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Sample records for optimal solvent cycle

  1. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  2. On optimal velocity during cycling.

    PubMed

    Maroński, R

    1994-02-01

    This paper focuses on the solution of two problems related to cycling. One is to determine the velocity as a function of distance which minimizes the cyclist's energy expenditure in covering a given distance in a set time. The other is to determine the velocity as a function of the distance which minimizes time for fixed energy expenditure. To solve these problems, an equation of motion for the cyclist riding over arbitrary terrain is written using Newton's second law. This equation is used to evaluate either energy expenditure or time, and the minimization problems are solved using an optimal control formulation in conjunction with the method of Miele [Optimization Techniques with Applications to Aerospace Systems, pp. 69-98 (1962) Academic Press, New York]. Solutions to both optimal control problems are the same. The solutions are illustrated through two examples. In one example where the relative wind velocity is zero, the optimal cruising velocity is constant regardless of terrain. In the second, where the relative wind velocity fluctuates, the optimal cruising velocity varies.

  3. Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I.

    2013-07-01

    In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

  4. Carboxymethylation of Cassava Starch in Different Solvents and Solvent-Water Mixtures: Optimization of Reaction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokocha, Louis M.; Ogunmola, Gabiel B.

    The influence of reaction medium on carboxymethylation process was investigated by treating cassava starch with sodium monochloroacetate in different solvents and solvent-water mixtures under alkaline conditions. The amount of carboxyl groups introduced into the starch moiety was determined titrimetrically and used to calculate the Degree of Substitution (DS) and Reaction Efficiency (RE). The results showed that carboxymethylation is significantly affected by the nature of reaction medium at p<0.05. Carboxymethylation in different solvent-water mixtures showed that aqueous 80% n-propanol offered the best medium for carboxymethylation. Optimization of reaction conditions in aqueous 80% n-propanol showed that the best condition for carboxymethylation was at starch-liquor ratio of 1:3, NaOH/reagent molar ratio of 4.0 and reagent-starch molar ratio of 0.35. An increase in temperature was required to effect the reaction at shorter time. At 55°C the highest values of DS and RE achieved in 0.5 h would require three hours to achieve the same values of DS and RE at 45°C.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of an Ionic LIquid versus Traditional Solvents and Their Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been claimed as "greener" replacements to traditional solvents. HOwever, the environmental impacts of the life cycle phases including the making of ILs, their application, separation, etc., and comparison with alternative methods have not been studied. Su...

  6. Optimized conditions for the extraction of secondary volatile metabolites in Angelica roots by accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-K; Abd El-Aty, A M; Choi, J-H; Kim, M R; Shim, J H

    2007-09-01

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of three common Angelica species found in Asia: Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels from China, Angelica acutiloba (Sieb. et Zucc.) Kitagawa from Japan, and Angelica gigas Nakai from Korea was investigated. Preliminary experiments, including the selection of the solvent, extraction time, pressure, static cycle and time were investigated to optimize experimental parameters. Kováts indices and mass spectra were used to identify the components in the various fractions. These were then confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 18 compounds were identified, with qualitative differences and similarities observed among the cultivars. From the 18 compounds found in the ASE extract of danggui cultivars, the major components were decursin, decursinol angelate (A. gigas); butylidene dihydrophthalide, 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone (A. sinensis); and 9,12-octadecanoic acid in Angelica acutiloba. The optimum ASE operating conditions were n-hexane as extraction solvent, extraction temperature and pressure of 80 degrees C and 1500 atm, respectively, static cycle of 2 min, and static time of 10 min. Under these conditions, the percentages of main analytes were increased.

  7. Brayton-cycle solvent recovery heat pump. A technical brief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R & D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Working closely with industry, OIT has successfully developed more than 50 new technologies that saved industry approximately 80 trillion Btu (84 quadrillion joules) of energy in 1992. More than 200 other projects are in various stages of development from laboratory research to field tests. The use of solvents in the industrial sector is widespread and results in the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) to the atmosphere. These VOC emissions represent an economic loss to industry and contribute significantly to air pollution. To comply with increasingly strict environmental regulations while keeping costs down, industry must find efficient and cost-effective ways to control emissions from solvent use.

  8. Brayton-cycle solvent recovery heat pump. A technical brief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R & D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Working closely with industry, OIT has successfully developed more than 50 new technologies that saved industry approximately 80 trillion Btu (84 quadrillion joules) of energy in 1992. More than 200 other projects are in various stages of development from laboratory research to field tests. The use of solvents in the industrial sector is widespread and results in the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. These VOC emissions represent an economic loss to industry and contribute significantly to air pollution. To comply with increasingly strict environmental regulations while keeping costs down, industry must find efficient and cost-effective ways to control emissions from solvent use.

  9. Life cycle optimization of building energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ayat; Norman, Bryan; Ries, Robert

    2008-02-01

    A life cycle optimization model intended to potentially reduce the environmental impacts of energy use in commercial buildings is presented. A combination of energy simulation, life cycle assessment, and operations research techniques are used to develop the model. In addition to conventional energy systems, such as the electric grid and a gas boiler, cogeneration systems which concurrently generate power and heat are investigated as an alternative source of energy. Cogeneration systems appeared to be an attractive alternative to conventional systems when considering life cycle environmental criteria. Internal combustion engine and microturbine (MT) cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 38% in global warming potential compared with conventional systems, while solid oxide fuel cell and MT cogeneration systems resulted in a reduction of up to 94% in tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP). Results include a Pareto-optimal frontier between reducing costs and reducing the selected environmental indicators.

  10. Density Changes in the Optimized CSSX Solvent System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.

    2002-11-25

    Density increases in caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) solvent have been observed in separate experimental programs performed by different groups of researchers. Such changes indicate a change in chemical composition. Increased density adversely affects separation of solvent from denser aqueous solutions present in the CSSX process. Identification and control of factors affecting solvent density are essential for design and operation of the centrifugal contactors. The goals of this research were to identify the factors affecting solvent density (composition) and to develop correlations between easily measured solvent properties (density and viscosity) and the chemical composition of the solvent, which will permit real-time determination and adjustment of the solvent composition. In evaporation experiments, virgin solvent was subjected to evaporation under quiescent conditions at 25, 35, and 45 C with continuously flowing dry air passing over the surface of the solvent. Density and viscosity were measured periodically, and chemical analysis was performed on the solvent samples. Chemical interaction tests were completed to determine if any chemical reaction takes place over extended contact time that changes the composition and/or physical properties. Solvent and simulant, solvent and strip solution, and solvent and wash solution were contacted continuously in agitated flasks. They were periodically sampled and the density measured (viscosity was also measured on some samples) and then submitted to the Chemical Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using the virgin solvent as the baseline. Chemical interaction tests showed that solvent densities and viscosities did not change appreciably during contact with simulant, strip, or wash solution. No effects on density and viscosity and no chemical changes in the solvent were noted within

  11. Toxic heavy metals: materials cycle optimization.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, R U

    1992-01-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies. PMID:11607259

  12. Toxic heavy metals: Materials cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, R.U. )

    1992-02-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies.

  13. Environmental analysis of the life cycle emissions of 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran solvent manufactured from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J; Hitchcock, David; Cavanagh, Eduardo J

    2016-01-01

    An environmental analysis has been conducted to determine the cradle to gate life cycle emissions to manufacture the green solvent, 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran. The solvent is considered a greener chemical since it can be manufactured from renewable resources with a lower life cycle footprint. Analyses have been performed using different methods to show greenness in both its production and industrial use. This solvent can potentially be substituted for other ether and chlorinated solvents commonly used in organometallic and biphasic reactions steps in pharmaceutical and fine chemical syntheses. The 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran made from renewable agricultural by-products is marketed by Penn A Kem under the name ecoMeTHF™. The starting material, 2-furfuraldehyde (furfural), is produced from corn cob waste by converting the available pentosans by acid hydrolysis. An evaluation of each step in the process was necessary to determine the overall life cycle and specific CO2 emissions for each raw material/intermediate produced. Allocation of credits for CO2 from the incineration of solvents made from renewable feedstocks significantly reduced the overall carbon footprint. Using this approach, the overall life cycle emissions for production of 1 kg of ecoMeTHF™ were determined to be 0.191 kg, including 0.150 kg of CO2. Life cycle emissions generated from raw material manufacture represents the majority of the overall environmental impact. Our evaluation shows that using 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran in an industrial scenario results in a 97% reduction in emissions, when compared to typically used solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, made through a conventional chemical route.

  14. Environmental analysis of the life cycle emissions of 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran solvent manufactured from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J; Hitchcock, David; Cavanagh, Eduardo J

    2016-01-01

    An environmental analysis has been conducted to determine the cradle to gate life cycle emissions to manufacture the green solvent, 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran. The solvent is considered a greener chemical since it can be manufactured from renewable resources with a lower life cycle footprint. Analyses have been performed using different methods to show greenness in both its production and industrial use. This solvent can potentially be substituted for other ether and chlorinated solvents commonly used in organometallic and biphasic reactions steps in pharmaceutical and fine chemical syntheses. The 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran made from renewable agricultural by-products is marketed by Penn A Kem under the name ecoMeTHF™. The starting material, 2-furfuraldehyde (furfural), is produced from corn cob waste by converting the available pentosans by acid hydrolysis. An evaluation of each step in the process was necessary to determine the overall life cycle and specific CO2 emissions for each raw material/intermediate produced. Allocation of credits for CO2 from the incineration of solvents made from renewable feedstocks significantly reduced the overall carbon footprint. Using this approach, the overall life cycle emissions for production of 1 kg of ecoMeTHF™ were determined to be 0.191 kg, including 0.150 kg of CO2. Life cycle emissions generated from raw material manufacture represents the majority of the overall environmental impact. Our evaluation shows that using 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran in an industrial scenario results in a 97% reduction in emissions, when compared to typically used solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, made through a conventional chemical route. PMID:26889729

  15. Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction for electrochemical water oxidation by tuning solvent properties.

    PubMed

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-14

    Electrochemical water-based energy cycles provide a most promising alternative to fossil-fuel sources of energy. However, current electrocatalysts are not adequate (high overpotential, lack of selectivity toward O2 production, catalyst degradation). We propose here mechanistic guidelines for experimental examination of modified catalysts based on the dependence of kinetic rates on the solvent dielectric constant. To illustrate the procedure we consider the fcc(111) platinum surface and show that the individual steps for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) change systematically with the polarizability of the medium. Thus changing this environmental variable can be used to tune the rate determining steps and the barriers, providing a means for screening and validating new systems to optimize the rate determining steps for the ORR and OER reaction pathways.

  16. Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction for electrochemical water oxidation by tuning solvent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunelli, Alessandro; Goddard, William A., III; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni

    2015-02-01

    Electrochemical water-based energy cycles provide a most promising alternative to fossil-fuel sources of energy. However, current electrocatalysts are not adequate (high overpotential, lack of selectivity toward O2 production, catalyst degradation). We propose here mechanistic guidelines for experimental examination of modified catalysts based on the dependence of kinetic rates on the solvent dielectric constant. To illustrate the procedure we consider the fcc(111) platinum surface and show that the individual steps for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) change systematically with the polarizability of the medium. Thus changing this environmental variable can be used to tune the rate determining steps and the barriers, providing a means for screening and validating new systems to optimize the rate determining steps for the ORR and OER reaction pathways.

  17. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  18. Regenerator optimization for Stirling cycle refrigeration II

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    A cryogenic regenerator for a Stirling cycle is discussed using fractional loss or entropy gain as the criterion of performance. The gas losses are treated separately from heat storage medium losses. We argue that the optimum design corresponds to uniform channel flow with minimum turbulence where the gas velocity and channel width are optimized as a function of gas temperature. The maximization of heat transfer from the gas to the wall and the minimization of entropy production by friction leads to a gas flow velocity equal to sound speed times loss fraction, 1/{sigma}. This velocity and an axial thermal conductivity in the gas leads to a minimum channel width and characteristic length, L=T(dz/dT). A particular scaling of width, W{sup 2} = W{sub o}{sup 2}T{sup 1/2}, and length, L = L{sub o} T{sup {minus}1/2} leads to a design where longitudinal conduction decreases as T{sup 3/2} and the remaining two losses, transverse conduction and friction are equal and constant. The loss fraction, 1/{sigma}, must be made quite small, {approximately}(1/60) in order that the cumulative losses for a large temperature ratio like 300K to 4K, be small enough, like 20% to 40%. This is because half the entropy generated as a loss must be transported first to the cold end before returning to the hot end before being rejected. The dead volume ratio then determines the minimum frequency and with it and the pressure the necessary wall properties. The thermal properties of the channel wall must then accommodate this cyclic heat flow without substantially increasing the loss fraction. This generation of entropy in the walls is derived in terms of the wall heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  19. Optimizing the surface density of polyethylene glycol chains by grafting from binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcot, Lokanathan; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Zhang, Shuai; Meyer, Rikke L.; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes are very effective at controlling non-specific deposition of biological material onto surfaces, which is of paramount importance to obtaining successful outcomes in biomaterials, tissue engineered scaffolds, biosensors, filtration membranes and drug delivery devices. We report on a simple 'grafting to' approach involving binary solvent mixtures that are chosen based on Hansen's solubility parameters to optimize the solubility of PEG thereby enabling control over the graft density. The PEG thiol-gold model system enabled a thorough characterization of PEG films formed, while studies on a PEG silane-silicon system examined the versatility to be applied to any substrate-head group system by choosing an appropriate solvent pair. The ability of PEG films to resist non-specific adsorption of proteins was quantitatively assessed by full serum exposure studies and the binary solvent strategy was found to produce PEG films with optimal graft density to efficiently resist protein adsorption.

  20. The demographic cycle and optimal schooling choices.

    PubMed

    Jeon, B P; Berger, M C

    1996-10-01

    A model is developed that enables the authors to estimate the effects of demographic cycles on both earnings and schooling. The model is tested using data from the 1991 Korean Occupational Wage Survey. The results indicate that cohorts following large birth cohorts in the cycle choose relatively less formal schooling compared to pre-peak cohorts, and that post-peak cohorts also have lower incomes. This result concerning South Korea is consistent with findings from previous studies concerning the United States.

  1. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

  2. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Optimized Solvent in the 2-cm Centrifugal Contactor Apparatus Using Dissolved Salt Cake from Tank 37H

    SciTech Connect

    Norato, M.A.

    2003-01-06

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flow sheet with optimized solvent. This represents the third such process demonstration using actual Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW). The present test differed from previous studies in the use of radioactive waste derived from Tank 37H dissolved salt cake, as opposed to supernate solutions used in previous demonstrations.

  3. Optimization of life cycle management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    As can be seen from the case studies, a LCM program needs to address and integrate, in the decision process, technical, political, licensing, remaining plant life, component replacement cycles, and financial issues. As part of the LCM evaluations, existing plant programs, ongoing replacement projects, short and long-term operation and maintenance issues, and life extension strategies must be considered. The development of the LCM evaluations and the cost benefit analysis identifies critical technical and life cycle cost parameters. These {open_quotes}discoveries{close_quotes} result from the detailed and effective use of a consistent, quantifiable, and well documented methodology. The systematic development and implementation of a plant-wide LCM program provides for an integrated and structured process that leads to the most practical and effective recommendations. Through the implementation of these recommendations and cost effective decisions, the overall power production costs can be controlled and ultimately lowered.

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE U.S. FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Terry A. Todd

    2011-10-01

    Treatment or processing of used nuclear fuel to recycle uranium and plutonium has historically been accomplished using the well known PUREX process. The PUREX process has been used on an industrial scale for over 60 years in the nuclear industry. Research is underway to develop advanced separation methods for the recovery of other used fuel components, such as the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) for possible transmutation in fast spectrum reactors, or other constituents (e.g. Cs, Sr, transition metals, lanthanides) to help facilitate effective waste management options. This paper will provide an overview of new solvent extraction processes developed for advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and summarize recent experimental results. This will include the utilization of new extractants for selective separation of target metals and new processes developed to selectively recover one or more elements from used fuel.

  5. Regenerator optimization for Stirling cycle refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic regenerator for a Stirling cycle is designed using a fractional loss or entropy gain as the criterion of performance. The gas losses are treated separately from heat storage medium losses. For the optimum channel flow nonturbulent design, the maximization of heat transfer from the gas to the wall and the minimization of entropy production by friction leads to a gas flow velocity criterion of sound speed times loss fraction. This velocity with a given frequency leads to a Stirling cycle dead volume ratio and consequently a channel of specified length and width. The thermal properties of the channel wall must then accommodate this cyclic heat flow without substantially increasing the loss fraction. It is found that stainless steel or plastics are adequate for 30 to 300 K, but that lower temperature stages 4 to 30 K require either a special lead alloy of moderate conductivity or a segmented anisotropic construction of alternate highly conducting lead layers and alternate insulating glass or epoxy fiber glass spacers. An overall efficiency of {congruent} 50% of Carnot is predicted at a frequency of 30 Hz and a pressure of one atmosphere.

  6. Optimization of solvent extraction of shea butter (Vitellaria paradoxa) using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Ajala, E O; Aberuagba, F; Olaniyan, A M; Onifade, K R

    2016-01-01

    Shea butter (SB) was extracted from its kernel by using n-hexane as solvent in an optimization study. This was to determine the optima operating variables that would give optimum yield of SB and to study the effect of solvent on the physico-chemical properties and chemical composition of SB extracted using n-hexane. A Box-behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization study while statistical analysis using ANOVA was used to test the significance of the variables for the process. The variables considered for this study were: sample weight (g), solvent volume (ml) and extraction time (min). The physico-chemical properties of SB extracted were determined using standard methods and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for the chemical composition. The results of RSM analysis showed that the three variables investigated have significant effect (p < 0.05) on the %yield of SB, with R(2) - 0.8989 which showed good fitness of a second-order model. Based on this model, optima operating variables for the extraction process were established as: sample weight of 30.04 g, solvent volume of 346.04 ml and extraction time of 40 min, which gave 66.90 % yield of SB. Furthermore, the result of the physico-chemical properties obtained for the shea butter extracted using traditional method (SBT) showed that it is a more suitable raw material for food, biodiesel production, cosmetics, medicinal and pharmaceutical purposes than shea butter extracted using solvent extraction method (SBS). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) results obtained for the two samples were similar to what was obtainable from other vegetable oil. PMID:26787993

  7. Optimization of solvent extraction of shea butter (Vitellaria paradoxa) using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Ajala, E O; Aberuagba, F; Olaniyan, A M; Onifade, K R

    2016-01-01

    Shea butter (SB) was extracted from its kernel by using n-hexane as solvent in an optimization study. This was to determine the optima operating variables that would give optimum yield of SB and to study the effect of solvent on the physico-chemical properties and chemical composition of SB extracted using n-hexane. A Box-behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization study while statistical analysis using ANOVA was used to test the significance of the variables for the process. The variables considered for this study were: sample weight (g), solvent volume (ml) and extraction time (min). The physico-chemical properties of SB extracted were determined using standard methods and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for the chemical composition. The results of RSM analysis showed that the three variables investigated have significant effect (p < 0.05) on the %yield of SB, with R(2) - 0.8989 which showed good fitness of a second-order model. Based on this model, optima operating variables for the extraction process were established as: sample weight of 30.04 g, solvent volume of 346.04 ml and extraction time of 40 min, which gave 66.90 % yield of SB. Furthermore, the result of the physico-chemical properties obtained for the shea butter extracted using traditional method (SBT) showed that it is a more suitable raw material for food, biodiesel production, cosmetics, medicinal and pharmaceutical purposes than shea butter extracted using solvent extraction method (SBS). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) results obtained for the two samples were similar to what was obtainable from other vegetable oil.

  8. Derivation of Reliable Geometries in QM Calculations of DNA Structures: Explicit Solvent QM/MM and Restrained Implicit Solvent QM Optimizations of G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gkionis, Konstantinos; Kruse, Holger; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-04-12

    Modern dispersion-corrected DFT methods have made it possible to perform reliable QM studies on complete nucleic acid (NA) building blocks having hundreds of atoms. Such calculations, although still limited to investigations of potential energy surfaces, enhance the portfolio of computational methods applicable to NAs and offer considerably more accurate intrinsic descriptions of NAs than standard MM. However, in practice such calculations are hampered by the use of implicit solvent environments and truncation of the systems. Conventional QM optimizations are spoiled by spurious intramolecular interactions and severe structural deformations. Here we compare two approaches designed to suppress such artifacts: partially restrained continuum solvent QM and explicit solvent QM/MM optimizations. We report geometry relaxations of a set of diverse double-quartet guanine quadruplex (GQ) DNA stems. Both methods provide neat structures without major artifacts. However, each one also has distinct weaknesses. In restrained optimizations, all errors in the target geometries (i.e., low-resolution X-ray and NMR structures) are transferred to the optimized geometries. In QM/MM, the initial solvent configuration causes some heterogeneity in the geometries. Nevertheless, both approaches represent a decisive step forward compared to conventional optimizations. We refine earlier computations that revealed sizable differences in the relative energies of GQ stems computed with AMBER MM and QM. We also explore the dependence of the QM/MM results on the applied computational protocol. PMID:26914292

  9. Derivation of Reliable Geometries in QM Calculations of DNA Structures: Explicit Solvent QM/MM and Restrained Implicit Solvent QM Optimizations of G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gkionis, Konstantinos; Kruse, Holger; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-04-12

    Modern dispersion-corrected DFT methods have made it possible to perform reliable QM studies on complete nucleic acid (NA) building blocks having hundreds of atoms. Such calculations, although still limited to investigations of potential energy surfaces, enhance the portfolio of computational methods applicable to NAs and offer considerably more accurate intrinsic descriptions of NAs than standard MM. However, in practice such calculations are hampered by the use of implicit solvent environments and truncation of the systems. Conventional QM optimizations are spoiled by spurious intramolecular interactions and severe structural deformations. Here we compare two approaches designed to suppress such artifacts: partially restrained continuum solvent QM and explicit solvent QM/MM optimizations. We report geometry relaxations of a set of diverse double-quartet guanine quadruplex (GQ) DNA stems. Both methods provide neat structures without major artifacts. However, each one also has distinct weaknesses. In restrained optimizations, all errors in the target geometries (i.e., low-resolution X-ray and NMR structures) are transferred to the optimized geometries. In QM/MM, the initial solvent configuration causes some heterogeneity in the geometries. Nevertheless, both approaches represent a decisive step forward compared to conventional optimizations. We refine earlier computations that revealed sizable differences in the relative energies of GQ stems computed with AMBER MM and QM. We also explore the dependence of the QM/MM results on the applied computational protocol.

  10. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  11. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 1. Optimization of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Gélinas, Pierre J.; Desnoyers, Jacques E.

    1998-03-01

    Phase diagrams were used for the formulation of alcohol-surfactant-solvent and to identify the DNAPL (Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquid) extraction zones. Four potential extraction zones of Mercier DNAPL, a mixture of heavy aliphatics, aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons, were identified but only one microemulsion zone showed satisfactory DNAPL recovery in sand columns. More than 90 sand column experiments were performed and demonstrate that: (1) neither surfactant in water, alcohol-surfactant solutions, nor pure solvent can effectively recover Mercier DNAPL and that only alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions are efficient; (2) adding salts to alcohol-surfactant or to alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions does not have a beneficial effect on DNAPL recovery; (3) washing solution formulations are site specific and must be modified if the surface properties of the solids (mineralogy) change locally, or if the interfacial behavior of liquids (type of oil) changes; (4) high solvent concentrations in washing solutions increase DNAPL extraction but also increase their cost and decrease their density dramatically; (5) maximum DNAPL recovery is observed with alcohol-surfactant-solvent formulations which correspond to the maximum solubilization in Zone C of the phase diagram; (6) replacing part of surfactant SAS by the alcohol n-butanol increases washing solution efficiency and decreases the density and the cost of solutions; (7) replacing part of n-butanol by the nonionic surfactant HOES decreases DNAPL recovery and increases the cost of solutions; (8) toluene is a better solvent than D-limonene because it increases DNAPL recovery and decreases the cost of solutions; (9) optimal alcohol-surfactant-solvent solutions contain a mixture of solvents in a mass ratio of toluene to D-limonene of one or two. Injection of 1.5 pore volumes of the optimal washing solution of n-butanol-SAS-toluene- D-limonene in water can recover up to 95% of Mercier DNAPL in sand columns. In the first

  12. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  13. Multi-objective optimization of combined Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles using advanced optimization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Rao, R.; Patel, Vivek

    2012-08-01

    This study explores the use of teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithms for determining the optimum operating conditions of combined Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. Maximization of thermal efficiency and specific work of the system are considered as the objective functions and are treated simultaneously for multi-objective optimization. Upper cycle pressure ratio and bottom cycle expansion pressure of the system are considered as design variables for the multi-objective optimization. An application example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithms. The results of optimization using the proposed algorithms are validated by comparing with those obtained by using the genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) on the same example. Improvement in the results is obtained by the proposed algorithms. The results of effect of variation of the algorithm parameters on the convergence and fitness values of the objective functions are reported.

  14. Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Containing Fluorinated Ester Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Smith, Kiah; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2010-01-01

    A number of experimental lithium-ion cells, consisting of MCMB (meso-carbon microbeads) carbon anodes and LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O2 cathodes, have been fabricated with increased safety and expanded capability. These cells serve to verify and demonstrate the reversibility, low-temperature performance, and electrochemical aspects of each electrode as determined from a number of electrochemical characterization techniques. A number of Li-ion electrolytes possessing fluorinated ester co-solvents, namely trifluoroethyl butyrate (TFEB) and trifluoroethyl propionate (TFEP), were demonstrated to deliver good performance over a wide temperature range in experimental lithium-ion cells. The general approach taken in the development of these electrolyte formulations is to optimize the type and composition of the co-solvents in ternary and quaternary solutions, focusing upon adequate stability [i.e., EC (ethylene carbonate) content needed for anode passivation, and EMC (ethyl methyl carbonate) content needed for lowering the viscosity and widening the temperature range, while still providing good stability], enhancing the inherent safety characteristics (incorporation of fluorinated esters), and widening the temperature range of operation (the use of both fluorinated and non-fluorinated esters). Further - more, the use of electrolyte additives, such as VC (vinylene carbonate) [solid electrolyte interface (SEI) promoter] and DMAc (thermal stabilizing additive), provide enhanced high-temperature life characteristics. Multi-component electrolyte formulations enhance performance over a temperature range of -60 to +60 C. With the need for more safety with the use of these batteries, flammability was a consideration. One of the solvents investigated, TFEB, had the best performance with improved low-temperature capability and high-temperature resilience. This work optimized the use of TFEB as a co-solvent by developing the multi-component electrolytes, which also contain non

  15. Optimization of mono and diacylglycerols production from enzymatic glycerolysis in solvent-free systems.

    PubMed

    Valério, Alexsandra; Rovani, Suzimara; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Débora; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    This work reports solvent-free enzymatic glycerolysis of olive oil with an immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) using Tween 40, Tween 65, Tween 80, Tween 85, Triton X-100, and soy lecithin as surfactants. The first step was the screening of two potential surfactants for Monoacylglycerol (MAG) and Diacylglycerol (DAG) production with a pre-established operating condition and 2 h of reaction time. Afterwards, a sequential experimental design strategy was carried out in order to optimize MAG and DAG production using Tween 65 and Triton X-100 as surfactants. The operating conditions that optimized MAG and DAG yields were 70 degrees C, stirring rate of 600 rpm, glycerol:olive oil molar ratio of 6:1, 16 wt% of surfactant Tween 65 and 9.0 wt% of Novozym 435, leading to a content of 26 and 17 wt% of MAG and DAG, respectively.

  16. Optimization of processing parameters for the preparation of phytosterol microemulsions by the solvent displacement method.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wai Fun; Che Man, Yaakob B; Lai, Oi Ming; Long, Kamariah; Misran, Misni; Tan, Chin Ping

    2009-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the parameters involved in the production of water-soluble phytosterol microemulsions for use in the food industry. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to model and optimize four of the processing parameters, namely, the number of cycles of high-pressure homogenization (1-9 cycles), the pressure used for high-pressure homogenization (100-500 bar), the evaporation temperature (30-70 degrees C), and the concentration ratio of microemulsions (1-5). All responses-particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PDI), and percent ethanol residual (%ER)-were well fit by a reduced cubic model obtained by multiple regression after manual elimination. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) and absolute average deviation (AAD) value for PS, PDI, and %ER were 0.9628 and 0.5398%, 0.9953 and 0.7077%, and 0.9989 and 1.0457%, respectively. The optimized processing parameters were 4.88 (approximately 5) homogenization cycles, homogenization pressure of 400 bar, evaporation temperature of 44.5 degrees C, and concentration ratio of microemulsions of 2.34 cycles (approximately 2 cycles) of high-pressure homogenization. The corresponding responses for the optimized preparation condition were a minimal particle size of 328 nm, minimal polydispersity index of 0.159, and <0.1% of ethanol residual. The chi-square test verified the model, whereby the experimental values of PS, PDI, and %ER agreed with the predicted values at a 0.05 level of significance. PMID:19694442

  17. Exergetic and economic optimization of a heat pump cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Benelmir, R.; Lallemand, M.; Lallemand, A.; Spakovsky, M. von

    1997-09-01

    A decentralized optimization method for the thermoeconomic design of vapor-compression cycles has been developed, where a primary component costing equation has been introduced. This method called Engineering Functional Analysis (EFA) facilitates the optimum design of large engineering systems in particular but also works well with smaller systems, allowing the optimization of each component by itself without significantly sacrificing the overall system optimum. In this paper, it is shown how EFA can be used in the thermoeconomic design of a vapor mechanical compression heat pump.

  18. Exergetic and economic optimization of a heat pump cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Benelmir, R.; Lallemand, M.; Lallemand, A.; Spakovsky, M. von

    1996-12-31

    A decentralized optimization method for the thermoeconomic design of vapor-compression cycles has been developed, where a primary component costing equation has been introduced. This method called Engineering Functional Analysis (EFA) facilitates the optimum design of large engineering systems in particular, but also works well with smaller systems, allowing the optimization of each component by itself without significantly sacrificing the overall system optimum. In this paper it is shown how EFA can be used in the thermoeconomic design of a vapor mechanical compression heat pump.

  19. SOL-CYCLE: A solar-assisted solvent-recycling process for asphalt-impregnation of fiber board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. E.

    1981-04-01

    To conserve resources and energy in the production of Flex-Joint, an asphalt-impregnated fiber board, a manufacturing process was developed. The Sol-Cycle process provides for: (1) recycle of the solvent used in the saturation step; (2) conversion of raw to finished board in 24 hours; (3) better control of the saturation step; and (4) the use of solar energy for a part of the driving force to accomplish (1) and (2).

  20. Life cycle optimization of automobile replacement: model and application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Chul; Keoleian, Gregory A; Grande, Darby E; Bean, James C

    2003-12-01

    Although recent progress in automotive technology has reduced exhaust emissions per mile for new cars, the continuing use of inefficient, higher-polluting old cars as well as increasing vehicle miles driven are undermining the benefits of this progress. As a way to address the "inefficient old vehicle" contribution to this problem, a novel life cycle optimization (LCO) model is introduced and applied to the automobile replacement policy question. The LCO model determines optimal vehicle lifetimes, accounting for technology improvements of new models while considering deteriorating efficiencies of existing models. Life cycle inventories for different vehicle models that represent materials production, manufacturing, use, maintenance, and end-of-life environmental burdens are required as inputs to the LCO model. As a demonstration, the LCO model was applied to mid-sized passenger car models between 1985 and 2020. An optimization was conducted to minimize cumulative carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2), and energy use over the time horizon (1985-2020). For CO, NMHC, and NOx pollutants with 12000 mi of annual mileage, automobile lifetimes ranging from 3 to 6 yr are optimal for the 1980s and early 1990s model years while the optimal lifetimes are expected to be 7-14 yr for model year 2000s and beyond. On the other hand, a lifetime of 18 yr minimizes cumulative energy and CO2 based on driving 12000 miles annually. Optimal lifetimes are inversely correlated to annual vehicle mileage, especially for CO, NMHC, and NOx emissions. On the basis of the optimization results, policies improving durability of emission controls, retiring high-emitting vehicles, and improving fuel economies are discussed.

  1. Process-centered revenue-cycle management optimizes payment process.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R J; Mandelbaum, S P; Graboys, K; Bailey, C

    2001-01-01

    By implementing a process-centered revenue cycle, healthcare organizations and group practices can achieve a seamless payment process with clear lines of accountability to achieve target outcomes. The integrated, end-to-end, revenue-cycle process involves four key components: jobs, skills, staffing, and structure; information and information systems; organizational alignment and accountability; and performance measures and evaluation measures. The Henry Ford Health System (HFHS), based in Detroit, Michigan, exemplifies the type of results that are achievable with this model. HFHS includes a group practice with more than 1,000 physicians in 40 specialties. After implementing a process-centered revenue cycle, HFHS dramatically improved registration and verification transactions and optimized revenues.

  2. Optimization of nanolime solvent for the consolidation of coarse porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsoi, Giovanni; Lubelli, Barbara; van Hees, Rob; Veiga, Rosário; Silva, António Santos

    2016-09-01

    The potentialities of nanomaterials for application in the field of conservation have been widely investigated in the last two decades. Among nanomaterials, nanolimes, i.e., dispersions of lime nanoparticles in alcohols are promising consolidating products for calcareous materials. Nanolimes are effective in recovering the very superficial loss of cohesion of decayed materials, but they do not always provide sufficient mass consolidation. This limitation is mainly related to the deposition of the nanoparticles nearby the surface of the material. Experimental research has been set up with the aim of improving the in-depth deposition of lime nanoparticles. Previous research by the authors has shown that nanolime deposition within a substrate can be controlled by adapting the nanolimes properties (kinetic stability and evaporation rate) to the moisture transport behavior of the substrate. Nanolime properties can be modified by the use of different solvents. In this research, nanolime dispersions have been further optimized for application on Maastricht limestone, a coarse porous limestone. Firstly, nanolimes were synthesized and dispersed in ethanol and/or water, both pure and mixed in different percentages. Subsequently, based on the kinetic stability of the nanolime dispersions, the most promising solvent mixtures were selected and applied on the limestone. The deposition of lime nanoparticles within the limestone was studied by phenolphthalein test, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results confirm that nanolime dispersed in a mixture of ethanol (95 %) and water (5 %) can guarantee a better nanoparticles in-depth deposition within coarse porous substrates, when compared to dispersions in pure ethanol.

  3. A technique for integrating engine cycle and aircraft configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1994-01-01

    A method for conceptual aircraft design that incorporates the optimization of major engine design variables for a variety of cycle types was developed. The methodology should improve the lengthy screening process currently involved in selecting an appropriate engine cycle for a given application or mission. The new capability will allow environmental concerns such as airport noise and emissions to be addressed early in the design process. The ability to rapidly perform optimization and parametric variations using both engine cycle and aircraft design variables, and to see the impact on the aircraft, should provide insight and guidance for more detailed studies. A brief description of the aircraft performance and mission analysis program and the engine cycle analysis program that were used is given. A new method of predicting propulsion system weight and dimensions using thermodynamic cycle data, preliminary design, and semi-empirical techniques is introduced. Propulsion system performance and weights data generated by the program are compared with industry data and data generated using well established codes. The ability of the optimization techniques to locate an optimum is demonstrated and some of the problems that had to be solved to accomplish this are illustrated. Results from the application of the program to the analysis of three supersonic transport concepts installed with mixed flow turbofans are presented. The results from the application to a Mach 2.4, 5000 n.mi. transport indicate that the optimum bypass ratio is near 0.45 with less than 1 percent variation in minimum gross weight for bypass ratios ranging from 0.3 to 0.6. In the final application of the program, a low sonic boom fix a takeoff gross weight concept that would fly at Mach 2.0 overwater and at Mach 1.6 overland is compared with a baseline concept of the same takeoff gross weight that would fly Mach 2.4 overwater and subsonically overland. The results indicate that for the design mission

  4. Optimization of conjugated linoleic acid triglycerides via enzymatic esterification in no-solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dan; Sun, Xiuqin; Li, Guangyou; Liu, Fayi; Lin, Xuezheng; Shen, Jihong

    2009-09-01

    We compared four esterifiable enzymes. The lipase Novozym 435 possessed the highest activity for the conjugated linoleic acid esterification during the synthesis of triglycerides. The triglycerides were synthesized by esterification of glycerol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in a no-solvent system using lipase catalysis. We investigated the effects of temperature, enzyme concentration, water content, and time on esterification. Enzyme and water concentrations of up to 1% of the total reaction volume and a system temperature of 60°C proved optimal for esterification. Similarly, when the esterification was carried out for 24 h, the reaction ratio improved to 94.11%. The esterification rate of the rotating screen basket remained high (87.28%) when the enzyme was re-used for the 5th time. We evaluated the substrate selectivity of lipase (NOVO 435) and determined that this lipase prefers the 10,12-octadacadienoic acid to the 9,11-octadecadienoic acid.

  5. A simple method to optimize the HSCCC two-phase solvent system by predicting the partition coefficient for target compound.

    PubMed

    Han, Quan-Bin; Wong, Lina; Yang, Nian-Yun; Song, Jing-Zheng; Qiao, Chun-Feng; Yiu, Hillary; Ito, Yoichiro; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2008-04-01

    A simple method was developed to optimize the solvent ratio of the two-phase solvent system used in the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) separation. Some mathematic equations, such as the exponential and the power equations, were established to describe the relationship between the solvent ratio and the partition coefficient. Using this new method, the two-phase solvent system was easily optimized to obtain a proper partition coefficient for the CCC separation of the target compound. Furthermore, this method was satisfactorily applied in determining the two-phase solvent system for the HSCCC preparation of pseudolaric acid B from the Chinese herb Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon (Pinaceae). The two-phase solvent system of n-hexane/EtOAc/MeOH/H(2)O (5:5:5:5 by volume) was used with a good partition coefficient K = 1.08. As a result, 232.05 mg of pseudolaric acid B was yielded from 0.5 g of the crude extract with a purity of 97.26% by HPLC analysis.

  6. Deep Eutectic Solvents Modified Molecular Imprinted Polymers for Optimized Purification of Chlorogenic Acid from Honeysuckle.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) were synthesized with choline chloride (ChCl), and DES modified molecular imprinted polymers (DES-MIPs), DES modified non-imprinted polymers (DES-NIPs, without template), MIPs and NIPs were prepared in an identical procedure. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the obtained polymers. Rebinding experiment and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were used to prove the high selectivity adsorption properties of the polymers. Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three factors was used to optimize the extraction condition of chlorogenic acid (CA) from honeysuckles. The optimum extraction conditions were found to be ultrasonic time optimized (20 min), the volume fraction of ethanol (60%) and ratio of liquid to material (15 mL g(-1)). Under these conditions, the mean extraction yield of CA was 12.57 mg g(-1), which was in good agreement with the predicted BBD model value. Purification of hawthorn extract was achieved by SPE process, and SPE recoveries of CA were 72.56, 64.79, 69.34 and 60.08% by DES-MIPs, DES-NIPs, MIPs and NIPs, respectively. The results showed DES-MIPs had potential for promising functional adsorption material for the purification of bioactive compounds.

  7. Deep Eutectic Solvents Modified Molecular Imprinted Polymers for Optimized Purification of Chlorogenic Acid from Honeysuckle.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) were synthesized with choline chloride (ChCl), and DES modified molecular imprinted polymers (DES-MIPs), DES modified non-imprinted polymers (DES-NIPs, without template), MIPs and NIPs were prepared in an identical procedure. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the obtained polymers. Rebinding experiment and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were used to prove the high selectivity adsorption properties of the polymers. Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three factors was used to optimize the extraction condition of chlorogenic acid (CA) from honeysuckles. The optimum extraction conditions were found to be ultrasonic time optimized (20 min), the volume fraction of ethanol (60%) and ratio of liquid to material (15 mL g(-1)). Under these conditions, the mean extraction yield of CA was 12.57 mg g(-1), which was in good agreement with the predicted BBD model value. Purification of hawthorn extract was achieved by SPE process, and SPE recoveries of CA were 72.56, 64.79, 69.34 and 60.08% by DES-MIPs, DES-NIPs, MIPs and NIPs, respectively. The results showed DES-MIPs had potential for promising functional adsorption material for the purification of bioactive compounds. PMID:26347506

  8. Solvent optimization for anthocyanin extraction from Syzygium cumini L. Skeels using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Bratati; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2013-05-01

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments that are potential candidates for use as natural food colourant. In this study, Syzygium cumini fruit skin has been used as anthocyanin source. All the six major types of anthocyanins were identified in the sample by ultra performance liquid chromatography studies, and the antioxidant activity was found to be 4.34 ± 0.26 Fe(2+)g(- 1) in the sample with highest anthocyanin content. Optimization of conditions for extracting high amounts of anthocyanin from the fruit peels was investigated by response surface methodology. The results suggested that highest anthocyanin yield (763.80 mg; 100 ml(- 1)), highest chroma and hue angle in the red colour range could be obtained when 20% ethanol was used in combination with 1% acetic acid. Methanol was replaced with ethanol for the extraction of pigments due to its less toxicity and being safe for human consumption. The optimized solvent can be used to extract anthocyanins from the S. cumini fruits and used as natural colourants in the food industries. PMID:23121325

  9. Multivariate optimization of hydrodistillation-headspace solvent microextraction of thymol and carvacrol from Thymus transcaspicus.

    PubMed

    Kiyanpour, Vahid; Fakhari, Ali Reza; Alizadeh, Reza; Asghari, Behvar; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2009-08-15

    In this paper multivariate response surface methodology (RSM) has been used for the optimization of hydrodistillation-headspace solvent microextraction (HD-HSME) of thymol and carvacrol in Thymus transcaspicus. Quantitative determination of compounds of interest was performed simultaneously using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were assessed and the optimized values were 5 min, 2 microL and 3 min for the extraction time, micro-drop volume and cooling time after extraction, respectively. The amounts of analyte extracted increased with plant weight. The calibration curves were linear in the ranges of 6.25-81.25 and 1.25-87.50 mg L(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Limit of detection (LOD) for thymol and carvacrol was 1.87 and 0.23 mg L(-1), respectively. Within-day and between-day precisions for both analytes were calculated in three different concentrations and recoveries obtained were in the range of 89-101% and 95-116% for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. PMID:19576432

  10. Optimization of long-range order in solvent-annealed polystyrene- b-polylactide block polymer thin films for nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruth, A.; Seo, M.; Lin, C.-H.; Walster, K.; Shankar, A.; Hillmyer, M. A.; Leighton, C.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate long-range order in solvent-annealed polystyrene- b-polylactide block polymer thin films for nanolithographic applications. This is accomplished via climate-controlled solvent vapor annealing, in situ solvent concentration measurements, and small angle x-ray scattering. By connecting the properties of swollen and dried films, we identify ``best practices'' for solvent-annealing, including that exposing block polymer films to a neutral solvent concentration just below the identified (viax-ray scattering) order-disorder transition, at low pressures, with fast solvent evaporation rates, will consistently yield large lateral correlation lengths (>6.9 μm) of hexagonally-packed cylinders that span the entire thickness of the film with center-to-center spacing ranging from 43 - 59 nm. The resultant films have sufficient fidelity for pattern transfer to an inorganic material, as evidenced by patterning of Ni metal nanodots using a damascene-type approach. We argue that our results can be qualitatively understood by analogy to thermal annealing of a single-component solid, where annealing just below the melting point leads to optimal recrystallization. Such reliability, combined with recently developed pattern-transfer techniques, places this cheap and rapid method of nanolithography in competition with conventional lithography schemes. Funded by NSF MRSEC and Creighton University Summer Research Award.

  11. Optimization of solution-processed oligothiophene:fullerene based organic solar cells by using solvent additives.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Gisela L; Urdanpilleta, Marta; Fitzner, Roland; Brier, Eduard; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Reinold, Egon; Bäuerle, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of solution-processed organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells with the acceptor-substituted quinquethiophene DCV5T-Bu 4 as donor in conjunction with PC61BM as acceptor is described. Power conversion efficiencies up to 3.0% and external quantum efficiencies up to 40% were obtained through the use of 1-chloronaphthalene as solvent additive in the fabrication of the photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy investigations of the photoactive layer gave insight into the distribution of donor and acceptor within the blend. The unique combination of solubility and thermal stability of DCV5T-Bu 4 also allows for fabrication of organic solar cells by vacuum deposition. Thus, we were able to perform a rare comparison of the device characteristics of the solution-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :PC61BM solar cell with its vacuum-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :C60 counterpart. Interestingly in this case, the efficiencies of the small-molecule organic solar cells prepared by using solution techniques are approaching those fabricated by using vacuum technology. This result is significant as vacuum-processed devices typically display much better performances in photovoltaic cells.

  12. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  13. Improvement of characteristic statistic algorithm and its application on equilibrium cycle reloading optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Shi, X.; Wang, B.

    2006-07-01

    A brief introduction of characteristic statistic algorithm (CSA) is given in the paper, which is a new global optimization algorithm to solve the problem of PWR in-core fuel management optimization. CSA is modified by the adoption of back propagation neural network and fast local adjustment. Then the modified CSA is applied to PWR Equilibrium Cycle Reloading Optimization, and the corresponding optimization code of CSA-DYW is developed. CSA-DYW is used to optimize the equilibrium cycle of 18 month reloading of Daya bay nuclear plant Unit 1 reactor. The results show that CSA-DYW has high efficiency and good global performance on PWR Equilibrium Cycle Reloading Optimization. (authors)

  14. ORGANIC-HIGH IONIC STRENGTH AQUEOUS SOLVENT SYSTEMS FOR SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY: GRAPHIC OPTIMIZATION OF PARTITION COEFFICIENT

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    A new series of organic-high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvents systems was designed for separation of highly polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography. A total of 21 solvent systems composed of 1-butanol-ethanol-saturated ammonium sulfate-water at various volume ratios are arranged according to an increasing order of polarity. Selection of the two-phase solvent system for a single compound or a multiple sample mixture can be achieved by two steps of partition coefficient measurements using a graphic method. The capability of the method is demonstrated by optimization of partition coefficient for seven highly polar samples including tartrazine (K=0.77), tryptophan (K=1.00), methyl green (K= 0.93), tyrosine (0.81), metanephrine (K=0.89), tyramine (K=0.98), and normetanephrine (K=0.96). Three sulfonic acid components in D&C Green No. 8 were successfully separated by HSCCC using the graphic selection of the two-phase solvent system. PMID:23467197

  15. Medium-based optimization of an organic solvent-tolerant extracellular lipase from the isolated halophilic Alkalibacillus salilacus.

    PubMed

    Samaei-Nouroozi, Amene; Rezaei, Shahla; Khoshnevis, Nika; Doosti, Mahmoud; Hajihoseini, Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic solvent-tolerant lipase was produced from Alkalibacillus salilacus within 48 h of growth in liquid medium. An overall 4.9-fold enhanced production was achieved over unoptimized media after medium optimization by statistical approaches. Plackett-Burman screening suggested lipase production maximally influenced by olive oil, KH2PO4, NaCl, and glucose; and response surface methodology predicted the appropriate levels of each parameter. Produced lipase was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (15-65 °C), pH (4.0-11.0), and NaCl concentration (0-30 %) showing excellent thermostable, pH-stable, and halophilic properties. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 40 °C. Majority of cations, except some like Co(2+) and Al(3+) were positive signals for lipase activity. In addition, the presence of chemical agents and organic solvents with different log P ow was well tolerated by the enzyme. Finally, efficacy of lipase-mediated esterification of various alcohols with oleic acid in organic solvents was studied. PMID:26198037

  16. Topology optimization in damage governed low cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Boris; Desmorat, Rodrigue

    2008-05-01

    Topology optimization is applied here to discuss an optimization problem of fatigue resistance. Fatigue lifetime is maximized by optimizing the shape of a structure in cyclic plasticity combined with Lemaitre damage law. The topology optimization algorithm is detailed. A 3D numerical example is given. To cite this article: B. Desmorat, R. Desmorat, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  17. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 2. DNAPL recovery mechanisms for an optimized alcohol surfactant solvent solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre J.

    1998-03-01

    A large sand column experiment is used to illustrate the principles of complex organic contaminants (DNAPL) recovery by a chemical solution containing an alcohol ( n-butanol), a surfactant (Hostapur SAS), and two solvents ( d-limonene and toluene). The washing solution is pushed by viscous polymer solutions to keep the displacement stable. The main NAPL recovery mechanisms identified are: (1) immiscible displacement by oil saturation increase (oil swelling), oil viscosity reduction, interfacial tension lowering, and relative permeability increase; (2) miscible NAPL displacement by solubilization. Most of the NAPL was recovered in a Winsor, type II system ahead of the washing solution. The 0.8 pore volume (PV) of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solution injected recovered more than 89% of the initial residual DNAPL saturation (0.195). Winsor system types were determined by visual observation of phases and confirmed by electrical resistivity measurements of phases and water content measurements in the oleic phase. Viscosity and density lowering of the oleic phase was made using solvents and alcohol transfer from the washing solution. Small sand column tests are performed to check different rinsing strategies used to minimize washing solution residual ingredients which can be trapped in sediments. An alcohol/surfactant rinsing solution without solvent, injected behind the washing solution, minimizes solvent trapping in sediments. More than five pore volumes of polymer solution and water must be injected after the rinsing solution to decrease alcohol and SAS concentrations in sediments to an acceptable level. To obtain reasonable trapped surfactant concentrations in sediments, the displacement front between the rinsing solution and the subsequent the following polymer solution has to be stable.

  18. Evaluation of alcohol-based deep eutectic solvent in extraction and determination of flavonoids with response surface methodology optimization.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2013-04-12

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are emerging rapidly as a new type of green solvent instead of an ionic liquid (IL), and are typically formed by mixing choline chloride with hydrogen bond donors. Few studies have applied DESs to the extraction and determination of bioactive compounds. Therefore, in the present study, DESs were used to extract flavonoids (myricetin and amentoflavone), which are well known and widely used antioxidants, to extend their applications. A range of alcohol-based DESs with different alcohols to choline chloride (ChCl) mixing ratios were used for extraction using several extraction methods. Other factors, such as temperature, time, water addition and solid/liquid ratio, were examined systematically using a response surface methodology (RSM). A total of 0.031 and 0.518 mg g(-1) of myricetin and amentoflavone were extracted under the optimized conditions: 35 vol% of water in ChCl/1,4-butanediol (1/5) at 70.0 °C for 40.0 min and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/1 (g 10 mL(-1)). Good linearity was obtained from 0.1 × 10(-3) to 0.1 mg mL(-1) (r(2)>0.999). The excellent properties of DESs highlight their potential as promising green solvents for the extraction and determination of a range of bioactive compounds or drugs.

  19. Improved Crystallization of Perovskite Films by Optimized Solvent Annealing for High Efficiency Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Gao, Cheng; He, Xulin; Ye, Qinyan; Ouyang, Liangqi; Zhuang, Daming; Liao, Cheng; Mei, Jun; Lau, Woonming

    2015-11-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite-based thin film solar cells show excellent light-to-power conversion efficiency. The high performance for the devices requires the preparation of well-crystallized perovskite absorbers. In this paper, we used the postannealing process to treat the perovskite films under different solvent vapors and observed that the solvent vapors have a strong effect on the film growth. A model regarding the perovskite film growth was proposed as well. Intensive characterizations including scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and admittance spectroscopy allowed us to attribute the improved performance to reduced recombination loss and defect density. Solar cell based on the DMSO-treated films delivered a power conversion efficiency of over 13% with negligible photocurrent hysteresis.

  20. Revenue cycle optimization in health care institutions. A conceptual framework for change management.

    PubMed

    Mugdh, Mrinal; Pilla, Satya

    2012-01-01

    Health care providers in the United States are constantly faced with the enormous challenge of optimizing their revenue cycle to improve their overall financial performance. These challenges keep evolving in both scope and complexity owing to a host of internal and external factors. Furthermore, given the lack of control that health care providers have over external factors, any attempt to successfully optimize the revenue cycle hinges on several critical improvements aimed at realigning the internal factors. This study provides an integrated change management model that aims to reengineer and realign the people-process-technology framework by using the principles of lean and Six Sigma for revenue cycle optimization.

  1. Process optimization for production and purification of a thermostable, organic solvent tolerant lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, P; Ramalingam, Subramanian; Nandhini Devi, Ganesan; Gautam, Pennathur

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate, purify and optimize the production conditions of an organic solvent tolerant and thermostable lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07 isolated from distillery waste. The lipase production was optimized by response surface methodology, and a maximum production of 14.5U/mL was observed at 30°C and pH 7, using a 0.5% (v/v) inoculum, 2% (v/v) castor oil (inducer), and agitation 150rpm. The optimized conditions from the shake flask experiments were validated in a 3L lab scale bioreactor, and the lipase production increased to 48U/mL. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and the overall yield was 36%. SDS-PAGE indicated a molecular weight of 45kDa for the purified protein, and Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis of the purified lipase showed sequence similarity with GDSL family of lipases. The optimum temperature and pH for activity of the enzyme was found to be 50°C and 8.0, respectively. The lipase was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but minimal inhibition was observed when incubated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and dithiothreitol. The enzyme was stable in the presence of non-polar hydrophobic solvents. Detergents like SDS inhibited enzyme activity; however, there was minimal loss of enzyme activity when incubated with hydrogen peroxide, Tween 80 and Triton X-100. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) revealed that the hydrolytic activity of the lipase was specific to moderate chain fatty acid esters. The Vmax, Km and Vmax/Km ratio of the enzyme were 16.98U/mg, 0.51mM, and 33.29, respectively when 4-nitrophenyl palmitate was used as a substrate. PMID:27268114

  2. Process optimization for production and purification of a thermostable, organic solvent tolerant lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, P; Ramalingam, Subramanian; Nandhini Devi, Ganesan; Gautam, Pennathur

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate, purify and optimize the production conditions of an organic solvent tolerant and thermostable lipase from Acinetobacter sp. AU07 isolated from distillery waste. The lipase production was optimized by response surface methodology, and a maximum production of 14.5U/mL was observed at 30°C and pH 7, using a 0.5% (v/v) inoculum, 2% (v/v) castor oil (inducer), and agitation 150rpm. The optimized conditions from the shake flask experiments were validated in a 3L lab scale bioreactor, and the lipase production increased to 48U/mL. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and the overall yield was 36%. SDS-PAGE indicated a molecular weight of 45kDa for the purified protein, and Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis of the purified lipase showed sequence similarity with GDSL family of lipases. The optimum temperature and pH for activity of the enzyme was found to be 50°C and 8.0, respectively. The lipase was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but minimal inhibition was observed when incubated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and dithiothreitol. The enzyme was stable in the presence of non-polar hydrophobic solvents. Detergents like SDS inhibited enzyme activity; however, there was minimal loss of enzyme activity when incubated with hydrogen peroxide, Tween 80 and Triton X-100. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) revealed that the hydrolytic activity of the lipase was specific to moderate chain fatty acid esters. The Vmax, Km and Vmax/Km ratio of the enzyme were 16.98U/mg, 0.51mM, and 33.29, respectively when 4-nitrophenyl palmitate was used as a substrate.

  3. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants

    DOEpatents

    Pope, William L.; Pines, Howard S.; Doyle, Padraic A.; Silvester, Lenard F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

  4. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  5. The optimal path of piston motion for Otto cycle with linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaojun; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2009-05-01

    An Otto cycle engine with internal and external irreversibilities of friction and heat leakage, in which the heat transfer between the working fluid and the environment obeys linear phenomenological heat transfer law [ q ∝ Δ( T -1)], is studied in this paper. The optimal piston motion trajectory for maximizing the work output per cycle is derived for the fixed total cycle time and fuel consumed per cycle. Optimal control theory is applied to determine the optimal piston trajectories for the cases of with and without piston acceleration constraint on each stroke and the optimal distribution of the total cycle time among the strokes. The optimal piston motion with acceleration constraint for each stroke consists of three segments, including initial maximum acceleration and final maximum deceleration boundary segments, respectively. Numerical examples for optimal configuration are provided, and the obtained results are compared with those obtained with Newton’s heat transfer law [ q ∝ Δ( T)]. The results also show that optimizing the piston motion can improve power and efficiency of the engine by more than 9%. This is primarily due to the decrease in heat leakage loss on the initial portion of the power stroke.

  6. Production, Optimization, and Characterization of Organic Solvent Tolerant Cellulases from a Lignocellulosic Waste-Degrading Actinobacterium, Promicromonospora sp. VP111.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lebin; Ram, Hari; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Ved Pal

    2016-07-01

    High costs of natural cellulose utilization and cellulase production are an industrial challenge. In view of this, an isolated soil actinobacterium identified as Promicromonospora sp. VP111 showed potential for production of major cellulases (CMCase, FPase, and β-glucosidase) utilizing untreated agricultural lignocellulosic wastes. Extensive disintegration of microcrystalline cellulose and adherence on it during fermentation divulged true cellulolytic efficiency of the strain. Conventional optimization resulted in increased cellulase yield in a cost-effective medium, and the central composite design (CCD) analysis revealed cellulase production to be limited by cellulose and ammonium sulfate. Cellulase activities were enhanced by Co(+2) (1 mM) and retained up to 60 °C and pH 9.0, indicating thermo-alkaline tolerance. Cellulases showed stability in organic solvents (25 % v/v) with log P ow  ≥ 1.24. Untreated wheat straw during submerged fermentation was particularly degraded and yielded about twofold higher levels of cellulases than with commercial cellulose (Na-CMC and avicel) which is especially economical. Thus, this is the first detailed report on cellulases from an efficient strain of Promicromonospora that was non-hemolytic, alkali-halotolerant, antibiotic (erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, cefaclor, ceftazidime) resistant, multiple heavy metal (Mo(+6) = W(+6) > Pb(+2) > Mn(+2) > Cr(+3) > Sn(+2)), and organic solvent (n-hexane, isooctane) tolerant, which is industrially and environmentally valuable. PMID:26956574

  7. Optimization of HS-GC-FID-MS Method for Residual Solvent Profiling in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Using DoE.

    PubMed

    Poceva Panovska, Ana; Acevska, Jelena; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Brezovska, Katerina; Petkovska, Rumenka; Dimitrovska, Aneta

    2016-02-01

    Within this research, a headspace (HS) gas chromatography-flame ionization detector-mass spectrometry method was developed for profiling of residual solvents (RSs) in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Design of experiment was used for optimization of sample preparation, as well as for robustness testing of the method. HS equilibration temperature and dilution medium were detected as parameters with greater impact on the sensitivity, compared with the time used for equilibration of the samples. Regardless of the sample solubility, the use of water for sample preparation was found to be crucial for better sensitivity. The use of a well-designed strategy for method development and robustness testing, additional level of identification confidence, as well as use of internal standard provided a strong and reliable analytical tool for API fingerprinting, thus enabling the authentication of the substance based on the RS profile. PMID:26290585

  8. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Hou, Tan H.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    Fibers reinforced composites are used in many applications. The composite parts and structures are often manufactured by curing the prepreg or unmolded material. The magnitudes and durations of the cure temperature and the cure pressure applied during the cure process have significant consequences on the performance of the finished product. The goal of this study is to exploit the potential of applying the optimization technique to the cure cycle design. The press molding process of a polyester is used as an example. Various optimization formulations for the cure cycle design are investigated. Recommendations are given for further research in computerizing the cure cycle design.

  9. Enzymatic conversion of sunflower oil to biodiesel in a solvent-free system: process optimization and the immobilized system stability.

    PubMed

    Ognjanovic, Nevena; Bezbradica, Dejan; Knezevic-Jugovic, Zorica

    2009-11-01

    The feasibility of using the commercial immobilized lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435) to synthesize biodiesel from sunflower oil in a solvent-free system has been proved. Using methanol as an acyl acceptor and the response surface methodology as an optimization technique, the optimal conditions for the transesterification has been found to be: 45 degrees C, 3% of enzyme based on oil weight, 3:1 methanol to oil molar ratio and with no added water in the system. Under these conditions, >99% of oil conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) has been achieved after 50 h of reaction, but the activity of the immobilized lipase decreased markedly over the course of repeated runs. In order to improve the enzyme stability, several alternative acyl acceptors have been tested for biodiesel production under solvent-free conditions. The use of methyl acetate seems to be of great interest, resulting in high FAME yield (95.65%) and increasing the half-life of the immobilized lipase by about 20.1 times as compared to methanol. The reaction has also been verified in the industrially feasible reaction system including both a batch stirred tank reactor and a packed bed reactor. Although satisfactory performance in the batch stirred tank reactor has been achieved, the kinetics in a packed bed reactor system seems to have a slightly better profile (93.6+/-3.75% FAME yield after 8-10 h), corresponding to the volumetric productivity of 48.5 g/(dm(3) h). The packed bed reactor has operated for up to 72 h with almost no loss in productivity, implying that the proposed process and the immobilized system could provide a promising solution for the biodiesel synthesis at the industrial scale.

  10. Oyster Creek cycle 10 nodal model parameter optimization study using PSMS

    SciTech Connect

    Dougher, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The power shape monitoring system (PSMS) is an on-line core monitoring system that uses a three-dimensional nodal code (NODE-B) to perform nodal power calculations and compute thermal margins. The PSMS contains a parameter optimization function that improves the ability of NODE-B to accurately monitor core power distributions. This functions iterates on the model normalization parameters (albedos and mixing factors) to obtain the best agreement between predicted and measured traversing in-core probe (TIP) reading on a statepoint-by-statepoint basis. Following several statepoint optimization runs, an average set of optimized normalization parameters can be determined and can be implemented into the current or subsequent cycle core model for on-line core monitoring. A statistical analysis of 19 high-power steady-state state-points throughout Oyster Creek cycle 10 operation has shown a consistently poor virgin model performance. The normalization parameters used in the cycle 10 NODE-B model were based on a cycle 8 study, which evaluated only Exxon fuel types. The introduction of General Electric (GE) fuel into cycle 10 (172 assemblies) was a significant fuel/core design change that could have altered the optimum set of normalization parameters. Based on the need to evaluate a potential change in the model normalization parameters for cycle 11 and in an attempt to account for the poor cycle 10 model performance, a parameter optimization study was performed.

  11. Optimal cycling time trial position models: aerodynamics versus power output and metabolic energy.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic drag of a cyclist in time trial (TT) position is strongly influenced by the torso angle. While decreasing the torso angle reduces the drag, it limits the physiological functioning of the cyclist. Therefore the aims of this study were to predict the optimal TT cycling position as function of the cycling speed and to determine at which speed the aerodynamic power losses start to dominate. Two models were developed to determine the optimal torso angle: a 'Metabolic Energy Model' and a 'Power Output Model'. The Metabolic Energy Model minimised the required cycling energy expenditure, while the Power Output Model maximised the cyclists׳ power output. The input parameters were experimentally collected from 19 TT cyclists at different torso angle positions (0-24°). The results showed that for both models, the optimal torso angle depends strongly on the cycling speed, with decreasing torso angles at increasing speeds. The aerodynamic losses outweigh the power losses at cycling speeds above 46km/h. However, a fully horizontal torso is not optimal. For speeds below 30km/h, it is beneficial to ride in a more upright TT position. The two model outputs were not completely similar, due to the different model approaches. The Metabolic Energy Model could be applied for endurance events, while the Power Output Model is more suitable in sprinting or in variable conditions (wind, undulating course, etc.). It is suggested that despite some limitations, the models give valuable information about improving the cycling performance by optimising the TT cycling position.

  12. Metrological characterization of a cycle-ergometer to optimize the cycling induced by functional electrical stimulation on patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Lorenzo; Ferrante, Simona; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Bocciolone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a well established method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Indeed, a bilateral movement such as cycling induced by FES would be crucial for these patients who had an unilateral motor impairment and had to recover an equivalent use of limbs. The aim of this study was to develop a low-cost meteorologically qualified cycle-ergometer, optimized for patients with stroke. A commercial ergometer was instrumented with resistive strain gauges and was able to provide the torque produced at the right and left crank, independently. The developed system was integrated with a stimulator, obtaining a novel FES cycling device able to control in real-time the movement unbalance. A dynamic calibration of the sensors was performed and a total torque uncertainty was computed. The system was tested on a healthy subject and on a stroke patient. Results demonstrated that the proposed sensors could be successfully used during FES cycling sessions where the maximum torque produced is about 9Nm, an order of magnitude less than the torque produced during voluntary cycling. This FES cycling system will assist in future investigations on stroke rehabilitation by means of FES and in new exercise regimes designed specifically for patients with unilateral impairments.

  13. Metrological characterization of a cycle-ergometer to optimize the cycling induced by functional electrical stimulation on patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Lorenzo; Ferrante, Simona; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Bocciolone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a well established method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Indeed, a bilateral movement such as cycling induced by FES would be crucial for these patients who had an unilateral motor impairment and had to recover an equivalent use of limbs. The aim of this study was to develop a low-cost meteorologically qualified cycle-ergometer, optimized for patients with stroke. A commercial ergometer was instrumented with resistive strain gauges and was able to provide the torque produced at the right and left crank, independently. The developed system was integrated with a stimulator, obtaining a novel FES cycling device able to control in real-time the movement unbalance. A dynamic calibration of the sensors was performed and a total torque uncertainty was computed. The system was tested on a healthy subject and on a stroke patient. Results demonstrated that the proposed sensors could be successfully used during FES cycling sessions where the maximum torque produced is about 9Nm, an order of magnitude less than the torque produced during voluntary cycling. This FES cycling system will assist in future investigations on stroke rehabilitation by means of FES and in new exercise regimes designed specifically for patients with unilateral impairments. PMID:20171923

  14. Optimization of a closed-cycle OTEC system

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, H. . Faculty of Science and Engineering); Ikegami, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    Optimization of an ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system is carried out by the Powell method (the method of steepest descent). The parameters in the objective function consist of the velocities of cold sea water and warm sea water passing through the heat exchangers, the phase change temperature, and turbine configuration (specific speed, specific diameter, ratio of blade to diameter). Numerical results are shown for a 100 MW OTEC plant with plate-type heat exchangers using ammonia as working fluid, and are compared with calculation results for the case when the turbine efficiency is fixed.

  15. Second-law analysis and optimization of reverse brayton cycles of different configurations for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, James Ryder; Razani, Arsalan

    2012-06-01

    Second-law of thermodynamics (2nd law) and exergy analyses and optimization offour Reverse Brayton Refrigeration (RBR) cryogenic cycle configurations: Conventional 1-stage compression cycle; Conventional 2-stage compression cycle; 1-stage compressionModified cycle with intermediate cooling of the recuperator using an auxiliary cooler; andan Integrated 2-stage expansion RBR cycle are performed. The conventional RBR cyclesare analyzed for low and high pressure ratio applications using multistage compressorswith intercooling. Analytical solutions for the conventional cycles are developed includingthermal and fluid flow irreversibilities of the recuperators and all heat exchangers inaddition to the compression and expansion processes. Analytical solutions are used to findthe thermodynamic bounds for the performance of the cycles. Exergy irreversibilitydiagrams of the cycles are developed and the effects of important system parameters onRBR cycle performance are investigated. 2nd law/exergy analyses, and optimization of thecycles with intermediate cooling of the recuperator, considering the cooling temperatureand the recuperator effectiveness and pressure drop, are included. The effect of the 2ndlaw/exergy efficiency of the auxiliary cooler on the total system efficiencies is presented.

  16. Optimization Of The Alternate Cycle In A Membrane Aeration/Filtration Combined Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongjie; Dong, Wenyi; Yang, Yue; Gan, Guanghua; Li, Weiguang

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a membrane aeration/filtration combined bioreactor (CMBR) was constructed, and the effect of alternate cycle by CMBR on membrane fouling and oxygen utilization efficiency (OUE) was investigated. Results showed that under the condition, when the alternate cycle was 0.75˜3h, the ΔTMP (TMP value of the time when a filtration cycle was over) of CMBR maintained a basically constant value during the 6 days' continuous operation, which implied the CMBR achieved a favorable effect of the membrane fouling relieving. Too short or too long cycle would lead to a gradual increase of ΔTMP. OUE of CMBR increased with the extension of the alternate cycle. Thus, it suggested that the optimal alternate cycle of CMBR should be 3h.

  17. Assessment and optimization of an ultrasound-assisted washing process using organic solvents for polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezama, Alberto; Flores, Alejandra; Araneda, Alberto; Barra, Ricardo; Pereira, Eduardo; Hernández, Víctor; Moya, Heriberto; Konrad, Odorico; Quiroz, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate a washing process that uses organic solutions for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil, and includes an ultrasound pre-treatment step to reduce operational times and organic solvent losses. In a preliminary trial, the suitability of 10 washing solutions of different polarities were tested, from which three n-hexane-based solutions were selected for further evaluation. A second set of experiments was designed using a three-level Taguchi L27 orthogonal array to model the desorption processes of seven different PCB congeners in terms of the variability of their PCB concentration levels, polarity of the washing solution, sonication time, the ratio washing solution/soil, number of extraction steps and total washing time. Linear models were developed for the desorption processes of all congeners. These models provide a good fit with the results obtained. Moreover, statistically significant outcomes were achieved from the analysis of variance tests carried out. It was determined that sonication time and ratio of washing solution/soil were the most influential process parameters. For this reason they were studied in a third set of experiments, constructed as a full factorial design. The process was eventually optimized, achieving desorption rates of more than 90% for all congeners, thus obtaining concentrations lower than 5 ppb in all cases. The use of an ultrasound-assisted soil washing process for PCB-contaminated soils that uses organic solvents seems therefore to be a viable option, especially with the incorporation of an extra step in the sonication process relating to temperature control, which is intended to prevent the loss of the lighter congeners.

  18. A new thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase from Staphylococcus warneri; optimization of media and production conditions using statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Yele, Viraj U; Desai, Krutika

    2015-01-01

    A new thermostable and solvent-tolerant lipase was isolated from newly isolated Staphylococcus warneri from oil-contaminated soil. Optimization of the fermentation media for production of thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant lipase was carried out using two statistical methods, i.e., Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and central composite design (CCD) were used for the optimization of the media components. PBD was used to efficiently select important medium components affecting the lipase production. Out of 15 medium components screened, four components, i.e., olive oil, peptone, maltose, and K2HPO4 were found to contribute positively to lipase production. CCD and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to determine the optimum levels of the selected components using Design-Expert 8.0 software. Production medium with olive oil (1.45 %), peptone (0.28 %), maltose (0.054 %), and K2HPO4 (0.091 %) was optimized with a maximum lipase production of 10.43 IU/ml/min. Similarly, production conditions for the lipase production were optimized by using CCD and RSM. Optimized conditions were found to have an incubation temperature of 55 °C, medium pH of 8.0, agitation of 120 rpm, and inoculum volume of 2 %. RSM revealed the maximum lipase production of 17.21 IU/ml using these optimized production conditions. Crude lipase showed enhanced activity in organic solvents such as diethyl ether, hexane, and cyclohexane. PMID:25344436

  19. Heuristic optimization of pressurized water reactor fuel cycle design under general constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, H.; Levine, S.H. ); Mahgerefteh, M. )

    1989-12-01

    Optimization techniques in fuel management have directed modern fuel cycle designs to use low-leakage loading patterns. Future optimization calculations involving low-leakage patterns must utilize nucleonic models that are both fast operationally and rigorous. A two-dimensional two-group diffusion theory code is developed and lattice homogenization constants are generated using a modified LEOPARD code to fulfill these criteria. Based on these two codes, a heuristic optimization study is performed that considers the general constraints (e.g., spent-fuel storage limit and mechanical burnup limit) given to a utility fuel cycle designer. The optimum cycle length that minimizes the fuel cost is {approximately} 600 effective full-power days for the conditions assumed.

  20. The evolution of life cycle complexity in aphids: Ecological optimization or historical constraint?

    PubMed

    Hardy, Nate B; Peterson, Daniel A; von Dohlen, Carol D

    2015-06-01

    For decades, biologists have debated why many parasites have obligate multihost life cycles. Here, we use comparative phylogenetic analyses of aphids to evaluate the roles of ecological optimization and historical constraint in the evolution of life cycle complexity. If life cycle complexity is adaptive, it should be evolutionarily labile, that is, change in response to selection. We provide evidence that this is true in some aphids (aphidines), but not others (nonaphidines)-groups that differ in the intensity of their relationships with primary hosts. Next, we test specific mechanisms by which life cycle complexity could be adaptive or a constraint. We find that among aphidines there is a strong association between complex life cycles and polyphagy but only a weak correlation between life cycle complexity and reproductive mode. In contrast, among nonaphidines the relationship between life cycle complexity and host breadth is weak but the association between complex life cycles and sexual reproduction is strong. Thus, although the adaptiveness of life cycle complexity appears to be lineage specific, across aphids, life cycle evolution appears to be tightly linked with the evolution of other important natural history traits.

  1. Spent fuel storage and waste management fuel cycle optimization using CAFCA

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, S.; Kazimi, M.

    2013-07-01

    Spent fuel storage modeling is at the intersection of nuclear fuel cycle system dynamics and waste management policy. A model that captures the economic parameters affecting used nuclear fuel storage location options, which complements fuel cycle economic assessment has been created using CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycles Assessment) of MIT. Research has also expanded to the study on dependency of used nuclear fuel storage economics, environmental impact, and proliferation risk. Three options of local, regional, and national storage were studied. The preliminary product of this research is the creation of a system dynamics tool known as the Waste Management Module which provides an easy to use interface for education on fuel cycle waste management economic impacts. Storage options costs can be compared to literature values with simple variation available for sensitivity study. Additionally, a first of a kind optimization scheme for the nuclear fuel cycle analysis is proposed and the applications of such an optimization are discussed. The main tradeoff for fuel cycle optimization was found to be between economics and most of the other identified metrics. (authors)

  2. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeenson

    1987-01-01

    A unified computed aided design method was studied for the cure cycle design that incorporates an optimal design technique with the analytical model of a composite cure process. The preliminary results of using this proposed method for optimal cure cycle design are reported and discussed. The cure process of interest is the compression molding of a polyester which is described by a diffusion reaction system. The finite element method is employed to convert the initial boundary value problem into a set of first order differential equations which are solved simultaneously by the DE program. The equations for thermal design sensitivities are derived by using the direct differentiation method and are solved by the DE program. A recursive quadratic programming algorithm with an active set strategy called a linearization method is used to optimally design the cure cycle, subjected to the given design performance requirements. The difficulty of casting the cure cycle design process into a proper mathematical form is recognized. Various optimal design problems are formulated to address theses aspects. The optimal solutions of these formulations are compared and discussed.

  3. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: A Systematic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, Stefano

    For decades, nuclear energy development was based on the expectation that recycling of the fissionable materials in the used fuel from today's light water reactors into advanced (fast) reactors would be implemented as soon as technically feasible in order to extend the nuclear fuel resources. More recently, arguments have been made for deployment of fast reactors in order to reduce the amount of higher actinides, hence the longevity of radioactivity, in the materials destined to a geologic repository. The cost of the fast reactors, together with concerns about the proliferation of the technology of extraction of plutonium from used LWR fuel as well as the large investments in construction of reprocessing facilities have been the basis for arguments to defer the introduction of recycling technologies in many countries including the US. In this thesis, the impacts of alternative reactor technologies on the fuel cycle are assessed. Additionally, metrics to characterize the fuel cycles and systematic approaches to using them to optimize the fuel cycle are presented. The fuel cycle options of the 2010 MIT fuel cycle study are re-examined in light of the expected slower rate of growth in nuclear energy today, using the CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis). The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycle options available in the future. The options include limited recycling in L WRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. Additional fuel cycle scenarios presented for the first time in this work assume the deployment of innovative recycling reactor technologies such as the Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors and Uranium-235 initiated Fast Reactors. A sensitivity study focused on system and technology parameters of interest has been conducted to test

  5. Entransy and exergy analyses for optimizations of heat-work conversion with carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chul Ho; Kim, Kyoung Hoon

    2016-06-01

    The concept of entransy has been newly proposed in terms of the analogy between heat and electrical conduction and could be useful in analyzing and optimizing the heat-work conversion systems. This work presents comparative analyses of entransy and exergy for optimizations of heat-work conversion. The work production and heat transfer processes in Carnot cycle system are investigated with the formulations of exergy destruction, entransy loss, work entransy, entransy dissipation, and efficiencies for both cases of dumping and non-dumping of used source fluid. The effects of source and condensation temperatures on the system performance are systematically investigated for optimal condition of producing maximum work or work entransy.

  6. The optimization air separation plants for combined cycle MHD-power plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.; Springmann, H.; Greenberg, R.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the design approaches being employed during a current supported study directed at developing an improved air separation process for the production of oxygen enriched air for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) combustion are outlined. The ultimate objective is to arrive at conceptual designs of air separation plants, optimized for minimum specific power consumption and capital investment costs, for integration with MHD combined cycle power plants.

  7. Population growth, life-cycle saving, and international differences in steady-state optimal saving rates.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M E

    1979-08-01

    Life-cycle savings theories have been a seminal development in analyses of the relationship between rational savings patterns for individuals and the accumulation of wealth or capital at the level of the society as a whole. Applications of the theories in industrialized countries never investigated the significance of large differences in birth and death rates across societies. The strong demographic components of life-cycle saving analysis are here the center of focus. Illustrative general numerical applications of a modified version of the life-cycle approach suggest that mortality differentials comparable to those presently encountered among nations are consistent with very large differentials in steady-state optimal ratios of wealth-to-income. Specific application to Peru of the model estimated by Tobin for the United States indicates that high levels of mortality, current Peruvian birth rates, and Peruvian age-income profiles imply optimal rational savings rates far below those of the United States. PMID:510637

  8. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  9. OPTIMAL DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING THE GANNI CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatarao Ganni, Peter Knudsen

    2010-04-01

    The constant pressure ratio process, as implemented in the floating pressure - Ganni cycle, is a new variation to prior cryogenic refrigeration and liquefaction cycle designs that allows for optimal operation and design of helium refrigeration systems. This cycle is based upon the traditional equipment used for helium refrigeration system designs, i.e., constant volume displacement compression and critical flow expansion devices. It takes advantage of the fact that for a given load, the expander sets the compressor discharge pressure and the compressor sets its own suction pressure. This cycle not only provides an essentially constant system Carnot efficiency over a wide load range, but invalidates the traditional philosophy that the (‘TS’) design condition is the optimal operating condition for a given load using the as-built hardware. As such, the Floating Pressure- Ganni Cycle is a solution to reduce the energy consumption while increasing the reliability, flexibility and stability of these systems over a wide operating range and different operating modes and is applicable to most of the existing plants. This paper explains the basic theory behind this cycle operation and contrasts it to the traditional operational philosophies presently used.

  10. Reducing California's Greenhouse Gas Emissions through ProductLife-Cycle Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Masanet, Eric; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Worrell,Ernst

    2005-12-30

    Product life-cycle optimization addresses the reduction ofenvironmental burdens associated with the production, use, andend-of-life stages of a product s life cycle. In this paper, we offer anevaluation of the opportunities related to product life-cycleoptimization in California for two key products: personal computers (PCs)and concrete. For each product, we present the results of an explorativecase study to identify specific opportunities for greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions reductions at each stage of the product life cycle. We thenoffer a discussion of the practical policy options that may exist forrealizing the identified GHG reduction opportunities. The case studiesdemonstrate that there may be significant GHG mitigation options as wellas a number of policy options that could lead to life-cycle GHG emissionsreductions for PCs and concrete in California.

  11. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body. PMID:26149246

  12. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body.

  13. Evaluation and Optimization of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Conversion Cycle for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-05-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550°C and 750°C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550°C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton Cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550°C versus 850°C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of the supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression Cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The UniSim model assumed a 600 MWt reactor power source, which provides heat to the power cycle at a maximum temperature of between 550°C and 750°C. The UniSim model used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete power conversion system. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating range for the cycle was adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing conditions near the critical point. The UniSim model was then optimized to maximize the power cycle thermal efficiency at the different maximum power cycle operating temperatures. The results of the analyses showed that power cycle thermal

  14. Optimal thermoeconomic performance of an irreversible regenerative ferromagnetic Ericsson refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhichao; Guo, Juncheng; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of the Langevin theory of classical statistical mechanics, the magnetization, entropy, and iso-field heat capacity of ferromagnetic materials are analyzed and their mathematical expressions are derived. An irreversible regenerative Ericsson refrigeration cycle by using a ferromagnetic material as the working substance is established, in which finite heat capacity rates of low and high temperature reservoirs, non-perfect regenerative heat of the refrigeration cycle, additional regenerative heat loss, etc. are taken into account. Based on the regenerative refrigeration cycle model, a thermoeconomic function is introduced as one objective function and optimized with respect to the temperatures of the working substance in the two iso-thermal processes. By means of numerical calculation, the effects of the effective factor of the heat exchangers in high/low temperature reservoir sides, efficiency of the regenerator, heat capacity rate of the low temperature reservoir, and applied magnetic field on the optimal thermoeconomic function as well as the corresponding cooling rate and coefficient of performance are revealed. The results obtained in this paper can provide some theoretical guidance for the optimal design of actual regenerative magnetic refrigerator cycle.

  15. Optimization of wave rotors for use as gas turbine engine topping cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1995-01-01

    Use of a wave rotor as a topping cycle for a gas turbine engine can improve specific power and reduce specific fuel consumption. Maximum improvement requires the wave rotor to be optimized for best performance at the mass flow of the engine. The optimization is a trade-off between losses due to friction and passage opening time, and rotational effects. An experimentally validated, one-dimensional CFD code, which includes these effects, has been used to calculate wave rotor performance, and find the optimum configuration. The technique is described, and results given for wave rotors sized for engines with sea level mass flows of 4, 26, and 400 lb/sec.

  16. Construction and optimization of a quantum analog of the Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-07-01

    The quantum analog of Carnot cycles in few-particle systems consists of two quantum adiabatic steps and two isothermal steps. This construction is formally justified by use of a minimum work principle. It is then shown, using minimal assumptions of work or heat in nanoscale systems, that the heat-to-work efficiency of such quantum heat engine cycles can be further optimized via two conditions regarding the expectation value of some generalized force operators evaluated at equilibrium states. In general the optimized efficiency is system specific, lower than the Carnot efficiency, and dependent upon both temperatures of the cold and hot reservoirs. Simple computational examples are used to illustrate our theory. The results should be an important guide towards the design of favorable working conditions of a realistic quantum heat engine.

  17. Construction and optimization of a quantum analog of the Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-07-01

    The quantum analog of Carnot cycles in few-particle systems consists of two quantum adiabatic steps and two isothermal steps. This construction is formally justified by use of a minimum work principle. It is then shown, using minimal assumptions of work or heat in nanoscale systems, that the heat-to-work efficiency of such quantum heat engine cycles can be further optimized via two conditions regarding the expectation value of some generalized force operators evaluated at equilibrium states. In general the optimized efficiency is system specific, lower than the Carnot efficiency, and dependent upon both temperatures of the cold and hot reservoirs. Simple computational examples are used to illustrate our theory. The results should be an important guide towards the design of favorable working conditions of a realistic quantum heat engine.

  18. Optimized Solvent for Energy-Efficient, Environmentally-Friendly Capture of CO{sub 2} at Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, G. A.; Rimpf, L. M.

    2014-04-30

    The overall goal of this project, as originally proposed, was to optimize the formulation of a novel solvent as a critical enabler for the cost-effective, energy-efficient, environmentally-friendly capture of CO{sub 2} at coal-fired utility plants. Aqueous blends of concentrated piperazine (PZ) with other compounds had been shown to exhibit high rates of CO{sub 2} absorption, low regeneration energy, and other desirable performance characteristics during an earlier 5-year development program conducted by B&W. The specific objective of this project was to identify PZ-based solvent formulations that globally optimize the performance of coal-fired power plants equipped with CO{sub 2} scrubbing systems. While previous solvent development studies have tended to focus on energy consumption and absorber size, important issues to be sure, the current work seeks to explore, understand, and optimize solvent formulation across the full gamut of issues related to commercial application of the technology: capital and operating costs, operability, reliability, environmental, health and safety (EH&S), etc. Work on the project was intended to be performed under four budget periods. The objective of the work in the first budget period has been to identify several candidate formulations of a concentrated PZ-based solvent for detailed characterization and evaluation. Work in the second budget period would generate reliable and comprehensive property and performance data for the identified formulations. Work in the third budget period would quantify the expected performance of the selected formulations in a commercial CO{sub 2} scrubbing process. Finally, work in the fourth budget period would provide a final technology feasibility study and a preliminary technology EH&S assessment. Due to other business priorities, however, B&W has requested that this project be terminated at the end of the first budget period. This document therefore serves as the final report for this project. It

  19. Cost versus life cycle assessment-based environmental impact optimization of drinking water production plants.

    PubMed

    Capitanescu, F; Rege, S; Marvuglia, A; Benetto, E; Ahmadi, A; Gutiérrez, T Navarrete; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2016-07-15

    Empowering decision makers with cost-effective solutions for reducing industrial processes environmental burden, at both design and operation stages, is nowadays a major worldwide concern. The paper addresses this issue for the sector of drinking water production plants (DWPPs), seeking for optimal solutions trading-off operation cost and life cycle assessment (LCA)-based environmental impact while satisfying outlet water quality criteria. This leads to a challenging bi-objective constrained optimization problem, which relies on a computationally expensive intricate process-modelling simulator of the DWPP and has to be solved with limited computational budget. Since mathematical programming methods are unusable in this case, the paper examines the performances in tackling these challenges of six off-the-shelf state-of-the-art global meta-heuristic optimization algorithms, suitable for such simulation-based optimization, namely Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2), Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II), Indicator-based Evolutionary Algorithm (IBEA), Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm based on Decomposition (MOEA/D), Differential Evolution (DE), and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The results of optimization reveal that good reduction in both operating cost and environmental impact of the DWPP can be obtained. Furthermore, NSGA-II outperforms the other competing algorithms while MOEA/D and DE perform unexpectedly poorly.

  20. Optimization of a solar powered absorption cycle under Abu Dhabi's weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Alili, A.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.; Kubo, I.

    2010-12-15

    In order for the solar absorption air conditioners to become a real alternative to the conventional vapour compression systems, their performance has to be improved and their total cost has to be reduced. A solar powered absorption cycle is modeled using the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) program and Typical Meteorological Year 2 data of Abu Dhabi. It uses evacuated tube collectors to drive a 10 kW ammonia-water absorption chiller. Firstly, the system performance and its total cost are optimized separately using single objective optimization algorithms. The design variables considered are: the collector slope, the collector mass flow rate, the collector area and the storage tank volume. The single objective optimization results show that MATLAB global optimization methods agree with the TRNSYS optimizer. Secondly, MATLAB is used to solve a multi-objective optimization problem to improve the system's performance and cost, simultaneously. The optimum designs are presented using Pareto curve and show the potential improvements of the baseline system. (author)

  1. Cost versus life cycle assessment-based environmental impact optimization of drinking water production plants.

    PubMed

    Capitanescu, F; Rege, S; Marvuglia, A; Benetto, E; Ahmadi, A; Gutiérrez, T Navarrete; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2016-07-15

    Empowering decision makers with cost-effective solutions for reducing industrial processes environmental burden, at both design and operation stages, is nowadays a major worldwide concern. The paper addresses this issue for the sector of drinking water production plants (DWPPs), seeking for optimal solutions trading-off operation cost and life cycle assessment (LCA)-based environmental impact while satisfying outlet water quality criteria. This leads to a challenging bi-objective constrained optimization problem, which relies on a computationally expensive intricate process-modelling simulator of the DWPP and has to be solved with limited computational budget. Since mathematical programming methods are unusable in this case, the paper examines the performances in tackling these challenges of six off-the-shelf state-of-the-art global meta-heuristic optimization algorithms, suitable for such simulation-based optimization, namely Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2), Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II), Indicator-based Evolutionary Algorithm (IBEA), Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm based on Decomposition (MOEA/D), Differential Evolution (DE), and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). The results of optimization reveal that good reduction in both operating cost and environmental impact of the DWPP can be obtained. Furthermore, NSGA-II outperforms the other competing algorithms while MOEA/D and DE perform unexpectedly poorly. PMID:27107954

  2. Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very

  3. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  4. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas; Igarashi, Takao; Cohen, Lydia; Hou, Ya-Ming; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2012-02-28

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle at the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics of proteins.

  5. Enzymatically catalyzed synthesis of anti-blooming agent 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol in a solvent-free system: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zong; Geng, Wen-Xin; Li, Jin-Wei; Yang, Zhao-Qi; Jiang, Jiang; Wang, Xing-Guo; Liu, Yuan-Fa

    2013-11-13

    Products rich in 1,3-dibehenoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (BOB) triglyceride (TAG) were produced by enzymatic interesterification of high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOSO) and behenic acid methyl ester (BME) by 1,3-regiospecific lipase Lipozyme RM IM in a solvent-free system. The impact factors of enzyme load, substrate molar ratio of BME to HOSO (BME/HOSO), reaction time, reaction temperature, and pre-equilibration water activity of the enzyme on BOB content and BME conversions were investigated by single-factor experiments and then optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 72 °C; reaction time, 7.99 h; substrate molar ratio, 2.5:1; enzyme load, 10%; and pre-equilibration water activities of the enzyme, 0.28. The results from the experiments conducted according to the predicted optimal conditions were as follows: the content of BOB was 32.76%, and the conversion of BME was 65.16%. The experimental values agreed with the predicted values, which verified the sufficiency of the quadratic regression models. After purification under the optimal short-range molecular distillation and two-step solvent fractionation, the content of BOB in the target product can reach 77.14%, indicating the great potential for industrial production of the anti-blooming agent. PMID:24147905

  6. Multiparticle quantum Szilard engine with optimal cycles assisted by a Maxwell's demon.

    PubMed

    Cai, C Y; Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2012-03-01

    We present a complete-quantum description of a multiparticle Szilard engine that consists of a working substance and a Maxwell's demon. The demon is modeled as a multilevel quantum system with specific quantum control, and the working substance consists of identical particles obeying Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics. In this description, a reversible scheme to erase the demon's memory by a lower-temperature heat bath is used. We demonstrate that (1) the quantum control of the demon can be optimized for a single-particle Szilard engine so that the efficiency of the demon-assisted thermodynamic cycle could reach the Carnot cycle's efficiency and (2) the low-temperature behavior of the working substance is very sensitive to the quantum statistics of the particles and the insertion position of the partition.

  7. Life cycle cost optimization of biofuel supply chains under uncertainties based on interval linear programming.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingzheng; Dong, Liang; Sun, Lu; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Tan, Shiyu; Dong, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model for optimizing the life cycle cost of biofuel supply chain under uncertainties. Multiple agriculture zones, multiple transportation modes for the transport of grain and biofuel, multiple biofuel plants, and multiple market centers were considered in this model, and the price of the resources, the yield of grain and the market demands were regarded as interval numbers instead of constants. An interval linear programming was developed, and a method for solving interval linear programming was presented. An illustrative case was studied by the proposed model, and the results showed that the proposed model is feasible for designing biofuel supply chain under uncertainties. PMID:25827247

  8. Life cycle cost optimization of biofuel supply chains under uncertainties based on interval linear programming.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingzheng; Dong, Liang; Sun, Lu; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Tan, Shiyu; Dong, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model for optimizing the life cycle cost of biofuel supply chain under uncertainties. Multiple agriculture zones, multiple transportation modes for the transport of grain and biofuel, multiple biofuel plants, and multiple market centers were considered in this model, and the price of the resources, the yield of grain and the market demands were regarded as interval numbers instead of constants. An interval linear programming was developed, and a method for solving interval linear programming was presented. An illustrative case was studied by the proposed model, and the results showed that the proposed model is feasible for designing biofuel supply chain under uncertainties.

  9. Life cycle analysis within pharmaceutical process optimization and intensification: case study of active pharmaceutical ingredient production.

    PubMed

    Ott, Denise; Kralisch, Dana; Denčić, Ivana; Hessel, Volker; Laribi, Yosra; Perrichon, Philippe D; Berguerand, Charline; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov; Loeb, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    As the demand for new drugs is rising, the pharmaceutical industry faces the quest of shortening development time, and thus, reducing the time to market. Environmental aspects typically still play a minor role within the early phase of process development. Nevertheless, it is highly promising to rethink, redesign, and optimize process strategies as early as possible in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) process development, rather than later at the stage of already established processes. The study presented herein deals with a holistic life-cycle-based process optimization and intensification of a pharmaceutical production process targeting a low-volume, high-value API. Striving for process intensification by transfer from batch to continuous processing, as well as an alternative catalytic system, different process options are evaluated with regard to their environmental impact to identify bottlenecks and improvement potentials for further process development activities.

  10. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ulhas; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence of organic solvents was explored. Bacillus circulans produced maximum alkaline protease (412 U/mL) in optimized medium (g/L): soybean meal, 15; starch, 10; KH2PO4, 1; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.05; CaCl2, 1; Na2CO3, 8; pH 10.0 at 37°C and 100 rpm. The competence of strain to grow in various organic solvents—n-octane, dodecane, n-decane, N,N-dimethylformamide, n-hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide, establishes its potential as solvent-stable protease source for the possible applications in nonaqueous reactions and fine chemical synthesis. PMID:25937965

  11. Integrating Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment with Multiobjective Optimization: A Modeling Framework.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dajun; Pandya, Shyama; You, Fengqi

    2016-02-01

    By combining life cycle assessment (LCA) with multiobjective optimization (MOO), the life cycle optimization (LCO) framework holds the promise not only to evaluate the environmental impacts for a given product but also to compare different alternatives and identify both ecologically and economically better decisions. Despite the recent methodological developments in LCA, most LCO applications are developed upon process-based LCA, which results in system boundary truncation and underestimation of the true impact. In this study, we propose a comprehensive LCO framework that seamlessly integrates MOO with integrated hybrid LCA. It quantifies both direct and indirect environmental impacts and incorporates them into the decision making process in addition to the more traditional economic criteria. The proposed LCO framework is demonstrated through an application on sustainable design of a potential bioethanol supply chain in the UK. Results indicate that the proposed hybrid LCO framework identifies a considerable amount of indirect greenhouse gas emissions (up to 58.4%) that are essentially ignored in process-based LCO. Among the biomass feedstock options considered, using woody biomass for bioethanol production would be the most preferable choice from a climate perspective, while the mixed use of wheat and wheat straw as feedstocks would be the most cost-effective one. PMID:26752618

  12. The optimal design of buildings: A life-cycle approach to energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khawas, Ihab Nabil

    This study reports on an energy model designed to minimize the life cycle cost of a building, considering both the building initial cost and its energy consumption. It reports on the structure of this model and a series of experiments conducted to derive optimal design. While there already exist models that analyze the energy consumption and efficiency of buildings, the general model presented here is unique in several ways. First, it addresses the needs of the typical architect who requires rapid technical feedback on the energy efficiency of a building during the initial design process. Second, it considers the trade-off between initial development costs and future operating costs. Different from most models therefore, it does not simply minimizes energy consumption, but takes into account the cost incurred as a result of any method to save energy. Third, it is an optimization model which derives design optima through numerical optimization methods rather than trial and error. However, it can still be used to develop design ideas outside the model optimization scope. Fourth, the model optimizes a number of design features of interest to the architect, including building orientation, dimensions, window placement and size, and choice of building material. Most other models appear to take these features as inputs. Rules of thumb and traditional design guidelines were also investigated through the analysis of a large number of model experiments, with different objective functions and constraint sets. The aim was to simulate a number of real life design alternatives and economic goals. The findings show that the cost of sub-optimal building dimensions and orientation may vary significantly under different user constraints. Generalizations are possible, but must be used with caution. One major finding of this study is that following rules of thumb and traditional guidelines will not always lead to an optimal design. In fact, the study proves that design variables, such

  13. Optimization of monitoring and inspections in the life-cycle of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanish Nithin, Anu; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the offshore wind farm developments across the world. Although this form of cleaner and greener energy is beneficial and eco-friendly, the production of wind energy entails high life-cycle costs. The costs associated with inspections, monitoring and repairs of wind turbines are primary contributors to the high costs of electricity produced in this way and are disadvantageous in today's competitive economic environment. There is limited research being done in the probabilistic optimization of life-cycle costs of offshore wind turbines structures and their components. This paper proposes a framework for assessing the life cycle cost of wind turbine structures subject to damage and deterioration. The objective of the paper is to develop a mathematical probabilistic cost assessment framework which considers deterioration, inspection, monitoring, repair and maintenance models and their uncertainties. The uncertainties are etched in the accuracy and precision of the monitoring and inspection methods and can be considered through the probability of damage detection of each method. Schedules for inspection, monitoring and repair actions are demonstrated using a decision tree. Examples of a generalised deterioration process integrated with the cost analysis using a decision tree are shown for a wind turbine foundation structure.

  14. Energy and exergy analyses of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Jin, Hongguang; Gao, Lin; Mumford, Kathryn Anne; Smith, Kathryn; Stevens, Geoff

    2014-12-16

    Energy and exergy analyses were studied for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture using hot potassium carbonate solvent. The study focused on the combined impact of the CO conversion ratio in the water gas shift (WGS) unit and CO2 recovery rate on component exergy destruction, plant efficiency, and energy penalty for CO2 capture. A theoretical limit for the minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was also provided. It was found that total plant exergy destruction increased almost linearly with CO2 recovery rate and CO conversion ratio at low CO conversion ratios, but the exergy destruction from the WGS unit and the whole plant increased sharply when the CO conversion ratio was higher than 98.5% at the design WGS conditions, leading to a significant decrease in plant efficiency and increase in efficiency penalty for CO2 capture. When carbon capture rate was over around 70%, via a combination of around 100% CO2 recovery rate and lower CO conversion ratios, the efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was reduced. The minimal efficiency penalty for CO2 capture was estimated to be around 5.0 percentage points at design conditions in an IGCC plant with 90% carbon capture. Unlike the traditional aim of 100% CO conversion, it was recommended that extremely high CO conversion ratios should not be considered in order to decrease the energy penalty for CO2 capture and increase plant efficiency.

  15. [Multi-objectives optimization on life cycle pollutants emission of cassava-based ethanol blended gasoline fuels].

    PubMed

    Pu, Geng-qiang; Hu, Zhi-yuan; Wang, Cheng-tao

    2004-09-01

    An optimization model on life cycle pollutants emission of cassava-based ethanol blended gasoline fuels, including single and multi-objectives, was carried out in this paper. And, the single and multi-objectives optimization of cassava-based ethanol blended gasoline fuels were done, using the life cycle CO, NOx, PM, HC, SOx, CO2 emissions as objectives. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of design variables was done. The multi-objectives results shown that the blend ratio between cassava-based ethanol and gasoline was 63%. Compare with the initial value, multi-objective optimization of cassava-based ethanol blended gasoline fuels achieved a little more life cycle CO, NOx and PM emissions, about 1%, 15% and 19% respectively, and reduced life cycle HC, SOx and CO2 emissions, 8%, 50%, and 21% respectively.

  16. iCycle: Integrated, multicriterial beam angle, and profile optimization for generation of coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Storchi, Pascal R. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To introduce iCycle, a novel algorithm for integrated, multicriterial optimization of beam angles, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) profiles. Methods: A multicriterial plan optimization with iCycle is based on a prescription called wish-list, containing hard constraints and objectives with ascribed priorities. Priorities are ordinal parameters used for relative importance ranking of the objectives. The higher an objective priority is, the higher the probability that the corresponding objective will be met. Beam directions are selected from an input set of candidate directions. Input sets can be restricted, e.g., to allow only generation of coplanar plans, or to avoid collisions between patient/couch and the gantry in a noncoplanar setup. Obtaining clinically feasible calculation times was an important design criterium for development of iCycle. This could be realized by sequentially adding beams to the treatment plan in an iterative procedure. Each iteration loop starts with selection of the optimal direction to be added. Then, a Pareto-optimal IMRT plan is generated for the (fixed) beam setup that includes all so far selected directions, using a previously published algorithm for multicriterial optimization of fluence profiles for a fixed beam arrangement Breedveld et al.[Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 7199-7209 (2009)]. To select the next direction, each not yet selected candidate direction is temporarily added to the plan and an optimization problem, derived from the Lagrangian obtained from the just performed optimization for establishing the Pareto-optimal plan, is solved. For each patient, a single one-beam, two-beam, three-beam, etc. Pareto-optimal plan is generated until addition of beams does no longer result in significant plan quality improvement. Plan generation with iCycle is fully automated. Results: Performance and characteristics of iCycle are demonstrated by generating plans for a maxillary sinus case, a cervical cancer patient, and a

  17. Development and Utilization of mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul; Hays, Ross

    2011-09-02

    Over the past sixty years, a wide variety of nuclear power technologies have been theorized, investigated and tested to various degrees. These technologies, if properly applied, could provide a stable, long-term, economical source of CO2-free electric power. However, the recycling of nuclear fuel introduces a degree of coupling between reactor systems which must be accounted for when making long term strategic plans. This work investigates the use of a simulated annealing optimization algorithm coupled together with the VISION fuel cycle simulation model in order to identify attractive strategies from economic, evironmental, non-proliferation and waste-disposal perspectives, which each have associated an objective function. The simulated annealing optimization algorithm works by perturbing the fraction of new reactor capacity allocated to each available reactor type (using a set of heuristic rules) then evaluating the resulting deployment scenario outcomes using the VISION model and the chosen objective functions. These new scenarios, which are either accepted or rejected according the the Metropolis Criterion, are then used as the basis for further perturbations. By repeating this process several thousand times, a family of near-optimal solutions are obtained. Preliminary results from this work using a two-step, Once-through LWR to Full-recycle/FRburner deployment scenario with exponentially increasing electric demand indicate that the algorithm is capable of nding reactor deployment pro les that reduce the long-term-heat waste disposal burden relative to an initial reference scenario. Further work is under way to re ne the current results and to extend them to include the other objective functions and to examine the optimization trade-o s that exist between these di erent objectives.

  18. Design of optimal solvent for extraction of bio–active ingredients from six varieties of Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive research has been performed worldwide and important evidences were collected to show the immense potential of plants used in various traditional therapeutic systems. The aim of this work is to investigate the different extracting solvents in terms of the influence of their polarity on the extracting ability of bioactive molecules (phenolic compounds) from the M. sativa flowers. Results The total phenolic content of samples was determined using the Folin Ciocalteu (FC) procedure and their antioxidant activity was assayed through in vitro radical decomposing activity using the radical DPPH° assay (IUPAC name for DPPH is (phenyl)–(2,4,6–trinitrophenyl) iminoazanium). The results showed that water was better than methanol and acetic acid for extracting bioactive compounds, in particular for total phenolic compounds from the flowers of alfalfa. The average content of bioactive molecules in methanol extract was 263.5±1.02 mg GAE/100g of dry weight lyophilized extract. The total phenolic content of the tested plant extracts was highly correlated with the radical decomposing activity. However, all extracts were free–radical inhibitors, but the water extract was more potent than the acetic and the methanol ones. The order of inhibitor effectiveness (expressed by IC50) proved to be: water extract (0.924mg/mL) > acetic acid extract (0.154mg/mL) > methanol (0.079mg/mL). The profiles of each extract (fingerprint) were characterized by FT–MIR spectroscopy. Conclusions The present study compares the fingerprint of different extracts of the M. sativa flowers, collected from the wild flora of Romania. The total phenolic content of the tested plant extracts was highly correlated with the radical decomposing activity. The dependence of the extract composition on the solvent polarity (acetic acid vs. methanol vs. water) was revealed by UV–VIS spectrometry and Infrared fingerprint. PMID:23098128

  19. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  20. Environmental life cycle optimization of essential terpene oils produced by the macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Paula; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Rorrer, Gregory; Moreira, María Teresa

    2016-01-15

    The macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea is a well-known producer of essential terpene oils with promising biological activities and similar applications to those of microalgal biocompounds in the pharmaceutical, food or cosmetics sectors. This study assesses the environmental impacts associated with the production of five essential terpene oils (myrcene, 10Z-bromomyrcene, 10E-bromo-3-chloromyrcene, apakaochtodene B and acyclic C10H14Br2) by O. secundiramea cultivated in a closed airlift photobioreactor with artificial illumination. The results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) allowed analyzing the effect of implementing a semi-continuous operation on several stages of the life cycle of the products, which may lead to impact reductions from 1% up to 25%. Regarding the most problematic aspects of the process, the cultivation in the photobioreactor (S4) was identified as the main stage responsible for the environmental burdens, with contributions ranging between 60% and 80% of the total impacts for a semi-continuous production maintained during one year of operation. The electricity supply is the key activity affecting eight of the ten assessed categories and involves between 50% and 60% of the impact of the process. S4 is the main cause of the high energy requirements, with 86% of the total electricity consumption. Additionally, several scenarios aiming at improving the environmental profile of the system were evaluated. The application of LCA finally led to the proposal of two optimized scenarios with improvements between 8% and 40% with respect to the baseline case study.

  1. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The computational techniques utilized to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements are described. The characteristics and use of the following computer codes are discussed: (1) NNEP - a very general cycle analysis code that can assemble an arbitrary matrix fans, turbines, ducts, shafts, etc., into a complete gas turbine engine and compute on- and off-design thermodynamic performance; (2) WATE - a preliminary design procedure for calculating engine weight using the component characteristics determined by NNEP; (3) POD DRG - a table look-up program to calculate wave and friction drag of nacelles; (4) LIFCYC - a computer code developed to calculate life cycle costs of engines based on the output from WATE; and (5) INSTAL - a computer code developed to calculate installation effects, inlet performance and inlet weight. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight, and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  2. Environmental life cycle optimization of essential terpene oils produced by the macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Paula; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Rorrer, Gregory; Moreira, María Teresa

    2016-01-15

    The macroalga Ochtodes secundiramea is a well-known producer of essential terpene oils with promising biological activities and similar applications to those of microalgal biocompounds in the pharmaceutical, food or cosmetics sectors. This study assesses the environmental impacts associated with the production of five essential terpene oils (myrcene, 10Z-bromomyrcene, 10E-bromo-3-chloromyrcene, apakaochtodene B and acyclic C10H14Br2) by O. secundiramea cultivated in a closed airlift photobioreactor with artificial illumination. The results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) allowed analyzing the effect of implementing a semi-continuous operation on several stages of the life cycle of the products, which may lead to impact reductions from 1% up to 25%. Regarding the most problematic aspects of the process, the cultivation in the photobioreactor (S4) was identified as the main stage responsible for the environmental burdens, with contributions ranging between 60% and 80% of the total impacts for a semi-continuous production maintained during one year of operation. The electricity supply is the key activity affecting eight of the ten assessed categories and involves between 50% and 60% of the impact of the process. S4 is the main cause of the high energy requirements, with 86% of the total electricity consumption. Additionally, several scenarios aiming at improving the environmental profile of the system were evaluated. The application of LCA finally led to the proposal of two optimized scenarios with improvements between 8% and 40% with respect to the baseline case study. PMID:26519589

  3. Immobilization of Lipase by Adsorption Onto Magnetic Nanoparticles in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Liu, Wei; Tao, Qing-Lan; Jiang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Cai-Hong; Zeng, Sha; Zhang, Ye-Wang

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of lipase in organic solvents, a simple immobilization method was developed by adsorption of lipase onto Fe₃O₄@ SiO₂magnetic nanoparticles in organic solvent. Among the solvents tested, toluene was found to be the most effective solvent for the immobilization. A maximum immobilization yield of 97% and relative activity of 124% were achieved in toluene at 30 °C. The optimal temperature, enzyme loading and water activity were 30 °C, 1.25 mg/mg support and 0.48 aw, respectively. The residual activity of immobilized lipase was 67% after 10 cycles of use. The advantages of the immobilized lipase including easy recovery, high stability, and enhanced activity of immobilized lipase in organic solvents show potential industrial applications in anhydrous solvents. PMID:27398494

  4. Integration and optimization of the gas removal system for hybrid-cycle OTEC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.; Panchal, C.B.; Stevens, H.C. )

    1990-02-01

    A preliminary design of the noncondensible gas removal system for a 10 mWe, land-based hybrid-cycle OTEC power plant has been developed and is presented herein. This gas removal system is very different from that used for conventional power plants because of the substantially larger and continuous noncondensible gas flow rates and lower condenser pressure levels which predicate the need for higher-efficiency components. Previous OTEC studies discussed the need for multiple high-efficiency compressors with intercoolers; however, no previous design effort was devoted to the details of the intercoolers, integration and optimization of the intercoolers with the compressors, and the practical design constraints and feasibility issues of these components. The resulting gas removal system design uses centrifugal (radial) compressors with matrix-type crossflow aluminum heat exchangers as intercoolers. Once-through boiling of ammonia is used as the heat sink for the cooling and condensing of the steam-gas mixture. A computerized calculation method was developed for the performance analysis and subsystem optimization. For a specific number of compressor units and the stream arrangement, the method is used to calculate the dimensions, speeds, power requirements, and costs of all the components.

  5. Study of the optimal duty cycle and pumping rate for square-wave amplitude-modulated Bell–Bloom magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei-Ling, Wang; Meng-Bing, Wang; Gui-Ying, Zhang; Kai-Feng, Zhao

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically and experimentally study the optimal duty cycle and pumping rate for square-wave amplitude-modulated Bell–Bloom magnetometers. The theoretical and the experimental results are in good agreement for duty cycles and corresponding pumping rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Our study gives the maximum field response as a function of duty cycle and pumping rate. Especially, for a fixed duty cycle, the maximum field response is obtained when the time averaged pumping rate, which is the product of pumping rate and duty cycle, is equal to the transverse relaxation rate in the dark. By using a combination of small duty cycle and large pumping rate, one can increase the maximum field response by up to a factor of 2 or π/2, relative to that of the sinusoidal modulation or the 50% duty cycle square-wave modulation respectively. We further show that the same pumping condition is also practically optimal for the sensitivity due to the fact that the signal at resonance is insensitive to the fluctuations of pumping rate and duty cycle. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11074050).

  6. Optimization and experimental validation of a thermal cycle that maximizes entropy coefficient fisher identifiability for lithium iron phosphate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Sergio; Rothenberger, Michael; Hake, Alison; Fathy, Hosam

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a framework for optimizing the thermal cycle to estimate a battery cell's entropy coefficient at 20% state of charge (SOC). Our goal is to maximize Fisher identifiability: a measure of the accuracy with which a parameter can be estimated. Existing protocols in the literature for estimating entropy coefficients demand excessive laboratory time. Identifiability optimization makes it possible to achieve comparable accuracy levels in a fraction of the time. This article demonstrates this result for a set of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cells. We conduct a 24-h experiment to obtain benchmark measurements of their entropy coefficients. We optimize a thermal cycle to maximize parameter identifiability for these cells. This optimization proceeds with respect to the coefficients of a Fourier discretization of this thermal cycle. Finally, we compare the estimated parameters using (i) the benchmark test, (ii) the optimized protocol, and (iii) a 15-h test from the literature (by Forgez et al.). The results are encouraging for two reasons. First, they confirm the simulation-based prediction that the optimized experiment can produce accurate parameter estimates in 2 h, compared to 15-24. Second, the optimized experiment also estimates a thermal time constant representing the effects of thermal capacitance and convection heat transfer.

  7. New Approach to QSPR Modeling of Fullerene C60 Solubility in Organic Solvents: An Application of SMILES-Based Optimal Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, A. A.; Rasulev, B. F.; Leszczynska, D.; Leszczynski, J.

    Optimal descriptors, calculated with simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES), have been used for modeling solubility of fullerene C60 in organic solvents. Local and global attributes of the SMILES have been involved in the modeling algorithm. Local attributes represent symbols, which are images of chemical elements ("O", "N", "Cl", "Br", etc) or chemical environment (double bonds, i.e., the " = "; triple bonds, i.e., "#", etc.) Global SMILES attributes are expressed as number of a given chemical element in given SMILES as well as superposition of chemical elements (for instance, SMILES contains both "Cl" and "Br"). Statistical characteristics of the derived model are given by n = 92, r2 = 0.8865, q2 = 0.8807, s = 0.363, F = 703 (training set); and n = 30, r2 = 0.9069, q2 = 0.8932, s = 0.399, F = 273 (test set).

  8. An optimized frequency-dependent multiphysics model for an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator with ethylene glycol as the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caponetto, R.; De Luca, V.; Graziani, S.; Sapuppo, F.

    2013-12-01

    IPMCs are electroactive polymers which can be used both as sensors and as actuators. The modeling of IPMC transducers is an open issue relevant to the development of effective applications. A multiphysics model of IPMC actuators is here implemented. It integrates the description of the electrical, mechanical, chemical and thermal coupled physics domains in a unique solution and, as a novelty, it allows the study in the frequency domain and the comparison with experimental response of the IPMC device. The IPMC white box modeling requires several macro- and microscopic parameters, not always accessible via theoretical approaches or experimentation. This work presents a new model optimization procedure which integrates the Nelder-Mead simplex method with the COMSOL Multiphysics®models. The proposed procedure uses experimental data and fits model simulations to IPMC real behavior for microscopic parameters’ identification. The model is developed for IPMCs with ethylene glycol as the solvent.

  9. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy.

  10. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy. PMID:26366164

  11. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy. PMID:26366164

  12. Optimized working conditions for a thermoelectric generator as a topping cycle for gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady Knowles, C.; Lee, Hohyun

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a model for a theoretical maximum efficiency of a thermoelectric generator integrated with a Brayton-cycle engine. The thermoelectric cycle is presented in two configurations as a topping cycle and a preheating topping cycle. For the topping cycle configuration, the thermoelectric generator receives heat from a high-temperature heat source and produces electrical work before rejecting heat to a Brayton cycle. For the preheating topping cycle, the rejected heat from the thermoelectric generator partially heats the compressed working fluid of the Brayton cycle before a secondary heater delivers heat to the working fluid directly from the heat source. The thermoelectric topping cycle efficiency increases as the temperature difference between the hot- and cold-side increases; however, this limits the heat transfer possible to the Brayton cycle, which in turn reduces power generation from the Brayton cycle. This model identifies the optimum operating parameters of the thermoelectric and Brayton cycles to obtain the maximum thermal efficiency of the combined cycle. In both configurations, efficiency gains are larger at low-temperature Brayton cycles. Although a thermoelectric generator (TEG) topping cycle enhances efficiency for a low temperature turbine, efficiency cannot exceed a high temperature gas turbine. Using a TEG topping cycle is limited to cases when space or price for a high temperature turbine cannot be justified. A design to achieve the preheating thermoelectric topping cycle is also presented.

  13. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  14. Unraveling the Fundamental Mechanisms of Solvent-Additive-Induced Optimization of Power Conversion Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Herath, Nuradhika; Das, Sanjib; Zhu, Jiahua; Kumar, Rajeev; Chen, Jihua; Xiao, Kai; Gu, Gong; Browning, James F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Lauter, Valeria

    2016-08-10

    The realization of controllable morphologies of bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is one of the key factors enabling high-efficiency devices. We provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms essential for the optimization of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) with additive processing to PBDTTT-CF:PC71BM system. We have studied the underlying mechanisms by monitoring the 3D nanostructural modifications in BHJs and correlated the modifications with the optical analysis and theoretical modeling of charge transport. Our results demonstrate profound effects of diiodooctane (DIO) on morphology and charge transport in the active layers. For small amounts of DIO (<3 vol %), DIO promotes the formation of a well-mixed donor-acceptor compact film and augments charge transfer and PCE. In contrast, for large amounts of DIO (>3 vol %), DIO facilitates a loosely packed mixed morphology with large clusters of PC71BM, leading to deterioration in PCE. Theoretical modeling of charge transport reveals that DIO increases the mobility of electrons and holes (the charge carriers) by affecting the energetic disorder and electric field dependence of the mobility. Our findings show the implications of phase separation and carrier transport pathways to achieve optimal device performances. PMID:27403964

  15. Unraveling the Fundamental Mechanisms of Solvent-Additive-Induced Optimization of Power Conversion Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Herath, Nuradhika; Das, Sanjib; Zhu, Jiahua; Kumar, Rajeev; Chen, Jihua; Xiao, Kai; Gu, Gong; Browning, James F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Lauter, Valeria

    2016-08-10

    The realization of controllable morphologies of bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is one of the key factors enabling high-efficiency devices. We provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms essential for the optimization of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) with additive processing to PBDTTT-CF:PC71BM system. We have studied the underlying mechanisms by monitoring the 3D nanostructural modifications in BHJs and correlated the modifications with the optical analysis and theoretical modeling of charge transport. Our results demonstrate profound effects of diiodooctane (DIO) on morphology and charge transport in the active layers. For small amounts of DIO (<3 vol %), DIO promotes the formation of a well-mixed donor-acceptor compact film and augments charge transfer and PCE. In contrast, for large amounts of DIO (>3 vol %), DIO facilitates a loosely packed mixed morphology with large clusters of PC71BM, leading to deterioration in PCE. Theoretical modeling of charge transport reveals that DIO increases the mobility of electrons and holes (the charge carriers) by affecting the energetic disorder and electric field dependence of the mobility. Our findings show the implications of phase separation and carrier transport pathways to achieve optimal device performances.

  16. Environmental optimization of chromium recovery from tannery sludge using a life cycle assessment approach.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Eylem; Puig, Rita; Baquero, Grau; Font, Joaquim; Colak, Selime; Gürler, Deniz

    2011-08-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the environmental impact of an oxidative chromium recovery method from tannery sludge, in comparison with the usual landfilling process. Three improvement options (water reduction, byproduct use and anaerobic sludge digestion) were considered. The results showed that the proposed chromium recovery process would be better environmentally than conventional landfilling in all the evaluated impact categories if the amount of chromium recovered was 43 kg per ton of sludge. This amount could be recovered if the chromium concentration was about 20 times higher than that considered in this study. Alternatively, a lower chromium concentration would produce a better result if the recovery method was optimized and implemented at industrial rather than laboratory scale, and if more accurate data were provided on environmental credits for avoiding the chromium production process. Thus, the recovery method is environmentally beneficial when tannery sludge contains a chromium concentration of about 100,000 ppm. According to the literature, such concentrations are not unusual. The results could serve as the basis for further environmental improvements in chromium recovery and tannery sludge management and should be used in decision-making processes, especially for end-of-pipe treatments.

  17. Optimization of power-cycle arrangements for Supercritical Water cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon-A-Lugrin, Laure

    The world energy demand is continuously rising due to the increase of both the world population and the standard of life quality. Further, to assure both a healthy world economy as well as adequate social standards, in a relatively short term, new energy-conversion technologies are mandatory. Within this framework, a Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established by the participation of 10 countries to collaborate for developing nuclear power reactors that will replace the present technology by 2030. The main goals of these nuclear-power reactors are: economic competitiveness, sustainability, safety, reliability and resistance to proliferation. As a member of the GIF, Canada has decided to orient its efforts towards the design of a CANDU-type Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). Such a system must run at a coolant outlet temperature of about 625°C and at a pressure of 25 MPa. It is obvious that at such conditions the overall efficiency of this kind of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) will compete with actual supercritical water-power boilers. In addition, from a heat-transfer viewpoint, the use of a supercritical fluid allows the limitation imposed by Critical Heat Flux (CHF) conditions, which characterize actual technologies, to be removed. Furthermore, it will be also possible to use direct thermodynamic cycles where the supercritical fluid expands right away in a turbine without the necessity of using intermediate steam generators and/or separators. This work presents several thermodynamic cycles that could be appropriate to run SCWR power plants. Improving both thermal efficiency and mechanical power constitutes a multi-objective optimization problem and requires specific tools. To this aim, an efficient and robust evolutionary algorithm, based on genetic algorithm, is used and coupled to an appropriate power plant thermodynamic simulation model. The results provide numerous combinations to achieve a thermal efficiency higher than 50% with a

  18. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature

  19. Solvent substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-09-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner.

  20. Rapid freeze-drying cycle optimization using computer programs developed based on heat and mass transfer models and facilitated by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS).

    PubMed

    Kuu, Wei Y; Nail, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    Computer programs in FORTRAN were developed to rapidly determine the optimal shelf temperature, T(f), and chamber pressure, P(c), to achieve the shortest primary drying time. The constraint for the optimization is to ensure that the product temperature profile, T(b), is below the target temperature, T(target). Five percent mannitol was chosen as the model formulation. After obtaining the optimal sets of T(f) and P(c), each cycle was assigned with a cycle rank number in terms of the length of drying time. Further optimization was achieved by dividing the drying time into a series of ramping steps for T(f), in a cascading manner (termed the cascading T(f) cycle), to further shorten the cycle time. For the purpose of demonstrating the validity of the optimized T(f) and P(c), four cycles with different predicted lengths of drying time, along with the cascading T(f) cycle, were chosen for experimental cycle runs. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to continuously measure the sublimation rate. As predicted, maximum product temperatures were controlled slightly below the target temperature of -25 degrees C, and the cascading T(f)-ramping cycle is the most efficient cycle design. In addition, the experimental cycle rank order closely matches with that determined by modeling. PMID:19504575

  1. Performance assessment and optimization of an irreversible nano-scale Stirling engine cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah

    2015-09-01

    Developing new technologies like nano-technology improves the performance of the energy industries. Consequently, emerging new groups of thermal cycles in nano-scale can revolutionize the energy systems' future. This paper presents a thermo-dynamical study of a nano-scale irreversible Stirling engine cycle with the aim of optimizing the performance of the Stirling engine cycle. In the Stirling engine cycle the working fluid is an Ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas. Moreover, two different strategies are proposed for a multi-objective optimization issue, and the outcomes of each strategy are evaluated separately. The first strategy is proposed to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F . Furthermore, the second strategy is suggested to maximize the thermal efficiency ( η), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F). All the strategies in the present work are executed via a multi-objective evolutionary algorithms based on NSGA∥ method. Finally, to achieve the final answer in each strategy, three well-known decision makers are executed. Lastly, deviations of the outcomes gained in each strategy and each decision maker are evaluated separately.

  2. Optimal power-to-mass ratios when predicting flat and hill-climbing time-trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Nevill, A M; Jobson, S A; Davison, R C R; Jeukendrup, A E

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to establish whether previously reported oxygen-to-mass ratios, used to predict flat and hill-climbing cycling performance, extend to similar power-to-mass ratios incorporating other, often quick and convenient measures of power output recorded in the laboratory [maximum aerobic power (W(MAP)), power output at ventilatory threshold (W(VT)) and average power output (W(AVG)) maintained during a 1 h performance test]. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with cycling speeds during flat and hill-climbing cycling. The optimal models predicting flat time-trial cycling speeds were found to be (W(MAP)m(-0.48))(0.54), (W(VT)m(-0.48))(0.46) and (W(AVG)m(-0.34))(0.58) that explained 69.3, 59.1 and 96.3% of the variance in cycling speeds, respectively. Cross-validation results suggest that, in conjunction with body mass, W(MAP) can provide an accurate and independent prediction of time-trial cycling, explaining 94.6% of the variance in cycling speeds with the standard deviation about the regression line, s=0.686 km h(-1). Based on these models, there is evidence to support that previously reported VO2-to-mass ratios associated with flat cycling speed extend to other laboratory-recorded measures of power output (i.e. Wm(-0.32)). However, the power-function exponents (0.54, 0.46 and 0.58) would appear to conflict with the assumption that the cyclists' speeds should be proportional to the cube root (0.33) of power demand/expended, a finding that could be explained by other confounding variables such as bicycle geometry, tractional resistance and/or the presence of a tailwind. The models predicting 6 and 12% hill-climbing cycling speeds were found to be proportional to (W(MAP)m(-0.91))(0.66), revealing a mass exponent, 0.91, that also supports previous research.

  3. Entransy analysis and optimization of performance of nano-scale irreversible Otto cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Bidi, Mokhtar

    2016-08-01

    This paper made attempt to investigate thermodynamically a nano scale irreversible Otto cycle for optimizing its performance. This system employed an ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas as a working fluid. Two different scenarios were proposed in the multi-objective optimization process and the results of each of the scenarios were examined separately. The first scenario made attempt to maximize the dimensionless ecological function and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. Furthermore, the second scenario tried to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. The multi objective evolutionary method integrated with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was used to optimize the proposed objective functions. To determine the final output of each scenario, three efficient decision makers were employed. Finally, error analysis was employed to determine the deviation of solutions chosen by decision makers.

  4. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Optimizing revenue cycle performance before, during, and after an EHR implementation.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Margaret; Berkebile, Jane; Vallozzi, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    An electronic health record implementation brings risks of adverse revenue cycle activity. Hospitals and health systems can mitigate that risk by taking aproactive, three-phase approach: Identify potential issues prior to implementation. Create teams to oversee operations during implementation. Hold regular meetings after implementation to ensure the system is running smoothly. PMID:27451570

  6. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent

    DOEpatents

    Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

    1980-06-23

    A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

  7. Optimization of an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the separation and determination of essential oil from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Sun, Qiushi; Hu, Zhiyan; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was established and employed for the extraction, concentration and analysis of essential oil constituents from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Response surface methodology was performed to optimize the key parameters in accelerated solvent extraction on the extraction efficiency, and key parameters in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction were discussed as well. Two representative constituents in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, (Z)-ligustilide and n-butylphthalide, were quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that the qualitative result of the accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approach was in good agreement with that of hydro-distillation, whereas the proposed approach took far less extraction time (30 min), consumed less plant material (usually <1 g, 0.01 g for this study) and solvent (<20 mL) than the conventional system. To sum up, the proposed method could be recommended as a new approach in the extraction and analysis of essential oil. PMID:26304788

  8. Optimization of an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the separation and determination of essential oil from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Sun, Qiushi; Hu, Zhiyan; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was established and employed for the extraction, concentration and analysis of essential oil constituents from Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Response surface methodology was performed to optimize the key parameters in accelerated solvent extraction on the extraction efficiency, and key parameters in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction were discussed as well. Two representative constituents in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort, (Z)-ligustilide and n-butylphthalide, were quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that the qualitative result of the accelerated solvent extraction dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction approach was in good agreement with that of hydro-distillation, whereas the proposed approach took far less extraction time (30 min), consumed less plant material (usually <1 g, 0.01 g for this study) and solvent (<20 mL) than the conventional system. To sum up, the proposed method could be recommended as a new approach in the extraction and analysis of essential oil.

  9. Development and optimization of a naphthoic acid-based ionic liquid as a "non-organic solvent microextraction" for the determination of tetracycline antibiotics in milk and chicken eggs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiajia; Wang, Hui; Qu, Jingang; Wang, Huili; Wang, Xuedong

    2017-01-15

    In traditional ionic liquids (ILs)-based microextraction, ILs are often used as extraction and dispersive solvents; however, their functional effects are not fully utilized. Herein, we developed a novel ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium naphthoic acid salt ([C4MIM][NPA]) with strong acidity. It was used as a mixed dispersive solvent with conventional [C2MIM][BF4] in "functionalized ionic liquid-based non-organic solvent microextraction (FIL-NOSM)" for determination of tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) in milk and eggs. Utilization of [C4MIM][NPA] in FIL-NOSM method increased extraction recoveries (ERs) of TCs by more than 20% and eliminated the pH adjustment step because of its strong acidity. Under optimized conditions based on central composite design, the ERs of four TCs were 94.1-102.1%, and the limitsofdetection were 0.08-1.12μgkg(-1) in milk and egg samples. This proposed method provides high extraction efficiency, less pretreatment time and requires non-organic solvents for determination of trace TC concentrations in complex animal-based food matrices. PMID:27542460

  10. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  11. Exergoeconomic analysis and optimization of an evaporator for a binary mixture of fluids in an organic Rankine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Rong; Du, Mei-Tang; Wang, Jian-Ning

    2012-12-01

    This paper focuses on the research of an evaporator with a binary mixture of organic working fluids in the organic Rankine cycle. Exergoeconomic analysis and performance optimization were performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the exergoeconomic theory. The annual total cost per unit heat transfer rate was introduced as the objective function. In this model, the exergy loss cost caused by the heat transfer irreversibility and the capital cost were taken into account; however, the exergy loss due to the frictional pressure drops, heat dissipation to surroundings, and the flow imbalance were neglected. The variation laws of the annual total cost with respect to the number of transfer units and the temperature ratios were presented. Optimal design parameters that minimize the objective function had been obtained, and the effects of some important dimensionless parameters on the optimal performances had also been discussed for three types of evaporator flow arrangements. In addition, optimal design parameters of evaporators were compared with those of condensers.

  12. Cyst and encystment in protozoan parasites: optimal targets for new life-cycle interrupting strategies?

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Díaz, Hugo; Carrero, Julio César; Argüello-García, Raúl; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Certain protozoan parasites use survival strategies to reside outside the host such as the formation of cysts. This dormant and resistant stage results from the complex process of encystment that involves diverse molecular and cellular modifications. The stimuli and changes associated with cyst biogenesis are a matter of ongoing studies in human and animal protozoan parasites such as amoeba and Giardia species because blocking every step in the encystment pathway should, in theory, interrupt their life cycles. The present review thoroughly examines this essential process in those protozoan parasites and discusses the possibility of using that information to develop new kinds of anti-parasite specific and life cycle-interrupting drugs, aimed at holding back the dissemination of these infections.

  13. Factors affecting the optimization of the Stirling cycle for use as a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringe, R.P.

    1983-11-01

    This report discusses the effects of variations of the phase-angle, cylinder volumes, dead space, cylinder heat transfer, working fluid, and temperature on capacity and performance of a Stirling cycle heat pump through the use of a relatively simple computer model. Shortcomings in predicting the coefficient of performance for heating (COP /SUB H/ ) via ideal analysis are identified. A comparison of the simulated COP /SUB H/ with experimental data is presented for one particular nonoptimum machine.

  14. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Optimal control of a remanufacturing system with consideration for product life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2004-02-01

    This paper deals with the cost management problem of a remanufacturing system with stochastic variability in the demand rate, the remanufacturing rate and the discard rate. We consider two types of inventories. One is the actual product inventory in the factory while the other is the virtual inventory that is still in use by the consumers. The state of the remanufacturing system is defined by considering the levels of both inventories. The cost function is composed of various costs such as the holding cost, backlogging cost and other manufacturing costs. We obtain the optimal production policy that minimizes the expected average cost per period. Numerical results provide insights on the effects of the various costs on the optimal policy.

  16. Energetically optimal cadence vs. freely-chosen cadence during cycling: effect of exercise duration.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, J; Hausswirth, C; Smith, D; Vercruyssen, F; Vallier, J M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cadence and oxygen consumption with exercise duration. Ten triathletes who trained regularly were examined. The first test was always a maximal test to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The other sessions were composed of six submaximal tests representing 80% of the maximal power reached with VO2max (Pmax). During these tests submaximal rides with a duration of 30 min were performed. Each test represented, in a randomised order, one of the following pedal rates: 50, 65, 80, 95, 110 rpm and a freely-chosen rate. VO2, respiratory parameters, and heart rate were monitored continuously. Two periods, between the 3rd and the 6th minute and between the 25th and the 28th minute, were analysed. Results showed that when VO2 and heart rate were plotted against cadence, each curve could be best described by a parabolic function, whatever the period. Furthermore, a significant effect of period was found on energetically optimal cadence (70 +/- 4.5 vs. 86 +/- 6.2 rpm, P < 0.05). Only during the second period was no significant difference found between freely-chosen cadence (83 +/- 6.9 rpm) and energetically optimal cadence (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that during prolonged exercise triathletes choose a cadence that is close to the energetically optimal cadence. A change of muscle fibre recruitment pattern with exercise duration and cadence would explain the shift in energetically optimal rate towards a higher pedal rate observed at the end of exercise. PMID:10683101

  17. ESBWR enhanced flow distribution with optimized orificing and related fuel cycle performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, G. J.; Karve, A. A.; Fawcett, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) is GEH's latest Generation III+ reactor design with natural circulation coolant flow and passive safety features. Reliance on natural circulation as the sole means of core coolant driving force results in increased power-to-flow ratio and places increased importance on the efficient distribution of core flow in order to achieve optimum thermal margins and improved fuel cycle efficiency. In addition, the large core size of the ESBWR, containing 1132 bundles, greatly benefits from a more targeted distribution of flow, directing a higher fraction of flow to high power bundles in the 'ring of fire' region of typical BWR loading patterns and a lower fraction of flow to low power bundles on and near the core periphery. Desirable flow distributions can be achieved by modifying the hydraulic resistance of the inlet orifices to preferentially force flow to the targeted region. The inlet orifice is a feature that is incorporated into the fuel support piece of a typical BWR design. The majority of existing forced circulation BWR's rely on only two orifice types - a peripheral orifice located along the outermost row and a central orifice in all other locations. A more optimum distribution of core flow is achievable with the introduction of multiple inlet orifice types. Multi-zone orifice layouts comprised of two, three and four types have been evaluated for the ESBWR. An efficient radial distribution of flow can have a direct beneficial effect on the Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR). An improved multi-zone orifice layout in the ESBWR has the potential of significantly increasing active flow in high power bundles. On average, this flow increase corresponds to a noteworthy MCPR improvement. Additional MCPR margin may be used to enhance operating flexibility and to achieve reduced fuel cycle costs over the plant lifetime. Combined with GNF's latest high performance fuel design for the ESBWR, GNF2E, and improved loading

  18. In-situ transesterification of seeds of invasive Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera L.) in a microwave batch system (GREEN(3)) using hexane as co-solvent: Biodiesel production and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Barekati-Goudarzi, Mohamad; Boldor, Dorin; Nde, Divine B

    2016-02-01

    In-situ transesterification (simultaneous extraction and transesterification) of Chinese tallow tree seeds into methyl esters using a batch microwave system was investigated in this study. A high degree of oil extraction and efficient conversion of oil to biodiesel were found in the proposed range. The process was further optimized in terms of product yields and conversion rates using Doehlert optimization methodology. Based on the experimental results and statistical analysis, the optimal production yield conditions for this process were determined as: catalyst concentration of 1.74wt.%, solvent ratio about 3 (v/w), reaction time of 20min and temperature of 58.1°C. H(+)NMR was used to calculate reaction conversion. All methyl esters produced using this method met ASTM biodiesel quality specifications. PMID:26638139

  19. Optimized Stem Cell Detection Using the DyeCycle-Triggered Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cancer stem cells are highly attractive target populations for regenerative medicine and novel potentially curative anticancer therapeutics. In order to get a better understanding of stem cell biology and function, it is essential to reproducibly identify these stem cells from biological samples for subsequent characterization or isolation. ABC drug transporter expression is a hallmark of stem cells. This is utilized to identify (cancer) stem cells by exploiting their dye extrusion properties, which is referred to as the “side population assay.” Initially described for high-end flow cytometers equipped with ultraviolet lasers, this technique is now also amenable for a broader scientific community, owing to the increasing availability of violet laser-furnished cytometers and the advent of DyeCycle Violet (DCV). Here, we describe important technical aspects of the DCV-based side population assay and discuss potential pitfalls and caveats helping scientists to establish a valid and reproducible DCV-based side population assay. In addition, we investigate the suitability of blue laser-excitable DyeCycle dyes for side population detection. This knowledge will help to improve and standardize detection and isolation of stem cells based on their expression of ABC drug transporters. PMID:26798352

  20. Design and optimization of organic rankine cycle for low temperature geothermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barse, Kirtipal A.

    Rising oil prices and environmental concerns have increased attention to renewable energy. Geothermal energy is a very attractive source of renewable energy. Although low temperature resources (90°C to 150°C) are the most common and most abundant source of geothermal energy, they were not considered economical and technologically feasible for commercial power generation. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) technology makes it feasible to use low temperature resources to generate power by using low boiling temperature organic liquids. The first hypothesis for this research is that using ORC is technologically and economically feasible to generate electricity from low temperature geothermal resources. The second hypothesis for this research is redesigning the ORC system for the given resource condition will improve efficiency along with improving economics. ORC model was developed using process simulator and validated with the data obtained from Chena Hot Springs, Alaska. A correlation was observed between the critical temperature of the working fluid and the efficiency for the cycle. Exergy analysis of the cycle revealed that the highest exergy destruction occurs in evaporator followed by condenser, turbine and working fluid pump for the base case scenarios. Performance of ORC was studied using twelve working fluids in base, Internal Heat Exchanger and turbine bleeding constrained and non-constrained configurations. R601a, R245ca, R600 showed highest first and second law efficiency in the non-constrained IHX configuration. The highest net power was observed for R245ca, R601a and R601 working fluids in the non-constrained base configuration. Combined heat exchanger area and size parameter of the turbine showed an increasing trend as the critical temperature of the working fluid decreased. The lowest levelized cost of electricity was observed for R245ca followed by R601a, R236ea in non-constrained base configuration. The next best candidates in terms of LCOE were R601a, R

  1. Optimization of the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted to determine what, if any, improvements could be made on the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants which could be reflected in higher thermal efficiency and a reduction in the cost of electricity, COE. A systematic analysis of air separation process varitions which showed that the specific energy consumption could be minimized when the product stream oxygen concentration is about 70 mole percent was conducted. The use of advanced air compressors, having variable speed and guide vane position control, results in additional power savings. The study also led to the conceptual design of a new air separation process, sized for a 500 MW sub e MHD plant, referred to a internal compression is discussed. In addition to its lower overall energy consumption, potential capital cost savings were identified for air separation plants using this process when constructed in a single large air separation train rather than multiple parallel trains, typical of conventional practice.

  2. Development of a novel naphthoic acid ionic liquid and its application in "no-organic solvent microextraction" for determination of triclosan and methyltriclosan in human fluids and the method optimization by central composite design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gao, Jiajia; Yu, Nana; Qu, Jingang; Fang, Fang; Wang, Huili; Wang, Mei; Wang, Xuedong

    2016-07-01

    In traditional ionic liquids (ILs)-based microextraction, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic ILs are often used as extractant and disperser, respectively. However, the functional effects of ILs are not utilized in microextraction procedures. Herein, we introduced 1-naphthoic acid into imidazolium ring to synthesize a novel ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium naphthoic acid salt ([C4MIM][NPA]), and its structure was characterized by IR, (1)H NMR and MS. On the basis of its acidic property and lower solubility than common [CnMIM][BF4], it was used as a mixing dispersive solvent with [C4MIM][BF4] in "functionalized ionic liquid-based no organic solvent microextraction (FIL-NOSM)". Utilization of [C4MIM][NPA] in FIL-NOSM procedures has two obvious advantages: (1) it promoted the non-polar environment, increased volume of the sedimented phase, and thus could enhance the extraction recoveries of triclosan (TCS) and methyltriclosan (MTCS) by more than 10%; and (2) because of the acidic property, it can act as a pH modifier, avoiding extra pH adjustment step. By combining single factor optimization and central composite design, the main factors in the FIL-NOSM method were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the relative recoveries of TCS and MTCS reached up to 98.60-106.09%, and the LODs of them were as low as 0.12-0.15µgL(-1) in plasma and urine samples. In total, this [C4MIM][NPA]-based FIL-NOSM method provided high extraction efficiency, and required less pretreatment time and unutilized any organic solvent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of [C4mim][NPA]-based microextraction method for the simultaneous quantification of trace TCS and MTCS in human fluids. PMID:27154690

  3. Automated Identification of the Heart Wall Throughout the Entire Cardiac Cycle Using Optimal Cardiac Phase for Extracted Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    In most methods for evaluation of cardiac function based on echocardiography, the heart wall is currently identified manually by an operator. However, this task is very time-consuming and suffers from inter- and intraobserver variability. The present paper proposes a method that uses multiple features of ultrasonic echo signals for automated identification of the heart wall region throughout an entire cardiac cycle. In addition, the optimal cardiac phase to select a frame of interest, i.e., the frame for the initiation of tracking, was determined. The heart wall region at the frame of interest in this cardiac phase was identified by the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, and heart wall regions in the following frames were identified by tracking each point classified in the initial frame as the heart wall region using the phased tracking method. The results for two subjects indicate the feasibility of the proposed method in the longitudinal axis view of the heart.

  4. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.

  5. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-01-01

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%. PMID:26056307

  6. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A; Scown, Corinne D; Toste, F Dean; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-06-23

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a method for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We also demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.

  7. Novel pathways for fuels and lubricants from biomass optimized using life-cycle greenhouse gas assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R.; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gunbas, Gorkem; Gokhale, Amit A.; Scown, Corinne D.; Toste, F. Dean; Bell, Alexis T.

    2015-06-08

    Decarbonizing the transportation sector is critical to achieving global climate change mitigation. Although biofuels will play an important role in conventional gasoline and diesel applications, bioderived solutions are particularly important in jet fuels and lubricants, for which no other viable renewable alternatives exist. Producing compounds for jet fuel and lubricant base oil applications often requires upgrading fermentation products, such as alcohols and ketones, to reach the appropriate molecular-weight range. Ketones possess both electrophilic and nucleophilic functionality, which allows them to be used as building blocks similar to alkenes and aromatics in a petroleum refining complex. Here, we develop a methodmore » for selectively upgrading biomass-derived alkyl methyl ketones with >95% yields into trimer condensates, which can then be hydrodeoxygenated in near-quantitative yields to give a new class of cycloalkane compounds. The basic chemistry developed here can be tailored for aviation fuels as well as lubricants by changing the production strategy. We demonstrate that a sugarcane biorefinery could use natural synergies between various routes to produce a mixture of lubricant base oils and jet fuels that achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80%.« less

  8. A model for optimizing cycling performance by varying power on hills and in wind.

    PubMed

    Swain, D P

    1997-08-01

    The effect of varying power, while holding mean power constant, would have on cycling performance in hilly or windy conditions was analyzed. Performance for a 70-kg cyclist on a 10-km time trial with alternating 1-km segments of uphill and downhill was modeled, with mean VO2 (3, 4, 5 L.min-1), variation in VO2 (5, 10, 15%), and grade (0, 5, 10, 15%) used as independent variables. For the conditions of 4 L.min-1, 10% variation, and 10% grade, results were as follows: finishing time of 22:47.2 with varied power, versus 24:20.3 at constant power, for a time savings of 1 min 33.1 s. Separately, a 40-km time trial with alternating 5-km segments of headwind and tailwind (0, 8, 16, 24 km.h-1) was modeled, with the following results for the conditions of 4 L.min-1, 10% variation, and wind speed of 16 km.h-1: finishing time of 60:21.2 with power variation vs 60:50.2 at constant power, for a time savings of 29 s. Time saved was directly proportional to variation in VO2, grade, and wind speed and was indirectly proportional to mean VO2. In conclusion, the model predicts that significantly time savings could be realized on hilly and windy courses by slightly increasing power on uphill or headwind segments while compensating with reduced power on downhill or tailwind segments.

  9. Optimization of the catalytic oxidation of CO for closed-cycle CO2 laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Wood, G. M.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.; Sidney, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    This report develops a basis for the design of a catalyst bed for the recombination of CO and O2 in a closed-cycle CO2 laser system. The catalyst is 1% Pt on SnO2 having a BET surface area of 6.7 sq m/g and a specific void volume of 0.374 cu cm/g. The design conditions are: a catalyst bed temperature of 100 C and a circulating flow rate of 10 lambda/min. Under these conditions, the required quantity of catalyst for prolonged laser operation of 668g. The rat law for the reaction of a stoichiometric mixture of 1% CO + 1/2% O2 in helium was determined to be overall first order; however, additional experiments with non-stoichiometric gas mixtures of CO and O2 are needed to determine the order of the CO concentration and the order of the O2 concentration in the rate law.

  10. Optimized, Competitive Supercritical-CO2 Cycle GFR for Gen IV Service

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Driscoll; P. Hejzlar; G. Apostolakis

    2008-09-08

    An overall plant design was developed for a gas-cooled fast reactor employing a direct supercritical Brayton power conversion system. The most important findings were that (1) the concept could be capital-cost competitive, but startup fuel cycle costs are penalized by the low core power density, specified in large part to satisfy the goal of significatn post-accident passive natural convection cooling; (2) active decay heat removal is preferable as the first line of defense, with passive performance in a backup role; (3) an innovative tube-in-duct fuel assembly, vented to the primpary coolant, appears to be practicable; and (4) use of the S-Co2 GFR to support hydrogen production is a synergistic application, since sufficient energy can be recuperated from the product H2 and 02 to allow the electrolysis cell to run 250 C hotter than the reactor coolant, and the water boilers can be used for reactor decay heat removal. Increasing core poer density is identified as the top priority for future work on GFRs of this type.

  11. Identifying energy and carbon footprint optimization potentials of a sludge treatment line with Life Cycle Assessment.

    PubMed

    Remy, C; Lesjean, B; Waschnewski, J

    2013-01-01

    This study exemplifies the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as a tool to quantify the environmental impacts of processes for wastewater treatment. In a case study, the sludge treatment line of a large wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is analysed in terms of cumulative energy demand and the emission of greenhouse gases (carbon footprint). Sludge treatment consists of anaerobic digestion, dewatering, drying, and disposal of stabilized sludge in mono- or co-incineration in power plants or cement kilns. All relevant forms of energy demand (electricity, heat, chemicals, fossil fuels, transport) and greenhouse gas emissions (fossil CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O) are accounted in the assessment, including the treatment of return liquor from dewatering in the WWTP. Results show that the existing process is positive in energy balance (-162 MJ/PE(COD) * a) and carbon footprint (-11.6 kg CO(2)-eq/PE(COD) * a) by supplying secondary products such as electricity from biogas production or mono-incineration and substituting fossil fuels in co-incineration. However, disposal routes for stabilized sludge differ considerably in their energy and greenhouse gas profiles. In total, LCA proves to be a suitable tool to support future investment decisions with information of environmental relevance on the impact of wastewater treatment, but also urban water systems in general.

  12. Studies on generalized kinetic model and Pareto optimization of a product-driven self-cycling bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaibiao; Kasperski, Andrzej; Tian, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is the optimization of a product-driven self-cycling bioprocess and presentation of a way to determine the best possible decision variables out of a set of alternatives based on the designed model. Initially, a product-driven generalized kinetic model, which allows a flexible choice of the most appropriate kinetics is designed and analysed. The optimization problem is given as the bi-objective one, where maximization of biomass productivity and minimization of unproductive loss of substrate are the objective functions. Then, the Pareto fronts are calculated for exemplary kinetics. It is found that in the designed bioprocess, a decrease of emptying/refilling fraction and an increase of substrate feeding concentration cause an increase of the biomass productivity. An increase of emptying/refilling fraction and a decrease of substrate feeding concentration cause a decrease of unproductive loss of substrate. The preferred solutions are calculated using the minimum distance from an ideal solution method, while giving proposals of their modifications derived from a decision maker's reactions to the generated solutions.

  13. Performance optimization of an air-standard irreversible dual-atkinson cycle engine based on the ecological coefficient of performance criterion.

    PubMed

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological performance analysis and optimization for an air-standard irreversible Dual-Atkinson cycle (DAC) based on the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP) criterion which includes internal irreversibilities, heat leak, and finite-rate of heat transfer. A comprehensive numerical analysis has been realized so as to investigate the global and optimal performances of the cycle. The results obtained based on the ECOP criterion are compared with a different ecological function which is named as the ecologic objective-function and with the maximum power output conditions. The results have been attained introducing the compression ratio, cut-off ratio, pressure ratio, Atkinson cycle ratio, source temperature ratio, and internal irreversibility parameter. The change of cycle performance with respect to these parameters is investigated and graphically presented. PMID:25170525

  14. Performance Optimization of an Air-Standard Irreversible Dual-Atkinson Cycle Engine Based on the Ecological Coefficient of Performance Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological performance analysis and optimization for an air-standard irreversible Dual-Atkinson cycle (DAC) based on the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP) criterion which includes internal irreversibilities, heat leak, and finite-rate of heat transfer. A comprehensive numerical analysis has been realized so as to investigate the global and optimal performances of the cycle. The results obtained based on the ECOP criterion are compared with a different ecological function which is named as the ecologic objective-function and with the maximum power output conditions. The results have been attained introducing the compression ratio, cut-off ratio, pressure ratio, Atkinson cycle ratio, source temperature ratio, and internal irreversibility parameter. The change of cycle performance with respect to these parameters is investigated and graphically presented. PMID:25170525

  15. Influence of processing procedure on the quality of Radix Scrophulariae: a quantitative evaluation of the main compounds obtained by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Li, Qinglin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang; Zhu, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with accelerated solvent extraction method was used to simultaneously determine six compounds in crude and processed Radix Scrophulariae samples. Accelerated solvent extraction parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, number of cycles, and analysis procedure were systematically optimized. The results indicated that compared with crude Radix Scrophulariae samples, the processed samples had lower contents of harpagide and harpagoside but higher contents of catalpol, acteoside, angoroside C, and cinnamic acid. The established method was sufficiently rapid and reliable for the global quality evaluation of crude and processed herbal medicines.

  16. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  17. Cerebral metabolic and circulatory effects of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, a neurotoxic industrial solvent. 2. Tissue concentrations of labile phosphates, glycolytic metabolites, citric acid cycle intermediates, amino acids, and cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Folbergrová, J; Hougaard, K; Westerberg, E; Siesjö, B K

    1984-01-01

    In order to obtain information on the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, rats maintained artificially ventilated on N2O:O2 (70:30) were exposed to a concentration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane of 8000 ppm, 43.7 mg L-1, that induces moderate ataxia in awake, spontaneously breathing animals. After 5 and 60 min of exposure, as well as after a 60-min recovery period following 60 min of exposure, the brain was frozen in situ and cortical tissue was assayed for phosphocreatine (PCr), + ATP, ADP, AMP, glycogen, glucose, pyruvate, lactate, citric acid cycle intermediates, associated amino acids, and cyclic nucleotides; in addition, purine nucleotides, nucleosides, and bases were assayed by HPLC techniques. Exposure of animals to 1,1,1-trichloroethane failed to alter blood glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations. However, the solvent induced highly significant increases in tissue lactate and pyruvate concentrations that were also reflected in cisternal CSF. Associated with these changes were increases in all citric acid cycle intermediates except succinate, an increase in alanine concentration, and a rise in the glutamate/aspartate ratio. After 5 min, a small decrease in glycogen concentration also occurred. All these changes were reversed when the exposure was terminated. No changes were observed in tissue concentrations of purine nucleotides, nucleosides, and bases except for a small reduction of ATP concentration after 60 min of exposure, still noticeable after 60 min of recovery. Apart from a small reduction in cAMP concentration after 5 min of exposure, cyclic nucleotide concentrations did not change.

  18. Optimization of the cycle life performance of VRLA batteries, working under high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M.; Trinidad, F.; Valenciano, J.; Sánchez, A.

    On hybrid vehicle applications, batteries must work in a rather low state of charge (SOC), in order to be able to recover as much of the regenerative braking energy as possible. Usually SOC values around 60% are used, which promotes the development of new unexpected failure modes not previously found, mainly associated with heavy sulphation of the negative plates. In order to try to optimise the cycle life performance to the point of making these batteries a real alternative for the application of hybrid vehicles, a series of tests have been undertaken, aimed to optimise the key parameters that from previous experience are known to determine life duration in high rate low state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions. Previous works have been focused on trying to determine the optimum composition of positive and negative active material, concerning paste density in the positive, and additives in negative. In order to overcome the deleterious effect of heavy sulphation in negative plates on cycle life, the use of conductivity enhancers additives such as graphite has been proposed. The objective of this project is to optimize the performance of the glass microfiber separators, in order to maintain a high degree of compression in the group, as well as to avoid acid stratification and development of short circuits along the battery life. To do this, different glass microfiber separators with inert additives, as well as different fiber composition have been tested. Results obtained up to now, indicate a remarkable good performance of the VRLA batteries with the new separators containing very fine fiberglass and silica fillers as an additive.

  19. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  20. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  1. Determine of the optimal number of cycles of docetaxel in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan-Chi; Chiang, Po-Hui; Luo, Hao-Lun; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chen, Yen-Ta; Kang, Chih-Hsiung; Hsu, Chun-Chien; Lee, Wei-Ching; Cheng, Yuan-Tso

    2016-09-01

    To determine the optimal number of cycles of docetaxel for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, we retrospectively collected 73 patients receiving varying numbers of docetaxel plus prednisolone and analyzed the clinical outcomes including overall survival, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, and adverse events. The study included 33 patients receiving ≤ 10 cycles of docetaxel and 40 patients receiving > 10 cycles. Patients receiving > 10 cycles were younger than those who received ≤ 10 cycles. There was no statistical significant difference in overall survival between the two groups (log-rank test, p = 0.75). Adverse effects were more common among patients receiving ≥ 10 cycles of treatment. A PSA flare-up was observed among six patients (8.2%); the median duration of the PSA surge was 3 weeks (range, 3-12 weeks). The overall survival rates in patients with PSA flare-up were comparable with the patients having PSA response. We concluded that at least four cycles of docetaxel should be administered in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients in order not to cease treatment prematurely from potentially beneficial chemotherapy. However, administering > 10 cycles does not result in any further improvement in survival and is associated with more adverse effects. PMID:27638405

  2. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  3. Dual response surface-optimized synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system by Candida rugosa lipase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wang, Yulun; Li, Jia; Wang, Ping; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yang; Fu, Chenyin; Dong, Wenqi

    2010-02-01

    Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of L-menthyl conjugated linoleate in solvent-free system was studied in this paper. Duel response surface methodology was employed to explore the factors which would influence the reaction conversion by a range of independent experiments. The conditions of reaction temperature, reaction time, enzyme amount, substrate molar ratio and water content were symmetrically investigated. When the substrates were 1 mmol CLA and 1 mmol L-menthol, the maximum conversion (79.1+/-0.8%) was obtained at 30 degrees C, Candida rugosa lipase of 33.7% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), water content of 32% (w/w by weight of L-menthol), reaction time of 43 h. The product isomers (9Z,11E-/10E,12Z-=63/37) were analyzed by GC/MS. The similarity between the oleic acid and 9Z,11E-CLA conformations which were obtained by molecular modeling could account for the specific catalyzed by C. rugosa lipase. PMID:19833506

  4. Advanced steam power plant concepts with optimized life-cycle costs: A new approach for maximum customer benefit

    SciTech Connect

    Seiter, C.

    1998-07-01

    The use of coal power generation applications is currently enjoying a renaissance. New highly efficient and cost-effective plant concepts together with environmental protection technologies are the main factors in this development. In addition, coal is available on the world market at attractive prices and in many places it is more readily available than gas. At the economical leading edge, standard power plant concepts have been developed to meet the requirements of emerging power markets. These concepts incorporate the high technological state-of-the-art and are designed to achieve lowest life-cycle costs. Low capital cost, fuel costs and operating costs in combination with shortest lead times are the main assets that make these plants attractive especially for IPPs and Developers. Other aspects of these comprehensive concepts include turnkey construction and the willingness to participate in BOO/BOT projects. One of the various examples of such a concept, the 2 x 610-MW Paiton Private Power Project Phase II in Indonesia, is described in this paper. At the technological leading edge, Siemens has always made a major contribution and was pacemaker for new developments in steam power plant technology. Modern coal-fired steam power plants use computer-optimized process and plant design as well as advanced materials, and achieve efficiencies exceeding 45%. One excellent example of this high technology is the world's largest lignite-fired steam power plant Schwarze Pumpe in Germany, which is equipped with two 800 MW Siemens steam turbine generators with supercritical steam parameters. The world's largest 50-Hz single-shaft turbine generator with supercritical steam parameters rated at 1025 MW for the Niederaussem lignite-fired steam power plant in Germany is a further example of the sophisticated Siemens steam turbine technology and sets a new benchmark in this field.

  5. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  6. Solvents safety handbook

    SciTech Connect

    De Renzo, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Know solvents and how to protect yourself from dangerous exposure to them. Instant information for decision-making regarding industrial solvents in everyday use, is provided in this handbook which is a compilation of data on 335 hazardous and frequently-used solvents.

  7. Frequency and duty cycle modulation optimization in minimizing thermal accumulation effect in Z-scan measurement with high-repetition-rate laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnan Zainal Abidin, Mohd; Noor, Ahmad Shukri Muhammad; Rashid, Suraya Abdul; Adzir Mahdi, Mohd

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the optimization of the chopper frequency and duty cycle in a Z-scan measurement with a 250 MHz high-repetition-rate (HRR) femtosecond laser to minimize the thermal lensing effect due to cumulative heating of the sample. The result shows that such minimization can be achieved by keeping the modulated exposure time on the sample shorter than the thermal diffusivity decay time tc. The minimum chopper frequency fmin is predicted by relating the duty cycle factor F with tc, while maintaining stable peak and valley transmittances, i.e., ΔTp and ΔTv, respectively. Furthermore, a lower fmin is obtained by taking a stable range of the peak-valley difference ΔTpv into consideration. The optimization allows for the low operational modulation frequency of Z-scan measurement with reduced thermal influence, thus enabling simple management of the thermal lensing effect.

  8. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  9. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  10. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. 6. Optimization of the selectivity of lithium dodecyl sulfate-lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate mixed micellar buffers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Torres-Lapasió, José Ramón; García-Alvarez-Coque, María Celia; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2002-09-01

    The optimization of the composition of mixed surfactants used as micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) pseudostationary phases is proposed as an effective method for the separation of complex mixtures of analytes. The solvation parameter model is used to select two surfactants (lithium dodecyl sulfate, LDS, and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate, LPFOS) with contrasting solvation properties. Combination of these two surfactants allows variations of the solvation properties of MEKC pseudostationary phase along a wide range. Thus, the convenient variation of the proportion of both surfactants allows an effective control of the selectivity in such systems. An algorithm that predicts the overall resolution of a given mixture of compounds is described and applied to optimize the composition of the mixed surfactant for the separation of the mixture. The algorithm is based on the calculation of peak purities on simulated chromatograms as a function of the composition of the mixed LDS/LPFOS micellar buffer from data at several micellar buffer compositions. Successful separations were achieved for mixtures containing up to 20 compounds, in less than 12 min.

  11. Efficient removal of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingjing; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Wencan; Jiao, Panpan; He, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    Naphthalene-2-ol is a typical biologically recalcitrant pollutant in dye wastewater. Solvent extraction of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions using mixed solvents was investigated. Various extractants and diluents were evaluated, and the effects of volume ratio of extractant to diluent, initial pH, initial concentration of naphthalene-2-ol in aqueous solution, extraction time, temperature, volume ratio of organic phase to aqueous phase (O/A), stirring rate and extraction stages, on extraction efficiency were examined separately. Regeneration and reuse of the spent extractant were also investigated. Results showed that tributyl phosphate (TBP) achieved 98% extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol in a single stage extraction, the highest among the 12 extractants evaluated. Extraction efficiency was optimized when cyclohexane and n-octane were used as diluents. The solvent combination of 20% TBP, 20% n-octanol and 60% cyclohexane (V/V) obtained the maximum extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol, 99.3%, within 20min using three cross-current extraction stages under the following extraction conditions: O/A ratio of 1:1, initial pH of 3, 25°C and stirring rate of 150r/min. Recovery of mixed solvents was achieved by using 15% (W/W) NaOH solution at an O:A ratio of 1:1 and a contact time of 15min. The mixed solvents achieved an extraction capacity for naphthalene-2-ol stably higher than 90% during five cycles after regeneration. PMID:27593279

  12. Combining Optimized Particle Morphology with a Niobium-Based Coating for Long Cycling-Life, High-Voltage Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Giulio; Axmann, Peter; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, Rolf Jürgen; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-01

    Morphologically optimized LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (LMNO-0) particles were treated with LiNbO3 to prepare a homogeneously coated material (LMNO-Nb) as cathode in batteries. Graphite/LMNO-Nb full cells present a twofold higher cycling life than cells assembled using uncoated LMNO-0 (graphite/LMNO-0 cell): Graphite/LMNO-0 cells achieve 80 % of the initial capacity after more than 300 cycles whereas for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells this is the case for more than 600 cycles. Impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal significantly lower film and charge-transfer resistances for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells than for graphite/LMNO-0 cells during cycling. Reduced resistances suggest slower aging related to film thickening and increase of charge-transfer resistances when using LMNO-Nb cathodes. Tests at 45 °C confirm the good electrochemical performance of the investigated graphite/LMNO cells while the cycling stability of full cells is considerably lowered under these conditions. PMID:27254109

  13. A rapid and optimization-free procedure allows the in vivo detection of subtle cell cycle and ploidy alterations in tissues by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Heinlein, Christina; Deppert, Wolfgang; Braithwaite, Antony W

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle alterations are fundamental to many physiological processes but their detection has proven difficult when cells are in the context of a tissue structure. Here we describe an easy, rapid and optimization-free procedure for obtaining high resolution cell cycle profiles from nearly all tissue types derived from mouse, human and sheep. Using a standardized and non-enzymatic procedure that is universally suitable for soft, solid and epithelial tissues alike, we reproducibly obtain cell cycle profiles of highest quality with half peak coefficients of variation below 2.0. We are able to reduce preparation-derived debris to almost zero and efficiently exclude doublets, but retain multinucleated cells and apoptotic subG1-fragments. Applying this technique, we determine DNA-indices as small as 1.09 in tumor samples containing large necrotic areas and follow ploidy changes within different sections of individual tumors. Moreover, we examine tissue-specific cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as an in vivo stress response caused by radiation of mice. This method significantly improves the quality of DNA content analysis in tissues and extends the spectrum of applications. It allows assessing changes in ploidy, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis/necrosis in vivo and should be instrumental in all research that involves experimental animal models and/or patient biopsies. PMID:20928939

  14. Combining Optimized Particle Morphology with a Niobium-Based Coating for Long Cycling-Life, High-Voltage Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Giulio; Axmann, Peter; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, Rolf Jürgen; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-01

    Morphologically optimized LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (LMNO-0) particles were treated with LiNbO3 to prepare a homogeneously coated material (LMNO-Nb) as cathode in batteries. Graphite/LMNO-Nb full cells present a twofold higher cycling life than cells assembled using uncoated LMNO-0 (graphite/LMNO-0 cell): Graphite/LMNO-0 cells achieve 80 % of the initial capacity after more than 300 cycles whereas for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells this is the case for more than 600 cycles. Impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal significantly lower film and charge-transfer resistances for graphite/LMNO-Nb cells than for graphite/LMNO-0 cells during cycling. Reduced resistances suggest slower aging related to film thickening and increase of charge-transfer resistances when using LMNO-Nb cathodes. Tests at 45 °C confirm the good electrochemical performance of the investigated graphite/LMNO cells while the cycling stability of full cells is considerably lowered under these conditions.

  15. Modeling and optimization of maximum available work for irreversible gas power cycles with temperature dependent specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin; Yamık, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    In classical thermodynamics, the maximum power obtained from a system is defined as exergy (availability). However, the term exergy is used for reversible cycles only; in reality, reversible cycles do not exist, and all systems are irreversible. Reversible cycles do not have such restrictions as time and dimension, and are assumed to work in an equilibrium state. The objective of this study is to obtain maximum available work for SI, CI and Brayton cycles while considering the aforementioned restrictions and assumptions. We assume that the specific heat of the working fluid varies with temperature, we define optimum compression ratios and pressure ratio in order to obtain maximum available work, and we discuss the results obtained. The design parameter most appropriate for the results obtained is presented.

  16. Life cycle thinking and assessment tools on environmentally-benign electronics: Convergent optimization of materials use, end-of-life strategy and environmental policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoying

    The purpose of this study is to integrate the quantitative environmental performance assessment tools and the theory of multi-objective optimization within the boundary of electronic product systems to support the selection among design alternatives in terms of environmental impact, technical criteria, and economic feasibility. To meet with the requirements that result from emerging environmental legislation targeting electronics products, the research addresses an important analytical methodological approach to facilitate environmentally conscious design and end-of-life management with a life cycle viewpoint. A synthesis of diverse assessment tools is applied on a set of case studies: lead-free solder materials selection, cellular phone design, and desktop display technology assessment. In the first part of this work, an in-depth industrial survey of the status and concerns of the U.S. electronics industry on the elimination of lead (Pb) in solders is described. The results show that the trade-offs among environmental consequences, technology challenges, business risks, legislative compliance and stakeholders' preferences must be explicitly, simultaneously, and systematically addressed in the decision-making process used to guide multi-faceted planning of environmental solutions. In the second part of this work, the convergent optimization of the technical cycle, economic cycle and environmental cycle is addressed in a coherent and systematic way using the application of environmentally conscious design of cellular phones. The technical understanding of product structure, components analysis, and materials flow facilitates the development of "Design for Disassembly" guidelines. A bottom-up disassembly analysis on a "bill of materials" based structure at a micro-operational level is utilized to select optimal end-of-life strategies on the basis of economic feasibility. A macro-operational level life cycle model is used to investigate the environmental consequences

  17. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  18. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  19. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  20. Optimizing modes of a small-scale combined-cycle power plant with atmospheric-pressure gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoi, I. G.; Marinchenko, A. Yu.; Kler, A. M.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    The scheme of an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant with small capacity is proposed. Using the built mathematical model a feasibility study of this unit was performed, taking into account the kinetics of physical and chemical transformations in the fuel bed. The estimates of technical and economic efficiency of the plant have been obtained and compared with the alternative options.

  1. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model and local biomass processing depots for sustainable biofuel production: Integrated life cycle assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Eranki, Pragnya L.; Manowitz, David H.; Bals, Bryan D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kim, Seungdo; Dale, Bruce E.

    2013-07-23

    An array of feedstock is being evaluated as potential raw material for cellulosic biofuel production. Thorough assessments are required in regional landscape settings before these feedstocks can be cultivated and sustainable management practices can be implemented. On the processing side, a potential solution to the logistical challenges of large biorefi neries is provided by a network of distributed processing facilities called local biomass processing depots. A large-scale cellulosic ethanol industry is likely to emerge soon in the United States. We have the opportunity to influence the sustainability of this emerging industry. The watershed-scale optimized and rearranged landscape design (WORLD) model estimates land allocations for different cellulosic feedstocks at biorefinery scale without displacing current animal nutrition requirements. This model also incorporates a network of the aforementioned depots. An integrated life cycle assessment is then conducted over the unified system of optimized feedstock production, processing, and associated transport operations to evaluate net energy yields (NEYs) and environmental impacts.

  2. Towards ultra-fast solvent evaporation, the development of a computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gunnar; Wong, J.; Drapes, C.; Grant, M.; Baruth, A.

    Despite the promise of cheap and fast nanoscale ordering of block polymer thin films via solvent vapor annealing, a standardized, scalable production scheme remains elusive. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a nano-thin film to the vapors of one or more solvents with the goal of forming a swollen and mobile state to direct the self-assembly process by tuning surface energies and mediating unfavorable chain interactions. We have shown that optimized annealing conditions, where kinetic and thermal properties for crystal growth are extremely fast (<1s), exist at solvent concentrations just below the order-disorder transition of the film. However, when investigating the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of a film during drying, the role of solvent evaporation comes under great scrutiny. During this process, the film undergoes a competition between two fronts; phase separation and kinetic trapping. Recent results in both theory and experiment point toward this critical element in controlling the resultant morphologies; however, no current method includes a controllable solvent evaporation rate at ultra-fast time scales. We report on a computer-controlled, pneumatically actuated chamber that provides control over solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance monitors solvent concentration with 10 ms temporal resolution and reveals several possible evaporation trajectories, ranging from linear to exponential to logarithmic. Funded by Dr. Randolph Ferlic Summer Research Scholarship and NASA Nebraska Space Grant.

  3. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  4. Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange in Radiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, G.

    In 1805, Bucholz extracted uranium from a nitric acid solution into ether and back-extracted it into pure water. This is probably the first reported solvent-extraction investigation. During the following decades, the distribution of neutral compounds between aqueous phases and pure solvents was studied, e.g., by Peligot, Berthelot and Jungfleisch, and Nernst. Selective extractants for analytical purposes became available during the first decades of the twentieth century. From about 1940, extractants such as organophosphorous esters and amines were developed for use in the nuclear fuel cycle. This connection between radiochemistry and solvent-extraction chemistry made radiochemists heavily involved in the development of new solvent extraction processes, and eventually solvent extraction became a major separation technique in radiochemistry. About 160 years ago, Thompson and Way observed that soil can remove potassium and ammonium ions from an aqueous solution and release calcium ions. This is probably the first scientific report on an ion-exchange separation. The first synthesis of the type of organic ion exchangers that are used today was performed by Adams and Holmes in 1935. Since then, ion-exchange techniques have been used extensively for separations of various radionuclides in trace as well as macro amounts. During the last 4 decades, inorganic ion exchangers have also found a variety of applications. Today, solvent extraction as well as ion exchange are used extensively in the nuclear industry and for nuclear, chemical, and medical research. Some of these applications are discussed in the chapter.

  5. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  6. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  7. Optimal Micro-Scale Secondary Flow Control for the Management of High Cycle Fatigue and Distortion in Compact Inlet Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Keller, Dennis J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study on micro-scale secondary flow control (MSFC) is to study the aerodynamic behavior of micro-vane effectors through their factor (i.e., the design variable) interactions and to demonstrate how these statistical interactions, when brought together in an optimal manner, determine design robustness. The term micro-scale indicates the vane effectors are small in comparison to the local boundary layer height. Robustness in this situation means that it is possible to design fixed MSFC robust installation (i.e.. open loop) which operates well over the range of mission variables and is only marginally different from adaptive (i.e., closed loop) installation design, which would require a control system. The inherent robustness of MSFC micro-vane effector installation designs comes about because of their natural aerodynamic characteristics and the manner in which these characteristics are brought together in an optimal manner through a structured Response Surface Methodology design process.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Optimal Resource Management during the Diurnal Cycle in Emiliania huxleyi by Genome-Scale Reconstruction and an Extended Flux Balance Analysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Knies, David; Wittmüß, Philipp; Appel, Sebastian; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The coccolithophorid unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi is known to form large blooms, which have a strong effect on the marine carbon cycle. As a photosynthetic organism, it is subjected to a circadian rhythm due to the changing light conditions throughout the day. For a better understanding of the metabolic processes under these periodically-changing environmental conditions, a genome-scale model based on a genome reconstruction of the E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 was created. It comprises 410 reactions and 363 metabolites. Biomass composition is variable based on the differentiation into functional biomass components and storage metabolites. The model is analyzed with a flux balance analysis approach called diurnal flux balance analysis (diuFBA) that was designed for organisms with a circadian rhythm. It allows storage metabolites to accumulate or be consumed over the diurnal cycle, while keeping the structure of a classical FBA problem. A feature of this approach is that the production and consumption of storage metabolites is not defined externally via the biomass composition, but the result of optimal resource management adapted to the diurnally-changing environmental conditions. The model in combination with this approach is able to simulate the variable biomass composition during the diurnal cycle in proximity to literature data. PMID:26516924

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Optimal Resource Management during the Diurnal Cycle in Emiliania huxleyi by Genome-Scale Reconstruction and an Extended Flux Balance Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Knies, David; Wittmüß, Philipp; Appel, Sebastian; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The coccolithophorid unicellular alga Emiliania huxleyi is known to form large blooms, which have a strong effect on the marine carbon cycle. As a photosynthetic organism, it is subjected to a circadian rhythm due to the changing light conditions throughout the day. For a better understanding of the metabolic processes under these periodically-changing environmental conditions, a genome-scale model based on a genome reconstruction of the E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 was created. It comprises 410 reactions and 363 metabolites. Biomass composition is variable based on the differentiation into functional biomass components and storage metabolites. The model is analyzed with a flux balance analysis approach called diurnal flux balance analysis (diuFBA) that was designed for organisms with a circadian rhythm. It allows storage metabolites to accumulate or be consumed over the diurnal cycle, while keeping the structure of a classical FBA problem. A feature of this approach is that the production and consumption of storage metabolites is not defined externally via the biomass composition, but the result of optimal resource management adapted to the diurnally-changing environmental conditions. The model in combination with this approach is able to simulate the variable biomass composition during the diurnal cycle in proximity to literature data. PMID:26516924

  10. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  11. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  12. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  13. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  15. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  16. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  17. Neurotoxicity of solvents.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Markku Alarik

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, several hundred million tons of organic solvents are used annually in household, industry, and other occupational settings. Millions of workers are regularly exposed to organic solvents considered neurotoxic. Acute neurotoxicity due to high exposure of solvent is usually evident, but the nature of long-term effects, such as chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), has raised uncertainty even among experts. Earlier studies were criticized for their methodology, mainly epidemiologic studies or investigations of exposed groups with many possible confounders and inadequate exposure assessment. However, an increasing number of studies have been performed since, also on workers with defined CSE based on differential diagnostics. During the last decade, evidence has emerged to enable identification of CSE, a necessity for the early recognition and prevention of progression of dysfunction and disability. Selected chemicals are presented here due to their widespread use, neurotoxic potential, and ability to cause solvent encephalopathy. Constant introduction of new chemicals may introduce new hazardous chemicals or known chemicals may reveal new health effects. It is important to keep an open mind for new findings of solvent-related neurobehavioral effects. PMID:26563785

  18. LLNL solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitch, M.G.

    1992-12-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electromechanical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements by July 1993. Several non-halogenated solvents (Exxate 1000, Bioact EC-7, Bioact EC-7R, d-limonene, ACT-100, Kester 5769, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system for a particular electronic assembly in lieu of the current trichloroethylenefisopropyl alcohol baseline cleaning process. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and a wide variety of general contaminants (oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc.) normally found in production departments. A DI water/isopropyl alcohol spray cleaning process was also evaluated for removing two organic acid fluxes. Test samples were contaminated, spray cleaned with the appropriate solvent, and then analyzed for cleanliness. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure,, organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues.

  19. Biofiltration of solvent vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Young-sook.

    1993-01-01

    For various industrial solvent vapors, biofiltration promises to offer a cost-effective emission control technology. Exploiting the full potential of this technology will help attain the goals of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Concentrating on large volumes of volatile industrial solvents, stable multicomponent microbial enrichments capable of growing a mineral medium with solvent vapors as their only source of carbon and energy were obtained from soil and sewage sludge. These consortia were immobilized on an optimized porous solid support (ground peat moss and perlite). The biofilter material was packed in glass columns connected to an array of pumps and flow meters that allowed the independent variation of superficial velocity and solvent vapor concentrations. In various experiments, single solvents, such as methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, hexane and nitrobenzene, and solvent mixtures, such as benzene-toluene-xylene (BTX) and chlorobenzene-o-dichlorobenzene (CB/DCB) were biofiltered with rates ranging from 15 to334 g solvent removed per m[sup 3] filter volume /h. Pressure drops were low to moderate (0-10 mmHg/m) and with periodic replacement of moisture, the biofiltration activity could be maintained for a period of several months. The experimental data on methanol biofiltration were subjected to mathematical analysis and modeling by the group of Dr. Baltzis at NJIT for a better understanding and a possible scale up of solvent vapor biofilters. In the case of chlorobenzenes and nitrobenzene, the biofilter columns had to be operated with water recirculation in a trickling filter mode. To prevent inactivation of the trickling filter by acidity during CB/DCB removal, pH control was necessary, and the removal rate of CB/DCB was strongly influenced by the flow rate of the recyling water. Nitrobenzene removal in a trickling filter did not require pH control, since the nitro group was reduced and volatilized as ammonia.

  20. Use of the force-velocity test to determine the optimal braking force for a sprint exercise on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Linossier, M T; Dormois, D; Fouquet, R; Geyssant, A; Denis, C

    1996-01-01

    A group of 15 untrained male subjects pedalled on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer as fast as possible for 5-7 s to reach the maximal velocity (vmax) against different braking forces (FB). Power was averaged during a complete crank rotation by adding the power dissipated against FB to the power necessary to accelerate the flywheel. For each sprint, determinations were made of peak power output (Wpeak), power output attained at vmax (Wvmax) calculated as the product of vmax and FB and the work performed to reach vmax expressed in mean power output (Wvmax). The relationships between these parameters and FB were examined. A biopsy taken from the vastus lateralis muscle and tomodensitometric radiographs of both thighs were taken at rest to identify muscle metabolic and morphometric properties. The Wpeak value was similar for all FB. Therefore, the average of values was defined as corrected maximal power (Wmax). This value was 11% higher than the maximal power output uncorrected for the acceleration. Whereas the Wmax determination did not require high loads, the highest Wvmax value (Wmax) was produced when loading was heavy, as evidenced by the Wvmax-FB parabolic relationship. For each subject, the braking force (FB,Wmax) giving Wmax was defined as optimal. The FB,Wmax, equal to 0.844 (SD 0.108) N.kg-1 bodymass, was related to thigh muscle area (r = 0.78, P < 0.05). The maximal velocity (vm,Wmax) reached against this force seemed to be related more to intrinsic fibre properties (% fast twitch b fibre area and adenylate kinase activity). Thus, from the Wmax determination, it is suggested that it should be possible to predict the conditions for optimal exercise on a cycle ergometer.

  1. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  2. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  3. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  4. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  6. Solvent Reaction Field Potential inside an Uncharged Globular Protein: A Bridge between Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The solvent reaction field potential of an uncharged protein immersed in Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) explicit solvent was computed over a series of molecular dynamics trajectories, intotal 1560 ns of simulation time. A finite, positive potential of 13 to 24 kbTec−1 (where T = 300K), dependent on the geometry of the solvent-accessible surface, was observed inside the biomolecule. The primary contribution to this potential arose from a layer of positive charge density 1.0 Å from the solute surface, on average 0.008 ec/Å3, which we found to be the product of a highly ordered first solvation shell. Significant second solvation shell effects, including additional layers of charge density and a slight decrease in the short-range solvent-solvent interaction strength, were also observed. The impact of these findings on implicit solvent models was assessed by running similar explicit-solvent simulations on the fully charged protein system. When the energy due to the solvent reaction field in the uncharged system is accounted for, correlation between per-atom electrostatic energies for the explicit solvent model and a simple implicit (Poisson) calculation is 0.97, and correlation between per-atom energies for the explicit solvent model and a previously published, optimized Poisson model is 0.99. PMID:17949217

  7. Parameter and Prediction uncertainty in an optimized terrestrial carbon cycle model: Effects of constraining variables and data record length

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Wilfred M; King, Anthony Wayne; Dragoni, Danilo

    2011-01-01

    Many parameters in terrestrial biogeochemical models are inherently uncertain, leading to uncertainty in predictions of key carbon cycle variables. At observation sites, this uncertainty can be quantified by applying model-data fusion techniques to estimate model parameters using eddy covariance observations and associated biometric data sets as constraints. Uncertainty is reduced as data records become longer and different types of observations are added. We estimate parametric and associated predictive uncertainty at the Morgan Monroe State Forest in Indiana, USA. Parameters in the Local Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon (LoTEC) are estimated using both synthetic and actual constraints. These model parameters and uncertainties are then used to make predictions of carbon flux for up to 20 years. We find a strong dependence of both parametric and prediction uncertainty on the length of the data record used in the model-data fusion. In this model framework, this dependence is strongly reduced as the data record length increases beyond 5 years. If synthetic initial biomass pool constraints with realistic uncertainties are included in the model-data fusion, prediction uncertainty is reduced by more than 25% when constraining flux records are less than 3 years. If synthetic annual aboveground woody biomass increment constraints are also included, uncertainty is similarly reduced by an additional 25%. When actual observed eddy covariance data are used as constraints, there is still a strong dependence of parameter and prediction uncertainty on data record length, but the results are harder to interpret because of the inability of LoTEC to reproduce observed interannual variations and the confounding effects of model structural error.

  8. Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

    2013-09-01

    This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the

  9. Solvent extraction of phenols from water

    SciTech Connect

    Greminger, D.C.; Burns, G.P.; Lynn, S.; Hanson, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE) have been evaluated as solvents for extraction of phenols, at high dilution, from water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) have been measured for phenol, dihydroxybenzenes and trihydroxybenzenes in both solvents as a function of pH. Particularly for the multihydric phenols, MIBK gives substantially higher values of K/sub D/ than does DIPE. The effect of pH can be described quantitatively through a simple ionization model, using published values of dissociation constants for the various phenols. Some method for removal of residual dissolved solvent must ordinarily be included in any extraction process for phenols. Possibilities include atmospheric-steam or inert-gas stripping, vacuum-steam stripping, and extraction with a second solvent. Vacuum-steam stripping is a particularly attractive choice for removal of MIBK; this reinforces the utility of MIBK as a solvent. The optimal temperature for vacuum stripping is generally the temperature of the extraction operation, which in turn is related to the effect of temperature on K/sub D/. Values of K/sub D/ for phenol-water-MIBK were determined at 30, 50, and 75/sup 0/C, and were found to decrease with increasing temperature at all concentrations.

  10. Optimization and life-cycle cost of health clinic PV system for a rural area in southern Iraq using HOMER software

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Karaghouli, Ali; Kazmerski, L.L.

    2010-04-15

    This paper addresses the need for electricity of rural areas in southern Iraq and proposes a photovoltaic (PV) solar system to power a health clinic in that region. The total daily health clinic load is 31.6 kW h and detailed loads are listed. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) optimization computer model for distributed power, ''HOMER,'' is used to estimate the system size and its life-cycle cost. The analysis shows that the optimal system's initial cost, net present cost, and electricity cost is US$ 50,700, US$ 60,375, and US$ 0.238/kW h, respectively. These values for the PV system are compared with those of a generator alone used to supply the load. We found that the initial cost, net present cost of the generator system, and electricity cost are US$ 4500, US$ 352,303, and US$ 1.332/kW h, respectively. We conclude that using the PV system is justified on humanitarian, technical, and economic grounds. (author)

  11. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  12. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  13. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  14. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  15. Solvent vapor collector

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  16. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  17. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  18. Solvent dewaxing of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-04-09

    This paper describes improvement in a process for producing a dewaxed lubricating oil from a wax-bearing mineral oil by the steps comprising; mixing the oil with a dewaxing solvent thereby forming an oil-solvent mixture, chilling the oil-solvent mixture to a dewaxing temperature thereby crystallizing the wax and forming an oil-solvent crystalline wax mixture, separating the oil-solvent-crystalline wax mixture to form a dewaxed oil-solvent mixture and crystalline wax, steam stripping the dewaxed oil-solvent mixture at a temperature of 300{degrees}F to 600{degrees}F and pressure of 1 atm to 3 atm, to yield a solvent free dewaxed oil.

  19. Solvent substitution for electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements. Current cleaning processes in the production departments use trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and various CFC-113 based solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (Solvent A - an aqueous solvent based on N,N-dimethylacetamide, Solvent B - an aqueous mixture of ethanol amines, Solvent C - a hydrocarbon solvent based on octadecyl acetate, Solvent D - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with emulsifiers, Solvent E - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with a separation agent, d-limonene, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated, non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues. Solvents C, D, E and d-limonene the best alternatives to trichloroethylene for removing all of the contaminants tested. For this particular electronic assembly, d-limonene was chosen as the alternate because of material compatibility and long-term reliability concerns.

  20. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  1. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  2. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  3. Retailer's optimal credit period and cycle time in a supply chain for deteriorating items with up-stream and down-stream trade credits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Gour Chandra

    2015-03-01

    In practice, the supplier often offers the retailers a trade credit period and the retailer in turn provides a trade credit period to her/his customer to stimulate sales and reduce inventory. From the retailer's perspective, granting trade credit not only increases sales and revenue but also increases opportunity cost (i.e., the capital opportunity loss during credit period) and default risk (i.e., the percentage that the customer will not be able to pay off his/her debt obligations). Hence, how to determine credit period is increasingly recognized as an important strategy to increase retailer's profitability. Also, the selling items such as fruits, fresh fishes, gasoline, photographic films, pharmaceuticals and volatile liquids deteriorate continuously due to evaporation, obsolescence and spoilage. In this paper, we propose an economic order quantity model for the retailer where (1) the supplier provides an up-stream trade credit and the retailer also offers a down-stream trade credit, (2) the retailer's down-stream trade credit to the buyer not only increases sales and revenue but also opportunity cost and default risk, and (3) the selling items are perishable. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a profit maximization problem to determine the retailer's optimal replenishment decisions under the supply chain management. We then show that the retailer's optimal credit period and cycle time not only exist but also are unique. We deduce some previously published results of other researchers as special cases. Finally, we use some numerical examples to illustrate the theoretical results.

  4. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  5. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  6. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  7. Selecting water-alcohol mixed solvent for synthesis of polydopamine nano-spheres using solubility parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2014-08-01

    The solvent plays an important role in a given chemical reaction. Since most reaction in nature occur in the mixed-solvent systems, a comprehensive principle for solvent optimization was required. By calculating the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) distance Ra, we designed a model experiment to explore the influence of mixed solvents on the chemical synthesis. The synthesis of polydopamine (PDA) in the water-alcohol system was chosen as model. As predicted, the well-dispersed PDA spheres were obtained in selected solvents with smaller Ra values: methanol/water, ethanol/water and 2-propanol/water. In addition, the mixed solvent with smaller Ra values gave a higher conversion of dopamine. The strategy for mixed solvent selection is might be useful to choose optimal reaction media for efficient chemical synthesis.

  8. Selecting water-alcohol mixed solvent for synthesis of polydopamine nano-spheres using solubility parameter

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2014-01-01

    The solvent plays an important role in a given chemical reaction. Since most reaction in nature occur in the mixed-solvent systems, a comprehensive principle for solvent optimization was required. By calculating the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) distance Ra, we designed a model experiment to explore the influence of mixed solvents on the chemical synthesis. The synthesis of polydopamine (PDA) in the water-alcohol system was chosen as model. As predicted, the well-dispersed PDA spheres were obtained in selected solvents with smaller Ra values: methanol/water, ethanol/water and 2-propanol/water. In addition, the mixed solvent with smaller Ravalues gave a higher conversion of dopamine. The strategy for mixed solvent selection is might be useful to choose optimal reaction media for efficient chemical synthesis. PMID:25317902

  9. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  10. Dynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  11. Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

    2011-12-15

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus

  12. Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2012-02-08

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus

  13. Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was

  14. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  15. High-Cycle-Life Lithium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Carter, B.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium-anode electrochemical cell offers increased number of charge/ discharge cycles. Cell uses components selected for compatibility with electrolyte solvent: These materials are wettable and chemically stable. Low vapor pressure and high electrochemical stability of solvent improve cell packaging, handling, and safety. Cell operates at modest temperatures - less than 100 degrees C - and is well suited to automotive, communications, and other applications.

  16. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

    1999-09-17

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to <5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature.

  17. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  18. Hazardous solvent source reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, M.S.; Green, B.

    1995-09-01

    This book is written for the managers, production leaders, and operations staff tasked with the job of eliminating hazardous cleaning solvents from their workplace. Information regarding the location, evaluation, and implementation of environmentally preferred cleaning technologies is offered for a broad range of applications. These include: removal of grease and grime from a piece of equipment during maintenance, cleaning small parts before assembly, defluxing printed circuit boards and assemblies, and stripping paint from field vehicles and aircraft. Moving beyond the limits of source reduction alone, this book provides complete information on the planning, staffing, and execution of a pollution prevention program, alternative and in-use cleaner testing, waste recycling and treatment, air emission control, replacement system design, and system economics. For the environmental specialist, this book helps to bridge the gap between regulatory requirements and shop-floor constraints.

  19. Solvent extraction studies of coprocessing flowsheets: results from campaigns 3 and 4 of the Solvent-Extraction Test Facility (SETF)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Benker, D.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Chattin, F.R.; King, L.J.; Ross, R.G.; Savage, H.C.

    1982-05-01

    Experiments on tri-n-butyl phosphate solvent extraction of uranium and plutonium at full activity levels (Campaigns 3 and 4) were conducted in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility (SETF), located in one of the heavily shielded cells of the Transuranium Processing Plant. The primary objectives were: (1) to demonstrate and evaluate the first two cycles of the Hot Engineering Facility flowsheets (codecontamination and partial partitioning), and (2) to investigate and evaluate the use of HNO{sub 2} as the reductant for tetravalent plutonium during reductive stripping operations. Secondary objectives were to determine the solvent extraction behavior of feed solutions prepared by dissolving fuel from a boiling water reactor (BWR) and to improve the solvent extraction feed clarification.

  20. A Short-Term Advantage for Syngamy in the Origin of Eukaryotic Sex: Effects of Cell Fusion on Cell Cycle Duration and Other Effects Related to the Duration of the Cell Cycle—Relationship between Cell Growth Curve and the Optimal Size of the Species, and Circadian Cell Cycle in Photosynthetic Unicellular Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mancebo Quintana, J. M.; Mancebo Quintana, S.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of sex is becoming a vexatious issue for Evolutionary Biology. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed, based on the genetic effects of sex, on trophic effects or on the formation of cysts and syncytia. Our approach addresses the change in cell cycle duration which would cause cell fusion. Several results are obtained through graphical and mathematical analysis and computer simulations. (1) In poor environments, cell fusion would be an advantageous strategy, as fusion between cells of different size shortens the cycle of the smaller cell (relative to the asexual cycle), and the majority of mergers would occur between cells of different sizes. (2) The easiest-to-evolve regulation of cell proliferation (sexual/asexual) would be by modifying the checkpoints of the cell cycle. (3) A regulation of this kind would have required the existence of the G2 phase, and sex could thus be the cause of the appearance of this phase. Regarding cell cycle, (4) the exponential curve is the only cell growth curve that has no effect on the optimal cell size in unicellular species; (5) the existence of a plateau with no growth at the end of the cell cycle explains the circadian cell cycle observed in unicellular algae. PMID:22666626

  1. EVALUATING THE GREENNESS OF IONIC LIQUIDS VIA LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ionic Liquids have been suggested as "greener" replacements to traditional solvents. However, the environmental impacts of the life cycle phases have not been studied. Such a "cradle to gate" Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for comparing the environmental impact of various solvents...

  2. Solvents and supporting electrolytes for vanadium acetylacetonate flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkle, Aaron A.; Pomaville, Timothy J.; Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Thompson, Levi T.; Monroe, Charles W.

    2014-02-01

    Properties of supporting electrolytes and solvents were examined for use with vanadium acetylacetonate - a member of the class of metal(β-diketonate) active species - in non-aqueous redox flow batteries. Twenty supporting-electrolyte/solvent combinations were screened for ionic conductivity and supporting-electrolyte solubility. Hexane, tetrahydrofuran, and dimethylcarbonate solvents did not meet minimal conductivity and solubility criteria for any of the electrolytes used, which included tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, and (1-butyl, 3-methyl)imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. Ionic conductivities and solubilities for solutions of these electrolytes passed screening criteria in acetonitrile and dimethylformamide solvents, in which maximum supporting-electrolyte and active-species solubilities were determined. Active-species electrochemistry was found to be reversible in several solvent/support systems; for some systems the voltammetric signatures of unwanted side reactions were suppressed. Correlations between supporting-solution properties and performance metrics suggest that an optimal solvent for a vanadium acetylacetonate RFB should have a low solvent molar volume for active-species solubility, and a high Hansen polarity for conductivity.

  3. Polymeric nanoparticle formation by non-solvent introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Dona; Yang, Zhengnan; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have found use in applications as diverse as coatings, microelectronics and drug delivery. Formation of a consistent particle with narrow tolerances offers even greater possibilities and diversity of application. This work focuses on a better understanding of the multiphase nanoparticle formation process. Physical interactions among polymer, solvent and non-solvent influence size, shape, distribution, and ease of nanoparticle formation and separation. The initial concentration of polymer in solvent is shown to correlate to the size and size distribution of particles. Adopting a continuous flow system broadens the array of design parameters to include temperature, solvent combination and flow conditions. Design parameters are correlated to nanostructure in order to control and optimize particle formation based on the specific physical properties desired.

  4. ANALYSIS OF SOLVENT RECOVERED FROM WRIGHT INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-01-11

    dispersion benefit. (3) WII Solvent that underwent a cleaning cycle provides an acceptable set of cesium distribution (i.e., D) values when used in a standard Extraction, Scrub, and Strip (ESS) test.

  5. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  6. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  7. Solvent changeouts without plant shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Vickery, D.J.; Campbell, S.W. )

    1988-01-01

    For reasons of greater selectivity, lower regeneration energy requirements, reduced corrosivity and possible greater amine stability, MDEA continues to replace DEA in numerous selective H/sub 2/S removal applications. Solvent changeouts from DEA to MDEA often require no equipment modification, yet they are generally achieved by shutting down the plant, draining the old solvent, cleaning, and finally recharging with MDEA. However, in at least one plant, solvent changeout was done on the fly simply by periodically making up normal DEA losses with MDEA until the plant was finally operating on MDEA alone. Gradual solvent changeouts have the advantages of no lost production, no disposal problems with the environmentally-hazardous old solvent, no use and subsequent disposal of cleaning agents, and no additional manpower requirements. An advanced flowsheet simulation capability can suggest when such a procedure is feasible and, when it is, plant simulation can help to ensure that the solvent changeout is done reliably and with no production or cost penalties. GASPLANT-PLUS(TM) is currently the only commercial simulator having formulated solvent (mixed amine) capabilities within a fully flexible flowsheeting environment. After highlighting its technical foundations, they will compare GASPLANT-PLUS predictions with some commercial plant data and, through examples, they will show how solvent changeouts can be done gradually, without plant shutdown.

  8. Tuning the Morphology and Performance of Low Bandgap Polymer: Fullerene Heterojunctions via Solvent Annealing in Selective Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huipeng; Hsiao, Yu-Che; Hu, Bin; Dadmun, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Low bandgap polymer (LBG):fullerene mixtures are some of the most promising organic photovoltaic active layers. Unfortunately, there are no post-deposition treatments available to rationally improve the morphology and performance of as-cast LBG:fullerene OPV active layers, where thermal annealing usually fails. Therefore, there is a glaring need to develop postdeposition methods to guide the morphology of LBG:fullerene bulk heterojunctions towards targeted structures and performance. In this paper, the structural evolution of PCPDTBT:PCBM mixtures with solvent annealing (SA) is examined, focusing on the effect of solvent quality of the fullerene and polymer in the annealing vapor on morphological evolution and device performance. The results indicate that exposure of this active layer to the solvent vapor controls the ordering of PCPDTBT and PCBM phase separation very effectively, presumably by inducing component mobility as the solvent plasticizes the mixture. These results also unexpectedly indicate that solvent annealing in a selective solvent provides a method to invert the morphology of the LBG:fullerene mixture from a polymer aggregate dispersed in a polymer:fullerene matrix to fullerene aggregates dispersed in a polymer:fullerene matrix. The judicious choice of solvent vapor, therefore, provides a unique method to exquisitely control and optimize the morphology of LBG conjugated polymer/fullerene mixtures.

  9. Use of response surface methodology in a fed-batch process for optimization of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to achieve high levels of canthaxanthin from Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1.

    PubMed

    Nasri Nasrabadi, Mohammad Reza; Razavi, Seyed Hadi

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we applied statistical experimental design to a fed-batch process for optimization of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates in order to achieve high-level production of canthaxanthin from Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1 cultured in beet molasses. A fractional factorial design (screening test) was first conducted on five TCA cycle intermediates. Out of the five TCA cycle intermediates investigated via screening tests, alfaketoglutarate, oxaloacetate and succinate were selected based on their statistically significant (P<0.05) and positive effects on canthaxanthin production. These significant factors were optimized by means of response surface methodology (RSM) in order to achieve high-level production of canthaxanthin. The experimental results of the RSM were fitted with a second-order polynomial equation by means of a multiple regression technique to identify the relationship between canthaxanthin production and the three TCA cycle intermediates. By means of this statistical design under a fed-batch process, the optimum conditions required to achieve the highest level of canthaxanthin (13172 + or - 25 microg l(-1)) were determined as follows: alfaketoglutarate, 9.69 mM; oxaloacetate, 8.68 mM; succinate, 8.51 mM.

  10. Ionic liquids as novel solvents for the synthesis of sugar fatty acid ester.

    PubMed

    Mai, Ngoc Lan; Ahn, Kihun; Bae, Sang Woo; Shin, Dong Woo; Morya, Vivek Kumar; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2014-12-01

    Sugar fatty acid esters are bio-surfactants known for their non-toxic, non-ionic, and high biodegradability . With great emulsifying and conditioning effects, sugar fatty acids are widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Biosynthesis of sugar fatty acid esters has attracted growing attention in recent decades. In this study, the enzymatic synthesis of sugar fatty acid esters in ionic liquids was developed, optimized, and scaled up. Reaction parameters affecting the conversion yield of lipase-catalyzed synthesis of glucose laurate from glucose and vinyl laurate (i.e. temperature, vinyl laurate/glucose molar ratio, and enzyme loads) were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). In addition, production was scaled up to 2.5 L, and recycling of enzyme and ionic liquids was investigated. The results showed that under optimal reaction conditions (66.86 °C, vinyl laurate/glucose molar ratio of 7.63, enzyme load of 73.33 g/L), an experimental conversion yield of 96.4% was obtained which is close to the optimal value predicted by RSM (97.16%). A similar conversion yield was maintained when the reaction was carried out at 2.5 L. Moreover, the enzymes and ionic liquids could be recycled and reused effectively for up to 10 cycles. The results indicate the feasibility of ionic liquids as novel solvents for the biosynthesis of sugar fatty acid esters.

  11. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  12. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To meet the great need of replacing many harmful solvents commonly used by industry and the public with environmentally benign substitute solvents, the PARIS II solvent design software has been developed. Although the difficulty of successfully finding replacements increases with...

  13. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  14. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved.

  15. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Solvent-Composition Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    2002-05-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected caustic-side solvent extraction as the preferred cesium removal technology for the treatment of high-level waste stored at the Savannah River Site. Data for the solubility of the extractant, calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), acquired and reported for the Salt Processing Program down-select decision, showed the original solvent composition to be supersaturated with respect to the extractant. Although solvent samples have been observed for approximately 1 year without any solids formation, work was completed to define a new solvent composition that was thermodynamically stable with respect to solids formation and to expand the operating temperature with respect to third-phase formation. Chemical and physical data as a function of solvent component concentrations were collected. The data included calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6) solubility; cesium distribution ratio under extraction, scrub, and strip conditions; flow sheet robustness; temperature range of third-phase formation; dispersion numbers for the solvent against waste simulant, scrub and strip acids, and sodium hydroxide wash solutions; solvent density; viscosity; and surface and interfacial tension. These data were mapped against a set of predefined performance criteria. The composition of 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octyl benzo-crown-6), 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine in the diluent Isopar{reg_sign} L provided the best match between the measured properties and the performance criteria. Therefore, it is recommended as the new baseline solvent composition.

  16. Solvent-free microwave-assisted extraction of fluoroquinolones from soil and liquid chromatography-fluorescence determination.

    PubMed

    Sturini, Michela; Speltini, Andrea; Maraschi, Federica; Rivagli, Elisa; Profumo, Antonella

    2010-11-19

    Presented hereafter is a novel method entailing solvent free microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and HPLC equipped with Fluorimetric Detector (HPLC-FD) for the simultaneous determination at μgkg(-1) concentration of eight fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) (Ciprofloxacin, Danofloxacin, Enrofloxacin, Flerofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Marbofloxacin, Norfloxacin and Orbifloxacin) in agricultural soils. The extraction was quantitatively performed, in a single step, by using an aqueous solution containing Mg(II) as complexing agent, thus avoiding consumption of organic solvents. The optimal MAE conditions have been established through a chemometric approach by considering temperature, irradiation time and matrix moisture or solvent, as the most important recognized variables affecting the extraction yield. Satisfying recoveries (69-110%, spikes 0.03-0.5mgkg(-1)) were gained with a single MAE cycle of 20min, at 80°C in 20% (w/v) Mg(NO(3))(2) solution as leaching agent. MAE-SPE recoveries at 10μgkg(-1), concentration near method quantification limits (MQLs), were in the range 60-85%. Good repeatability and within-lab reproducibility were observed (both in the range 1-16%). The applicability of the method to real samples was assessed on natural contaminated soils. Compared to ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE), MAE was shown to be highly competitive in terms of extraction efficacy and analysis speed.

  17. Ultrasound assisted enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of waste cooking oil under solvent free condition.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Govind V; Rathod, Virendra K

    2016-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the hydrolysis of waste cooking oil (WCO) under solvent free condition using commercial available immobilized lipase (Novozyme 435) under the influence of ultrasound irradiation. The process parameters were optimized using a sequence of experimental protocol to evaluate the effects of temperature, molar ratios of substrates, enzyme loading, duty cycle and ultrasound intensity. It has been observed that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of WCO would be a promising alternative for conventional methods. A maximum conversion of 75.19% was obtained at mild operating parameters: molar ratio of oil to water (buffer pH 7) 3:1, catalyst loading of 1.25% (w/w), lower ultrasound power 100W (ultrasound intensity - 7356.68Wm(-2)), duty cycle 50% and temperature (50°C) in a relatively short reaction time (2h). The activation energy and thermodynamic study shows that the hydrolysis reaction is more feasible when ultrasound is combined with mechanical agitation as compared with the ultrasound alone and simple conventional stirring technique. Application of ultrasound considerably reduced the reaction time as compared to conventional reaction. The successive use of the catalyst for repetitive cycles under the optimum experimental conditions resulted in a loss of enzymatic activity and also minimized the product conversion. PMID:27150746

  18. Ultrasound assisted enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of waste cooking oil under solvent free condition.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Govind V; Rathod, Virendra K

    2016-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the hydrolysis of waste cooking oil (WCO) under solvent free condition using commercial available immobilized lipase (Novozyme 435) under the influence of ultrasound irradiation. The process parameters were optimized using a sequence of experimental protocol to evaluate the effects of temperature, molar ratios of substrates, enzyme loading, duty cycle and ultrasound intensity. It has been observed that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of WCO would be a promising alternative for conventional methods. A maximum conversion of 75.19% was obtained at mild operating parameters: molar ratio of oil to water (buffer pH 7) 3:1, catalyst loading of 1.25% (w/w), lower ultrasound power 100W (ultrasound intensity - 7356.68Wm(-2)), duty cycle 50% and temperature (50°C) in a relatively short reaction time (2h). The activation energy and thermodynamic study shows that the hydrolysis reaction is more feasible when ultrasound is combined with mechanical agitation as compared with the ultrasound alone and simple conventional stirring technique. Application of ultrasound considerably reduced the reaction time as compared to conventional reaction. The successive use of the catalyst for repetitive cycles under the optimum experimental conditions resulted in a loss of enzymatic activity and also minimized the product conversion.

  19. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  20. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  1. TALSPEAK Solvent Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the radiolytic degradation behavior of organic molecules involved in new or existing schemes for the recycle of used nuclear fuels is of significant interest for sustaining a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Here we have conducted several lines of investigation to begin understanding the effects of radiolysis on the aqueous phase of the TALSPEAK process for the separation of the trivalent lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. Using the 60-Co irradiator at the INL, we have begun to quantify the effects of radiation on the aqueous phase complexants used in this separation technique, and how this will affect the actinide lanthanide separation factor. In addition we have started to develop methodologies for stable product identification, a key element in determining the degradation pathways. We have also introduced a methodology to investigate the effects of alpha radiolysis that has previously received limited attention.

  2. High-density extraction solvent-based solvent de-emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with MEKC for detection of chlorophenols in water samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ting-Ting; Lv, Zhi-Hua; Jiang, Ting-Fu; Wang, Yuan-Hong

    2013-02-01

    For the first time, the high-density solvent-based solvent de-emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (HSD-DLLME) was developed for the fast, simple, and efficient determination of chlorophenols in water samples followed by field-enhanced sample injection with reverse migrating micelles in CE. The extraction of chlorophenols in the aqueous sample solution was performed in the presence of extraction solvent (chloroform) and dispersive solvent (acetone). A de-emulsification solvent (ACN) was then injected into the aqueous solution to break up the emulsion, the obtained emulsion cleared into two phases quickly. The lower layer (chloroform) was collected and analyzed by field-enhanced sample injection with reverse migrating micelles in CE. Several important parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of HSD-DLLME such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, disperser solvent and de-emulsification solvent, sample pH, extraction time as well as salting-out effects were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 0.02-4 μg/mL, low LODs (4 ng/mL), and good repeatability of the extractions (RSDs below 9.3%, n = 5). And enrichment factors for three phenols were 684, 797, and 233, respectively. This method was then utilized to analyze two real environmental samples from wastewater and tap water and obtained satisfactory results. The obtained results indicated that the developed method is an excellent alternative for the routine analysis in the environmental field.

  3. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  4. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  5. Optimization of bioelectricity generation in fed-batch microbial fuel cell: effect of electrode material, initial substrate concentration, and cycle time.

    PubMed

    Cirik, Kevser

    2014-05-01

    Effective wastewater treatment and electricity generation using dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) will require a better understanding of how operational parameters affect system performance. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to investigate the bioelectricity production in a dual-chambered MFC-operated batch mode under different operational conditions. Initially, platinum (Pt) and mixed metal oxide titanium (Ti-TiO2) electrodes were used to investigate the influence of the electrode materials on the power generation at initial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of 400 mg/L and cycle time of 15 days. MFC equipped with Ti-TiO2 electrode performed better and was used to examine the effect of influent DOC concentration and cycle time on MFC performance. Increasing influent DOC concentration resulted in improving electricity generation, corresponding to a 1.65-fold increase in power density. However, decrease in cycle time from 15 to 5 days adversely affected reactor performance. Maximum DOC removal was 90 ± 3 %, which was produced at 15-day cycle time with an initial DOC of 3,600 mg/L, corresponding to maximum power generation of about 7,205 mW/m(2). PMID:24639089

  6. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  7. The problem of optimizing the water chemistry used in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear power station equipped with VVER reactors under the conditions of longer fuel cycle campaigns and increased capacity of power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafutdinov, R. B.; Kharitonova, N. L.

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that the optimal water chemistry of the primary coolant circuit must be substantiated while introducing measures aimed at increasing the power output in operating power units and for the project called AES-2006/AES TOI (a typical optimized project of a nuclear power station with enhanced information support). The experience gained from operation of PWR reactors with an elongated fuel cycle at an increased level of power is analyzed. Conditions under which boron compounds are locally concentrated on the fuel rod surfaces (the hideout phenomenon) and axial offset anomaly occurs are enlisted, and the influence of lithium on the hideout in the pores of deposits on the surfaces of fuel assemblies is shown.

  8. Effect of solvent composition on dispersing ability of reaction sialon suspensions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Oliveira, Marta; Ferreira, José M F

    2003-03-15

    This work focuses on the optimization of the rheological behavior of suspensions considering different solvent compositions. The effects of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)/ethanol (E) solvent mixtures on reaction sialon suspensions were investigated by measuring sedimentation behavior, adsorption of dispersant, and flow behavior. It was shown that both the flow behavior and the sedimentation behavior strongly depended on selection of solvent composition. Using 3 wt% KD1 as dispersant, well-dispersed colloidal suspensions could be obtained in MEK-rich solvents. The suspensions with 60 vol% MEK/40 vol% E as solvent could be fitted to the Bingham model with very low yield stress, while suspensions with pure MEK or ethanol-rich mixtures as solvent showed pseudo plastic behavior with relatively high yield stress values. A model was proposed to explain the different flow behaviors of suspensions considering the different configurations of dispersant at particles' surfaces.

  9. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  10. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows.

  11. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows. PMID:24871934

  12. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  13. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  14. Recombinant LH supplementation during IVF cycles with a GnRH-antagonist in estimated poor responders: A cross-matched pilot investigation of the optimal daily dose and timing

    PubMed Central

    GIZZO, SALVATORE; ANDRISANI, ALESSANDRA; NOVENTA, MARCO; MANFÈ, SERENA; OLIVA, ALESSANDRA; GANGEMI, MICHELE; NARDELLI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA; AMBROSINI, GUIDO

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that patients, who are considered poor responders to in vitro fertilization (IVF) benefit from recombinant luteinizing hormone (rLH) supplementation during an in vitro fertilization cycle, particularly when gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist (ant) treatment is used the optimal administration timing and daily dose of rLH remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the optimal timing of rLH-supplementation to improve ovarian response, embryo quality, endometrial thickness and pregnancy rate in infertile, estimated poor responders to IVF, undergoing GnRH-ant treatment. In addition, the present study aimed to evaluate the optimal daily dose to achieve the same outcomes. A prospective-randomized-cross-matched investigation was performed on 40 patients undergoing a GnRH-ant-treatment-cycle The patients were randomly assigned to either group A (rLH-75 IU/day) or group B (rLH-150 IU/day) and further randomized into subgroup A1/B1, in which rLH was administered at recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) administration, and subgroup A2/B2, in which rLH was administered at GnRH-ant administration. Patients who did not become pregnant during the first cycle (35 patients), were treated a second time, cross-matched for groups and subgroups. Improved ovarian response, embryo quality and pregnancy rate were achieved by administering rLH at 150 IU/day, starting from GnRH-ant administration, independently from the total rLH dose administered. Improved endometrial thickness at oocyte retrieval day was achieved by administering rLH at 150 IU from the start of rFSH administration. These data led to the hypothesis that ovarian responses are affected by the timing of administration more than the total-dose of rLH. The optimal window to administer rLH appears to be the mid-to-late follicular phase, despite the fact that rLH-supplementation in the early follicular phase appeared to increase endometrial

  15. Catalysts for upgrading solvent refined lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.K.

    1982-01-01

    The solvent refined lignite (SRL), made at the University of North Dakota Process Development Unit, was a solid having a nominal melting point of 160/sup 0/C. The SRL was pulverized and mixed with a donor solvent, tetralin. The SRL to tetralin ratio of 1:1 was selected to pretreat in a high pressure and temperature reactor. The optimized reactor conditions were a reaction temperature of 475/sup 0/C, an initial hydrogen pressure of 2000 psig and a retention time of 40 minutes. Under these conditions approximately 97% of the SRL was dissolved in tetralin. The resulting solution was used to test the 27 developmental catalysts. The catalysts were developed by impregnating on the ..gamma..-alumina the 3 active metals; MoO/sub 3/, CoO, and WO/sub 3/, each at 3 levels. The effect of these factors on upgrading of the SRL was evaluated in terms of denitrogenation, desulfurization, and hydrocracking. The multiple linear regression analysis showed that the metal compositions for the best overall catalytic performance were 9.5% MoO/sub 3/, 4.3% CoO, and 4% WO/sub 3/ (% of carrier weight). A model was developed based on the results of scanning electron micrographs to explain some of the physical characteristics of the catalysts. The disadvantage of the incipient wetness method used in metal impregnation was explained, and the preferable pore structure and distribution were suggested.

  16. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  17. Determination of fat in dairy products using pressurized solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R K

    2001-01-01

    Gravimetric fat data were obtained for a wide range of dairy products with fat contents ranging from 0.5 to 83% using pressurized solvent extraction at elevated temperatures and pressure (80-120 degrees C; 10.3 MPa). Extraction performance was sensitive to solvent composition, temperature, and sample matrix. By optimizing solvent mixtures, sample-solvent contact times of 8-10 min were sufficient for high recoveries from all products tested. The most successful solvents with regard to speed of extraction, selectivity, and recovery (average recovery, %) were various mixtures of hexane (or petroleum ether)-dichloromethane-methanol for dried cream (99.8%), dried whole milk (99.6%), dried buttermilk (98.2%), dried skim milk (97.0%), dried whey protein concentrate (97.5%), casein (95.0%), and caseinate (102.1%); petroleum ether-acetone-ethanol or petroleum ether-acetone-isopropanol for cheddar-type cheese (99.4%); petroleum ether-acetone for butter (99.9%); petroleum ether-acetone-isopropanol for cream (100.3%); and petroleum ether-isopropanol for liquid milks (99.0%). Relative standard deviations for repeatability were obtained for dried whole milk (0.2%), dried whey protein concentrate (0.7%), cheese (0.3%), butter (0.1%), and ultraheat treated (UHT) milk (0.7%). Solvent removal and drying of extracts with a heated block evaporator saved time compared with conventional drying ovens. Estimated savings in labor (50-75%) and solvents (80%) were substantial compared with the manual Mojonnier methods.

  18. Connecting free energy surfaces in implicit and explicit solvent: an efficient method to compute conformational and solvation free energies.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nanjie; Zhang, Bin W; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-06-01

    The ability to accurately model solvent effects on free energy surfaces is important for understanding many biophysical processes including protein folding and misfolding, allosteric transitions, and protein–ligand binding. Although all-atom simulations in explicit solvent can provide an accurate model for biomolecules in solution, explicit solvent simulations are hampered by the slow equilibration on rugged landscapes containing multiple basins separated by barriers. In many cases, implicit solvent models can be used to significantly speed up the conformational sampling; however, implicit solvent simulations do not fully capture the effects of a molecular solvent, and this can lead to loss of accuracy in the estimated free energies. Here we introduce a new approach to compute free energy changes in which the molecular details of explicit solvent simulations are retained while also taking advantage of the speed of the implicit solvent simulations. In this approach, the slow equilibration in explicit solvent, due to the long waiting times before barrier crossing, is avoided by using a thermodynamic cycle which connects the free energy basins in implicit solvent and explicit solvent using a localized decoupling scheme. We test this method by computing conformational free energy differences and solvation free energies of the model system alanine dipeptide in water. The free energy changes between basins in explicit solvent calculated using fully explicit solvent paths agree with the corresponding free energy differences obtained using the implicit/explicit thermodynamic cycle to within 0.3 kcal/mol out of ∼3 kcal/mol at only ∼8% of the computational cost. We note that WHAM methods can be used to further improve the efficiency and accuracy of the implicit/explicit thermodynamic cycle.

  19. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes.

  20. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes. PMID:26676907

  1. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  2. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: Luteal support strategies to optimize pregnancy success in cycles with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ovulatory trigger.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio

    2010-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) administration for the induction of oocyte maturation during in vitro fertilization treatment is effective in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). However, some studies have reported a lower ongoing pregnancy rate after GnRHa trigger. The excellent conception rates reported in recipients receiving embryos originating from donor cycles or in women receiving frozen embryos originating from fresh cycles during which GnRHa was used to induce oocyte maturation suggest that it does not adversely affect the quality of the oocyte or embryo. A defective corpus luteum function resulting from the relatively short endogenous luteinizing hormone surge may be detrimental to endometrial receptivity. Aggressive luteal phase support and monitoring is therefore essential in view of the overwhelming evidence suggestive of abnormal luteal phase steroid profile. This may be achieved by the use of adequate estradiol and progesterone supplementation in the luteal phase and the first trimester. An alternative approach is the use of adjuvant low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin, although caution should be exercised in view of the associated risk of OHSS development.

  3. Optimization of the analogue-sensitive Cdc2/Cdk1 mutant by in vivo selection eliminates physiological limitations to its use in cell cycle analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Yuki; Kawashima, Shigehiro A.; Simanis, Viesturs; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Analogue-sensitive (as) mutants of kinases are widely used to selectively inhibit a single kinase with few off-target effects. The analogue-sensitive mutant cdc2-as of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a powerful tool to study the cell cycle, but the strain displays meiotic defects, and is sensitive to high and low temperature even in the absence of ATP-analogue inhibitors. This has limited the use of the strain for use in these settings. Here, we used in vivo selection for intragenic suppressor mutations of cdc2-as that restore full function in the absence of ATP-analogues. The cdc2-asM17 underwent meiosis and produced viable spores to a similar degree to the wild-type strain. The suppressor mutation also rescued the sensitivity of the cdc2-as strain to high and low temperature, genotoxins and an anti-microtubule drug. We have used cdc2-asM17 to show that Cdc2 activity is required to maintain the activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that maintenance of the Shugoshin Sgo1 at meiotic centromeres does not require Cdc2 activity, whereas localization of the kinase aurora does. The modified cdc2-asM17 allele can be thus used to analyse many aspects of cell-cycle-related events in fission yeast. PMID:24990387

  4. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  5. SOLVENT EXTRACTION FOR URANIUM MOLYBDENUM ALLOY DISSOLUTION FLOWSHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-06-07

    H-Canyon Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform two solvent extraction experiments using dissolved Super Kukla (SK) material. The SK material is an uranium (U)-molybdenum (Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight with 20% 235U enrichment. The first series of solvent extraction tests involved a series of batch distribution coefficient measurements with 7.5 vol % tributylphosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin for extraction from 4-5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), using 4 M HNO{sub 3}-0.02 M ferrous sulfamate (Fe(SO3NH2)2) scrub, 0.01 M HNO3 strip steps with particular emphasis on the distribution of U and Mo in each step. The second set of solvent extraction tests determined whether the 2.5 wt % sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) solvent wash change frequency would need to be modified for the processing of the SK material. The batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed using dissolved SK material diluted to 20 g/L (U + Mo) in 4 M HNO{sub 3} and 5 M HNO{sub 3}. In these experiments, U had a distribution coefficient greater than 2.5 while at least 99% of the nickel (Ni) and greater than 99.9% of the Mo remained in the aqueous phase. After extraction, scrub, and strip steps, the aqueous U product from the strip contains nominally 7.48 {micro}g Mo/g U, significantly less than the maximum allowable limit of 800 {micro}g Mo/g U. Solvent washing experiments were performed to expose a 2.5 wt % Na2CO3 solvent wash solution to the equivalent of 37 solvent wash cycles. The low Mo batch distribution coefficient in this solvent extraction system yields only 0.001-0.005 g/L Mo extracted to the organic. During the solvent washing experiments, the Mo appears to wash from the organic.

  6. Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-02-13

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  7. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy This information in Spanish ( en español ) The menstrual cycle Day 1 starts with the first day of ... drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and ...

  8. Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  9. Modeling Carbon Dioxide Capture by Monoethanolamine Solvent with ASPEN Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tianyi

    Fossil fuels provide approximately 80% of the world's energy demands. Methods for reducing CO2 emissions resulting from fossil fuels include increasing the efficiency of power plants and production processes, decreasing energy demands, in combination with CO2 capture and long term storage (CCS). CO2 capture technologies include post-combustion, pre-combustion, and oxyfuel combustion. The amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant was studied in this thesis. In case of post-combustion capture, CO2 can be captured by Monoethanolamine solvent (MEA), a primary ethanolamine. MEA can associate with H3O+ to form an ion MEAH+, and can react with CO2 to form a carbonate ion MEACOO-. Commercial code ASPEN Plus was used to simulate the process of CO2 capture and optimize the process parameters and required energy duty. The major part of thermal energy requirement is from the Absorber and Stripper columns. This suggests that process optimization should focus on the Absorption/Desorption process. Optimization results show that the gas-liquid reaction equilibrium is affected by several operating parameters including solvent flow rate, stream temperature, column operating pressure, flue gas composition, solvent concentration and absorber design. With optimized CO2 capture, the energy consumption for solvent regeneration (reboiler thermal duty) was decreased from 5.76 GJ/ton captured CO2 to 4.56 GJ/t CO2. On the other hand, the cost of CO2 capture (and sequestration) could be reduced by limiting size of the Absorber column and operating pressure.

  10. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  11. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Chlorophyll a: Solvent Dependent Spectral Evolution.

    PubMed

    Moca, Roberta; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of the monomeric chlorophyll Q-band electronic transition with solvents of differing physical-chemical properties is investigated through two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). Chlorophyll constitutes the key chromophore molecule in light harvesting complexes. It is well-known that the surrounding protein in the light harvesting complex fine-tunes chlorophyll electronic transitions to optimize energy transfer. Therefore, an understanding of the influence of the environment on the monomeric chlorophyll electronic transitions is important. The Q-band 2DES is inhomogeneous at early times, particularly in hydrogen bonding polar solvents, but also in nonpolar solvents like cyclohexane. Interestingly this inhomogeneity persists for long times, even up to the nanosecond time scale in some solvents. The reshaping of the 2DES occurs over multiple time scales and was assigned mainly to spectral diffusion. At early times the reshaping is Gaussian-like, hinting at a strong solvent reorganization effect. The temporal evolution of the 2DES response was analyzed in terms of a Brownian oscillator model. The spectral densities underpinning the Brownian oscillator fitting were recovered for the different solvents. The absorption spectra and Stokes shift were also properly described by this model. The extent and nature of inhomogeneous broadening was a strong function of solvent, being larger in H-bonding and viscous media and smaller in nonpolar solvents. The fastest spectral reshaping components were assigned to solvent dynamics, modified by interactions with the solute.

  12. Biomass derived solvents for the scalable production of single layered graphene from graphite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Singh, Nripat; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-07-12

    Among four different biomass derived green and sustainable solvents namely levulinic acid (LA), ethyl lactate (EL), γ-valerolactone (GVL) and formic acid (FA) only LA was found to exfoliate graphite to single and few layered graphene sheets. During exfoliation, the formation of LA crystals embedded with single layered graphene sheets was observed. The process is scalable and the solvent can be recovered and reused in five subsequent cycles of exfoliation for the large scale production of graphene sheets.

  13. Optimization of the treatment cycle of pressed-off leachate produced in a facility processing the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    d'Antonio, Luca; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Pontoni, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates, at a laboratory scale, the applicability of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of pressed-off leachate produced in a biomechanical treatment plant for municipal solid waste. Batch tests show that the anaerobic process proceeds smoothly and produces about 10,000 mL of methane per litre of treated leachate. The process is characterized by a lag phase lasting about 30 days, and is completed in about 2 months. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile fatty acids monitoring allows studying process kinetics that are modelled through a triple linear expression. Physical and biological treatments are also investigated to reduce the residual organic charge of the produced digestate. The best performances are obtained via aerobic degradation followed by assisted sedimentation. This cycle reduces the residual COD of about 85%, and allows the correct disposal of the final waste stream. PMID:25422035

  14. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution.

  15. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution. PMID:24952564

  16. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution.

  17. Anti-solvent co-crystallization of carbamazepine and saccharin.

    PubMed

    Wang, In-Chun; Lee, Min-Jeong; Sim, Sang-Jun; Kim, Woo-Sik; Chun, Nan-Hee; Choi, Guang J

    2013-06-25

    The co-crystal approach has been investigated extensively over the past decade as one of the most promising methods to enhance the dissolution properties of insoluble drug substances. Co-crystal powders are typically produced by mechanical grinding (neat or wet) or a solution method (evaporation or cooling). In this study, high-purity carbamazepine-saccharin (CBZ-SAC) co-crystals were manufactured by a novel method, anti-solvent addition. Among various solvents, methanol was found to perform well with water as the anti-solvent for the co-crystallization of CBZ and SAC. When water was added to the methanol solution of CBZ and SAC at room temperature under agitation, nucleation of CBZ-SAC co-crystals occurred within 2-3 min. Co-crystallization was complete after 30 min, giving a solid yield as high as 84.5% on a CBZ basis. The effects of initial concentrations, focusing on the SAC/CBZ ratio, were examined to establish optimal conditions. The whole anti-solvent co-crystallization process was monitored at-line via ATR-FTIR analysis of regularly sampled solutions. The nucleation and crystal growth of CBZ-SAC co-crystals were detected by a significant increase in absorption in the range of 2400-2260 cm(-1), associated with the formation of hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl group in CBZ and the N-H of SAC. When CBZ hydrates were formed as impurities during anti-solvent co-crystallization, the hydrogen bonding between methanol and water was reduced greatly, primarily due to the incorporation of water molecules into the CBZ crystal lattice. In conclusion, an anti-solvent approach can be used to produce highly pure CBZ-SAC co-crystal powders with a high solid yield. PMID:23598078

  18. Anti-solvent co-crystallization of carbamazepine and saccharin.

    PubMed

    Wang, In-Chun; Lee, Min-Jeong; Sim, Sang-Jun; Kim, Woo-Sik; Chun, Nan-Hee; Choi, Guang J

    2013-06-25

    The co-crystal approach has been investigated extensively over the past decade as one of the most promising methods to enhance the dissolution properties of insoluble drug substances. Co-crystal powders are typically produced by mechanical grinding (neat or wet) or a solution method (evaporation or cooling). In this study, high-purity carbamazepine-saccharin (CBZ-SAC) co-crystals were manufactured by a novel method, anti-solvent addition. Among various solvents, methanol was found to perform well with water as the anti-solvent for the co-crystallization of CBZ and SAC. When water was added to the methanol solution of CBZ and SAC at room temperature under agitation, nucleation of CBZ-SAC co-crystals occurred within 2-3 min. Co-crystallization was complete after 30 min, giving a solid yield as high as 84.5% on a CBZ basis. The effects of initial concentrations, focusing on the SAC/CBZ ratio, were examined to establish optimal conditions. The whole anti-solvent co-crystallization process was monitored at-line via ATR-FTIR analysis of regularly sampled solutions. The nucleation and crystal growth of CBZ-SAC co-crystals were detected by a significant increase in absorption in the range of 2400-2260 cm(-1), associated with the formation of hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl group in CBZ and the N-H of SAC. When CBZ hydrates were formed as impurities during anti-solvent co-crystallization, the hydrogen bonding between methanol and water was reduced greatly, primarily due to the incorporation of water molecules into the CBZ crystal lattice. In conclusion, an anti-solvent approach can be used to produce highly pure CBZ-SAC co-crystal powders with a high solid yield.

  19. Simultaneous extraction of flavonoids from Chamaecyparis obtusa using deep eutectic solvents as additives of conventional extractions solvents.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Park, Ha Eun; Row, Kyung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Three flavones (quercetin, myricetin and amentoflavone) were extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa leaves using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as additives to conventional extractions solvents. Sixteen DESs were synthesized from different salts and hydrogen bond donors. In addition, C. obtusa was extracted under optimal conditions of methanol as the solvent in the heating process (60°C) for 120 min at a solid/liquid ratio of 80%. Under these optimal conditions, a good linear relationship was observed at analyte concentrations ranging from 5.0 to 200.0 μg/mL (R(2) > 0.999). The extraction recovery ranged from 96.7 to 103.3% with the inter- and intraday relative standard deviations of <4.97%. Under the optimal conditions, from C. obtusa, the quantities of quercetin, myricetin and amentoflavone extracted were 325.90, 8.66 and 50.34 µg/mL, respectively. Overall, DESs are expected to have a wide range of applications.

  20. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  1. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  2. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  3. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  4. Comparison of ultrasound-enhanced air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction methods for determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Goochani Moghadam, Ahmad; Mirkhani, Nasim; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Two dispersive-based liquid-liquid microextraction methods including ultrasound-enhanced air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (USE-AALLME) and low-density solvent-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LDS-DLLME) were compared for the extraction of salicylic acid (the hydrolysis product of acetylsalicylic acid), diclofenac and ibuprofen, as instances of the most commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in human urine prior to their determination by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The influence of different parameters affecting the USE-AALLME (including type and volume of the extraction solvent, sample pH, ionic strength, and simultaneous sonication and number of extraction cycles) and the LDS-DLLME (including type and volume of the extraction and disperser solvents, sample pH, and ionic strength) were investigated to optimize their extraction efficiencies. Both methods are fast, simple and convenient with organic solvent consumption at μL level. However, the best results were obtained using the USE-AALLME method, applying 30 μL of 1-octanol as extraction solvent, 5.0 mL of sample at pH 3.0, without salt addition, and 5 extraction cycles during 20s of sonication. This method was validated based on linearities (r(2) >0 .971), limits of detection (0.1-1.0 μg L(-1)), linear dynamic ranges (0.4-1000.0 μg L(-1)), enrichment factors (115 ± 3-135 ± 3), consumptive indices (0.043-0.037), inter- and intra-day precisions (4.3-4.8 and 5.6-6.1, respectively), and relative recoveries (94-103%). The USE-AALLME in combination with GC-FID, and with no need to derivatization step, was demonstrated to be a simple, inexpensive, sensitive and efficient method to determine NSAIDs in human urine samples.

  5. Ethylmethylcarbonate, a promising solvent for Li-ion rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ein-Eli, Y.; Thomas, S.R.; Koch, V.; Aurbach, D.; Markovsky, B.; Schechter, A.

    1996-12-01

    Ethylmethylcarbonate (EMC) has been found to be a promising solvent for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Graphite electrodes, which are usually sensitive to the composition of the electrolyte solution, can be successfully cycled at high reversible capacities in several Li salt solutions in this solvent (LiAsF{sub 6}, LiPF{sub 6}, etc.). These results are interesting because lithium ions cannot intercalate into graphite in diethyl carbonate solutions and cycle poorly in dimethyl carbonate solutions. To understand the high compatibility of EMC for Li-ion battery systems as compared with the other two open-chain alkyl carbonates mentioned above, the surface chemistry developed in both Li and carbon electrodes in EMC solution was studied and compared with that developed on these electrodes in other alkyl carbonate solutions. Basically, the major surface species formed on both electrodes in EMC include ROLi, ROCO{sub 2}Li, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} species. The uniqueness of EMC as a battery solvent is discussed in light of these studies.

  6. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  7. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  8. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F.; Venturini, Cristina de G.; Machado, Vanderlei G.

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy ( ET) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The ET values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  9. FES cycling.

    PubMed

    Newham, D J; Donaldson, N de N

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a partial or complete disruption of motor, sensory, and autonomic nerve pathways below the level of the lesion. In paraplegic patients, functional electrical stimulation (FES) was originally widely considered as a means to restore walking function but this was proved technically very difficult because of the numerous degrees of freedom involved in walking. FES cycling was developed for people with SCI and has the advantages that cycling can be maintained for reasonably long periods in trained muscles and the risk of falls is low. In the article, we review research findings relevant to the successful application of FES cycling including the effects on muscle size, strength and function, and the cardiovascular and bone changes. We also describe important practical considerations in FES cycling regarding the application of surface electrodes, training and setting up the stimulator limitations, implanted stimulators and FES cycling including FES cycling in groups and other FES exercises such as FES rowing.

  10. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  11. The extraction of aromatic amino acids with binary and ternary mixtures of hydrophilic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokshina, N. Ya.; Pakhomova, O. A.; Niftaliev, S. I.

    2007-11-01

    The extraction of tyrosine and phenylalanine with binary and ternary mixtures of hydrophilic solvents from aqueous salt solutions was studied, and several tendencies were observed. Simplex-lattice planning of experiment was used for the optimization of the composition of solvent mixtures. It was shown that the extraction systems developed could be employed for the almost complete extraction of tyrosine and phenylalanine from aqueous solutions.

  12. Enhanced production and organic solvent stability of a protease from Brevibacillus laterosporus strain PAP04.

    PubMed

    Anbu, P

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain (PAP04) isolated from cattle farm soil was shown to produce an extracellular, solvent-stable protease. Sequence analysis using 16S rRNA showed that this strain was highly homologous (99%) to Brevibacillus laterosporus. Growth conditions that optimize protease production in this strain were determined as maltose (carbon source), skim milk (nitrogen source), pH 7.0, 40°C temperature, and 48 h incubation. Overall, conditions were optimized to yield a 5.91-fold higher production of protease compared to standard conditions. Furthermore, the stability of the enzyme in organic solvents was assessed by incubation for 2 weeks in solutions containing 50% concentration of various organic solvents. The enzyme retained activity in all tested solvents except ethanol; however, the protease activity was stimulated in benzene (74%) followed by acetone (63%) and chloroform (54.8%). In addition, the plate assay and zymography results also confirmed the stability of the PAP04 protease in various organic solvents. The organic solvent stability of this protease at high (50%) concentrations of solvents makes it an alternative catalyst for peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:27007657

  13. Solvent-less repair inks for color filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Ming P.; Tang, Feng-Chin; Li, Chi-Hsin; Hsieh, Wen-Jen; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    Color filter (CF), one of the key components for liquid crystal display (LCD), is costly to make from repeated lithography processes. The defects may be created during the repeated lithography processes. The recycling defect CF panels are environmental unfriendly and not cost-effective process. CF repairing is an important cost-effective technical process to improve product yield. In this study, a solvent-less repaired ink system was studied. The optimized formulas of red, green, blue, and black inks have passed the quality control, reliability, and life-time tests. The new solvent-free ink system possesses the balance characteristics in liquid fluidic, UV reactivity, and color saturation. The energy has been conserved without high temperature process for removing organic solvent. The new system exhibits the state-ofthe- art fabrication process without unnecessary energy waste. As a result, the solvent-less CF repair inks offer a promising result for contributing to a low carbon process in the near future.

  14. Dynamical SCFT Simulations of Solvent Annealed Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradiso, Sean; Delaney, Kris; Ceniceros, Hector; Garcia-Cervera, Carlos; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2014-03-01

    Block copolymer thin films are ideal candidates for a broad range of technologies including rejection layers for ultrafiltration membranes, proton-exchange membranes in solar cells, optically active coatings, and lithographic masks for bit patterning storage media. Optimizing the performance of these materials often hinges on tuning the orientation and long-range order of the film's internal nanostructure. In response, solvent annealing techniques have been developed for their promise to afford additional flexibility in tuning thin film morphology, but pronounced processing history dependence and a dizzying parameter space have resulted in slow progress towards developing clear design rules for solvent annealing systems. In this talk, we will report recent theoretical progress in understanding the self assembly dynamics relevant to solvent-annealed and solution-cast block copolymer films. Emphasis will be placed on evaporation-induced ordering trends in both the slow and fast drying regimes for cylinder-forming block copolymers from initially ordered and disordered films, along with the role solvent selectivity plays in the ordering dynamics.

  15. Effect of solvents on the enzyme mediated degradation of copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-09-01

    The biodegradation of polycaprolactone (PCL), polylactic acid (PLA), polyglycolide (PGA) and their copolymers, poly (lactide-co-glycolide) and poly (D, L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) was investigated. The influence of different solvents on the degradation of these polymers at 37 °C in the presence of two different lipases namely Novozym 435 and the free lipase of porcine pancreas was investigated. The rate coefficients for the polymer degradation and enzyme deactivation were determined using continuous distribution kinetics. Among the homopolymers, the degradation of PGA was nearly an order of magnitude lower than that for PCL and PLA. The overall rate coefficients of the copolymers were higher than their respective homopolymers. Thus, PLCL degraded faster than either PCL or PLA. The degradation was highly dependent on the viscosity of the solvent used with the highest degradation observed in acetone. The degradation of the polymers in acetone was nearly twice that observed in dimethyl sulfoxide indicating that the degradation decreases with increase in the solvent viscosity. The degradation of the polymers in water-solvent mixtures indicated an optimal water content of 2.5 wt% of water.

  16. Evaluation of mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Dawson, S.; Halpert, G.

    1988-01-01

    The ethylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran (EC/2-MeTHF) mixed-solvent electrolyte has been experimentally found to possess many desirable electrolyte characteristics for ambient-temperature secondary Li-TiS2 cell applications. As many as 300 cycles have been demonstrated, and a cycling efficiency figure-of-merit of 38.5 percent, for 10-percent EC/90-percent MeTHF mixed-solvent electrolyte in experimental Li-TiS2 cells. The improved performance of this electrolyte is attributable to the formation of a beneficial passivating film on the Li electrode by interaction with the EC.

  17. Whole-cell based solvent-free system for one-pot production of biodiesel from waste grease.

    PubMed

    Li, Aitao; Ngo, Thao P N; Yan, Jinyong; Tian, Kaiyuan; Li, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    A whole-cell based solvent-free system was developed for efficient conversion of waste grease to biodiesel via one-pot esterification and transesterification. By isolation and screening of lipase-producing strains from soil, Serratia marcescens YXJ-1002 was discovered for the biotransformation of grease to biodiesel. The lipase (SML) from this strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an intracellular enzyme, showing 6 times higher whole-cell based hydrolysis activity than that of wild type strain. The recombinant cells were used for biodiesel production from waste grease in one-pot reactions containing no solvent with the addition of methanol in several small portions, and 97% yield of biodiesel (FAME) was achieved under optimized conditions. In addition, the whole-cell biocatalysts showed excellent reusability, retaining 74% productivity after 4 cycles. The developed system, biocatalyst, and process enable the efficient, low-cost, and green production of biodiesel from waste grease, providing with a potential industrial application. PMID:22483351

  18. Thorex solvent extraction studies with irradiated HTGR fuel: series I

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.E.; Mitchell, A.D.; Vaughen, V.C.A.; Shannon, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    A series of solvent extraction experiments to test the first-cycle fuel reprocessing flowsheet, proposed by the General Atomic Company for the Hot Engineering Test Facility, was completed. Using irradiated fuel, the experiments were designed to test the extraction, partition, partition-scrub, and strip operations. Each experiment utilized crosscurrent batch extractions and consecutive stages. Each stage was tested in duplicate. Experimental procedures were developed with synthetic feeds and then were used in a hot cell with radioactive solutions of dissolved irradiated fuel. The analytical measurements for thorium and acid compared favorably with the values predicted by the computer program for solvent extraction processes having interacting solutes (SEPHIS-MOD4). The SEPHIS-MOD4 program was valuable in interpreting this first set of experiments with irradiated fuels. Significant problems were experienced in the analysis for uranium in irradiated solutions. These problems emphasize the need for continued development of new or improved procedures for analyzing highly radioactive materials.

  19. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Christy, John R.; Goodman, Steven J.; Miller, Tim L.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Lapenta, Bill; Wang, Shouping

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates changes on both global and regional scales. The following subject areas are covered: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) diabatic heating; (4) MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) temperature analysis; (5) Optimal precipitation and streamflow analysis; (6) CCM (Community Climate Model) hydrological cycle; (7) CCM1 climate sensitivity to lower boundary forcing; and (8) mesoscale modeling of atmosphere/surface interaction.

  20. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin; Goodman, Steven J.; Christy, John R.; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.; Chou, Shi-Hung; Crosson, William; Wang, Shouping; Ramirez, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    This research is the MSFC component of a joint MSFC/Pennsylvania State University Eos Interdisciplinary Investigation on the global water cycle extension across the earth sciences. The primary long-term objective of this investigation is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates change on both global and regional scales. Significant accomplishments in the past year are presented and include the following: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) global modeling; and (4) optimal precipitation and stream flow analysis and hydrologic processes.

  1. Steady state recycling chromatography with an integrated solvent removal unit - separation of glucose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Hellstén, Sanna; Siitonen, Jani; Mänttäri, Mika; Sainio, Tuomo

    2012-08-17

    A process concept where a solvent removal unit is integrated to a steady-state recycling chromatography process (SSR-SR) offers a possibility to significantly increase the performance of single column chromatographic separation. The advantages of solvent removal for a difficult separation task at conditions typical for industrial scale chromatography were demonstrated by investigating the performance of SSR-SR in separation of glucose and galactose. Two limits for the extent of solvent removal were imposed: maximum total concentration of the solution fed into the column (viscosity limit) and the maximum total concentration achievable in the solvent removal unit (solubility or osmotic pressure limit). The process was optimized using numerical simulation. Three SSR-SR configurations with different positions of the solvent removal unit were compared with (1) the conventional batch process, (2) SSR without solvent removal, and (3) batch process with solvent removal. SSR-SR was found to always improve the productivity. In addition, solvent removal reduced eluent consumption in most cases. The concentration limits and the concentration of the fresh feed were shown to determine which SSR-SR configuration yields the best performance.

  2. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  3. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  4. Accelerated, microwave-assisted, and conventional solvent extraction methods affect anthocyanin composition from colored grains.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Akhtar, Humayoun; Rabalski, Iwona; Bryan, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Anthocyanins are important dietary components with diverse positive functions in human health. This study investigates effects of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) on anthocyanin composition and extraction efficiency from blue wheat, purple corn, and black rice in comparison with the commonly used solvent extraction (CSE). Factorial experimental design was employed to study effects of ASE and MAE variables, and anthocyanin extracts were analyzed by spectrophotometry, high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (DAD), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatography. The extraction efficiency of ASE and MAE was comparable with CSE at the optimal conditions. The greatest extraction by ASE was achieved at 50 °C, 2500 psi, 10 min using 5 cycles, and 100% flush. For MAE, a combination of 70 °C, 300 W, and 10 min in MAE was the most effective in extracting anthocyanins from blue wheat and purple corn compared with 50 °C, 1200 W, and 20 min for black rice. The anthocyanin composition of grain extracts was influenced by the extraction method. The ASE extraction method seems to be more appropriate in extracting anthocyanins from the colored grains as being comparable with the CSE method based on changes in anthocyanin composition. The method caused lower structural changes in anthocaynins compared with the MAE method. Changes in blue wheat anthocyanins were lower in comparison with purple corn or black rice perhaps due to the absence of acylated anthocyanin compounds in blue wheat. The results show significant differences in anthocyanins among the 3 extraction methods, which indicate a need to standardize a method for valid comparisons among studies and for quality assurance purposes. PMID:24547694

  5. Accelerated, microwave-assisted, and conventional solvent extraction methods affect anthocyanin composition from colored grains.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Akhtar, Humayoun; Rabalski, Iwona; Bryan, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Anthocyanins are important dietary components with diverse positive functions in human health. This study investigates effects of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) on anthocyanin composition and extraction efficiency from blue wheat, purple corn, and black rice in comparison with the commonly used solvent extraction (CSE). Factorial experimental design was employed to study effects of ASE and MAE variables, and anthocyanin extracts were analyzed by spectrophotometry, high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (DAD), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatography. The extraction efficiency of ASE and MAE was comparable with CSE at the optimal conditions. The greatest extraction by ASE was achieved at 50 °C, 2500 psi, 10 min using 5 cycles, and 100% flush. For MAE, a combination of 70 °C, 300 W, and 10 min in MAE was the most effective in extracting anthocyanins from blue wheat and purple corn compared with 50 °C, 1200 W, and 20 min for black rice. The anthocyanin composition of grain extracts was influenced by the extraction method. The ASE extraction method seems to be more appropriate in extracting anthocyanins from the colored grains as being comparable with the CSE method based on changes in anthocyanin composition. The method caused lower structural changes in anthocaynins compared with the MAE method. Changes in blue wheat anthocyanins were lower in comparison with purple corn or black rice perhaps due to the absence of acylated anthocyanin compounds in blue wheat. The results show significant differences in anthocyanins among the 3 extraction methods, which indicate a need to standardize a method for valid comparisons among studies and for quality assurance purposes.

  6. Comparisons of amine solvents for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture: A multi-objective analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Anita S; Eslick, John C; Miller, David C; Kitchin, John R

    2013-10-01

    Amine solvents are of great interest for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture applications. Although the development of new solvents is predominantly conducted at the laboratory scale, the ability to assess the performance of newly developed solvents at the process scale is crucial to identifying the best solvents for CO{sub 2} capture. In this work we present a methodology to evaluate and objectively compare the process performance of different solvents. We use Aspen Plus, with the electrolyte-NRTL thermodynamic model for the solvent CO{sub 2} interactions, coupled with a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimization to determine the best process design and operating conditions for each solvent. This ensures that the processes utilized for the comparison are those which are best suited for the specific solvent. We evaluate and compare the process performance of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) in a 90% CO{sub 2} capture process from a 550 MW coal fired power plant. From our analysis the best process specifications are amine specific and with those specific, optimized specifications DEA has the potential to be a better performing solvent than MEA, with a lower energy penalty and lower capital cost investment.

  7. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  8. [Low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Benqiong; Chen, Hao; Li, Shengqing

    2012-02-01

    A novel method of low-density solvent-based solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) was developed for the determination of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Conventional DLLME methods usually employ organic solvents heavier than water as the extraction solvents and achieve the phase separation through centrifugation. On the contrary, in this proposed extraction procedure, a mixture of low-density extraction solvent (toluene) and dispersive solvent (acetone) was injected into the aqueous sample solution to form an emulsion. A demulsification solvent (acetonitrile) was then injected into the aqueous solution to break up the emulsion, which turned clear quickly and was separated into two layers. The upper layer (toluene) was collected and analyzed by GC. No centrifugation was required in this procedure. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the type and volume of dispersive solvent, extraction solvent and de-emulsifier were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method provided a good linearity in the range of 20 - 500 microg/L (r2 = 0.994 2 - 0.999 9). The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were in the range of 0.52 - 5.11 microg/L. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the determination of 40 microg/L PAHs were in the range of 2.2% - 13.6% (n = 5). The proposed method is fast, efficient and convenient. It has been successfully applied to the determination of PAHs in natural water samples with the spiked recoveries of 80.2% - 115.1%.

  9. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  10. Solvent effect on the vibrational spectra of Carvedilol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Pataki, Hajnalka; Unsalan, Ozan; Mikosch, Hans; Vajna, Balázs; Marosi, György

    2012-09-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an important medicament for heart arrhythmia. The aim of this work was the interpretation of its vibrational spectra with consideration on the solvent effect. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded in solid state as well in solution. The experimental spectra were evaluated using DFT quantum chemical calculations computing the optimized structure, atomic net charges, vibrational frequencies and force constants. The same calculations were done for the molecule in DMSO and aqueous solutions applying the PCM method. The calculated force constants were scaled to the experimentally observed solid state frequencies. The characters of the vibrational modes were determined by their potential energy distributions. Solvent effects on the molecular properties were interpreted. Based on these results vibrational spectra were simulated.

  11. Organic solvent simulations under non-periodic boundary conditions: A library of effective potentials for the GLOB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Giordano; Brancato, Giuseppe; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    We extend the library of solvents that can be treated using the GLOB (general liquid optimized boundary) method, that allows to perform MD simulations under non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBC) optimizing effective potentials between explicit molecules and the boundary for four organic solvents: CHCl3, CCl4, CH3OH and CH3CN. We show that GLOB allows reducing the number of explicit solvent shells to be included, while yielding results comparable with PBC and significant advantages over simulations without explicit boundaries. Finally, we provide polynomial fittings for all available GLOB effective potentials (including SPC water) to simplify their implementation in NPBC MD simulations.

  12. Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.

    2012-03-20

    1. The Cycle Analysis code is an Microsoft Excel code that performs many different types of thermodynamic cycle analysis for power producing systems. The code will calculate the temperature and pressure and all other thermodynamic properties at the inlet and outlet of each component. The code also calculates the power that is produced, the efficiency, and the heat transported in the heater, gas chiller and recuperators. The code provides a schematic of the loop and provides the temperature and pressure at each location in the loop. The code also provides a T-S (temperature-entropy) diagram of the loop and often it provides an pressure enthalpy plot as well. 2. This version of the code concentrates on supercritical CO2 power cycles, but by simply changing the name of the working fluid many other types of fluids can be analyzed. The Cycle Analysis code provided here contains 18 different types of power cycles. Each cycle is contained in one worksheet or tab that the user can select. The user can change the yellow highlighted regions to perform different thermodynamic cycle analysis.

  13. Cycle Analysis

    2012-03-20

    1. The Cycle Analysis code is an Microsoft Excel code that performs many different types of thermodynamic cycle analysis for power producing systems. The code will calculate the temperature and pressure and all other thermodynamic properties at the inlet and outlet of each component. The code also calculates the power that is produced, the efficiency, and the heat transported in the heater, gas chiller and recuperators. The code provides a schematic of the loop andmore » provides the temperature and pressure at each location in the loop. The code also provides a T-S (temperature-entropy) diagram of the loop and often it provides an pressure enthalpy plot as well. 2. This version of the code concentrates on supercritical CO2 power cycles, but by simply changing the name of the working fluid many other types of fluids can be analyzed. The Cycle Analysis code provided here contains 18 different types of power cycles. Each cycle is contained in one worksheet or tab that the user can select. The user can change the yellow highlighted regions to perform different thermodynamic cycle analysis.« less

  14. [Chlorinate solvents natural biodegradation in shallow groundwater].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang-tao; Li, Ye; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hong-han

    2005-03-01

    Chlorinated solvents contaminations are most popular in shallow groundwater. A serious local groundwater contamination of chlorinated solvents is founded in a north city of China during the organic pollution investigation. On the basis of the available data and the determining methods of chlorinated solvents biodegradation in groundwater under natural conditions, research on chlorinated solvents biodegrading potential is carried out. The results show that the ground water environment parameters, Eh and pH of the groundwater, indirect sign of biodegradation, i.e. NO3- changing, and concentration variation of biodegradation intermediate products of PCE and TCE all proved that chlorinated solvents can be degraded by microorganism in groundwater. The results of simulating experiment also reveal that, co-metabolism biodegradation of chlorinated solvent was possible under the groundwater circumstances in this sample. Therefore, admitting there is biotransformation from PCE to TCE can explain the present situation more reasonably.

  15. Solvent signal as an NMR concentration reference.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Raftery, Daniel

    2008-12-15

    We propose that the NMR solvent signal be utilized as a universal concentration reference because most solvents can be observed by NMR and solvent concentrations can be readily calculated or determined independently. In particular, a highly protonated solvent such as water can serve as a primary concentration standard for its stability, availability, and ease of observation. The potential problems of radiation damping associated with a strong NMR signal can be alleviated by small pulse angle excitation. The solvent signal then can be detected by the NMR receiver with the same efficiency as a dilute analyte. We demonstrated that the analyte's proton concentration can be accurately determined from 4 microM to more than 100 M, referenced by solvent (water) protons of concentrations more than 10 M. The proposed method is robust and indifferent to probe tuning and does not require any additional concentration standard.

  16. Hope, optimism and delusion.

    PubMed

    McGuire-Snieckus, Rebecca

    2014-04-01

    Optimism is generally accepted by psychiatrists, psychologists and other caring professionals as a feature of mental health. Interventions typically rely on cognitive-behavioural tools to encourage individuals to 'stop negative thought cycles' and to 'challenge unhelpful thoughts'. However, evidence suggests that most individuals have persistent biases of optimism and that excessive optimism is not conducive to mental health. How helpful is it to facilitate optimism in individuals who are likely to exhibit biases of optimism already? By locating the cause of distress at the individual level and 'unhelpful' cognitions, does this minimise wider systemic social and economic influences on mental health?

  17. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Sack, W.A.; Carriere, P.E.; Whiteman, C.S.; Davis, M.P.; Raman, S.; Cuddeback, J.E.; Shiemke, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    In situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic is receiving growing support and widespread testing in the field. It is an attractive alternative with the potential to destroy contaminants almost completely. The research seeks to exploit the natural symbiotic relationship between methanogenic and methanotrophic microorganisms. The methanogens are able to carry out anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of highly chlorinated solvents while producing methane. The methanotrophs in turn utilize the end products of the methanogens, including the methane, to aerobically degrade the residual CAH compounds to environmentally acceptable end products. Both groups of organisms degrade the CAH compounds cometabolically and require a primary substrate. The purpose of the research is to evaluate and optimize the ability of methanotrophic, methanogenic, and other selected bacteria for cost-effective biotransformation of TCE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This paper describes initial studies using separate anaerobic and aerobic columns. As soon as the initial column studies are complete, the anaerobic and aerobic columns will be combined in both sequential and simultaneous modes to evaluate complete CAH destruction.

  18. Improvement of hydrocarbon recovery by spouting solvent into culture of Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Phill; Bahn, Sang-Hoon; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-12-01

    Botryococcus braunii, a green microalga, is known to produce plentiful liquid hydrocarbons as promising biodiesel resources. However, the hydrocarbon extraction methods that have so far achieved have several problems such as low efficiency and high cost. In our study, a solvent-spouted extraction process integrated with photo-bioculture was designed for simultaneous realization of hydrocarbon extraction and cell culture in two phases. The n-octane was selected as the best solvent among several solvents because its biocompatibility was highest for B. braunii. As a result, high level of biomass and hydrocarbon, 4.17 and 893.79 mg/L, respectively, was attained at 100 mL/min of solvent recycling rate through three times of processes for 66 days. Moreover, formation of cell clump was suppressed in solvent extraction, cells were regenerated after it, and thus cell viability was maintained even after repeated cycles of it. Finally, this solvent-spouted culture process required the smaller cost due to reuse of the less solvent and regenerated cells, compared with the other conventional methods. Accordingly, this technique would be applicable to exploit the continuous extraction of hydrocarbon from the algal biomass, especially for application on a large scale. PMID:23703677

  19. Predicting autoxidation stability of ether- and amide-based electrolyte solvents for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Faglioni, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Finding suitable solvents remains one of the most elusive challenges in rechargeable, nonaqueous Li-air battery technology. Although ether and amides are identified as stable classes of aprotic solvents against nucleophilic attack by superoxide, many of them are prone to autoxidation under oxygen atmosphere. In this work, we use density functional theory calculations coupled with an implicit solvent model to investigate the autoxidative stability of ether- and N,N-dialkylamide-based solvents. The change in the activation free energy for the C-H bond cleavage by O(2) is consistent with the extent of peroxide production for each class of solvent. Conversely, the thermodynamic stability alone is not sufficient to account for the observed variation in solvent reactivity toward O(2). A detailed understanding of the factors influencing the autoxidative stability provides several strategies for designing molecules with enhanced air/O(2) stability, comparable or superior to that of structurally related hydrocarbons. The mechanism of superoxide-mediated oxidation of hydroperoxides derived from ethers and amides is presented. The degradation mechanism accounts for the primary decomposition products (esters and carboxylates) observed in the Li-air battery with ether-based electrolytes. The identification of solvents having resistance to autoxidation is critical for the development of rechargeable Li-air batteries with long cycle life. PMID:22681046

  20. Predicting autoxidation stability of ether- and amide-based electrolyte solvents for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Faglioni, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    Finding suitable solvents remains one of the most elusive challenges in rechargeable, nonaqueous Li-air battery technology. Although ether and amides are identified as stable classes of aprotic solvents against nucleophilic attack by superoxide, many of them are prone to autoxidation under oxygen atmosphere. In this work, we use density functional theory calculations coupled with an implicit solvent model to investigate the autoxidative stability of ether- and N,N-dialkylamide-based solvents. The change in the activation free energy for the C-H bond cleavage by O(2) is consistent with the extent of peroxide production for each class of solvent. Conversely, the thermodynamic stability alone is not sufficient to account for the observed variation in solvent reactivity toward O(2). A detailed understanding of the factors influencing the autoxidative stability provides several strategies for designing molecules with enhanced air/O(2) stability, comparable or superior to that of structurally related hydrocarbons. The mechanism of superoxide-mediated oxidation of hydroperoxides derived from ethers and amides is presented. The degradation mechanism accounts for the primary decomposition products (esters and carboxylates) observed in the Li-air battery with ether-based electrolytes. The identification of solvents having resistance to autoxidation is critical for the development of rechargeable Li-air batteries with long cycle life.

  1. Aryne Compatible Solvents are not Always Innocent.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Eun; Chenoweth, David M

    2016-08-19

    Arynes are important and versatile intermediates in a variety of transformations. Commonly used solvents for aryne chemistry include acetonitrile and dichloromethane. Although rarely reported, the reactive nature of aryne intermediates makes them prone to side reactions, which sometimes involve solvent participation. Acetonitrile and dichloromethane are not always innocent solvents and can participate in aryne-based reactions. These results are presented in the context of ongoing mechanistic investigations of the triple aryne-tetrazine reaction. PMID:27486792

  2. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  3. MCU MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH CSSX SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2006-01-13

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) plans to use several new materials of construction not previously used with CSSX solvent. SRNL researchers tested seven materials proposed for service in seal and gasket applications. None of the materials leached detectable amounts of components into the CSSX solvent during 96 hour tests. All are judged acceptable for use based on their effect on the solvent. However, some of the materials adsorbed solvent or changed dimensions during contact with solvent. Consultation with component and material vendors with regard to performance impact and in-use testing of the materials is recommended. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), a material selected for use in contactor bearing seals, did not gain weight or change dimensions on contact with CSSX solvent. Analysis of the solvent contacted with this material showed no impurities and the standard dispersion test gave acceptable phase separation results. The material contains a leachable hydrocarbon substance, detectable on exposed surfaces, that did not adversely contaminate the solvent within the limits of the testing. We recommend contacting the vendor to determine the source and purpose of this component, or, alternatively, pursue the infrared analysis of the PEEK in an effort to better define potential impacts.

  4. Automated dynamic headspace organic solvent film microextraction for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene. Renewable liquid film as a sampler by a programmable motor.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2006-02-24

    A simple, fast and efficient dynamic headspace-organic solvent film microextraction (DHS-OSFME) method using a new automatic device was developed. The renewable organic films were formed inside a microsyringe barrel using the uniform and repeated movement of the syringe plunger enabled by programmable stirring motor. The plunger speed, number of extraction cycles, and dwell time (stop time after each half round) were controlled by a computer software, which was written by C++ Builder. A theoretical treatment of the DHS-OSFME based on the consecutive first-order process is proposed in this report. A mathematical solution for the dynamic process of the mass transfer was obtained by correlating the variation of analyte concentration in the syringe volume with the plunger speed and the amount of analyte extracted to the OSF. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX) were employed as model compounds to assess the extraction procedure and were determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. Of the three organic solvents (1-octanol, benzyl alcohol and n-dodecane) studied as extractants, n-dodecane proved to be the most sensitive solvent for the extraction of these analytes. Several parameters, including the syringe withdrawal rate, dwelling time, number of extraction cycles, sampling volume, sample temperature, and ionic strength of the solution, were investigated for their effects on the extraction performance. The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.5-200 ng ml(-1), with the detection limits between 0.18 and 0.35 ng ml(-1). Wastewater samples were extracted by the optimized method, and determined using the standard addition method.

  5. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR PC BLEND 2 AIRCRAFT RADOME DEPAINTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the life cycle assessment on a potential replacement solvent blend for aircraft radome depainting at the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker Air Force Base. The life cycle assessment is composed of three separate but interrelated components: life cy...

  6. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  7. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  8. 'GREENER' ORGANIC SYNTHESES AND TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS OR AQUEOUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such as alumina, silica, clay, or 'doped' surfaces is presented which is applicable to a wide range of cleavage, condensation, cycl...

  9. ORGANIC SYNTHESES IN SOLVENT-FREE AND AQUEOUS MEDIA USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such as alumina, silica, clay, or 'doped' surfaces is presented which is applicable to a wide range of cleavage, condensation, cycl...

  10. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS OR AQUEOUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such as alumina, silica, clay, or 'doped' surfaces is presented which is applicable to a wide range of cleavage, condensation, cycl...

  11. Isolation of an organic solvent-tolerant bacterium Bacillus licheniformis PAL05 that is able to secrete solvent-stable lipase.

    PubMed

    Anbu, Periasamy; Hur, Byung Ki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, seven lipase-producing bacterial strains were isolated from salt-enriched and cattle farm soil samples after incubation in toluene- and benzene-enriched media. One strain (PAL05) showed significantly greater lipase activity on spirit blue agar medium and stability in organic solvents. The positive strain (PAL05) was identified as Bacillus licheniformis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Lipase production was optimized in a medium containing glycerol as the carbon source and Tween 80 as an inducer (0.5% glycerol+0.5% Tween 80) at pH 8.0 and a temperature of 30 °C. In addition, the enzyme was moderately halotolerant as it exhibited increased activity in the presence of 2.5% NaCl. Optimized conditions increased the lipase production threefold. Crude lipase retained its activity for 14 days of incubation in the presence of various organic solvents at a level of 25% and 50%. The enzyme was stable at 25% in most solvents; some of the solvents such as hexane, benzene, and ethanol actually stimulated enzyme activity. The organic solvent stability of the lipase produced by the strain PAL05 enables the enzyme to be used as a potential biocatalyst for ester synthesis and other applications in nonaqueous conditions. PMID:24397298

  12. Gas turbine bottoming cycles: Triple-pressure steam versus Kalina

    SciTech Connect

    Marston, C.H.; Hyre, M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a triple-pressure steam cycle has been compared with a single-stage Kalina cycle and an optimized three-stage Kalina cycle as the bottoming sections of a gas turbine combined cycle power plant. A Monte Carlo direct search was used to find the optimum separator temperature and ammonia mass fraction for the three-stage Kalina cycle for a specific plant configuration. Both Kalina cycles were more efficient than the triple pressure steam cycle. Optimization of the three-stage Kalina cycle resulted in almost a two percentage point improvement.

  13. Standard test method for nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using the solvent purity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue of volatile cleaning solvents using a solvent purity meter. The residue is concentrated in aerosol form by evaporation of the more volatile solvents. The volume of the concentrated aerosol is passed by a forward light scattering photometer. Experimentally devised curves relating photometer output to nonvolatile residue concentration are used to obtain parts per million of nonvolatile residue content of the cleaning solvents.

  14. Determination of organochlorine pesticides and chlorobenzenes in strawberries by using accelerated solvent extraction combined with sorptive enrichment and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wennrich, L; Popp, P; Köller, G; Breuste, J

    2001-01-01

    An analytical scheme for the determination of several organochlorine pesticides like hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and DDX compounds (p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDT) as well as chlorobenzenes in strawberries has been developed. The procedure is based on aqueous accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and subsequent thermodesorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. A 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane/ divinylbenzene fiber was chosen for the SPME experiments. Significant SPME and ASE parameters were optimized using spiked water and strawberry samples. For the ASE of the organochlorine compounds, a water-acetone mixture (90 + 10, v/v) as the extraction solvent, an extraction temperature of 120 degrees C, and 2 cycles of 10 min extraction proved optimal. The developed method was evaluated with respect to precision and limits of detection (LOD). The relative standard deviations of replicate ASE-SPME determinations (n = 5) were in the range of 4-24%. LOD values between 1 and 10 microg/kg were achieved with the exception of DDT and DDE (40 microg/kg). Using SBSE, the LOD of these compounds could be improved (2 and 5 microg/kg). The main advantages of this method are the avoidance of cleanup and concentration procedures as well as the significant reduction of the required volume of organic solvents. The described method was applied to the determination of the pollutants in strawberry samples collected from different allotment gardens in a potentially polluted area, the Bitterfeld-Wolfen region (Germany). PMID:11501923

  15. The role of the solvent in PMMA gel polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, J.; Musil, M.; Sedlaříková, M.; Kořínek, R.; Bartušek, K.; Fedorková, A.

    2016-03-01

    Ionic mobility and solvent vapor pressure were studied on gels containing sodium perchlorate, polymethylmethacrylate and sulfolane as a solvent. The excess of solvent increases markedly the mobility of ions and is indicated by solvent evaporation at elevated temperature. The solvent is bonded similarly as in the liquid solution of sodium salt. The heat of solvent evaporation from gels is near to that of pure solvents.

  16. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    PubMed

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results. PMID:25867082

  17. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    PubMed

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  18. Properties of polylactide inks for solvent-cast printing of three-dimensional freeform microstructures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang-Zhuang; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Therriault, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Solvent-cast printing is a highly versatile microfabrication technique that can be used to construct various geometries such as filaments, towers, scaffolds, and freeform circular spirals by the robotic deposition of a polymer solution ink onto a moving stage. In this work, we have performed a comprehensive characterization of the solvent-cast printing process using polylactide (PLA) solutions by analyzing the flow behavior of the solutions, the solvent evaporation kinetics, and the effect of process-related parameters on the crystallization of the extruded filaments. Rotational rheometry at low to moderate shear rates showed a nearly Newtonian behavior of the PLA solutions, while capillary flow analysis based on process-related data indicated shear thinning at high shear rates. Solvent vaporization tests suggested that the internal diffusion of the solvent through the filaments controlled the solvent removal of the extrudates. Different kinds of three-dimensional (3D) structures including a layer-by-layer tower, nine-layer scaffold, and freeform spiral were fabricated, and a processing map was given to show the proper ranges of process-related parameters (i.e., polymer content, applied pressure, nozzle diameter, and robot velocity) for the different geometries. The results of differential scanning calorimetry revealed that slow solvent evaporation could increase the ability of PLA to complete its crystallization process during the filament drying stage. The method developed here offers a new perspective for manufacturing complex structures from polymer solutions and provides guidelines to optimize the various parameters for 3D geometry fabrication.

  19. Helium process cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao

    2007-10-09

    A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

  20. Helium process cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao

    2008-08-12

    A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

  1. Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 49 NIST Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D) (PC database for purchase)   The CYCLE_D database package simulates the vapor compression refrigeration cycles. It is fully compatible with REFPROP 9.0 and covers the 62 single-compound refrigerants . Fluids can be used in mixtures comprising up to five components.

  2. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution. PMID:27575084

  3. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  4. Immiscible solvents enabled nanostructure formation for efficient polymer photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Michael Yang, Yang; You, Jingbi; Richard, Eric; Li, Gang

    2014-07-25

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) fabricated via solution processing are an attractive way to realize low cost solar energy harvesting. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices are the most successful design, but their morphology is less controllable. In this manuscript, we describe a simple approach to realize 'ordered' BHJ morphology using two immiscible solvents with different boiling point and a quasi-bilayer approach. Tunable fine structures were demonstrated in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) model systems, and the devices with optimized fine structure showed a 33% efficiency enhancement compared to those with a planar bilayer structure.

  5. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  6. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  7. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  8. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  9. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  10. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  11. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Classification of Solvents according to Interaction Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Wasi

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a model for solvent effects based on the observation that the excitation energy of all-trans-N-Retinylidenmethyl-n-butylammonium iodide is directly related to the dielectric constant of a series of aromatic and aliphatic solvents as the dielectric constant (e) ranges from 2 to 10.5. (BT)

  13. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  14. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  15. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  16. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  17. Gallium complexes and solvent extraction of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.P.; Graham, C.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes a process for recovering gallium from aqueous solutions containing gallium which comprises contacting such a solution with an organic solvent containing at least 2% by weight of a water-insoluble N-organo hydroxamic acid having at least about 8 carbon atoms to extract gallium, and separating the gallium loaded organic solvent phase from the aqueous phase.

  18. Mixed solvent electrolytes for ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Deligiannis, Fotios (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention comprises an improved electrolyte for secondary lithium-based cells as well as batteries fabricated using this electrolyte. The electrolyte is a lithium containing salt dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent, which is made from a mixture of ethylene carbonate, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, 2-methylfuran, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. This improved, mixed solvent electrolyte is more conductive than prior electrolytes and much less corrosive to lithium anodes. Batteries constructed with this improved electrolyte utilize lithium or lithium alloy anodes and cathodes made of metal chalcogenides or oxides, such as TiS.sub.2, NbSe.sub.3, V.sub.6 O.sub.13, V.sub.2 O.sub.5, MoS.sub.2, MoS.sub.3, CoO.sub.2, or CrO.sub.2, dissolved in a supporting polymer matrix, like EPDM. The preferred non-aqueous solvent mixture comprises approximately 5 to 30 volume percent ethylene carbonate, approximately 0.01 to 0.1 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and approximately 0.2 to 2 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The most preferred solvent comprises approximately 10 to 20 volume percent ethylene carbonate, about 0.05 weight percent ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, and about 1.0 percent 2-methylfuran, with the balance being 2-methyltetrahydrofuran. The concentration of lithium arsenic hexafluoride can range from about 1.0 to 1.8 M; a concentration 1.5 M is most preferred. Secondary batteries made with the improved electrolyte of this invention have lower internal impedance, longer cycle life, higher energy density, low self-discharge, and longer shelf life.

  19. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  20. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  1. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  2. Hydrocarbon-solvent based cleaners as replacements for chlorinated and CFC solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiner, J.L.; Berlin, E.P.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated and CFC solvents have been used for about 30 years to remove various contaminants from products during the manufacturing process. Among the contaminants being removed are oils, greases, and waxes that have petroleum products as the base. Prior to the advent of the chlorinated solvents petroleum distillates were used for these cleaning operations. Processing improvements over the past 30 years now permit production of higher purity hydrocarbons solvents that can be used as replacements for the chlorinated and CFC solvents being phased out. These hydrocarbon solvents are well suited for removal of the various petroleum based contaminants, as one recalls the old adage {open_quotes}like dissolves like.{close_quotes}

  3. Alternative control technology document: Halogenated solvent cleaners. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    The document contains information on the use and control of halogenated solvents in solvent-cleaning applications. Described are the types of solvent cleaners manufactured, sources of solvent emissions, methods of controlling solvent emissions, and the costs associated with installation of control devices.

  4. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  5. A selenium-based ionic liquid as a recyclable solvent for the catalyst-free synthesis of 3-selenylindoles.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Everton G; Thurow, Samuel; Freitas, Camilo S; Mendes, Samuel R; Perin, Gelson; Alves, Diego; Jacob, Raquel G; Lenardão, Eder J

    2013-04-05

    The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylselenite, [bmim][SeO2(OCH3)], was successfully used as solvent in the catalyst-free preparation of 3-arylselenylindoles by the reaction of indole with ArSeCl at room temperature. The products were obtained selectively in good yields without the need of any additive and the solvent was easily reused for several cycles with good results.

  6. Menu Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Alfred; Almony, John

    The curriculum guide for commercial foods instruction is designed to aid the teacher in communicating the importance of menu cycles in commercial food production. It also provides information about the necessary steps in getting food from the raw form to the finished product, and then to the consumer. In addition to providing information on how to…

  7. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lange, Linda; Heisel, Stefan; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1) in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:27164075

  8. AN ACCELERATED RATE CALORIMETRY STUDY OF CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITHOUT EXTRACTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-03-07

    This study found that 4 - 48 part per thousand (ppth) of Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent without extractant in caustic salt solution at evaporator-relevant temperatures result in no process-significant energetic events. However, the data suggest a chemical reaction (possible decomposition) in the CSSX solvent near 140 C. This concentration of entrained solvent is believed to markedly exceed the amount of solvent that will pass from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Unit (MCU) through the downstream Defense Waste Processing Facility and enter the evaporator through routine tank farm operations. The rate of pressure rise at 140 C differs appreciably - i.e., is reduced - for salt solution containing the organic from that of the same solution without solvent. This behavior is due to a reaction between the CSSX components and the salt solution simulant.

  9. Impact of co-solvent chain branching on lithium-ion battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Jens; Buqa, Hilmi; Holzapfel, Michael; Novák, Petr

    The influence of the electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries on the reversible capacity and long-term cycling stability is not only determined by the salt and the film-forming solvent, but also, to a minor extent, by the co-solvent that is usually comprised in order to ensure suitable physical properties. Electrolytes containing three different isomers of butyl methyl carbonates were investigated in both, graphite half- and full-cells in order to determine the influence of co-solvent chain branching on the electrochemical performance. The reversible capacity obtained in SFG44 graphite (TIMCAL Ltd.) half-cells is higher for electrolytes with branched co-solvents and increases as the chain branching gets closer to the carbonate group. The long-term cycling stability, investigated in SLP30 graphite (TIMCAL Ltd.) half-cells, shows the same trend. The overall effect is rather small, but still perceivable in a full-cell set-up (SFG44/LiCoO 2). A possible pathway of interaction of the co-solvent via the structure and composition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is proposed.

  10. Organic aqueous tunable solvents (OATS): a vehicle for coupling reactions and separations.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Pamela; Hart, Ryan J; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L

    2010-09-21

    In laboratory-based chemical synthesis, the choice of the solvent and the means of product purification are rarely determined by cost or environmental impact considerations. When a reaction is scaled up for industrial applications, however, these choices are critical: the separation of product from the solvent, starting materials, and byproduct usually constitutes 60-80% of the overall cost of a process. In response, researchers have developed solvents and solvent-handling methods to optimize both the reaction and the subsequent separation steps on the manufacturing scale. These include "switchable" solvents, which are designed so that their physical properties can be changed abruptly, as well as "tunable" solvents, wherein the solvent's properties change continuously through the application of an external stimulus. In this Account, we describe the organic aqueous tunable solvent (OATS) system, examining two instructive and successful areas of application of OATS as well as its clear potential for further refinement. OATS systems address the limitations of biphasic processes by optimizing reactions and separations simultaneously. The reaction is performed homogeneously in a miscible aqueous-organic solvent mixture, such as water-tetrahydrofuran (THF). The efficient product separation is conducted heterogeneously by the simple addition of modest pressures of CO(2) (50-60 bar) to the system. Under these conditions, the water-THF phase splits into two relatively immiscible phases: the organic THF phase contains the hydrophobic product, and the aqueous phase contains the hydrophilic catalyst. We take advantage of the unique properties of OATS to develop environmentally benign and cost-competitive processes relevant in industrial applications. Specifically, we describe the use of OATS for optimizing the reaction, separation, design, and recycling of (i) Rh-catalyzed hydroformylation of olefins such as 1-octene and (ii) enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of 2-phenylacetate. We

  11. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  12. Differential response of marine diatoms to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Phillips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V.

    1995-06-01

    Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result of discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, only few data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Phytoplankton species vary in their tolerance to trace metals. Diatoms in particular are able to detoxify trace metals by the excretion of organic compounds. A previous study reported that diatoms collected form different sites in the Gulf of Mexico varied in their physiological characteristics. Algae have been considered to be good indicator s of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to marine diatoms. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on seven diatom species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (δ13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  14. Implicit treatment of solvent dispersion forces in protein simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    A model is proposed for the evaluation of dispersive forces in a continuum solvent representation for use in large-scale computer simulations. It captures the short and long-range effects of water-exclusion in conditions of partial and anisotropic hydration. The model introduces three parameters, one of which represents the degree of hydration (water occupancy) at any point in the system, which depends on the solute conformation, and two that represent the strength of water-water and water-solute dispersive interactions. It is optimized for proteins, using hydration data of a sub-optimally hydrated binding site and results from dynamics simulations in explicit water. The model is applied to a series of aliphatic-alcohol/protein complexes and a set of binary and ternary complexes of various sizes. Implications for weak and ultra-weak protein-protein association and for simulation in crowded media are discussed. PMID:24919463

  15. CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers as novel solvents for CO{sub 2} absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Matthew B; Luebke, David R; Enick, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Desirable properties for an oligomeric CO{sub 2}-capture solvent in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant include high selectivity for CO{sub 2} over H{sub 2} and water, low viscosity, low vapor pressure, low cost, and minimal environmental, health, and safety impacts. The neat solvent viscosity and solubility of CO{sub 2}, measured via bubble-point loci and presented on a pressure−composition diagram (weight basis), and water miscibility in CO{sub 2}-philic solvents have been determined and compared to results obtained with Selexol, a commercial oligomeric CO{sub 2} solvent. The solvents tested include polyethyleneglycol dimethylether (PEGDME), polypropyleneglycol dimethylether (PPGDME), polypropyleneglycol diacetate (PPGDAc), polybutyleneglycol diacetate (PBGDAc), polytetramethyleneetherglycol diacetate (PTMEGDAc), glyceryl triacetate (GTA), polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS), and perfluorpolyether (PFPE) that has a perfluorinated propyleneglycol monomer unit. Overall, PDMS and PPGDME are the best oligomeric solvents tested and exhibit properties that make them very promising alternatives for the selective absorption of CO{sub 2} from a mixed gas stream, especially if the absorption of water is undesirable.

  16. Effect of solvent characteristics on coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, He; Wang, Shaojie; Wang, Keyu; Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    It has been known for a long time that the characteristics of the liquefaction solvent has a profound effect on direct coal liquefaction. The amount of hydrogen consumed during the liquefaction process, the degree and quantity of retrograde reactions that occur, and the quality of the liquid products are all influenced by the process solvent. A number of analytical approaches have been developed to determine the important characteristics of the solvent for coal liquefaction. The hydrogen donor ability has clearly been important. However, such other characteristics of a liquefaction solvent as solubility parameter, content and type of higher aromatic hydrocarbons, and phenolic content have also been found to be significant. Finseth et al. have shown that the bulk of the hydrogen consumed from an uncatalyzed donor solvent liquefaction above 400{degrees}C is consumed in gas generation, heteroatom removal and hydrogenolysis of the coal matrix. Wilson et al. have also shown that the major role of hydrogen in uncatalyzed liquefaction is consumed by alkyl fission and hydrogenolysis reactions and not with hydrogenating aromatic rings. McMillan et al. have postulated that a radical hydrogen transfer process along with donor solvent capping of thermally produced radicals from the coal as possible processes involved with the hydroaromatic donor solvents in coal liquefaction. With the development of a short contact time batch reactor (SCTBR), determining the influence of the processing solvent on the liquefaction rates, conversion profiles and the quality of the liquid product at a particular time became possible. The influence of type of solvent, combined with other effects, such as gas atmosphere (i.e., in hydrogen and in nitrogen) and catalyst, on the coal liquefaction is reported in this paper.

  17. Life cycle assessment of biodiesel production from algal bio-crude oils extracted under subcritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Reddy, Harvind Kumar; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Downes, Cara Meghan; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-10-01

    A life cycle assessment study is performed for the energy requirements and greenhouse gas emissions in an algal biodiesel production system. Subcritical water (SCW) extraction was applied for extracting bio-crude oil from algae, and conventional transesterification method was used for converting the algal oil to biodiesel. 58MJ of energy is required to produce 1kg of biodiesel without any co-products management, of which 36% was spent on cultivation and 56% on lipid extraction. SCW extraction with thermal energy recovery reduces the energy consumption by 3-5 folds when compared to the traditional solvent extraction. It is estimated that 1kg of algal biodiesel fixes about 0.6kg of CO2. An optimized case considering the energy credits from co-products could further reduce the total energy demand. The energy demand for producing 1kg of biodiesel in the optimized case is 28.23MJ.

  18. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  19. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  20. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1992-11-01

    To expand the information base on molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coal, Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) were swelled in polar, basic solvents before and after moisture loss and upon air oxidation. So far studies have been reported on the changes in pore size distribution as a function of temperature when polar basic swelling solvents are used. Additional studies employing EPR spin probe techniques performed on the breaking up of the hydrogen bonding between bedding planes were later confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging at Argonne National Lab and the University of Illinois.

  1. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  2. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  3. Mechanism of paint removing by organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Del Nero, V.; Siat, C.; Marti, M.J.; Aubry, J.M.; Lallier, J.P.; Dupuy, N.; Huvenne, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of paint removing has been studied by comparing the stripping efficiency of a given solvent with its ability to swell the film. The most effective solvents have a Hildebrand{close_quote}s parameter, {delta}{sub H}, ranging from 10.5 to 12 and a Dimroth parameter, ET{sub (30)}, ranging from 0.25 to 0.4. The synergy observed with the mixtures DMSO/non polar solvent is explained by a dissociation of the DMSO clusters into individual molecules which diffuse more easily. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  5. Reduction of solvent emissions from vapor degreasing

    SciTech Connect

    Buresh, P.

    1989-12-31

    Hutchinson Tehnology, Inc. (HTI) implemented a number of low cost, low technology procedures to reduce emissions and prevent solvent loss from two open-top freon (CFC-113) vapor degreasers (Branson No. 1 and No. 2). HTI is a computer components manufacturer that uses freon vapor degreasing systems to remove fluxes and other residues remaining on the flexible printed circuits from the soldering process. With relatively minor changes in operation, solvent emissions were reduced by an average of 2.8 gallons per day (GDP) for both degreasers combined. It is anticipated that HTI will follow through with installation of an automatic cover, which can result in further solvent emissions reduction.

  6. Optical nonlinearity of HBI in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Ma, Lina; Geng, Yaohui; Zhang, Siwen; Wang, Zhe; Cheng, Xiaoman

    2014-04-01

    2-(2'-Hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HBI) is one kind of organic molecules featuring excited-state proton transfer (ESPT). The nonlinear optical properties of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HBI) in different polar solvents were investigated by means of Z-scan technique under the excitation of the 1064 nm picoseconds laser pulse. The experimental results show that the nonlinear refractive indices decrease with the enhancement of the polarity of the solvent. The nonlinear refractive indices sensitive to the solvent polarity allow them to be widely used for the optoelectronic devices.

  7. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  8. Cleaning solvent substitution in electronic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Alternatives to chlorinated and fluorinated solvents have been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, has been selected as the solvent of choice for cleaning complex electronic assemblies, and has been found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data.

  9. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  10. Effect of pH and lactose concentration on solvent production from whey permeate using Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.M.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-02-20

    A study was performed to optimize the production of solvents from whey permeate in batch fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum P262. Fermentations performed at relatively low pH values resulted in high solvent yields and productivities, but lactose utilization was incomplete. At higher pH values, lactose-utilization was improved but acid production dominated over solvent production. When operating at the higher pH values, an increase in the initial lactose concentration of the whey permeate resulted in lower rates of lactose utilization, and this was accompanied by increased solvent production and decreased acid production. Analysis of data from several experiments revealed a strong inverse relationship between solvent yield and lactose utilization rate. Thus, conditions which minimize the lactose utilization rate such as low culture pH values or high initial lactose concentrations, favor solventogenesis at the expense of acid production. 12 references.

  11. Determination of organochlorine pesticides in snow water samples by low density solvent based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenting; Li, Jindong; Wu, Tong; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2014-09-01

    A simple, rapid, efficient, and environmentally friendly pretreatment based on a low-density solvent based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for determining trace levels of 17 organochlorine pesticides in snow. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the type and volume of the extraction and dispersive solvents, extraction time, and salt content, were optimized. The optimized conditions yielded a good performance, with enrichment factors ranging from 271 to 474 and recoveries ranging from 71.4 to 114.5% and relative standard deviations between 1.6 and 14.8%. The detection limits, calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio, ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 μg/L. The validated method was used to successfully analyze 17 analytes in snow water samples, overcoming the drawbacks of some existing low-density solvent liquid microextraction methods, which require special devices, large volumes of organic solvents, or complicated operation procedures.

  12. Enzymatic biodiesel production kinetics using co-solvent and an anhydrous medium: a strategy to improve lipase performance in a semi-continuous reactor.

    PubMed

    Azócar, Laura; Navia, Rodrigo; Beroiz, Leticia; Jeison, David; Ciudad, Gustavo

    2014-09-25

    Enzymatic biodiesel production kinetics under previously optimized conditions were investigated. Waste frying oil (WFO) was used as the raw material, Novozym 435 as catalyst, methanol as acyl acceptor and tert-butanol as co-solvent. To investigate pure transesterification kinetics improving product properties, 3Å molecular sieves were incorporated into the reaction to provide an anhydrous medium avoiding the side reactions of hydrolysis and esterification. The effects of either WFO or methanol on the reaction rate were analyzed separately. The reaction was described by a Ping Pong mechanism and competitive inhibition by methanol. The results obtained in the kinetics study were applied in the operation of a semi-continuous reactor for biodiesel production. The operational conditions of each reaction cycle were: methanol-to-oil ratio 8/1 (mol/mol), 15% (wt) Novozym 435, 0.75% (v/v) of tert-butanol, 44.5°C, 200 rpm and 4h of reaction time. The enzymes were successively reused by remaining in the reactor during all the cycles. Under these conditions, biodiesel production yields higher than 80% over 7 reaction cycles were observed. Both the kinetics study and the reactor operation showed that Novozym 435 was not inhibited at high methanol concentrations and that the kinetics of the proposed enzymatic process could be comparable to the conventional chemical process.

  13. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus. PMID:25185320

  14. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  15. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  16. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  17. Used lubricating oil recycling using hydrocarbon solvents.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ahmad; Al-Zubaidy, Essam; Fayed, Muhammad E

    2005-01-01

    A solvent extraction process using new hydrocarbon solvents was employed to treat used lubricant oil. The solvents used were liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) condensate and stabilized condensate. A demulsifier was used to enhance the treatment process. The extraction process using stabilized condensate demonstrated characteristics that make it competitive with existing used oil treatment technologies. The process is able to reduce the asphaltene content of the treated lubricating oil to 0.106% (w/w), the ash content to 0.108%, and the carbon residue to 0.315% with very low levels of contaminant metals. The overall yield of oil is 79%. The treated used oil can be recycled as base lubricating oil. The major disadvantage of this work is the high temperature of solvent recovery. Experimental work and results are presented in detail. PMID:15627468

  18. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  19. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  20. Water as a Solvent for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  1. Screening evaluation of alternative cleaning solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The cleaning efficiency of five alternative solvents for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and chlorohydrocarbons (CHCs) used in the manufacture of certain electronic components was studied. These solvents were evaluated in the first phase of a two-phase program to remove various manufacturing contaminants such as oils, greases, mold release, and body oils. Results have shown that EXXATE 1000 and EC-7 were able to effectively remove these contaminants from copper board substrates. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes using organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, S; Demortier, A; Detriche, S; Raes, C; Fonseca, A; Rühle, M; Nagy, J B

    2006-05-01

    Phenyl ethyl alcohol was used for fast and stable dispersion of carbon nanotubes. This solvent, more effective than ethanol and toluene, allows easy dispersion of carbon nanotubes for TEM characterization. For TEM grids prepared at high dilution, it is possible to observe each tube separately. Applying that solvent, it was possible to measure the length, the diameter and the solubility of different carbon nanotubes samples.

  3. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  4. Solvent extraction behaviour of thiocyanic acid.

    PubMed

    Jurriaanse, A; Kemp, D M

    1968-11-01

    The solvent extraction behaviour of thiocyanic acid with isobutyl methyl ketone and xylene as solvents is described. In the ketone system the thiocyanic acid is solvated in the organic phase to give a complex with a proposed composition of HSCN. 2IBMK. Deviations from ideal behaviour, which can be attributed to variations in the activity coefficient of the acid in the aqueous phase, are shown.

  5. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate. PMID:27708264

  6. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate.

  7. Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

  8. Optimization and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhou, Hui; Gan, Jay; Sun, Mingxing; Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Shen, Guoqing

    2015-03-01

    The agronomic benefit of biochar has attracted widespread attention to biochar-based fertilizers. However, the inevitable presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar is a matter of concern because of the health and ecological risks of these compounds. The strong adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to biochar complicates their analysis and extraction from biochar-based fertilizers. In this study, we optimized and validated a method for determining the 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers. Results showed that accelerated solvent extraction exhibited high extraction efficiency. Based on a Box-Behnken design with a triplicate central point, accelerated solvent extraction was used under the following optimal operational conditions: extraction temperature of 78°C, extraction time of 17 min, and two static cycles. The optimized method was validated by assessing the linearity of analysis, limit of detection, limit of quantification, recovery, and application to real samples. The results showed that the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited good linearity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The limits of detection varied between 0.001 (phenanthrene) and 0.021 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene), and the limits of quantification varied between 0.004 (phenanthrene) and 0.069 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene). The relative recoveries of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were 70.26-102.99%.

  9. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1991-08-01

    Research continued on the determination of pore size and number distribution changes after swelling the coal samples with various solvents. A paper has just been submitted to the journal Fuel on the Low temperature Swelling of Argonne Premium Coal samples using solvents of varying polarity. The variation in the shape of the pore was followed as a function of temperature and swelling solvent polarity. This change in pore structure was attributed to break-up of the hydrogen bonding network in coal by polar solvents. The modification in pore shape from spherical to cylindrical was attributed to anisotropy in hydrogen bond densities. A copy of this paper has been attached to this report. Wojciech Sady has determine the structural changes in the pores that occur when APCS coal is dehydrated prior to swelling with polar solvents. These changes are different from those that occur in the absence of prior dehydration. He has also completed a study on the variation in the hydrogen bonding character of the pore wall as the coals are swelled with various polar solvents. A statistical analysis of the data is currently underway to determine important trends in his data. 9 refs.

  10. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  11. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin.

    PubMed

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K

    2013-03-15

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (φ(f)) and fluorescence lifetime (τ(f)) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, φ(f) increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes. PMID:23314392

  12. Influence of solvent polarity on preferential solvation of molecular recognition probes in solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Valeria; Cook, Joanne L; Hunter, Christopher A; Low, Caroline M R; Vinter, Jeremy G

    2012-12-13

    The association constants for formation of 1:1 complexes between a H-bond acceptor, tri-n-butylphosphine oxide, and a H-bond donor, 4-phenylazophenol, have been measured in a range of different solvent mixtures. Binary mixtures of n-octane and a more polar solvent (ether, ester, ketone, nitrile, sulfoxide, tertiary amide, and halogenated and aromatic solvents) have been investigated. Similar behavior was observed in all cases. When the concentration of the more polar solvent is low, the association constant is identical to that observed in pure n-octane. Once a threshold concentration of the more polar solvent in reached, the logarithm of the association constant decreases in direct proportion to the logarithm of the concentration of the more polar solvent. This indicates that one of the two solutes is preferentially solvated by the more polar solvent, and it is competition with this solvation equilibrium that determines the observed association constant. The concentration of the more polar solvent at which the onset of preferential solvation takes place depends on solvent polarity: 700 mM for toluene, 60 mM for 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 20 mM for the ether, ester, ketone, and nitrile, 0.2 mM for the tertiary amide, and 0.1 mM for the sulfoxide solvents. The results can be explained by a simple model that considers only pairwise interactions between specific sites on the surfaces of the solutes and solvents, which implies that the bulk properties of the solvent have little impact on solvation thermodynamics. PMID:23190174

  13. EXponentially Converging Eradication Pulse Train (EXCEPT) for solvent-signal suppression in investigations with variable T1 times.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Emmalou T; Pfaff, Annalise R; Zhang, Wenjia; Chi, Lingyu; Gerald, Rex E; Woelk, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Selective presaturation is a common technique for suppressing excessive solvent signals during proton NMR analysis of dilute samples in protic solvents. When the solvent T1 relaxation time constant varies within a series of samples, parameters for the presaturation sequence must often be re-adjusted for each sample. The EXCEPT (EXponentially Converging Eradication Pulse Train) presaturation pulse sequence was developed to eliminate time consuming pulse-parameter re-optimization as long as the variation in the solvent's T1 remains within an order of magnitude. EXCEPT consists of frequency-selective inversion pulses with progressively decreasing interpulse delays. The interpulse delays were optimized to encompass T1 relaxation times ranging from 1 to 10s, but they can be easily adjusted by a single factor for other ranges that fall within an order of magnitude with respect to T1. Sequences with different numbers of inversion pulses were tested to maximize suppression while minimizing the number of pulses and thus the total time needed for suppression. The EXCEPT-16 experiment, where 16 denotes the number of inversion pulses, was found satisfactory for many standard applications. Experimental results demonstrate that EXCEPT provides effective T1-insensitive solvent suppression as predicted by the theory. The robustness of EXCEPT with respect to changes in solvent T1 allows NMR investigations to be carried out for a series of samples without the need for pulse-parameter re-optimization for each sample. PMID:27179454

  14. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W.; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  15. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  16. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  17. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  18. Application of a statistically enhanced, novel, organic solvent stable lipase from Bacillus safensis DVL-43.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Davender; Parshad, Rajinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the molecular identification of a newly isolated bacterial strain producing a novel and organic solvent stable lipase, statistical optimization of fermentation medium, and its application in the synthesis of ethyl laurate. On the basis of nucleotide homology and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified as Bacillus safensis DVL-43 (Gen-bank accession number KC156603). Optimization of fermentation medium using Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology led to 11.4-fold increase in lipase production. The lipase from B. safensis DVL-43 exhibited excellent stability in various organic solvents. The enzyme retained 100% activity after 24h incubation in xylene, DMSO and toluene, each solvent being used at a concentration of 25% (v/v). The use of partially purified DVL-43 lipase as catalyst in the synthesis of ethyl laurate, an esterification product of lauric acid and ethanol, resulted in 80% esterification in 12h under optimized conditions. The formation of ethyl laurate was confirmed using TLC and (1)H NMR. Organic solvent stable lipases exhibiting potential application in enzymatic esterification are in great demand in flavor, fine chemicals and pharma industries. We could not find any report on lipase production from B. safensis strain and its application in esterification.

  19. Application of a statistically enhanced, novel, organic solvent stable lipase from Bacillus safensis DVL-43.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Davender; Parshad, Rajinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the molecular identification of a newly isolated bacterial strain producing a novel and organic solvent stable lipase, statistical optimization of fermentation medium, and its application in the synthesis of ethyl laurate. On the basis of nucleotide homology and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified as Bacillus safensis DVL-43 (Gen-bank accession number KC156603). Optimization of fermentation medium using Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology led to 11.4-fold increase in lipase production. The lipase from B. safensis DVL-43 exhibited excellent stability in various organic solvents. The enzyme retained 100% activity after 24h incubation in xylene, DMSO and toluene, each solvent being used at a concentration of 25% (v/v). The use of partially purified DVL-43 lipase as catalyst in the synthesis of ethyl laurate, an esterification product of lauric acid and ethanol, resulted in 80% esterification in 12h under optimized conditions. The formation of ethyl laurate was confirmed using TLC and (1)H NMR. Organic solvent stable lipases exhibiting potential application in enzymatic esterification are in great demand in flavor, fine chemicals and pharma industries. We could not find any report on lipase production from B. safensis strain and its application in esterification. PMID:24534493

  20. Effect of solvent and PVP on electrode conductivity in laser-induced reduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Huseung; Yang, Minyang

    2015-04-01

    Laser sintering process is a promising technique which can sinter an electrode pattern selectively without mask. In this study, metal oxide nanoparticle with several solvents and various molar ratio of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is prepared to optimize a fabrication of a copper electrode pattern. As a result, the solvent with exothermic heat flow and low absorption cross-section shows better pattern shape and higher conductivity in selective laser sintering. Additionally, PVP, a reductant, affects to the quality of electrode, too. High molar ratio and large amount of PVP make the laser sintering process window broad and the specific resistivity low.

  1. Life cycle assessment of PC blend 2 aircraft radome depainter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Franklin, W.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes a multi-year effort to test and evaluate a solvent blend alternative for methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) in aircraft radome depainting operations. The study was conducted at the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC) at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). TAFB currently uses MEK to depaint B-52 and KC-135 aircraft randomes in a ventilated booth. Because MEK is highly volatile, many gallons vaporize in the atmosphere during each depainting session. Supported by SERDP and EPA`s WREAPS program, this study began with a preliminary testing by Huntsman Chemical Company to determine the optimal formulation of the chemical stripper. We then conducted a demonstration of a formulation designated PC Blend 2, which was shown to have performance characteristics comparable to MEK. This report expands upon the completed technology evaluation through a life cycle evaluation of PC Blend 2 to determine the environmental, energy and economic impacts of each chemical and the formulation.

  2. Preparation of graphene sponge by vapor phase reduction for oil and organic solvent removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruihan; Yu, Baowei; Jin, Xinyan; Liu, Xiaoyang; Bai, Yitong; Chen, Lingyun; Ming, Zhu; Yang, Hua; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the porous structure and hydrophobicity, graphene sponge has huge adsorption capacity for oils and organic solvents. In this study, we reported that graphene sponge could be prepared by vapor phase reduction (denoted as VPRGS) for oil and organic solvent removal. Graphene oxide was lyophilized and reduced by steamy hydrazine hydrate to produce VPRGS. VPRGS had huge capacity for oils and organic solvents (72–224 g g‑1). In particular, the adsorption capacity for crude oil reached 165 g g‑1, suggesting that VPRGS could be applied in oil leakage remediation. VPRGS could treat pollutants both in pure liquid form and in the simulated sea water, where the hydrophobic nature of VPRGS allowed the floating of VPRGS on simulated sea water. VPRGS could be easily regenerated without obvious capacity loss up to 9 cycles. The implications to the applications of VPRGS in oil/water separation and water remediation are discussed.

  3. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  4. Lipase catalyzed esterification of glycidol in nonaqueous solvents: solvent effects on enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Martins, J F; de Sampaio, T C; de Carvalho, I B; Barreiros, S

    1994-06-01

    We studied the effect of organic solvents on the kinetics of porcine pancreatic lipase (pp) for the resolution of racemic glycidol through esterification with butyric acid. We quantified ppl hydration by measuring water sorption isotherms for the enzyme in the solvents/mixtures tested. The determination of initial rates as a function of enzyme hydration revealed that the enzyme exhibits maximum apparent activity in the solvents/mixtures at the same water content (9% to 11% w/w) within the associated experimental error. The maximum initial rates are different in all the media and correlate well with the logarithm of the molar solubility of water in the media, higher initial rates being observed in the solvents/mixtures with lower water solubilities. The data for the mixtures indicate that ppl apparent activity responds to bulk property of the solvent. Measurements of enzyme particle sizes in five of the solvents, as function of enzyme hydration, revealed that mean particle sizes increased with enzyme hydration in all the solvents, differences between solvents being more pronounced at enzyme hydration levels close to 10%. At this hydration level, solvents having a higher water content lead to lower reaction rates; these are the solvents where the mean enzyme particle sizes are greater. Calculation of the observable modulus indicates there are no internal diffusion limitations. The observed correlation between changes in initial rates and changes in external surface area of the enzyme particles suggests that interfacial activation of ppl is only effective at the external surface of the particles. Data obtained for the mixtures indicate that ppl enantioselectivity depends on specific solvent-enzyme interactions. We make reference to ppl hydration and activity in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  5. Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

    2014-06-01

    Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

  6. Scale-up of recovery process for waste solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnert, G. W.; Carey, D. A.

    1991-02-01

    Recycling of spent cleaning solvents, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and trichlorotrifluoroethane at KCP was evaluated. Gas chromatography was used to identify stabilization levels in virgin and recycled solvent. Segregation, pretreatment, and distillation processes were defined. Existing distillation equipment was modified and a solvent drying process was added. Recycled solvent quality of several production lots is also presented.

  7. Scale-up of recovery process for waste solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carey, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Recycling of spent cleaning solvents, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and trichlorotrifluoroethane at KCP was evaluated. Gas chromatography was used to identify stabilization levels in virgin and recycled solvent. Segregation, pretreatment and distillation processes were defined. Existing distillation equipment was modified and a solvent drying process was added. Recycled solvent quality of several production lots is also presented. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Solvent disperser for removing oil from sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Di Foggio, R.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes method for dispersing solvent for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, comprising: (a) receiving solvent dripping downwardly, and (b) conducting the received solvent by means of capillary action to an application zone located and dimensioned for passing such solvent to the sponge in a sponge core barrel.

  9. Production of Thermostable Organic Solvent Tolerant Keratinolytic Protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4: IAA Production and Plant Growth Promotion.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amit; Singh, Hukum; Anwar, Mohammad S; Kumar, Shailendra; Ansari, Mohammad W; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports about the optimization of protease production, but only few have optimized the production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic proteases that show remarkable exploitation in the development of the non-polluting processes in biotechnological industries. The present study was carried with aim to optimize the production of a thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 utilizing chicken feathers. Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 isolated from the soil sample collected from a rice mill wasteyard site near Kashipur, Uttrakhand was identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease enzyme by Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 was optimized by varying physical culture conditions such as pH (10.0), temperature (60°C), inoculum percentage (2%), feather concentration (2%) and agitation rate (2 g) for feather degradation. The result showed that Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 potentially produces extra-cellular thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease in the culture medium. Further, the feather hydrolysate from keratinase production media showed plant growth promoting activity by producing indole-3-acetic acid itself. The present findings suggest that keratinolytic protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 offers enormous industrial applications due to its organic solvent tolerant property in peptide synthesis, practical role in feather degradation and potential function in plant growth promoting activity, which might be a superior candidate to keep ecosystem healthy and functional. PMID:27555836

  10. Production of Thermostable Organic Solvent Tolerant Keratinolytic Protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4: IAA Production and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Amit; Singh, Hukum; Anwar, Mohammad S.; Kumar, Shailendra; Ansari, Mohammad W.; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports about the optimization of protease production, but only few have optimized the production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic proteases that show remarkable exploitation in the development of the non-polluting processes in biotechnological industries. The present study was carried with aim to optimize the production of a thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 utilizing chicken feathers. Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 isolated from the soil sample collected from a rice mill wasteyard site near Kashipur, Uttrakhand was identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease enzyme by Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 was optimized by varying physical culture conditions such as pH (10.0), temperature (60°C), inoculum percentage (2%), feather concentration (2%) and agitation rate (2 g) for feather degradation. The result showed that Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 potentially produces extra-cellular thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease in the culture medium. Further, the feather hydrolysate from keratinase production media showed plant growth promoting activity by producing indole-3-acetic acid itself. The present findings suggest that keratinolytic protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 offers enormous industrial applications due to its organic solvent tolerant property in peptide synthesis, practical role in feather degradation and potential function in plant growth promoting activity, which might be a superior candidate to keep ecosystem healthy and functional. PMID:27555836

  11. Anodic behavior of aluminum current collector in LiTFSI solutions with different solvent compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Masayuki; Shibata, Takuo; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Ishikawa, Masashi

    The anodic behavior of aluminum (Al) current collector of Li-ion batteries has been investigated in organic electrolyte solutions containing lithium bis[trifluoromethylsulfonyl]imide (Li(CF 3SO 2) 2N: LiTFSI) with different compositions of solvents. The Al anode was subjected to anodic corrosion in the LiTFSI solution, but the degree of the corrosion depended on the solvent composition. The surface of Al pre-treated by mechanical polishing has suffered serious corrosion in the mixed solvent solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC), whereas the Al surface pre-treated by electro-polishing was relatively stable in the mixed solvent of γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and DMC. The results of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) experiments showed that the mass change of the Al surface during the potential cycling in GBL + DMC was much different from that in the EC + DMC solution. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation proved that the corrosion pits evolved on the electro-polished Al surface after potential cycling, but GBL resulted in a smaller amount of the corrosion product on the Al surface.

  12. Chemical compatibility of PU/PAN interpenetrating polymer network membrane with substituted aromatic solvents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, H; Siddaramaiah

    2007-09-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based polyurethane/polyacrylonitrile (PU/PAN, 50/50) semi-interpenetrating polymer network (SIPN) membrane has been studied from sorption/desorption cycles and diffusion behaviour with substituted aromatic probe molecules at 20, 40 and 60 degrees C. Sorption/desorption cycles have been repeated to evaluate polymer-solvent interaction. Organic solvents taken up or given out by IPN are measured periodically till equilibrium. Using these data, sorption (S), diffusion (D) and permeation (P) coefficients have been calculated from Fick's equation. Sorption data is correlated with solubility parameter of solvents and polymer. It was found that solvents of comparable solubility parameter with IPN interact more and thus there is an increase in sorption. Molecular mass between cross-link has been calculated using Flory Rehner equation. The cross-link density and degree of cross-linking of the membrane is calculated. From the temperature dependence of sorption and diffusion coefficients, the Arrhenius activation parameters like activation energy for diffusion (E(D)) and permeation (E(P)) processes have been calculated. Furthermore, the sorption results have been interpreted in terms of thermodynamic parameters such as change in enthalpy (DeltaH) and entropy (DeltaS). Concentration profiles of penetrants at different penetration depths in the polymer sample at different time intervals have also been calculated theoretically from a solution of Fick's equation under appropriate initial boundary conditions. PMID:17418943

  13. Hazardous solvents: Innovative alternatives offer choices

    SciTech Connect

    Melody, M.

    1993-01-01

    Use of hazardous solvents pose various problems for industry, including contributing to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, creating hazardous wastes and exposing workers to dangerous chemicals. Several environmental laws regulate the use of hazardous solvents, but only mandated phaseouts have prompted action by businesses. The CAA Amendments and the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer are generating industry response, because they order the phaseout of two popular solvents -- CFCs and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Regulations and hazardous waste disposal costs are the major factors influencing companies to switch to alternative cleaning solvents and technologies. Another factor contributing to the demand for alternative cleaners and processes is increased awareness of risks associated with hazardous solvents. Although most alternative cleaners do not have hazardous characteristics, the contaminants they remove may be hazardous. Vendors, therefore, are cautious about discussing waste disposal. Many facilities switching to aqueous and semi-aqueous systems need to install or modify wastewater treatment facilities, add a filtration system to recycle water, or buy water evaporators.

  14. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  15. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of Allied Signal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, has been selected as the solvent of choice, and has been found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  16. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Changes in psychological performances of solvent-poisoned and solvent-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in psychological performances associated with long-term exposure to organic solvents and solvent mixtures were studied in a group of 56 male workers diagnosed as having an occupational disease caused by solvents. Their mean duration of exposure was 9.1 +/- SD 8.3 years, and they were exposed mainly to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons and to mixtures of paint solvents. The psychological performances of these solvent-exposed patients were compared with those of 98 styrene-exposed workers and a nonexposed group of 43 construction workers. The applied psychological test variables were factor analyzed, before other statistical analysis, in order to clarify what they measured in the present study. The solvent-exposed group was characterized by a decline in visuomotor performance and decreased freedom from distractibility. The poor visuomotor performances were also related to the long duration of solvent exposure in this group of patients. The index applied for the exposure level revealed no significant relationships to psychological performances among the solvent-exposed patients. The psychological performances of the styrene-exposed group differed only very slightly from those of the nonexposed workers.

  18. Optimized butyl butyrate synthesis catalyzed by Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa B; Friedrich, John L R; Rodrigues, Rafael C; Garcia-Galan, Cristina; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Ayub, Marco A Z

    2013-01-01

    Butyl butyrate is an ester present in pineapple flavor, which is very important for the food and beverages industries. In this work, the optimization of the reaction of butyl butyrate synthesis catalyzed by the immobilized lipase Lipozyme TL-IM was performed. n-Hexane was selected as the most appropriate solvent. Other reaction parameters such as temperature, substrate molar ratio, biocatalyst content and added water, and their responses measured as yield, were evaluated using a fractional factorial design, followed by a central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology. In the fractional design 2(4-1) , the four variables were tested and temperature and biocatalyst content were statistically significant and then used for optimization on CCD. The optimal conditions for butyl butyrate synthesis were found to be 48°C; substrate molar ratio 3:1 (butanol:butyric acid); biocatalyst content of 40% of acid mass. Under these conditions, over 90% of yield was obtained in 2 h. Enzyme reuse was tested by washing the biocatalyst with n-hexane or by direct reuse. The direct reuse produced a rapid decrease on enzyme activity, while washing with n-hexane allowed reusing the enzyme for five reactions cycles keeping approximately 85% of its activity.

  19. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R.; Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C.

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  20. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation.

  1. Thermoeconomic analysis of an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, U.; Gervino, G.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper an analysis of the Stirling cycle in thermoeconomic terms is developed using the entropy generation. In the thermoeconomic optimization of an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle the F function has been introduced to evaluate the optimum for the higher and lower sources temperature ratio in the cycle: this ratio represents the value which optimizes the cycle itself. The variation of the function F is proportional to the variation of the entropy generation, the maxima and minima of F has been evaluated in a previous paper without giving the physical foundation of the method. We investigate the groundwork of this approach: to study the upper and lower limits of F function allows to determine the cycle stability and the optimization conditions. The optimization consists in the best COP at the least cost. The principle of maximum variation for the entropy generation becomes the analytic foundation of the optimization method in the thermoeconomic analysis for an irreversible Stirling heat pump cycle.

  2. Solvent effects on chemical processes. 8. Demethylation kinetics of aspartame in binary aqueous-organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Skwierczynski, R D; Connors, K A

    1994-12-01

    The kinetics of demethylation of aspartame were studied in binary aqueous-organic solvent mixtures at 25 degrees C under two solution conditions, namely 1.0 M HCl (pH 0.28 in water) and carbonate buffer (pH 10.1 in water). Under these conditions solvent effects on the acid dissociation constants of aspartame do not complicate the interpretation of the kinetics. The organic cosolvents were acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, and methanol. The observed kinetic solvent effects were modest in magnitude, not exceeding a factor of 3 in rate constant, relative to the fully aqueous solution. The rate changes included both increases and decreases, and in some solvent mixtures extrema were observed. It is concluded that at least two contributory factors, identified as an electrostatic (dielectric constant) effect and a solvation effect, must be operating to produce the observed kinetic solvent effects.

  3. Effect of solvent evaporation on fiber morphology in rotary jet spinning.

    PubMed

    Golecki, Holly McIlwee; Yuan, Hongyan; Glavin, Calla; Potter, Benjamin; Badrossamay, Mohammad R; Goss, Josue A; Phillips, Michael D; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-11-11

    The bulk production of polymeric nanofibers is important for fabricating high-performance, nanoscale materials. Rotary jet spinning (RJS) enables the mass production of nanostructured fibers by centrifugal forces but may result in inconsistent surface morphologies. Because nanofiber performance is dependent upon its surface features, we asked which parameters must be optimized during production to control fiber morphology. We developed and tested a mathematical model that describes how the competition between fluid instability and solvent removal in RJS regulates the degree of beading in fibers. Our data suggest that solvent evaporation during the spinning process causes an increase in jet viscosity and that these changes inhibit both bead formation and jet thinning. The RJS was used to vary experimental parameters, showing that fiber beading can be reduced by increasing solvent volatility, solution viscosity, and spinning velocity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nanofiber morphology and diameter can be precisely controlled during RJS manufacturing.

  4. Investigations on the activity of poly(2-oxazoline) enzyme conjugates dissolved in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Stefan; Krumm, Christian; Doert, Dominik; Neufeld, Katharina; Tiller, Joerg C

    2014-07-10

    The use of enzymes in organic solvents offers a great opportunity for the highly selective synthesis of complex organic compounds. In this study we investigate the POXylation of several enzymes with different polyoxazolines ranging from the hydrophilic poly(2-methyl-oxazoline) (PMOx) to the hydrophobic poly(2-heptyl-oxazoline) (PHeptOx). As reported previously on the examples of model enzymes POXylation mediated by pyromellitic acid dianhydride results in highly modified, organosoluble protein conjugates. This procedure is here extended to a larger number of proteins and optimized for the different polyoxazolines. The resulting polymer-enzyme conjugates (PEC) became soluble in different organic solvents ranging from hydrophilic DMF to even toluene. These conjugates were characterized regarding their solubility and especially their activity in organic solvents and in some cases the PECs showed significantly (up to 153,000 fold) higher activities than the respective native enzymes. PMID:24709400

  5. Unsaturated Phosphazenes as Co-Solvents for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W.; Jamison, David K.; Dufek, Eric J; Gering, Kevin L; Luther, Thomas A

    2014-07-24

    This paper covers the synthesis and use of a related family of cyclic phosphazene solvents containing terminal unsaturations. A brief synopsis on the synthesis and purification of these compounds is given. Data will be presented that covers physical and chemical properties of the phosphazenes as well as the properties when blended at various level with representative organic carbonate baseline solvents. Cycling data will be presented using commercially available electrode couples (LRMR/C) as well as studies focusing on cell performance at early lifetime as well as after repeated cycles. Conclusions regarding the effect of the unsaturated phosphazene compounds and their interaction with various alkyl carbonates, and their effect on cell performance will be presented.

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  7. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  11. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...