUNING, WALTER F.

    SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AND COMMUNITY PLANNERS CAN AID THE SCHOOL SITE SELECTION PROCESS BY WORKING TOGETHER ON A COMMUNITY MASTER PLAN. MANY COMMUNITIES HAVE DEVELOPED SUCH A PLAN UNDER THE STATE AND FEDERALLY AIDED 701 PROGRAM. SOUND SITE SELECTION PRINCIPLES REQUIRE CONSIDERATION OF OTHER FACTORS THAN STUDENT POPULATION DISTRIBUTION. IDEALLY…

  14. Nest-site selection in the acorn woodpecker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooge, P.N.; Stanback, M.T.; Koenig, Walter D.

    1999-01-01

    Acorn Woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) at Hastings Reservation in central California prefer to nest in dead limbs in large, dead valley oaks (Quercus lobata) and California sycamores (Platanus racemosa) that are also frequently used as acorn storage trees. Based on 232 nest cavities used over an 18-year period, we tested whether preferred or modal nest-site characters were associated with increased reproductive success (the 'nest-site quality' hypothesis). We also examined whether more successful nests were likely to experience more favorable microclimatic conditions or to be less accessible to terrestrial predators. We found only equivocal support for the nest-site quality hypothesis: only 1 of 5 preferred characters and 2 of 10 characters exhibiting a clear modality were correlated with higher reproductive success. All three characteristics of nests known or likely to be associated with a more favorable microclimate, and two of five characteristics likely to render nests less accessible to predators, were correlated with higher reproductive success: These results suggest that nest cavities in this population are built in part to take advantage of favorable microclimatic conditions and, to a lesser extent, to reduce access to predators. However, despite benefits of particular nest characteristics, birds frequently nested in apparently suboptimal cavities. We also found a significant relationship between mean group size and the history of occupancy of particular territories and the probability of nest cavities being built in microclimatically favorable live limbs, suggesting that larger groups residing on more stable territories were better able to construct nests with optimal characteristics. This indicates that there may be demographic, as well as ecological, constraints on nest-site selection in this primary cavity nester.

  15. Optimized probability sampling of study sites to improve generalizability in a multisite intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Keyserling, Thomas C; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Gizlice, Ziya; Garcia, Beverly A; Johnston, Larry F; Gustafson, Alison; Petrovic, Lindsay; Glasgow, Russell E; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D

    2010-01-01

    Studies of type 2 translation, the adaption of evidence-based interventions to real-world settings, should include representative study sites and staff to improve external validity. Sites for such studies are, however, often selected by convenience sampling, which limits generalizability. We used an optimized probability sampling protocol to select an unbiased, representative sample of study sites to prepare for a randomized trial of a weight loss intervention. We invited North Carolina health departments within 200 miles of the research center to participate (N = 81). Of the 43 health departments that were eligible, 30 were interested in participating. To select a representative and feasible sample of 6 health departments that met inclusion criteria, we generated all combinations of 6 from the 30 health departments that were eligible and interested. From the subset of combinations that met inclusion criteria, we selected 1 at random. Of 593,775 possible combinations of 6 counties, 15,177 (3%) met inclusion criteria. Sites in the selected subset were similar to all eligible sites in terms of health department characteristics and county demographics. Optimized probability sampling improved generalizability by ensuring an unbiased and representative sample of study sites.

  16. Lunar Observer Laser Altimeter observations for lunar base site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Bufton, Jack L.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical datasets for optimal selection of future lunar landing sites is local- to regional-scale topography. Lunar base site selection will require such data for both engineering and scientific operations purposes. The Lunar Geoscience Orbiter or Lunar Observer is the ideal precursory science mission from which to obtain this required information. We suggest that a simple laser altimeter instrument could be employed to measure local-scale slopes, heights, and depths of lunar surface features important to lunar base planning and design. For this reason, we have designed and are currently constructing a breadboard of a Lunar Observer Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument capable of acquiring contiguous-footprint topographic profiles with both 30-m and 300-m along-track resolution. This instrument meets all the severe weight, power, size, and data rate limitations imposed by Observer-class spacecraft. In addition, LOLA would be capable of measuring the within-footprint vertical roughness of the lunar surface, and the 1.06-micron relative surface reflectivity at normal incidence. We have used airborne laser altimeter data for a few representative lunar analog landforms to simulate and analyze LOLA performance in a 100-km lunar orbit. We demonstrate that this system in its highest resolution mode (30-m diameter footprints) would quantify the topography of all but the very smallest lunar landforms. At its global mapping resolution (300-m diameter footprints), LOLA would establish the topographic context for lunar landing site selection by providing the basis for constructing a 1-2 km spatial resolution global, geodetic topographic grid that would contain a high density of observations (e.g., approximately 1000 observations per each 1 deg by 1 deg cell at the lunar equator). The high spatial and vertical resolution measurements made with a LOLA-class instrument on a precursory Lunar Observer would be highly synergistic with high-resolution imaging datasets, and

  17. A New Technique of Site Selection for Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    James B. Baker; W. M. Broadfoot

    1978-01-01

    A problem foresters often face in establishing hardwood plantations is selecting proper sites for various species. Before planting, a forest manager should have confidence that a site is suitable for a particular species, and for investment planning he would like to have some idea of the site's potential productivity. This paper describes how to use a new...

  18. An Evaluation Guide for Selecting a Junior College Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reida, G. W.

    Emphasis is placed upon conceiving the site as an integral part of the total educational environment. Preliminary steps are suggested for planning a junior college campus, placing emphasis upon the need for a master plan. Criteria for site selection are discussed for site size, student enrollment, land use patterns, and accessibility. Directions…

  19. 15 CFR 921.12 - Post site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NOAA approval of a proposed site, the state may submit a request for funds to develop the draft... and biological characteristics of the site approved by NOAA necessary for providing EIS information to NOAA. The state's request for these post site selection funds must be accompanied by the...

  20. 15 CFR 921.12 - Post site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NOAA approval of a proposed site, the state may submit a request for funds to develop the draft... and biological characteristics of the site approved by NOAA necessary for providing EIS information to NOAA. The state's request for these post site selection funds must be accompanied by the...

  1. 15 CFR 921.12 - Post site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NOAA approval of a proposed site, the state may submit a request for funds to develop the draft... and biological characteristics of the site approved by NOAA necessary for providing EIS information to NOAA. The state's request for these post site selection funds must be accompanied by the...

  2. 15 CFR 921.12 - Post site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NOAA approval of a proposed site, the state may submit a request for funds to develop the draft... and biological characteristics of the site approved by NOAA necessary for providing EIS information to NOAA. The state's request for these post site selection funds must be accompanied by the...

  3. 15 CFR 921.12 - Post site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NOAA approval of a proposed site, the state may submit a request for funds to develop the draft... and biological characteristics of the site approved by NOAA necessary for providing EIS information to NOAA. The state's request for these post site selection funds must be accompanied by the...

  4. Scour at selected bridge sites in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.V.

    1995-01-01

    Scour data were collected during 1936-94 at 22 bridge sites in Mississippi. The drainage area of the bridge-scour sites ranged from 60.8 to 5,720 square miles, and the slope in the vicinity of each site ranged from 0.00011 to 0.00163 foot per foot. Measured pier-scour depths ranged from 0.6 to 20.4 feet. Measured total-scour depths at minimum-bed elevation ranged from 5.2 to 29.8 feet. Recurrence intervals of measured streamflow discharges ranged from less than 2 years to about 500 years. All of the Mississippi pier-scour depths were within 2.3 times the normal pier width, which agreed with previous research. Only 12 (6 percent) of the 190 measured pier-scour depths were greater than 1.1 times the normal pier width. Measured pier-scour depths were as much as 2.24 times a normal pier width of 3.3 feet. However, for pier widths greater than about 4 feet, measured pier-scour depths were significantly less than 2.3 times the normal pier width. An envelope-curve equation for the Mississippi pier-scour data was developed by relating pier-scour depth divided by normal pier width to measured approach-flow depth divided by normal pier width. The envelope-curve equation predictions could be used for reasonable verifi- cations of the HEC-18 pier-scour predictions, currently required for the design and mainte- nance of bridges over waterways in Mississippi.

  5. Key elements in optimizing catalyst selections for resid FCC units

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, S.J.; O`Connor, P.

    1995-09-01

    Achieving the optimum activity and yield structure from a commercial Resid FCC Unit (RFCC) is essential to maximizing profitability in today`s modern refinery. Proper catalyst selection is a key element in this optimization. This paper is written to provide FCC Process Engineers with an understanding of some basic elements of RFCC operation. The necessity of using realistic evaluation methods to assure proper RFCC catalyst selection is explained. The differences between Activity limited and Delta Coke limited RFCC operations are elucidated and the related catalyst performance requirements are discussed. The effect of the catalyst to oil ratio on conversion and on catalyst site utilization and poisoning plays a key role in the transition of an RFCC unit from Catalyst Activity limited regime to a Cat-to-Oil limited regime. For the Activity limited operation the catalyst resistance to poisons with the appropriate feedstock will be the most important selection criteria. For the Delta Coke limited operation, a reduction of the commercial delta coke of the catalyst will be crucial. The types of commercial delta coke are discussed and methods for their evaluation are suggested. In both cases the use of realistic catalyst evaluation methods and feedstock will be essential in order to arrive at the correct catalyst selection. Finally, commercial data comparisons illustrate the improvements in product value that can be achieved when the proper catalyst is chosen.

  6. Site selection and licensing issues: Southwest Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, J.L.

    1989-11-01

    The low-level radioactive waste disposal site in California is being selected through a three-phase program. Phase 1 is a systematic statewide, regional, and local screening study. This program was conducted during 1986 and 1987, and culminated in the selection of three candidate sites fur further study. The candidate sites are identified as the Panamint, Silurian, and Ward Valley sites. Phase 2 comprises site characterization and environmental and socio-economic impact study activities at the three candidate sites. Based upon the site characterization studies, the candidate sites are ranked according to the desirability and conformance with regulatory requirements. Phase 3 comprises preparation of a license application for the selected candidate site. The license application will include a detailed characterization of the site, detailed design and operations plans for the proposed facility, and assessments of potential impacts of the site upon the environment and the local communities. Five types of siting criteria were developed to govern the site selection process. These types are: technical suitability exclusionary criteria, high-avoidance criteria beyond technical suitability requirements, discretionary criteria, public acceptance, and schedule requirements of the LLWR Policy Act Amendments. This paper discusses the application of the hydrological and geotechnical criteria during the siting and licensing studies in California. These criteria address site location and performance, and the degree to which present and future site behavior can be predicted. Primary regulatory requirements governing the suitability of a site are that the site must be hydrologically and geologically simple enough for the confident prediction of future behavior, and that the site must be stable enough that frequent or intensive maintenance of the closed site will not be required. This paper addresses the methods to measure site suitability at each stage of the process, methods to

  7. Optimal smoothing of site-energy distributions from adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Travis, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The equation for the adsorption isotherm on a heterogeneous surface is a Fredholm integral equation. In solving it for the site-energy distribution (SED), some sort of smoothing must be carried out. The optimal amount of smoothing will give the most information that is possible without introducing nonexistent structure into the SED. Recently, Butler, Reeds, and Dawson proposed a criterion (the BRD criterion) for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter when using regularization to solve Fredholm equations. The BRD criterion is tested for its suitability in obtaining optimal SED's. This criterion is found to be too conservative. While using it never introduces nonexistent structure into the SED, significant information is often lost. At present, no simple criterion for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter exists, and a modeling approach is recommended.

  8. History of the production complex: The methods of site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Experience taught the Atomic Energy Commission how to select the best possible sites for its production facilities. AEC officials learned from the precedents set by the wartime Manhattan Project and from their own mistakes in the immediate postwar years. This volume discusses several site selections. The sites covered are: (1) the Hanford Reservation, (2) the Idaho reactor site, (3) the Savannah River Plant, (4) the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, (5) the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, (6) the Fernald Production Center, (7) the PANTEX and Spoon River Plants, (8) the Rocky Flats Fabrication Facility, and (9) the Miamisburg and Pinellas plants. (JDH)

  9. Selection of promising sites for magma energy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Long Valley and Coso Hot Springs areas of California have been identified as the most promising sites for conducting a magma energy extraction experiment. These two locations were selected from among the potential sites on the basis of several factors that are critical to the success of the proposed long-term energy extraction experiment. These factors include the likelihood of the existence of shallow magma targets as well as several other drilling, energy extraction and programmatic considerations. As the magma energy extraction program continues, these sites will be analyzed in detail so that one can be selected as the site for the planned magma experiment.

  10. Water Quality Optimization through Selective Withdrawal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    river. 16. Kaplan noted that Staha and Himmelblau compared the COMET al- gorithm to three nonlinear programming codes for 25 test problems. The...Mathematics, Vol 9. Staha, R. L. and Himmelblau , D. M. 1972. "Constrained Optimization Via Moving Exterior Truncations," presented at the Society for

  11. Preliminary site selection report for the new sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has proposed a new sanitary landfill (NSL) for solid waste. A site selection team, comprised of representatives from Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) evaluated potential landfill sites. The site selection team conducted an initial screening of SRS to eliminate unsuitable areas. The screening was based on criteria that were principally environmental factors; however, the criteria also included avoiding areas with unacceptable features for construction or operation of the facility. This initial screening identified seven candidate sites for further evaluation.

  12. 23 CFR 1340.5 - Selection of observation sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) States shall select observation sites from a database of road inventories approved by NHTSA or provided... not within a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), as published by the Office of Management and Budget...

  13. 23 CFR 1340.5 - Selection of observation sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) States shall select observation sites from a database of road inventories approved by NHTSA or provided... not within a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), as published by the Office of Management and Budget...

  14. 23 CFR 1340.5 - Selection of observation sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) States shall select observation sites from a database of road inventories approved by NHTSA or provided... not within a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), as published by the Office of Management and Budget...

  15. Site-selected Auger electron spectroscopy of N2O.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Paola; Coreno, Marcello; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Storchi, Loriano; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2006-08-07

    The N 1s Auger spectra for the two nonequivalent N atoms in N2O have been measured via Auger electron-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy. The site-selected Auger spectra are compared with the normal Auger spectrum and with accurate theoretical calculations accounting for the effects of the dynamics of the nuclei on the energy and linewidth of the Auger bands. Such effects are found to be crucial factors in determining the different band shapes in the site-selected spectra.

  16. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  17. 20 CFR 638.303 - Site selection and facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site selection and facilities management. 638.303 Section 638.303 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... agency submit a site survey and utilization study. If the Job Corps Director decides to establish a...

  18. Elk resource selection at parturition sites, Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Chadwick P. Lehman; Mark A. Rumble; Christopher T. Rota; Benjamin J. Bird; Dillon T. Fogarty; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2015-01-01

    We studied elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) parturition sites at coarse (314-km2 and 7-km2) and fine (0.2-ha) scales in the Black Hills, South Dakota, 2011-2013, following a period of population decline and poor calf recruitment. Our objective was to test whether female elk selected parturition sites across spatial scales in association with forage, terrain...

  19. The economic and social aspects of sanitary landfill site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, W. J.; Rogers, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The factors involved in the selection of suitable sites for sanitary land fills are discussed. The economic considerations and problems of social acceptance are considered the most important. The subjects discussed are: (1) accessibility of land, (2) availability of cover material, (3) expected capacity of site, (4) cover material and compaction, (5) fire protection, (6) site location with respect to residential and industrial areas, and (7) land usage after landfill completion.

  20. Optimized source selection for intracavitary low dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nurushev, T.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2005-05-01

    A procedure has been developed for automating optimal selection of sources from an available inventory for the low dose rate brachytherapy, as a replacement for the conventional trial-and-error approach. The method of optimized constrained ratios was applied for clinical source selection for intracavitary Cs-137 implants using Varian BRACHYVISION software as initial interface. However, this method can be easily extended to another system with isodose scaling and shaping capabilities. Our procedure provides optimal source selection results independent of the user experience and in a short amount of time. This method also generates statistics on frequently requested ideal source strengths aiding in ordering of clinically relevant sources.

  1. Selection against tandem splice sites affecting structured protein regions.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Michael; Szafranski, Karol; Huse, Klaus; Backofen, Rolf; Platzer, Matthias

    2008-03-21

    Alternative selection of splice sites in tandem donors and acceptors is a major mode of alternative splicing. Here, we analyzed whether in-frame tandem sites leading to subtle mRNA insertions/deletions of 3, 6, or 9 nucleotides are under natural selection. We found multiple lines of evidence that the human protein coding sequences are under selection against such in-frame tandem splice events, indicating that these events are often deleterious. The strength of selection is not homogeneous within the coding sequence as protein regions that fold into a fixed 3D structure (intrinsically ordered) are under stronger selection, especially against sites with a strong minor splice site. Investigating structures of functional protein domains, we found that tandem acceptors are preferentially located at the domain surface and outside structural elements such as helices and sheets. Using three-species comparisons, we estimate that more than half of all mutations that create NAGNAG acceptors in the coding region have been eliminated by selection. We estimate that ~2,400 introns are under selection against possessing a tandem site.

  2. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Site Optimization for Poyang Lake, the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Mengan; Deng, Yanqing; Tang, Chunyan; Yang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a coupled method to optimize the surface water quality monitoring sites for a huge freshwater lake based on field investigations, mathematical analysis, and numerical simulation tests. Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on the field investigated water quality data in the 5 years from 2008 to 2012, the water quality inter-annual variation coefficients at all the present sites and the water quality correlation coefficients between adjacent sites were calculated and analyzed to present an optimization scheme. A 2-D unsteady water quality model was established to get the corresponding water quality data at the optimized monitoring sites, which were needed for the rationality test on the optimized monitoring network. We found that: (1) the water quality of Piaoshan (No. 10) fluctuated most distinguishably and the inter-annual variation coefficient of NH3-N and TP could reach 99.77% and 73.92%, respectively. The four studied indexes were all closely related at Piaoshan (No. 10) and Tangyin (No. 11), and the correlation coefficients of COD and NH3-N could reach 0.91 and 0.94 separately. (2) It was suggested that the present site No. 10 be removed to avoid repeatability, and it was suggested that the three sites of Changling, Huzhong, and Nanjiang be added to improve the representativeness of the monitoring sites. (3) According to the rationality analysis, the 21 optimized water quality monitoring sites could scientifically replace the primary network, and the new monitoring network could better reflect the water quality of the whole lake. PMID:25407419

  3. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; Lai, Judy

    2011-04-01

    Berkeley Lab has been developing the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) for several years. Given load curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (u grid), fuel costs and other economic inputs, and a menu of available technologies, DER-CAM finds the optimum equipment fleet and its optimum operating schedule using a mixed integer linear programming approach. This capability is being applied using a software as a service (SaaS) model. Optimisation problems are set up on a Berkeley Lab server and clients can execute their jobs as needed, typically daily. The evolution of this approach is demonstrated by description of three ongoing projects. The first is a public access web site focused on solar photovoltaic generation and battery viability at large commercial and industrial customer sites. The second is a building CO2 emissions reduction operations problem for a University of California, Davis student dining hall for which potential investments are also considered. And the third, is both a battery selection problem and a rolling operating schedule problem for a large County Jail. Together these examples show that optimization of building u grid design and operation can be effectively achieved using SaaS.

  4. Optimization of a crossing system using mate selection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; van der Werf, Julius H J; Kinghorn, Brian P

    2006-01-01

    A simple model based on one single identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) in a two-way crossing system was used to demonstrate the power of mate selection algorithms as a natural means of opportunistic line development for optimization of crossbreeding programs over multiple generations. Mate selection automatically invokes divergent selection in two parental lines for an over-dominant QTL and increased frequency of the favorable allele toward fixation in the sire-line for a fully-dominant QTL. It was concluded that an optimal strategy of line development could be found by mate selection algorithms for a given set of parameters such as genetic model of QTL, breeding objective and initial frequency of the favorable allele in the base populations, etc. The same framework could be used in other scenarios, such as programs involving crossing to exploit breed effects and heterosis. In contrast to classical index selection, this approach to mate selection can optimize long-term responses.

  5. Optimization of a crossing system using mate selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjun; Werf, Julius HJ van der; Kinghorn, Brian P

    2006-01-01

    A simple model based on one single identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) in a two-way crossing system was used to demonstrate the power of mate selection algorithms as a natural means of opportunistic line development for optimization of crossbreeding programs over multiple generations. Mate selection automatically invokes divergent selection in two parental lines for an over-dominant QTL and increased frequency of the favorable allele toward fixation in the sire-line for a fully-dominant QTL. It was concluded that an optimal strategy of line development could be found by mate selection algorithms for a given set of parameters such as genetic model of QTL, breeding objective and initial frequency of the favorable allele in the base populations, etc. The same framework could be used in other scenarios, such as programs involving crossing to exploit breed effects and heterosis. In contrast to classical index selection, this approach to mate selection can optimize long-term responses. PMID:16492372

  6. Optimal Selection of Army Military Construction Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    The second column defines the categories for each project. For example, a pier (category: waterfront restoration) receives ten points even though...world information system project selection (from a set of 28) for the Dubai Medical Center in the State of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. After

  7. Producer breeding objectives and optimal sire selection.

    PubMed

    Tozer, P R; Stokes, J R

    2002-12-01

    Information from an online survey of dairy producers was used to determine how important producers perceived three different objectives in the breeding problem. The objectives were: maximizing expected net merit of the progeny, minimizing the expected progeny inbreeding coefficient, and minimizing semen expenditure. Producers were asked to rank the three objectives and then to weight the importance of each objective relative to the others. This information was then used to determine weights to be used in a multiple-objective integer program designed to select individual mates for a herd of 76 Jersey cows with known genetic background and cow net merit. The results of the multiple-objective models show that rank and relative importance of producer objectives can affect the portfolio of sires selected. Producers whose primary objective was to maximize expected net merit had a range of average expected progeny net merit of $306 to $310, but the level of expected progeny inbreeding was from 6.99 to 10.45%, with a semen cost per conception of $35 to $41. For producers who selected minimizing progeny inbreeding as the primary goal in their breeding programs, the range of inbreeding was from 6.11 to 6.60%, with lower net merit range of $274 to $301 and semen expenditure of $30 to $37 per conception. One producer selected minimizing semen cost as the primary objective. For that producer's portfolio, the semen cost was $27 per conception and net merit was $288, with a progeny inbreeding coefficient of 10.68%. The results of this research suggest that producer information and goals have a substantial impact on the portfolio of sires selected by that producer to attain these goals.

  8. Site-selective covalent reactions on proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Ho; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Wei; Wong, Clarence T T; Sun, Hongyan; Xia, Jiang

    2017-07-05

    To achieve precise control of the signaling events or to achieve unmistakable synthesis of biomolecules, nature has evolved organic reactions involving proteinogenic amino acids with unparalleled site selectivity. For example, dedicated enzymes accurately dictate the site of post-translational modifications in signaling proteins, and ribosomes precisely link the C-terminal carboxylic acid of one unprotected amino acid with the N-terminal amino group of the other amino acid through spatially confined proximity. For many years, chemists have been striving to achieve site selectivity on biomolecules by mimicking nature. Driven by the development of chemoselective protein conjugation reactions, enzymology and protein-protein interactions, the past decade has witnessed a boom in site-selective protein conjugation reactions. (In this review, a site-selective protein conjugation reaction is defined as an organic reaction that targets a single amino acid instead of a kind of amino acids in a protein or a proteome under physiological conditions, for example, a single cysteine residue among all of the cysteines.) In this review, we summarize the recent advancements of bioconjugation reactions that demonstrate this feature of precise site selectivity, focusing on the reactions of the proteinogenic amino acids (excluding those at non-coded or non-proteinogenic amino acids that are introduced to proteins through genetic manipulations). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Site Selection Criteria for Sheltering after Earthquakes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ahmad; Ardalan, Ali; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Proper shelter site selection is necessary for long-term welfare of earthquake affected people. This study aims to explore the criteria that need to be considered after earthquakes. Methods: Through a systematic review, 273 articles found that were published till April 2014. Among these, seven articles have been selected and analyzed for the criteria that they introduced for sheltering site selection after earthquakes. Results: Out of 27 proposed criteria, accessibility and proximity to homes of affected people were stressed in all the papers. Moreover, seven other criteria were the same in most of the papers including suitable size, suitable distance from hazardous areas, geological hazards and land slope, suitable distance from medical centers, water supply and Security. We categorized all the mentioned criteria in six main categories. Size and location, disaster risk reduction, relief and rescue facilities, feasibility of the site, environmental and social aspects are the main categories. Conclusion: Selection and applying proper criteria for shelter site selection after earthquakes is a multi-disciplinary task. The decision needs relevant models and/or tools. Geographic Information System (GIS) is a useful tool for this purpose. Key words: Disaster, earthquake, shelter, site selection, systematic review PMID:25642367

  10. Site selection criteria for sheltering after earthquakes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ahmad; Ardalan, Ali; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad

    2014-08-29

    Proper shelter site selection is necessary for long-term welfare of earthquake affected people. This study aims to explore the criteria that need to be considered after earthquakes. Through a systematic review, 273 articles found that were published till April 2014. Among these, seven articles have been selected and analyzed for the criteria that they introduced for sheltering site selection after earthquakes. Out of 27 proposed criteria, accessibility and proximity to homes of affected people were stressed in all the papers. Moreover, seven other criteria were the same in most of the papers including suitable size, suitable distance from hazardous areas, geological hazards and land slope, suitable distance from medical centers, water supply and Security. We categorized all the mentioned criteria in six main categories. Size and location, disaster risk reduction, relief and rescue facilities, feasibility of the site, environmental and social aspects are the main categories. Selection and applying proper criteria for shelter site selection after earthquakes is a multi-disciplinary task. The decision needs relevant models and/or tools. Geographic Information System (GIS) is a useful tool for this purpose. Key words: Disaster, earthquake, shelter, site selection, systematic review.

  11. On Optimal Input Design and Model Selection for Communication Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Djouadi, Seddik M; Olama, Mohammed M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the optimal model (structure) selection and input design which minimize the worst case identification error for communication systems are provided. The problem is formulated using metric complexity theory in a Hilbert space setting. It is pointed out that model selection and input design can be handled independently. Kolmogorov n-width is used to characterize the representation error introduced by model selection, while Gel fand and Time n-widths are used to represent the inherent error introduced by input design. After the model is selected, an optimal input which minimizes the worst case identification error is shown to exist. In particular, it is proven that the optimal model for reducing the representation error is a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) model, and the optimal input is an impulse at the start of the observation interval. FIR models are widely popular in communication systems, such as, in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems.

  12. Optimized tuner selection for engine performance estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L. (Inventor); Garg, Sanjay (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A methodology for minimizing the error in on-line Kalman filter-based aircraft engine performance estimation applications is presented. This technique specifically addresses the underdetermined estimation problem, where there are more unknown parameters than available sensor measurements. A systematic approach is applied to produce a model tuning parameter vector of appropriate dimension to enable estimation by a Kalman filter, while minimizing the estimation error in the parameters of interest. Tuning parameter selection is performed using a multi-variable iterative search routine which seeks to minimize the theoretical mean-squared estimation error. Theoretical Kalman filter estimation error bias and variance values are derived at steady-state operating conditions, and the tuner selection routine is applied to minimize these values. The new methodology yields an improvement in on-line engine performance estimation accuracy.

  13. Location Distribution Optimization of Photographing Sites for Indoor Panorama Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wu, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xin, Z.; Liu, J.

    2017-09-01

    Generally, panoramas image modeling is costly and time-consuming because of photographing continuously to capture enough photos along the routes, especially in complicated indoor environment. Thus, difficulty follows for a wider applications of panoramic image modeling for business. It is indispensable to make a feasible arrangement of panorama sites locations because the locations influence the clarity, coverage and the amount of panoramic images under the condition of certain device. This paper is aim to propose a standard procedure to generate the specific location and total amount of panorama sites in indoor panoramas modeling. Firstly, establish the functional relationship between one panorama site and its objectives. Then, apply the relationship to panorama sites network. We propose the Distance Clarity function (FC and Fe) manifesting the mathematical relationship between panoramas and objectives distance or obstacle distance. The Distance Buffer function (FB) is modified from traditional buffer method to generate the coverage of panorama site. Secondly, transverse every point in possible area to locate possible panorama site, calculate the clarity and coverage synthetically. Finally select as little points as possible to satiate clarity requirement preferentially and then the coverage requirement. In the experiments, detailed parameters of camera lens are given. Still, more experiments parameters need trying out given that relationship between clarity and distance is device dependent. In short, through the function FC, Fe and FB, locations of panorama sites can be generated automatically and accurately.

  14. Hypermutable non-synonymous sites are under stronger negative selection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Steffen; Gerasimova, Anna; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Adzhubei, Ivan A; Adzuhbei, Ivan A; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2008-11-01

    Mutation rate varies greatly between nucleotide sites of the human genome and depends both on the global genomic location and the local sequence context of a site. In particular, CpG context elevates the mutation rate by an order of magnitude. Mutations also vary widely in their effect on the molecular function, phenotype, and fitness. Independence of the probability of occurrence of a new mutation's effect has been a fundamental premise in genetics. However, highly mutable contexts may be preserved by negative selection at important sites but destroyed by mutation at sites under no selection. Thus, there may be a positive correlation between the rate of mutations at a nucleotide site and the magnitude of their effect on fitness. We studied the impact of CpG context on the rate of human-chimpanzee divergence and on intrahuman nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous coding sites. We compared nucleotides that occupy identical positions within codons of identical amino acids and only differ by being within versus outside CpG context. Nucleotides within CpG context are under a stronger negative selection, as revealed by their lower, proportionally to the mutation rate, rate of evolution and nucleotide diversity. In particular, the probability of fixation of a non-synonymous transition at a CpG site is two times lower than at a CpG site. Thus, sites with different mutation rates are not necessarily selectively equivalent. This suggests that the mutation rate may complement sequence conservation as a characteristic predictive of functional importance of nucleotide sites.

  15. Hypermutable Non-Synonymous Sites Are under Stronger Negative Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Adzuhbei, Ivan A.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2008-01-01

    Mutation rate varies greatly between nucleotide sites of the human genome and depends both on the global genomic location and the local sequence context of a site. In particular, CpG context elevates the mutation rate by an order of magnitude. Mutations also vary widely in their effect on the molecular function, phenotype, and fitness. Independence of the probability of occurrence of a new mutation's effect has been a fundamental premise in genetics. However, highly mutable contexts may be preserved by negative selection at important sites but destroyed by mutation at sites under no selection. Thus, there may be a positive correlation between the rate of mutations at a nucleotide site and the magnitude of their effect on fitness. We studied the impact of CpG context on the rate of human–chimpanzee divergence and on intrahuman nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous coding sites. We compared nucleotides that occupy identical positions within codons of identical amino acids and only differ by being within versus outside CpG context. Nucleotides within CpG context are under a stronger negative selection, as revealed by their lower, proportionally to the mutation rate, rate of evolution and nucleotide diversity. In particular, the probability of fixation of a non-synonymous transition at a CpG site is two times lower than at a CpG site. Thus, sites with different mutation rates are not necessarily selectively equivalent. This suggests that the mutation rate may complement sequence conservation as a characteristic predictive of functional importance of nucleotide sites. PMID:19043566

  16. Selective robust optimization: A new intensity-modulated proton therapy optimization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Niemela, Perttu; Siljamaki, Sami; Vanderstraeten, Reynald; Liao, Li; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a new robust optimization strategy for intensity-modulated proton therapy as an important step in translating robust proton treatment planning from research to clinical applications. Methods: In selective robust optimization, a worst-case-based robust optimization algorithm is extended, and terms of the objective function are selectively computed from either the worst-case dose or the nominal dose. Two lung cancer cases and one head and neck cancer case were used to demonstrate the practical significance of the proposed robust planning strategy. The lung cancer cases had minimal tumor motion less than 5 mm, and, for the demonstration of the methodology, are assumed to be static. Results: Selective robust optimization achieved robust clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and at the same time increased nominal planning target volume coverage to 95.8%, compared to the 84.6% coverage achieved with CTV-based robust optimization in one of the lung cases. In the other lung case, the maximum dose in selective robust optimization was lowered from a dose of 131.3% in the CTV-based robust optimization to 113.6%. Selective robust optimization provided robust CTV coverage in the head and neck case, and at the same time improved controls over isodose distribution so that clinical requirements may be readily met. Conclusions: Selective robust optimization may provide the flexibility and capability necessary for meeting various clinical requirements in addition to achieving the required plan robustness in practical proton treatment planning settings.

  17. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  18. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-08-17

    A site selection study was conducted to evaluate locations for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities. Facilities to be located include the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), and the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) facility. Objectives of the study include: (1) Confirm that the Department of Energy (DOE) selected locations for the MOX and PDCF were suitable based on selected siting criteria, (2) Recommend a site in the vicinity of F Area that is suitable for the PIP, and (3) Identify alternative suitable sites for one or more of these facilities in the event that further geotechnical characterization or other considerations result in disqualification of a currently proposed site.

  19. Optimization of ultrasonic transducers for selective guided wave actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszczynski, Mateusz; Packo, Pawel; Zbyrad, Paulina; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz; Lis, Jerzy; Wiatr, Kazimierz

    2016-04-01

    The application of guided waves using surface-bonded piezoceramic transducers for nondestructive testing (NDT) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) have shown great potential. However, due to difficulty in identification of individual wave modes resulting from their dispersive and multi-modal nature, selective mode excitement methods are highly desired. The presented work focuses on an optimization-based approach to design of a piezoelectric transducer for selective guided waves generation. The concept of the presented framework involves a Finite Element Method (FEM) model in the optimization process. The material of the transducer is optimized in topological sense with the aim of tuning piezoelectric properties for actuation of specific guided wave modes.

  20. Optimized Selective Coatings for Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.; Curtis, H. B.

    1967-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of black nickel electroplated over stainless steel and of black copper produced by oxidation of copper sheet were measured for various plating times of black nickel and for various lengths of time of oxidation of the copper sheet, and compared to black chrome over nickel and to converted zinc. It was determined that there was an optimum time for both plating of black nickel and for the oxidation of copper black. At this time the solar selective properties show high absorptance in the solar spectrum and low emittance in the infrared. The conditions are compared for production of optimum optical properties for black nickel, black copper, black chrome, and two black zinc conversions which at the same conditions had absorptances of 0.84, 0.90, 0.95, 0.84, and 0.92, respectively, and emittances of 0.18, 0.08, 0.09, 0.10, and 0.08, respectively.

  1. Digital logic optimization using selection operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor); Cameron, Eric G. (Inventor); Gambles, Jody W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to the invention, a digital design method for manipulating a digital circuit netlist is disclosed. In one step, a first netlist is loaded. The first netlist is comprised of first basic cells that are comprised of first kernel cells. The first netlist is manipulated to create a second netlist. The second netlist is comprised of second basic cells that are comprised of second kernel cells. A percentage of the first and second kernel cells are selection circuits. There is less chip area consumed in the second basic cells than in the first basic cells. The second netlist is stored. In various embodiments, the percentage could be 2% or more, 5% or more, 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, or 40% or more.

  2. Unusual sleeping site selection by southern bamboo lemurs.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Timothy M; Donati, Giuseppe; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2016-04-01

    Selection of sleeping sites has consequences for individual fitness. Non-human primates often bias their selection towards arboreal sites, and the lemurs of Madagascar typically rest/sleep in trees, tree holes, and/or constructed nests. Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain sleeping site selection include protection from predators, avoidance of parasitic vectors, and improved thermoregulation. Here, we examine these hypotheses for the unusual sleeping site selections by the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). Within the Mandena littoral forest of southeast Madagascar, the southern bamboo lemur is known for its ecological flexibility compared to other bamboo lemur species, including a dietary niche expansion to feeding on the ground. Between October 2012 and December 2013, we observed bamboo lemurs from three social groups for 1778.67 h, conducting full-day focal follows on 11 adult individuals (five males, six females). During this period, all three groups were observed to sleep on the ground, with one of these groups also using an abandoned nest of a Madagascar crested ibis (Lophotibis cristata). We collected habitat and temperature data to examine whether selection was influenced by environmental variables. Terrestrial sleeping (N = 17) was observed in all individuals but one adult female, with individuals burrowing under thick vegetation more often during the hot austral summer. While difficult to rigorously test, it is possible that terrestrial sleep sites and/or sleeping in a bird nest may impair visual detection by some aerial and terrestrial predators. Neither of these sites (i.e., terrestrial sleeping or use of a bird nest), however, is likely to minimize exposure to parasites/vectors. Terrestrial sleeping appears to support a thermoregulatory strategy, whereas the use of a bird nest could not be empirically tested. Our observations of unique sleeping site locations used by southern bamboo lemurs further the complexity of their

  3. Comparison of optimal irrigation scheduling and groundwater recharge at representative sites in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is an important food production area in China, facing an increasing water shortage and overexploitation of groundwater. It is critical to optimize the irrigation scheduling and accurately estimate groundwater recharge for saving water and increasing crop water use efficiency. However, the water cycle and crop responses to irrigation are quite various in different areas, because of the spatial variation of climatic, soil, water table and other management practices in the NCP. In this study, three representative sites (LC site in the piedmont plain, TZ site in the northern alluvial and lacustrine plain, YC site in the southern alluvial and lacustrine plain) were selected to compare the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge under different hydrological years for winter wheat-summer maize double cropping system. At each site, a physically based agro-hydrological model (SWAP) was calibrated using field data of soil moisture. Then, scenarios under different irrigation time and amount were simulated. Results showed that the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge were significant different between the three representative sites. The mean water table depth at the LC (33.0 m), YC (10.3 m), and TZ site (2.5 m) caused great different time lags of infiltrated water and groundwater contribution to evapotranspiration. Then, the most irrigation amount was required for the TZ site but the least requirement for the YC site at each hydrologic year. As most clay contents in the deep soils at the LC site increased tortuosity and limited water movement, which resulted in lower rates of recharge compared to more sandy soils at the other two sites. Averagely, using the optimal irrigation scheduling could save 2.04×109 m3 irrigation water and reduce about 84.3% groundwater over-exploitation in winter wheat growth period in the NCP. Therefore, comparison of the simulation results among the three

  4. Is hyporheic flow an indicator for salmonid spawning site selection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjankar, R. M.; Tonina, D.; Marzadri, A.; McKean, J. A.; Isaak, D.

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have investigated the role of hydraulic variables in the selection of spawning sites by salmonids. Some recent studies suggest that the intensity of the ambient hyporheic flow, that present without a salmon egg pocket, is a cue for spawning site selection, but others have argued against it. We tested this hypothesis by using a unique dataset of field surveyed spawning site locations and an unprecedented meter-scale resolution bathymetry of a 13.5 km long reach of Bear Valley Creek (Idaho, USA), an important Chinook salmon spawning stream. We used a two-dimensional surface water model to quantify stream hydraulics and a three-dimensional hyporheic model to quantify the hyporheic flows. Our results show that the intensity of ambient hyporheic flows is not a statistically significant variable for spawning site selection. Conversely, the intensity of the water surface curvature and the habitat quality, quantified as a function of stream hydraulics and morphology, are the most important variables for salmonid spawning site selection. KEY WORDS: Salmonid spawning habitat, pool-riffle system, habitat quality, surface water curvature, hyporheic flow

  5. Strategies for nest-site selection by king eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentzen, R.L.; Powell, A.N.; Suydam, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Nest site selection is a critical component of reproduction and has presumably evolved in relation to predation, local resources, and microclimate. We investigated nest-site choice by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) on the coastal plain of northern Alaska, USA, 2003-2005. We hypothesized that nest-site selection is driven by predator avoidance and that a variety of strategies including concealment, seclusion, and conspecific or inter-specific nest defense might lead to improved nesting success. We systematically searched wetland basins for king eider nests and measured habitat and social variables at nests (n = 212) and random locations (n = 493). King eiders made use of both secluded and concealed breeding strategies; logistic regression models revealed that females selected nests close to water, on islands, and in areas with high willow (Salix spp.) cover but did not select sites near conspecific or glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) nests. The most effective nest-placement strategy may vary depending on density and types of nest predators; seclusion is likely a mammalian-predator avoidance tactic whereas concealment may provide protection from avian predators. We recommend that managers in northern Alaska attempt to maintain wetland basins with islands and complex shorelines to provide potential nest sites in the vicinity of water. ?? The Wildlife Society.

  6. Efficient Simulation Budget Allocation for Selecting an Optimal Subset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; He, Donghai; Fu, Michael; Lee, Loo Hay

    2008-01-01

    We consider a class of the subset selection problem in ranking and selection. The objective is to identify the top m out of k designs based on simulated output. Traditional procedures are conservative and inefficient. Using the optimal computing budget allocation framework, we formulate the problem as that of maximizing the probability of correc tly selecting all of the top-m designs subject to a constraint on the total number of samples available. For an approximation of this corre ct selection probability, we derive an asymptotically optimal allocat ion and propose an easy-to-implement heuristic sequential allocation procedure. Numerical experiments indicate that the resulting allocatio ns are superior to other methods in the literature that we tested, and the relative efficiency increases for larger problems. In addition, preliminary numerical results indicate that the proposed new procedur e has the potential to enhance computational efficiency for simulation optimization.

  7. Efficient Simulation Budget Allocation for Selecting an Optimal Subset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; He, Donghai; Fu, Michael; Lee, Loo Hay

    2008-01-01

    We consider a class of the subset selection problem in ranking and selection. The objective is to identify the top m out of k designs based on simulated output. Traditional procedures are conservative and inefficient. Using the optimal computing budget allocation framework, we formulate the problem as that of maximizing the probability of correc tly selecting all of the top-m designs subject to a constraint on the total number of samples available. For an approximation of this corre ct selection probability, we derive an asymptotically optimal allocat ion and propose an easy-to-implement heuristic sequential allocation procedure. Numerical experiments indicate that the resulting allocatio ns are superior to other methods in the literature that we tested, and the relative efficiency increases for larger problems. In addition, preliminary numerical results indicate that the proposed new procedur e has the potential to enhance computational efficiency for simulation optimization.

  8. Roost site selection by ring-billed and herring gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Daniel E.; Destefano, Stephen; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Whitney, Jillian J.

    2016-01-01

    Gulls (Larus spp.) commonly roost in large numbers on inland and coastal waters, yet there is little information on how or where gulls choose sites for roosting. Roost site selection can lead to water quality degradation or aviation hazards when roosts are formed on water supply reservoirs or are close to airports. Harassment programs are frequently initiated to move or relocate roosting gulls but often have mixed results because gulls are reluctant to leave or keep returning. As such, knowledge of gull roost site selection and roosting ecology has applied and ecological importance. We used satellite telemetry and an information-theoretic approach to model seasonal roost selection of ring-billed (L. delawarensis) and herring gulls (L. argentatus) in Massachusetts, USA. Our results indicated that ring-billed gulls preferred freshwater roosts and will use a variety of rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Herring gulls regularly roosted on fresh water but used salt water roosts more often than ring-billed gulls and also roosted on a variety of land habitats. Roost modeling showed that herring and ring-billed gulls selected inland fresh water roosts based on size of the water body and proximity to their last daytime location; they selected the largest roost closest to where they ended the day. Management strategies to reduce or eliminate roosting gulls could identify and try to eliminate other habitat variables (e.g., close-by foraging sites) that are attracting gulls before attempting to relocate or redistribute (e.g., through hazing programs) roosting birds.

  9. Selection of Structures with Grid Optimization, in Multiagent Data Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorawski, Marcin; Bańkowski, Sławomir; Gorawski, Michał

    The query optimization problem in data base and data warehouse management systems is quite similar. Changes to Joins sequences, projections and selections, usage of indexes, and aggregations are all decided during the analysis of an execution schedule. The main goal of these changes is to decrease the query response time. The optimization operation is often dedicated to a single node. This paper proposes optimization to grid or cluster data warehouses / databases. Tests were conducted in a multi-agent environment, and the optimization focused not only on a single node but on the whole system as well. A new idea is proposed here with multi-criteria optimization that is based on user-given parameters. Depending on query time, result admissible errors, and the level of system usage, task results were obtained along with grid optimization.

  10. Enabling Interoperable and Selective Data Sharing among Social Networking Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongwan; Lopes, Rodrigo

    With the widespread use of social networking (SN) sites and even introduction of a social component in non-social oriented services, there is a growing concern over user privacy in general, how to handle and share user profiles across SN sites in particular. Although there have been several proprietary or open source-based approaches to unifying the creation of third party applications, the availability and retrieval of user profile information are still limited to the site where the third party application is run, mostly devoid of the support for data interoperability. In this paper we propose an approach to enabling interopearable and selective data sharing among SN sites. To support selective data sharing, we discuss an authenticated dictionary (ADT)-based credential which enables a user to share only a subset of her information certified by external SN sites with applications running on an SN site. For interoperable data sharing, we propose an extension to the OpenSocial API so that it can provide an open source-based framework for allowing the ADT-based credential to be used seamlessly among different SN sites.

  11. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, R.; Fergason, R.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Sun, Y.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Noe Dobrea, E.; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-09-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target "go to" areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and "go to" sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  12. Selection of the Mars Science Laboratory landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.; Grant, J.; Kipp, D.; Vasavada, A.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Fergason, Robin L.; Bellutta, P.; Calef, F.; Larsen, K.; Katayama, Y.; Huertas, A.; Beyer, R.; Chen, A.; Parker, T.; Pollard, B.; Lee, S.; Hoover, R.; Sladek, H.; Grotzinger, J.; Welch, R.; Dobrea, E. Noe; Michalski, J.; Watkins, M.

    2012-01-01

    The selection of Gale crater as the Mars Science Laboratory landing site took over five years, involved broad participation of the science community via five open workshops, and narrowed an initial >50 sites (25 by 20 km) to four finalists (Eberswalde, Gale, Holden and Mawrth) based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included: (1) latitude (±30°) for thermal management of the rover and instruments, (2) elevation (<-1 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the spacecraft, (3) relief of <100-130 m at baselines of 1-1000 m for control authority and sufficient fuel during powered descent, (4) slopes of <30° at baselines of 2-5 m for rover stability at touchdown, (5) moderate rock abundance to avoid impacting the belly pan during touchdown, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface that is safe for landing and roving and not dominated by fine-grained dust. Science criteria important for the selection include the ability to assess past habitable environments, which include diversity, context, and biosignature (including organics) preservation. Sites were evaluated in detail using targeted data from instruments on all active orbiters, and especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. All of the final four sites have layered sedimentary rocks with spectral evidence for phyllosilicates that clearly address the science objectives of the mission. Sophisticated entry, descent and landing simulations that include detailed information on all of the engineering constraints indicate all of the final four sites are safe for landing. Evaluation of the traversabilty of the landing sites and target “go to” areas outside of the ellipse using slope and material properties information indicates that all are trafficable and “go to” sites can be accessed within the lifetime of the mission. In the final selection, Gale crater was favored over Eberswalde based on its greater diversity and potential habitability.

  13. A Process for Site Selection of Reading Recovery Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary

    1997-01-01

    The Fort Bend Independent School District (a large, growing school district in Sugar Land, Texas) elected to become a Reading Recovery Teacher Training site and faced many decisions regarding effective implementation, including campus (school) selection. They began slowly with only two campuses the first year, added four to five the second year,…

  14. Spotted owl roost and nest site selection in northwestern California

    Treesearch

    J.A. Blakesley; A.B. Franklin; R.J. Gutierrez

    1992-01-01

    We directly observed roost and nest site selection in a population of northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in northwestern California during 1985-89. Because of potential biases caused by use of radio telemetry in previous studies, we examined habitat use relative to habitat availability at a level not previously reported for spotted...

  15. Cache-site selection in Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)

    Treesearch

    Teresa J. Lorenz; Kimberly A. Sullivan; Amanda V. Bakian; Carol A. Aubry

    2011-01-01

    Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga Columbiana) is one of the most specialized scatter-hoarding birds, considered a seed disperser for four species of pines (Pinus spp.), as well as an obligate coevolved mutualist of White bark Pine (P. albicaulis). Cache-site selection has not been formally studied in Clark...

  16. Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises.

    PubMed

    Robertson, H G

    1987-10-01

    Oviposition by Cactoblastis cactorum on Opuntia ficus-indica and O. aurantiaca was assessed from the positioning of egg sticks on plants in the field. The number of egg sticks laid on O. ficus-indica plants was affected by: (1) plant size; (2) moth emergence near the plant; (3) cladode condition; and (4) plant conspicuousness. These factors contributed towards the clumping of egg sticks on plants. There was no apparent oviposition preference for one of the two host plant species despite the fact that egg predation was higher and fecundity lower on O. aurantiaca. The selection of a site for oviposition on the host plants was influenced by: (1) cladode condition; (2) height above ground; and (3) shelter from wind during oviposition. Succulent cladodes were the favoured sites for oviposition. The evidence suggests that in C. cactorum, oviposition site selection is largely the net result of a compromise between oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of juvenile survival and oviposition behaviour selected for increasing the probability of laying the full complement of eggs. In addition, environmental and physiological factors such as wind and wing-loading, are thought to place constraints on the range of sites available for oviposition.

  17. Site-specific group selection drives locally adapted group compositions.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Goodnight, Charles J

    2014-10-16

    Group selection may be defined as selection caused by the differential extinction or proliferation of groups. The socially polymorphic spider Anelosimus studiosus exhibits a behavioural polymorphism in which females exhibit either a 'docile' or 'aggressive' behavioural phenotype. Natural colonies are composed of a mixture of related docile and aggressive individuals, and populations differ in colonies' characteristic docile:aggressive ratios. Using experimentally constructed colonies of known composition, here we demonstrate that population-level divergence in docile:aggressive ratios is driven by site-specific selection at the group level--certain ratios yield high survivorship at some sites but not others. Our data also indicate that colonies responded to the risk of extinction: perturbed colonies tended to adjust their composition over two generations to match the ratio characteristic of their native site, thus promoting their long-term survival in their natal habitat. However, colonies of displaced individuals continued to shift their compositions towards mixtures that would have promoted their survival had they remained at their home sites, regardless of their contemporary environment. Thus, the regulatory mechanisms that colonies use to adjust their composition appear to be locally adapted. Our data provide experimental evidence of group selection driving collective traits in wild populations.

  18. A method of selecting forest sites for air pollution study

    Treesearch

    Sreedevi K. Bringi; Thomas A. Seliga; Leon S. Dochinger

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method of selecting suitable forested areas for meaningful assessments of air pollution effects. The approach is based on the premise that environmental influences can significantly affect the forest-air pollution relationship, and that it is, therefore, desirable to equalize such influences at different sites. From existing data on environmental factors and...

  19. Following the equator: division site selection in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms that spatially regulate cytokinesis are more diverse than initially thought. In two recent publications a positive regulator of FtsZ positioning has been identified in Streptococcus pneumoniae. MapZ (LocZ) connects the division machinery with cell wall elongation, providing a simple mechanism to ensure correct division site selection.

  20. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  1. Tunnel-Site Selection by Remote Sensing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study of the role of remote sensing for geologic reconnaissance for tunnel-site selection was commenced. For this study, remote sensing was defined...conventional remote sensing . Future research directions are suggested, and the extension of remote sensing to include airborne passive microwave

  2. Chemical tailoring of teicoplanin with site-selective reactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tejas P; Miller, Scott J

    2013-06-05

    Semisynthesis of natural product derivatives combines the power of fermentation with orthogonal chemical reactions. Yet, chemical modification of complex structures represents an unmet challenge, as poor selectivity often undermines efficiency. The complex antibiotic teicoplanin eradicates bacterial infections. However, as resistance emerges, the demand for improved analogues grows. We have discovered chemical reactions that achieve site-selective alteration of teicoplanin. Utilizing peptide-based additives that alter reaction selectivities, certain bromo-teicoplanins are accessible. These new compounds are also scaffolds for selective cross-coupling reactions, enabling further molecular diversification. These studies enable two-step access to glycopeptide analogues not available through either biosynthesis or rapid total chemical synthesis alone. The new compounds exhibit a spectrum of activities, revealing that selective chemical alteration of teicoplanin may lead to analogues with attenuated or enhanced antibacterial properties, in particular against vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant strains.

  3. Fast Simulation and Optimization Tool to Explore Selective Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Dali, Mélissa; Rossel, Olivier; Guiraud, David

    2016-01-01

    In functional electrical stimulation, selective stimulation of axons is desirable to activate a specific target, in particular muscular function. This implies to simulate a fascicule without activating neighboring ones i.e. to be spatially selective. Spatial selectivity is achieved by the use of multicontact cuff electrodes over which the stimulation current is distributed. Because of the large number of parameters involved, numerical simulations provide a way to find and optimize electrode configuration. The present work offers a computation effective scheme and associated tool chain capable of simulating electrode-nerve interface and find the best spread of current to achieve spatial selectivity. PMID:27990231

  4. Fast Simulation and Optimization Tool to Explore Selective Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dali, Mélissa; Rossel, Olivier; Guiraud, David

    2016-06-13

    In functional electrical stimulation, selective stimulation of axons is desirable to activate a specific target, in particular muscular function. This implies to simulate a fascicule without activating neighboring ones i.e. to be spatially selective. Spatial selectivity is achieved by the use of multicontact cuff electrodes over which the stimulation current is distributed. Because of the large number of parameters involved, numerical simulations provide a way to find and optimize electrode configuration. The present work offers a computation effective scheme and associated tool chain capable of simulating electrode-nerve interface and find the best spread of current to achieve spatial selectivity.

  5. Discrete Biogeography Based Optimization for Feature Selection in Molecular Signatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Tian, Meihong; Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Xiangtao

    2015-04-01

    Biomarker discovery from high-dimensional data is a complex task in the development of efficient cancer diagnoses and classification. However, these data are usually redundant and noisy, and only a subset of them present distinct profiles for different classes of samples. Thus, selecting high discriminative genes from gene expression data has become increasingly interesting in the field of bioinformatics. In this paper, a discrete biogeography based optimization is proposed to select the good subset of informative gene relevant to the classification. In the proposed algorithm, firstly, the fisher-markov selector is used to choose fixed number of gene data. Secondly, to make biogeography based optimization suitable for the feature selection problem; discrete migration model and discrete mutation model are proposed to balance the exploration and exploitation ability. Then, discrete biogeography based optimization, as we called DBBO, is proposed by integrating discrete migration model and discrete mutation model. Finally, the DBBO method is used for feature selection, and three classifiers are used as the classifier with the 10 fold cross-validation method. In order to show the effective and efficiency of the algorithm, the proposed algorithm is tested on four breast cancer dataset benchmarks. Comparison with genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization, differential evolution algorithm and hybrid biogeography based optimization, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is better or at least comparable with previous method from literature when considering the quality of the solutions obtained.

  6. Learning natural selection from the site frequency spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Roy; Udpa, Nitin; Halperin, Eran; Bafna, Vineet

    2013-09-01

    Genetic adaptation to external stimuli occurs through the combined action of mutation and selection. A central problem in genetics is to identify loci responsive to specific selective constraints. Many tests have been proposed to identify the genomic signatures of natural selection by quantifying the skew in the site frequency spectrum (SFS) under selection relative to neutrality. We build upon recent work that connects many of these tests under a common framework, by describing how selective sweeps affect the scaled SFS. We show that the specific skew depends on many attributes of the sweep, including the selection coefficient and the time under selection. Using supervised learning on extensive simulated data, we characterize the features of the scaled SFS that best separate different types of selective sweeps from neutrality. We develop a test, SFselect, that consistently outperforms many existing tests over a wide range of selective sweeps. We apply SFselect to polymorphism data from a laboratory evolution experiment of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to hypoxia and identify loci that strengthen the role of the Notch pathway in hypoxia tolerance, but were missed by previous approaches. We further apply our test to human data and identify regions that are in agreement with earlier studies, as well as many novel regions.

  7. Site-Selective Conjugation of Native Proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Trads, Julie B; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2017-06-20

    Conjugation of DNA to proteins is increasingly used in academia and industry to provide proteins with tags for identification or handles for hybridization to other DNA strands. Assay technologies such as immuno-PCR and proximity ligation and the imaging technology DNA-PAINT require DNA-protein conjugates. In DNA nanotechnology, the DNA handle is exploited to precisely position proteins by self-assembly. For these applications, site-selective conjugation is almost always desired because fully functional proteins are required to maintain the specificity of antibodies and the activity of enzymes. The introduction of a bioorthogonal handle at a specific position of a protein by recombinant techniques provides an excellent approach to site-specific conjugation, but for many laboratories and for applications where several proteins are to be labeled, the expression of recombinant proteins may be cumbersome. In recent years, a number of chemical methods that target conjugation to specific sites at native proteins have become available, and an overview of these methods is provided in this Account. Our laboratory has investigated DNA-templated protein conjugation (DTPC), which offers an alternative approach to site-selective conjugation of DNA to proteins. The method is inspired by the concept of DNA-templated synthesis where functional groups conjugated to DNA strands are preorganized by DNA hybridization to dramatically increase the reaction rate. In DPTC, we target metal binding sites in proteins to template selective covalent conjugation reactions. By chelation of a DNA-metal complex with a metal binding site of the protein, an electrophile on a second DNA strand is aligned for reaction with a lysine side chain on the protein in the proximity of the metal binding site. The method is quite general because approximately one-third of all wild-type proteins contain metal-binding sites, including many IgG antibodies, and it is also applicable to His-tagged proteins. This

  8. Periodical cicadas use light for oviposition site selection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Louie H

    2006-01-01

    Organisms use incomplete information from local experience to assess the suitability of potential habitat sites over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Although ecologists have long recognized the importance of spatial scales in habitat selection, few studies have investigated the temporal scales of habitat selection. In particular, cues in the immediate environment may commonly provide indirect information about future habitat quality. In periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.), oviposition site selection represents a very long-term habitat choice. Adult female cicadas insert eggs into tree branches during a few weeks in the summer of emergence, but their oviposition choices determine the underground habitats of root-feeding nymphs over the following 13 or 17 years. Here, field experiments are used to show that female cicadas use the local light environment of host trees during the summer of emergence to select long-term host trees. Light environments may also influence oviposition microsite selection within hosts, suggesting a potential behavioural mechanism for associating solar cues with host trees. In contrast, experimental nutrient enrichment of host trees did not influence cicada oviposition densities. These findings suggest that the light environments around host trees may provide a robust predictor of host tree quality in the near future. This habitat selection may influence the spatial distribution of several cicada-mediated ecological processes in eastern North American forests. PMID:17015354

  9. Periodical cicadas use light for oviposition site selection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Louie H

    2006-12-07

    Organisms use incomplete information from local experience to assess the suitability of potential habitat sites over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Although ecologists have long recognized the importance of spatial scales in habitat selection, few studies have investigated the temporal scales of habitat selection. In particular, cues in the immediate environment may commonly provide indirect information about future habitat quality. In periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.), oviposition site selection represents a very long-term habitat choice. Adult female cicadas insert eggs into tree branches during a few weeks in the summer of emergence, but their oviposition choices determine the underground habitats of root-feeding nymphs over the following 13 or 17 years. Here, field experiments are used to show that female cicadas use the local light environment of host trees during the summer of emergence to select long-term host trees. Light environments may also influence oviposition microsite selection within hosts, suggesting a potential behavioural mechanism for associating solar cues with host trees. In contrast, experimental nutrient enrichment of host trees did not influence cicada oviposition densities. These findings suggest that the light environments around host trees may provide a robust predictor of host tree quality in the near future. This habitat selection may influence the spatial distribution of several cicada-mediated ecological processes in eastern North American forests.

  10. Optimal ossicular site for maximal vibration transmissions to coupled transducers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Juyong; Song, Won Joon; Sim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Wandoo; Oh, Seung-Ha

    2013-07-01

    Totally implantable middle-ear prosthetic devices, such as the Esteem system (Envoy Medical Corporation), detect vibrational motion of the middle-ear ossicles rather than acoustic stimulation to the eardrum. This eliminates the need for a subcutaneous microphone, which is susceptible to interference by ambient noises. Study of the vibrational characteristics of the human ossicles provides valuable information for determining the site of maximum ossicular motion that would be optimal for attachment of the sensor portion of the prosthesis. In this study, vibrational responses at seven locations on the middle-ear ossicles (i.e., the malleus head, 4 different points on the incus body, middle of the incus long process, tip of the incus long process) in human temporal bones (n = 6) were measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurements were repeated after separating the incudostapedial joint (ISJ). Measured displacement at each location was normalized with the sound pressure level near the tympanic membrane (TM) for representation in the form of a displacement transfer function (DTF). The normalized squared sum of the DTFs (NSSDTF) was then calculated as a measure of vibration motion through a specific frequency range at the considered sites. The relatively large NSSDTF was observed at the sites on the superior part of the malleus head (MH), on the lateral part of the incus body (IBL), and on the superior part of the incus body near the incudomalleal joint (IBS1) for the frequency ranges of 1-4 kHz and 1-9 kHz, regardless of the condition of the ISJ. This indicates that maximum vibrational motion of the middle-ear is deliverable to the piezoelectric transducer of totally implantable devices through these sites. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Site selection: Past and present. [Social planning criteria for Nuclear Power Plant siting

    SciTech Connect

    Tilford, N.R. )

    1994-06-01

    Site selection has been going on since the earliest times. The process has evolved through the Industrial Revolution to the present period of exploding population and environmental awareness. Now the work must be done both with increasing sophistication and greater transparency. Modern techniques for site selection have been developed during the last two decades or so, utilizing a teachable body of knowledge and a growing literature. Many firms and individuals have contributed to this growing field. The driving force has been the need for such a process in siting and licensing of critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. A list of crucial, documented steps for identifying social impacts and acceptability are provided. A recent innovation is the self-selection method developed by government. The Superconducting Supercollider serves as an example of this approach. Geological or geologically dependent factors often dominate the process. The role as engineering and environmental geoscientists is to provide responsible leadership, consultation, and communication to the effort.

  12. Retroviral integration: Site matters: Mechanisms and consequences of retroviral integration site selection.

    PubMed

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2015-11-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co-opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine-grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. © 2015 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. GIS-based approach for optimized siting of municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Sumathi, V.R. Natesan, Usha; Sarkar, Chinmoy

    2008-11-15

    The exponential rise in the urban population of the developing countries in the past few decades and the resulting accelerated urbanization phenomenon has brought to the fore the necessity to develop environmentally sustainable and efficient waste management systems. Sanitary landfill constitutes one of the primary methods of municipal solid waste disposal. Optimized siting decisions have gained considerable importance in order to ensure minimum damage to the various environmental sub-components as well as reduce the stigma associated with the residents living in its vicinity, thereby enhancing the overall sustainability associated with the life cycle of a landfill. This paper addresses the siting of a new landfill using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and overlay analysis using a geographic information system (GIS). The proposed system can accommodate new information on the landfill site selection by updating its knowledge base. Several factors are considered in the siting process including geology, water supply resources, land use, sensitive sites, air quality and groundwater quality. Weightings were assigned to each criterion depending upon their relative importance and ratings in accordance with the relative magnitude of impact. The results from testing the system using different sites show the effectiveness of the system in the selection process.

  14. GIS-based approach for optimized siting of municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, V R; Natesan, Usha; Sarkar, Chinmoy

    2008-11-01

    The exponential rise in the urban population of the developing countries in the past few decades and the resulting accelerated urbanization phenomenon has brought to the fore the necessity to develop environmentally sustainable and efficient waste management systems. Sanitary landfill constitutes one of the primary methods of municipal solid waste disposal. Optimized siting decisions have gained considerable importance in order to ensure minimum damage to the various environmental sub-components as well as reduce the stigma associated with the residents living in its vicinity, thereby enhancing the overall sustainability associated with the life cycle of a landfill. This paper addresses the siting of a new landfill using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and overlay analysis using a geographic information system (GIS). The proposed system can accommodate new information on the landfill site selection by updating its knowledge base. Several factors are considered in the siting process including geology, water supply resources, land use, sensitive sites, air quality and groundwater quality. Weightings were assigned to each criterion depending upon their relative importance and ratings in accordance with the relative magnitude of impact. The results from testing the system using different sites show the effectiveness of the system in the selection process.

  15. Two mechanisms of ion selectivity in protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Roux, Benoît

    2010-11-23

    A theoretical framework is presented to clarify the molecular determinants of ion selectivity in protein binding sites. The relative free energy of a bound ion is expressed in terms of the main coordinating ligands coupled to an effective potential of mean force representing the influence of the rest of the protein. The latter is separated into two main contributions. The first includes all the forces keeping the ion and the coordinating ligands confined to a microscopic subvolume but does not prevent the ligands from adapting to a smaller or larger ion. The second regroups all the remaining forces that control the precise geometry of the coordinating ligands best adapted to a given ion. The theoretical framework makes it possible to delineate two important limiting cases. In the limit where the geometric forces are dominant (rigid binding site), ion selectivity is controlled by the ion-ligand interactions within the matching cavity size according to the familiar "snug-fit" mechanism of host-guest chemistry. In the limit where the geometric forces are negligible, the ion and ligands behave as a "confined microdroplet" that is free to fluctuate and adapt to ions of different sizes. In this case, ion selectivity is set by the interplay between ion-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions and is controlled by the number and the chemical type of ion-coordinating ligands. The framework is illustrated by considering the ion-selective binding sites in the KcsA channel and the LeuT transporter.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium extends across putative selected sites in FOXP2.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Susan E; Enard, Wolfgang; Wiebe, Victor; Hellmann, Ines; Krause, Johannes; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2009-10-01

    Polymorphism data in humans suggest that the gene encoding the transcription factor FOXP2, which influences speech and language development, has been subject to a selective sweep within the last 260,000 years. It has been proposed that one or both of two substitutions that occurred on the human evolutionary lineage and changed amino acids were the targets for selection. In apparent contradiction to this is the observation that these substitutions are present in Neandertals who diverged from humans maybe 300,000-400,000 years ago. We have collected polymorphism data upstream and downstream of the substitutions. Contrary to what is expected, following a selective sweep, we find that the haplotypes extend across the two sites. We discuss possible explanations for these observations. One of them is that the selective sweep reflected in FOXP2 polymorphism data was not associated with the two amino acid substitutions.

  17. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation.

  18. Selection of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Grant, J. A.; Parker, T. J.; Kass, D. M.; Crisp, J. A.; Squyres, S. W.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Adler, M.; Lee, W. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Arvidson, R. E.; Carr, M. H.; Kirk, R. L.; Knocke, P. C.; Roncoli, R. B.; Weitz, C. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Zurek, R. W.; Christensen, P. R.; Fergason, R. L.; Anderson, F. S.; Rice, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    The selection of Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater as the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites took over 2 years, involved broad participation of the science community via four open workshops, and narrowed an initial ~155 potential sites (80-300 × 30 km) to four finalists based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included (1) latitude (10°N-15°S) for maximum solar power, (2) elevation (less than -1.3 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander, (3) low horizontal winds, shear, and turbulence in the last few kilometers to minimize horizontal velocity, (4) low 10-m-scale slopes to reduce airbag spin-up and bounce, (5) moderate rock abundance to reduce abrasion or strokeout of the airbags, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface safe for landing and roving that is not dominated by fine-grained dust. The evaluation of sites utilized existing as well as targeted orbital information acquired from the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey. Three of the final four landing sites show strong evidence for surface processes involving water and appear capable of addressing the science objectives of the missions, which are to determine the aqueous, climatic, and geologic history of sites on Mars where conditions may have been favorable to the preservation of evidence of possible prebiotic or biotic processes. The evaluation of science criteria placed Meridiani and Gusev as the highest-priority sites. The evaluation of the three most critical safety criteria (10-m-scale slopes, rocks, and winds) and landing simulation results indicated that Meridiani and Elysium Planitia are the safest sites, followed by Gusev and Isidis Planitia.

  19. Selection of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Grant, J. A.; Parker, T.J.; Kass, D.M.; Crisp, J.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Adler, M.; Lee, W.J.; Bridges, N.T.; Arvidson, R. E.; Carr, M.H.; Kirk, R.L.; Knocke, P.C.; Roncoli, R.B.; Weitz, C.M.; Schofield, J.T.; Zurek, R.W.; Christensen, P.R.; Fergason, R.L.; Anderson, F.S.; Rice, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    The selection of Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater as the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites took over 2 years, involved broad participation of the science community via four open workshops, and narrowed an initial ???155 potential sites (80-300 ?? 30 km) to four finalists based on science and safety. Engineering constraints important to the selection included (1) latitude (10??N- 15??S) for maximum solar power, (2) elevation (less than - 1.3 km) for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander, (3) low horizontal winds, shear, and turbulence in the last few kilometers to minimize horizontal velocity, (4) low 10-m-scale slopes to reduce airbag spin-up and bounce, (5) moderate rock abundance to reduce abrasion or strokeout of the airbags, and (6) a radar-reflective, load-bearing, and trafficable surface safe for landing and roving that is not dominated by fine-grained dust. The evaluation of sites utilized existing as well as targeted orbital information acquired from the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey. Three of the final four landing sites show strong evidence for surface processes involving water and appear capable of addressing the science objectives of the missions, which are to determine the aqueous, climatic, and geologic history of sites on Mars where conditions may have been favorable to the preservation of evidence of possible prebiotic or biotic processes. The evaluation of science criteria placed Meridiani and Gusev as the highest-priority sites. The evaluation of the three most critical safety criteria (10-m-scale slopes, rocks, and winds) and landing simulation results indicated that Meridiani and Elysium Planitia are the safest sites, followed by Gusev and Isidis Planitia. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Site selection modeling system for a production facility at Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.; Shedrow, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River site (SRS) is located along the Savannah River in southwestern South Carolina and encompasses an area of {approximately}832 km (198 344 acres). Major land covers include evergreen and deciduous forests, surface water, wetlands, and administrative/industrial areas. Less than 10% of the site`s surface area is developed. Several endangered and threatened species are found on the SRS, including the red-cockaded woodpecker, the southern bald eagle, the wood stork, and the smooth purple coneflower. With the cessation of the Cold War, the traditional defense-related missions at the SRS have been significantly reduced. The implementation of new missions at the SRS will require the utilization of effective siting and prioritization methodologies to ensure the best use of available land resources and protection of the environment. The objective of this paper is to describe the utilization of the Site Selection Modeling System (SSMS) for the selection of potential industrial development sites within the SRS. The SSMS is a raster geographic information system (GIS)-based system that integrates the graphical interface ArcView 2.1 with the GRID modeling functionality of ARC/INFO. The proposed industrial development being sited is a linear accelerator, which will be used for the accelerator production of tritium.

  1. Managing the Public Sector Research and Development Portfolio Selection Process: A Case Study of Quantitative Selection and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    PUBLIC SECTOR RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO SELECTION PROCESS: A CASE STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE SELECTION AND OPTIMIZATION by Jason A. Schwartz...PUBLIC SECTOR RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO SELECTION PROCESS: A CASE STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE SELECTION AND OPTIMIZATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...describing how public sector organizations can implement a research and development (R&D) portfolio optimization strategy to maximize the cost

  2. Training set optimization under population structure in genomic selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The optimization of the training set (TRS) in genomic selection (GS) has received much interest in both animal and plant breeding, because it is critical to the accuracy of the prediction models. In this study, five different TRS sampling algorithms, stratified sampling, mean of the Coefficient of D...

  3. Multidimensional Adaptive Testing with Optimal Design Criteria for Item Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Joris; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2009-01-01

    Several criteria from the optimal design literature are examined for use with item selection in multidimensional adaptive testing. In particular, it is examined what criteria are appropriate for adaptive testing in which all abilities are intentional, some should be considered as a nuisance, or the interest is in the testing of a composite of the…

  4. Optimal Financial Aid Policies for a Selective University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Sherman, Daniel R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper provides a model of optimal financial aid policies for a selective university. The model implies that the financial aid package to be offered to each category of admitted applicants depends on the elasticity of the fraction who accept offers of admission with respect to the financial aid package offered them. (Author/SSH)

  5. [Optimal selection method of technologies of medical wastes treatment].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Liu, Yong; Guo, Huai-cheng; Wang, Li-jing

    2006-06-01

    This paper investigate the medical wastes (MW) definition, production, characteristics and technical requirements, which is decisive for properly selecting methods for medical wastes treatment (MWT). Base on this, the advantages/disadvantages and adaptation of various treatment options are qualitatively analyzed and broadly compared. Then, four kinds of technologies, namely the thermal treatment, autoclaving, chemical disinfection, and microwave disinfection, are primarily chosen. Moreover, a hierarchy decision-making model considering the disposal status, economic level, policies and international turns is further set up. According to it, 4 proposed methods are effectively assessed. The result indicates that thermal treatment technology is the optimal choice for medical wastes treatment in Hangzhou city. Besides, the optimal selection method for medical wastes treatment is synthetically presented, which is suggested as a strong support for choosing optimal technology, and will contribute a lot to related research as well.

  6. Effects of spatial disturbance on common loon nest site selection and territory success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.P.; DeStefano, S.

    2011-01-01

    The common loon (Gavia immer) breeds during the summer on northern lakes and water bodies that are also often desirable areas for aquatic recreation and human habitation. In northern New England, we assessed how the spatial nature of disturbance affects common loon nest site selection and territory success. We found through classification and regression analysis that distance to and density of disturbance factors can be used to classify observed nest site locations versus random points, suggesting that these factors affect loon nest site selection (model 1: Correct classification = 75%, null = 50%, K = 0.507, P < 0.001; model 2: Correct classification = 78%, null = 50%, K = 0.551, P < 0.001). However, in an exploratory analysis, we were unable to show a relation between spatial disturbance variables and breeding success (P = 0.595, R 2 = 0.436), possibly because breeding success was so low during the breeding seasons of 2007-2008. We suggest that by selecting nest site locations that avoid disturbance factors, loons thereby limit the effect that disturbance will have on their breeding success. Still, disturbance may force loons to use sub-optimal nesting habitat, limiting the available number of territories, and overall productivity. We advise that management efforts focus on limiting disturbance factors to allow breeding pairs access to the best nesting territories, relieving disturbance pressures that may force sub-optimal nest placement. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  7. Multivariate analysis of Buteo nest site selection in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.G.; Bechard, M.; Knight, R.L.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    Raptor breeding populations of grasslands and semi-arid grasslands of western North America include varying densities of three Buteo species, the Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) and Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni). These three species are behaviorially rather similar in their diurnal activity patterns and foraging habitats and exhibit similar diets comprised of small mammals and birds. Principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis were used to describe key similarities and differences in nest site selection of the three Buteo species. Differences in nest site selection may offer an explanation of how the three Buteo species may nest sympatrically and at times successfully at distances of less than 0.5 km despite apparent similarities in use of other resources. 15 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  8. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION GUIDELINES FOR GEOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-08-31

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a key technology pathway to substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for the state of California and the western region. Current estimates suggest that the sequestration resource of the state is large, and could safely and effectively accept all of the emissions from large CO2 point sources for many decades and store them indefinitely. This process requires suitable sites to sequester large volumes of CO2 for long periods of time. Site characterization is the first step in this process, and the state will ultimately face regulatory, legal, and technical questions as commercial CCS projects develop and commence operations. The most important aspects of site characterizations are injectivity, capacity, and effectiveness. A site can accept at a high rate a large volume of CO2 and store it for a long time is likely to serve as a good site for geological carbon sequestration. At present, there are many conventional technologies and approaches that can be used to estimate, quantify, calculate, and assess the viability of a sequestration site. Any regulatory framework would need to rely on conventional, easily executed, repeatable methods to inform the site selection and permitting process. The most important targets for long-term storage are deep saline formations and depleted oil and gas fields. The primary CO2 storage mechanisms for these targets are well understood enough to plan operations and simulate injection and long-term fate of CO2. There is also a strong understanding of potential geological and engineering hazards for CCS. These hazards are potential pathway to CO2 leakage, which could conceivably result in negative consequences to health and the environmental. The risks of these effects are difficult to quantify; however, the hazards themselves are sufficiently well understood to identify, delineate, and manage those risks effectively. The primary hazard elements are wells and faults, but may include other

  9. Rock coasts and seabird breeding sites : a common optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Eveillard-Buchoux

    2014-05-01

    The North-West coasts of Europe support a lot of part of Northern hemisphere breeding seabirds. In that context, Scotland has a preponderant place and Brittany has southernmost limit of these species areas, for most of them. Outside the breeding season these species live mainly on the open sea and when they do visit the land to breed, they nest on a specific sites : almost all the time they breed on the rock coasts, often on seacliffs. This specific habitat are defines by geomorphological characteristics which offer special forms of the coast. The forms of rock coasts are originally and different because of several proprieties of geology, of lithology, of structures. Breeding seabird, occupying these sites, reveals, in a new light, the richness of these forms and the originals geographic location of the coastline : seabirds prefer nest in exposed coastline like rock caps, rocky points or islands. Seabirds and rock coasts are research topics in environmental geography since several years. However, these combination studies is a new approach in this field and enlargement in the heritage field allows supplement scientific approach. For example, it show that in most important touristic sites, environmental protection measures focused on landscape, habitat or bird, but much more rarely on rock coasts for these intrinsic values. Indeed, in Brittany or in Scotland, seabirds are often stars species in lot of coastal nature reserves, where they're considered like greater ecological heritage. We could see it in touristic promotion field : bird is everywhere, cliff is mostly kept in the dark, as well in leaflets as in speech visitor's guides - without, for example, as a part of this landscape. In all cases, combination of these two heritages is extremely rare. Yet, this current research illustrates the interest and the issue of development of this comparative approach seabirds / rock coasts for optimization of nature tourism and geotourism.

  10. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  11. Optimal selection of nodes to propagate influence on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifan

    2016-11-01

    How to optimize the spreading process on networks has been a hot issue in complex networks, marketing, epidemiology, finance, etc. In this paper, we investigate a problem of optimizing locally the spreading: identifying a fixed number of nodes as seeds which would maximize the propagation of influence to their direct neighbors. All the nodes except the selected seeds are assumed not to spread their influence to their neighbors. This problem can be mapped onto a spin glass model with a fixed magnetization. We provide a message-passing algorithm based on replica symmetrical mean-field theory in statistical physics, which can find the nearly optimal set of seeds. Extensive numerical results on computer-generated random networks and real-world networks demonstrate that this algorithm has a better performance than several other optimization algorithms.

  12. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  13. Site-Selective Trimetallic Heterogeneous Nanostructures for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Shibayama, Tamaki; Lei, Yanhua; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2015-10-07

    Trimetallic Au/Ag/Pt hetero-nanostructures (AAPHNs) with distinctive, designed morphology are synthesized by galvanic replacement reaction and a site-selective strategy. The three metals present on the surface are shown to act synergistically to enhance the electro-catalytic performance and durability for methanol oxidation. The described structural modification of the nanocomposites increases the range of potential applications to include both the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells and photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction.

  14. Mars sample return: Site selection and sample acquisition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickle, N. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Various vehicle and mission options were investigated for the continued exploration of Mars; the cost of a minimum sample return mission was estimated; options and concepts were synthesized into program possibilities; and recommendations for the next Mars mission were made to the Planetary Program office. Specific sites and all relevant spacecraft and ground-based data were studied in order to determine: (1) the adequacy of presently available data for identifying landing sities for a sample return mission that would assure the acquisition of material from the most important geologic provinces of Mars; (2) the degree of surface mobility required to assure sample acquisition for these sites; (3) techniques to be used in the selection and drilling of rock a samples; and (4) the degree of mobility required at the two Viking sites to acquire these samples.

  15. The OSIRIS-REx Mission Sample Site Selection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshore, Edward C.; Lauretta, Dante

    2014-11-01

    In September of 2016, the OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, REgolith eXplorer) spacecraft will depart for asteroid (101955) Bennu, and in doing so, will turn an important corner in the exploration of the solar system. After arriving at Bennu in the fall of 2018, OSIRIS-REx will undertake a program of observations designed to select a site suitable for retrieving a sample that will be returned to the Earth in 2023. The third mission in NASA’s New Frontiers program, OSIRIS-REx will return over 60 grams from Bennu’s surface.OSIRIS-REx is unique because the science team will have an operational role to play in preparing data products needed to select a sample site. These include products used to ensure flight system safety — topographic maps and shape models, temperature measurements, maps of hazards — as well as assessments of sampleability and science value. The timing and production of these will be presented, as will the high-level decision-making tools and processes for the interim and final site selection processes.

  16. Commercial facility site selection simulating based on MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yi; Li, Qingquan; Zheng, Guizhou

    2008-10-01

    The location of commercial facility decides the benefit of the operator to a large degree. Existing location methods can express the static relationships between site selection result and location factors, but there still are some limites when express the dynamic and uncertain relationship between them. Hence, a dynamic, stochastic and forecastable location model should be built which can introduce the customer's behavior into the model and combine the macro pattern and micro spatial interaction. So the authors proposes Geosim-LM based on MAS. Geosim-LM has 3 kinds of agents, CustAgent, SiteAgent and GovAgent. They represent the customers, commercial fercilities and government. The land type, land price and traffic are the model environment. Then Geosim-LM is applied in the bank branches site evaluation and selection in Liwan district, Guangzhou. In existing bank branches site evaluation, there are 70% consistent in score grade between result of Geosim-LM after 200 round runing and actual rebust location. It proves the model is reliable and feasible. The conclusions can be get from the paper. MAS have advantages in location choice than existed methods. The result of Geosim-LM running can powerfully proves that building location model based on MAS is feasible.

  17. Efficient and scalable Pareto optimization by evolutionary local selection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Menczer, F; Degeratu, M; Street, W N

    2000-01-01

    Local selection is a simple selection scheme in evolutionary computation. Individual fitnesses are accumulated over time and compared to a fixed threshold, rather than to each other, to decide who gets to reproduce. Local selection, coupled with fitness functions stemming from the consumption of finite shared environmental resources, maintains diversity in a way similar to fitness sharing. However, it is more efficient than fitness sharing and lends itself to parallel implementations for distributed tasks. While local selection is not prone to premature convergence, it applies minimal selection pressure to the population. Local selection is, therefore, particularly suited to Pareto optimization or problem classes where diverse solutions must be covered. This paper introduces ELSA, an evolutionary algorithm employing local selection and outlines three experiments in which ELSA is applied to multiobjective problems: a multimodal graph search problem, and two Pareto optimization problems. In all these experiments, ELSA significantly outperforms other well-known evolutionary algorithms. The paper also discusses scalability, parameter dependence, and the potential distributed applications of the algorithm.

  18. Gas Hydrate Research Site Selection and Operational Research Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.; Boswell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years it has become generally accepted that gas hydrates represent a potential important future energy resource, a significant drilling and production hazard, a potential contributor to global climate change, and a controlling factor in seafloor stability and landslides. Research drilling and coring programs carried out by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), government agencies, and several consortia have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates in marine and permafrost environments. For the most part, each of these field projects were built on the lessons learned from the projects that have gone before them. One of the most important factors contributing to the success of some of the more notable gas hydrate field projects has been the close alignment of project goals with the processes used to select the drill sites and to develop the project’s operational research plans. For example, IODP Expedition 311 used a transect approach to successfully constrain the overall occurrence of gas hydrate within the range of geologic environments within a marine accretionary complex. Earlier gas hydrate research drilling, including IODP Leg 164, were designed primarily to assess the occurrence and nature of marine gas hydrate systems, and relied largely on the presence of anomalous seismic features, including bottom-simulating reflectors and “blanking zones”. While these projects were extremely successful, expeditions today are being increasingly mounted with the primary goal of prospecting for potential gas hydrate production targets, and site selection processes designed to specifically seek out anomalously high-concentrations of gas hydrate are needed. This approach was best demonstrated in a recently completed energy resource focused project, the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II), which featured the collection of a

  19. Selecting Landing Sites for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Watkins, M. M.; Mars Landing Site Steering Committee

    2006-12-01

    Landing site selection for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is underway and includes a series of open workshops for soliciting science community input regarding the landing site. The first workshop was held in Spring 2006 and focused on prioritizing 33 proposed sites for imaging by orbital spacecraft. It should be noted that the number of potential landing sites is high because MSL entry, descent, and landing (EDL) capabilities enable a small landing error circle (20 km in diameter), high landing site altitude (below 1 km, MOLA datum), and wide latitudes (plus/minus 45 degrees). The primary scientific goal of MSL is to assess the present and past habitability of environments accessed by the mission. In particular, MSL will assess the biological potential of the landing site, characterize the geology and geochemistry at appropriate spatial scales, investigate planetary processes that influence habitability, including the role of water, and characterize the broad spectrum of surface radiation. The geological, chemical, and/or biological evidence for habitability should be expected to be preserved for, accessible to and interpretable by the MSL investigations at the landing site. Because landing safely is paramount, all engineering constraints for the mission must be adhered to for a proposed site to be viewed favorably. For example, areas with potentially high winds will need to be compared with landing system tolerance during development. Slopes across length scales of 2 to 5 km, 20 meters, and 5 meters must be less than 3 degrees, 15 degrees, and 15 degrees, respectively. Rocks at the landing site should be less than 0.6 m high and in intermediate to lower abundance terrains. The landing surface must be load-bearing, radar reflective, trafficable and not be dominated by dust. Persistent cold surface temperatures and CO2 frost will negatively impact performance and areas with very low thermal inertia and very high albedo are excluded. Finally planetary

  20. Strategy Developed for Selecting Optimal Sensors for Monitoring Engine Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Sensor indications during rocket engine operation are the primary means of assessing engine performance and health. Effective selection and location of sensors in the operating engine environment enables accurate real-time condition monitoring and rapid engine controller response to mitigate critical fault conditions. These capabilities are crucial to ensure crew safety and mission success. Effective sensor selection also facilitates postflight condition assessment, which contributes to efficient engine maintenance and reduced operating costs. Under the Next Generation Launch Technology program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, has developed a model-based procedure for systematically selecting an optimal sensor suite for assessing rocket engine system health. This optimization process is termed the systematic sensor selection strategy. Engine health management (EHM) systems generally employ multiple diagnostic procedures including data validation, anomaly detection, fault-isolation, and information fusion. The effectiveness of each diagnostic component is affected by the quality, availability, and compatibility of sensor data. Therefore systematic sensor selection is an enabling technology for EHM. Information in three categories is required by the systematic sensor selection strategy. The first category consists of targeted engine fault information; including the description and estimated risk-reduction factor for each identified fault. Risk-reduction factors are used to define and rank the potential merit of timely fault diagnoses. The second category is composed of candidate sensor information; including type, location, and estimated variance in normal operation. The final category includes the definition of fault scenarios characteristic of each targeted engine fault. These scenarios are defined in terms of engine model hardware parameters. Values of these parameters define engine simulations that generate

  1. Physiological and ecological consequences of sleeping-site selection by the Galapagos land iguana (Conolophus pallidus)

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, K.A.; Tracy, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Field observations and biophysical models were combined to analyze sleeping-site selection by Galapagos land iguanas (Conolophus pallidus). Iguanas slept in different kinds of sleeping sites during different seasons. In the coolest season (garua), adult land iguanas were found in sleeping sites that were warmer than the coolest sites available. This may be because the garua season (cool, overcast, and foggy) is a time when environmental conditions mitigate against rapid warm-up in the mornings, so lizards may regulate nighttime body temperatures so that it is easier to warm up to preferred daytime body temperatures. In the warmest season, adult iguanas were found in the coolest sleeping sites available. This observation is consistent with hypotheses of voluntary hypothermia, which can be advantageous in energy conservation and in avoiding detrimental effects associated with maintenance of constant body temperatures throughout the day and night. Juvenile iguanas were found sleeping in rock crevices regardless of the ambient thermal environments. Such sites are likely to be important as refugia for this life stage, which, unlike the adult stage, is vulnerable to predation. It was concluded that selection of sleeping sites is a process that may help in avoidance of predation, optimization of body temperature at the end of the sleeping period, and reduction of metabolic costs during sleeping. The importance of some of these factors may change with the thermal milieu (e.g., season).

  2. Resource evaluation and site selection for microalgae production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; Folger, A.G.; Hogg, S.E.

    1985-05-01

    Climate, land, and water resource requirements of microalgae production systems (MPS) were examined relative to construction costs, operating costs, and biomass productivity. The objective was the stratification of the southwestern United States into zones of relative suitability for MPS. Maps of climate (insolation, freeze-free period, precipitation, evaporation, thunderstorm days), land (use/cover, ownership, slope), and water (saline groundwater) resource parameters were obtained. These maps were transformed into digital overlays permitting the cell-by-cell compositing of selected resource parameters to form maps representing relative productivity, make-up water, climate suitability, land suitability, water suitability, and overall suitability. The Southwest was selected for this study because of its high levels of insolation, saline water resources, and large areas of relatively low valued land. The stratification maps cannot be used for the selection of specific sites because of their low resolution (12,455-acre cells). They can be used to guide future resource studies and site selection efforts, however, by limiting these efforts to the most suitable regions. Future efforts should concentrate on saline water resources, for which only limited data are currently available. 13 refs., 44 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-07

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases.

  4. Astronomical site selection for Turkey using GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksaker, N.; Yerli, S. K.; Erdoğan, M. A.; Erdi, E.; Kaba, K.; Ak, T.; Aslan, Z.; Bakış, V.; Demircan, O.; Evren, S.; Keskin, V.; Küçük, İ.; Özdemir, T.; Özışık, T.; Selam, S. O.

    2015-10-01

    A site selection of potential observatory locations in Turkey have been carried out by using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) coupled with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and satellite imagery which in turn reduced cost and time and increased the accuracy of the final outcome. The layers of cloud cover, digital elevation model, artificial lights, precipitable water vapor, aerosol optical thickness and wind speed were studied in the GIS system. In conclusion of MCDA, the most suitable regions were found to be located in a strip crossing from southwest to northeast including also a diverted region in southeast of Turkey. These regions are thus our prime candidate locations for future on-site testing. In addition to this major outcome, this study has also been applied to locations of major observatories sites. Since no goal is set for the best, the results of this study is limited with a list of positions. Therefore, the list has to be further confirmed with on-site tests. A national funding has been awarded to produce a prototype of an on-site test unit (to measure both astronomical and meteorological parameters) which might be used in this list of locations.

  5. Selection and Characterization of Landing Sites for Chandrayaan-2 Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Krishna, Barla; Amitabh, Amitabh; Srinivasan, T. P.; Karidhal, Ritu; Nagesh, G.; Manjusha, N.

    2016-07-01

    Indian Space Research Organisation has planned the second mission to moon known as Chandrayaan-2, which consists of an Orbiter, a Lander and a Rover. This will be the first soft landing mission of India on lunar surface. The Orbiter, Lander and Rover individually will carry scientific payloads that enhance the scientific objectives of Chandrayaan-2. The Lander soft lands on the lunar surface and subsequently Lander & Rover will carry on with the payload activities on the moon surface. Landing Site identification based on the scientific and engineering constrains of lander plays an important role in success of a mission. The Lander poses some constraints because of its engineering design for the selection of the landing site and on the other hand the landing site / region imparts some constrain on the Lander. The various constraints that have to be considered for the study of the landing site are Local slope, Sun illumination during mission life, Radio communication with the Earth, Global slope towards equator, Boulders size, Crater density and boulder distribution. This paper describes the characterization activities of the different landing locations which have been studied for Chandrayaan-2 Lander. The sites have been studied both in the South Polar and North Polar regions of the moon on the near side. The Engineering Constraints at the sites due to the Lander, Factors that affect mission life (i.e. illumination at the location), Factors influencing communication to earth (i.e. RF visibility) & Shadow movements have been studied at these locations and zones that are favourable for landing have been short listed. This paper gives methodology of these studies along with the results of the characteristics of all the sites and the recommendations for further action in finalizing the landing area.

  6. Field site selection: getting it right first time around

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart GJ; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract - just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  7. Field site selection: getting it right first time around.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart G J; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-11-16

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract--just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT.

  8. Selection and Characterization of the LCROSS Impact Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, Gwendolyn D.; Colaprete, A.

    2008-09-01

    This presentation will discuss characterization of potential LCROSS impact sites and the requirements for impact site selection. LCROSS, the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite, will be launched on the same rocket as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) next year. The primary LCROSS science goal is to confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region on the Moon. To achieve this goal, the LCROSS spacecraft will set the rocket's Centaur Earth departure upper stage (EDUS) on an impact trajectory with the Moon. Following four minutes behind the EDUS, LCROSS will fly through the resulting impact plume, using its 9 instruments (cameras, spectrometers, and photometer) to characterize the plume and identify water. Target selection will be key to the success of this mission. Characterizing the expected terrain within the crater will be difficult because the target impact site is required to be permanently shadowed. Because of lack of high resolution visible imaging at the poles, we use high resolution Earth-based radar data, which can directly observe some parts of the permanently shadowed regions. Once the tools and analysis methods are established, we will be ready to quickly assess new data provided by the instruments on LRO, which will begin taking data 2-3 months prior to the LCROSS impact. The constraints on the impact site selection are: (1) the ejecta plume must be observable by ground-based and orbital observatories. (2) the ejecta must be illuminated by sunlight, since the instruments primarily measure reflected light. (3) the target should be in a region with low roughness, low slopes, and deep regolith cover. (4) the target should be in a region with an observed concentration of increased hydrogen, which could indicate presence of water.

  9. Deciphering the Code for Retroviral Integration Target Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Federico Andrea; Hartley, Oliver; Luban, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Upon cell invasion, retroviruses generate a DNA copy of their RNA genome and integrate retroviral cDNA within host chromosomal DNA. Integration occurs throughout the host cell genome, but target site selection is not random. Each subgroup of retrovirus is distinguished from the others by attraction to particular features on chromosomes. Despite extensive efforts to identify host factors that interact with retrovirion components or chromosome features predictive of integration, little is known about how integration sites are selected. We attempted to identify markers predictive of retroviral integration by exploiting Precision-Recall methods for extracting information from highly skewed datasets to derive robust and discriminating measures of association. ChIPSeq datasets for more than 60 factors were compared with 14 retroviral integration datasets. When compared with MLV, PERV or XMRV integration sites, strong association was observed with STAT1, acetylation of H3 and H4 at several positions, and methylation of H2AZ, H3K4, and K9. By combining peaks from ChIPSeq datasets, a supermarker was identified that localized within 2 kB of 75% of MLV proviruses and detected differences in integration preferences among different cell types. The supermarker predicted the likelihood of integration within specific chromosomal regions in a cell-type specific manner, yielding probabilities for integration into proto-oncogene LMO2 identical to experimentally determined values. The supermarker thus identifies chromosomal features highly favored for retroviral integration, provides clues to the mechanism by which retrovirus integration sites are selected, and offers a tool for predicting cell-type specific proto-oncogene activation by retroviruses. PMID:21124862

  10. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%). PMID:26819671

  11. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  12. Optimized LOWESS normalization parameter selection for DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John A; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Järvinen, Anna-Kaarina; Edgren, Henrik; Mitra, Sanjit K; Astola, Jaakko

    2004-01-01

    Background Microarray data normalization is an important step for obtaining data that are reliable and usable for subsequent analysis. One of the most commonly utilized normalization techniques is the locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOWESS) algorithm. However, a much overlooked concern with the LOWESS normalization strategy deals with choosing the appropriate parameters. Parameters are usually chosen arbitrarily, which may reduce the efficiency of the normalization and result in non-optimally normalized data. Thus, there is a need to explore LOWESS parameter selection in greater detail. Results and discussion In this work, we discuss how to choose parameters for the LOWESS method. Moreover, we present an optimization approach for obtaining the fraction of data points utilized in the local regression and analyze results for local print-tip normalization. The optimization procedure determines the bandwidth parameter for the local regression by minimizing a cost function that represents the mean-squared difference between the LOWESS estimates and the normalization reference level. We demonstrate the utility of the systematic parameter selection using two publicly available data sets. The first data set consists of three self versus self hybridizations, which allow for a quantitative study of the optimization method. The second data set contains a collection of DNA microarray data from a breast cancer study utilizing four breast cancer cell lines. Our results show that different parameter choices for the bandwidth window yield dramatically different calibration results in both studies. Conclusions Results derived from the self versus self experiment indicate that the proposed optimization approach is a plausible solution for estimating the LOWESS parameters, while results from the breast cancer experiment show that the optimization procedure is readily applicable to real-life microarray data normalization. In summary, the systematic approach to obtain critical

  13. Using Geoscience and Geostatistics to Optimize Groundwater Monitoring Networks at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckfield, R.C.

    2001-03-22

    A team of scientists, engineers, and statisticians was assembled to review the operation efficiency of groundwater monitoring networks at US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). Subsequent to a feasibility study, this team selected and conducted an analysis of the A/M area groundwater monitoring well network. The purpose was to optimize the number of groundwater wells requisite for monitoring the plumes of the principal constituent of concern, viz., trichloroethylene (TCE). The project gathered technical expertise from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), the Environmental Restoration Division (ERD), and the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) of SRS.

  14. Microclimate and nest-site selection in Micronesian Kingfishers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, Dylan C.; Haig, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the relationship between microclimate and nest-site selection in the Pohnpei Micronesian Kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamominus reichenbachii) which excavates nest cavities from the mudlike nest structures of arboreal termites (Nasutitermes sp.) or termitaria. Mean daily high temperatures at termitaria were cooler and daily low temperatures were warmer than at random sites in the forest. Results also indicate that termitaria provided insulation from temperature extremes, and that temperatures inside termitaria were within the thermoneutral zone of Micronesian Kingfishers more often than those outside. No differences were identified in temperatures at sites where nest termitaria and nonnest termitaria occurred or among the insulation properties of used and unused termitaria. These results suggest that although termitaria provide insulation from thermal extremes and a metabolically less stressful microclimate, king-fishers did not select from among available termitaria based on their thermal properties. Our findings are relevant to conservation efforts for the critically endangered Guam Micronesian Kingfisher (T. c. cinnamominus) which is extinct in the wild and exists only as a captive population. Captive breeding facilities should provide aviaries with daily ambient temperatures ranging from 22.06 A?C to 28.05 A?C to reduce microclimate-associated metabolic stress and to replicate microclimates used by wild Micronesian Kingfishers.

  15. Landfill site selection by using geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şener, Başak; Süzen, M. Lütfi; Doyuran, Vedat

    2006-01-01

    One of the serious and growing potential problems in most large urban areas is the shortage of land for waste disposal. Although there are some efforts to reduce and recover the waste, disposal in landfills is still the most common method for waste destination. An inappropriate landfill site may have negative environmental, economic and ecological impacts. Therefore, it should be selected carefully by considering both regulations and constraints on other sources. In this study, candidate sites for an appropriate landfill area in the vicinity of Ankara are determined by using the integration of geographic information systems and multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). For this purpose, 16 input map layers including topography, settlements (urban centers and villages), roads (Highway E90 and village roads), railways, airport, wetlands, infrastructures (pipelines and power lines), slope, geology, land use, floodplains, aquifers and surface water are prepared and two different MCDA methods (simple additive weighting and analytic hierarchy process) are implemented to a geographical information system. Comparison of the maps produced by these two different methods shows that both methods yield conformable results. Field checks also confirm that the candidate sites agree well with the selected criteria.

  16. The method of landing sites selection for Russian lunar lander missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Djachkova, Maya; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Russian space agency is planning to launch two lunar landers in the upcoming years - Luna-Glob (2018) and Luna-Resurs (2021). Instruments installed on board the landers are designed to study volatiles and water ice, lunar exosphere, dust particles and regolith composition. As primary scientific interest is concentrated in the south polar region, the landing sites for both landers will be selected there. Since rugged terrain, conditions of solar illumination at high altitudes and necessity of direct radio communication with the Earth, it is essential to select an optimal landing site for each lander. We present the method of landing sites selection, which is based on geographical information systems (GIS) technologies to perform analysis, based on the criteria of surface suitability for landing, such as slopes, illumination conditions and Earth visibility. In addition, the estimations of hydrogen concentration in regolith based on LEND/LRO data were used to evaluate landing site candidates on possible water ice presence. The method gave us 6 canditates to land. Four of them are located in the impact craters: Simpelius D, Simpelius E, Boguslawsky C, Boussingault, and the other two are located to the north of Schomberger crater and to the north-west of Boguslawsky C crater and associated with probable basin-related materials. The main parameters of these sites will be presented with possible prioritization based on both technical requirements and scientific interest.

  17. Optimization Review, Black Butte Mine Superfund Site, Lane County, Oregon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The BBM Superfund Site (the site) is located in Lane County, Oregon, approximately 35 miles southeast of Eugene and approximately 10 miles upstream from the Cottage Grove Reservoir (CGR). Mercury mining and processing operations were active at the site...

  18. Optimization Review: Carson River Mercury Superfund Site, Carson City, Nevada

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Carson River Mercury Site (CRMS) (Figure 1) is located in northwest Nevada and was designated a Superfund site in 1990 because of elevated mercury concentrations observed in surface water, sediments and biota inhabiting the site.

  19. An ArcGIS decision support tool for artificial reefs site selection (ArcGIS ARSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stylianou, Stavros; Zodiatis, George

    2017-04-01

    Although the use and benefits of artificial reefs, both socio-economic and environmental, have been recognized with research and national development programmes worldwide their development is rarely subjected to a rigorous site selection process and the majority of the projects use the traditional (non-GIS) approach, based on trial and error mode. Recent studies have shown that the use of Geographic Information Systems, unlike to traditional methods, for the identification of suitable areas for artificial reefs siting seems to offer a number of distinct advantages minimizing possible errors, time and cost. A decision support tool (DSS) has been developed based on the existing knowledge, the multi-criteria decision analysis techniques and the GIS approach used in previous studies in order to help the stakeholders to identify the optimal locations for artificial reefs deployment on the basis of the physical, biological, oceanographic and socio-economic features of the sites. The tool provides to the users the ability to produce a final report with the results and suitability maps. The ArcGIS ARSS support tool runs within the existing ArcMap 10.2.x environment and for the development the VB .NET high level programming language has been used along with ArcObjects 10.2.x. Two local-scale case studies were conducted in order to test the application of the tool focusing on artificial reef siting. The results obtained from the case studies have shown that the tool can be successfully integrated within the site selection process in order to select objectively the optimal site for artificial reefs deployment.

  20. Site selection for MSFC operational tests of solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The criteria, methodology, and sequence aspects of the site selection process are presented. This report organized the logical thought process that should be applied to the site selection process, but final decisions are highly selective.

  1. Systematic optimization model and algorithm for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Han, Kehang; Zhu, Yushan

    2013-01-01

    A systematic optimization model for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design was developed based on the transition state theory of enzyme catalysis and graph-theoretical modeling. The saddle point on the free energy surface of the reaction system was represented by catalytic geometrical constraints, and the binding energy between the active site and transition state was minimized to reduce the activation energy barrier. The resulting hyperscale combinatorial optimization problem was tackled using a novel heuristic global optimization algorithm, which was inspired and tested by the protein core sequence selection problem. The sequence recapitulation tests on native active sites for two enzyme catalyzed hydrolytic reactions were applied to evaluate the predictive power of the design methodology. The results of the calculation show that most of the native binding sites can be successfully identified if the catalytic geometrical constraints and the structural motifs of the substrate are taken into account. Reliably predicting active site sequences may have significant implications for the creation of novel enzymes that are capable of catalyzing targeted chemical reactions. PMID:23649589

  2. Systematic optimization model and algorithm for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Han, Kehang; Zhu, Yushan

    2013-07-01

    A systematic optimization model for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design was developed based on the transition state theory of enzyme catalysis and graph-theoretical modeling. The saddle point on the free energy surface of the reaction system was represented by catalytic geometrical constraints, and the binding energy between the active site and transition state was minimized to reduce the activation energy barrier. The resulting hyperscale combinatorial optimization problem was tackled using a novel heuristic global optimization algorithm, which was inspired and tested by the protein core sequence selection problem. The sequence recapitulation tests on native active sites for two enzyme catalyzed hydrolytic reactions were applied to evaluate the predictive power of the design methodology. The results of the calculation show that most of the native binding sites can be successfully identified if the catalytic geometrical constraints and the structural motifs of the substrate are taken into account. Reliably predicting active site sequences may have significant implications for the creation of novel enzymes that are capable of catalyzing targeted chemical reactions.

  3. Optimization of the selective frequency damping parameters using model reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Guilherme; Passaggia, Pierre-Yves; Lazareff, Marc

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, an optimization methodology to compute the best control parameters, χ and Δ, for the selective frequency damping method is presented. The optimization does not suppose any a priori knowledge of the flow physics, neither of the underlying numerical methods, and is especially suited for simulations requiring large quantity of grid elements and processors. It allows for obtaining an optimal convergence rate to a steady state of the damped Navier-Stokes system. This is achieved using the Dynamic Mode Decomposition, which is a snapshot-based method, to estimate the eigenvalues associated with global unstable dynamics. Validations test cases are presented for the numerical configurations of a laminar flow past a 2D cylinder, a separated boundary-layer over a shallow bump, and a 3D turbulent stratified-Poiseuille flow.

  4. Improved Clonal Selection Algorithm Combined with Ant Colony Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shangce; Wang, Wei; Dai, Hongwei; Li, Fangjia; Tang, Zheng

    Both the clonal selection algorithm (CSA) and the ant colony optimization (ACO) are inspired by natural phenomena and are effective tools for solving complex problems. CSA can exploit and explore the solution space parallely and effectively. However, it can not use enough environment feedback information and thus has to do a large redundancy repeat during search. On the other hand, ACO is based on the concept of indirect cooperative foraging process via secreting pheromones. Its positive feedback ability is nice but its convergence speed is slow because of the little initial pheromones. In this paper, we propose a pheromone-linker to combine these two algorithms. The proposed hybrid clonal selection and ant colony optimization (CSA-ACO) reasonably utilizes the superiorities of both algorithms and also overcomes their inherent disadvantages. Simulation results based on the traveling salesman problems have demonstrated the merit of the proposed algorithm over some traditional techniques.

  5. Parameter Optimization for Selected Correlation Analysis of Intracranial Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Faltermeier, Rupert; Proescholdt, Martin A.; Bele, Sylvia; Brawanski, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recently we proposed a mathematical tool set, called selected correlation analysis, that reliably detects positive and negative correlations between arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Such correlations are associated with severe impairment of the cerebral autoregulation and intracranial compliance, as predicted by a mathematical model. The time resolved selected correlation analysis is based on a windowing technique combined with Fourier-based coherence calculations and therefore depends on several parameters. For real time application of this method at an ICU it is inevitable to adjust this mathematical tool for high sensitivity and distinct reliability. In this study, we will introduce a method to optimize the parameters of the selected correlation analysis by correlating an index, called selected correlation positive (SCP), with the outcome of the patients represented by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). For that purpose, the data of twenty-five patients were used to calculate the SCP value for each patient and multitude of feasible parameter sets of the selected correlation analysis. It could be shown that an optimized set of parameters is able to improve the sensitivity of the method by a factor greater than four in comparison to our first analyses. PMID:26693250

  6. ExoMars 2018 Landing Site Selection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vago, Jorge L.; Kminek, Gerhard; Rodionov, Daniel

    The ExoMars 2018 mission will include two science elements: a Rover and a Surface Platform. The ExoMars Rover will carry a comprehensive suite of instruments dedicated to geology and exobiology research named after Louis Pasteur. The Rover will be able to travel several kilometres searching for traces of past and present signs of life. It will do this by collecting and analysing samples from outcrops, and from the subsurface—down to 2-m depth. The very powerful combination of mobility with the ability to access locations where organic molecules can be well preserved is unique to this mission. After the Rover will have egressed, the ExoMars Surface Platform will begin its science mission to study the surface environment at the landing location. This talk will describe the landing site selection process and introduce the scientific, planetary protection, and engineering requirements that candidate landing sites must comply with in order to be considered for the mission.

  7. Site selection for manned Mars landings: A geological perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, Paul D.

    1986-01-01

    Issues relating to the selection of initial landing sites for manned Mars missions are discussed from a geological viewpoint. The two prime objectives for initial manned exploration should be the youngest unambiguous lava flows (to tie down the late end of the cratering history curve for Mars) and old highland crust, which is best sampled and studied through the use of large impact basins as natural, planetary drill-holes. Exploration of these two sites will provide data on Martian chronology, volcanism, impact processes and gross chemical structure that will enable a first-order global synthesis through integration of these results with the global remote-sensing data already in hand from Viking and that to be provided by the Mars Observer Mission.

  8. Adjustable Bearing System with Selectively Optimized Installational Clearances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-30

    ÄÖQ¥ÄL1HE mssx^. Navy Case No. 78,325 PATENTS ADJUSTABLE BEARING SYSTEM WITH SELECTIVELY OPTIMIZED INSTALLATIONAL CLEARANCES BACKGROUND OF THE... clearance 7 conditions. 8 9 10 .. small range of clearances within which to accommodate various operational conditions. Thus, a 12 very tight... clearance is extremely difficult to achieve for certain installations or conditions such as 13 quiet submarine control surface operation and

  9. Selection of the InSight Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, I. J.; Fergason, R.; Kirk, R. L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, S.; Putzig, N. E.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M.; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.; Lognonné, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation ( {≤}{-}2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S-5°N and later 3°N-5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ˜600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes <15° at 84 m and 2 m length scales for radar tracking and touchdown stability, low rock abundance (<10 %) to avoid impact and spacecraft tip over, instrument deployment constraints, which included identical slope and rock abundance constraints, a radar reflective and load bearing surface, and a fragmented regolith ˜5 m thick for full penetration of the heat flow probe. Unlike other Mars landers, science objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  10. Competitor phenology as a social cue in breeding site selection.

    PubMed

    Samplonius, Jelmer M; Both, Christiaan

    2017-05-01

    Predicting habitat quality is a major challenge for animals selecting a breeding patch, because it affects reproductive success. Breeding site selection may be based on previous experience, or on social information from the density and success of competitors with an earlier phenology. Variation in animal breeding phenology is often correlated with variation in habitat quality. Generally, animals breed earlier in high-quality habitats that allow them to reach a nutritional threshold required for breeding earlier or avoid nest predation. In addition, habitat quality may affect phenological overlap between species and thereby interspecific competition. Therefore, we hypothesized that competitor breeding phenology can be used as social cue by settling migrants to locate high-quality breeding sites. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally advanced and delayed hatching phenology of two resident tit species on the level of study plots and studied male and female settlement patterns of migratory pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca. The manipulations were assigned at random in two consecutive years, and treatments were swapped between years in sites that were used in both years. In both years, males settled in equal numbers across treatments, but later arriving females avoided pairing with males in delayed phenology plots. Moreover, male pairing probability declined strongly with arrival date on the breeding grounds. Our results demonstrate that competitor phenology may be used to assess habitat quality by settling migrants, but we cannot pinpoint the exact mechanism (e.g. resource quality, predation pressure or competition) that has given rise to this pattern. In addition, we show that opposing selection pressures for arrival timing may give rise to different social information availabilities between sexes. We discuss our findings in the context of climate warming, social information use and the evolution of protandry in migratory animals.

  11. Selection of the InSight landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Fergason, Robin L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Putzig, N.E.; Campbell, B.A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M A; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.E.; Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2017-01-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation (≤−2.5 km">≤−2.5 km≤−2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S–5°N and later 3°N–5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ∼600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes <15° at 84 m and 2 m length scales for radar tracking and touchdown stability, low rock abundance (<10 %) to avoid impact and spacecraft tip over, instrument deployment constraints, which included identical slope and rock abundance constraints, a radar reflective and load bearing surface, and a fragmented regolith ∼5 m thick for full penetration of the heat flow probe. Unlike other Mars landers, science objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  12. Feature selection for optimized skin tumor recognition using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Handels, H; Ross, T; Kreusch, J; Wolff, H H; Pöppl, S J

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, a new approach to computer supported diagnosis of skin tumors in dermatology is presented. High resolution skin surface profiles are analyzed to recognize malignant melanomas and nevocytic nevi (moles), automatically. In the first step, several types of features are extracted by 2D image analysis methods characterizing the structure of skin surface profiles: texture features based on cooccurrence matrices, Fourier features and fractal features. Then, feature selection algorithms are applied to determine suitable feature subsets for the recognition process. Feature selection is described as an optimization problem and several approaches including heuristic strategies, greedy and genetic algorithms are compared. As quality measure for feature subsets, the classification rate of the nearest neighbor classifier computed with the leaving-one-out method is used. Genetic algorithms show the best results. Finally, neural networks with error back-propagation as learning paradigm are trained using the selected feature sets. Different network topologies, learning parameters and pruning algorithms are investigated to optimize the classification performance of the neural classifiers. With the optimized recognition system a classification performance of 97.7% is achieved.

  13. A selection system for identifying accessible sites in target RNAs.

    PubMed

    Pan, W H; Devlin, H F; Kelley, C; Isom, H C; Clawson, G A

    2001-04-01

    Although ribozymes offer tremendous potential for posttranscriptionally controlling expression of targeted genes, their utility is often limited by the accessibility of the targeted regions within the RNA transcripts. Here we describe a method that identifies RNA regions that are accessible to oligonucleotides. Based on this selection protocol, we show that construction of hammerhead ribozymes targeted to the identified regions results in catalytic activities that are consistently and substantially greater than those of ribozymes designed on the basis of computer modeling. Identification of accessible sites should also be widely applicable to design of antisense oligonucleotides and DNAzymes.

  14. Site-Selective Surface-Enhanced Raman Detection of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matteini, Paolo; Cottat, Maximilien; Tavanti, Francesco; Panfilova, Elizaveta; Scuderi, Mario; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Menziani, Maria Cristina; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; de Angelis, Marella; Pini, Roberto

    2017-01-24

    Strategies for protein detection via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) currently exploit the formation of randomly generated hot spots at the interfaces of metal colloidal nanoparticles, which are clustered together by intrusive chemical or physical processes in the presence of the target biomolecule. We propose a different approach based on selective and quantitative gathering of protein molecules at regular hot spots generated on the corners of individual silver nanocubes in aqueous medium at physiological pH. Here, the protein, while keeping its native configuration, experiences an intense local E-field, which boosts SERS efficiency and detection sensitivity. Uncontrolled signal fluctuations caused by variable molecular adsorption to different particle areas or inside clustered nanoparticles are circumvented. Advanced electron microscopy analyses and computational simulations outline a strategy relying on a site-selective mechanism with superior Raman signal enhancement, which offers the perspective of highly controlled and reproducible routine SERS detection of proteins.

  15. A New Approach to Site Demand-Based Level Inventory Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    TO SITE DEMAND-BASED LEVEL INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION by Tacettin Ersoz June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Javier Salmeron Second Reader: Emily...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A NEW APPROACH TO SITE DEMAND-BASED LEVEL INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...number of orders. The Site Demand-Based Level Inventory Optimization Model (SIOM) is a mixed-integer, linear program developed at the Naval

  16. Hyperopt: a Python library for model selection and hyperparameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstra, James; Komer, Brent; Eliasmith, Chris; Yamins, Dan; Cox, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Sequential model-based optimization (also known as Bayesian optimization) is one of the most efficient methods (per function evaluation) of function minimization. This efficiency makes it appropriate for optimizing the hyperparameters of machine learning algorithms that are slow to train. The Hyperopt library provides algorithms and parallelization infrastructure for performing hyperparameter optimization (model selection) in Python. This paper presents an introductory tutorial on the usage of the Hyperopt library, including the description of search spaces, minimization (in serial and parallel), and the analysis of the results collected in the course of minimization. This paper also gives an overview of Hyperopt-Sklearn, a software project that provides automatic algorithm configuration of the Scikit-learn machine learning library. Following Auto-Weka, we take the view that the choice of classifier and even the choice of preprocessing module can be taken together to represent a single large hyperparameter optimization problem. We use Hyperopt to define a search space that encompasses many standard components (e.g. SVM, RF, KNN, PCA, TFIDF) and common patterns of composing them together. We demonstrate, using search algorithms in Hyperopt and standard benchmarking data sets (MNIST, 20-newsgroups, convex shapes), that searching this space is practical and effective. In particular, we improve on best-known scores for the model space for both MNIST and convex shapes. The paper closes with some discussion of ongoing and future work.

  17. Computer-based planning of optimal donor sites for autologous osseous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Chlebiej, Michal; Zerfass, Peter; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Mikolajczak, Pawel; Keeve, Erwin

    2002-05-01

    Bone graft surgery is often necessary for reconstruction of craniofacial defects after trauma, tumor, infection or congenital malformation. In this operative technique the removed or missing bone segment is filled with a bone graft. The mainstay of the craniofacial reconstruction rests with the replacement of the defected bone by autogeneous bone grafts. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention is required. The major problem is to determine as accurately as possible the donor site where the graft should be dissected from and to define the shape of the desired transplant. A computer-aided method for semi-automatic selection of optimal donor sites for autografts in craniofacial reconstructive surgery has been developed. The non-automatic step of graft design and constraint setting is followed by a fully automatic procedure to find the best fitting position. In extension to preceding work, a new optimization approach based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method has been implemented and embedded into our computer-based surgical planning system. This new technique enables, once the pre-processing step has been performed, selection of the optimal donor site in time less than one minute. The method has been applied during surgery planning step in more than 20 cases. The postoperative observations have shown that functional results, such as speech and chewing ability as well as restoration of bony continuity were clearly better compared to conventionally planned operations. Moreover, in most cases the duration of the surgical interventions has been distinctly reduced.

  18. Implications of high-spatial-resolution thermal infrared (Termoskan) data for Mars landing site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bruce H.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal infrared observations of Mars from spacecraft provide physical information about the upper thermal skin depth of the surface, which is on the order of a few centimeters in depth and thus very significant for lander site selection. The Termoskan instrument onboard the Soviet Phobos '88 spacecraft acquired the highest spatial-resolution thermal infrared data obtained for Mars, ranging in resolution from 300 m to 3 km per pixel. It simultaneously obtained broadband reflected solar flux data. Although the 6 deg N - 30 deg S Termoskan coverage only slightly overlaps the nominal Mars Pathfinder target range, the implications of Termoskan data for that overlap region and the extrapolations that can be made to other regions give important clues for optimal landing site selection.

  19. Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix landing site selection and characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R.; Adams, D.; Bonfiglio, G.; Christensen, P.; Cull, S.; Golombek, M.; Guinn, J.; Guinness, E.; Heet, T.; Kirk, R.; Knudson, A.; Malin, M.; Mellon, M.; McEwen, A.; Mushkin, A.; Parker, T.; Seelos, F.; Seelos, K.; Smith, P.; Spencer, D.; Stein, T.; Tamppari, L.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure a successful touchdown and subsequent surface operations, the Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix Lander must land within 65?? to 72?? north latitude, at an elevation less than -3.5 km. The landing site must have relatively low wind velocities and rock and slope distributions similar to or more benign than those found at the Viking Lander 2 site. Also, the site must have a soil cover of at least several centimeters over ice or icy soil to meet science objectives of evaluating the environmental and habitability implications of past and current near-polar environments. The most challenging aspects of site selection were the extensive rock fields associated with crater rims and ejecta deposits and the centers of polygons associated with patterned ground. An extensive acquisition campaign of Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging Spectrometer predawn thermal IR images, together with ???0.31 m/pixel Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images was implemented to find regions with acceptable rock populations and to support Monte Carlo landing simulations. The chosen site is located at 68.16?? north latitude, 233.35?? east longitude (areocentric), within a ???50 km wide (N-S) by ???300 km long (E-W) valley of relatively rock-free plains. Surfaces within the eastern portion of the valley are differentially eroded ejecta deposits from the relatively recent ???10-km-wide Heimdall crater and have fewer rocks than plains on the western portion of the valley. All surfaces exhibit polygonal ground, which is associated with fracture of icy soils, and are predicted to have only several centimeters of poorly sorted basaltic sand and dust over icy soil deposits. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Rocky Mountain snowpack chemistry at selected sites for 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Campbell, Donald H.; Handran, Heather

    2003-01-01

    Because regional-scale atmospheric deposition data in the Rocky Mountains are sparse, a program was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and other agencies, to more thoroughly determine the chemical composition of precipitation and to identify sources of atmospherically deposited contaminants in a network of high-elevation sites. Samples of seasonal snowpacks at 57 geographically distributed sites, in a regional network from New Mexico to Montana, were collected and analyzed for major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon during 2001. Sites selected in this report have been sampled annually since 1993, enabling identification of increases or decreases in chemical concentrations from year to year. Spatial patterns in snowpack-chemical data for concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate indicate that concentrations of these acid precursors in less developed areas of the region are lower than concentrations in the heavily developed areas. Results for the 2001 snowpack-chemistry analyses, however, indicate increases in concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in particular at sites where past concentrations typically were lower. Since 1993, concentrations of nitrate and sulfate were highest from snowpack samples in northern Colorado that were collected from sites adjacent to the Denver metropolitan area to the east and the coal-fired powerplants to the west. In 2001, relatively high concentrations of nitrate (12.3 to 23.0 microequivalents per liter (?eq/L) and sulfate (7.7 to 12.5 ?eq/L) were detected in Montana and Wyoming. Ammonium concentrations were highest in north-central Colorado (14.5 to 16.9 ?eq/L) and southwestern Montana (12.8 to 14.2 ?eq/L).

  1. Optimization of topical gels with betamethasone dipropionate: selection of gel forming and optimal cosolvent system.

    PubMed

    Băiţan, Mariana; Lionte, Mihaela; Moisuc, Lăcrămioara; Gafiţanu, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to develop a 0.05% betamethasone gel characterized by physical-chemical stability and good release properties. The preliminary studies were designed to select the gel-forming agents and the excipients compatible with betamethasone dipropionate. In order to formulate a clear gel without particles of drug substances in suspension, a solvent system for the drug substance was selected. The content of drug substance released, the rheological and in vitro release tests were the tools used for the optimal formulation selection. A stable carbomer gel was obtained by solubilization of betamethasone dipropionate in a vehicle composed by 40% PEG 400, 10% ethanol and 5% Transcutol.

  2. State-Selective Excitation of Quantum Systems via Geometrical Optimization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-09-08

    We lay out the foundations of a general method of quantum control via geometrical optimization. We apply the method to state-selective population transfer using ultrashort transform-limited pulses between manifolds of levels that may represent, e.g., state-selective transitions in molecules. Assuming that certain states can be prepared, we develop three implementations: (i) preoptimization, which implies engineering the initial state within the ground manifold or electronic state before the pulse is applied; (ii) postoptimization, which implies engineering the final state within the excited manifold or target electronic state, after the pulse; and (iii) double-time optimization, which uses both types of time-ordered manipulations. We apply the schemes to two important dynamical problems: To prepare arbitrary vibrational superposition states on the target electronic state and to select weakly coupled vibrational states. Whereas full population inversion between the electronic states only requires control at initial time in all of the ground vibrational levels, only very specific superposition states can be prepared with high fidelity by either pre- or postoptimization mechanisms. Full state-selective population inversion requires manipulating the vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state before the optical pulse is applied and in the excited electronic state afterward, but not during all times.

  3. A new approach to the optimal target selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Bassett, B. A.; van der Heyden, K.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper addresses a common problem in astronomy and cosmology: to optimally select a subset of targets from a larger catalog. A specific example is the selection of targets from an imaging survey for multi-object spectrographic follow-up. Aims: We present a new heuristic optimisation algorithm, HYBRID, for this purpose and undertake detailed studies of its performance. Methods: HYBRID combines elements of the simulated annealing, MCMC and particle-swarm methods and is particularly successful in cases where the survey landscape has multiple curvature or clustering scales. Results: HYBRID consistently outperforms the other methods, especially in high-dimensionality spaces with many extrema. This means many fewer simulations must be run to reach a given performance confidence level and implies very significant advantages in solving complex or computationally expensive optimisation problems. Conclusions: .HYBRID outperforms both MCMC and SA in all cases including optimisation of high dimensional continuous surfaces indicating that HYBRID is useful far beyond the specific problem of optimal target selection. Future work will apply HYBRID to target selection for the new 10 m Southern African Large Telescope in South Africa.

  4. Salt Effect Accelerates Site-Selective Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient and selective chemical reactions are desired. For small molecule chemistry, the reaction rate can be varied by changing the concentration, temperature, and solvent used. In contrast for large biomolecules, the reaction rate is difficult to modify by adjusting these variables because stringent biocompatible reaction conditions are required. Here we show that adding salts can change the rate constant over 4 orders of magnitude for an arylation bioconjugation reaction between a cysteine residue within a four-residue sequence (π-clamp) and a perfluoroaryl electrophile. Biocompatible ammonium sulfate significantly enhances the reaction rate without influencing the site-specificity of π-clamp mediated arylation, enabling the fast synthesis of two site-specific antibody–drug conjugates that selectively kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Computational and structure–reactivity studies indicate that salts may tune the reaction rate through modulating the interactions between the π-clamp hydrophobic side chains and the electrophile. On the basis of this understanding, the salt effect is extended to other bioconjugation chemistry, and a new regioselective alkylation reaction at π-clamp cysteine is developed. PMID:27725962

  5. Site Selection for Ground Based Free Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment (GBFEL-TIE), Volume 3: Preferred Site Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    established that the GBFEL-TIE could be accomplished at any of the three candidate sites. However, based on differences identified during site investigations...construction and operation of the GBFEL-TIE, including environmental mitigation costs, differed only slightly among the three sites, with the Orogrande site...the differences in the findings that would affect site selection, and established a relative ranking of the three sites under consideration. The

  6. Remote Borehole Strainmeter Sites: Power system optimization improves data quality and increases equipment uptime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatt, C.; Van Boskirk, E.; Gallaher, W.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Henderson, D. B.; Gottlieb, M. H.; Johnson, W.; Fox, O.; Mencin, D.; Mattioli, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Borehole strainmeter network consists of 74 sites, spanning the west coast of North America from Anza, California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Several instruments are installed at each site (including Gladwin Tensor Strainmeter, 3-component geophone, barometer, and rain gauge), with associated data storage and communications equipment. Selected sites also are co-located with high-precision GPS, tiltmeter, pore pressure sensor and metpack. The peak load for a site with VSAT communications is approximately 65W. Most sites are AC powered with battery backup systems. 21 sites are located in remote areas where AC power is unavailable; of these, 18 use solar panels and batteries as the primary power source. During O&M phase of PBO, two issues have brought the borehole solar sites into focus. First, most solar sites cannot continuously operate throughout the winter months because of inclement weather and local topography that blocks the solar array, which results in data loss. Second, high frequency noise is introduced into the instrument data stream by the solar charging system. Reducing noise levels at higher frequencies would decrease the detection threshold for short term transients, such as aseismic creep events, thus allowing researchers to leverage the overlap between simultaneous seismometer and strainmeter observations. Several improvements have been made to optimize the power system as well as decrease noise. TriStar TS-MPPT-60 solar controllers have been installed, which optimize solar flux by tracking and responding to the solar array maximum power point. The battery charge algorithm is designed to provide gains of up to 15% efficiency during winter months. In addition, the new solar controllers have been engineered to limit noise, and also feature remote network interfaces and data logging capability. For those sites where topography impacts the function of the solar power system, methanol fuel cells

  7. An R-D optimized transcoding resilient motion vector selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminlou, Alireza; Semsarzadeh, Mehdi; Fatemi, Omid

    2014-12-01

    Selection of motion vector (MV) has a significant impact on the quality of an encoded, and particularly a transcoded video, in terms of rate-distortion (R-D) performance. The conventional motion estimation process, in most existing video encoders, ignores the rate of residuals by utilizing rate and distortion of motion compensation step. This approach implies that the selected MV depends on the quantization parameter. Hence, the same MV that has been selected for high bit rate compression may not be suitable for low bit rate ones when transcoding the video with motion information reuse technique, resulting in R-D performance degradation. In this paper, we propose an R-D optimized motion selection criterion that takes into account the effect of residual rate in MV selection process. Based on the proposed criterion, a new two-piece Lagrange multiplier selection is introduced for motion estimation process. Analytical evaluations indicate that our proposed scheme results in MVs that are less sensitive to changes in bit rate or quantization parameter. As a result, MVs in the encoded bitstream may be used even after the encoded sequence has been transcoded to a lower bit rate one using re-quantization. Simulation results indicate that the proposed technique improves the quality performance of coding and transcoding without any computational overhead.

  8. Geospatial optimization of siting large-scale solar projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macknick, Jordan; Quinby, Ted; Caulfield, Emmet; Gerritsen, Margot; Diffendorfer, James E.; Haines, Seth S.

    2014-01-01

    guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  9. Optimization Review, Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site, Portsmouth, Virginia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site is a 33-acre property located in Norfolk County, Portsmouth, Virginia. PIM (Figure 1) is the site of a former scrap metal storage and recycling facility that began operation in the 1940s.

  10. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  11. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Frohne, K.H.; Boswell, R.

    1993-12-31

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  12. Evaluation of different approaches for identifying optimal sites to predict mean hillslope soil moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kaihua; Zhou, Zhiwen; Lai, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qing; Feng, Huihui

    2017-04-01

    -means method (EFsTheta-PCA). Overall, TS required only one site, but its accuracy was limited. The best K-means method required <8 sites and yielded high accuracy, but extra soil and terrain information is necessary when using this method. The stratified sampling strategy can only be used if no pre-knowledge about soil moisture variation is available. This information will help in selecting the optimal methods for estimation the area mean soil moisture.

  13. Optimal control of mode-selective femtochemistry in multidimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitric, Roland; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta

    2007-09-15

    We present a strategy for optimal control of the ground-state dynamics in multidimensional systems based on a combination of the semiclassical Wigner distribution approach with direct quantum chemical molecular dynamics (MD) 'on the fly'. This allows one to treat all degrees of freedom without the need for precalculation of global potential energy surfaces. We demonstrate the scope of our theoretical procedure on two prototype systems representing rigid symmetrical molecules (Na{sub 3}F) and flexible biomolecules with low-frequency modes (glycine). We show that the ground-state isomerization process can be selectively driven by ultrashort laser pulses with different shapes which are characteristic of the prototype systems. Thus, our method opens perspectives for control of the functionality of biomolecules. Moreover, assignment of the underlying processes to pulse shapes based on MD allows one to use optimal control as a tool for analysis.

  14. Effects of spatial disturbance on common loon nest site selection and territory success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kyle P.; Destefano, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The common loon (Gavia immer) breeds during the summer on northern lakes and water bodies that are also often desirable areas for aquatic recreation and human habitation. In northern New England, we assessed how the spatial nature of disturbance affects common loon nest site selection and territory success. We found through classification and regression analysis that distance to and density of disturbance factors can be used to classify observed nest site locations versus random points, suggesting that these factors affect loon nest site selection (model 1: Correct classification = 75%, null = 50%, K = 0.507, P < 0.001; model 2: Correct classification = 78%, null = 50%, K = 0.551, P < 0.001). However, in an exploratory analysis, we were unable to show a relation between spatial disturbance variables and breeding success (P = 0.595, R2 = 0.436), possibly because breeding success was so low during the breeding seasons of 2007–2008. We suggest that by selecting nest site locations that avoid disturbance factors, loons thereby limit the effect that disturbance will have on their breeding success. Still, disturbance may force loons to use sub-optimal nesting habitat, limiting the available number of territories, and overall productivity. We advise that management efforts focus on limiting disturbance factors to allow breeding pairs access to the best nesting territories, relieving disturbance pressures that may force sub-optimal nest placement.

  15. Measurement of volatile organic chemicals at selected sites in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Viezee, W.; Sitton, B.; Ferek, R.

    1992-01-01

    Urban air concentrations of 24 selected volatile organic chemicals that may be potentially hazardous to human health and environment were measured during field experiments conducted at two California locations, at Houston, and at Denver. Chemicals measured included chlorofluorocarbons, halomethanes, haloethanes, halopropanes, chloroethylenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons. With emphasis on California sites, data from these studies are analyzed and interpreted with respect to variabilities in ambient air concentrations, diurnal changes, relation to prevailing meteorology, sources and trends. Except in a few instances, mean concentrations are typically between 0 and 5 ppb. Significant variabilities in atmospheric concentrations associated with intense sources and adverse meteorological conditions are shown to exist. In addition to short-term variability, there is evidence of systematic diurnal and seasonal trends. In some instances it is possible to detect declining trends resulting from the effectiveness of control strategies.

  16. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection.

    PubMed

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin

    2011-11-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent theme. In recent years substantial progress has been made towards this goal, spurred by the possibility of applying genome-wide, sequencing-based analysis. We now have a large collection of high-resolution datasets identifying locations of TSSs, protein-DNA interactions, and chromatin features over whole genomes; the field is now faced with the daunting challenge of translating these descriptive maps into quantitative and predictive models describing the underlying biology. We review here the genomic and chromatin features that underlie TSS selection and usage, focusing on the differences between the major classes of core promoters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Application of Computer-Aided Discovery to Spacecraft Site Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, V.; Blair, D. M.; Gowanlock, M.; Herring, T.

    2015-12-01

    The selection of landing and exploration sites for interplanetary robotic or human missions is a complex task. Historically it has been labor-intensive, with large groups of scientists manually interpreting a planetary surface across a variety of datasets to identify potential sites based on science and engineering constraints. This search process can be lengthy, and excellent sites may get overlooked when the aggregate value of site selection criteria is non-obvious or non-intuitive. As planetary data collection leads to Big Data repositories and a growing set of selection criteria, scientists will face a combinatorial search space explosion that requires scalable, automated assistance. We are currently exploring more general computer-aided discovery techniques in the context of planetary surface deformation phenomena that can lend themselves to application in the landing site search problem. In particular, we are developing a general software framework that addresses key difficulties: characterizing a given phenomenon or site based on data gathered from multiple instruments (e.g. radar interferometry, gravity, thermal maps, or GPS time series), and examining a variety of possible workflows whose individual configurations are optimized to isolate different features. The framework allows algorithmic pipelines and hypothesized models to be perturbed or permuted automatically within well-defined bounds established by the scientist. For example, even simple choices for outlier and noise handling or data interpolation can drastically affect the detectability of certain features. These techniques aim to automate repetitive tasks that scientists routinely perform in exploratory analysis, and make them more efficient and scalable by executing them in parallel in the cloud. We also explore ways in which machine learning can be combined with human feedback to prune the search space and converge to desirable results. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge support from NASA AIST

  18. Designing Pareto-optimal selection systems: formalizing the decisions required for selection system development.

    PubMed

    De Corte, Wilfried; Sackett, Paul R; Lievens, Filip

    2011-09-01

    The article presents an analytic method for designing Pareto-optimal selection systems where the applicants belong to a mixture of candidate populations. The method is useful in both applied and research settings. In an applied context, the present method is the first to assist the selection practitioner when deciding on 6 major selection design issues: (1) the predictor subset, (2) the selection rule, (3) the selection staging, (4) the predictor sequencing, (5) the predictor weighting, and (6) the stage retention decision issue. From a research perspective, the method offers a unique opportunity for studying the impact and relative importance of different strategies for reducing adverse impact. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Selection of cranial site for shunting debilitated patients.

    PubMed

    Kouyialis, A T; Stranjalis, G; Boviatsis, E J; Korfias, S; Sakas, D E

    2005-07-01

    The optimum cranial site for ventricular catheter insertion in CSF shunts is still under debate and there has been no general consensus as far as surgical technicalities are concerned. Furthermore, there have been no reports dealing with appropriate cranial site selection in debilitated patients. The aim of this report is to stress the need to utilize a frontal approach when dealing with patients who are likely to remain bed-bound for long periods and to emphasize the well-known prerequisites such as meticulous surgical technique and peri-operative general and local care. A retrospective analysis of all shunt operations and revisions performed in our department during the last 6 years. This analysis revealed 8 long-term recumbent patients with late valve extrusion (N1 = 5) or primary wound breakdown (N2 = 3), all through the occipital area. Extended periods of bed rest due to neurological disease combined with poor nursing and dietary intake had led to either chronic valve extrusion or wound breakdown. Shunt revision was performed successfully by a frontal approach in 5 whereas 2 tolerated shunt removal and one died of meningitis. In debilitated patients or those who are likely to remain bed-bound for long periods, a frontal approach for proximal catheter insertion may help prevent immediate postoperative wound breakdown or late valve extrusion.

  20. Helium mining on the Moon: Site selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Eugene N.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of recovering helium (He) from the Moon as a source of fusion energy on Earth is currently being studied at the University of Wisconsin. Part of this study is selection and evaluation of potential sites for lunar He mining. Selection and evaluation of potential mining sites are based on four salient findings by various investigators of lunar samples: (1) Regoliths from areas underlain by highland materials contain less than 20 wppm He; (2) Certain maria regoliths contain less than 20 wppm He, but other contain 25 to 49 wppm; (3) The He content of a mare regolith is a function of its composition; regoliths rich in Ti are relatively rich in He; and (4) He is concentrated in the less than 100-micron size fractions of regoliths. The first three findings suggest that maria are the most promising mining sites, specifically, those that have high-Ti regoliths. Information on the regional distribution and extent of high-Ti regoliths comes mainly from two sources: direct sampling by various Apollo and Luna missions, and remote sensing by gamma-ray spectroscopy and Earth-based measurements of lunar spectral reflectance. Sampling provides essential control on calibration and interpretation of data from remote sensing. These data indicate that Mare Tranquillitatis is the principal area of high-Ti regolith of the eastern nearside, but large areas of high-Ti regolith are indicated in the Imbrium and Procellarum regions. Recovery of significant amounts of He-3 will require mining billions of tonnes of regolith. Large individual areas suitable for mining must therefore be delineated. The concentration of He in the finer size fractions and considerations of ease of mining mean that mining areas must be as free as possible of sizable craters and blocks of rock. Pending additional lunar missions, information regarding these features must be obtained from lunar photographs, photogeologic maps, and radar surveys. The present study is decidedly preliminary; available

  1. Model of the best-of-N nest-site selection process in honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Andreagiovanni; Marshall, James A. R.; Trianni, Vito; Bose, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The ability of a honeybee swarm to select the best nest site plays a fundamental role in determining the future colony's fitness. To date, the nest-site selection process has mostly been modeled and theoretically analyzed for the case of binary decisions. However, when the number of alternative nests is larger than two, the decision-process dynamics qualitatively change. In this work, we extend previous analyses of a value-sensitive decision-making mechanism to a decision process among N nests. First, we present the decision-making dynamics in the symmetric case of N equal-quality nests. Then, we generalize our findings to a best-of-N decision scenario with one superior nest and N -1 inferior nests, previously studied empirically in bees and ants. Whereas previous binary models highlighted the crucial role of inhibitory stop-signaling, the key parameter in our new analysis is the relative time invested by swarm members in individual discovery and in signaling behaviors. Our new analysis reveals conflicting pressures on this ratio in symmetric and best-of-N decisions, which could be solved through a time-dependent signaling strategy. Additionally, our analysis suggests how ecological factors determining the density of suitable nest sites may have led to selective pressures for an optimal stable signaling ratio.

  2. Selecting landing sites for lunar lander missions using spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djachkova, Maia; Lazarev, Evgeniy

    Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) is planning to launch two spacecrafts to the Moon with lander missions in 2015 and 2017. [1] Here, we present an approach to create a method of landing sites selection. We researched the physical features of the Moon using spatial analysis techniques presented in ArcGIS Desktop Software in accordance with its suitability for automatic landing. Hence we analyzed Russian lunar program and received the technical characteristics of the spacecrafts and scientific goals that they should meet [1]. Thus we identified the criteria of surface suitability for landing. We divided them into two groups: scientific criteria (the hydrogen content of the regolith [2] and day and night sur-face temperature [3]) and safety criteria (surface slopes and roughness, sky view factor, the Earth altitude, presence of polar permanently shadowed regions). In conformity with some investigations it is believed that the south polar region of the Moon is the most promising territory where water ice can be found (finding water ice is the main goal for Russian lunar missions [1]). According to the selected criteria and selected area of research we used remote sensing data from LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter) [4] as basic data, because it is the most actual and easily available. The data was processed and analyzed using spatial analysis techniques of ArcGIS Desktop Software, so we created a number of maps depicting the criteria and then combined and overlaid them. As a result of overlay process we received five territories where the landing will be safe and the scientific goals will have being met. It should be noted that our analysis is only the first order assessment and the results cannot be used as actual landing sites for the lunar missions in 2015 and 2017, since a number of factors, which can only be analyzed in a very large scale, was not taken into account. However, an area of researching is narrowed to five territories, what can make the future

  3. Optimal Selection of Threshold Value 'r' for Refined Multiscale Entropy.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Puneeta; Sunkaria, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Refined multiscale entropy (RMSE) technique was introduced to evaluate complexity of a time series over multiple scale factors 't'. Here threshold value 'r' is updated as 0.15 times SD of filtered scaled time series. The use of fixed threshold value 'r' in RMSE sometimes assigns very close resembling entropy values to certain time series at certain temporal scale factors and is unable to distinguish different time series optimally. The present study aims to evaluate RMSE technique by varying threshold value 'r' from 0.05 to 0.25 times SD of filtered scaled time series and finding optimal 'r' values for each scale factor at which different time series can be distinguished more effectively. The proposed RMSE was used to evaluate over HRV time series of normal sinus rhythm subjects, patients suffering from sudden cardiac death, congestive heart failure, healthy adult male, healthy adult female and mid-aged female groups as well as over synthetic simulated database for different datalengths 'N' of 3000, 3500 and 4000. The proposed RMSE results in improved discrimination among different time series. To enhance the computational capability, empirical mathematical equations have been formulated for optimal selection of threshold values 'r' as a function of SD of filtered scaled time series and datalength 'N' for each scale factor 't'.

  4. Optimizing Hammermill Performance Through Screen Selection and Hammer Design

    SciTech Connect

    Neal A. Yancey; Tyler L. Westover; Christopher T. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mechanical preprocessing, which includes particle size reduction and mechanical separation, is one of the primary operations in the feedstock supply system for a lignocellulosic biorefinery. It is the means by which raw biomass from the field or forest is mechanically transformed into an on-spec feedstock with characteristics better suited for the fuel conversion process. Results: This work provides a general overview of the objectives and methodologies of mechanical preprocessing and then presents experimental results illustrating (1) improved size reduction via optimization of hammer mill configuration, (2) improved size reduction via pneumatic-assisted hammer milling, and (3) improved control of particle size and particle size distribution through proper selection of grinder process parameters. Conclusion: Optimal grinder configuration for maximal process throughput and efficiency is strongly dependent on feedstock type and properties, such moisture content. Tests conducted using a HG200 hammer grinder indicate that increasing the tip speed, optimizing hammer geometry, and adding pneumatic assist can increase grinder throughput as much as 400%.

  5. Brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: optimal patient selection.

    PubMed

    Kollmeier, Marisa A; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of each modality and delineate how to best select patients who are optimal candidates for these treatment approaches. Prostate brachytherapy as a curative modality for clinically localized prostate cancer has become increasingly utilized over the past decade; 25% of all early cancers are now treated this way in the United States (1). The popularity of this treatment strategy lies in the highly conformal nature of radiation dose, low morbidity, patient convenience, and high efficacy rates. Prostate brachytherapy can be delivered by either a permanent interstitial radioactive seed implantation (low dose rate [LDR]) or a temporary interstitial insertion of iridium-192 (Ir192) afterloading catheters. The objective of both of these techniques is to deliver a high dose of radiation to the prostate gland while exposing normal surrounding tissues to minimal radiation dose. Brachytherapy techniques are ideal to achieve this goal given the close proximity of the radiation source to tumor and sharp fall off of the radiation dose cloud proximate to the source. Brachytherapy provides a powerful means of delivering dose escalation above and beyond that achievable with intensity-modulated external beam radiotherapy alone. Careful selection of appropriate patients for these therapies, however, is critical for optimizing both disease-related outcomes and treatment-related toxicity.

  6. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modal analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.

  7. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modalmore » analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.« less

  8. Initial basalt target site selection evaluation for the Mars penetrator drop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Quaide, W. L.; Polkowski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential basalt target sites for an air drop penetrator test were described and the criteria involved in site selection were discussed. A summary of the background field geology and recommendations for optimum sites are also presented.

  9. 40 CFR 761.250 - Sample site selection for pipeline section abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample site selection for pipeline... Disposal of Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.250 Sample site selection for pipeline section abandonment. This...

  10. 40 CFR 761.250 - Sample site selection for pipeline section abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample site selection for pipeline... Disposal of Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.250 Sample site selection for pipeline section abandonment. This...

  11. Ant colony optimization with selective evaluation for feature selection in character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Seok; Lee, Jin-Seon

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the size characteristics of character recognition domain with the aim of developing a feature selection algorithm adequate for the domain. Based on the results, we further analyze the timing requirements of three popular feature selection algorithms, greedy algorithm, genetic algorithm, and ant colony optimization. For a rigorous timing analysis, we adopt the concept of atomic operation. We propose a novel scheme called selective evaluation to improve convergence of ACO. The scheme cut down the computational load by excluding the evaluation of unnecessary or less promising candidate solutions. The scheme is realizable in ACO due to the valuable information, pheromone trail which helps identify those solutions. Experimental results showed that the ACO with selective evaluation was promising both in timing requirement and recognition performance.

  12. Fuzzy multicriteria disposal method and site selection for municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmekcioglu, Mehmet; Kaya, Tolga; Kahraman, Cengiz

    2010-08-15

    The use of fuzzy multiple criteria analysis (MCA) in solid waste management has the advantage of rendering subjective and implicit decision making more objective and analytical, with its ability to accommodate both quantitative and qualitative data. In this paper a modified fuzzy TOPSIS methodology is proposed for the selection of appropriate disposal method and site for municipal solid waste (MSW). Our method is superior to existing methods since it has capability of representing vague qualitative data and presenting all possible results with different degrees of membership. In the first stage of the proposed methodology, a set of criteria of cost, reliability, feasibility, pollution and emission levels, waste and energy recovery is optimized to determine the best MSW disposal method. Landfilling, composting, conventional incineration, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) combustion are the alternatives considered. The weights of the selection criteria are determined by fuzzy pairwise comparison matrices of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). It is found that RDF combustion is the best disposal method alternative for Istanbul. In the second stage, the same methodology is used to determine the optimum RDF combustion plant location using adjacent land use, climate, road access and cost as the criteria. The results of this study illustrate the importance of the weights on the various factors in deciding the optimized location, with the best site located in Catalca. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted to monitor how sensitive our model is to changes in the various criteria weights.

  13. Validation of the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds.

    PubMed

    Pan, Q; Maeda, N; Manda, Y; Kodama, N; Minagi, S

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the swallowing sound has been used to detect swallowing events non-invasively. A previous study, using an accelerometer, showed that the site over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage was the optimal site for detecting swallowing sounds. However, the optimal site for detection of the swallowing sound using a microphone remains undetermined. To validate the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds. Fourteen healthy subjects (mean age, 27·6 ± 2·2 years; seven male and seven female) participated in this study. Twenty condenser microphones were attached to 20 sites on the left neck surface to detect swallowing sounds. Participants were instructed to swallow five different stimuli three times as follows: Resting saliva, 1 and 5 mL of Japanese tea, and 1 and 5 mL of yoghurt. Mean relative peak intensity was used to indicate the magnitude of the swallowing sound. Sound spectrograms were used to illustrate differences in the properties of swallowing sounds. Mean relative peak intensity number was highest in sites at the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle (site 11) and sites over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage (site 8). Comparison of spectrograms showed a greater density distribution of higher frequency components at site 11 compared with site 8. These results indicate that the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle is the optimal site for the detection of swallowing sounds.

  14. Novel Triazole-Quinoline Derivatives as Selective Dual Binding Site Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mantoani, Susimaire P; Chierrito, Talita P C; Vilela, Adriana F L; Cardoso, Carmen L; Martínez, Ana; Carvalho, Ivone

    2016-02-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Currently, the only strategy for palliative treatment of AD is to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in order to increase the concentration of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. Evidence indicates that AChE also interacts with the β-amyloid (Aβ) protein, acting as a chaperone and increasing the number and neurotoxicity of Aβ fibrils. It is known that AChE has two binding sites: the peripheral site, responsible for the interactions with Aβ, and the catalytic site, related with acetylcholine hydrolysis. In this work, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a library of new tacrine-donepezil hybrids, as a potential dual binding site AChE inhibitor, containing a triazole-quinoline system. The synthesis of hybrids was performed in four steps using the click chemistry strategy. These compounds were evaluated as hAChE and hBChE inhibitors, and some derivatives showed IC50 values in the micro-molar range and were remarkably selective towards hAChE. Kinetic assays and molecular modeling studies confirm that these compounds block both catalytic and peripheral AChE sites. These results are quite interesting since the triazole-quinoline system is a new structural scaffold for AChE inhibitors. Furthermore, the synthetic approach is very efficient for the preparation of target compounds, allowing a further fruitful new chemical library optimization.

  15. Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2000-01-01

    Management of the ground-water resources near Kualapuu on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, is hindered by the uncertainty in the vertical salinity structure in the aquifer. In the State of Hawaii, vertical profiles of ground-water salinity are commonly obtained from deep monitor wells, and these profiles are used to estimate the thicknesses of the freshwater part of the ground-water flow system and the freshwater-saltwater transition zone. Information from a deep monitor well would improve the understanding of the ground-water flow system and the ability to effectively manage the ground-water resources near Kualapuu; however, as of mid-1999 no deep monitor wells had been drilled on the island of Molokai. Selection of an appropriate site for drilling a deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area depends partly on where future ground-water development may occur. Simulations using an areally two-dimensional, steady-state, sharp-interface ground-water flow model previously developed for the island of Molokai, Hawaii, indicate that the southeastern part of the Kualapuu area is a possible area of future ground-water development because (1) withdrawals from this area have a small effect on water levels at existing wells in the Kualapuu area (relative to effects from withdrawals in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex), and (2) model-calculated water levels in this part of the Kualapuu area are high relative to water levels in other parts of the Kualapuu area that are outside of the dike complex. Additional site-selection criteria include (1) ground-water level, (2) ground-surface altitude, (3) land classification, ownership, and accessibility, (4) geology, (5) locations of existing production wells, and (6) historical ground-water quality information. A deep monitor well in the Kualapuu area will likely be most useful for management purposes if it is located (1) in the vicinity of future ground-water development, (2) in an area where water levels

  16. Optimal experiment design for model selection in biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mathematical modeling is often used to formalize hypotheses on how a biochemical network operates by discriminating between competing models. Bayesian model selection offers a way to determine the amount of evidence that data provides to support one model over the other while favoring simple models. In practice, the amount of experimental data is often insufficient to make a clear distinction between competing models. Often one would like to perform a new experiment which would discriminate between competing hypotheses. Results We developed a novel method to perform Optimal Experiment Design to predict which experiments would most effectively allow model selection. A Bayesian approach is applied to infer model parameter distributions. These distributions are sampled and used to simulate from multivariate predictive densities. The method is based on a k-Nearest Neighbor estimate of the Jensen Shannon divergence between the multivariate predictive densities of competing models. Conclusions We show that the method successfully uses predictive differences to enable model selection by applying it to several test cases. Because the design criterion is based on predictive distributions, which can be computed for a wide range of model quantities, the approach is very flexible. The method reveals specific combinations of experiments which improve discriminability even in cases where data is scarce. The proposed approach can be used in conjunction with existing Bayesian methodologies where (approximate) posteriors have been determined, making use of relations that exist within the inferred posteriors. PMID:24555498

  17. Portfolio optimization for seed selection in diverse weather scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Brdar, Sanja; Panić, Marko; Šašić, Isidora; Despotović, Danica; Knežević, Milivoje; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for selection of optimal soybean varieties for the American Midwest using data analytics. We extracted the knowledge about 174 varieties from the dataset, which contained information about weather, soil, yield and regional statistical parameters. Next, we predicted the yield of each variety in each of 6,490 observed subregions of the Midwest. Furthermore, yield was predicted for all the possible weather scenarios approximated by 15 historical weather instances contained in the dataset. Using predicted yields and covariance between varieties through different weather scenarios, we performed portfolio optimisation. In this way, for each subregion, we obtained a selection of varieties, that proved superior to others in terms of the amount and stability of yield. According to the rules of Syngenta Crop Challenge, for which this research was conducted, we aggregated the results across all subregions and selected up to five soybean varieties that should be distributed across the network of seed retailers. The work presented in this paper was the winning solution for Syngenta Crop Challenge 2017. PMID:28863173

  18. Portfolio optimization for seed selection in diverse weather scenarios.

    PubMed

    Marko, Oskar; Brdar, Sanja; Panić, Marko; Šašić, Isidora; Despotović, Danica; Knežević, Milivoje; Crnojević, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for selection of optimal soybean varieties for the American Midwest using data analytics. We extracted the knowledge about 174 varieties from the dataset, which contained information about weather, soil, yield and regional statistical parameters. Next, we predicted the yield of each variety in each of 6,490 observed subregions of the Midwest. Furthermore, yield was predicted for all the possible weather scenarios approximated by 15 historical weather instances contained in the dataset. Using predicted yields and covariance between varieties through different weather scenarios, we performed portfolio optimisation. In this way, for each subregion, we obtained a selection of varieties, that proved superior to others in terms of the amount and stability of yield. According to the rules of Syngenta Crop Challenge, for which this research was conducted, we aggregated the results across all subregions and selected up to five soybean varieties that should be distributed across the network of seed retailers. The work presented in this paper was the winning solution for Syngenta Crop Challenge 2017.

  19. Simulation of the optimal femoral insertion site in medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Oka, Shinya; Matsushita, Takehiko; Kubo, Seiji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Tajimi, Hiroyuki; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2014-10-01

    To develop and validate a new simulation system to predict the optimal femoral insertion site of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) using preprogrammed conditions of graft length change. A computed tomography scan was performed for constructing bone surface models of the patella and the femur. Lateral radiographs of the knee and axial radiographs of the patellofemoral joint at knee flexion were used for constructing a three-dimensional patellofemoral joint model by 3D-2D image matching at each knee flexion angle. To determine the optimal femoral insertion site, the following three conditions were devised: (1) MPFL behaves isometric from 0° to 60°, (2) MPFL is most taut at full extension, and (3) MPFL is slack at more than 60° of knee flexion. Every condition was applied to the femoral bone surface model, and the area that fulfilled all three conditions was defined as the optimal femoral insertion site of MPFL. Twenty knees of ten healthy volunteers were assessed to verify the simulation. Comparison between simulated optimal femoral insertion and anatomical insertion was done. The mean simulated optimal femoral insertion was close to the anatomical insertion site. There were no significant differences in the proximal-distal position and anterior-posterior position between the simulated insertion and the anatomical insertion sites. The system can be useful for predicting the optimal femoral insertion site as a part of a preoperative plan for MPFL reconstruction, and it may help surgeons to determine the optimal femoral insertion site during MPFL reconstruction.

  20. Protein fragment swapping: a method for asymmetric, selective site-directed recombination.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2010-03-01

    This article presents a new approach to site-directed recombination, swapping combinations of selected discontiguous fragments from a source protein in place of corresponding fragments of a target protein. By being both asymmetric (differentiating source and target) and selective (swapping discontiguous fragments), our method focuses experimental effort on a more restricted portion of sequence space, constructing hybrids that are more likely to have the properties that are the objective of the experiment. Furthermore, since the source and target need to be structurally homologous only locally (rather than overall), our method supports swapping fragments from functionally important regions of a source into a target "scaffold" (for example, to humanize an exogenous therapeutic protein). A protein fragment swapping plan is defined by the residue position boundaries of the fragments to be swapped; it is assessed by an average potential score over the resulting hybrid library, with singleton and pairwise terms evaluating the importance and fit of the swapped residues. While we prove that it is NP-hard to choose an optimal set of fragments under such a potential score, we develop an integer programming approach, which we call Swagmer, that works very well in practice. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in three swapping problems: selective recombination between beta-lactamases, activity swapping between glutathione transferases, and activity swapping between carboxylases and mutases in the purE family. We show that the selective recombination approach generates better plan (in terms of resulting potential score) than traditional site-directed recombination approaches. We also show that in all cases the optimized experiments are significantly better than ones that would result from stochastic methods.

  1. Ensemble of Surrogates-based Optimization for Identifying an Optimal Surfactant-enhanced Aquifer Remediation Strategy at Heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W., Sr.; Xin, X.; Luo, J.; Jiang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, M.; Hou, Z.; Ouyang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  2. Ensemble of surrogates-based optimization for identifying an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation strategy at heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhao, Haiqing; Na, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  3. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  4. 40 CFR 228.5 - General criteria for the selection of sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.5 General criteria for the selection of sites. (a) The dumping of materials into the ocean will be permitted only at sites or in areas... ocean dumping sites beyond the edge of the continental shelf and other such sites that have...

  5. Influenza B vaccine lineage selection--an optimized trivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mosterín Höpping, Ana; Fonville, Judith M; Russell, Colin A; James, Sarah; Smith, Derek J

    2016-03-18

    Epidemics of seasonal influenza viruses cause considerable morbidity and mortality each year. Various types and subtypes of influenza circulate in humans and evolve continuously such that individuals at risk of serious complications need to be vaccinated annually to keep protection up to date with circulating viruses. The influenza vaccine in most parts of the world is a trivalent vaccine, including an antigenically representative virus of recently circulating influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1, and influenza B viruses. However, since the 1970s influenza B has split into two antigenically distinct lineages, only one of which is represented in the annual trivalent vaccine at any time. We describe a lineage selection strategy that optimizes protection against influenza B using the standard trivalent vaccine as a potentially cost effective alternative to quadrivalent vaccines.

  6. Selection of an optimal treatment method for acute periodontitis disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Rafik A; Aliyev, B F; Gardashova, Latafat A; Huseynov, Oleg H

    2012-04-01

    The present paper is devoted to selection of an optimal treatment method for acute periodontitis by using fuzzy Choquet integral-based approach. We consider application of different treatment methods depending on development stages and symptoms of the disease. The effectiveness of application of different treatment methods in each stage of the disease is linguistically evaluated by a dentist. The stages of the disease are also linguistically described by a dentist. Dentist's linguistic evaluations are represented by fuzzy sets. The total effectiveness of the each considered treatment method is calculated by using fuzzy Choquet integral with fuzzy number-valued integrand and fuzzy number-valued fuzzy measure. The most effective treatment method is determined by using fuzzy ranking method.

  7. Optimizing Ocean Space: Co-siting Open Ocean Aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, B. L.; Wickliffe, L. C.; Morris, J. A., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    In January of 2016, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service released the Gulf Aquaculture Plan (GAP) to manage the development of environmentally sound and economically sustainable open ocean finfish aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico (inside the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone [EEZ]). The GAP provides the first regulatory framework for aquaculture in federal waters with estimated production of 64 million pounds of finfish, and an estimated economic impact of $264 million annually. The Gulf of Mexico is one of the most industrialized ocean basins in the world, with many existing ocean uses including oil and natural gas production, shipping and commerce, commercial fishing operations, and many protected areas to ensure conservation of valuable ecosystem resources and services. NOAA utilized spatial planning procedures and tools identifying suitable sites for establishing aquaculture through exclusion analyses using authoritative federal and state data housed in a centralized geodatabase. Through a highly collaborative, multi-agency effort a mock permitting exercise was conducted to illustrate the regulatory decision-making process for the Gulf. Further decision-making occurred through exploring co-siting opportunities with oil and natural gas platforms. Logistical co-siting was conducted to reduce overall operational costs by looking at distance to major port and commodity tonnage at each port. Importantly, the process of co-siting allows aquaculture to be coupled with other benefits, including the availability of previously established infrastructure and the reduction of environmental impacts.

  8. Optimizing Curriculum Planning in Site-Based Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Examines why curriculum planning falls short in site-based management and what can be done about it. Alternative curriculum-planning strategies include holistic planning, construction of thematic units to suit students' individual differences, and a multifaceted, cross-functional approach. Adapting corporate innovations and pursuing strategic…

  9. The Use of Collective Dose for Optimization of a Low-Level Waste Site Closure Cover

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2010-03-07

    Low-level radioactive waste management regulations require that releases to the environment be as low as reasonably achievable. Collective dose’s use in quantitative cost benefit analysis is well accepted for optimization of operational radiation safety, but seldom applied to routine environmental releases. One concern is that collective dose for large areas and long time periods may obscure the spatial and temporal distribution of risk and the magnitude of individual doses. Use of collective dose for optimization also requires that the decision maker justify subjective inputs including truncation limits for the summation of collective dose in space and time, a monetary value for collective dose, and a discount rate for future health detriment. In this study, a probabilistic collective dose model is developed and used to optimize the closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. Collective dose’s shortcomings are addressed by preparing a dose matrix that disaggregates the collective dose in space and time and by reporting individual doses for exposed subgroups. Important subjective inputs are assigned discrete values reflecting differing opinions, and the consequence of the differences on the final decision is described. The resulting optimization process remains subjective, but clearly identifies subjective inputs, the values selected, and their impact on the decision. For the Area 5 RWMS, the value of the collective dose is small compared to closure cover cost options over a broad range of subjective values for the spatial and temporal limits for truncation of collective dose, monetary value of collective dose, and discount rates for future dose. The collective dose matrix and individual doses indicate that the societal and individual risks are greatest for future residents within the disposal site boundary, suggesting that options deterring intrusion have the greatest potential for cost-effectiveness. The cost of

  10. Site location optimization of regional air quality monitoring network in China: methodology and case study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Liu, Panwei; Zhong, Liuju; Lai, Senchao

    2011-11-01

    Regional air quality monitoring networks (RAQMN) are urgently needed in China due to increasing regional air pollution in city clusters, arising from rapid economic development in recent decades. This paper proposes a methodological framework for site location optimization in designing a RAQMN adapting to air quality management practice in China. The framework utilizes synthetic assessment concentrations developed from simulated data from a regional air quality model in order to simplify the optimal process and to reduce costs. On the basis of analyzing various constraints such as cost and budget, terrain conditions, administrative district, population density and spatial coverage, the framework takes the maximum approximate degree as an optimization objective to achieve site location optimization of a RAQMN. An expert judgment approach was incorporated into the framework to help adjust initial optimization results in order to make the network more practical and representative. A case study was used to demonstrate the application of the framework, indicating that it is feasible to conduct site optimization for a RAQMN design in China. The effects of different combinations of primary and secondary pollutants on site location optimization were investigated. It is suggested that the network design considering both primary and secondary pollutants could better represent regional pollution characteristics and more extensively reflect temporal and spatial variations of regional air quality. The work shown in this study can be used as a reference to guide site location optimization of a RAQMN design in China or other regions of the world.

  11. Optimized bioregenerative space diet selection with crew choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicens, Carrie; Wang, Carolyn; Olabi, Ammar; Jackson, Peter; Hunter, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies on optimization of crew diets have not accounted for choice. A diet selection model with crew choice was developed. Scenario analyses were conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of certain crew preferences, such as preferences for numerous-desserts, high-salt, and high-acceptability foods. For comparison purposes, a no-choice and a random-choice scenario were considered. The model was found to be feasible in terms of food variety and overall costs. The numerous-desserts, high-acceptability, and random-choice scenarios all resulted in feasible solutions costing between 13.2 and 17.3 kg ESM/person-day. Only the high-sodium scenario yielded an infeasible solution. This occurred when the foods highest in salt content were selected for the crew-choice portion of the diet. This infeasibility can be avoided by limiting the total sodium content in the crew-choice portion of the diet. Cost savings were found by reducing food variety in scenarios where the preference bias strongly affected nutritional content.

  12. Optimized bioregenerative space diet selection with crew choice.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Carrie; Wang, Carolyn; Olabi, Ammar; Jackson, Peter; Hunter, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies on optimization of crew diets have not accounted for choice. A diet selection model with crew choice was developed. Scenario analyses were conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of certain crew preferences, such as preferences for numerous-desserts, high-salt, and high-acceptability foods. For comparison purposes, a no-choice and a random-choice scenario were considered. The model was found to be feasible in terms of food variety and overall costs. The numerous-desserts, high-acceptability, and random-choice scenarios all resulted in feasible solutions costing between 13.2 and 17.3 kg ESM/person-day. Only the high-sodium scenario yielded an infeasible solution. This occurred when the foods highest in salt content were selected for the crew-choice portion of the diet. This infeasibility can be avoided by limiting the total sodium content in the crew-choice portion of the diet. Cost savings were found by reducing food variety in scenarios where the preference bias strongly affected nutritional content.

  13. Optimization of killer assays for yeast selection protocols.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C A; Sangorrín, M P

    2010-01-01

    A new optimized semiquantitative yeast killer assay is reported for the first time. The killer activity of 36 yeast isolates belonging to three species, namely, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Wickerhamomyces anomala and Torulaspora delbrueckii, was tested with a view to potentially using these yeasts as biocontrol agents against the wine spoilage species Pichia guilliermondii and Pichia membranifaciens. The effectiveness of the classical streak-based (qualitative method) and the new semiquantitative techniques was compared. The percentage of yeasts showing killer activity was found to be higher by the semiquantitative technique (60%) than by the qualitative method (45%). In all cases, the addition of 1% NaCl into the medium allowed a better observation of the killer phenomenon. Important differences were observed in the killer capacity of different isolates belonging to a same killer species. The broadest spectrum of action was detected in isolates of W. anomala NPCC 1023 and 1025, and M. pulcherrima NPCC 1009 and 1013. We also brought experimental evidence supporting the importance of the adequate selection of the sensitive isolate to be used in killer evaluation. The new semiquantitative method proposed in this work enables to visualize the relationship between the number of yeasts tested and the growth of the inhibition halo (specific productivity). Hence, this experimental approach could become an interesting tool to be taken into account for killer yeast selection protocols.

  14. Optimized bioregenerative space diet selection with crew choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicens, Carrie; Wang, Carolyn; Olabi, Ammar; Jackson, Peter; Hunter, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies on optimization of crew diets have not accounted for choice. A diet selection model with crew choice was developed. Scenario analyses were conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of certain crew preferences, such as preferences for numerous-desserts, high-salt, and high-acceptability foods. For comparison purposes, a no-choice and a random-choice scenario were considered. The model was found to be feasible in terms of food variety and overall costs. The numerous-desserts, high-acceptability, and random-choice scenarios all resulted in feasible solutions costing between 13.2 and 17.3 kg ESM/person-day. Only the high-sodium scenario yielded an infeasible solution. This occurred when the foods highest in salt content were selected for the crew-choice portion of the diet. This infeasibility can be avoided by limiting the total sodium content in the crew-choice portion of the diet. Cost savings were found by reducing food variety in scenarios where the preference bias strongly affected nutritional content.

  15. Autonomous site selection and instrument positioning for sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A.; Barnes, D.; Pugh, S.

    The European Space Agency Aurora Exploration Program aims to establish a European long-term programme for the exploration of Space, culminating in a human mission to space in the 2030 timeframe. Two flagship missions, namely Mars Sample Return and ExoMars, have been proposed as recognised steps along the way. The Exomars Rover is the first of these flagship missions and includes a rover carrying the Pasteur Payload, a mobile exobiology instrumentation package, and the Beagle 2 arm. The primary objective is the search for evidence of past or present life on mars, but the payload will also study the evolution of the planet and the atmosphere, look for evidence of seismological activity and survey the environment in preparation for future missions. The operation of rovers in unknown environments is complicated, and requires large resources not only on the planet but also in ground based operations. Currently, this can be very labour intensive, and costly, if large teams of scientists and engineers are required to assess mission progress, plan mission scenarios, and construct a sequence of events or goals for uplink. Furthermore, the constraints in communication imposed by the time delay involved over such large distances, and line-of-sight required, make autonomy paramount to mission success, affording the ability to operate in the event of communications outages and be opportunistic with respect to scientific discovery. As part of this drive to reduce mission costs and increase autonomy the Space Robotics group at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth is researching methods of autonomous site selection and instrument positioning, directly applicable to the ExoMars mission. The site selection technique used builds on the geometric reasoning algorithms used previously for localisation and navigation [Shaw 03]. It is proposed that a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local surface, generated during traverse and without interaction from ground based operators, can be

  16. Coordination chemistry of phosphinocarbynes: phosphorus vs. carbyne site selectivity.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, Annie L; Hill, Anthony F

    2017-03-13

    The phosphinocarbyne complex [W([triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2)(CO)2(Tp*)] (1: Tp* = hydrotris(dimethylpyrazolyl)borate) coordinates transition metal fragments via the phosphine to form bimetallic species [W{[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2RhCl2(Cp*)}(CO)2(Tp*)] (2) and [W([triple bond, length as m-dash]CPPh2AuCl)(CO)2(Tp*)] (3). Appropriately tailored sterics allow for complexation of a second equivalent of AuCl to afford the trimetallic complex [W{η(2)-C(AuCl)PPh2AuCl}(CO)2(Tp*)] (4), containing an Au-W-C dimetallacyclopropene connectivity. Similarly, AuCl binds to the carbyne linkage in [W{[triple bond, length as m-dash]CP([double bond, length as m-dash]S)Ph2}(CO)2(Tp*)], yielding [W{η(2)-C(AuCl)P([double bond, length as m-dash]S)Ph2}(CO)2(Tp*)] (5). In the case of auration of the ditungsten species [W2(μ-C2PPh)(CO)4(Tp*)2] (6), variation in the stoichiometry leads to trimetallic [W2(μ-C2PPhAuCl)(CO)4(Tp*)2] (7) and pentametallic [W2{μ-(η(2)-CAuCl)2PPhAuCl}(CO)4(Tp*)2] (8) complexes, via a proposed tetrametallic intermediate [W2{μ-(η(2)-CAuCl)2PPh}(CO)4(Tp*)2], the site selectivity being dictated by aurophilic interactions.

  17. Optimization Review Report: Saunders Supply Company Superfund Site Suffolk County, Virginia, EPA Region 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is a 7-1/3 acre former wood treating plant. The source areas included wastewater ponds, treatment areas, and burn pits. This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the optimization review team.

  18. [Hyperspectral remote sensing image classification based on SVM optimized by clonal selection].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Jing, Lin-Hai; Wang, Meng-Fei; Lin, Qi-Zhong

    2013-03-01

    Model selection for support vector machine (SVM) involving kernel and the margin parameter values selection is usually time-consuming, impacts training efficiency of SVM model and final classification accuracies of SVM hyperspectral remote sensing image classifier greatly. Firstly, based on combinatorial optimization theory and cross-validation method, artificial immune clonal selection algorithm is introduced to the optimal selection of SVM (CSSVM) kernel parameter a and margin parameter C to improve the training efficiency of SVM model. Then an experiment of classifying AVIRIS in India Pine site of USA was performed for testing the novel CSSVM, as well as a traditional SVM classifier with general Grid Searching cross-validation method (GSSVM) for comparison. And then, evaluation indexes including SVM model training time, classification overall accuracy (OA) and Kappa index of both CSSVM and GSSVM were all analyzed quantitatively. It is demonstrated that OA of CSSVM on test samples and whole image are 85.1% and 81.58, the differences from that of GSSVM are both within 0.08% respectively; And Kappa indexes reach 0.8213 and 0.7728, the differences from that of GSSVM are both within 0.001; While the ratio of model training time of CSSVM and GSSVM is between 1/6 and 1/10. Therefore, CSSVM is fast and accurate algorithm for hyperspectral image classification and is superior to GSSVM.

  19. The effect of fluctuating selection on the genealogy at a linked site.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jesse E

    2013-08-01

    The genealogical consequences of temporally fluctuating selection at linked neutrally-evolving sites are studied using coalescent processes structured by genetic backgrounds. Surprisingly, although between-generation fluctuating selection and within-generation fecundity variance polymorphism lead to indistinguishable allele frequency dynamics at the selected site, I show that these two scenarios affect the genealogical structure of the population in distinctive ways. Whereas coalescence times are elevated at the selected site when heterozygotes have lower within-generation fecundity variance than either homozygote, fluctuating selection typically depresses the depth of the genealogy at tightly-linked sites. More importantly, these results indicate that fluctuating selection will have a characteristic signature combining an excess of selected variation at the affected site and a slight reduction in neutral variation at tightly linked sites. This observation suggests that it may be possible to distinguish balanced polymorphisms maintained by environmental variation from those maintained by heterozygote advantage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 40 CFR 228.5 - General criteria for the selection of sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.5 General criteria for the selection of sites. (a) The dumping of materials into the ocean will be permitted only at sites or in areas selected to minimize the interference of disposal activities with other activities in the...

  1. OSU TOMF Program Site Selection and Preliminary Concept Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spadling, Steve

    2012-05-10

    The purpose of this report is to confirm the programmatic requirements for the new facilities, identify the most appropriate project site, and develop preliminary site and building concepts that successfully address the overall project goals and site issues. These new facilities will be designed to accommodate the staff, drivers and maintenance requirements for the future mixed fleet of passenger vehicles, Transit Style Buses and School Buses.

  2. Final Report: Pilot Region-Based Optimization Program for Fund-Lead Sites, EPA Region III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes a pilot study for a Region-based optimization program, implemented by a Regional Optimization Evaluation Team (ROET) that was conducted in U.S. EPA Region III at Fund-lead sites with pump-and-treat (P&T) systems.

  3. Estimates of External Validity Bias When Impact Evaluations Select Sites Nonrandomly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen H.; Olsen, Robert B.; Orr, Larry L.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluations of educational programs or interventions are typically conducted in nonrandomly selected samples of schools or districts. Recent research has shown that nonrandom site selection can yield biased impact estimates. To estimate the external validity bias from nonrandom site selection, we combine lists of school districts that were…

  4. Estimates of External Validity Bias When Impact Evaluations Select Sites Nonrandomly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen H.; Olsen, Robert B.; Orr, Larry L.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluations of educational programs or interventions are typically conducted in nonrandomly selected samples of schools or districts. Recent research has shown that nonrandom site selection can yield biased impact estimates. To estimate the external validity bias from nonrandom site selection, we combine lists of school districts that were…

  5. Site-selective hydrolysis of tRNA by lanthanide metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Nobuhiro ); Takeda, Naoya; Yashiro, Morio; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Komiyama, Makoto ); Shiiba, Tetsuro )

    1993-12-22

    tRNA[sup Phe] is site-selectively hydrolyzed by lanthanide metal complexes (Ce(III), Eu(III), La(III)) of hexaimine macrocyclic ligands. The selectivities of the complexes are much higher than those of the metal ions and are strongly dependent on the ligand structure. The tertiary structure of tRNA is essential for the site-selective scission.

  6. Highly selective Lewis acid sites in desilicated MFI zeolites for dihydroxyacetone isomerization to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Dapsens, Pierre Y; Mondelli, Cecilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2013-05-01

    Desilication of commercial MFI-type (ZSM-5) zeolites in solutions of alkali metal hydroxides is demonstrated to generate highly selective heterogeneous catalysts for the aqueous-phase isomerization of biobased dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to lactic acid (LA). The best hierarchical ZSM-5 sample attains a LA selectivity exceeding 90 %, which is comparable to that of the state-of-the-art catalyst (i.e., the Sn-beta zeolite); this optimized hierarchical catalyst is recyclable over three runs. The Lewis acid sites, which are created through desilication along with the introduction of mesoporosity, are shown to play a crucial role in the formation of the desired product; these cannot be achieved by using other post-synthetic methods, such as steaming or impregnation of aluminum species. Desilication of other metallosilicates, such as Ga-MFI, also leads to high LA selectivity. In the presence of a soluble aluminum source, such as aluminum nitrate, alkaline-assisted alumination can introduce these unique Lewis acid centers in all-silica MFI zeolites. These findings highlight the potential of zeolites in the field of biomass-to-chemical conversion, and expand the applicability of desilication for the generation of selective catalytic centers.

  7. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-02-12

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology.

  8. Determination of ecologically vital groundwaters at selected sites in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vinikour, W.S.; Yin, S.C.L.

    1989-08-01

    The US Department of Energy is classifying groundwaters at sites in its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Of particular concern is the potential presence of groundwaters that are highly vulnerable to contamination and that are either (1) irreplaceable sources of drinking water or (2) ecologically vital. Conditions at nine FUSRAP sites were evaluated to determine if ecologically vital groundwaters are present. The sites evaluated were Wayne Interim Storage Site, Maywood Interim Storage Site, and Middlesex Sampling Plant in New Jersey; Ashland 2 Site, Seaway Industrial Park, Colonie Interim storage Site, and Niagara Falls Storage Site in New York; and the St. Louis Airport Site and Hazelwood Interim Storage Site in Missouri. The analyses indicated that groundwaters are vulnerable to contamination at all but two of the sites -- the Ashland 2 and Seaway Industrial Park sites in New York. Groundwater discharge points were identified within a 2-mile radius (i.e., the classification review area) of all of the sites. No ecologically vital groundwater areas exist in the vicinities of any of the nine FUSRAP sites evaluated. 35 refs., 17 figs.

  9. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 228.6 Section 228.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.6 Specific criteria for site... area, including prevailing current direction and velocity, if any; (7) Existence and effects of...

  10. Feasibility of growing olives on selected sites along coastal Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five sites along the Texas coastline (Seadrift, Galveston, Brazoria, Santa Fe, and Orange) were evaluated for feasibility of growing olives in these areas. In addition, two non-coastal sites (Carrizo Springs and Weslaco) were also included in the study for comparative purposes. Flowering and fruit ...

  11. 40 CFR 228.6 - Specific criteria for site selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of special scientific importance and other legitimate uses of the ocean; (9) The existing water quality and ecology of the site as determined by available data or by trend assessment or baseline surveys... importance. (b) The results of a disposal site evaluation and/or designation study based on the criteria...

  12. Streamflow and basin characteristics at selected sites in Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, N.B.; Ruhl, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Common basin and streamflow characteristics for sites in Kentucky are presented. Basin characteristics include quantified drainage basin parameters and statistics on areal rainfall. Streamflow characteristics include tables for mean, high and low flow frequencies and partial duration discharge. The data listed in this report are for continuous and low-flow partial-record sites. (USGS)

  13. Antibiotic selectivity for prokaryotic vs. eukaryotic decoding sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Dix, Andrew V; Tor, Yitzhak

    2010-08-14

    A FRET assembly reports antibiotic affinities to two different RNA targets. A binder was labeled with a fluorophore that acts both as an acceptor for the emissive nucleoside on the bacterial A-site and a donor fluorophore for the terminally-labeled human A-site. Unlabeled drugs were used to dissociate the labeled antibiotic.

  14. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Manthorne, David J.; Clow, David W.; Handran, Heather M.; Winterringer, Jesse A.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2004-01-01

    During spring 2002, the chemical composition of annual snowpacks in the Rocky Mountain region of the Western United States was analyzed. Snow samples were collected at 75 geographically distributed sites extending from New Mexico to Montana. Near the end of the 2002 snowfall season, the snow-water equivalent (SWE) in annual snowpacks sampled generally was below average in most of the region. Regional patterns in the concentrations of major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), mercury, and stable sulfur isotope ratios are presented. The 2002 snowpack chemistry in the region differed from the previous year. Snowpack ammonium concentrations were higher at 66 percent of sites in Montana compared to concentrations in the 2001 snowpack but were lower at 74 percent of sites in Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Nitrate was lower at all Montana sites and lower at all but one Wyoming site; nitrate was higher at all but two Colorado sites and higher at all New Mexico sites. Sulfate was lower across the region at 77 percent of sites. The range of mercury concentrations for the region was similar to those of 2001 but showed more variability than ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Concentrations of stable sulfur isotope ratios exhibited a strong regional pattern with values increasing northward from southern Colorado to northern Colorado and Wyoming.

  15. Selecting landing sites for the 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, John A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Parker, Timothy J.; Crisp, Joy A.; Squyres, Steven W.; Weitz, Catherine M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-plus year process of identifying and evaluating landing sites for the NASA 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers began with definition of mission science objectives, preliminary engineering requirements, and identification of ˜155 potential sites in near-equator locations (these included multiple ellipses for locations accessible by both rovers). Four open workshops were used together with ongoing engineering evaluations to narrow the list of sites to four: Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater were ranked highest for science, with southern Isidis Basin and a "wind safe" site in Elysium following in order. Based on exhaustive community assessment, these sites comprise the best-studied locales on Mars and should possess attributes enabling mission success.

  16. The genealogy of sequences containing multiple sites subject to strong selection in a subdivided population.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, Magnus; Innan, Hideki

    2003-03-01

    A stochastic model for the genealogy of a sample of recombining sequences containing one or more sites subject to selection in a subdivided population is described. Selection is incorporated by dividing the population into allelic classes and then conditioning on the past sizes of these classes. The past allele frequencies at the selected sites are thus treated as parameters rather than as random variables. The purpose of the model is not to investigate the dynamics of selection, but to investigate effects of linkage to the selected sites on the genealogy of the surrounding chromosomal region. This approach is useful for modeling strong selection, when it is natural to parameterize the past allele frequencies at the selected sites. Several models of strong balancing selection are used as examples, and the effects on the pattern of neutral polymorphism in the chromosomal region are discussed. We focus in particular on the statistical power to detect balancing selection when it is present.

  17. 40 CFR 228.5 - General criteria for the selection of sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sites. 228.5 Section 228.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.5 General criteria for the selection of sites. (a) The dumping of materials into the ocean will be permitted only at sites or in areas...

  18. 40 CFR 228.5 - General criteria for the selection of sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sites. 228.5 Section 228.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.5 General criteria for the selection of sites. (a) The dumping of materials into the ocean will be permitted only at sites or in areas...

  19. Regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection in Malaysia-a review.

    PubMed

    Basri, N A; Hashim, S; Ramli, A T; Bradley, D A; Hamzah, K

    2016-12-01

    Malaysia has initiated a range of pre-project activities in preparation for its planned nuclear power programme. Clearly one of the first steps is the selection of sites that are deemed suitable for the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Here we outline the Malaysian regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection, emphasizing details of the selection procedures and site characteristics needed, with a clear focus on radiation safety and radiation protection in respect of the site surroundings. The Malaysia Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) site selection guidelines are in accord with those provided in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents. To enhance the suitability criteria during selection, as well as to assist in the final decision making process, possible assessments using the site selection characteristics and information are proposed.

  20. Selective optimization with compensation (SOC) competencies in depression.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Marcus; Dammermann, Claudia; Stoppe, Gabriela

    2011-09-01

    The metamodel of selective optimization with compensation (SOC) aims to integrate scientific knowledge about the nature of development and aging with a focus on successful adaptation. For the first time the present study examines how SOC competencies and depressive symptoms are associated. In particular, potential state or trait effects of SOC competencies are considered. Fifty-three patients (31 women and 22 men), aged 21 to 73 years, suffering from depression, were interviewed twice during inpatient treatment, first on admission to hospital and later during remission or on discharge, to assess the severity of depression and differences in the SOC competencies using standardized scales. For comparison purpose, data from a population based survey in Germany were used. The SOC scores in the first interview were significantly lower than those of the comparison collective (p<0.0001), but in remission there was no significant difference left. Younger and older patients showed no significant difference in their SOC competencies, neither regarding the severity of depressive symptoms on admission to the hospital, nor during remission. These findings support the hypothesis that the SOC ability is dynamic and mood dependent (state effect). Otherwise, there is no hint of life-long reduced SOC competencies or a trait effect which would be associated with an increased vulnerability to the development of a depressive disorder. Regarding the high prevalence of depression especially in the elderly and physically ill patients, (gerontological) studies on SOC competencies should take depression into account. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Making the optimal decision in selecting protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J. Mark

    2007-07-01

    Protective Clothing plays a major role in the decommissioning and operation of nuclear facilities. Literally thousands of employee dress-outs occur over the life of a decommissioning project and during outages at operational plants. In order to make the optimal decision on which type of protective clothing is best suited for the decommissioning or maintenance and repair work on radioactive systems, a number of interrelating factors must be considered, including - Protection; - Personnel Contamination; - Cost; - Radwaste; - Comfort; - Convenience; - Logistics/Rad Material Considerations; - Reject Rate of Laundered Clothing; - Durability; - Security; - Personnel Safety including Heat Stress; - Disposition of Gloves and Booties. In addition, over the last several years there has been a trend of nuclear power plants either running trials or switching to Single Use Protective Clothing (SUPC) from traditional protective clothing. In some cases, after trial usage of SUPC, plants have chosen not to switch. In other cases after switching to SUPC for a period of time, some plants have chosen to switch back to laundering. Based on these observations, this paper reviews the 'real' drivers, issues, and interrelating factors regarding the selection and use of protective clothing throughout the nuclear industry. (authors)

  2. 75 FR 39437 - Optimizing the Security of Biological Select Agents and Toxins in the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Executive Order 13546--Optimizing the Security of Biological Select Agents and Toxins in the United States... July 2, 2010 Optimizing the Security of Biological Select Agents and Toxins in the United States By the... and productive scientific enterprise that utilizes biological select agents and toxins (BSAT)...

  3. Tritium activities in selected wells on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, B.F.

    1993-05-01

    Literature and data were reviewed related to radionuclides in groundwater on and near the Nevada Test Site. No elevated tritium activities have been reported outside of the major testing regions of the Nevada Test Site. Three wells were identified as having water with above-background (>50 pCi/l) tritium activities: UE-15d Water Well; USGS Water Well A; and USGS Test Well B Ex. Although none of these wells have tritium activities greater than the Nevada State Drinking Water standard (20,000 pCi/l), their time-series tritium trends may be indicative to potential on-site radionuclide migration.

  4. Optimal site for throat culture: tonsillar surface versus posterior pharyngeal wall.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, E L; Sanders, E A M; Videler, W J M; van Staaij, B K; van Benthem, P P G; Schilder, A G M

    2006-08-01

    To determine the optimal site of throat culture for the detection of potential pathogens by comparing culture results from the tonsillar surface and the posterior pharyngeal wall in children selected for adenotonsillectomy and in children without upper respiratory disease. Cotton culture swabs were taken from the tonsillar surface and the posterior pharyngeal wall of 50 children selected for adenotonsillectomy for symptoms of recurrent tonsillitis and/or adenotonsillar hypertrophy and of 50 children without upper respiratory disease. Potential respiratory pathogens were identified. In the overall group (n = 100), positive culture results were found in 67 posterior pharyngeal wall samples and 47 tonsillar surface samples (P = 0.001). Haemophilus influenzae was the most frequently isolated micro-organism both in the posterior pharyngeal wall and the tonsillar surface samples; 55 and 35%, respectively (P = 0.001). Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci were found in the samples of the posterior pharyngeal wall and the tonsillar surface in 17 and 13%, respectively (P = 0.2). When dealing with patients with sore throat, sampling both tonsillar surfaces is enough for the detection of group A beta-haemolytic streptococci. When detection of other bacteria is also important, such as for research purposes, the posterior pharyngeal wall should be sampled as well.

  5. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 9: selection of transplant sites and habitat characterization. [Conradilla caelata

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.J.; Heuer, J.H.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the selection process and the composite analysis of 15 short reaches of free flowing streams in which the physical, limnological, botanical, and zoological components were examined. The purpose was to identify combinations of environmental conditions which occur in the study areas that support populations of Cumberlandian freshwater mussels and to select transplant sites which could support populations of selected Cumberlandian mussel species, especially Conradilla caelata, once they were (re)introduced. This report is divided into three major sections (selection of study reaches, selection of transplant sites, and habitat characterization) two of which appear to fall in reverse order. Chronologically, transplant sites for the birdwing pearly mussel, Conradilla caelata, were selected before the characterization of mussel habitat could be completed. Since the transplants were made based upon the comparison of sites presented in that analysis, the site selection description was retained in an unmodified state.

  6. Optimal-adaptive filters for modelling spectral shape, site amplification, and source scaling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal

    1989-01-01

    This paper introduces some applications of optimal filtering techniques to earthquake engineering by using the so-called ARMAX models. Three applications are presented: (a) spectral modelling of ground accelerations, (b) site amplification (i.e., the relationship between two records obtained at different sites during an earthquake), and (c) source scaling (i.e., the relationship between two records obtained at a site during two different earthquakes). A numerical example for each application is presented by using recorded ground motions. The results show that the optimal filtering techniques provide elegant solutions to above problems, and can be a useful tool in earthquake engineering.

  7. Site-specific PEGylation of therapeutic proteins via optimization of both accessible reactive amino acid residues and PEG derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-lan; Yuan, Yong-hua; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Modification of accessible amino acid residues with poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] is a widely used technique for formulating therapeutic proteins. In practice, site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible nonessential reactive residues of therapeutic proteins with common activated PEG derivatives is a promising strategy to concomitantly improve pharmacokinetics, allow retention of activity, alleviate immunogenicity, and avoid modification isomers. Specifically, through molecular engineering of a therapeutic protein, accessible essential residues reactive to an activated PEG derivative are substituted with unreactive residues provided that protein activity is retained, and a limited number of accessible nonessential reactive residues with optimized distributions are selected/introduced. Subsequently, all accessible nonessential reactive residues are completely PEGylated with the activated PEG derivative in great excess. Branched PEG derivatives containing new PEG chains with negligible metabolic toxicity are more desirable for site-specific PEGylation. Accordingly, for the successful formulation of therapeutic proteins, optimization of the number and distributions of accessible nonessential reactive residues via molecular engineering can be integrated with the design of large-sized PEG derivatives to achieve site-specific PEGylation of all selected/engineered accessible reactive residues.

  8. Kin, daytime associations, or preferred sleeping sites? Factors influencing sleep site selection in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Lock, Louise C; Anderson, James R

    2013-01-01

    Chimpanzee nesting behaviours and the factors that may influence these behaviours are rarely studied in captive settings. In the present study, the daytime associations, sleeping site selections and nesting groups of 11 zoo-housed chimpanzees over a 29-day period were analysed. Neither daytime associations nor presence of kin influenced sleeping site selection in females. Daytime associations did influence sleeping arrangements in males. Nighttime spatial arrangements and individual preferences for specific sleeping areas were broadly comparable to nesting patterns reported in free-living chimpanzee communities. In the interests of captive ape welfare, we conclude that exhibits should incorporate multilevel nesting areas and a choice of several potential sleeping sites.

  9. Optimal Estimation of the Average Areal Rainfall and Optimal Selection of Rain Gauge Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, G.; Lorent, B.; Duqué, C.; Gevers, M.

    1984-04-01

    We propose a simple procedure for the real-time estimation of the average rainfall over a catchment area. The rainfall is modeled as a two-dimensional random field. The average areal rainfall is computed by a linear unbiased minimum variance estimation method (kriging) which requires knowledge of the variogram of the random field. We propose a time-varying estimator for the variogram which takes into account the influences of both the seasonal variations and the rainfall intensity. Our average areal rainfall estimator has been implemented in practice. We illustrate its application to real data in two river basins in Belgium. Finally, it is shown how the method can be used for the optimal selection of the rain gauge locations in a basin.

  10. Site-selective imination of an anthracenone sensor: selective fluorescence detection of barium(II).

    PubMed

    Basa, Prem N; Bhowmick, Arundhati; Schulz, Mariah M; Sykes, Andrew G

    2011-10-07

    Site-selective imination of anthraquinone-based macrocyclic crown ethers using titanium tetrachloride as the catalyst yields imines where only the external carbonyl group of the anthraquinone forms Schiff-bases. The following aromatic amines yield monomeric compounds (aniline, 4-nitroaniline, 4-pyrrolaniline, and 1,3-phenylenediamine). Reaction of 2 equiv of the macrocyclic anthraquinone host with 1,2- and 1,4-phenylenediamine yields dimeric imine compounds. The 1,2-diimino host acts as a luminescence sensor, exhibiting enhanced selectivity for Ba(II) ion. Spectroscopic data indicate that two barium ions coordinate to the sensor. Due to E/Z isomerization of the imine, the monomeric complexes are nonluminescent. Restricted rotation about the 1,2 oriented C═N groups or other noncovalent/coordinate-covalent interactions acting between neighboring crown ether rings may inhibit E/Z isomerization in this example, which is different from current examples that employ coordination of a metal cation with a chelating imine nitrogen atom to suppress E/Z isomerization and activate luminescence. The 1,4-diimino adduct, where the crown rings remain widely separated, remains nonluminescent.

  11. Attachment site selection of ticks on roe deer, Capreolus capreolus.

    PubMed

    Kiffner, C; Lödige, C; Alings, M; Vor, T; Rühe, F

    2011-01-01

    The spatio-temporal attachment site patterns of ticks feeding on their hosts can be of significance if co-feeding transmission (i.e. from tick to tick without a systemic infection of the host) of pathogens affects the persistence of a given disease. Using tick infestation data on roe deer, we analysed preferred attachment sites and niche width of Ixodes ticks (larvae, nymphs, males, females) and investigated the degree of inter- and intrastadial aggregation. The different development stages showed rather consistent attachment site patterns and relative narrow feeding site niches. Larvae were mostly found on the head and on the front legs of roe deer, nymphs reached highest densities on the head and highest adult densities were found on the neck of roe deer. The tick stages feeding (larvae, nymphs, females) on roe deer showed high degrees of intrastadial spatial aggregation, whereas males did not. Male ticks showed large feeding site overlap with female ticks. Feeding site overlap between larval-female and larval-nymphal ticks did occur especially during the months May-August on the head and front legs of roe deer and might allow pathogen transmission via co-feeding. Tick density, niche width and niche overlap on roe deer are mainly affected by seasonality, reflecting seasonal activity and abundance patterns of ticks. Since different tick development stages occur spatially and temporally clustered on roe deer, transmission experiments of tick-borne pathogens are urgently needed.

  12. Site Selection for Mars Surveyor Landing Sites: Some Key Factors for 2001 and Relation to Long-Term Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James W.

    1999-01-01

    The Site Selection Process: Site selection as a process can be subdivided into several main elements and these can be represented as the corners of a tetrahedron. Successful site selection outcome requires the interactions between these elements or corners, and should also take into account several other external factors or considerations. In principle, elements should be defined in approximately the following order: (1) major scientific and programmatic goals and objectives: What are the major questions that are being asked, goals that should be achieved, and objectives that must be accomplished. Do programmatic goals (e.g., sample return) differ from mission goals (e.g., precursor to sample return)? It is most helpful if these questions can be placed in the context of site characterization and hypothesis testing (e.g., Was Mars warm and wet in the Noachian? Land at a Noachian-aged site that shows evidence of surface water and characterize it specifically to address this question). Goals and objectives, then, help define important engineering factors such as type of payload, landing regions of interest (highlands, lowlands, smooth, rough, etc.), mobility, mission duration, etc. Goals and objectives then lead to: (2) spacecraft design and engineering landing site constraints: the spacecraft is designed to optimize the areas that will meet the goals and objectives, but this in turn introduces constraints that must be met in the selection of a landing site. Scientific and programmatic goals and objectives also help to define (3), the specific lander scientific payload requirements and capabilities. For example, what observations and experiments are required to address the major questions? How do we characterize the site in reference to the specific questions? Is mobility required and if so, how much? Which experiments are on the spacecraft, which on the rover? The results of these deliberations should lead to a surface exploration strategy, in which the goals and

  13. A Simple Method for Improving Torsion Optimization of Ligand Molecules in Receptor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Che, Jianwei

    2005-07-01

    A simple but effective method is introduced for optimizing ligand molecules in torsion space within receptor binding sites. The algorithm makes use of geometric constraints of ligand molecules to search for energetically favorable conformations. It is applied to a conjugate gradient (CG) method as an example. During conformational energy optimization, new line search directions are modified according to the spatial span of rotational groups in ligand molecules. Significant improvements were observed in terms of the abilities both to recover global optimal structures and to obtain lower energy ensembles. This simple algorithm allows rapid implementation and can be incorporated into other conformational energy optimization techniques.

  14. A Technical Guide to Ground-Water Model Selection at Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report addresses the selection of ground-water flow and contaminant transport models and is intended to be used by hydrogeologists and geoscientists responsible for selecting transport models for use at sites containing radioactive materials.

  15. Selection of Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring Sites based on Geographic Parameters Extraction of GIS and Fuzzy Matter-Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfa; Peng, Dahao; Ma, Jianhao; Zhao, Li; Sun, Ce; Ling, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    To effectively monitor the atmospheric quality of small-scale areas, it is necessary to optimize the locations of the monitoring sites. This study combined geographic parameters extraction by GIS with fuzzy matter-element analysis. Geographic coordinates were extracted by GIS and transformed into rectangular coordinates. These coordinates were input into the Gaussian plume model to calculate the pollutant concentration at each site. Fuzzy matter-element analysis, which is used to solve incompatible problems, was used to select the locations of sites. The matter element matrices were established according to the concentration parameters. The comprehensive correlation functions KA (xj) and KB (xj), which reflect the degree of correlation among monitoring indices, were solved for each site, and a scatter diagram of the sites was drawn to determine the final positions of the sites based on the functions. The sites could be classified and ultimately selected by the scatter diagram. An actual case was tested, and the results showed that 5 positions can be used for monitoring, and the locations conformed to the technical standard. In the results of this paper, the hierarchical clustering method was used to improve the methods. The sites were classified into 5 types, and 7 locations were selected. Five of the 7 locations were completely identical to the sites determined by fuzzy matter-element analysis. The selections according to these two methods are similar, and these methods can be used in combination. In contrast to traditional methods, this study monitors the isolated point pollutant source within a small range, which can reduce the cost of monitoring. PMID:25923911

  16. Remedial action selection report Maybell, Colorado, site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The site is 2.5 mi (4 km) northeast of the Yampa River on relatively flat terrain broken by low, flat-topped mesas. U.S. Highway 40 runs east-west 2 mi (3.2 km) south of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. The site is situated between Johnson Wash to the east and Rob Pit Mine to the west. Numerous reclaimed and unreclaimed mines are in the immediate vicinity. Aerial photographs (included at the end of this executive summary) show evidence of mining activity around the Maybell site. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [ml]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd 3 (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3}(420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}).

  17. The optimization of diffraction structures based on the principle selection of the main criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, O.; Beletskaja, S.; Lvovich, Ya; Lvovich, I.; Choporov, O.; Preobrazhenskiy, A.

    2017-02-01

    The possibilities of optimizing the characteristics of diffractive structures are analysed. A functional block diagram of a subsystem of diffractive structure optimization is shown. Next, a description of the method for the multicriterion optimization of diffractive structures is given. We then consider an algorithm for selecting the main criterion in the process of optimization. The algorithm efficiency is confirmed by an example of optimization of the diffractive structure.

  18. Application of an Optimal Search Strategy for the DNAPL Source Identification to a Field Site in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longting, M.; Ye, S.; Wu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Identification and removing the DNAPL source in aquifer system is vital in rendering remediation successful and lowering the remediation time and cost. Our work is to apply an optimal search strategy introduced by Zoi and Pinder[1], with some modifications, to a field site in Nanjing City, China to define the strength, and location of DNAPL sources using the least samples. The overall strategy uses Monte Carlo stochastic groundwater flow and transport modeling, incorporates existing sampling data into the search strategy, and determines optimal sampling locations that are selected according to the reduction in overall uncertainty of the field and the proximity to the source locations. After a sample is taken, the plume is updated using a Kalman filter. The updated plume is then compared to the concentration fields that emanate from each individual potential source using fuzzy set technique. The comparison followed provides weights that reflect the degree of truth regarding the location of the source. The above steps are repeated until the optimal source characteristics are determined. Considering our site case, some specific modifications and work have been done as follows. K random fields are generated after fitting the measurement K data to the variogram model. The locations of potential sources that are given initial weights are targeted based on the field survey, with multiple potential source locations around the workshops and wastewater basin. Considering the short history (1999-2010) of manufacturing optical brightener PF at the site, and the existing sampling data, a preliminary source strength is then estimated, which will be optimized by simplex method or GA later. The whole algorithm then will guide us for optimal sampling and update as the investigation proceeds, until the weights finally stabilized. Reference [1] Dokou Zoi, and George F. Pinder. "Optimal search strategy for the definition of a DNAPL source." Journal of Hydrology 376.3 (2009): 542

  19. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Handran, Heather H.; Manthorne, David J.; Hultstrand, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    During spring 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service collected and analyzed snowpack samples for 65 sites in the Rocky Mountain region from New Mexico to Montana. Snowpacks were sampled from late February through early April and generally had well-below-average- to near-average snow-water equivalent. Regionally, on April 1, snow-water equivalent ranged from 50 to 89 percent. At most regional sites monitored during 1993-2004, snowpack ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations for 2004 were lower than the 12-year averages. Snowpack ammonium concentrations in the region were lower than average concentrations for the period at 61 percent of sites in the region, but showed a new pattern compared to previous years with three of the four highest 2004 concentrations observed in northern Colorado. Nitrate concentrations in 2004 were lower than the 12-year average for the year at 53 percent of regional sites, and typically occurred at sites in Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana where powerplants and large industrial areas were limited. A regional decrease in sulfate concentrations across most of the Rocky Mountains (with concentrations lower than the 12-year average at 84 percent of snowpack sites) was consistent with other monitoring of atmospheric deposition in the Western United States. Total mercury concentrations, although data are only available for the past 3 years, decreased slightly for the region as a whole in 2004 relative to 2003. Ratios of stable sulfur isotopes indicated a similar regional pattern as observed in recent years with sulfur-34 (d34S) values generally increasing northward from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado to northern Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana.

  20. Hydrogen Oxidation-Selective Electrocatalysis by Fine Tuning of Pt Ensemble Sites to Enhance the Durability of Automotive Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Su-Won; Park, Shin-Ae; Kim, Tae-June; Kim, Jun-Hyuk; Pak, Gi-Woong; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-02-08

    A simple, inexpensive approach is proposed for enhancing the durability of automotive proton exchange membrane fuel cells by selective promotion of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and suppression of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the anode in startup/shutdown events. Dodecanethiol forms a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the surface of Pt particles, thus decreasing the number of Pt ensemble sites. Interestingly, by controlling the dodecanethiol concentration during SAM formation, the number of ensemble sites can be precisely optimized such that it is sufficient for the HOR but insufficient for the ORR. Thus, a Pt surface with an SAM of dodecanethiol clearly effects HOR-selective electrocatalysis. Clear HOR selectivity is demonstrated in unit cell tests with the actual membrane electrode assembly, as well as in an electrochemical three-electrode setup with a thin-film rotating disk electrode configuration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  2. Reference site selection report for the advanced liquid metal reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sivill, R.L.

    1990-03-01

    This Reference Site Selection Report was prepared by EG G, Idaho Inc., for General Electric (GE) to provide information for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) in selecting a Safety Test Site for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. Similar Evaluation studies are planned to be conducted at other potential DOE sites. The Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Concept was developed for ALMR by GE. A ALMR Safety Test is planned to be performed on a DOE site to demonstrate features and meet Nuclear Regulatory Commission Requirements. This study considered possible locations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory that met the ALMR Prototype Site Selection Methodology and Criteria. Four sites were identified, after further evaluation one site was eliminated. Each of the remaining three sites satisfied the criteria and was graded. The results were relatively close. Thus concluding that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a suitable location for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Safety Test. 23 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Flow Duration at Selected Stream-Sites in Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, F.; Kiesler, J.; Macy, J.

    1980-01-01

    Flow duration characteristics were determined for 195 streamflow stations in Kentucky. The data includes flow duration tables for the period of record of the stations based on mean daily discharges. Seasonal flow durations are also presented from monthly analysis of the data. At sites affected by regulation, tables are published showing both the before and after regulation flow duration data. (USGS)

  4. 15 CFR 921.11 - Site selection and feasibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and II); (2) The site's ecological characteristics, including its biological productivity, diversity... natural system to approximate an ecological unit and to ensure effective conservation. Boundary size will... areas (or “core area”) and a buffer zone. Key land and water areas and a buffer zone will likely require...

  5. 15 CFR 921.11 - Site selection and feasibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and II); (2) The site's ecological characteristics, including its biological productivity, diversity... natural system to approximate an ecological unit and to ensure effective conservation. Boundary size will... areas (or “core area”) and a buffer zone. Key land and water areas and a buffer zone will likely require...

  6. 15 CFR 921.11 - Site selection and feasibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and II); (2) The site's ecological characteristics, including its biological productivity, diversity... natural system to approximate an ecological unit and to ensure effective conservation. Boundary size will... areas (or “core area”) and a buffer zone. Key land and water areas and a buffer zone will likely require...

  7. 15 CFR 921.11 - Site selection and feasibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and II); (2) The site's ecological characteristics, including its biological productivity, diversity... natural system to approximate an ecological unit and to ensure effective conservation. Boundary size will... areas (or “core area”) and a buffer zone. Key land and water areas and a buffer zone will likely require...

  8. 15 CFR 921.11 - Site selection and feasibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and II); (2) The site's ecological characteristics, including its biological productivity, diversity... natural system to approximate an ecological unit and to ensure effective conservation. Boundary size will... areas (or “core area”) and a buffer zone. Key land and water areas and a buffer zone will likely require...

  9. Off-Site Trip Leaders: Selecting Appropriate Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Will

    1996-01-01

    Well-trained off-site trip leaders can turn a trip into a positive educational lesson. American Camping Association standards are referenced, and some personality traits are suggested as criteria for determining the suitability of staff to act responsibly "in loco director." Discusses factors that determine counselor-to-camper ratios,…

  10. 38 CFR 39.19 - General requirements for site selection and construction of veterans' cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... site selection and construction of veterans' cemeteries. 39.19 Section 39.19 Pensions, Bonuses, and... IMPROVEMENT OF VETERANS' CEMETERIES (Eff. until 7-16-10) Standards and Requirements for Project § 39.19 General requirements for site selection and construction of veterans' cemeteries. (a) The various...

  11. SELECTING REFERENCE SITES FOR STREAM BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS: BEST PROFESSIONAL JUDGMENT OR OBJECT CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selection of reference sites is a critical component in the process of developing and applying biological indicators of ecological condition. Some evidence suggests that despite its importance the rules by which reference sites are selected have not always been evaluated critical...

  12. THE ROLE OF GIS IN SELECTING SITES FOR RIPARIAN RESTORATION BASED ON HYDROLOGY AND LAND USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful long-term wetland restoration efforts require consideration of hydrology and surrounding land use during the site selection process. This article describes an approach to initial site selection in the San Luis Rey River watershed in southern California that uses waters...

  13. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-2 - Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings. 960.3-2-2-2 Section 960.3-2-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-2 Selection...

  14. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-2 - Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings. 960.3-2-2-2 Section 960.3-2-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-2 Selection...

  15. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-2 - Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings. 960.3-2-2-2 Section 960.3-2-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-2 Selection...

  16. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-2 - Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings. 960.3-2-2-2 Section 960.3-2-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-2 Selection...

  17. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-2 - Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Selection of sites within geohydrologic settings. 960.3-2-2-2 Section 960.3-2-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-2 Selection...

  18. THE ROLE OF GIS IN SELECTING SITES FOR RIPARIAN RESTORATION BASED ON HYDROLOGY AND LAND USE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful long-term wetland restoration efforts require consideration of hydrology and surrounding land use during the site selection process. This article describes an approach to initial site selection in the San Luis Rey River watershed in southern California that uses waters...

  19. Site-selective electronic correlation in α-plutonium metal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-Xin; Albers, R C; Haule, K; Kotliar, G; Wills, J M

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the phase diagram of elemental plutonium (Pu) must include both, the effects of the strong directional bonding and the high density of states of the Pu 5f electrons, as well as how that bonding weakens under the influence of strong electronic correlations. Here we present electronic-structure calculations of the full 16-atom per unit cell α-phase structure within the framework of density functional theory together with dynamical mean-field theory. Our calculations demonstrate that Pu atoms sitting on different sites within the α-Pu crystal structure have a strongly varying site dependence of the localization-delocalization correlation effects of their 5f electrons and a corresponding effect on the bonding and electronic properties of this complicated metal. In short, α-Pu has the capacity to simultaneously have multiple degrees of electron localization/delocalization of Pu 5f electrons within a pure single-element material.

  20. Scour at selected bridge sites in Alabama, 1991-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, J. Brian; Hedgecock, T. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Scour data were collected at 15 sites on streams in Alabama during high flow conditions. The recurrence intervals of the streamflows ranged from less than 2 to 10 years. Scour depths measured near bridge piers ranged from 0.3 to 5.8 feet. The Colorado State University (CSU) local scour equation recommended in the Federal Highway Administration Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18 was used to estimate scour depths at the study sites. Estimated scour depths based on the CSU equation ranged from 2.5 to 12.7 feet with residuals (measured scour depth minus estimated scour depth) ranging from -8.1 to -1.4 feet. A comparison of the residuals with the estimated scour depths indicated that the CSU equation overestimated the measured scour depths throughout the range of measured data by an average of 434 percent.

  1. Characterization of Seismic Noise at Selected Non-Urban Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Hz center frequency for vertical, east-west and north-south components of wind farm ground motion during the 50-min periods 0000 - 0050 (turbines...13 Figure 6. Hourly power PDFs at 4-Hz center frequency for vertical ground motion for the period 0400 – 1200 GMT...15 Figure 7. Wind speed data recorded at the Enfield site. Data dropouts occurred during the 10-min periods

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  3. Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1997-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Specification of sites for polarized growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the influence of external factors on site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Madden, K; Snyder, M

    1992-01-01

    Many eucaryotic cell types exhibit polarized cell growth and polarized cell division at nonrandom sites. The sites of polarized growth were investigated in G1 arrested haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. When yeast cells are arrested during G1 either by treatment with alpha-factor or by shifting temperature-sensitive cdc28-1 cells to the restrictive temperature, the cells form a projection. Staining with Calcofluor reveals that in both cases the projection usually forms at axial sites (i.e., next to the previous bud scar); these are the same sites where bud formation is expected to occur. These results indicate that sites of polarized growth are specified before the end of G1. Sites of polarized growth can be influenced by external conditions. Cells grown to stationary phase and diluted into fresh medium preferentially select sites for polarized growth opposite the previous bud scar (i.e., distal sites). Incubation of cells in a mating mixture results in projection formation at nonaxial sites: presumably cells form projections toward their mating partner. These observations have important implications in understanding three aspects of cell polarity in yeast: 1) how yeast cell shape is influenced by growth conditions 2) how sites of polarized growth are chosen, and 3) the pathway by which polarity is affected and redirected during the mating process. Images PMID:1421575

  5. Modeling Training Site Vegetation Coverage Probability with a Random Optimizing Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    Coverage Probability with a Random Optimization Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach by Biing T. Guan, George Z. Gertner, and Alan B...Modeling Training Site Vegetation Coverage Probability with a Random Optimizing Procedure: An Artificial Neural Network Approach 6. AUTHOR(S) Biing...coverage based on past coverage. Approach A literature survey was conducted to identify artificial neural network analysis techniques applicable for

  6. CRITERIA FOR SELECTION AND APPROVAL OF COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE SITES IN FLORIDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    THE APPROVAL OF A COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE SITE IN FLORIDA IS A MATTER OF DECISION BY LOCAL COMMUNITY AUTHORITIES, HOWEVER, FINAL APPROVAL OF THE SITE BY THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IS REQUIRED BEFORE CAPITAL OUTLAY FUNDS CAN BE EXPENDED. TO FACILITATE SELECTION AND APPROVAL OF SITES FOR COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGES, A DATA SHEET OF CRITERIA…

  7. Nesting habitat and nest site selection by the bald eagle in Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.A.; Andrew, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    Habitat at 70 bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nest sites was quantified and compared with evaluations at 139 random habitat plots located in the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland. Bald eagles selected vegetationally open habitats near water and away from selected human activities relative to random habitat plots. Successful nest sites were located in denser forest stands farther from water and unoccupied structures than unsuccessful nest sites.

  8. Comparison of Genetic Algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization and Biogeography-based Optimization for Feature Selection to Classify Clusters of Microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khehra, Baljit Singh; Pharwaha, Amar Partap Singh

    2017-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is one type of breast cancer. Clusters of microcalcifications (MCCs) are symptoms of DCIS that are recognized by mammography. Selection of robust features vector is the process of selecting an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain after the feature extraction and before any classification scheme. Feature selection reduces the feature space that improves the performance of classifier and decreases the computational burden imposed by using many features on classifier. Selection of an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain is a difficult search problem. For n features, the total numbers of possible subsets of features are 2n. Thus, selection of an optimal subset of features problem belongs to the category of NP-hard problems. In this paper, an attempt is made to find the optimal subset of MCCs features from all possible subsets of features using genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and biogeography-based optimization (BBO). For simulation, a total of 380 benign and malignant MCCs samples have been selected from mammogram images of DDSM database. A total of 50 features extracted from benign and malignant MCCs samples are used in this study. In these algorithms, fitness function is correct classification rate of classifier. Support vector machine is used as a classifier. From experimental results, it is also observed that the performance of PSO-based and BBO-based algorithms to select an optimal subset of features for classifying MCCs as benign or malignant is better as compared to GA-based algorithm.

  9. Comparison of Genetic Algorithm, Particle Swarm Optimization and Biogeography-based Optimization for Feature Selection to Classify Clusters of Microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khehra, Baljit Singh; Pharwaha, Amar Partap Singh

    2016-06-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is one type of breast cancer. Clusters of microcalcifications (MCCs) are symptoms of DCIS that are recognized by mammography. Selection of robust features vector is the process of selecting an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain after the feature extraction and before any classification scheme. Feature selection reduces the feature space that improves the performance of classifier and decreases the computational burden imposed by using many features on classifier. Selection of an optimal subset of features from a large number of available features in a given problem domain is a difficult search problem. For n features, the total numbers of possible subsets of features are 2n. Thus, selection of an optimal subset of features problem belongs to the category of NP-hard problems. In this paper, an attempt is made to find the optimal subset of MCCs features from all possible subsets of features using genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and biogeography-based optimization (BBO). For simulation, a total of 380 benign and malignant MCCs samples have been selected from mammogram images of DDSM database. A total of 50 features extracted from benign and malignant MCCs samples are used in this study. In these algorithms, fitness function is correct classification rate of classifier. Support vector machine is used as a classifier. From experimental results, it is also observed that the performance of PSO-based and BBO-based algorithms to select an optimal subset of features for classifying MCCs as benign or malignant is better as compared to GA-based algorithm.

  10. To Eat or Not to Eat: An Easy Simulation of Optimal Diet Selection in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal diet selection, a component of optimal foraging theory, suggests that animals should select a diet that either maximizes energy or nutrient consumption per unit time or minimizes the foraging time needed to attain required energy or nutrients. In this exercise, students simulate the behavior of foragers that either show no foraging…

  11. To Eat or Not to Eat: An Easy Simulation of Optimal Diet Selection in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal diet selection, a component of optimal foraging theory, suggests that animals should select a diet that either maximizes energy or nutrient consumption per unit time or minimizes the foraging time needed to attain required energy or nutrients. In this exercise, students simulate the behavior of foragers that either show no foraging…

  12. The Importance of Site Selection for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Roslan; Zainal Abidin, Zamri; Abidin Ibrahim, Zainol

    2014-10-01

    Radio sources are very weak since this object travel very far from outer space. Radio astronomy studies are limited due to radio frequency interference (RFI) that is made by man. If the harassment is not stopped, it will provide critical problems in their radio astronomy scientists research. The purpose of this study is to provide RFI map Peninsular Malaysia with a minimum mapping techniques RFI interference. RFI mapping technique using GIS is proposed as a tool in mapping techniques. Decision-making process for the selection requires gathering information from a variety of parameters. These factors affecting the selection process are also taken account. In this study, various factors or parameters involved such as availability of telecommunications transmission (including radio and television), rainfall, water line and human activity. This study will benefit radio astronomy research especially in the RFI profile in Malaysia. Keywords: Radio Astronomy, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), RFI mapping technique : GIS.

  13. An artificial system for selecting the optimal surgical team.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Nahid; Mahvash, Mohsen; Zenati, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an intelligent system to optimize a team composition based on the team's historical outcomes and apply this system to compose a surgical team. The system relies on a record of the procedures performed in the past. The optimal team composition is the one with the lowest probability of unfavorable outcome. We use the theory of probability and the inclusion exclusion principle to model the probability of team outcome for a given composition. A probability value is assigned to each person of database and the probability of a team composition is calculated from them. The model allows to determine the probability of all possible team compositions even if there is no recoded procedure for some team compositions. From an analytical perspective, assembling an optimal team is equivalent to minimizing the overlap of team members who have a recurring tendency to be involved with procedures of unfavorable results. A conceptual example shows the accuracy of the proposed system on obtaining the optimal team.

  14. Site selection for concentrated solar thermal systems in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, A.

    1987-01-01

    This report identifies ares on the five major islands (Oahu, Maui, Molakai, Hawaii, and Kauai) that have the potential for concentrating solar thermal applications. The locations are based on existing solar insolation (mostly global and some direct normal) data, other meteorological information, land use, potential end-use, and existing facilities. These areas are: - Western coast of Oahu, especially near Kahe Point - Maui plains area - South-Central Molokai - Kona coast of the Big Island, especially Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii - Western and southern areas of Kauai. Monitoring stations are recommended at some of these sites to obtain direct normal insolation data for future evaluation.

  15. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  16. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  17. Model-data fusion across ecosystems: from multi-site optimizations to global simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppel, S.; Peylin, P.; Maignan, F.; Chevallier, F.; Kiely, G.; Montagnani, L.; Cescatti, A.

    2014-05-01

    This study uses a variational data assimilation framework to simultaneously constrain a global ecosystem model with eddy covariance measurements of daily net carbon (NEE) and latent heat (LE) fluxes from a large number of sites grouped in seven plant functional types (PFTs). It is an attempt to bridge the gap between the numerous site-specific parameter optimization works found in the literature and the generic parameterization used by most land surface models within each PFT. The present multi-site approach allows deriving PFT-generic sets of optimized parameters enhancing the agreement between measured and simulated fluxes at most of the sites considered, with performances often comparable to those of the corresponding site-specific optimizations. Besides reducing the PFT-averaged model-data root-mean-square difference (RMSD) and the associated daily output uncertainty, the optimization improves the simulated CO2 balance at tropical and temperate forests sites. The major site-level NEE adjustments at the seasonal scale are: reduced amplitude in C3 grasslands and boreal forests, increased seasonality in temperate evergreen forests, and better model-data phasing in temperate deciduous broadleaf forests. Conversely, the poorer performances in tropical evergreen broadleaf forests points to deficiencies regarding the modeling of phenology and soil water stress for this PFT. An evaluation with data-oriented estimates of photosynthesis (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) rates indicates distinctively improved simulations of both gross fluxes. The multi-site parameter sets are then tested against CO2 concentrations measured at 53 locations around the globe, showing significant adjustments of the modeled seasonality of atmospheric CO2 concentration, whose relevance seems PFT-dependent, along with an improved interannual variability. Lastly, a global scale evaluation with remote sensing NDVI measurements indicates an improvement of the simulated seasonal variations of

  18. Emitter-site-selective photoelectron circular dichroism of trifluoromethyloxirane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Hartmann, G.; Rupprecht, P.; Artemyev, A. N.; Coffee, R. N.; Li, Z.; Ohldag, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Osipov, T.; Ray, D.; Schmidt, Ph.; Wolf, T. J. A.; Ehresmann, A.; Moeller, S.; Knie, A.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2017-05-01

    The angle-resolved inner-shell photoionization of R-trifluoromethyloxirane, C3H3F3O , is studied experimentally and theoretically. Thereby, we investigate the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) for nearly symmetric O 1 s and F 1 s electronic orbitals, which are localized on different molecular sites. The respective dichroic β1 and angular distribution β2 parameters are measured at the photoelectron kinetic energies from 1 to 16 eV by using variably polarized synchrotron radiation and velocity map imaging spectroscopy. The present experimental results are in good agreement with the outcome of ab initio electronic structure calculations. We report a sizable chiral asymmetry β1 of up to about 9% for the K -shell photoionization of oxygen atom. For the individual fluorine atoms, the present calculations predict asymmetries of similar size. However, being averaged over all fluorine atoms, it drops down to about 2%, as also observed in the present experiment. Our study demonstrates a strong emitter and site sensitivity of PECD in the one-photon inner-shell ionization of this chiral molecule.

  19. Emitter-site-selective photoelectron circular dichroism of trifluoromethyloxirane

    DOE PAGES

    Ilchen, M.; Hartmann, G.; Rupprecht, P.; ...

    2017-05-30

    The angle-resolved inner-shell photoionization of R-trifluoromethyloxirane, C3H3F3O, is studied experimentally and theoretically. Thereby, we investigate the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) for nearly symmetric O 1s and F 1s electronic orbitals, which are localized on different molecular sites. The respective dichroic β1 and angular distribution β2 parameters are measured at the photoelectron kinetic energies from 1 to 16 eV by using variably polarized synchrotron radiation and velocity map imaging spectroscopy. The present experimental results are in good agreement with the outcome of ab initio electronic structure calculations. We report a sizable chiral asymmetry β1 of up to about 9% for themore » K -shell photoionization of oxygen atom. For the individual fluorine atoms, the present calculations predict asymmetries of similar size. However, being averaged over all fluorine atoms, it drops down to about 2%, as also observed in the present experiment. Our study demonstrates a strong emitter and site sensitivity of PECD in the one-photon inner-shell ionization of this chiral molecule.« less

  20. Enzymatic Detoxication, Conformational Selection, and the Role of Molten Globule Active Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Honaker, Matthew T.; Acchione, Mauro; Zhang, Wei; Mannervik, Bengt; Atkins, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The role of conformational ensembles in enzymatic reactions remains unclear. Discussion concerning “induced fit” versus “conformational selection” has, however, ignored detoxication enzymes, which exhibit catalytic promiscuity. These enzymes dominate drug metabolism and determine drug-drug interactions. The detoxication enzyme glutathione transferase A1–1 (GSTA1–1), exploits a molten globule-like active site to achieve remarkable catalytic promiscuity wherein the substrate-free conformational ensemble is broad with barrierless transitions between states. A quantitative index of catalytic promiscuity is used to compare engineered variants of GSTA1–1 and the catalytic promiscuity correlates strongly with characteristics of the thermodynamic partition function, for the substrate-free enzymes. Access to chemically disparate transition states is encoded by the substrate-free conformational ensemble. Pre-steady state catalytic data confirm an extension of the conformational selection model, wherein different substrates select different starting conformations. The kinetic liability of the conformational breadth is minimized by a smooth landscape. We propose that “local” molten globule behavior optimizes detoxication enzymes. PMID:23649628

  1. Optimal number of sites in multi-site fisheries with fish stock dependent migrations.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, Ali; Auger, Pierre; Lett, Christophe

    2011-07-01

    We present a stock-effort dynamical model of a fishery subdivided into fishing zones. The stock corresponds to a fish population moving between these zones, on which they are harvested by fishing fleets. We consider a linear chain of identical fishing zones. Fish movements between the zones, as well as vessels displacements, are assumed to take place at a faster time scale than the variation of the stock and the change of the fleet size. The vessels movements between the fishing areas are assumed to be stock dependent, i.e. the larger the stock density is in a zone the more vessels tends to remain in it. We take advantage of these two time scales to derive a reduced model governing the dynamics of the total harvested stock and the total fishing effort. Under some assumption, we obtain either a stable equilibrium or a stable limit cycle which involves large cyclic variations of the total fish stock and fishing effort. We show that there exists an optimal number of fishing zones that maximizes the total catch at equilibrium. We discuss the results in relation to fish aggregating devices (FADs) fisheries.

  2. Bed site selection by neonate deer in grassland habitats on the northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grovenburg, T.W.; Jacques, C.N.; Klaver, R.W.; Jenks, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Bed site selection is an important behavioral trait influencing neonate survival. Vegetation characteristics of bed sites influence thermal protection of neonates and concealment from predators. Although previous studies describe bed site selection of neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in regions of forested cover, none determined microhabitat effects on neonate bed site selection in the Northern Great Plains, an area of limited forest cover. During summers 2007–2009, we investigated bed site selection (n  =  152) by 81 radiocollared neonate white-tailed deer in north-central South Dakota, USA. We documented 80 (52.6%) bed sites in tallgrass–Conservation Reserve Program lands, 35 (23.0%) bed sites in forested cover, and 37 (24.3%) in other habitats (e.g., pasture, alfalfa, wheat). Bed site selection varied with age and sex of neonate. Tree canopy cover (P < 0.001) and tree basal area (P < 0.001) decreased with age of neonates, with no bed sites observed in forested cover after 18 days of age. Male neonates selected sites with less grass cover (P < 0.001), vertical height of understory vegetation (P < 0.001), and density of understory vegetation (P < 0.001) but greater bare ground (P  =  0.047), litter (P  =  0.028), and wheat (P  =  0.044) than did females. Odds of bed site selection increased 3.5% (odds ratio  =  1.035, 95% CI  =  1.008–1.062) for every 1-cm increase in vertical height of understory vegetation. Management for habitat throughout the grasslands of South Dakota that maximizes vertical height of understory vegetation would enhance cover characteristics selected by neonates.

  3. Age-Related Differences in Goals: Testing Predictions from Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Theory and Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penningroth, Suzanna L.; Scott, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Two prominent theories of lifespan development, socioemotional selectivity theory and selection, optimization, and compensation theory, make similar predictions for differences in the goal representations of younger and older adults. Our purpose was to test whether the goals of younger and older adults differed in ways predicted by these two…

  4. Age-Related Differences in Goals: Testing Predictions from Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Theory and Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penningroth, Suzanna L.; Scott, Walter D.

    2012-01-01

    Two prominent theories of lifespan development, socioemotional selectivity theory and selection, optimization, and compensation theory, make similar predictions for differences in the goal representations of younger and older adults. Our purpose was to test whether the goals of younger and older adults differed in ways predicted by these two…

  5. Site selection for the future stations of the french permanent broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jérôme; Charade, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    RESIF (REseau SIsmologique et géodésique Français) is a new French research infrastructure dedicated to the observation of earth deformation based on seismic and geodetic instruments mainly located in France. One of its major component, called RESIF-CLB (Construction Large Bande), is devoted to the evolution of the permanent seismic broadband network in metropolitan France with the objective to complement the 45 existing stations with ~155 new stations within the next eight years. This network will be used for various scientific objectives including deep structures imaging and national seismicity monitoring. The chosen network topology consists in a backbone of homogeneously distributed stations (long wavelength array) completed by additional stations in seismically active regions. Management of the RESIF-CLB project is carried out by the technical division of INSU (Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers) who will rely on eight regional observatories and the CEA-LDG for the construction and operation of the stations. To optimize the performance of the network, we put a strong emphasis on the standardization of the stations in term of vault types, scientific and technical instrumentation and operation procedures. We also set up a procedure for site selection requiring that every potential site has to be tested for at least 3 weeks with a minimalist installation. Analysis of the continuous ambient noise records is then included in a standardized report submitted to all committed partners for acceptance. During the last two years, about 60 potential new sites have been tested, spanning various places and environments. We present a review of the seismic noise measurements at these sites and discuss the influence of different types of noise sources depending on the frequency band of interest. For example, we show that regional population distribution can be used as a proxy to infer the noise level at frequencies higher than 1 Hz. Based on similar noise analyses

  6. Site quality in Appalachian hardwoods: the biological and economic response under selection silviculture

    Treesearch

    Orris D. McCauley; George R., Jr. Trimble

    1975-01-01

    The relative or percentage value response after 12 years of selective cutting practices on low- and high-quality sites in Appalachian hardwoods amounted to a 119-percent increase on the low-quality site and 145 percent on the high-quality site. The absolute value or actual dollar response, on the other hand, showed that the low-quality site increased in value only $76/...

  7. Reliable Refuge: Two Sky Island Scorpion Species Select Larger, Thermally Stable Retreat Sites.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jamie E; Brown, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Sky island scorpions shelter under rocks and other surface debris, but, as with other scorpions, it is unclear whether these species select retreat sites randomly. Furthermore, little is known about the thermal preferences of scorpions, and no research has been done to identify whether reproductive condition might influence retreat site selection. The objectives were to (1) identify physical or thermal characteristics for retreat sites occupied by two sky island scorpions (Vaejovis cashi Graham 2007 and V. electrum Hughes 2011) and those not occupied; (2) determine whether retreat site selection differs between the two study species; and (3) identify whether thermal selection differs between species and between gravid and non-gravid females of the same species. Within each scorpion's habitat, maximum dimensions of rocks along a transect line were measured and compared to occupied rocks to determine whether retreat site selection occurred randomly. Temperature loggers were placed under a subset of occupied and unoccupied rocks for 48 hours to compare the thermal characteristics of these rocks. Thermal gradient trials were conducted before parturition and after dispersal of young in order to identify whether gravidity influences thermal preference. Vaejovis cashi and V. electrum both selected larger retreat sites that had more stable thermal profiles. Neither species appeared to have thermal preferences influenced by reproductive condition. However, while thermal selection did not differ among non-gravid individuals, gravid V. electrum selected warmer temperatures than its gravid congener. Sky island scorpions appear to select large retreat sites to maintain thermal stability, although biotic factors (e.g., competition) could also be involved in this choice. Future studies should focus on identifying the various biotic or abiotic factors that could influence retreat site selection in scorpions, as well as determining whether reproductive condition affects thermal

  8. Reliable Refuge: Two Sky Island Scorpion Species Select Larger, Thermally Stable Retreat Sites

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jamie E.; Brown, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Sky island scorpions shelter under rocks and other surface debris, but, as with other scorpions, it is unclear whether these species select retreat sites randomly. Furthermore, little is known about the thermal preferences of scorpions, and no research has been done to identify whether reproductive condition might influence retreat site selection. The objectives were to (1) identify physical or thermal characteristics for retreat sites occupied by two sky island scorpions (Vaejovis cashi Graham 2007 and V. electrum Hughes 2011) and those not occupied; (2) determine whether retreat site selection differs between the two study species; and (3) identify whether thermal selection differs between species and between gravid and non-gravid females of the same species. Within each scorpion’s habitat, maximum dimensions of rocks along a transect line were measured and compared to occupied rocks to determine whether retreat site selection occurred randomly. Temperature loggers were placed under a subset of occupied and unoccupied rocks for 48 hours to compare the thermal characteristics of these rocks. Thermal gradient trials were conducted before parturition and after dispersal of young in order to identify whether gravidity influences thermal preference. Vaejovis cashi and V. electrum both selected larger retreat sites that had more stable thermal profiles. Neither species appeared to have thermal preferences influenced by reproductive condition. However, while thermal selection did not differ among non-gravid individuals, gravid V. electrum selected warmer temperatures than its gravid congener. Sky island scorpions appear to select large retreat sites to maintain thermal stability, although biotic factors (e.g., competition) could also be involved in this choice. Future studies should focus on identifying the various biotic or abiotic factors that could influence retreat site selection in scorpions, as well as determining whether reproductive condition affects thermal

  9. Threshold Assessment: Definition of Acceptable Sites as Part of Site Selection for the Japanese HLW Program

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.A.; Wakasugi, Keiichiro; Webb, E.K.; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Yoshinao, Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Baba, Tomoko; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Umeki, Hiroyuki

    2000-10-03

    For the last ten years, the Japanese High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) repository program has focused on assessing the feasibility of a basic repository concept, which resulted in the recently published H12 Report. As Japan enters the implementation phase, a new organization must identify, screen and choose potential repository sites. Thus, a rapid mechanism for determining the likelihood of site suitability is critical. The threshold approach, described here, is a simple mechanism for defining the likelihood that a site is suitable given estimates of several critical parameters. We rely on the results of a companion paper, which described a probabilistic performance assessment simulation of the HLW reference case in the H12 report. The most critical two or three input parameters are plotted against each other and treated as spatial variables. Geostatistics is used to interpret the spatial correlation, which in turn is used to simulate multiple realizations of the parameter value maps. By combining an array of realizations, we can look at the probability that a given site, as represented by estimates of this combination of parameters, would be good host for a repository site.

  10. Recombination Modulates How Selection Affects Linked Sites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Heil, Caiti S. S.; Manzano-Winkler, Brenda; Loewe, Laurence; Goldstein, Steve; Himmel, Tiffany L.; Noor, Mohamed A. F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most influential observations in molecular evolution has been a strong association between local recombination rate and nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. This is interpreted as evidence for ubiquitous natural selection. The alternative explanation, that recombination is mutagenic, has been rejected by the absence of a similar association between local recombination rate and nucleotide divergence between species. However, many recent studies show that recombination rates are often very different even in closely related species, questioning whether an association between recombination rate and divergence between species has been tested satisfactorily. To circumvent this problem, we directly surveyed recombination across approximately 43% of the D. pseudoobscura physical genome in two separate recombination maps and 31% of the D. miranda physical genome, and we identified both global and local differences in recombination rate between these two closely related species. Using only regions with conserved recombination rates between and within species and accounting for multiple covariates, our data support the conclusion that recombination is positively related to diversity because recombination modulates Hill–Robertson effects in the genome and not because recombination is predominately mutagenic. Finally, we find evidence for dips in diversity around nonsynonymous substitutions. We infer that at least some of this reduction in diversity resulted from selective sweeps and examine these dips in the context of recombination rate. PMID:23152720

  11. Landfill site selection using combination of GIS and fuzzy AHP, a case study: Iranshahr, Iran.

    PubMed

    Torabi-Kaveh, M; Babazadeh, R; Mohammadi, S D; Zaresefat, M

    2016-03-09

    One of the most important recent challenges in solid waste management throughout the world is site selection of sanitary landfill. Commonly, because of simultaneous effects of social, environmental, and technical parameters on suitability of a landfill site, landfill site selection is a complex process and depends on several criteria and regulations. This study develops a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process, which combines geographic information system (GIS) analysis with a fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP), to determine suitable sites for landfill construction in Iranshahr County, Iran. The GIS was used to calculate and classify selected criteria and FAHP was used to assess the criteria weights based on their effectiveness on selection of potential landfill sites. Finally, a suitability map was prepared by overlay analyses and suitable areas were identified. Four suitability classes within the study area were separated, including high, medium, low, and very low suitability areas, which represented 18%, 15%, 55%, and 12% of the study area, respectively.

  12. Guidance for Optimizing Remedy Evaluation, Selection, and Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    soils that are similarly contaminated, then on-site treatment (e.g., a biopile ) followed by on-site disposal (as clean fill or daily cover at the base... membrane interface probe followed by confirmation sampling with a Geoprobe™ could be used to better define contaminant extent prior to implementation of...presence of a nearby source. Vari- ous characterization technologies can then be applied to further delineate the source. For exam- ple, a membrane

  13. The importance of scale-dependent ravine characteristics on breeding-site selection by the Burrowing Parrot, Cyanoliseus patagonus.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Herranz, Myriam; Rios, Rodrigo S; Vargas-Rodriguez, Renzo; Novoa-Jerez, Jose-Enrique; Squeo, Francisco A

    2017-01-01

    characteristics followed by extrinsic variables associated to human disturbance. Likewise, within reproductive ravines, intrinsic characteristics are more strongly related to the number of nests. The probability of producing eggs, however, was related only to distance to roads and human settlements. Patterns suggest that C. patagonus mainly selects nesting sites based on intrinsic morphological characteristics of ravines. Scale differences in the importance of ravine characteristics could be a consequence of the particular orography of the breeding habitat. The arrangement of resources is associated to the location of the gullies rather than to individual ravines, determining the spatial availability and disposition of resources and disturbances. Thus, nest selection is influenced by intrinsic characteristics that maximize the fitness of individuals. Scaling in nest-selection is discussed under an optimality approach that partitions patch selection based on foraging theory.

  14. The importance of scale-dependent ravine characteristics on breeding-site selection by the Burrowing Parrot, Cyanoliseus patagonus

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Rodrigo S.; Vargas-Rodriguez, Renzo; Novoa-Jerez, Jose-Enrique; Squeo, Francisco A.

    2017-01-01

    characteristics followed by extrinsic variables associated to human disturbance. Likewise, within reproductive ravines, intrinsic characteristics are more strongly related to the number of nests. The probability of producing eggs, however, was related only to distance to roads and human settlements. Patterns suggest that C. patagonus mainly selects nesting sites based on intrinsic morphological characteristics of ravines. Scale differences in the importance of ravine characteristics could be a consequence of the particular orography of the breeding habitat. The arrangement of resources is associated to the location of the gullies rather than to individual ravines, determining the spatial availability and disposition of resources and disturbances. Thus, nest selection is influenced by intrinsic characteristics that maximize the fitness of individuals. Scaling in nest-selection is discussed under an optimality approach that partitions patch selection based on foraging theory. PMID:28462019

  15. Site Selection in Experiments: An Assessment of Site Recruitment and Generalizability in Two Scale-Up Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Fellers, Lauren; Caverly, Sarah; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Ruiz de Castilla, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Recently, statisticians have begun developing methods to improve the generalizability of results from large-scale experiments in education. This work has included the development of methods for improved site selection when random sampling is infeasible, including the use of stratification and targeted recruitment strategies. This article provides…

  16. Site Selection in Experiments: An Assessment of Site Recruitment and Generalizability in Two Scale-Up Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Fellers, Lauren; Caverly, Sarah; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Ruiz de Castilla, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Recently, statisticians have begun developing methods to improve the generalizability of results from large-scale experiments in education. This work has included the development of methods for improved site selection when random sampling is infeasible, including the use of stratification and targeted recruitment strategies. This article provides…

  17. Near-optimal experimental design for model selection in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Busetto, Alberto Giovanni; Hauser, Alain; Krummenacher, Gabriel; Sunnåker, Mikael; Dimopoulos, Sotiris; Ong, Cheng Soon; Stelling, Jörg; Buhmann, Joachim M.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Biological systems are understood through iterations of modeling and experimentation. Not all experiments, however, are equally valuable for predictive modeling. This study introduces an efficient method for experimental design aimed at selecting dynamical models from data. Motivated by biological applications, the method enables the design of crucial experiments: it determines a highly informative selection of measurement readouts and time points. Results: We demonstrate formal guarantees of design efficiency on the basis of previous results. By reducing our task to the setting of graphical models, we prove that the method finds a near-optimal design selection with a polynomial number of evaluations. Moreover, the method exhibits the best polynomial-complexity constant approximation factor, unless P = NP. We measure the performance of the method in comparison with established alternatives, such as ensemble non-centrality, on example models of different complexity. Efficient design accelerates the loop between modeling and experimentation: it enables the inference of complex mechanisms, such as those controlling central metabolic operation. Availability: Toolbox ‘NearOED’ available with source code under GPL on the Machine Learning Open Source Software Web site (mloss.org). Contact: busettoa@inf.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23900189

  18. Discovery of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1: optimization of kinase selectivity and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Keith R; Chen, Xin; Crew, Andrew P; Kleinberg, Andrew; Ma, Lifu; Mulvihill, Mark J; Wang, Jing; Wilde, Victoria L; Albertella, Mark; Bittner, Mark; Cooke, Andrew; Kadhim, Salam; Kahler, Jennifer; Maresca, Paul; May, Earl; Meyn, Peter; Romashko, Darlene; Tokar, Brianna; Turton, Roy

    2013-08-15

    The kinase selectivity and pharmacokinetic optimization of a series of 7-aminofuro[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitors of TAK1 is described. The intersection of insights from molecular modeling, computational prediction of metabolic sites, and in vitro metabolite identification studies resulted in a simple and unique solution to both of these problems. These efforts culminated in the discovery of compound 13a, a potent, relatively selective inhibitor of TAK1 with good pharmacokinetic properties in mice, which was active in an in vivo model of ovarian cancer.

  19. Stochastic injection-strategy optimization for the preliminary assessment of candidate geological storage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Brent M.; Baù, Domenico; González-Nicolás, Ana

    2015-09-01

    Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) has been identified as having the potential to reduce increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, a global impact will only be achieved if GCS is cost-effectively and safely implemented on a massive scale. This work presents a computationally efficient methodology for identifying optimal injection strategies at candidate GCS sites having uncertainty associated with caprock permeability, effective compressibility, and aquifer permeability. A multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithm is used to heuristically determine non-dominated solutions between the following two competing objectives: (1) maximize mass of CO2 sequestered and (2) minimize project cost. A semi-analytical algorithm is used to estimate CO2 leakage mass rather than a numerical model, enabling the study of GCS sites having vastly different domain characteristics. The stochastic optimization framework presented herein is applied to a feasibility study of GCS in a brine aquifer in the Michigan Basin (MB), USA. Eight optimization test cases are performed to investigate the impact of decision-maker (DM) preferences on Pareto-optimal objective-function values and carbon-injection strategies. This analysis shows that the feasibility of GCS at the MB test site is highly dependent upon the DM's risk-adversity preference and degree of uncertainty associated with caprock integrity. Finally, large gains in computational efficiency achieved using parallel processing and archiving are discussed.

  20. Optimal Surveillance Culture Sites for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Newborns▿

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Alana; White, Diane; Churilla, Sheila; Brodie, Sandra; Katz, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe two outbreaks among newborns, one caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the other by hospital-associated MRSA. The umbilicus, rectum, and nares were tested for colonization. We found that no single body site had optimal sensitivity when tested alone. The combination of umbilical and nasal swabs achieved a sensitivity of >90%. PMID:16957041

  1. Optimal Bandwidth Selection in Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Häggström, Jenny; Wiberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The selection of bandwidth in kernel equating is important because it has a direct impact on the equated test scores. The aim of this article is to examine the use of double smoothing when selecting bandwidths in kernel equating and to compare double smoothing with the commonly used penalty method. This comparison was made using both an equivalent…

  2. Eliminating Scope and Selection Restrictions in Compiler Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    C o d e S a m p le s O pt i l ev el (R ) O pt i l ev el (W ) If- co nv . (R ) If- co nv . (W ) Ld - S t (R ) Ld - S ...exploration performance” of each such subset is determined, as follows: Let R( s , c ) be the runtime of a code sample s when optimized using an...optimization configuration c . Then the exploration value of a set of configurations C on a set of code samples S is given by the

  3. The Why of Waiting: How mathematical Best-Choice Models demonstrate optimality of a Refractory Period in Habitat Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, M. F.; Waymire, E. C.; Betts, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    When brush mice, fruit flies, and other animals disperse from their natal site, they are immediately tasked with selecting new habitat, and must do so in such a way as to optimize their chances of surviving and breeding. Habitat selection connects the fields of behavioral ecology and landscape ecology by describing the role the physical quality of habitat plays in the selection process. Interestingly, observations indicate a strategy that occurs with a certain prescribed statistical regularity. It has been demonstrated (Stamps, Davis, Blozis, Boundy-Mills, Anim. Behav., 2007) that brush mice and fruit flies employ a refractory period: a period wherein a disperser, after leaving its natal site, will not accept highly-preferred natural habitats. Assuming this behavior has adaptive benefit, the apparent optimality of this strategy is mirrored in mathematical models of Stochastic Optimization. In one such model, the Classical Best Choice Problem, a selector views some permutation of the numbers {1, ..., n} one-by-one, seeing only their relative ranks and then either selecting that element or discarding it. The goal is to choose the ``n" element. The optimal strategy is to wait for the ⌈ n/e ⌉ th element and then pick an element if it is better than all those already seen; this might demonstrate why refractory periods have adaptive benefit. We present three extensions to the Best Choice Problem: a partial ordering on the set of elements (Kubicki & Morayne, SIAM J. Discrete Math., 2005), a new goal of minimizing the expected rank (Chow, Moriguti, Robbins, Samuels, Israel J. Math., 1964), and a general utility function (Gusein-Zade, Theory of Prob. and Applications, 1966), allowing the top r sites to be equally desirable. These extensions relate to ecological phenomena not represented by the Classical Problem. In each, we discuss the effect on the duration or existence of the Refractory Period.

  4. Ecotoxicity literature review of selected Hanford Site contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    Available information on the toxicity, food chain transport, and bioconcentration of several Hanford Site contaminants were reviewed. The contaminants included cesium-137, cobalt-60, europium, nitrate, plutonium, strontium-90, technetium, tritium, uranium, and chromium (III and VI). Toxicity and mobility in both aquatic and terrestrial systems were considered. For aquatic systems, considerable information was available on the chemical and/or radiological toxicity of most of the contaminants in invertebrate animals and fish. Little information was available on aquatic macrophyte response to the contaminants. Terrestrial animals such as waterfowl and amphibians that have high exposure potential in aquatic systems were also largely unrepresented in the toxicity literature. The preponderance of toxicity data for terrestrial biota was for laboratory mammals. Bioconcentration factors and transfer coefficients were obtained for primary producers and consumers in representative aquatic and terrestrial systems; however, little data were available for upper trophic level transfer, particularly for terrestrial predators. Food chain transport and toxicity information for the contaminants were generally lacking for desert or sage brush-steppe organisms, particularly plants and reptiles

  5. Site selection and characterization processes for deep geologic disposal of high level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L.S.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper, the major elements of the site selection and characterization processes used in the US high level waste program are discussed. While much of the evolution of the site selection and characterization processes have been driven by the unique nature of the US program, these processes, which are well defined and documented, could be used as an initial basis for developing site screening, selection, and characterization programs in other countries. Thus, this paper focuses more on the process elements than the specific details of the US program.

  6. Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?

    PubMed

    Rands, Sean A

    2017-01-01

    Animals living in complex environments experience differing risks of predation depending upon their location within the landscape. An animal could reduce the risk it experiences by remaining in a refuge site, but it may need to emerge from its refuge and enter more dangerous sites for feeding and other activities. Here, I consider the actions of an animal choosing to travel a short distance between a safe refuge and a dangerous foraging site, such as a bird leaving cover to visit a feeder. Although much work has been conducted examining the choice between a refuge and a foraging site when faced with a trade-off between starvation and predation risk, the work presented here is the first to consider the travel behaviour between these locations. Using state-dependent stochastic dynamic programming, I illustrate that there are several forms of optimal behaviour that can emerge. In some situations, the animal should choose to travel without stopping between sites, but in other cases, it is optimal for the animal to travel hesitantly towards the food, and to stop its travel at a point before it reaches the refuge. I discuss how this hesitant 'dawdling' behaviour may be optimal, and suggest further work to test these predictions.

  7. Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Animals living in complex environments experience differing risks of predation depending upon their location within the landscape. An animal could reduce the risk it experiences by remaining in a refuge site, but it may need to emerge from its refuge and enter more dangerous sites for feeding and other activities. Here, I consider the actions of an animal choosing to travel a short distance between a safe refuge and a dangerous foraging site, such as a bird leaving cover to visit a feeder. Although much work has been conducted examining the choice between a refuge and a foraging site when faced with a trade-off between starvation and predation risk, the work presented here is the first to consider the travel behaviour between these locations. Using state-dependent stochastic dynamic programming, I illustrate that there are several forms of optimal behaviour that can emerge. In some situations, the animal should choose to travel without stopping between sites, but in other cases, it is optimal for the animal to travel hesitantly towards the food, and to stop its travel at a point before it reaches the refuge. I discuss how this hesitant ‘dawdling’ behaviour may be optimal, and suggest further work to test these predictions. PMID:28280590

  8. A smartphone-optimized web site for conveniently viewing otolaryngology journal abstracts.

    PubMed

    Golub, Justin S; Sharma, Arun; Samy, Ravi N

    2014-12-01

    Access to the medical literature has not kept pace with the mobile revolution. We aimed to (1) gauge interest in a smartphone-optimized Web site for conveniently accessing otolaryngology literature and (2) create an easy-to-access and convenient Web site that displays otolaryngology journal abstracts in a format optimized for smartphones. A survey was sent to physicians of a major US academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery department. Demographics, literature-browsing habits, and barriers to staying updated were assessed. The response rate was 87%. Ninety-one percent of respondents used a smartphone, and 85% wished they could stay more up to date with the otolaryngology literature. Most respondents believed a convenient smartphone-optimized Web site could help them achieve this goal. A Web site was then developed in collaboration with a university creative department as a proof of concept. The site uses a simple RSS aggregator to display journal abstracts formatted for smartphone-sized screens (www.otosurg.com).

  9. Self-Selection, Optimal Income Taxation, and Redistribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amegashie, J. Atsu

    2009-01-01

    The author makes a pedagogical contribution to optimal income taxation. Using a very simple model adapted from George A. Akerlof (1978), he demonstrates a key result in the approach to public economics and welfare economics pioneered by Nobel laureate James Mirrlees. He shows how incomplete information, in addition to the need to preserve…

  10. Self-Selection, Optimal Income Taxation, and Redistribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amegashie, J. Atsu

    2009-01-01

    The author makes a pedagogical contribution to optimal income taxation. Using a very simple model adapted from George A. Akerlof (1978), he demonstrates a key result in the approach to public economics and welfare economics pioneered by Nobel laureate James Mirrlees. He shows how incomplete information, in addition to the need to preserve…

  11. A Regression Design Approach to Optimal and Robust Spacing Selection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    release and sale; its distribution is unlimited Acceso For NTIS GRA&I DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS DTIC TAB Unannounced Southern Methodist University F...such as the Cauchy where A is a constant multiple of the identity. In fact, for the Cauchy distribution asymptotically optimal spacing sequences for

  12. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  13. Resource Prospector: Mission Goals, Relevance and Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R. C.; Andrews, D.; Sanders, G.; McGovern, A.; Vaughan, R.; Heldmann, J.; Trimble, J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades a wealth of new observations of the moon have demonstrated a lunar water system dramatically more complex and rich than was deduced following the Apollo era. Observation from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) revealed enhancements of hydrogen near the lunar poles. This observation has since been confirmed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission targeted a permanently shadowed, enhanced hydrogen location within the crater Cabeus. The LCROSS impact showed that at least some of the hydrogen enhancement is in the form of water ice and molecular hydrogen (H2). Other volatiles were also observed in the LCROSS impact cloud, including CO2, CO, an H2S. These volatiles, and in particular water, have the potential to be a valuable or enabling resource for future exploration. In large part due to these new findings, the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) have selected a lunar volatiles prospecting mission for a concept study and potential flight in CY2020. The mission includes a rover-borne payload that (1) can locate surface and near-subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith (up to 1 meter), and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials.

  14. Site selection report: characterization of subsidence over longwall mining panels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-20

    We have completed our evaluation of candidate longwall mines available for study in the Rocky Mountain Coal Province. This report summarizes our views and evaluation of two candidate mines, the Allen Mine in Weston, Colorado, and the Hawk's Nest Mine in Somerset, Colorado. WCC visited the Allen and the Hawk's Nest Mines, and rated them in order of preference for subsidence monitoring according to criteria given in this report. Based on these evaluations and related discussions with the Technical Project Officer, the Hawk's Nest Mine appears to be the preferred mine for subsidence monitoring, because it is the only candidate mine offering two adjacent longwall panels for monitoring wherein a full subsidence profile may be obtained for at least one of the panels. Selection of this mine requires that provisions be made for monitoring 2000 ft of overburden, whereas our proposal addressed a mine with 600 ft of overburden. Changes in instrumentation which may permit the project to remain within the current budget were investigated and are discussed.

  15. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Site closeout report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Selective Agglomeration POC facility consisted of a coal crushing and grinding circuit, followed by an agglomeration circuit and product dewatering. (A plot plan of the facility is shown in Figure 1-2.) The coal crushing and grinding system consisted of a hammermill coal crusher, weigh-belt feeder, two ball mills (primary and secondary), and necessary hoppers, pumps, and conveyors. The mills were capable of providing coal over a range of grinds from a d{sub 50} of 125 to 25 microns. Slurry discharged from the ball mills was pumped to the agglomeration circuit. The agglomeration circuit began with a high-shear mixer, where diesel was added to the slurry to begin the formation of microagglomerates. The high-shear mixer was followed by two stages of conventional flotation cells for microagglomerate recovery. The second-stage-flotation-cell product was pumped to either a rotary-drum vacuum filter or a high-G centrifuge for dewatering. The dewatered product was then convoyed to the product pad from which dump trucks were used to transfer it to the utility plant located next to the facility. Plant tailings were pumped to the water clarifier for thickening and then dewatered in plate-and-frame filter presses. These dewatered tailings were also removed to the utility via dump truck. Clarified water (thickener overflow) was recycled to the process via a head tank.

  16. Coupling GIS and multivariate approaches to reference site selection for wadeable stream monitoring.

    PubMed

    Collier, Kevin J; Haigh, Andy; Kelly, Johlene

    2007-04-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to identify potential reference sites for wadeable stream monitoring, and multivariate analyses were applied to test whether invertebrate communities reflected a priori spatial and stream type classifications. We identified potential reference sites in segments with unmodified vegetation cover adjacent to the stream and in >85% of the upstream catchment. We then used various landcover, amenity and environmental impact databases to eliminate sites that had potential anthropogenic influences upstream and that fell into a range of access classes. Each site identified by this process was coded by four dominant stream classes and seven zones, and 119 candidate sites were randomly selected for follow-up assessment. This process yielded 16 sites conforming to reference site criteria using a conditional-probabilistic design, and these were augmented by an additional 14 existing or special interest reference sites. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) analysis of percent abundance invertebrate data indicated significant differences in community composition among some of the zones and stream classes identified a priori providing qualified support for this framework in reference site selection. NMS analysis of a range standardised condition and diversity metrics derived from the invertebrate data indicated a core set of 26 closely related sites, and four outliers that were considered atypical of reference site conditions and subsequently dropped from the network. Use of GIS linked to stream typology, available spatial databases and aerial photography greatly enhanced the objectivity and efficiency of reference site selection. The multi-metric ordination approach reduced variability among stream types and bias associated with non-random site selection, and provided an effective way to identify representative reference sites.

  17. Centuries of domestication has not impaired oviposition site-selection function in the silkmoth, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra Mahadappa; Rajasekhar, Sowmya Bandhisara; Venkataramanappa, Ravindra Kothapalli; Nandagopal, Bakthavatsalam; Verghese, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Oviposition site-selection in insects is mediated through innate recognition templates (IRTs) tuned to specific chemical cues. These cues aid gravid insects in choosing suitable oviposition sites and may even enhance the fitness of their offspring by warding off predators and parasitoids. However, studies on the evolution of oviposition site-selection and cues instigating oviposition in domesticated insects remain elusive. Using the interaction between the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, and its host plant mulberry, Morus alba, as a model system, we demonstrate that centuries of domestication of silkmoth has not impaired its oviposition site-selection function. Silkmoths significantly preferred mulberry leaves to filter paper as oviposition sites. Oviposition assays with filter paper, filter paper treated with leaf volatiles and leaf alone proved that surface texture was not a significant criterion for oviposition site-selection, but volatile cues were. Oviposition assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from mulberry revealed that two of the volatiles, valencene and α-humulene, aided moths in choosing suitable oviposition sites and enhanced egg-laying significantly. Moreover, we show that generalist egg-parasitoids are strongly repelled by valencene and α-humulene. Our results demonstrate that IRTs tuned to cues that aid crucial functions like oviposition site-selection are less likely to be impaired even after centuries of domestication. PMID:25503440

  18. Centuries of domestication has not impaired oviposition site-selection function in the silkmoth, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra Mahadappa; Rajasekhar, Sowmya Bandhisara; Venkataramanappa, Ravindra Kothapalli; Nandagopal, Bakthavatsalam; Verghese, Abraham

    2014-12-15

    Oviposition site-selection in insects is mediated through innate recognition templates (IRTs) tuned to specific chemical cues. These cues aid gravid insects in choosing suitable oviposition sites and may even enhance the fitness of their offspring by warding off predators and parasitoids. However, studies on the evolution of oviposition site-selection and cues instigating oviposition in domesticated insects remain elusive. Using the interaction between the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, and its host plant mulberry, Morus alba, as a model system, we demonstrate that centuries of domestication of silkmoth has not impaired its oviposition site-selection function. Silkmoths significantly preferred mulberry leaves to filter paper as oviposition sites. Oviposition assays with filter paper, filter paper treated with leaf volatiles and leaf alone proved that surface texture was not a significant criterion for oviposition site-selection, but volatile cues were. Oviposition assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from mulberry revealed that two of the volatiles, valencene and α-humulene, aided moths in choosing suitable oviposition sites and enhanced egg-laying significantly. Moreover, we show that generalist egg-parasitoids are strongly repelled by valencene and α-humulene. Our results demonstrate that IRTs tuned to cues that aid crucial functions like oviposition site-selection are less likely to be impaired even after centuries of domestication.

  19. Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Judzis, Arnis; Black, Alan D; Green, Sidney J; Robertson, Homer A; Bland, Ronald G; Curry, David Alexander; Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W.

    2011-04-19

    To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

  20. Tuning the ion selectivity of tetrameric cation channels by changing the number of ion binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Derebe, Mehabaw G.; Sauer, David B.; Zeng, Weizhong; Alam, Amer; Shi, Ning; Jiang, Youxing

    2011-01-01

    Selective ion conduction across ion channel pores is central to cellular physiology. To understand the underlying principles of ion selectivity in tetrameric cation channels, we engineered a set of cation channel pores based on the nonselective NaK channel and determined their structures to high resolution. These structures showcase an ensemble of selectivity filters with a various number of contiguous ion binding sites ranging from 2 to 4, with each individual site maintaining a geometry and ligand environment virtually identical to that of equivalent sites in K+ channel selectivity filters. Combined with single channel electrophysiology, we show that only the channel with four ion binding sites is K+ selective, whereas those with two or three are nonselective and permeate Na+ and K+ equally well. These observations strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single file is the key determinant of the channel’s selectivity properties and the presence of four sites in K+ channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K+ ions. PMID:21187421

  1. Tuning the ion selectivity of tetrameric cation channels by changing the number of ion binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Derebe, Mehabaw G.; Sauer, David B.; Zeng, Weizhong; Alam, Amer; Shi, Ning; Jiang, Youxing

    2015-11-30

    Selective ion conduction across ion channel pores is central to cellular physiology. To understand the underlying principles of ion selectivity in tetrameric cation channels, we engineered a set of cation channel pores based on the nonselective NaK channel and determined their structures to high resolution. These structures showcase an ensemble of selectivity filters with a various number of contiguous ion binding sites ranging from 2 to 4, with each individual site maintaining a geometry and ligand environment virtually identical to that of equivalent sites in K{sup +} channel selectivity filters. Combined with single channel electrophysiology, we show that only the channel with four ion binding sites is K{sup +} selective, whereas those with two or three are nonselective and permeate Na{sup +} and K{sup +} equally well. These observations strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single file is the key determinant of the channel's selectivity properties and the presence of four sites in K{sup +} channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K{sup +} ions.

  2. On the optimal siting of cubic kilometre scale neutrino telescope infrastructure on the deep-sea floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Priede, Imants G.; Holford, Anne

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose an approach for optimal siting of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope on the sea floor. The method is based on Geographic Information System (GIS) spatial analyses and cost assessment. GIS techniques initially aim to derive depth and slope characteristics of the sea floor, and estimate the distance from shore. Subsequently, GIS methods are used to pre-select sites meeting the KM3NeT infrastructure criteria. Finally, the candidate locations are evaluated in terms of cost estimation. A convex combination of instantaneous cost functions (ICFs) is applied and different weighting factors are allowed to account for dissimilar importance of the considered variables. The ICFs are indexed by a parameter β to assign different cost characteristics to different variables. The overall assessment is based on the comparison of costs computed for the candidate sites assuming many configurations of weights and β values. Our exercise uses a simulated numerical bathymetry to avoid a site-specific evaluation at the initial stage of the KM3NeT project. Hence, no recommendations as to the real locations of the neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea are addressed. Our approach is found to serve well in the process of comparing costs between different candidate sites.

  3. Enzymatic site-selectivity enabled by structure-guided directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Bo; Li, Guangyue; Reetz, Manfred T

    2017-03-15

    Biocatalytic site-selective (regioselective) organic transformations have been practiced for decades, but the traditional limitations of enzymes regarding narrow substrate acceptance and the often observed insufficient degree of selectivity have persisted until recently. With the advent of directed evolution, it is possible to engineer site-selectivity to suit the needs of organic chemists. This review features recent progress in this exciting research area, selected examples involving P450 monooxygenases, halogenases and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases being featured for illustrative purposes. The complementary nature of enzymes and man-made catalysts is emphasized.

  4. Selectivity of ORC binding sites and the relation to replication timing, fragile sites, and deletions in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Benoit; Ji, Zhe; Struhl, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds sites from which DNA replication is initiated. We address ORC binding selectivity in vivo by mapping ∼52,000 ORC2 binding sites throughout the human genome. The ORC binding profile is broader than those of sequence-specific transcription factors, suggesting that ORC is not bound or recruited to specific DNA sequences. Instead, ORC binds nonspecifically to open (DNase I-hypersensitive) regions containing active chromatin marks such as H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation. ORC sites in early and late replicating regions have similar properties, but there are far more ORC sites in early replicating regions. This suggests that replication timing is due primarily to ORC density and stochastic firing of origins. Computational simulation of stochastic firing from identified ORC sites is in accord with replication timing data. Large genomic regions with a paucity of ORC sites are strongly associated with common fragile sites and recurrent deletions in cancers. We suggest that replication origins, replication timing, and replication-dependent chromosome breaks are determined primarily by the genomic distribution of activator proteins at enhancers and promoters. These activators recruit nucleosome-modifying complexes to create the appropriate chromatin structure that allows ORC binding and subsequent origin firing. PMID:27436900

  5. Selectivity of ORC binding sites and the relation to replication timing, fragile sites, and deletions in cancers.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Benoit; Ji, Zhe; Struhl, Kevin

    2016-08-16

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds sites from which DNA replication is initiated. We address ORC binding selectivity in vivo by mapping ∼52,000 ORC2 binding sites throughout the human genome. The ORC binding profile is broader than those of sequence-specific transcription factors, suggesting that ORC is not bound or recruited to specific DNA sequences. Instead, ORC binds nonspecifically to open (DNase I-hypersensitive) regions containing active chromatin marks such as H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation. ORC sites in early and late replicating regions have similar properties, but there are far more ORC sites in early replicating regions. This suggests that replication timing is due primarily to ORC density and stochastic firing of origins. Computational simulation of stochastic firing from identified ORC sites is in accord with replication timing data. Large genomic regions with a paucity of ORC sites are strongly associated with common fragile sites and recurrent deletions in cancers. We suggest that replication origins, replication timing, and replication-dependent chromosome breaks are determined primarily by the genomic distribution of activator proteins at enhancers and promoters. These activators recruit nucleosome-modifying complexes to create the appropriate chromatin structure that allows ORC binding and subsequent origin firing.

  6. Optimized angle selection for radial sampled NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, John M.; Joshua Wand, A.

    2008-12-01

    Sparse sampling offers tremendous potential for overcoming the time limitations imposed by traditional Cartesian sampling of indirectly detected dimensions of multidimensional NMR data. Unfortunately, several otherwise appealing implementations are accompanied by spectral artifacts that have the potential to contaminate the spectrum with false peak intensity. In radial sampling of linked time evolution periods, the artifacts are easily identified and removed from the spectrum if a sufficient set of radial sampling angles is employed. Robust implementation of the radial sampling approach therefore requires optimization of the set of radial sampling angles collected. Here we describe several methods for such optimization. The approaches described take advantage of various aspects of the general simultaneous multidimensional Fourier transform in the analysis of multidimensional NMR data. Radially sampled data are primarily contaminated by ridges extending from authentic peaks. Numerical methods are described that definitively identify artifactual intensity and the optimal set of sampling angles necessary to eliminate it under a variety of scenarios. The algorithms are tested with both simulated and experimentally obtained triple resonance data.

  7. A parallel optimization method for product configuration and supplier selection based on interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Zhang, Meng; Li, Guoxi

    2017-06-01

    In the process of design and manufacturing, product configuration is an important way of product development, and supplier selection is an essential component of supply chain management. To reduce the risk of procurement and maximize the profits of enterprises, this study proposes to combine the product configuration and supplier selection, and express the multiple uncertainties as interval numbers. An integrated optimization model of interval product configuration and supplier selection was established, and NSGA-II was put forward to locate the Pareto-optimal solutions to the interval multiobjective optimization model.

  8. On-Site Additive Manufacturing by Selective Laser Melting of Composite Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateri, M.; Khosravi, M.

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for cost reduction of future space missions by manufacturing parts on foreign planets. The suitability of Selective Laser Melting process for on-site production of metallic, ceramic and glass products on mars is examined.

  9. High yielding and extremely site-selective covalent functionalization of graphene.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Juan Jesús; Calleja, Fabián; Miranda, Rodolfo; Pérez, Emilio M; Vázquez de Parga, Amadeo L

    2017-09-07

    We describe a method to functionalize graphene covalently with 92% yield and 98% site-selectivity and strict spatial periodicity on the nanometer scale. This method could be extended to other functional molecules.

  10. Oviposition site selection by the grasshoppers Melanoplus borealis and M. sanguinipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Female grasshoppers can affect the fitness of their offspring through their selection of oviposition sites. Successful embryological development depends on suitable temperature and moisture levels, factors which may vary considerably on a fine scale in natural environments where grasshoppers occur. ...

  11. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  12. Selection of magnetorheological brake types via optimal design considering maximum torque and constrained volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on optimal design of different types of magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), from which an optimal selection of MRB types is identified. In the optimization, common types of MRB such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-types, and T-shaped type are considered. The optimization problem is to find the optimal value of significant geometric dimensions of the MRB that can produce a maximum braking torque. The MRB is constrained in a cylindrical volume of a specific radius and length. After a brief description of the configuration of MRB types, the braking torques of the MRBs are derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley model of the MR fluid. The optimal design of MRBs constrained in a specific cylindrical volume is then analysed. The objective of the optimization is to maximize the braking torque while the torque ratio (the ratio of maximum braking torque and the zero-field friction torque) is constrained to be greater than a certain value. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is employed to obtain optimal solutions of the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs constrained in different volumes are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, discussions on the optimal selection of MRB types depending on constrained volumes are given.

  13. Optimizing the yield and selectivity of high purity nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Leonard F.

    2011-05-01

    Here we investigate the parameters that govern the yield and selectivity of small clusters composed of nanoparticles using a Monte Carlo simulation that accounts for spatial and dimensional distributions in droplet and nanoparticle density and size. Clustering nanoparticles presents a powerful paradigm with which to access properties not otherwise available using individual molecules, individual nanoparticles or bulk materials. However, the governing parameters that precisely tune the yield and selectivity of clusters fabricated via an electrospray droplet evaporation method followed by purification with differential mobility analysis (DMA) remain poorly understood. We find that the product of the electrospray droplet mean diameter to the third power and nanoparticle concentration governs the yield of individual clusters, while the ratio of the nanoparticle standard deviation to the mean diameter governs the selectivity. The resulting, easily accessible correlations may be used to minimize undesirable clustering, such as protein aggregation in the biopharmaceutical industry, and maximize the yield of a particular type of cluster for nanotechnology and energy applications.

  14. Colony site selection and abandonment by least terns Sterna antillarum in New Jersey, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kotliar, Natasha B.; Burger, Joanna

    1986-01-01

    The presence of shells or pebbles in a sandy substrate, and short, sparse vegetation, were the habitat characteristics of New Jersey least tern colony sites most strongly correlated with colony site selection. Dredge spoil sites had significantly greater evidence of human disturbance, distance to water, and proportion of coarse particles in the substrate than beach sites. These differences may have contributed to the smaller colonines and greater colony turnover rates at spoil sites relative to beach sites. Overall, abandoned colony site characteristics did not differ significantly from occupied sites. However, human disturbance, over-growth of vegetation, predation, and flooding were all prevalent at colonies prior to abandonment. The results of this study suggest techniques for habitat management of both least and little terns.

  15. Development of oxidative coupling strategies for site-selective protein modification.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Adel M; Francis, Matthew B

    2015-07-21

    the challenges and opportunities associated with the optimization of site-selective chemistries that target native amino acids. We close by discussing the most recent reports from our laboratory that have capitalized on the unique reactivity of o-iminoquinone derivatives. We discuss the various oxidants and conditions that can be used to generate these reactive intermediates from appropriate precursors, as well as the product distributions that result. We also describe our work to determine the nature of iminoquinone reactivity with proteins and peptides bearing free N-terminal amino groups. Through this discussion, we hope to facilitate the use of oxidative approaches to protein bioconjugation, as well as inspire the discovery of new reactions for the site-selective modification of biomolecular targets.

  16. Quantitative Framework and Management Expectation Tool for the Selection of Bioremediation Approaches at Chlorinated Solvent Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-19

    Bioremediation Approaches at Chlorinated Solvent Sites March 19, 2015 SERDP & ESTCP Webinar Series (#11) SERDP & ESTCP Webinar Series Welcome and...Expectation Tool for the Selection of Bioremediation Approaches at Chlorinated Solvent Sites Ms. Carmen Lebrón, Independent Consultant (20 minutes + Q&A) Dr...ESTCP Webinar Series Quantitative Framework and Management Expectation Tool for the Selection of Bioremediation Approaches at Chlorinated

  17. Site and bond selective H- formation in methylated pyrimidine bases driven by potassium molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D.; Martins, G.; Nunes, Y.; Garcia, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2012-11-01

    In this study we present for the first time site (N1-H / N3-H) and bond (N-H / C-H) selectivity of H- formation in 1-methylthymine, 3-methyluracil and deuterated thymine (C positions) triggered by potassium molecule collisions. By comparing the H loss of these molecules with H loss in thymine and uracil and setting the energy one can predict site and bond selectivity in these set of molecules.

  18. Significant Selective Constraint at 4-Fold Degenerate Sites in the Avian Genome and Its Consequence for Detection of Positive Selection

    PubMed Central

    Künstner, Axel; Nabholz, Benoit; Ellegren, Hans

    2011-01-01

    A major conclusion from comparative genomics is that many sequences that do not code for proteins are conserved beyond neutral expectations, indicating that they evolve under the influence of purifying selection and are likely to have functional roles. Due to the degeneracy of the genetic code, synonymous sites within protein-coding genes have previously been seen as “silent” with respect to function and thereby invisible to selection. However, there are indications that synonymous sites of vertebrate genomes are also subject to selection and this is not necessarily because of potential codon bias. We used divergence in ancestral repeats as a neutral reference to estimate the constraint on 4-fold degenerate sites of avian genes in a whole-genome approach. In the pairwise comparison of chicken and zebra finch, constraint was estimated at 24–32%. Based on three-species alignments of chicken, turkey, and zebra finch, lineage-specific estimates of constraint were 43%, 29%, and 24%, respectively. The finding of significant constraint at 4-fold degenerate sites from data on interspecific divergence was replicated in an analysis of intraspecific diversity in the chicken genome. These observations corroborate recent data from mammalian genomes and call for a reappraisal of the use of synonymous substitution rates as neutral standards in molecular evolutionary analysis, for example, in the use of the well-known dN/dS ratio and in inferences on positive selection. We show by simulations that the rate of false positives in the detection of positively selected genes and sites increases several-fold at the levels of constraint at 4-fold degenerate sites found in this study. PMID:22042333

  19. Optimization of selection for growth in Menz sheep while minimizing inbreeding depression in fitness traits.

    PubMed

    Gizaw, Solomon; Getachew, Tesfaye; Haile, Aynalem; Rischkowsky, Barbara; Sölkner, Johann; Tibbo, Markos

    2013-06-19

    The genetic trends in fitness (inbreeding, fertility and survival) of a closed nucleus flock of Menz sheep under selection during ten years for increased body weight were investigated to evaluate the consequences of selection for body weight on fitness. A mate selection tool was used to optimize in retrospect the actual selection and matings conducted over the project period to assess if the observed genetic gains in body weight could have been achieved with a reduced level of inbreeding. In the actual selection, the genetic trends for yearling weight, fertility of ewes and survival of lambs were 0.81 kg, -0.00026% and 0.016% per generation. The average inbreeding coefficient remained zero for the first few generations and then tended to increase over generations. The genetic gains achieved with the optimized retrospective selection and matings were highly comparable with the observed values, the correlation between the average breeding values of lambs born from the actual and optimized matings over the years being 0.99. However, the level of inbreeding with the optimized mate selections remained zero until late in the years of selection. Our results suggest that an optimal selection strategy that considers both genetic merits and coancestry of mates should be adopted to sustain the Menz sheep breeding program.

  20. Simulation-optimization framework for multi-site multi-season hybrid stochastic streamflow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Roshan; Srinivasan, K.; Sudheer, K. P.

    2016-11-01

    A simulation-optimization (S-O) framework is developed for the hybrid stochastic modeling of multi-site multi-season streamflows. The multi-objective optimization model formulated is the driver and the multi-site, multi-season hybrid matched block bootstrap model (MHMABB) is the simulation engine within this framework. The multi-site multi-season simulation model is the extension of the existing single-site multi-season simulation model. A robust and efficient evolutionary search based technique, namely, non-dominated sorting based genetic algorithm (NSGA - II) is employed as the solution technique for the multi-objective optimization within the S-O framework. The objective functions employed are related to the preservation of the multi-site critical deficit run sum and the constraints introduced are concerned with the hybrid model parameter space, and the preservation of certain statistics (such as inter-annual dependence and/or skewness of aggregated annual flows). The efficacy of the proposed S-O framework is brought out through a case example from the Colorado River basin. The proposed multi-site multi-season model AMHMABB (whose parameters are obtained from the proposed S-O framework) preserves the temporal as well as the spatial statistics of the historical flows. Also, the other multi-site deficit run characteristics namely, the number of runs, the maximum run length, the mean run sum and the mean run length are well preserved by the AMHMABB model. Overall, the proposed AMHMABB model is able to show better streamflow modeling performance when compared with the simulation based SMHMABB model, plausibly due to the significant role played by: (i) the objective functions related to the preservation of multi-site critical deficit run sum; (ii) the huge hybrid model parameter space available for the evolutionary search and (iii) the constraint on the preservation of the inter-annual dependence. Split-sample validation results indicate that the AMHMABB model is

  1. Data-Driven Surface Traversability Analysis for Mars 2020 Landing Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Rothrock, Brandon; Almeida, Eduardo; Ansar, Adnan; Otero, Richard; Huertas, Andres; Heverly, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is three-fold: 1) to describe the engineering challenges in the surface mobility of the Mars 2020 Rover mission that are considered in the landing site selection processs, 2) to introduce new automated traversability analysis capabilities, and 3) to present the preliminary analysis results for top candidate landing sites. The analysis capabilities presented in this paper include automated terrain classification, automated rock detection, digital elevation model (DEM) generation, and multi-ROI (region of interest) route planning. These analysis capabilities enable to fully utilize the vast volume of high-resolution orbiter imagery, quantitatively evaluate surface mobility requirements for each candidate site, and reject subjectivity in the comparison between sites in terms of engineering considerations. The analysis results supported the discussion in the Second Landing Site Workshop held in August 2015, which resulted in selecting eight candidate sites that will be considered in the third workshop.

  2. Data-Driven Surface Traversability Analysis for Mars 2020 Landing Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Rothrock, Brandon; Almeida, Eduardo; Ansar, Adnan; Otero, Richard; Huertas, Andres; Heverly, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is three-fold: 1) to describe the engineering challenges in the surface mobility of the Mars 2020 Rover mission that are considered in the landing site selection processs, 2) to introduce new automated traversability analysis capabilities, and 3) to present the preliminary analysis results for top candidate landing sites. The analysis capabilities presented in this paper include automated terrain classification, automated rock detection, digital elevation model (DEM) generation, and multi-ROI (region of interest) route planning. These analysis capabilities enable to fully utilize the vast volume of high-resolution orbiter imagery, quantitatively evaluate surface mobility requirements for each candidate site, and reject subjectivity in the comparison between sites in terms of engineering considerations. The analysis results supported the discussion in the Second Landing Site Workshop held in August 2015, which resulted in selecting eight candidate sites that will be considered in the third workshop.

  3. Oriented Scanning Is the Leading Mechanism Underlying 5′ Splice Site Selection in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Borensztajn, Keren; Sobrier, Marie-Laure; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Tapon-Bretaudière, Jacqueline; Amselem, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Splice site selection is a key element of pre-mRNA splicing. Although it is known to involve specific recognition of short consensus sequences by the splicing machinery, the mechanisms by which 5′ splice sites are accurately identified remain controversial and incompletely resolved. The human F7 gene contains in its seventh intron (IVS7) a 37-bp VNTR minisatellite whose first element spans the exon7–IVS7 boundary. As a consequence, the IVS7 authentic donor splice site is followed by several cryptic splice sites identical in sequence, referred to as 5′ pseudo-sites, which normally remain silent. This region, therefore, provides a remarkable model to decipher the mechanism underlying 5′ splice site selection in mammals. We previously suggested a model for splice site selection that, in the presence of consecutive splice consensus sequences, would stimulate exclusively the selection of the most upstream 5′ splice site, rather than repressing the 3′ following pseudo-sites. In the present study, we provide experimental support to this hypothesis by using a mutational approach involving a panel of 50 mutant and wild-type F7 constructs expressed in various cell types. We demonstrate that the F7 IVS7 5′ pseudo-sites are functional, but do not compete with the authentic donor splice site. Moreover, we show that the selection of the 5′ splice site follows a scanning-type mechanism, precluding competition with other functional 5′ pseudo-sites available on immediate sequence context downstream of the activated one. In addition, 5′ pseudo-sites with an increased complementarity to U1snRNA up to 91% do not compete with the identified scanning mechanism. Altogether, these findings, which unveil a cell type–independent 5′−3′-oriented scanning process for accurate recognition of the authentic 5′ splice site, reconciliate apparently contradictory observations by establishing a hierarchy of competitiveness among the determinants involved in 5′ splice

  4. Selection of den sites by black bears in the southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Mitchell, M.S.; Powell, R.A.; Brown, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated selection of den sites by American black bears (Ursus americanus) in the Pisgah Bear Sanctuary, western North Carolina, by comparing characteristics of dens at 53 den sites with availability of habitat characteristics in annual home ranges of bears and in the study area. We also tested whether den-site selection differed by sex, age, and reproductive status of bears. In addition, we evaluated whether the den component of an existing habitat model for black bears predicted where bears would select den sites. We found bears selected den sites far from gravel roads, on steep slopes, and at high elevations relative to what was available in both annual home ranges and in the study area. Den-site selection did not differ by sex or age, but it differed by reproductive status. Adult females with cubs preferred to den in areas that were relatively far from gravel roads, but adult females without cubs did not. The habitat model overestimated the value of areas near gravel roads, underestimated the value of moderately steep areas, and did not include elevation as a predictor variable. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating den selection in terms of both use and availability of den characteristics. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  5. Optimal parametrization of electrodynamical battery model using model selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-García, Andrés; Alfonsín, Víctor; Urréjola, Santiago; Sánchez, Ángel

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the mathematical parametrization of an electrodynamical battery model using different model selection criteria. A good modeling technique is needed by the battery management units in order to increase battery lifetime. The elements of battery models can be mathematically parametrized to enhance their implementation in simulation environments. In this work, the best mathematical parametrizations are selected using three model selection criteria: the coefficient of determination (R2), the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayes Information Criterion (BIC). The R2 criterion only takes into account the error of the mathematical parametrizations, whereas AIC and BIC consider complexity. A commercial 40 Ah lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery is modeled and then simulated for contrasting. The OpenModelica open-source modeling and simulation environment is used for doing the battery simulations. The mean percent error of the simulations is 0.0985% for the models parametrized with R2 , 0.2300% for the AIC ones, and 0.3756% for the BIC ones. As expected, the R2 selected the most precise, complex and slowest mathematical parametrizations. The AIC criterion chose parametrizations with similar accuracy, but simpler and faster than the R2 ones.

  6. L-O-S-T: Logging Optimization Selection Technique

    Treesearch

    Jerry L. Koger; Dennis B. Webster

    1984-01-01

    L-O-S-T is a FORTRAN computer program developed to systematically quantify, analyze, and improve user selected harvesting methods. Harvesting times and costs are computed for road construction, landing construction, system move between landings, skidding, and trucking. A linear programming formulation utilizing the relationships among marginal analysis, isoquants, and...

  7. On some Methods for Constructing Optimal Subset Selection Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any purpose of the United States Government. cc-I U On Some Methods for Constructing Optimal...Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any purpose of the United States Government. 2/ LL-mma 1. A Family of’ distributions P, has SIP in...if" E ,,(X) , Eep(X) for,9 - _3 - - 𔃽 - al I non-decre:asin integralle function ip(x) and all (3 < It is ea;v to generalize Alam’s result in [1] as

  8. Site Selection and Automatically Calculated Rover Traverse for a Lunar Teleoperated Landing Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard; Flahaut, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    With the recent interest for the Moon, and the plans from the ESA side to do a tele-operated mission from Earth or lunar orbit, it is important to target a well-defined location. One of the major topics to study on the Moon is the existence and availability of volatiles and ices. Because no lander ever visited one of the poles on the Moon the theories with respect to water ice are only based on data from orbiters. In a four month research project the data from the orbiters was used for assessing potential landing sites and a rover traverse planning. Mainly data from the Prospector and LRO were used to select regions of interest. The prior selection was based on slope, temperature and a geological map from the USGS. Three sites on both the North as South Pole were used to test a proposed method for rover traverse planning. Besides the scientific interest, the sites where assessed on its accessibility for landing and roving. This assessment was done based on some assumptions what would be possible for landing and roving. For landing sites it was proposed to pick a site larger than 1km in diameter, in a (partial) illuminated area with a slope lower than 5o, which was inside an area which would be accessible for a rover. The requirements to be selected as accessible area was a slope lower than 20o, the largest polygon which meets this requirement was chosen as accessible area. As destination a site in the PSR was selected which was inside the accessible area and had extremely low temperatures. The boundary for extremely low was defined as 54K which is the sublimation temperature of CO2 in lunar atmospheric pressure. As additional target for the rover a site was selected where the temperature difference would be more than 150K to study volatile migration processes. A combination of tools in ArcGIS were used to do the site selection and rover traverse planning. In the end Rozhdestvensky and Amundsen were selected as most accessible and interesting. After comparing both

  9. Selecting radiotherapy dose distributions by means of constrained optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, J C L; Buttazzo, G; García-Archilla, B; Herrero, M A; Núñez, L

    2014-05-01

    The main steps in planning radiotherapy consist in selecting for any patient diagnosed with a solid tumor (i) a prescribed radiation dose on the tumor, (ii) bounds on the radiation side effects on nearby organs at risk and (iii) a fractionation scheme specifying the number and frequency of therapeutic sessions during treatment. The goal of any radiotherapy treatment is to deliver on the tumor a radiation dose as close as possible to that selected in (i), while at the same time conforming to the constraints prescribed in (ii). To this day, considerable uncertainties remain concerning the best manner in which such issues should be addressed. In particular, the choice of a prescription radiation dose is mostly based on clinical experience accumulated on the particular type of tumor considered, without any direct reference to quantitative radiobiological assessment. Interestingly, mathematical models for the effect of radiation on biological matter have existed for quite some time, and are widely acknowledged by clinicians. However, the difficulty to obtain accurate in vivo measurements of the radiobiological parameters involved has severely restricted their direct application in current clinical practice.In this work, we first propose a mathematical model to select radiation dose distributions as solutions (minimizers) of suitable variational problems, under the assumption that key radiobiological parameters for tumors and organs at risk involved are known. Second, by analyzing the dependence of such solutions on the parameters involved, we then discuss the manner in which the use of those minimizers can improve current decision-making processes to select clinical dosimetries when (as is generally the case) only partial information on model radiosensitivity parameters is available. A comparison of the proposed radiation dose distributions with those actually delivered in a number of clinical cases strongly suggests that solutions of our mathematical model can be

  10. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  11. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    PubMed

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  12. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  13. Criteria for Site Selection of Temporary Shelters after Earthquakes: a Delphi Panel

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ahmad; Ardalan, Ali; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After a devastating earthquake, the site selection for the sheltering of earthquake victims is an important task. In order to generate a list of appropriate criteria for deciding on temporary sheltering site selection, we systematically combined the experience of experts and the findings of published documents in this study. Methods: Having explored published papers, we generated a list of criteria for the selection of the best location for temporary sheltering. In the next step, all criteria were presented to a group of experts in Iran and after a scientific discussion, the list was updated. In the last step, the final list of criteria was developed using the Delphi method in three rounds. Results: Based on our previous systematic review, 27 criteria were presented for sheltering site selection. Expert interviews added 12 more items to them. The Delphi process approved 21 criteria of all proposed ones. These items then grouped into four categories: land suitability, socio-cultural considerations, service availability and disaster risk reduction. Discussion: After an earthquake, our list of criteria may help the disaster team to select the best locations for temporary sheltering with minimum confusion. The consent of the earthquake victims and cost reduction of the operation would be the minimum benefits of using the appropriate criteria. These criteria also could be used by researchers to make objective and reproducible assessments of temporary sheltering site selection. Key words: Criteria, Earthquake, Model, Site selection, Temporary shelter, PMID:26693079

  14. Resource Utilization and Site Selection for a Self-Sufficient Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Donald; Chamitoff, Gregory; James, George

    1998-01-01

    As a planet with striking similarities to Earth, Mars is an important focus for scientific research aimed at understanding the processes of planetary evolution and the formation of our solar system. Fortunately, Mars is also a planet with abundant natural resources, including assessible materials that can be used to support human life and to sustain a self-sufficient martian outpost. Resources required include water, breathable air, food, shelter, energy, and fuel. Through a mission design based on in situ resource development, we can establish a permanent outpost on Mars beginning with the first manned mission. This paper examines the potential for supporting the first manned mission with the objective of achieving self-sufficiency through well-understood resource development and a program of rigorous scientific research aimed at extending that capability. We examine the potential for initially extracting critical resources from the martian environment, and discuss the scientific investigations required to identify additional resources in the atmosphere, on the surface, and within the subsurface. We also discuss our current state of knowledge of Mars, technical considerations of resource utilization, and using unmanned missions' data for selecting an optimal site. The primary goal of achieving self-sufficiency on Mars would accelerate the development of human colonization beyond Earth, while providing a robust and permanent martian base from which humans can explore and conduct long-term research on planetary evolution, the solar system, and life itself.

  15. Cyberinfrastructure for eddy covariance systems: From site selection to data submission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, A.; Salayandia, L.; Laney, C.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is one of the most direct methods to measure the vertical turbulence that drives the mass exchange of heat, water vapor, and carbon within the atmospheric boundary layer. EC is mathematically complex and challenging to implement, especially for a researcher with little experience. Therefore, significant care in setting up the EC equipment and processing data is required; failure to do so may cause numerous types of data errors. In addition, analysis of data from flux towers is site specific, and it is nearly impossible to use a uniform methodology across different ecosystems. Although, a large effort to unify different approaches is being done by national and international flux networks (e.g., FLUXNET, Ameriflux, CarboEurope, NEON), as well as the flux community in general; Implementation remains challenging especially for non-experience users and small labs striving to collaborate with large networks. Here, we introduce Semantic Abstract Workflows (SAWs) as a novel approach to document and manage the processes used for the implementation of an eddy covariance research site. From site selection, data collection, data processing, data preparation for submission to community networks. Our eddy covariance tower represents the Chihuahuan Desert and specifically aids the study of land-atmosphere interactions in a mixed creosote (Larrea tridentata) - mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) shrubland located within the Jornada Experimental Range, USDA ARS, Las Cruces, NM. . Documented processes in the form of SAWs were constructed using the Wdo-it tool1. These SAWs are currently being used to annotate data as is being generated from the Jornada EC site. The Provenance Mark-up Language (PML) is being used to structure such annotations in a form that effectively captures provenance of data. Another tool called Probe-IT is then used to analyze data from a provenance perspective. SAWs provide a simple graphical notation intended to facilitate reuse of process

  16. a New Framework for Geospatial Site Selection Using Artificial Neural Networks as Decision Rules: a Case Study on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujayyab, S. K. M.; Ahamad, M. A. S.; Yahya, A. S.; Saad, A.-M. H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    This paper briefly introduced the theory and framework of geospatial site selection (GSS) and discussed the application and framework of artificial neural networks (ANNs). The related literature on the use of ANNs as decision rules in GSS is scarce from 2000 till 2015. As this study found, ANNs are not only adaptable to dynamic changes but also capable of improving the objectivity of acquisition in GSS, reducing time consumption, and providing high validation. ANNs make for a powerful tool for solving geospatial decision-making problems by enabling geospatial decision makers to implement their constraints and imprecise concepts. This tool offers a way to represent and handle uncertainty. Specifically, ANNs are decision rules implemented to enhance conventional GSS frameworks. The main assumption in implementing ANNs in GSS is that the current characteristics of existing sites are indicative of the degree of suitability of new locations with similar characteristics. GSS requires several input criteria that embody specific requirements and the desired site characteristics, which could contribute to geospatial sites. In this study, the proposed framework consists of four stages for implementing ANNs in GSS. A multilayer feed-forward network with a backpropagation algorithm was used to train the networks from prior sites to assess, generalize, and evaluate the outputs on the basis of the inputs for the new sites. Two metrics, namely, confusion matrix and receiver operating characteristic tests, were utilized to achieve high accuracy and validation. Results proved that ANNs provide reasonable and efficient results as an accurate and inexpensive quantitative technique for GSS.

  17. Structure based lead optimization approach in discovery of selective DPP4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghate, Manjunath; Jain, Shailesh V

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive metabolic disorder that has profound consequences for individuals, families, and society. To date, main available oral antidiabetic medications target either insulin resistance (metformin, glitazones), or insulin deficiency (sulfonylureas, glinides), but leading to shortfalls in medication. Advancement in modern oral hypoglycemic agents may be encouraged with or in place of traditional therapies. The lower risk for hypoglycemic events as compared with other insulinotropic or insulin-sensitizing agents make DPP-4 inhibitors very promising candidates for a more physiological treatment of type-2 diabetes. Only some DPP-4 inhibitors are currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and various inhibitors currently undergoing animal and human testing. A number of catalytically active DPPs distinct from DPP-4 (DPP II, FAP, DPP-8, and DPP-9) have been described that is associated with side-effect and toxicity. To discover potent and selective and safer drugs in a shorter time frame and with reduced cost it requires using an innovative approach for designing novel inhibitors. This review article focuses on the status of advanced lead candidates of DPP group and their binding affinity with the active site residue of target structure which help in discovery of potent and selective DPP-4 inhibitors by lead optimization approach.

  18. Selection of Reserves for Woodland Caribou Using an Optimization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Richard R.; Hauer, Grant; Dawe, Kimberly; Adamowicz, Wiktor; Boutin, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Habitat protection has been identified as an important strategy for the conservation of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus). However, because of the economic opportunity costs associated with protection it is unlikely that all caribou ranges can be protected in their entirety. We used an optimization approach to identify reserve designs for caribou in Alberta, Canada, across a range of potential protection targets. Our designs minimized costs as well as three demographic risk factors: current industrial footprint, presence of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and climate change. We found that, using optimization, 60% of current caribou range can be protected (including 17% in existing parks) while maintaining access to over 98% of the value of resources on public lands. The trade-off between minimizing cost and minimizing demographic risk factors was minimal because the spatial distributions of cost and risk were similar. The prospects for protection are much reduced if protection is directed towards the herds that are most at risk of near-term extirpation. PMID:22363702

  19. Selection of reserves for woodland caribou using an optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Richard R; Hauer, Grant; Dawe, Kimberly; Adamowicz, Wiktor; Boutin, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Habitat protection has been identified as an important strategy for the conservation of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus). However, because of the economic opportunity costs associated with protection it is unlikely that all caribou ranges can be protected in their entirety. We used an optimization approach to identify reserve designs for caribou in Alberta, Canada, across a range of potential protection targets. Our designs minimized costs as well as three demographic risk factors: current industrial footprint, presence of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and climate change. We found that, using optimization, 60% of current caribou range can be protected (including 17% in existing parks) while maintaining access to over 98% of the value of resources on public lands. The trade-off between minimizing cost and minimizing demographic risk factors was minimal because the spatial distributions of cost and risk were similar. The prospects for protection are much reduced if protection is directed towards the herds that are most at risk of near-term extirpation.

  20. Optimal selection of Orbital Replacement Unit on-orbit spares - A Space Station system availability model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaab, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical programing model is presented to optimize the selection of Orbital Replacement Unit on-orbit spares for the Space Station. The model maximizes system availability under the constraints of logistics resupply-cargo weight and volume allocations.

  1. Optimization of gene sequences under constant mutational pressure and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Gierlik, A.; Mackiewicz, P.; Cebrat, S.; Dudek, M. R.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the influence of constant mutational pressure and selection on the nucleotide composition of DNA sequences of various size, which were represented by the genes of the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. With the help of MC simulations we have found that longer DNA sequences accumulate much less base substitutions per sequence length than short sequences. This leads us to the conclusion that the accuracy of replication may determine the size of genome.

  2. A Multi-Site Study on Medical School Selection, Performance, Motivation and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, A.; Croiset, G.; Schripsema, N. R.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Spaai, G. W.; Hulsman, R. L.; Kusurkar, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Medical schools seek ways to improve their admissions strategies, since the available methods prove to be suboptimal for selecting the best and most motivated students. In this multi-site cross-sectional questionnaire study, we examined the value of (different) selection procedures compared to a weighted lottery procedure, which includes direct…

  3. Positive Darwinian selection at single amino acid sites conferring plant virus resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Explicit evaluation of the accuracy and power of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods for detecting site-specific positive Darwinian selection presents a challenge because selective consequences of single amino acid changes are generally unknown. We exploit extensive molecular and functional cha...

  4. Application’s Method of Quadratic Programming for Optimization of Portfolio Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Shigeru; Takamoto, Masanori; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro

    Investors or fund-managers face with optimization of portfolio selection, which means that determine the kind and the quantity of investment among several brands. We have developed a method to obtain optimal stock’s portfolio more rapidly from twice to three times than conventional method with efficient universal optimization. The method is characterized by quadratic matrix of utility function and constrained matrices divided into several sub-matrices by focusing on structure of these matrices.

  5. Sensor Selection and Optimization for Health Assessment of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Kopasakis, George; Santi, Louis M.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Aerospace systems are developed similarly to other large-scale systems through a series of reviews, where designs are modified as system requirements are refined. For space-based systems few are built and placed into service. These research vehicles have limited historical experience to draw from and formidable reliability and safety requirements, due to the remote and severe environment of space. Aeronautical systems have similar reliability and safety requirements, and while these systems may have historical information to access, commercial and military systems require longevity under a range of operational conditions and applied loads. Historically, the design of aerospace systems, particularly the selection of sensors, is based on the requirements for control and performance rather than on health assessment needs. Furthermore, the safety and reliability requirements are met through sensor suite augmentation in an ad hoc, heuristic manner, rather than any systematic approach. A review of the current sensor selection practice within and outside of the aerospace community was conducted and a sensor selection architecture is proposed that will provide a justifiable, dependable sensor suite to address system health assessment requirements.

  6. Sensor Selection and Optimization for Health Assessment of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Kopasakis, George; Santi, Louis M.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Aerospace systems are developed similarly to other large-scale systems through a series of reviews, where designs are modified as system requirements are refined. For space-based systems few are built and placed into service these research vehicles have limited historical experience to draw from and formidable reliability and safety requirements, due to the remote and severe environment of space. Aeronautical systems have similar reliability and safety requirements, and while these systems may have historical information to access, commercial and military systems require longevity under a range of operational conditions and applied loads. Historically, the design of aerospace systems, particularly the selection of sensors, is based on the requirements for control and performance rather than on health assessment needs. Furthermore, the safety and reliability requirements are met through sensor suite augmentation in an ad hoc, heuristic manner, rather than any systematic approach. A review of the current sensor selection practice within and outside of the aerospace community was conducted and a sensor selection architecture is proposed that will provide a justifiable, defendable sensor suite to address system health assessment requirements.

  7. Optimal band selection for dimensionality reduction of hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, Stephen D.; Wilson, Bruce E.; Peterson, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperspectral images have many bands requiring significant computational power for machine interpretation. During image pre-processing, regions of interest that warrant full examination need to be identified quickly. One technique for speeding up the processing is to use only a small subset of bands to determine the 'interesting' regions. The problem addressed here is how to determine the fewest bands required to achieve a specified performance goal for pixel classification. The band selection problem has been addressed previously Chen et al., Ghassemian et al., Henderson et al., and Kim et al.. Some popular techniques for reducing the dimensionality of a feature space, such as principal components analysis, reduce dimensionality by computing new features that are linear combinations of the original features. However, such approaches require measuring and processing all the available bands before the dimensionality is reduced. Our approach, adapted from previous multidimensional signal analysis research, is simpler and achieves dimensionality reduction by selecting bands. Feature selection algorithms are used to determine which combination of bands has the lowest probability of pixel misclassification. Two elements required by this approach are a choice of objective function and a choice of search strategy.

  8. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  9. Golden-cheeked warbler males participate in nest-site selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graber, A.E.; Davis, C.A.; Leslie, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Nest-site selection behaviors have rarely been described for songbirds. Furthermore, male involvement in nest-site selection is generally assumed to be minimal among most species, especially those predominantly exhibiting female nest building. This assumption has held true for the federally endangered Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia), a breeding resident of central Texas. We observed Golden-cheeked Warbler males and females searching for nest sites together on three separate occasions, 2001-2003. Although rare, such observations add to our knowledge of the life history of songbirds.

  10. Optimizing the sequence of diameter distributions and selection harvests for uneven-aged stand management

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Haight; J. Douglas Brodie; Darius M. Adams

    1985-01-01

    The determination of an optimal sequence of diameter distributions and selection harvests for uneven-aged stand management is formulated as a discrete-time optimal-control problem with bounded control variables and free-terminal point. An efficient programming technique utilizing gradients provides solutions that are stable and interpretable on the basis of economic...

  11. Automated selection of appropriate pheromone representations in ant colony optimization.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James; Randall, Marcus; Hendtlass, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) is a constructive metaheuristic that uses an analogue of ant trail pheromones to learn about good features of solutions. Critically, the pheromone representation for a particular problem is usually chosen intuitively rather than by following any systematic process. In some representations, distinct solutions appear multiple times, increasing the effective size of the search space and potentially misleading ants as to the true learned value of those solutions. In this article, we present a novel system for automatically generating appropriate pheromone representations, based on the characteristics of the problem model that ensures unique pheromone representation of solutions. This is the first stage in the development of a generalized ACO system that could be applied to a wide range of problems with little or no modification. However, the system we propose may be used in the development of any problem-specific ACO algorithm.

  12. Selection of optimal composition-control parameters for friable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, Yu.N.; Vdovkin, A.V.

    1988-05-01

    A method for composition analysis of coal and minerals is proposed which uses scattered gamma radiation and does away with preliminary sample preparation to ensure homogeneous particle density, surface area, and size. Reduction of the error induced by material heterogeneity has previously been achieved by rotation of the control object during analysis. A further refinement is proposed which addresses the necessity that the contribution of the radiation scattered from each individual surface to the total intensity be the same. This is achieved by providing a constant linear rate of travel for the irradiated spot through back-and-forth motion of the sensor. An analytical expression is given for the laws of motion for the sensor and test tube which provides for uniform irradiated area movement along a path analogous to the Archimedes spiral. The relationships obtained permit optimization of measurement parameters in analyzing friable materials which are not uniform in grain size.

  13. About the use of vector optimization for company's contractors selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Medvedev, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    For effective functioning of an enterprise it is necessary to make a right choice of partners: suppliers of raw material, buyers of finished products, and others with which the company interacts in the course of their business. However, the presence on the market of big amount of enterprises makes the choice of the most appropriate among them very difficult and requires the ability to objectively assess of the possible partners, based on multilateral analysis of their activities. This analysis can be carried out based on the solution of multiobjective problem of mathematical programming by using the methods of vector optimization. The present work addresses the theoretical foundations of such approach and also describes an algorithm realizing proposed method on practical example.

  14. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons Instrument Onboard MSL Mission: Selection of Landing Site from HEND/Odyssey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2007-03-01

    This abstract contains description of DAN instrument selected for MSL mission and results of analysis of prioritized landing site selections (First MSL Landing Site Workshop) based on HEND/Odyssey data.

  15. Reference site selection for wetland condition assessments: Integrating best professional judgement and objective selection criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Wetlands Condition Assessment (NWCA), one of a series of water assessments being conducted by states, tribes, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other partners, surveyed over 900 wetland sites across the lower 48 states during Summer 2011. The NWCA ...

  16. Reference site selection for wetland condition assessments: Integrating best professional judgement and objective selection criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Wetlands Condition Assessment (NWCA), one of a series of water assessments being conducted by states, tribes, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other partners, surveyed over 900 wetland sites across the lower 48 states during Summer 2011. The NWCA ...

  17. Selection on Inversion Breakpoints Favors Proximity to Pairing Sensitive Sites in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Corbett-Detig, Russell B

    2016-09-01

    Chromosomal inversions are widespread among taxa, and have been implicated in a number of biological processes including adaptation, sex chromosome evolution, and segregation distortion. Consistent with selection favoring linkage between loci, it is well established that length is a selected trait of inversions. However, the factors that affect the distribution of inversion breakpoints remain poorly understood. "Sensitive sites" have been mapped on all euchromatic chromosome arms in Drosophila melanogaster, and may be a source of natural selection on inversion breakpoint positions. Briefly, sensitive sites are genomic regions wherein proximal structural rearrangements result in large reductions in local recombination rates in heterozygotes. Here, I show that breakpoints of common inversions are significantly more likely to lie within a cytological band containing a sensitive site than are breakpoints of rare inversions. Furthermore, common inversions for which neither breakpoint intersects a sensitive site are significantly longer than rare inversions, but common inversions whose breakpoints intersect a sensitive site show no evidence for increased length. I interpret these results to mean that selection favors inversions whose breakpoints disrupt synteny near to sensitive sites, possibly because these inversions suppress recombination in large genomic regions. To my knowledge this is the first evidence consistent with positive selection acting on inversion breakpoint positions. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Optimizing purebred selection for crossbred performance using QTL with different degrees of dominance

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Jack CM; Chakraborty, Reena

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed to optimize simultaneous selection for a quantitative trait with a known QTL within a male and a female line to maximize crossbred performance from a two-way cross. Strategies to maximize cumulative discounted response in crossbred performance over ten generations were derived by optimizing weights in an index of a QTL and phenotype. Strategies were compared to selection on purebred phenotype. Extra responses were limited for QTL with additive and partial dominance effects, but substantial for QTL with over-dominance, for which optimal QTL selection resulted in differential selection in male and female lines to increase the frequency of heterozygotes and polygenic responses. For over-dominant QTL, maximization of crossbred performance one generation at a time resulted in similar responses as optimization across all generations and simultaneous optimal selection in a male and female line resulted in greater response than optimal selection within a single line without crossbreeding. Results show that strategic use of information on over-dominant QTL can enhance crossbred performance without crossbred testing. PMID:15107268

  19. Rapid screening of endonuclease target site preference using a modified bacterial two-plasmid selection.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Jason M; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Edgell, David R

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases and other site-specific endonucleases have potential applications in genome editing, yet efficient targeting requires a thorough understanding of DNA-sequence specificity. Here, we describe a modified two-plasmid genetic selection in Escherichia coli that allows rapid profiling of nucleotide substitutions within a target site of given endonucleases. The selection utilizes a toxic plasmid (pTox) that encodes a DNA gyrase toxin in addition to the endonuclease target site. Cleavage of the toxic plasmid by an endonuclease expressed from a second plasmid (pEndo) facilitates growth under selective conditions. The modified protocol utilizes competent cells harboring the endonuclease expression plasmid into which target site plasmids are transformed. Replica plating on nonselective and selective media plates identifies cleavable and non-cleavable targets. Thus, a library of randomized target sites, or many individual target sites, can be analyzed using a single transformation. Both cleavable and non-cleavable targets can be analyzed by DNA sequencing to gain information about nucleotide preference in the endonuclease's target site.

  20. Crystal-Site-Selective Spectrum of Fe3O4 Obtained by Mössbauer Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shin; Mitsui, Takaya; Fujiwara, Kosuke; Ikeda, Naoshi; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Shimomura, Susumu

    2017-02-01

    We have succeeded for the first time in obtaining a crystal-site-selective Mössbauer spectrum of Fe3O4 using the Mössbauer diffractometer at SPring-8 BL11XU. In order to extract the nuclear resonant scattering, which provides the crystal-site-selective emission spectrum, reflections having a Bragg angle near 45° were used. The 666 and 10 10 0 reflection spectra reveal only B- and A-site spectra, respectively. Mössbauer diffraction spectroscopy enables us to measure the crystal-site-selective spectrum and to determine the precise hyperfine structure. This technique provides new possibilities for studying the local crystallographic and magnetic structure on iron sublattices in various multisite materials.