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Sample records for optimized geometric bond

  1. Geometric optimization of thermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebrahim, Asad Mansour

    2000-10-01

    The work in chapter 1 extends to three dimensions and to convective heat transfer the constructal method of minimizing the thermal resistance between a volume and one point. In the first part, the heat flow mechanism is conduction, and the heat generating volume is occupied by low conductivity material (k 0) and high conductivity inserts (kp) that are shaped as constant-thickness disks mounted on a common stem of kp material. In the second part the interstitial spaces once occupied by k0 material are bathed by forced convection. The internal and external geometric aspect ratios of the elemental volume and the first assembly are optimized numerically subject to volume constraints. Chapter 2 presents the constrained thermodynamic optimization of a cross-flow heat exchanger with ram air on the cold side, which is used in the environmental control systems of aircraft. Optimized geometric features such as the ratio of channel spacings and flow lengths are reported. It is found that the optimized features are relatively insensitive to changes in other physical parameters of the installation and relatively insensitive to the additional irreversibility due to discharging the ram-air stream into the atmosphere, emphasizing the robustness of the thermodynamic optimum. In chapter 3 the problem of maximizing exergy extraction from a hot stream by distributing streams over a heat transfer surface is studied. In the first part, the cold stream is compressed in an isothermal compressor, expanded in an adiabatic turbine, and discharged into the ambient. In the second part, the cold stream is compressed in an adiabatic compressor. Both designs are optimized with respect to the capacity-rate imbalance of the counter-flow and the pressure ratio maintained by the compressor. This study shows the tradeoff between simplicity and increased performance, and outlines the path for further conceptual work on the extraction of exergy from a hot stream that is being cooled gradually. The aim

  2. Evolutionary Optimization of a Geometrically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.; Dozier, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection, and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This Technical Publication (TP) presents a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: genetic algorithms and differential evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. A nontraditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this TP, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  3. Optimization of biotechnological systems through geometric programming

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Voit, Eberhard O; Gonzalez-Alcon, Carlos; Torres, Nestor V

    2007-01-01

    Background In the past, tasks of model based yield optimization in metabolic engineering were either approached with stoichiometric models or with structured nonlinear models such as S-systems or linear-logarithmic representations. These models stand out among most others, because they allow the optimization task to be converted into a linear program, for which efficient solution methods are widely available. For pathway models not in one of these formats, an Indirect Optimization Method (IOM) was developed where the original model is sequentially represented as an S-system model, optimized in this format with linear programming methods, reinterpreted in the initial model form, and further optimized as necessary. Results A new method is proposed for this task. We show here that the model format of a Generalized Mass Action (GMA) system may be optimized very efficiently with techniques of geometric programming. We briefly review the basics of GMA systems and of geometric programming, demonstrate how the latter may be applied to the former, and illustrate the combined method with a didactic problem and two examples based on models of real systems. The first is a relatively small yet representative model of the anaerobic fermentation pathway in S. cerevisiae, while the second describes the dynamics of the tryptophan operon in E. coli. Both models have previously been used for benchmarking purposes, thus facilitating comparisons with the proposed new method. In these comparisons, the geometric programming method was found to be equal or better than the earlier methods in terms of successful identification of optima and efficiency. Conclusion GMA systems are of importance, because they contain stoichiometric, mass action and S-systems as special cases, along with many other models. Furthermore, it was previously shown that algebraic equivalence transformations of variables are sufficient to convert virtually any types of dynamical models into the GMA form. Thus

  4. A geometric representation scheme suitable for shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    A geometric representation scheme is outlined which utilizes the natural design variable concept. A base configuration with distinct topological features is created. This configuration is then deformed to define components with similar topology but different geometry. The values of the deforming loads are the geometric entities used in the shape representation. The representation can be used for all geometric design studies; it is demonstrated here for structural optimization. This technique can be used in parametric design studies, where the system response is defined as functions of geometric entities. It can also be used in shape optimization, where the geometric entities of an original design are modified to maximize performance and satisfy constraints. Two example problems are provided. A cantilever beam is elongated to meet new design specifications and then optimized to reduce volume and satisfy stress constraints. A similar optimization problem is presented for an automobile crankshaft section. The finite element method is used to perform the analyses.

  5. Adatom bond-induced geometric and electronic properties of passivated armchair graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Hsien-Ching; Yang, Po-Hua; Lin, Shih-Yang; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2015-07-01

    The geometric and electronic properties of passivated armchair graphene nanoribbons, enriched by strong chemical bonding between edge-carbons and various adatoms, are investigated by first-principle calculations. Adatom arrangements, bond lengths, charge distributions, and energy dispersions are dramatically changed by edge passivation. Elements with an atomic number of less than 20 are classified into three types depending on the optimal geometric structures: planar and non-planar structures, the latter of which are associated with specific arrangements and stacked configurations of adatoms. Especially, the nitrogen passivated nanoribbon is the most stable one with a heptagon-pentagon structure at the edges. The low-lying band structures are drastically varied, exhibiting non-monotonous energy dispersions and adatom-dominated bands. A relationship between energy gaps and ribbon widths no longer exists, and some adatoms further induce a semiconductor-metal transition. All the main characteristics are directly reflected in the density of states, revealing dip structures, plateaus, symmetric peaks, and square-root divergent asymmetric peaks. PMID:26051862

  6. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  7. Optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; Martín De Diego, David; Zuccalli, Marcela

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we consider a geometric formalism for optimal control of underactuated mechanical systems. Our techniques are an adaptation of the classical Skinner and Rusk approach for the case of Lagrangian dynamics with higher-order constraints. We study a regular case where it is possible to establish a symplectic framework and, as a consequence, to obtain a unique vector field determining the dynamics of the optimal control problem. These developments will allow us to develop a new class of geometric integrators based on discrete variational calculus.

  8. Optimal source codes for geometrically distributed integer alphabets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallager, R. G.; Van Voorhis, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An approach is shown for using the Huffman algorithm indirectly to prove the optimality of a code for an infinite alphabet if an estimate concerning the nature of the code can be made. Attention is given to nonnegative integers with a geometric probability assignment. The particular distribution considered arises in run-length coding and in encoding protocol information in data networks. Questions of redundancy of the optimal code are also investigated.

  9. Optimized probabilistic quantum processors: A unified geometric approach 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergou, Janos; Bagan, Emilio; Feldman, Edgar

    Using probabilistic and deterministic quantum cloning, and quantum state separation as illustrative examples we develop a complete geometric solution for finding their optimal success probabilities. The method is related to the approach that we introduced earlier for the unambiguous discrimination of more than two states. In some cases the method delivers analytical results, in others it leads to intuitive and straightforward numerical solutions. We also present implementations of the schemes based on linear optics employing few-photon interferometry

  10. THP-1 macrophage lipid accumulation unaffected by fatty acid double bond geometric or positional configuration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fatty acid type alters atherosclerotic lesion progression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Incompletely elucidated are the mechanisms by which fatty acids differing in double-bond geometric or positional configuration alter arterial lipid accumulation. The objective of this study was to ev...

  11. Comparison between first geometric-arithmetic index and atom-bond connectivity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kinkar Ch.; Trinajstić, N.

    2010-09-01

    The first geometric-arithmetic index ( GA) [1] and atom-bond connectivity index ( ABC) [2] that are recently introduced, are found to be useful tools in QSPR and QSAR studies. In this letter we compare the GA and ABC indices for chemical trees and molecular graphs. Moreover, we also compare these two indices for general graphs.

  12. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  13. Preparing porcelain surfaces for optimal bonding.

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2008-01-01

    When placing an indirect restoration such as a porcelain veneer, inlay, or onlay, the intaglio surface is typically treated in some fashion to ensure optimal bonding to the resin-based adhesives and luting cements required to affix it to the tooth tissues. A variety of surface preparation techniques have been advocated, including the use of acids, particle abrasion, various adhesives, and chemical couplers such as silane. There is often equivocation in the literature regarding the effectiveness of these materials and surface preparation techniques. This article will attempt to make some sense of the various methodologies currently advocated for the treatment of porcelain surfaces before placement.

  14. A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume

    PubMed Central

    Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

  15. Interpretation of intermolecular geometric isotope effect in hydrogen bonds: nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Yutaka; Nakai, Hiromi

    2011-03-01

    The intermolecular geometric isotope effect (GIE) in hydrogen bond A-X···B (X = H and D) is investigated theoretically using the nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital (NOMO) theory. To interpret the GIE in terms of physically meaningful energy components such as electrostatic and exchange-repulsion interactions, the reduced variational space self-consistent-field method is extended to the NOMO scheme. The intermolecular GIE is analyzed as a two-stage process: the intramolecular bond shrinkage and the intermolecular bond elongation. According to the isotopic shifts of energy components described by the NOMO/MP2 method, the intermolecular GIE is approximately interpreted as a process reducing the exchange-repulsion interaction after the decrease of electrostatic interaction. PMID:21306139

  16. State-Selective Excitation of Quantum Systems via Geometrical Optimization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-09-01

    We lay out the foundations of a general method of quantum control via geometrical optimization. We apply the method to state-selective population transfer using ultrashort transform-limited pulses between manifolds of levels that may represent, e.g., state-selective transitions in molecules. Assuming that certain states can be prepared, we develop three implementations: (i) preoptimization, which implies engineering the initial state within the ground manifold or electronic state before the pulse is applied; (ii) postoptimization, which implies engineering the final state within the excited manifold or target electronic state, after the pulse; and (iii) double-time optimization, which uses both types of time-ordered manipulations. We apply the schemes to two important dynamical problems: To prepare arbitrary vibrational superposition states on the target electronic state and to select weakly coupled vibrational states. Whereas full population inversion between the electronic states only requires control at initial time in all of the ground vibrational levels, only very specific superposition states can be prepared with high fidelity by either pre- or postoptimization mechanisms. Full state-selective population inversion requires manipulating the vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state before the optical pulse is applied and in the excited electronic state afterward, but not during all times.

  17. Printability Optimization For Fine Pitch Solder Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yoo, Sehoon

    2011-01-17

    Effect of metal mask and pad design on solder printability was evaluated by DOE in this study. The process parameters were stencil thickness, squeegee angle, squeegee speed, mask separating speed, and pad angle of PCB. The main process parameters for printability were stencil thickness and squeegee angle. The response surface showed that maximum printability of 1005 chip was achieved at the stencil thickness of 0.12 mm while the maximum printability of 0603 and 0402 chip was obtained at the stencil thickness of 0.05 mm. The bonding strength of the MLCC chips was also directly related with the printability.

  18. Communication: ab initio simulations of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics: collective tunneling and the origin of geometrical isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Wikfeldt, K T; Michaelides, A

    2014-01-28

    Ab initio simulations that account for nuclear quantum effects have been used to examine the order-disorder transition in squaric acid, a prototypical H-bonded antiferroelectric crystal. Our simulations reproduce the >100 K difference in transition temperature observed upon deuteration as well as the strong geometrical isotope effect observed on intermolecular separations within the crystal. We find that collective transfer of protons along the H-bonding chains - facilitated by quantum mechanical tunneling - is critical to the order-disorder transition and the geometrical isotope effect. This sheds light on the origin of isotope effects and the importance of tunneling in squaric acid which likely extends to other H-bonded ferroelectrics.

  19. Communication: Ab initio simulations of hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics: Collective tunneling and the origin of geometrical isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wikfeldt, K. T.; Michaelides, A.

    2014-01-28

    Ab initio simulations that account for nuclear quantum effects have been used to examine the order-disorder transition in squaric acid, a prototypical H-bonded antiferroelectric crystal. Our simulations reproduce the >100 K difference in transition temperature observed upon deuteration as well as the strong geometrical isotope effect observed on intermolecular separations within the crystal. We find that collective transfer of protons along the H-bonding chains – facilitated by quantum mechanical tunneling – is critical to the order-disorder transition and the geometrical isotope effect. This sheds light on the origin of isotope effects and the importance of tunneling in squaric acid which likely extends to other H-bonded ferroelectrics.

  20. Bond strength optimization between adherends with different curvatures

    SciTech Connect

    Randow, C.L.; Dillard, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the increasing use of adhesives in various industrial applications, the accurate prediction of bond behavior becomes more important. This information may also be used to optimize bond design. In particular, the following analysis focuses on bond geometries involving a curvature mismatch between adherends. For example, consider the profile view of a typical laminated counter-top. This involves bonding an initially flat adherend to a rigid substrate with a flat top, a curved corner of radius {rho}, and a flat landing at the bond edge. Questions arise regarding the behavior of the bond and how to optimize the design to minimize stresses resulting from the initially flat adherend being fixed to the rigid, curved substrate. The deflection of the adherend is modeled using beam on elastic foundation analysis. These results, which can be used to calculate peel stresses, are used to determine the optimal design of the laminated counter-top geometry as presented above. Experimental results are also correlated to the analytical solution.

  1. Optimization of the geometrical stability in square ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagata, R.; Beghi, A.; Belfi, J.; Beverini, N.; Cuccato, D.; Di Virgilio, A.; Ortolan, A.; Porzio, A.; Solimeno, S.

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-sensitive ring laser gyroscopes are regarded as potential detectors of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect due to the rotation of the Earth. Our project for this goal is called GINGER (gyroscopes in general relativity), and consists of a ground-based triaxial array of ring lasers aimed at measuring the rotation rate of the Earth with an accuracy of {{10}-14} rad {{s}-1}. Such an ambitious goal is now within reach, as large-area ring lasers are very close to the required sensitivity and stability. However, demanding constraints on the geometrical stability of the optical path of the laser inside the ring cavity are required. Thus, we have begun a detailed study of the geometry of an optical cavity in order to find a control strategy for its geometry that could meet the specifications of the GINGER project. As the cavity perimeter has a stationary point for the square configuration, we identify a set of transformations on the mirror positions that allows us to adjust the laser beam steering to the shape of a square. We show that the geometrical stability of a square cavity strongly increases by implementing a suitable system to measure the mirror distances, and that the geometry stabilization can be achieved by measuring the absolute lengths of the two diagonals and the perimeter of the ring.

  2. Geometrical optimization of a local ballistic magnetic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, Yuhsuke; Hara, Masahiro; Nomura, Tatsuya; Kimura, Takashi

    2014-04-07

    We have developed a highly sensitive local magnetic sensor by using a ballistic transport property in a two-dimensional conductor. A semiclassical simulation reveals that the sensitivity increases when the geometry of the sensor and the spatial distribution of the local field are optimized. We have also experimentally demonstrated a clear observation of a magnetization process in a permalloy dot whose size is much smaller than the size of an optimized ballistic magnetic sensor fabricated from a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas.

  3. Geometrical optimization of microstripe arrays for microbead magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of magnetic beads plays an increasingly important role in molecular diagnostics. Magnetophoresis is a promising technique for selective transportation of magnetic beads in lab-on-a-chip systems. We investigate periodic arrays of exchange-biased permalloy microstripes fabricated using a single lithography step. Magnetic beads can be continuously moved across such arrays by combining the spatially periodic magnetic field from microstripes with a rotating external magnetic field. By measuring and modeling the magnetophoresis properties of thirteen different stripe designs, we study the effect of the stripe geometry on the magnetophoretic transport properties of the magnetic microbeads between the stripes. We show that a symmetric geometry with equal width of and spacing between the microstripes facilitates faster transportation and that the optimal period of the periodic stripe array is approximately three times the height of the bead center over the microstripes. PMID:26543515

  4. Numerical investigation of heat transfer augmentation through geometrical optimization of vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mofid; Mirgolbabaei, Hessam; Barari, Amin; Domairry, Ganji

    2010-12-01

    In this paper a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a steady incompressible and turbulent model has been carried out to study the effects of vortex generators in a compact heat exchanger in a curvilinear coordinate system. The mesh which is applied in this study is boundary fitted and has been smoothed by a Laplace operator. Experimental data of a former study has been applied to validate the numerical results. The effects of geometrical variation are studied by adjusting vortex generators’ inclination and relative cross location. The major issue of this study is the optimal trade-off by selecting an optimal geometric, considering the opposite influences of geometrical variation on Nusselt number and pressure drop.

  5. Numerical investigation of heat transfer augmentation through geometrical optimization of vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mofid; Mirgolbabaei, Hessam; Barari, Amin; Domairry, Ganji

    2010-12-01

    In this paper a two-dimensional numerical simulation of a steady incompressible and turbulent model has been carried out to study the effects of vortex generators in a compact heat exchanger in a curvilinear coordinate system. The mesh which is applied in this study is boundary fitted and has been smoothed by a Laplace operator. Experimental data of a former study has been applied to validate the numerical results. The effects of geometrical variation are studied by adjusting vortex generators' inclination and relative cross location. The major issue of this study is the optimal trade-off by selecting an optimal geometric, considering the opposite influences of geometrical variation on Nusselt number and pressure drop.

  6. Extraordinary magnetoresistance in two and three dimensions: Geometrical optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugsley, Lisa M.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.; Solin, S. A.

    2013-02-01

    The extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) in metal-semiconductor hybrid structures was first demonstrated using a van der Pauw configuration for a circular semiconductor wafer with a concentric metallic inclusion in it. This effect depends on the orbital motion of carriers in an external magnetic field, and the remarkably high magnetoresistance response observed suggests that the geometry of the metallic inclusion can be optimized to further significantly enhance the EMR. Here, we consider the theory and simulations to achieve this goal by comparing both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures in an external magnetic field to evaluate the EMR in them. New results for 3D structures are presented to show the feasibility of such modeling. Examples of structures that are compatible with present day technological capabilities are given together with their expected responses in terms of EMR. For a 10 μm 2D square structure with a square metallic inclusion, we find an MR up to 107 percent for an applied magnetic field of 1 T. In 3D, for a 10 μm cube with a 5 μm centered metallic inclusion, we obtain an MR of ˜104 percent, which is comparable with the 2D structure of equivalent dimensions. The results presented here for specific geometries are scalable to smaller dimensions down to the onset of ballistic effects in the transport. The present calculations open up the possibility of 3D magnetic field sensors capable of determining the magnitude and also direction of the magnetic field once a full characterization of the sensor response is performed.

  7. A Wafer-Bonded, Floating Element Shear-Stress Sensor Using a Geometric Moire Optical Transduction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Stephen; Chen, Tai-An; Chandrasekaran, Venkataraman; Tedjojuwono, Ken; Cattafesta, Louis; Nishida, Toshikazu; Sheplak, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a geometric Moir optical-based floating-element shear stress sensor for wind tunnel turbulence measurements. The sensor was fabricated using an aligned wafer-bond/thin-back process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer. Measured results indicate a static sensitivity of 0.26 microns/Pa, a resonant frequency of 1.7 kHz, and a noise floor of 6.2 mPa/(square root)Hz.

  8. Geometric versus numerical optimal control of a dissipative spin-(1/2) particle

    SciTech Connect

    Lapert, M.; Sugny, D.; Zhang, Y.; Braun, M.; Glaser, S. J.

    2010-12-15

    We analyze the saturation of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal using optimal magnetic fields. We consider both the problems of minimizing the duration of the control and its energy for a fixed duration. We solve the optimal control problems by using geometric methods and a purely numerical approach, the grape algorithm, the two methods being based on the application of the Pontryagin maximum principle. A very good agreement is obtained between the two results. The optimal solutions for the energy-minimization problem are finally implemented experimentally with available NMR techniques.

  9. Optimization of the Geometric Phase Sensitivity of an Array of Atom Ring Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Sanchez, Karina; Campo, Christian; Rivera, Tabitha; Toland, John

    2015-05-01

    Sagnac, and Aharonov-Bohm phase shifts are important geometric phase shifts in atom interferometry. These phase shifts characterize rotational and magnetic field interference effects respectively. Theoretical explorations have shown that a series of ring interferometers can be connected in series to increase the sensitivity of the overall device while keeping the maximum path separation less than the coherence length of the atoms. It has also been shown that the application of an area chirp to the rings will further enhance the sensitivity of the array of rings to geometric phase shifts. Area chirp refers to characterizing all of the rings in the array to a fixed percentage of a reference ring, this allows for the phase shifts in each ring to be characterized by one ring. The goal of this project is to determine a set of parameters namely kL, the product of the ring circumference and the wave number and γ, the chirp factor for the area chirp, that optimize the geometric phase sensitivity for an array of N rings. We model the transmission coefficient of a quantum matter wave through an area chirped array of interferometers as a function of phase, using transfer matrices to represent the transmission and reflection of individual rings in the array. Isolated transmission resonances represent the domain of interest, these are regions of high phase sensitivity. After optimizing a ring array without loss we apply velocity broadening to the input matter waves to investigate a more realistic output.

  10. Automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal trees by global optimization with geometric priors.

    PubMed

    Türetken, Engin; González, Germán; Blum, Christian; Fua, Pascal

    2011-09-01

    We present a novel probabilistic approach to fully automated delineation of tree structures in noisy 2D images and 3D image stacks. Unlike earlier methods that rely mostly on local evidence, ours builds a set of candidate trees over many different subsets of points likely to belong to the optimal tree and then chooses the best one according to a global objective function that combines image evidence with geometric priors. Since the best tree does not necessarily span all the points, the algorithm is able to eliminate false detections while retaining the correct tree topology. Manually annotated brightfield micrographs, retinal scans and the DIADEM challenge datasets are used to evaluate the performance of our method. We used the DIADEM metric to quantitatively evaluate the topological accuracy of the reconstructions and showed that the use of the geometric regularization yields a substantial improvement. PMID:21573886

  11. Geometrical Deviation and Residual Strain in Novel Silicon-on-Aluminium-Nitride Bonded Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chuan-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Wu, Yan-Jun; An, Zheng-Hua; Xie, Xin-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Lu

    2002-11-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN), with much higher thermal conductivity, is considered to be an excellent alternative to the SiO2 layer in traditional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials. The silicon-on-aluminium-nitride (SOAN) structure was fabricated by the smart-cut process to alleviate the self-heating effects for traditional SOI. The convergent beam Kikuchi line diffraction pattern results show that some rotational misalignment exists when two wafers are bonded, which is about 3°. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction result indicates that, before annealing at high temperature, the residual lattice strain in the top silicon layer is tensile. After annealing at 1100°C for an hour, the strain in the top Si decreases greatly and reverses from tensile to slightly compressive as a result of viscous flow of AlN.

  12. Implementation and Optimization of miniGMG - a Compact Geometric Multigrid Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Kalamkar, Dhiraj; Singh, Amik; Deshpande, Anand M.; Straalen, Brian Van; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Almgren, Ann; Dubey, Pradeep; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    Multigrid methods are widely used to accelerate the convergence of iterative solvers for linear systems used in a number of different application areas. In this report, we describe miniGMG, our compact geometric multigrid benchmark designed to proxy the multigrid solves found in AMR applications. We explore optimization techniques for geometric multigrid on existing and emerging multicore systems including the Opteron-based Cray XE6, Intel Sandy Bridge and Nehalem-based Infiniband clusters, as well as manycore-based architectures including NVIDIA's Fermi and Kepler GPUs and Intel's Knights Corner (KNC) co-processor. This report examines a variety of novel techniques including communication-aggregation, threaded wavefront-based DRAM communication-avoiding, dynamic threading decisions, SIMDization, and fusion of operators. We quantify performance through each phase of the V-cycle for both single-node and distributed-memory experiments and provide detailed analysis for each class of optimization. Results show our optimizations yield significant speedups across a variety of subdomain sizes while simultaneously demonstrating the potential of multi- and manycore processors to dramatically accelerate single-node performance. However, our analysis also indicates that improvements in networks and communication will be essential to reap the potential of manycore processors in large-scale multigrid calculations.

  13. Light scattering measurements for quantifying biological cell concentration: an optimization of opto-geometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Giannelli, L.

    2011-05-01

    An experimental study was carried out, aimed at optimizing the optical/geometrical configuration for measuring the concentration of biological cells by means of static light scattering measurements. A LED-based optoelectronic setup making use of optical fibers was experimented, as the precursor of a low-cost device to be integrated in instrumentation for cytometry. Two biological sample types were considered as test samples of the most popular analyses - cervical cells and urine, respectively. The most suitable wavelengths and detecting angles were identified, and calibration curves were calculated.

  14. Light scattering measurements for quantifying biological cell concentration: an optimization of opto-geometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Giannelli, L.; Mencaglia, A. A.

    2012-03-01

    An experimental study was carried out, aimed at optimizing the optical/geometrical configuration for measuring the concentration of biological cells by means of static light scattering measurements. A LED-based optoelectronic setup making use of optical fibers was experimented, as the precursor of a low-cost device to be integrated in instrumentation for cytometry. Two biological sample types were considered as test samples of the most popular analyses - cervical cells and urine, respectively. The most suitable wavelengths and detecting angles were identified, and calibration curves were calculated.

  15. Geometrical optimization of sensors for eddy currents nondestructive testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thollon, F.; Burais, N.

    1995-05-01

    Design of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) and Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) sensors is possible by solving Maxwell`s relations with FEM or BIM. But the large number of geometrical and electrical parameters of sensor and tested material implies many results that don`t give necessarily a well adapted sensor. The authors have used a genetic algorithm for automatic optimization. After having tested this algorithm with analytical solution of Maxwell`s relations for cladding thickness measurement, the method has been implemented in finite element package.

  16. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkla, Anna M. Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  17. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  18. Geometric parameter analysis to predetermine optimal radiosurgery technique for the treatment of arteriovenous malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, Ante . E-mail: amestrovic@bccancer.bc.ca; Clark, Brenda G.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of predicting the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques for treatment of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) based on internal geometric parameters. Methods and Materials: For each of 18 previously treated AVM patients, four treatment plans were created: circular collimator arcs, dynamic conformal arcs, fixed conformal fields, and intensity-modulated radiosurgery. An algorithm was developed to characterize the target and critical structure shape complexity and the position of the critical structures with respect to the target. Multiple regression was employed to establish the correlation between the internal geometric parameters and the dose distribution for different treatment techniques. The results from the model were applied to predict the dosimetric outcomes of different radiosurgery techniques and select the optimal radiosurgery technique for a number of AVM patients. Results: Several internal geometric parameters showing statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) with the treatment planning results for each technique were identified. The target volume and the average minimum distance between the target and the critical structures were the most effective predictors for normal tissue dose distribution. The structure overlap volume with the target and the mean distance between the target and the critical structure were the most effective predictors for critical structure dose distribution. The predicted values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques were in close agreement with the original data. Conclusions: A statistical model has been described that successfully predicts the values of dose distribution parameters of different radiosurgery techniques and may be used to predetermine the optimal technique on a patient-to-patient basis.

  19. Macronutrient Optimization and Seasonal Diet Mixing in a Large Omnivore, the Grizzly Bear: A Geometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Sean C. P.; Raubenheimer, David; Stenhouse, Gordon B.; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient balance is a strong determinant of animal fitness and demography. It is therefore important to understand how the compositions of available foods relate to required balance of nutrients and habitat suitability for animals in the wild. These relationships are, however, complex, particularly for omnivores that often need to compose balanced diets by combining their intake from diverse nutritionally complementary foods. Here we apply geometric models to understand how the nutritional compositions of foods available to an omnivorous member of the order Carnivora, the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos L.), relate to optimal macronutrient intake, and assess the seasonal nutritional constraints on the study population in west-central Alberta, Canada. The models examined the proportion of macronutrients that bears could consume by mixing their diet from food available in each season, and assessed the extent to which bears could consume the ratio of protein to non-protein energy previously demonstrated using captive bears to optimize mass gain. We found that non-selective feeding on ungulate carcasses provided a non-optimal macronutrient balance with surplus protein relative to fat and carbohydrate, reflecting adaptation to an omnivorous lifestyle, and that optimization through feeding selectively on different tissues of ungulate carcasses is unlikely. Bears were, however, able to dilute protein intake to an optimal ratio by mixing their otherwise high-protein diet with carbohydrate-rich fruit. Some individual food items were close to optimally balanced in protein to non-protein energy (e.g. Hedysarum alpinum roots), which may help explain their dietary prevalence. Ants may be consumed particularly as a source of lipids. Overall, our analysis showed that most food available to bears in the study area were high in protein relative to lipid or carbohydrate, suggesting the lack of non-protein energy limits the fitness (e.g. body size and reproduction) and population density

  20. Macronutrient optimization and seasonal diet mixing in a large omnivore, the grizzly bear: a geometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Sean C P; Raubenheimer, David; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Nielsen, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient balance is a strong determinant of animal fitness and demography. It is therefore important to understand how the compositions of available foods relate to required balance of nutrients and habitat suitability for animals in the wild. These relationships are, however, complex, particularly for omnivores that often need to compose balanced diets by combining their intake from diverse nutritionally complementary foods. Here we apply geometric models to understand how the nutritional compositions of foods available to an omnivorous member of the order Carnivora, the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos L.), relate to optimal macronutrient intake, and assess the seasonal nutritional constraints on the study population in west-central Alberta, Canada. The models examined the proportion of macronutrients that bears could consume by mixing their diet from food available in each season, and assessed the extent to which bears could consume the ratio of protein to non-protein energy previously demonstrated using captive bears to optimize mass gain. We found that non-selective feeding on ungulate carcasses provided a non-optimal macronutrient balance with surplus protein relative to fat and carbohydrate, reflecting adaptation to an omnivorous lifestyle, and that optimization through feeding selectively on different tissues of ungulate carcasses is unlikely. Bears were, however, able to dilute protein intake to an optimal ratio by mixing their otherwise high-protein diet with carbohydrate-rich fruit. Some individual food items were close to optimally balanced in protein to non-protein energy (e.g. Hedysarum alpinum roots), which may help explain their dietary prevalence. Ants may be consumed particularly as a source of lipids. Overall, our analysis showed that most food available to bears in the study area were high in protein relative to lipid or carbohydrate, suggesting the lack of non-protein energy limits the fitness (e.g. body size and reproduction) and population density

  1. Macronutrient optimization and seasonal diet mixing in a large omnivore, the grizzly bear: a geometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Sean C P; Raubenheimer, David; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Nielsen, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient balance is a strong determinant of animal fitness and demography. It is therefore important to understand how the compositions of available foods relate to required balance of nutrients and habitat suitability for animals in the wild. These relationships are, however, complex, particularly for omnivores that often need to compose balanced diets by combining their intake from diverse nutritionally complementary foods. Here we apply geometric models to understand how the nutritional compositions of foods available to an omnivorous member of the order Carnivora, the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos L.), relate to optimal macronutrient intake, and assess the seasonal nutritional constraints on the study population in west-central Alberta, Canada. The models examined the proportion of macronutrients that bears could consume by mixing their diet from food available in each season, and assessed the extent to which bears could consume the ratio of protein to non-protein energy previously demonstrated using captive bears to optimize mass gain. We found that non-selective feeding on ungulate carcasses provided a non-optimal macronutrient balance with surplus protein relative to fat and carbohydrate, reflecting adaptation to an omnivorous lifestyle, and that optimization through feeding selectively on different tissues of ungulate carcasses is unlikely. Bears were, however, able to dilute protein intake to an optimal ratio by mixing their otherwise high-protein diet with carbohydrate-rich fruit. Some individual food items were close to optimally balanced in protein to non-protein energy (e.g. Hedysarum alpinum roots), which may help explain their dietary prevalence. Ants may be consumed particularly as a source of lipids. Overall, our analysis showed that most food available to bears in the study area were high in protein relative to lipid or carbohydrate, suggesting the lack of non-protein energy limits the fitness (e.g. body size and reproduction) and population density

  2. Joining of Silicon Carbide: Diffusion Bond Optimization and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Joining and integration methods are critically needed as enabling technologies for the full utilization of advanced ceramic components in aerospace and aeronautics applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. In the application, several SiC substrates with different hole patterns to form fuel and combustion air channels are bonded to form the injector. Diffusion bonding is a joining approach that offers uniform bonds with high temperature capability, chemical stability, and high strength. Diffusion bonding was investigated with the aid of titanium foils and coatings as the interlayer between SiC substrates to aid bonding. The influence of such variables as interlayer type, interlayer thickness, substrate finish, and processing time were investigated. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  3. Towards the geometric optimization of potential field models - A new spatial operator tool and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Claudia; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    We present a new method for automated geometric modifications of potential field models. Computational developments and the increasing amount of available potential field data, especially gradient data from the satellite missions, lead to increasingly complex models and integrated modelling tools. Editing of these models becomes more difficult. Our approach presents an optimization tool that is designed to modify vertex-based model geometries (e.g. polygons, polyhedrons, triangulated surfaces) by applying spatial operators to the model that use an adaptive, on-the-fly model discretization. These operators deform the existing model via vertex-dragging, aiming at a minimized misfit between measured and modelled potential field anomaly. The parameters that define the operators are subject to an optimization process. This kind of parametrization provides a means for the reduction of unknowns (dimensionality of the search space), allows a variety of possible modifications and ensures that geometries are not destroyed by crossing polygon lines or punctured planes. We implemented a particle swarm optimization as a global searcher with restart option for the task of finding optimal operator parameters. This approach provides us with an ensemble of model solutions that allows a selection and geologically reasonable interpretations. The applicability of the tool is demonstrated in two 2D case studies that provide models of different extent and with different objectives. The first model is a synthetic salt structure in a horizontally layered background model. Expected geometry modifications are considerably small and localized and the initial models contain rather little information on the intended salt structure. A large scale example is given in the second study. Here, the optimization is applied to a sedimentary basin model that is based on seismic interpretation. With the aim to evaluate the seismically derived model, large scale operators are applied that mainly cause

  4. The impact of geometric non-linearities on the fatigue analysis of trailing edge bond lines in wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever Castelos, Pablo; Balzani, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    The accurate prediction of stress histories for the fatigue analysis is of utmost importance for the design process of wind turbine rotor blades. As detailed, transient, and geometrically non-linear three-dimensional finite element analyses are computationally weigh too expensive, it is commonly regarded sufficient to calculate the stresses with a geometrically linear analysis and superimpose different stress states in order to obtain the complete stress histories. In order to quantify the error from geometrically linear simulations for the calculation of stress histories and to verify the practical applicability of the superposition principal in fatigue analyses, this paper studies the influence of geometric non-linearity in the example of a trailing edge bond line, as this subcomponent suffers from high strains in span-wise direction. The blade under consideration is that of the IWES IWT-7.5-164 reference wind turbine. From turbine simulations the highest edgewise loading scenario from the fatigue load cases is used as the reference. A 3D finite element model of the blade is created and the bond line fatigue assessment is performed according to the GL certification guidelines in its 2010 edition, and in comparison to the latest DNV GL standard from end of 2015. The results show a significant difference between the geometrically linear and non-linear stress analyses when the bending moments are approximated via a corresponding external loading, especially in case of the 2010 GL certification guidelines. This finding emphasizes the demand to reconsider the application of the superposition principal in fatigue analyses of modern flexible rotor blades, where geometrical nonlinearities become significant. In addition, a new load application methodology is introduced that reduces the geometrically non-linear behaviour of the blade in the finite element analysis.

  5. Stereoelectronic requirements for optimal hydrogen-bond-catalyzed enolization.

    PubMed

    Pápai, Imre; Hamza, Andrea; Pihko, Petri M; Wierenga, Rik K

    2011-03-01

    Protein crystallographic analysis of the active sites of enolizing enzymes and structural analysis of hydrogen-bonded carbonyl compounds in small molecule crystal structures, complemented by quantum chemical calculations on related model enolization reactions, suggest a new stereoelectronic model that accounts for the observed out-of-plane orientation of hydrogen-bond donors (HBDs) in the oxyanion holes of enolizing enzymes. The computational results reveal that the lone-pair directionality of HBDs characteristic for hydrogen-bonded carbonyls is reduced upon enolization, and the enolate displays almost no directional preference for hydrogen bonding. Positioning the HBDs perpendicular to the carbonyl plane induces strain in the catalyst-substrate complex, which is released upon enolization, resulting in more favorable kinetics and thermodynamics than the in-plane arrangement of HBDs. PMID:21308811

  6. A geometrical optimization of a magneto-rheological rotary brake in a prosthetic knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, K. H.; Jonsdottir, F.; Thorsteinsson, F.

    2010-03-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been successfully introduced to prosthetic devices. One such device is a biomechanical prosthetic knee that uses MR fluids to actively control its rotary stiffness. The brake is rotational, utilizing the MR fluid in shear mode. In this study, the geometrical design of the MR brake is addressed. This includes the design of the magnetic circuit and the geometry of the fluid chamber. Mathematical models are presented that describe the rotary torque of the brake. A novel perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based MR fluid is introduced, whose properties are tailored for the prosthetic knee. On-state and off-state rheological measurements of the MR fluid are presented. The finite element method is used to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the MR fluid. The design is formulated as an optimization problem, aiming to maximize the braking torque. A parametric study is carried out for several design parameters. Subsequently, a multi-objective optimization problem is defined that considers three design objectives: the field-induced braking torque, the off-state rotary stiffness and the weight of the brake. Trade-offs between the three design objectives are investigated which provides a basis for informed design decisions on furthering the success of the MR prosthetic knee.

  7. Whole cell tracking through the optimal control of geometric evolution laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazakis, Konstantinos N.; Madzvamuse, Anotida; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Styles, Vanessa; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2015-09-01

    Cell tracking algorithms which automate and systematise the analysis of time lapse image data sets of cells are an indispensable tool in the modelling and understanding of cellular phenomena. In this study we present a theoretical framework and an algorithm for whole cell tracking. Within this work we consider that "tracking" is equivalent to a dynamic reconstruction of the whole cell data (morphologies) from static image data sets. The novelty of our work is that the tracking algorithm is driven by a model for the motion of the cell. This model may be regarded as a simplification of a recently developed physically meaningful model for cell motility. The resulting problem is the optimal control of a geometric evolution law and we discuss the formulation and numerical approximation of the optimal control problem. The overall goal of this work is to design a framework for cell tracking within which the recovered data reflects the physics of the forward model. A number of numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the applicability of our approach.

  8. Geometrical criteria versus quantum chemical criteria for assessment of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction: A computational comparison into the effect of chlorine substitution on IMHB of salicylic acid in its lowest energy ground state conformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Density functional theory based computational study has been performed to characterize intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IMHB) interaction in a series of salicylic acid derivatives varying in chlorine substitution on the benzene ring. The molecular systems studied are salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid and 3,5,6-tricholorosalicylic acid. Major emphasis is rendered on the analysis of IMHB interaction by calculation of electron density ρ(r) and Laplacian ∇2ρ(r) at the bond critical point using atoms-in-molecule theory. Topological features, energy densities based on ρ(r) through perturbing the intramolecular H-bond distances suggest that at equilibrium geometry the IMHB interaction develops certain characteristics typical of covalent interaction. The interplay between aromaticity and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) is discussed using both geometrical and magnetic criteria as the descriptors of aromaticity. The optimized geometry features, molecular electrostatic potential map analysis are also found to produce a consensus view in relation with the formation of RAHB in these systems.

  9. Geometric optimization of self-healing power capacitor with consideration of multiple factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zijian; Yan, Fei; Hua, Zheng; Qi, Lingna; Hou, Zhijian; Xu, Zhiniu

    2016-08-01

    To decrease temperature rise in self-healing power capacitor and lay foundation for improvement of applied voltage and lifetime, the influence of elements orientation on the temperature distribution of self-healing capacitor is investigated using Fluent15.0 and validated by thermal stability test. Based on the above investigations, the influences of parameters of film, electrode and element on power loss and temperature rise of capacitor are systematically investigated. The results reveal that if geometry and volume of capacitor remain constant, orientation of spray coating has little influence on temperature rise. In view of manufacturing processes, the mode of spray coating close to the large surface should be selected. The power loss will decrease with increasing/decreasing in film thickness/width. Therefore, thicker film should be selected and its width should be less than 75 mm. Temperature rise decreases slowly with element diameter. However, the element diameter should be a moderate value because of the influence of it on the number of self-healing point. A capacitor group with rated voltage of 11/ √{ 3} kV and capacity of 334 kvar is designed and the scheme with the lowest temperature rise is selected. This study provides a reference to self-healing capacitor geometric optimization and lifetime improvement.

  10. Performance improvement for optimization of the non-linear geometric fitting problem in manufacturing metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Giovanni; Syam, Wahyudin P.; Petrò, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    Product quality is a main concern today in manufacturing; it drives competition between companies. To ensure high quality, a dimensional inspection to verify the geometric properties of a product must be carried out. High-speed non-contact scanners help with this task, by both speeding up acquisition speed and increasing accuracy through a more complete description of the surface. The algorithms for the management of the measurement data play a critical role in ensuring both the measurement accuracy and speed of the device. One of the most fundamental parts of the algorithm is the procedure for fitting the substitute geometry to a cloud of points. This article addresses this challenge. Three relevant geometries are selected as case studies: a non-linear least-squares fitting of a circle, sphere and cylinder. These geometries are chosen in consideration of their common use in practice; for example the sphere is often adopted as a reference artifact for performance verification of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and a cylinder is the most relevant geometry for a pin-hole relation as an assembly feature to construct a complete functioning product. In this article, an improvement of the initial point guess for the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm by employing a chaos optimization (CO) method is proposed. This causes a performance improvement in the optimization of a non-linear function fitting the three geometries. The results show that, with this combination, a higher quality of fitting results a smaller norm of the residuals can be obtained while preserving the computational cost. Fitting an ‘incomplete-point-cloud’, which is a situation where the point cloud does not cover a complete feature e.g. from half of the total part surface, is also investigated. Finally, a case study of fitting a hemisphere is presented.

  11. Optimization of laser-assisted glass frit bonding process by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Xiao, Yanyi; Wu, Xingyang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a systematic study on laser-assisted glass frit bonding process was carried out by response surface methodology (RSM). Laser power, sealing speed and spot diameter were considered as key bonding parameters. Combined with a central rotatable experimental design, RSM was employed to establish mathematical model to predict the relationship between the shear force after bonding and the bonding process parameters. The model was validated experimentally. Based on the model, the interaction effects of the process parameters on the shear force were analyzed and the optimum bonding parameters were achieved. The results indicate that the model can be used to illustrate the relationship between the shear force and the bonding parameters. The predicted results obtained under the optimized parameters by the models are consistent with the experimental results.

  12. Parabolic movement primitives and cortical states: merging optimality with geometric invariance.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Felix; Stark, Eran; Drori, Rotem; Abeles, Moshe; Flash, Tamar

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that several types of rules govern the generation of complex arm movements. One class of rules consists of optimizing an objective function (e.g., maximizing motion smoothness). Another class consists of geometric and kinematic constraints, for instance the coupling between speed and curvature during drawing movements as expressed by the two-thirds power law. It has also been suggested that complex movements are composed of simpler elements or primitives. However, the ability to unify the different rules has remained an open problem. We address this issue by identifying movement paths whose generation according to the two-thirds power law yields maximally smooth trajectories. Using equi-affine differential geometry we derive a mathematical condition which these paths must obey. Among all possible solutions only parabolic paths minimize hand jerk, obey the two-thirds power law and are invariant under equi-affine transformations (which preserve the fit to the two-thirds power law). Affine transformations can be used to generate any parabolic stroke from an arbitrary parabolic template, and a few parabolic strokes may be concatenated to compactly form a complex path. To test the possibility that parabolic elements are used to generate planar movements, we analyze monkeys' scribbling trajectories. Practiced scribbles are well approximated by long parabolic strokes. Of the motor cortical neurons recorded during scribbling more were related to equi-affine than to Euclidean speed. Unsupervised segmentation of simulta- neously recorded multiple neuron activity yields states related to distinct parabolic elements. We thus suggest that the cortical representation of movements is state-dependent and that parabolic elements are building blocks used by the motor system to generate complex movements.

  13. Optimization approach for the evaluation of geometric errors in computer-aided inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guohua

    Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) is a set of standards that defines a clear and concise mathematical language for communicating product definition. A design based on GD&T clearly reflects the functional requirements of a product, provides unique definition of a drawing among design, manufacturing and inspection engineers and conveys the design intention clearly without any ambiguity. The latest version of this standard is ASME Y14.5M-1994. Traditional methods for the inspection of geometric tolerances have been mostly with the use of functional gages and Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM). Function gages are very expensive and only provide a yes/no result. CMMs have embedded algorithms to verify geometric tolerances according to the design specification. However, it has been shown that these embedded algorithms neither provide accurate evaluation of geometric errors nor do they conform to the ASME standards. High accuracy requirements in the manufacture of precision parts with complex geometries have made accurate evaluation and verification of geometric tolerances very critical. Over the years, researchers have developed many algorithms to evaluate some of the geometric errors. However, there is still a significant lack of evaluation procedures for complex geometric errors. In this dissertation, mathematical models have been built for the evaluation of a certain set of complex geometric characteristics. The concentration has been on the evaluation of 3D feature relating positional error, cylindricity error and straightness error of spatial line. Research has been carried out to understand the mathematical natures of these problems. Based on the research results, efficient solution methodologies have been developed according to the ASME standards. A robust and efficient procedure has also been developed for the identification of candidate datum sets. The proposed procedures have been implemented using the C++ or C programming language. Experimental

  14. Optimization of Stability Constrained Geometrically Nonlinear Shallow Trusses Using an Arc Length Sparse Method with a Strain Energy Density Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for the optimization of stability constrained geometrically nonlinear shallow trusses with snap through behavior is demonstrated using the arc length method and a strain energy density approach within a discrete finite element formulation. The optimization method uses an iterative scheme that evaluates the design variables' performance and then updates them according to a recursive formula controlled by the arc length method. A minimum weight design is achieved when a uniform nonlinear strain energy density is found in all members. This minimal condition places the design load just below the critical limit load causing snap through of the structure. The optimization scheme is programmed into a nonlinear finite element algorithm to find the large strain energy at critical limit loads. Examples of highly nonlinear trusses found in literature are presented to verify the method.

  15. Optimal point of insertion of the needle in neuraxial blockade using a midline approach: study in a geometrical model

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Mark; van Gerwen, Dennis J; van den Dobbelsteen, John J; Hagenaars, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Performance of neuraxial blockade using a midline approach can be technically difficult. It is therefore important to optimize factors that are under the influence of the clinician performing the procedure. One of these factors might be the chosen point of insertion of the needle. Surprisingly few data exist on where between the tips of two adjacent spinous processes the needle should be introduced. A geometrical model was adopted to gain more insight into this issue. Spinous processes were represented by parallelograms. The length, the steepness relative to the skin, and the distance between the parallelograms were varied. The influence of the chosen point of insertion of the needle on the range of angles at which the epidural and subarachnoid space could be reached was studied. The optimal point of insertion was defined as the point where this range is the widest. The geometrical model clearly demonstrated, that the range of angles at which the epidural or subarachnoid space can be reached, is dependent on the point of insertion between the tips of the adjacent spinous processes. The steeper the spinous processes run, the more cranial the point of insertion should be. Assuming that the model is representative for patients, the performance of neuraxial blockade using a midline approach might be improved by choosing the optimal point of insertion. PMID:27570462

  16. Optimizing wind farm layout via LES-calibrated geometric models inclusive of wind direction and atmospheric stability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina; Ghaisas, Niranjan

    2015-04-01

    The energy generation at a wind farm is controlled primarily by the average wind speed at hub height. However, two other factors impact wind farm performance: 1) the layout of the wind turbines, in terms of spacing between turbines along and across the prevailing wind direction; staggering or aligning consecutive rows; angles between rows, columns, and prevailing wind direction); and 2) atmospheric stability, which is a measure of whether vertical motion is enhanced (unstable), suppressed (stable), or neither (neutral). Studying both factors and their complex interplay with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is a valid approach because it produces high-resolution, 3D, turbulent fields, such as wind velocity, temperature, and momentum and heat fluxes, and it properly accounts for the interactions between wind turbine blades and the surrounding atmospheric and near-surface properties. However, LES are computationally expensive and simulating all the possible combinations of wind directions, atmospheric stabilities, and turbine layouts to identify the optimal wind farm configuration is practically unfeasible today. A new, geometry-based method is proposed that is computationally inexpensive and that combines simple geometric quantities with a minimal number of LES simulations to identify the optimal wind turbine layout, taking into account not only the actual frequency distribution of wind directions (i.e., wind rose) at the site of interest, but also atmospheric stability. The geometry-based method is calibrated with LES of the Lillgrund wind farm conducted with the Software for Offshore/onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), based on the open-access OpenFOAM libraries. The geometric quantities that offer the best correlations (>0.93) with the LES results are the blockage ratio, defined as the fraction of the swept area of a wind turbine that is blocked by an upstream turbine, and the blockage distance, the weighted distance from a given turbine to all upstream turbines

  17. The packing of soft materials: Molecular asymmetry, geometric frustration and optimal lattices in block copolymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    Melts of block copolymers provide an ideal route to engineering well-controlled structures on nanometer length scales. Through the control of only a few thermodynamic parameters, these systems can be tuned to self-assemble into periodic structures of an astounding variety. It is known that geometry plays a particularly important role in determining equilibrium structure since phase behavior of copolymer melts is generically insensitive to detail at the monomeric scale. Here, we explore a particular way in which the geometry of packing objects in three dimensions frustrates the internal configurations of segregated block copolymer domains. In particular, we find that lattices of spherical micelles are sensitive to the periodic structure of the lattice arrangement because these micelles are forced to occupy the non-ideal, polyhedral unit cells of the lattice. By analyzing the energetics of block copolymer melts in the limit of strongly-segregated domains, we find that the interfaces which separate unlike polymer domains tend to adopt the polyhedral shape of the lattice unit cell, and this tendency is entirely controlled by the specific copolymer architecture. Furthermore, in the limit where interfaces are perfectly polyhedral, a remarkable simplicity emerges, and the relative stability of competing lattice arrangements of micelles can be assessed purely in terms of geometric measures of the two-dimensional lattice unit cell. From this analysis we predict the stability of a novel cubic arrangement spherical micelles in block copolymer melts, the A15 lattice. To corroborate our geometric arguments we develop and implement a numerical self-consistent field theory for melts of highly asymmetric block copolymers. This field theory allows us to systematically and efficiently explore the equilibrium phase behavior of asymmetric copolymer melts as a function of molecular architecture. These numerical results bear out the predictions of our geometric analysis and confirm that

  18. On the validity of the arithmetic-geometric mean method to locate the optimal solution in a supply chain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kun-Jen

    2012-08-01

    Cardenas-Barron [Cardenas-Barron, L.E. (2010) 'A Simple Method to Compute Economic order Quantities: Some Observations', Applied Mathematical Modelling, 34, 1684-1688] indicates that there are several functions in which the arithmetic-geometric mean method (AGM) does not give the minimum. This article presents another situation to reveal that the AGM inequality to locate the optimal solution may be invalid for Teng, Chen, and Goyal [Teng, J.T., Chen, J., and Goyal S.K. (2009), 'A Comprehensive Note on: An Inventory Model under Two Levels of Trade Credit and Limited Storage Space Derived without Derivatives', Applied Mathematical Modelling, 33, 4388-4396], Teng and Goyal [Teng, J.T., and Goyal S.K. (2009), 'Comment on 'Optimal Inventory Replenishment Policy for the EPQ Model under Trade Credit Derived without Derivatives', International Journal of Systems Science, 40, 1095-1098] and Hsieh, Chang, Weng, and Dye [Hsieh, T.P., Chang, H.J., Weng, M.W., and Dye, C.Y. (2008), 'A Simple Approach to an Integrated Single-vendor Single-buyer Inventory System with Shortage', Production Planning and Control, 19, 601-604]. So, the main purpose of this article is to adopt the calculus approach not only to overcome shortcomings of the arithmetic-geometric mean method of Teng et al. (2009), Teng and Goyal (2009) and Hsieh et al. (2008), but also to develop the complete solution procedures for them.

  19. Optimization of spin injection and spin detection in lateral nanostructures by geometrical means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejskal, Ondřej; Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pištora, Jaromír; Otani, Yoshichika

    2016-09-01

    Lateral spin devices are an important concept in nowadays all-metallic spintronic devices. One of the key problems is to obtain large spin injection and detection efficiency. Several concepts has been envisaged, such as to use half-metallic ferromagnetic electrodes or spin-polarized interface barriers. Within this work, we address the optimization of spin devices (namely optimization of spin current density, spin current and spin accumulation) based on adjustment of the geometry (dimensions) of the lateral device, material selection of spin conductors, jointly with optimization of the interface resistance.

  20. Geometric optimization of a solar cubic-cavity multi-tubular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valades-Pelayo, P. J.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C. A.; Villafan-Vidales, H.; Romero-Paredes, H.

    2016-05-01

    A multi-tubular solar thermochemical cavity reactor is proposed and the tubular array optimized. The optimized reactor design aims at operating under different temperatures and carrying out different kinds of thermochemical reactions. The radiation entering the receptacle comes from a solar concentrating system and the reactor consists of a cubic receptacle made of woven graphite, housing nine 2.54 cm diameter tungsten tubes. A model is developed and implemented considering high-temperature radiative transfer at steady state. The temperature distribution within the cavity surfaces is determined by employing a hybrid Monte Carlo-Finite Volume approach. Optimal tube distributions are explored by using a custom-made stochastic, multi-parameter, optimization algorithm. In this way, multiple global maxima are determined. Patterns among all possible optimal tube distributions within the cavity are obtained for different scenarios, by maximizing average tube temperature. From this study, practical guidelines are obtained for future application in the design of solar cavity reactors and more specifically, on the layout of multi tubular arrays to optimize radiative heat transfer.

  1. Generation of Link Mechanism by Shape-Topology Optimization of Trusses Considering Geometrical Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Makoto; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    A two-stage general optimization approach is presented for generating link mechanisms from a highly connected ground structure. The structure is modeled as a pinjointed truss, which is to be optimized so that a large displacement is generated in the specified direction at the output node. The design variables are the cross-sectional areas of the members and the nodal locations. The equilibrium path of an unstable mechanism is traced by the displacement control method. In the first step, the unnecessary members are removed by solving the optimization problem for minimizing the total structural volume under constraints on the maximum load, the displacement at the specified node, and the stiffnesses at the initial and final states. In the second step, the deviation of the displacement of the output node from the specified direction is minimized. It is shown in the numerical examples that several mechanisms can be naturally found as a result of the two-stage optimization starting from randomly selected initial solutions.

  2. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  3. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  4. Optimizing galvanic pulse plating parameters to improve indium bump to bump bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan J.; Rowen, Adam; Mani, Seethambal S.; Yelton, W. Graham; Arrington, Christian; Gillen, Rusty; Hollowell, Andrew E.; Okerlund, Daniel; Ionescu, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The plating characteristics of a commercially available indium plating solution are examined and optimized to help meet the increasing performance demands of integrated circuits requiring substantial numbers of electrical interconnections over large areas. Current fabrication techniques rely on evaporation of soft metals, such as indium, into lift-off resist profiles. This becomes increasingly difficult to accomplish as pitches decrease and aspect ratios increase. To minimize pixel dimensions and maximize the number of pixels per unit area, lithography and electrochemical deposition (ECD) of indium has been investigated. Pulse ECD offers the capability of improving large area uniformity ideal for large area device hybridization. Electrochemical experimentation into lithographically patterned molds allow for large areas of bumps to be fabricated for low temperature indium to indium bonds. The galvanic pulse profile, in conjunction with the bath configuration, determines the uniformity of the plated array. This pulse is manipulated to produce optimal properties for hybridizing arrays of aligned and bonded indium bumps. The physical properties of the indium bump arrays are examined using a white light interferometer, a SEM and tensile pull testing. This paper provides details from the electroplating processes as well as conclusions leading to optimized plating conditions.

  5. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn S.; Tokumaru, Phillip; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David

    2009-09-29

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  6. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn M.; Tokumaru, Phil; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David T.

    2006-10-17

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  7. Discrete-Time Pricing and Optimal Exercise of American Perpetual Warrants in the Geometric Random Walk Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderbei, Robert J.; P Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I nar, Mustafa C.; Bozkaya, Efe B.

    2013-02-15

    An American option (or, warrant) is the right, but not the obligation, to purchase or sell an underlying equity at any time up to a predetermined expiration date for a predetermined amount. A perpetual American option differs from a plain American option in that it does not expire. In this study, we solve the optimal stopping problem of a perpetual American option (both call and put) in discrete time using linear programming duality. Under the assumption that the underlying stock price follows a discrete time and discrete state Markov process, namely a geometric random walk, we formulate the pricing problem as an infinite dimensional linear programming (LP) problem using the excessive-majorant property of the value function. This formulation allows us to solve complementary slackness conditions in closed-form, revealing an optimal stopping strategy which highlights the set of stock-prices where the option should be exercised. The analysis for the call option reveals that such a critical value exists only in some cases, depending on a combination of state-transition probabilities and the economic discount factor (i.e., the prevailing interest rate) whereas it ceases to be an issue for the put.

  8. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis.

  9. Experimental determination of optimal root-mean-square deviations of macromolecular bond lengths and angles from their restrained ideal values.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian J

    2007-12-01

    A number of inconsistencies are apparent in the recent research paper by Jaskolski et al. [(2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 611-620] concerning their recommendations for the values of the magnitude and resolution-dependence of the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of bond lengths and angles from their restrained ideal values in macromolecular refinement, as well as their suggestions for the use of variable standard uncertainties dependent on atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and occupancies. Whilst many of the comments and suggestions in the paper regarding updates for the ideal geometry values proposed by Engh and Huber are entirely reasonable and supported by the experimental evidence, the recommendations concerning the optimal values of RMSDs appear to be in conflict with previous experimental and theoretical work in this area [Tickle et al. (1998), Acta Cryst. D54, 243-252] and indeed appear to be based on a misunderstanding of the distinction between RMSD and standard uncertainty (SU). In contrast, it is proposed here that the optimal values of all desired weighting parameters, in particular the weighting parameters for the ADP differences and for the diffraction terms, be estimated by the purely objective procedure of maximizing the experiment-based log(free likelihood). In principle, this allows all weighting parameters that are not known accurately a priori to be scaled globally, relative to those that are known accurately, for an optimal refinement. The RMS Z score (RMSZ) is recommended as a more satisfactory statistic than the RMSD to assess the extent to which the geometry deviates from the ideal values and a theoretical rationale for the results obtained is presented in which the optimal RMSZ is identified as the calculated versus true Z-score correlation coefficient, the latter being a monotonic function of the resolution cutoff of the data. Regarding the proposal to use variable standard uncertainties, it is suggested that any departure from the current

  10. Optimal tubular adhesive-bonded lap joint of the carbon fiber epoxy composite shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Kim, Won T.; Lee, Dai G.; Jun, Eui J.

    The effects of the adhesive thickness and the adherend surface roughness on the fatigue strength of a tubular adhesive-bonded single lap joint were investigated using fatigue test specimens whose adherends were made of S45C carbon steel. Results of fatigue tests showed that the optimal arithmetic surface roughness of the adherends is about 2 microns and the optimal adhesive thickness is about 0.15 mm. Using these values, the prototype torsional adhesive joints were manufactured for power transmission shafts of an automotive vehicle or a small helicopter, and static tests under torque were performed on a single-lap joint, a single-lap joint with scarf, a double-lap joint, and a double-lap joint with scarf. It was found that the double-lap joint was superior among the joints, in terms of torque capacity and manufacturing cost.

  11. Estimation of Gravity Parameters Related to Simple Geometrical Structures by Developing an Approach Based on Deconvolution and Linear Optimization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfahani, J.; Tlas, M.

    2015-10-01

    An easy and practical method for interpreting residual gravity anomalies due to simple geometrically shaped models such as cylinders and spheres has been proposed in this paper. This proposed method is based on both the deconvolution technique and the simplex algorithm for linear optimization to most effectively estimate the model parameters, e.g., the depth from the surface to the center of a buried structure (sphere or horizontal cylinder) or the depth from the surface to the top of a buried object (vertical cylinder), and the amplitude coefficient from the residual gravity anomaly profile. The method was tested on synthetic data sets corrupted by different white Gaussian random noise levels to demonstrate the capability and reliability of the method. The results acquired show that the estimated parameter values derived by this proposed method are close to the assumed true parameter values. The validity of this method is also demonstrated using real field residual gravity anomalies from Cuba and Sweden. Comparable and acceptable agreement is shown between the results derived by this method and those derived from real field data.

  12. Investigation of optimized end-bonding magnetoelectric heterostructure for sensitive magnetic field sensor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Wang, Lei; Gao, Jipu; Gui, Junguo; Lin, Chenghui

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports an optimized end-bonding magnetoelectric (ME) heterostructure FeCuNbSiB-PZT-FeCuNbSiB (FPF) for sensitive magnetic field sensor. The heterostructure is made by attaching magnetostrictive Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils at the free ends of piezoelectric Pb(Zr1-x,Tix)O3 (PZT) plates. Due to the structural advantages, the FPF has ∼3.12 times larger resonance voltage coefficient (αME,r) than traditional FeCuNbSiB/PZT laminate. And compared with the Metglas-PZT-Metglas heterostructure, the FPF heterostructure has stronger ME responses for the excellent magnetic characteristics of FeCuNbSiB. In experiments, the FPF heterostructure is optimal designed through adjusting the thickness of PZT plate (tp) and the length of FeCuNbSiB foil (L). The results demonstrate that the maximum αME,r of 662.1 (V/cm Oe) is observed at 13 Oe DC bias magnetic field when L = 15 mm and tp = 0.6 mm. Based on the giant ME coupling, the DC magnetic field sensitivity for the optimized FPF heterostructure is 3.89 nT at resonant frequency. These results are very promising for the cheap room-temperature magnetic field sensing technology.

  13. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%. PMID:27484370

  14. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O; Thompson, Hugh P G; Day, Graeme M

    2016-08-01

    We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%. PMID:27484370

  15. Anatomy-based inverse optimization in high-dose-rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of incidence of acute genitourinary toxicity between anatomy-based inverse optimization and geometric optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Akimoto, Tetsuo . E-mail: takimoto@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Shioya, Mariko; Nakano, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the advantages of anatomy-based inverse optimization (IO) in planning high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 114 patients who received HDR brachytherapy (9 Gy in two fractions) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) were analyzed. The dose distributions of HDR brachytherapy were optimized using geometric optimization (GO) in 70 patients and by anatomy-based IO in the remaining 44 patients. The correlation between the dose-volume histogram parameters, including the urethral dose and the incidence of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, was evaluated. Results: The averaged values of the percentage of volume receiving 80-150% of the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (V{sub 8}-V{sub 15}) of the urethra generated by anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than the corresponding values generated by GO. Similarly, the averaged values of the minimal dose received by 5-50% of the target volume (D{sub 5}-D{sub 5}) obtained using anatomy-based IO were significantly lower than those obtained using GO. Regarding acute toxicity, Grade 2 or worse acute GU toxicity developed in 23% of all patients, but was significantly lower in patients for whom anatomy-based IO (16%) was used than in those for whom GO was used (37%), consistent with the reduced urethral dose (p <0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that anatomy-based IO is superior to GO for dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  16. Chlorophyll a Covalently Bonded to Organo-Modified Translucent Silica Xerogels: Optimizing Fluorescence and Maximum Loading.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, M A; Serratos, I N; Sosa, R; Tapia-Esquivel, T; González-García, F; Rojas-González, F; Tello-Solís, S R; Palacios-Enriquez, A Y; Esparza Schulz, J M; Arrieta, A

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll is a pyrrolic pigment with important optical properties, which is the reason it has been studied for many years. Recently, interest has been rising with respect to this molecule because of its outstanding physicochemical properties, particularly applicable to the design and development of luminescent materials, hybrid sensor systems, and photodynamic therapy devices for the treatment of cancer cells and bacteria. More recently, our research group has been finding evidence for the possibility of preserving these important properties of substrates containing chlorophyll covalently incorporated within solid pore matrices, such as SiO₂, TiO₂ or ZrO₂ synthesized through the sol-gel process. In this work, we study the optical properties of silica xerogels organo-modified on their surface with allyl and phenyl groups and containing different concentrations of chlorophyll bonded to the pore walls, in order to optimize the fluorescence that these macrocyclic species displays in solution. The intention of this investigation was to determine the maximum chlorophyll a concentration at which this molecule can be trapped inside the pores of a given xerogel and to ascertain if this pigment remains trapped as a monomer, a dimer, or aggregate. Allyl and phenyl groups were deposited on the surface of xerogels in view of their important effects on the stability of the molecule, as well as over the fluorescence emission of chlorophyll; however, these organic groups allow the trapping of either chlorophyll a monomers or dimers. The determination of the above parameters allows finding the most adequate systems for subsequent in vitro or in vivo studies. The characterization of the obtained xerogels was performed through spectroscopic absorption, emission and excitation spectra. These hybrid systems can be employed as mimics of natural systems; the entrapment of chlorophyll inside pore matrices indicates that it is possible to exploit some of the most physicochemical

  17. Chlorophyll a Covalently Bonded to Organo-Modified Translucent Silica Xerogels: Optimizing Fluorescence and Maximum Loading.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, M A; Serratos, I N; Sosa, R; Tapia-Esquivel, T; González-García, F; Rojas-González, F; Tello-Solís, S R; Palacios-Enriquez, A Y; Esparza Schulz, J M; Arrieta, A

    2016-07-22

    Chlorophyll is a pyrrolic pigment with important optical properties, which is the reason it has been studied for many years. Recently, interest has been rising with respect to this molecule because of its outstanding physicochemical properties, particularly applicable to the design and development of luminescent materials, hybrid sensor systems, and photodynamic therapy devices for the treatment of cancer cells and bacteria. More recently, our research group has been finding evidence for the possibility of preserving these important properties of substrates containing chlorophyll covalently incorporated within solid pore matrices, such as SiO₂, TiO₂ or ZrO₂ synthesized through the sol-gel process. In this work, we study the optical properties of silica xerogels organo-modified on their surface with allyl and phenyl groups and containing different concentrations of chlorophyll bonded to the pore walls, in order to optimize the fluorescence that these macrocyclic species displays in solution. The intention of this investigation was to determine the maximum chlorophyll a concentration at which this molecule can be trapped inside the pores of a given xerogel and to ascertain if this pigment remains trapped as a monomer, a dimer, or aggregate. Allyl and phenyl groups were deposited on the surface of xerogels in view of their important effects on the stability of the molecule, as well as over the fluorescence emission of chlorophyll; however, these organic groups allow the trapping of either chlorophyll a monomers or dimers. The determination of the above parameters allows finding the most adequate systems for subsequent in vitro or in vivo studies. The characterization of the obtained xerogels was performed through spectroscopic absorption, emission and excitation spectra. These hybrid systems can be employed as mimics of natural systems; the entrapment of chlorophyll inside pore matrices indicates that it is possible to exploit some of the most physicochemical

  18. Evaluation of an alternative technique to optimize direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to temporary crowns

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Francilena Maria Campos Santos; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Tavares, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo; Bramante, Fausto Silva; Fialho, Melissa Nogueira Proença

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare shear bond strength of different direct bonding techniques of orthodontic brackets to acrylic resin surfaces. METHODS: The sample comprised 64 discs of chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) randomly divided into four groups: discs in group 1 were bonded by means of light-cured composite resin (conventional adhesive); discs in group 2 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by conventional direct bonding by means of light-cured composite resin; discs in group 3 were bonded by means of CAAR (alternative adhesive); and discs in group 4 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by direct bonding by means of CAAR. Shear bond strength values were determined after 24 hours by means of a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min, and compared by analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Tukey test. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was measured and compared among groups by means of Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. RESULTS: Groups 3 and 4 had significantly greater shear bond strength values in comparison to groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 yielded similar results. Group 2 showed better results when compared to group 1. In ARI analyses, groups 1 and 2 predominantly exhibited a score equal to 0, whereas groups 3 and 4 predominantly exhibited a score equal to 3. CONCLUSIONS: Direct bonding of brackets to acrylic resin surfaces using CAAR yielded better results than light-cured composite resin. Surface preparation with diamond bur only increased shear bond strength in group 2. PMID:26352846

  19. A simple geometric algorithm to predict optimal starting gantry angles using equiangular-spaced beams for intensity modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Potrebko, Peter S.; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Butler, James B.; El-Gubtan, Adel S.; Nugent, Zoann

    2007-10-15

    A fast, geometric beam angle optimization (BAO) algorithm for clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was implemented on ten localized prostate cancer patients on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0126 protocol. The BAO algorithm computed the beam intersection volume (BIV) within the rectum and bladder using five and seven equiangular-spaced beams as a function of starting gantry angle for comparison to the V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy. A mathematical theory was presented to explain the correlation of BIV with dose and dose-volume metrics. The class solution 'W' pattern in the rectal V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy as a function of starting gantry angle using five equiangular-spaced beams (with two separate minima centered near 20 deg. and 50 deg. ) was reproduced by the 5 BIV within the rectum. A strong correlation was found between the rectal 5 BIV and the rectal V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy as a function of starting gantry angle. The BAO algorithm predicted the location of the two dosimetric minima in rectal V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy (optimal starting gantry angles) to within 5 deg. . It was demonstrated that the BIV geometric variations for seven equiangular-spaced beams were too small to translate into a strong dosimetric effect in the rectal V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy. The relatively flat distribution with starting gantry angle of the bladder V 75 Gy and V 70 Gy was reproduced by the bladder five and seven BIV for each patient. A geometric BAO method based on BIV has the advantage over dosimetric BAO methods of simplicity and rapid computation time. This algorithm can be used as a standalone optimization method or act as a rapid calculation filter to reduce the search space for a dosimetric BAO method. Given the clinically infeasible computation times of many dosimetric beam orientation optimization algorithms, this robust geometric BIV algorithm has the potential to facilitate beam angle selection for prostate IMRT in clinical practice.

  20. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-01

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg-1 by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high

  1. Ultrashort pulsed laser conditioning of human enamel: in vitro study of the influence of geometrical processing parameters on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, M C; Portillo, M; Moreno, P; Montero, J; García, A; Santos-del Riego, S E; Albaladejo, A

    2015-02-01

    The surfaces of 63 extracted premolar teeth were processed with intense ultrashort laser pulses (λ = 795 nm; pulse duration, 120 fs; repetition rate, 1 kHz) to produce cross patterns with different pitches (s) in the micrometer range in order to evaluate the influence of such microstructures on the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets to enamel. The samples were classified in nine groups corresponding to the control group (raw samples) and eight different laser-processed groups (cross patterns with s increasing from 15 to 180 μm). Brackets were luted with Transbond(TM) XT adhesive resin to all the samples; after 72 h, they all were submitted to strength test in a universal testing machine. Additionally, a third of the samples underwent morphological analysis of the debonded surface by means of scanning electron microscope microscopy and an analysis of the failure mode based on the adhesive remnant index. The results showed that enamel microstructuring with ultrashort laser pulses remarkably increase the bond strength of brackets. Dense cross patterns (s < 90 μm) produce the highest increase of bond strengths as compared to control group whereas light ones (s > 90 μm) give rise to smaller improvements of the bond strength. A strong correlation of this behavior with the predominant failure mode in both scenarios was found. So far, the best compromise between suitable adhesive efficiency, processing time minimization, and enamel surface preservation suggests the performance of cross patterns with pitches in the order of 90 μm.

  2. Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindlein, Norbert; Leuchs, Gerd

    This chapter shall discuss the basics and the applications of geometrical optical methods in modern optics. Geometrical optics has a long tradition and some ideas are many centuries old. Nevertheless, the invention of modern personal computers which can perform several million floating-point operations in a second also revolutionized the methods of geometrical optics and so several analytical methods lost importance whereas numerical methods such as ray tracing became very important. Therefore, the emphasis in this chapter is also on modern numerical methods such as ray tracing and some other systematic methods such as the paraxial matrix theory.

  3. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.

  4. Laser Surface Preparation of Epoxy Composites for Secondary Bonding: Optimization of Ablation Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2015-01-01

    Surface preparation has been identified as one of the most critical aspects of attaining predictable and reliable adhesive bonds. Energetic processes such as laser ablation or plasma treatment are amenable to automation and are easily monitored and adjusted for controlled surface preparation. A laser ablation process was developed to accurately remove a targeted depth of resin, approximately 0.1 to 20 micrometers, from a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite surface while simultaneously changing surface chemistry and creating micro-roughness. This work demonstrates the application of this process to prepare composite surfaces for bonding without exposing or damaging fibers on the surface. Composite panels were prepared in an autoclave and had a resin layer approximately 10 micrometers thick above the fiber reinforcement. These composite panels were laser surface treated using several conditions, fabricated into bonded panels and hygrothermally aged. Bond performance of aged, experimental specimens was compared with grit blast surface treated specimens using a modified double cantilever beam test that enabled accelerated saturation of the specimen with water. Comparison of bonded specimens will be used to determine how ablation depth may affect average fracture energies and failure modes.

  5. Optimizing dentin bond durability: strategies to prevent hydrolytic degradation of the hybrid layer

    PubMed Central

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Nascimento, Fabio D.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tersariol, Ivarne L.S.; Geraldeli, Saulo; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carrilho, Marcela; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Endogenous dentin collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, are responsible for the time-related hydrolysis of collagen matrix of the hybrid layers. As the integrity of the collagen matrix is essential for the preservation of long-term dentin bond strength, inhibition or inactivation of endogenous dentin proteases is necessary for durable resin-bonded composite resin restorations. Methods Dentin contains collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins, which are responsible for the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. Several tentative approaches to prevent enzyme function either directly or indirectly have been proposed in the literature. Results Chlorhexidine, a general inhibitor of both MMPs and cysteine cathepsins, applied before primer/adhesive application is the most tested method. In general, these experiments have shown that enzyme inhibition is a promising scheme to improve hybrid layer preservation and bond strength durability. Other enzyme inhibitors, e.g. enzyme-inhibiting monomers and antimicrobial compounds, may be considered promising alternatives that would allow more simple clinical application than chlorhexidine. Cross-linking collagen and/or dentin organic matrix-bound enzymes could render hybrid layer organic matrix resistant to degradation, and complete removal of water from the hybrid layer with ethanol wet bonding or biomimetic remineralization should eliminate hydrolysis of both collagen and resin components. Significance Identification of the enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of hybrid layer collagen and understanding their function has prompted several innovative approaches to retain the hybrid layer integrity and strong dentin bonding. The ultimate goal, prevention of collagen matrix degradation with techniques and commercially available materials that are simple and effective in clinical settings may be achievable in

  6. Geometric and Electronic Structure of [{Cu(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2(O22−))]2+ with an Unusually Long O–O Bond: O–O Bond Weakening vs Activation for Reductive Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Young; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Woertink, Julia; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A.; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with particularly low υO–O (710–730 cm−1) have been found in equilibrium with their bis-μ-oxo dicopper(III) isomer. An issue is whether such side-on peroxo bridges are further activated for O–O cleavage. In a previous study (Liang, H.-C., et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4170–4171), we showed that oxygenation of the three-coordinate complex [CuI(MeAN)]+ (MeAN=N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) leads to a low-temperature stable [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ peroxo species with low υO–O (721 cm−1), as characterized by UV-Vis absorption and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopies. Here, this complex has been crystallized as its SbF6− salt and an X-ray structure indicates the presence of an unusually long O–O bond (1.540(5) Å) consistent with the low υO–O. EXAFS and rR spectroscopic and reactivity studies indicate the exclusive formation of [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ without any bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) isomer present. This is the first structure of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with a significantly long and weak O–O bond. DFT calculations show that the weak O–O bond results from strong σ donation from the MeAN ligand to Cu that is compensated by a decrease in the extent of peroxo to Cu charge transfer. Importantly, the weak O–O bond does not reflect an increase in backbonding into the σ* orbital of the peroxide. Thus, although the O–O bond is unusually weak, this structure is not further activated for reductive cleavage to form a reactive bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) species. These results highlight the necessity of understanding electronic structure changes associated with spectral changes for correlations to reactivity. PMID:22571744

  7. Extremal Optimization for Ground States of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Spin Glass with Levy Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan

    Ground states of Ising spin glasses on fully connected graphs are studied for a broadly distributed bond family. In particular, bonds J distributed according to a Levy distribution P(J) / 1/|J|1+α; |J| > 1; are investigated for a range of powers α. We determine ground state energy density variation with α and their finite-size corrections. We find that the energies attain universally the Parisi-energy of the SK as long as the second moment of P (J) exists (α > 2). They compare favorably with recent one-step replica symmetry breaking predictions well below α = 2. At and just below α = 2, the simulations deviate significantly from theoretical expectations. The finite-size investigation reveals that the corrections exponent ω decays from the putative SK value ωSK = = 2/3 already well above α = 2, at which point it reaches a minimum.

  8. Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    1999-10-01

    Mechanics for the nonmathematician-a modern approach For physicists, mechanics is quite obviously geometric, yet the classical approach typically emphasizes abstract, mathematical formalism. Setting out to make mechanics both accessible and interesting for nonmathematicians, Richard Talman uses geometric methods to reveal qualitative aspects of the theory. He introduces concepts from differential geometry, differential forms, and tensor analysis, then applies them to areas of classical mechanics as well as other areas of physics, including optics, crystal diffraction, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. For easy reference, Dr. Talman treats separately Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Newtonian mechanics-exploring their geometric structure through vector fields, symplectic geometry, and gauge invariance respectively. Practical perturbative methods of approximation are also developed. Geometric Mechanics features illustrative examples and assumes only basic knowledge of Lagrangian mechanics. Of related interest . . . APPLIED DYNAMICS With Applications to Multibody and Mechatronic Systems Francis C. Moon A contemporary look at dynamics at an intermediate level, including nonlinear and chaotic dynamics. 1998 (0-471-13828-2) 504 pp. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS Applied Mathematics for Scientists and Engineers Bruce Kusse and Erik Westwig A comprehensive treatment of the mathematical methods used to solve practical problems in physics and engineering. 1998 (0-471-15431-8) 680 pp.

  9. Preliminary Simulations for Geometric Optimization of a High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectrometer for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is under investigation as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative effort to develop non-destructive assay instruments for plutonium mass quantification in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Results obtained to date indicate that individual isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray spectra can potentially be used to quantify the total fissile content and individual weight fractions of fissile and fertile nuclides present in spent fuel. Adequate assay precision for inventory analysis can be obtained using a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available detection technology. In an attempt to optimize the geometric configuration and material composition for a delayed gamma measurement on spent fuel, the current study applies MCNPX, a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, in order to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. Results are presented for optimizing the neutron spectrum tailoring material, geometries to maximize thermal or fast fissions from a given neutron source, and detector location to allow an acceptable delayed gamma-ray signal while achieving a reasonable detector lifetime while operating in a high-energy neutron field. This work is supported in part by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  10. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-01

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  11. Geometric verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Present LANDSAT data formats are reviewed to clarify how the geodetic location and registration capabilities were defined for P-tape products and RBV data. Since there is only one geometric model used in the master data processor, geometric location accuracy of P-tape products depends on the absolute accuracy of the model and registration accuracy is determined by the stability of the model. Due primarily to inaccuracies in data provided by the LANDSAT attitude management system, desired accuracies are obtained only by using ground control points and a correlation process. The verification of system performance with regards to geodetic location requires the capability to determine pixel positions of map points in a P-tape array. Verification of registration performance requires the capability to determine pixel positions of common points (not necessarily map points) in 2 or more P-tape arrays for a given world reference system scene. Techniques for registration verification can be more varied and automated since map data are not required. The verification of LACIE extractions is used as an example.

  12. Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing configuration. [langley 7 by 10 foot tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Huffman, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted in the Langley 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine the influence of an optimized leading-edge deflection on the low speed aerodynamic performance of a configuration with a low aspect ratio, highly swept wing. The sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to geometric anhedral was also studied. The optimized leading edge deflection was developed by aligning the leading edge with the incoming flow along the entire span. Owing to spanwise variation of unwash, the resulting optimized leading edge was a smooth, continuously warped surface for which the deflection varied from 16 deg at the side of body to 50 deg at the wing tip. For the particular configuration studied, levels of leading-edge suction on the order of 90 percent were achieved. The results of tests conducted to determine the sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to geometric anhedral indicate values which are in reasonable agreement with estimates provided by simple vortex-lattice theories.

  13. HNCO-based measurement of one-bond amide 15N-1H couplings with optimized precision.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Luke; Majumdar, Ananya; Tolman, Joel R

    2010-02-01

    A pair of 3D HNCO-based experiments have been developed with the aim of optimizing the precision of measurement of (1)J(NH) couplings. Both pulse sequences record (1)J(NH) coupling evolution during the entire constant time interval that (15)N magnetization is dephasing or rephasing with respect to the directly bonded (13)C' nucleus, with (15)N(13)C' multiple quantum coherence maintained during the (13)C' evolution period. The first experiment, designed for smaller proteins, produces an apparent doubling of the (1)J(NH) coupling without any accompanying increases in line width. The second experiment is a J-scaled TROSY-HNCO experiment in which the (1)J(NH) coupling is measured by frequency difference between resonances offset symmetrically about the position of the downfield component of the (15)N doublet (i.e. the TROSY resonance). This experiment delivers significant gains in precision of (1)J(NH) coupling measurement compared to existing J-scaled TROSY-HNCO experiments. With the proper choice of acquisition parameters and sufficient sensitivity to acquire a 3D TROSY-HNCO experiment, it is shown that (1)J(NH) couplings can be measured with a precision which approaches or exceeds the precision of measurement with which the frequency of the TROSY resonance itself can be determined. PMID:20012159

  14. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  15. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  16. A quantum mechanics-based halogen bonding scoring function for protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Xu, Zhijian; Shi, Jiye; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-06-01

    A quantum mechanics-based scoring function for halogen bonding interaction, namely XBScore(QM), is developed based on 18,135 sets of geometrical and energetical parameters optimized at M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Applying the function on typical halogen bonding systems from Protein Data Bank demonstrates its strong ability of predicting halogen bonding as attractive interaction with strength up to -4 kcal mol(-1). With a diverse set of proteins complexed with halogenated ligands, a systematic evaluation demonstrates the integrative advantage of XBScore(QM) over 12 other scoring functions on halogen bonding in four aspects, viz. pseudo docking power, ranking power, scoring power, and genuine docking power. Thus, this study not only provides a practicable scoring function of halogen bonding for high throughput virtual screening, but also serves as a benchmark for evaluating the performance of current scoring functions on characterizing halogen bonding.

  17. Geometric time delay interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-08-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using time delay interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the interspacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new and intuitive approach to extend this interpretation to all TDI observables. Unlike the standard algebraic formalism, Geometric TDI provides a combinatorial algorithm to explore exhaustively the space of second-generation TDI observables (i.e., those that cancel laser noise in LISA-like interferometers with time-dependent arm lengths). Using this algorithm, I survey the space of second-generation TDI observables of length (i.e., number of component phase measurements) up to 24, and I identify alternative, improved forms of the standard second-generation TDI observables. The alternative forms have improved high-frequency gravitational-wave sensitivity in realistic noise conditions (because they have fewer nulls in the gravitational-wave and noise response functions), and are less susceptible to instrumental gaps and glitches (because their component phase measurements span shorter time periods).

  18. On the efficiency of VBSCF algorithms, a comment on "An efficient algorithm for energy gradients and orbital optimization in valence bond theory".

    PubMed

    van Lenthe, J H; Broer-Braam, H B; Rashid, Z

    2012-03-30

    We comment on the paper [Song et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2009, 30, 399]. and discuss the efficiency of the orbital optimization and gradient evaluation in the Valence Bond Self Consistent Field (VBSCF) method. We note that Song et al. neglect to properly reference Broer et al., who published an algorithm [Broer and Nieuwpoort, Theor. Chim. Acta 1988, 73, 405] to use a Fock matrix to compute a matrix element between two different determinants, which can be used for an orbital optimization. Further, Song et al. publish a misleading comparison with our VBSCF algorithm [Dijkstra and van Lenthe, J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 113, 2100; van Lenthe et al., Mol. Phys. 1991, 73, 1159] to enable them to favorably compare their algorithm with ours. We give detail timings in terms of different orbital types in the calculation and actual timings for the example cases. PMID:22278948

  19. REMO: A new protocol to refine full atomic protein models from C-alpha traces by optimizing hydrogen-bonding networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-15

    Protein structure prediction approaches usually perform modeling simulations based on reduced representation of protein structures. For biological utilizations, it is an important step to construct full atomic models from the reduced structure decoys. Most of the current full atomic model reconstruction procedures have defects which either could not completely remove the steric clashes among backbone atoms or generate final atomic models with worse topology similarity relative to the native structures than the reduced models. In this work, we develop a new protocol, called REMO, to generate full atomic protein models by optimizing the hydrogen-bonding network with basic fragments matched from a newly constructed backbone isomer library of solved protein structures. The algorithm is benchmarked on 230 nonhomologous proteins with reduced structure decoys generated by I-TASSER simulations. The results show that REMO has a significant ability to remove steric clashes, and meanwhile retains good topology of the reduced model. The hydrogen-bonding network of the final models is dramatically improved during the procedure. The REMO algorithm has been exploited in the recent CASP8 experiment which demonstrated significant improvements of the I-TASSER models in both atomic-level structural refinement and hydrogen-bonding network construction.

  20. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes XI: Full geometry optimization and vibration analysis of porphyrin iron-oxo species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Saito, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Kawakami, Takashi; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    Physiochemical properties of compound I and II intermediate states for heme enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, P450) and inorganic models are investigated by hybrid density functional theory. Used theoretical models are composed of an oxoferryl porphyrin and an axial ligand, which are cresol, methylimidazole, methylthiol, and chloride for catalase, peroxidase, P450, and inorganic models, respectively. The oxoferryl bonds are characterized in terms of bond lengths and vibration frequencies. It is found that the oxoferryl bond lengths (the stretching frequency) are shorter (higher) than those of the X-ray crystal structures of enzymes, on the other hand for inorganic models, they are comparable with the experimental values. Spin density distributions showed that radical state at the compound I can be classified into two types: (1) porphyrin radical state and (2) axial ligand radical state. Peroxidase and inorganic model are in the former case and Catalase and P450 are in the later case at the present calculation models. Magnetic interactions between oxoferryl and ligand radical moieties are analyzed by the natural orbital analysis and it is showed that the effective exchange integral (J) values are strongly related to the radical spin density distributions: axial ligand radical tends to increase the antiferromagnetic interaction. Mössbauer shift parameters are also evaluated and it is shown that iron charge states are similar for these models.

  1. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  2. Hydrogen bonds in methane-water clusters.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Cano, Juan-Ramón; Guevara-García, Alfredo; Vargas, Rubicelia; Restrepo, Albeiro; Garza, Jorge

    2016-08-24

    Characterization of hydrogen bonds in CH4-(H2O)12 clusters was carried out by using several quantum chemistry tools. An initial stochastic search provided around 2 500 000 candidate structures, then, using a convex-hull polygon criterion followed by gradient based optimization under the Kohn-Sham scheme, a total of 54 well defined local minima were located in the Potential Energy Surface. These structures were further analyzed through second-order many-body perturbation theory with an extended basis set at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. Our analysis of Gibbs energies at several temperatures clearly suggests a structural preference toward compact water clusters interacting with the external methane molecule, instead of the more commonly known clathrate-like structures. This study shows that CH4-(H2O)12 clusters may be detected at temperatures up to 179 K, this finding provides strong support to a recently postulated hypothesis that suggests that methane-water clusters could be present in Mars at these conditions. Interestingly, we found that water to water hydrogen bonding is strengthened in the mixed clusters when compared to the isolated water dimer, which in turn leads to a weakening of the methane to water hydrogen bonding when compared to the CH4-(H2O) dimer. Finally, our evidence places a stern warning about the abilities of popular geometrical criteria to determine the existence of hydrogen bonds.

  3. Hydrogen bonds in methane-water clusters.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Cano, Juan-Ramón; Guevara-García, Alfredo; Vargas, Rubicelia; Restrepo, Albeiro; Garza, Jorge

    2016-08-24

    Characterization of hydrogen bonds in CH4-(H2O)12 clusters was carried out by using several quantum chemistry tools. An initial stochastic search provided around 2 500 000 candidate structures, then, using a convex-hull polygon criterion followed by gradient based optimization under the Kohn-Sham scheme, a total of 54 well defined local minima were located in the Potential Energy Surface. These structures were further analyzed through second-order many-body perturbation theory with an extended basis set at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. Our analysis of Gibbs energies at several temperatures clearly suggests a structural preference toward compact water clusters interacting with the external methane molecule, instead of the more commonly known clathrate-like structures. This study shows that CH4-(H2O)12 clusters may be detected at temperatures up to 179 K, this finding provides strong support to a recently postulated hypothesis that suggests that methane-water clusters could be present in Mars at these conditions. Interestingly, we found that water to water hydrogen bonding is strengthened in the mixed clusters when compared to the isolated water dimer, which in turn leads to a weakening of the methane to water hydrogen bonding when compared to the CH4-(H2O) dimer. Finally, our evidence places a stern warning about the abilities of popular geometrical criteria to determine the existence of hydrogen bonds. PMID:27492605

  4. Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds.

  5. Geometric Algebra for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Chris; Lasenby, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    Preface; Notation; 1. Introduction; 2. Geometric algebra in two and three dimensions; 3. Classical mechanics; 4. Foundations of geometric algebra; 5. Relativity and spacetime; 6. Geometric calculus; 7. Classical electrodynamics; 8. Quantum theory and spinors; 9. Multiparticle states and quantum entanglement; 10. Geometry; 11. Further topics in calculus and group theory; 12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques; 13. Symmetry and gauge theory; 14. Gravitation; Bibliography; Index.

  6. High-throughput design and optimization of fast lithium ion conductors by the combination of bond-valence method and density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ruijuan; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan

    2015-01-01

    Looking for solid state electrolytes with fast lithium ion conduction is an important prerequisite for developing all-solid-state lithium secondary batteries. By combining the simulation techniques in different levels of accuracy, e.g. the bond-valence (BV) method and the density functional theory (DFT), a high-throughput design and optimization scheme is proposed for searching fast lithium ion conductors as candidate solid state electrolytes for lithium rechargeable batteries. The screening from more than 1000 compounds is performed through BV-based method, and the ability to predict reliable tendency of the Li+ migration energy barriers is confirmed by comparing with the results from DFT calculations. β-Li3PS4 is taken as a model system to demonstrate the application of this combination method in optimizing properties of solid electrolytes. By employing the high-throughput DFT simulations to more than 200 structures of the doping derivatives of β-Li3PS4, the effects of doping on the ionic conductivities in this material are predicted by the BV calculations. The O-doping scheme is proposed as a promising way to improve the kinetic properties of this materials, and the validity of the optimization is proved by the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. PMID:26387639

  7. Exploring New Geometric Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirode, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    When students work with a non-Euclidean distance formula, geometric objects such as circles and segment bisectors can look very different from their Euclidean counterparts. Students and even teachers can experience the thrill of creative discovery when investigating these differences among geometric worlds. In this article, the author describes a…

  8. Simulation and optimization of Al-Fe aerospace alloy processed by laser surface remelting using geometric Multigrid solver and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, Moisés Meza; de Oliveira, Fabiane; Teleginski, Viviane; Machado, Siliane; Pinto, Marcio Augusto Villela

    2016-05-01

    Al-1.5 wt% Fe alloy was irradiate by Yb-fiber laser beam using the laser surface remelting (LSR) technique, generating weld fillets that covered the whole surface of the sample. The laser-treatment showed to be an efficient technology for corrosion resistance improvements. In this study, the finite element method was used to simulate the solidification processes by LSR technique. The method Multigrid was employed in order to reduce the CPU time, which is important to the viability for industrial applications. Multigrid method is a technique very promising of optimization that reduced drastically the CPU time. The result was highly satisfactory, because the CPU time has fallen dramatically in comparison when it was not used Multigrid method. To validate the result of numerical simulation with the experimental result was done the microstructural characterization of laser-treated layer by the optical microscopy and SEM techniques and however, that both results showing be consistent.

  9. Biomolecular halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Ho, P Shing

    2015-01-01

    Halogens are atypical elements in biology, but are common as substituents in ligands, including thyroid hormones and inhibitors, which bind specifically to proteins and nucleic acids. The short-range, stabilizing interactions of halogens - now seen as relatively common in biology - conform generally to halogen bonds characterized in small molecule systems and as described by the σ-hole model. The unique properties of biomolecular halogen bonds (BXBs), particularly in their geometric and energetic relationship to classic hydrogen bonds, make them potentially powerful tools for inhibitor design and molecular engineering. This chapter reviews the current research on BXBs, focusing on experimental studies on their structure-energy relationships, how these studies inform the development of computational methods to model BXBs, and considers how BXBs can be applied to the rational design of more effective inhibitors against therapeutic targets and of new biological-based materials.

  10. Geometrical frustration in the spin liquid β'-Me3EtSb[Pd(dmit)2]2 and the valence-bond solid Me3EtP[Pd(dmit)2]2.

    PubMed

    Scriven, E P; Powell, B J

    2012-08-31

    We show that the electronic structures of the title compounds predicted by density functional theory are well described by tight binding models. We determine the frustration ratio, J'/J, of the Heisenberg model on the anisotropic triangular lattice, which describes the spin degrees of freedom in the Mott insulating phase for a range of Pd(dmit)2 salts. All of the antiferromagnetic materials studied have J'/J is < or approximately equal to 0.5 or J'/J > or approximately equal to 0.9, and all salts with 0.5 < or approximately equal to J'/J < or approximately equal to 0.9 are known, experimentally, to be charge ordered valence-bond solids or spin liquids. PMID:23002879

  11. On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, E.; Reingruber, J.; Sansom, M. S. P.

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel rate theory based on the notions of splitting probability and mean first passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. In contrast to traditional approaches such as transition state theory or Kramers theory, transitions between different conduction states in our model are governed by rates which depend on the full geometry of the potential of mean force (PMF) resulting from the superposition of an equilibrium free energy profile and a transmembrane potential induced by a nonequilibrium constraint. If a detailed theoretical PMF is available (e.g., from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations), it can be used to compute characteristic conductance curves in the framework of our model, thereby bridging the gap between the atomistic and the mesoscopic level of description. Explicit analytic solutions for the rates, the ion flux, and the associated electric current can be obtained by approximating the actual PMF by a piecewise linear potential. As illustrative examples, we consider both a theoretical and an experimental application of the model. The theoretical example is based on a hypothetical channel with a fully symmetric sawtooth equilibrium PMF. For this system, we explore how changes in the spatial extent of the binding sites affect the rate of transport when a linear voltage ramp is applied. Already for the case of a single binding site, we find that there is an optimum size of the site which maximizes the current through the channel provided that the applied voltage exceeds a threshold value given by the binding energy of the site. The above optimization effect is shown to arise from the complex interplay between the channel structure and the applied electric field, expressed by a nonlinear dependence of the rates with respect to the linear size of the binding site. In studying the properties of current-voltage curves, we find a double crossover between sublinear and superlinear

  12. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  13. Geometric Reasoning for Automated Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Knight, Russell L.; Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of mission planning for NASA s operation of the International Space Station is the allocation and management of space for supplies and equipment. The Stowage, Configuration Analysis, and Operations Planning teams collaborate to perform the bulk of that planning. A Geometric Reasoning Engine is developed in a way that can be shared by the teams to optimize item placement in the context of crew planning. The ISS crew spends (at the time of this writing) a third or more of their time moving supplies and equipment around. Better logistical support and optimized packing could make a significant impact on operational efficiency of the ISS. Currently, computational geometry and motion planning do not focus specifically on the optimized orientation and placement of 3D objects based on multiple distance and containment preferences and constraints. The software performs reasoning about the manipulation of 3D solid models in order to maximize an objective function based on distance. It optimizes for 3D orientation and placement. Spatial placement optimization is a general problem and can be applied to object packing or asset relocation.

  14. Descriptive Geometry and Geometric Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. Alan

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiences for engineering students to develop spatial awareness and reasoning capability. Describes geometric modeling, basic geometric concepts, operations, surface modeling, and conclusions. (YP)

  15. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  16. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  17. Halogen Bonding in Hypervalent Iodine Compounds.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Luca; Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Halogen bonds occur when electrophilic halogens (Lewis acids) attractively interact with donors of electron density (Lewis bases). This term is commonly used for interactions undertaken by monovalent halogen derivatives. The aim of this chapter is to show that the geometric features of the bonding pattern around iodine in its hypervalent derivatives justify the understanding of some of the longer bonds as halogen bonds. We suggest that interactions directionality in ionic and neutral λ(3)-iodane derivatives is evidence that the electron density distribution around iodine atoms is anisotropic, a region of most positive electrostatic potential exists on the extensions of the covalent bonds formed by iodine, and these positive caps affect, or even determine, the crystal packing of these derivatives. For instance, the short cation-anion contacts in ionic λ(3)-iodane and λ(5)-iodane derivatives fully match the halogen bond definition and geometrical prerequisites. The same holds for the short contacts the cation of ionic λ(3)-iodanes forms with lone-pair donors or the short contacts given by neutral λ(3)-iodanes with incoming nucleophiles. The longer and weaker bonds formed by iodine in hypervalent compounds are usually called secondary bondings and we propose that the term halogen bond can also be used. Compared to the term secondary bond, halogen bond may possibly be more descriptive of some bonding features, e.g., its directionality and the relationships between structure of interacting groups and interaction strength. PMID:26809623

  18. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly.

  19. Inflation from geometrical tachyons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steven; Ward, John

    2005-10-15

    We propose an alternative formulation of tachyon inflation using the geometrical tachyon arising from the time dependent motion of a BPS D3-brane in the background geometry due to k parallel NS5-branes arranged around a ring of radius R. Because of the fact that the mass of this geometrical tachyon field is {radical}(2/k) times smaller than the corresponding open-string tachyon mass, we find that the slow-roll conditions for inflation and the number of e-foldings can be satisfied in a manner that is consistent with an effective 4-dimensional model and with a perturbative string coupling. We also show that the metric perturbations produced at the end of inflation can be sufficiently small and do not lead to the inconsistencies that plague the open-string tachyon models. Finally we argue for the existence of a minimum of the geometrical tachyon potential which could give rise to a traditional reheating mechanism.

  20. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly. PMID:25507310

  1. Geometrical optical illusionists.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical optical illusions were given this title by Oppel in 1855. Variants on such small distortions of visual space were illustrated thereafter, many of which bear the names of those who first described them. Some original forms of the geometrical optical illusions are shown together with 'perceptual portraits' of those who described them. These include: Roget, Chevreul, Fick, Zöllner, Poggendorff, Hering, Kundt, Delboeuf Mach, Helmholtz, Hermann, von Bezold, Müller-Lyer, Lipps, Thiéry, Wundt, Münsterberg, Ebbinghaus, Titchener, Ponzo, Luckiesh, Sander, Ehrenstein, Gregory, Heard, White, Shepard, and. Lingelbach. The illusions are grouped under the headings of orientation, size, the combination of size and orientation, and contrast. Early theories of illusions, before geometrical optical illusions were so named, are mentioned briefly. PMID:25420326

  2. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  3. PREFACE: Geometrically frustrated magnetism Geometrically frustrated magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2011-04-01

    Frustrated magnetism is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics that has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement in the field of geometrically frustrated magnets and is inspired by the 2010 Highly Frustrated Magnetism (HFM 2010) meeting in Baltimore, MD, USA. Geometric frustration is a broad phenomenon that results from an intrinsic incompatibility between some fundamental interactions and the underlying lattice geometry based on triangles and tetrahedra. Most studies have centred around the kagomé and pyrochlore based magnets but recent work has looked at other structures including the delafossite, langasites, hyper-kagomé, garnets and Laves phase materials to name a few. Personally, I hope this issue serves as a great reference to scientist both new and old to this field, and that we all continue to have fun in this very frustrated playground. Finally, I want to thank the HFM 2010 organizers and all the sponsors whose contributions were an essential part of the success of the meeting in Baltimore. Geometrically frustrated magnetism contents Spangolite: an s = 1/2 maple leaf lattice antiferromagnet? T Fennell, J O Piatek, R A Stephenson, G J Nilsen and H M Rønnow Two-dimensional magnetism and spin-size effect in the S = 1 triangular antiferromagnet NiGa2S4 Yusuke Nambu and Satoru Nakatsuji Short range ordering in the modified honeycomb lattice compound SrHo2O4 S Ghosh, H D Zhou, L Balicas, S Hill, J S Gardner, Y Qi and C R Wiebe Heavy fermion compounds on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice M S Kim and M C Aronson A neutron polarization analysis study of moment correlations in (Dy0.4Y0.6)T2 (T = Mn, Al) J R Stewart, J M Hillier, P Manuel and R Cywinski Elemental analysis and magnetism of hydronium jarosites—model kagome antiferromagnets and topological spin glasses A S Wills and W G Bisson The Herbertsmithite Hamiltonian: μSR measurements on single crystals

  4. Geometric Series via Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Infinite series is a challenging topic in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum for many students. In fact, there is a vast literature in mathematics education research on convergence issues. One of the most important types of infinite series is the geometric series. Their beauty lies in the fact that they can be evaluated explicitly and that…

  5. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  6. 1500 System Geometric Dictionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peloquin, Paul V.

    A general description is provided of the "geometric dictionary," a graphic display aid, used by the Computer-Assisted Instruction Laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University. The purpose of the description is to enable the reader to duplicate and use the dictionary on any cathode ray tube terminal of the IBM 1500 system. The major advantages…

  7. A Geometric Scavenger Hunt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie; Marshall, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Children possess a genuine curiosity for exploring the natural world around them. One third grade teacher capitalized on this inherent trait by leading her students on "A Geometric Scavenger Hunt." The four-lesson inquiry investigation described in this article integrates mathematics and science. Among the students' discoveries was the fact that…

  8. Bond stretching phonon softening and angle-resolved photoemission kinks in optimally doped Bi2Sr1:6La0:4Cu2O6+sigma superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; d'Astuto, M.; Jozwiak, C.; Garcia, D.R.; Saini, N.L.; Krisch, M.; Ikeuchi, K.; Baron, A.Q.R.; Eisaki, H.; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2008-05-08

    We report the first measurement of the Cu-O bond stretching phonon dispersion in optimally doped Bi2Sr1.6La0.4Cu2O6+delta using inelastic x-ray scattering. We found a softening of this phonon at q=(0.25,0,0) from 76 to 60 meV, similar to the one reported in other cuprates. A comparison with angle-resolved photoemission data on the same sample revealed an excellent agreement in terms of energy and momentum between the angle-resolved photoemission nodal kink and the soft part of the bond stretching phonon. Indeed, we find that the momentum space where a 63+-5 meV kink is observed can be connected with a vector q=(xi,0,0) with xi>= 0.22, corresponding exactly to the soft part of the bond stretching phonon.

  9. Adaptive Source Coding Schemes for Geometrically Distributed Integer Alphabets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K-M.; Smyth, P.

    1993-01-01

    Revisit the Gallager and van Voorhis optimal source coding scheme for geometrically distributed non-negative integer alphabets and show that the various subcodes in the popular Rice algorithm can be derived from the Gallager and van Voorhis code.

  10. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  11. Valence State Driven Site Preference in the Quaternary Compound Ca5MgAgGe5: An Electron-Deficient Phase with Optimized Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Ponou, Simeon; Lidin, Sven; Zhang, Yuemei; Miller, Gordon J.

    2014-04-18

    The quaternary phase Ca5Mg0.95Ag1.05(1)Ge5 (3) was synthesized by high-temperature solid-state techniques, and its crystal structure was determined by single-crystal diffraction methods in the orthorhombic space group Pnma – Wyckoff sequence c12 with a = 23.1481(4) Å, b = 4.4736(1) Å, c = 11.0128(2) Å, V = 1140.43(4) Å3, Z = 4. The crystal structure can be described as linear intergrowths of slabs cut from the CaGe (CrB-type) and the CaMGe (TiNiSi-type; M = Mg, Ag) structures. Hence, 3 is a hettotype of the hitherto missing n = 3 member of the structure series with the general formula R2+nT2X2+n, previously described with n = 1, 2, and 4. The member with n = 3 was predicted in the space group Cmcm – Wyckoff sequence f5c2. The experimental space group Pnma (in the nonstandard setting Pmcn) corresponds to a klassengleiche symmetry reduction of index two of the predicted space group Cmcm. This transition originates from the switching of one Ge and one Ag position in the TiNiSi-related slab, a process that triggers an uncoupling of each of the five 8f sites in Cmcm into two 4c sites in Pnma. The Mg/Ag site preference was investigated using VASP calculations and revealed a remarkable example of an intermetallic compound for which the electrostatic valency principle is a critical structure-directing force. The compound is deficient by one valence electron according to the Zintl concept, but LMTO electronic structure calculations indicate electronic stabilization and overall bonding optimization in the polyanionic network. Other stability factors beyond the Zintl concept that may account for the electronic stabilization are discussed.

  12. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2014-02-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates.

  13. Effect of bonding on the performance of a piezoactuator-based active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is studied. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to select the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The presented method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators and the bonding layers have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the MIMSC method and to demonstrate the effect of the physical and geometrical properties of the bonding layer on the dynamic performance of the actively controlled beams. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  14. Geometrical structure, stability and electronic properties of AunHg(1 ≤ n ≤ 12) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Wei; Kuang, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    The geometrical structures, relative stabilities, electronic properties and chemical hardness of AunHg( n=1-12) clusters are systematically investigated using the density functional theory with relativistic all-electron methods. The optimized low-lying energy geometries exhibit two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, all the lowest-energy structures of AunHg( n=1-12) clusters favor planar geometries with slight distortion, in which the dopant Hg atom prefers to occupy a peripheral site with a lower coordination. The geometrical, electronic and chemical stabilities of the AunHg cluster with even number of valence electrons are higher than those of the neighboring AunHg cluster with odd number of valence electrons. Besides, 5 d valence electrons of impurity Hg atom in the AunHg cluster hardly join in the orbital interactions compared with 5 d valence electrons of corresponding Au atom in Aun+1 cluster. Au-Hg bonds in AunHg clusters are weaker and have more obviously ionic-like characteristics than the corresponding Au-Au bonds in Aun+1 clusters.

  15. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  16. Geometrically representing spin correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian G.; Mirasola, Anthony; Hollingsworth, Jacob; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a general method to visualize spin correlations, and we demonstrate its usefulness in ultracold matter from fermions in lattices to trapped ions and ultracold molecules. Correlations are of fundamental interest in many-body physics: they characterize phases in condensed matter and AMO, and are required for quantum sensing and computing. However, it is often difficult to understand even the simplest correlations - for example between two spin-1/2's - directly from the components Cab = - for { a , b } ∈ { x , y , z } . Not only are the nine independent Cab unwieldy, but considering the components also obscures the natural geometric structure. For example, simple spin rotations lead to complex transformations among the nine Cab. We provide a one-to-one map between the spin correlations and certain three-dimensional objects, analogous to the map between single spins and Bloch vectors. This object makes the geometric structure of the correlations manifest. Moreover, much as one can reason geometrically about dynamics using a Bloch vector - e.g. a magnetic field causes it to precess and dephasing causes it to shrink - we show that analogous reasoning holds for our visualization method.

  17. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-07-16

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov-Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects.

  18. Representing geometrical knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J A

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces perspex algebra which is being developed as a common representation of geometrical knowledge. A perspex can currently be interpreted in one of four ways. First, the algebraic perspex is a generalization of matrices, it provides the most general representation for all of the interpretations of a perspex. The algebraic perspex can be used to describe arbitrary sets of coordinates. The remaining three interpretations of the perspex are all related to square matrices and operate in a Euclidean model of projective space-time, called perspex space. Perspex space differs from the usual Euclidean model of projective space in that it contains the point at nullity. It is argued that the point at nullity is necessary for a consistent account of perspective in top-down vision. Second, the geometric perspex is a simplex in perspex space. It can be used as a primitive building block for shapes, or as a way of recording landmarks on shapes. Third, the transformational perspex describes linear transformations in perspex space that provide the affine and perspective transformations in space-time. It can be used to match a prototype shape to an image, even in so called 'accidental' views where the depth of an object disappears from view, or an object stays in the same place across time. Fourth, the parametric perspex describes the geometric and transformational perspexes in terms of parameters that are related to everyday English descriptions. The parametric perspex can be used to obtain both continuous and categorical perception of objects. The paper ends with a discussion of issues related to using a perspex to describe logic. PMID:9304680

  19. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of 4-chlorobenzothioamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 4-chlorobenzothioamide were investigated. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of 4-chlorobenzothioamide in the solid phase were recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared and Raman intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 4-chlorobenzothioamide was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯S hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  20. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of a biomolecule: 5-Hydroxymethyluracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 5-hydroxymethyluracil were investigated. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) spectrum of the molecule in the solid phase was recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 5-hydroxymethyluracil molecule was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on its vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while its in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  1. The geometric horopter.

    PubMed

    Howarth, P A

    2011-02-23

    Two aspects of the geometric horopter, which here is based on the criterion of equality of angle, are clarified. The first is that in the fixation plane (containing the nodal points and the fixation point) the locus of points lying on the horopter is the larger arc of a circle, and not a full circle as has been previously accepted. The second is that elsewhere, the locus of these points is a straight line perpendicular to this plane and midway between the eyes. These rules hold for both symmetric and asymmetric convergence, and for fixation elevated or depressed from the horizontal.

  2. Consequences of Optimal Bond Valence on Structural Rigidity and Improved Luminescence Properties in SrxBa2-xSiO4:Eu2+ Orthosilicate Phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Denault, Kristin A.; Brgoch, Jakoah; Gaultois, Michael W.; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Petry, Ralf; Winkler, Holger; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram

    2014-08-19

    The orthosilicate phosphors SrxBa2–xSiO4:Eu2+ have now been known for over four decades and have found extensive recent use in solid-state white lighting. It is well-recognized in the literature and in practice that intermediate compositions in the solid-solutions between the orthosilicates Sr2SiO4 and Ba2SiO4 yield the best phosphor hosts when the thermal stability of luminescence is considered. We employ a combination of synchrotron X-ray diffraction, total scattering measurements, density functional theory calculations, and low-temperature heat capacity measurements, in conjunction with detailed temperature- and time-resolved studies of luminescence properties to understand the origins of the improved luminescence properties. We observe that in the intermediate compositions, the two cation sites in the crystal structure are optimally bonded as determined from bond valence sum calculations. Optimal bonding results in a more rigid lattice, as established by the intermediate compositions possessing the highest Debye temperature, which are determined experimentally from low-temperature heat capacity measurements. Greater rigidity in turn results in the highest luminescence efficiency for intermediate compositions at elevated temperatures.

  3. Geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-10-15

    Using the quantum kinematic approach of Mukunda and Simon, we propose a geometric phase in Bohmian mechanics. A reparametrization and gauge invariant geometric phase is derived along an arbitrary path in configuration space. The single valuedness of the wave function implies that the geometric phase along a path must be equal to an integer multiple of 2{pi}. The nonzero geometric phase indicates that we go through the branch cut of the action function from one Riemann sheet to another when we locally travel along the path. For stationary states, quantum vortices exhibiting the quantized circulation integral can be regarded as a manifestation of the geometric phase. The bound-state Aharonov-Bohm effect demonstrates that the geometric phase along a closed path contains not only the circulation integral term but also an additional term associated with the magnetic flux. In addition, it is shown that the geometric phase proposed previously from the ensemble theory is not gauge invariant.

  4. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde: IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Taherian, Fatemeh; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2016-05-01

    The structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies of 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5NSA) were studied by the FT-IR and Raman spectra and the quantum chemical calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in order to investigate the intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) present in its structure. The strength and nature of IHB in the optimized structure of 5NSA were studied in detail by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) and the natural bond orbital (NBO) approaches. The results obtained were then compared with the corresponding data for its parent molecule, salicylaldehyde (SA). Comparisons made between the geometrical structures for 5NSA and SA, their OH/OD stretching and out-of-plane bending modes, their enthalpies for the hydrogen bond, and their AIM parameters demonstrated a stronger H-bonding in 5NSA compared with that in SA. The calculated binding enthalpy (ΔHbind) for 5NSA was -10.92 kcal mol-1. The observed νOH and γOH appeared at about 3120 cm-1 and 786 cm-1 respectively. The stretching frequency shift of H-bond formation was 426 cm-1 which is consistent with ΔHbind and the strength of H-bond in 5NSA. The delocalization energies and electron delocalization indices derived by the NBO and AIM approaches indicate that the resonance effects were responsible for the stronger IHB in 5NSA than in SA.

  5. Interaction geometries and energies of hydrogen bonds to C[double bond]O and C[double bond]S acceptors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter A; Pidcock, Elna; Allen, Frank H

    2008-08-01

    The occurrence, geometries and energies of hydrogen bonds from N-H and O-H donors to the S acceptors of thiourea derivatives, thioamides and thiones are compared with data for their O analogues - ureas, amides and ketones. Geometrical data derived from the Cambridge Structural Database indicate that hydrogen bonds to the C[double bond]S acceptors are much weaker than those to their C[double bond]O counterparts: van der Waals normalized hydrogen bonds to O are shorter than those to S by approximately 0.25 A. Further, the directionality of the approach of the hydrogen bond with respect to S, defined by the C[double bond]S...H angle, is in the range 102-109 degrees , much lower than the analogous C[double bond]O...H angle which lies in the range 127-140 degrees . Ab initio calculations using intermolecular perturbation theory show good agreement with the experimental results: the differences in hydrogen-bond directionality are closely reproduced, and the interaction energies of hydrogen bonds to S are consistently weaker than those to O, by approximately 12 kJ mol(-1), for each of the three compound classes. There are no CSD examples of hydrogen bonds to aliphatic thiones, (Csp(3))(2)C=S, consistent with the near-equality of the electronegativities of C and S. Thioureas and thioamides have electron-rich N substituents replacing the Csp(3) atoms. Electron delocalization involving C[double bond]S and the N lone pairs then induces a significant >C(delta+)[double bond]S(delta-) dipole, which enables the formation of the medium-strength C[double bond]S...H bonds observed in thioureas and thioamides.

  6. Methods and apparatuses for signaling with geometric constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use signal constellations, which have unequally spaced (i.e. geometrically shaped) points. In many embodiments, the communication systems use specific geometric constellations that are capacity optimized at a specific SNR. In addition, ranges within which the constellation points of a capacity optimized constellation can be perturbed and are still likely to achieve a given percentage of the optimal capacity increase compared to a constellation that maximizes d.sub.min, are also described. Capacity measures that are used in the selection of the location of constellation points include, but are not limited to, parallel decode (PD) capacity and joint capacity.

  7. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond.

  8. Geometrical Destabilization of Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Turzyński, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    We show the existence of a general mechanism by which heavy scalar fields can be destabilized during inflation, relying on the fact that the curvature of the field space manifold can dominate the stabilizing force from the potential and destabilize inflationary trajectories. We describe a simple and rather universal setup in which higher-order operators suppressed by a large energy scale trigger this instability. This phenomenon can prematurely end inflation, thereby leading to important observational consequences and sometimes excluding models that would otherwise perfectly fit the data. More generally, it modifies the interpretation of cosmological constraints in terms of fundamental physics. We also explain how the geometrical destabilization can lead to powerful selection criteria on the field space curvature of inflationary models.

  9. Geometrical aspects of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Leinaas, Jon Magne; Myrheim, Jan; Ovrum, Eirik

    2006-07-15

    We study geometrical aspects of entanglement, with the Hilbert-Schmidt norm defining the metric on the set of density matrices. We focus first on the simplest case of two two-level systems and show that a 'relativistic' formulation leads to a complete analysis of the question of separability. Our approach is based on Schmidt decomposition of density matrices for a composite system and nonunitary transformations to a standard form. The positivity of the density matrices is crucial for the method to work. A similar approach works to some extent in higher dimensions, but is a less powerful tool. We further present a numerical method for examining separability and illustrate the method by a numerical study of bound entanglement in a composite system of two three-level systems.

  10. Geometrical pattern learning

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of learning the positions of spheres in metric spaces, given as data randomly drawn points classified according to whether they are internal or external to an unknown sphere. The particular metrics under consideration are geometrical shape metrics, and the results are intended to be applicable to the problem of learning to identify a shape from related shapes classified according to whether they resemble it visually. While it is typically NP-hard to locate a central point for a hypothesis sphere, we find that it is however often possible to obtain a non-spherical hypothesis which can accurately predict whether further random points lie within the unknown sphere. We exhibit algorithms which achieve this, and in the process indicate useful general techniques for computational learning. Finally we exhibit a natural shape metric and show that it defines a class of spheres not predictable in this sense, subject to standard cryptographic assumptions.

  11. Geometric Frustration with Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Nayoon; Silevitch, Daniel M.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2014-03-01

    We study the effects of Nd doping on the geometrically-frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet Gadolinium Gallium Garnet (GGG), using linear and nonlinear ac magnetic susceptibility. Doping levels from 0.1 to 1 percent Nd alleviate the intrinsic frustration of pure GGG and elevate the ordering temperature compared to the pure material. We use nonlinear pump-probe magnetic susceptometry to examine cluster dynamics for both the pure and the doped series. At low frequency (~10 Hz), spectral hole burning is possible, indicating the presence of spin clusters with discrete energy levels largely decoupled from the overall spin bath. At kHz, we find a Fano resonance, revealing scattering pathways between spin cluster excitations and the bath. We trace the evolution of this resonance behavior as a function of dopant concentration.

  12. Distinguishing the Effects of Bond-Length Alternation versus Bond-Order Alternation on the Nonlinear Optical Properties of π-Conjugated Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Rebecca L; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-18

    Understanding the relationships between the molecular nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and the bond-length alternation (BLA) or π-bond-order alternation (BOA) along the molecular backbone of linear π-conjugated systems has proven widely useful in the development of NLO organic chromophores and materials. Here, we examine model polymethines to elucidate the reliability of these relationships. While BLA is solely a measure of molecular geometric structure, BOA includes information pertaining to the electronic structure. As a result, BLA is found to be a good predictor of NLO properties only when optimized geometries are considered, whereas BOA is more broadly applicable. Proper understanding of the distinction between BLA and BOA is critical when designing computational studies of NLO properties, especially for molecules in complex environments or in nonequilibrium geometries.

  13. Imperfect Geometric Control and Overdamping for The Damped Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burq, Nicolas; Christianson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    We consider the damped wave equation on a manifold with imperfect geometric control. We show the sub-exponential energy decay estimate in (Christianson, J Funct Anal 258(3):1060-1065, 2010) is optimal in the case of one hyperbolic periodic geodesic. We show if the equation is overdamped, then the energy decays exponentially. Finally we show if the equation is overdamped but geometric control fails for one hyperbolic periodic geodesic, then nevertheless the energy decays exponentially.

  14. Insights on hydrogen-bond lifetimes in liquid and supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Martiniano, H F M C; Galamba, N

    2013-12-19

    We study the temperature dependence of the lifetime of geometric and geometric/energetic water hydrogen-bonds (H-bonds), down to supercooled water, through molecular dynamics. The probability and lifetime of H-bonds that break either by translational or librational motions and those of energetic broken H-bonds, along with the effects of transient broken H-bonds and transient H-bonds, are considered. We show that the fraction of transiently broken energetic H-bonds increases at low temperatures and that this energetic breakdown is caused by oxygen-oxygen electrostatic repulsions upon too small amplitude librations to disrupt geometric H-bonds. Hence, differences between geometric and energetic continuous H-bond lifetimes are associated with large H-bond energy fluctuations, in opposition to moderate geometric fluctuations, within common energetic and geometric H-bond definition thresholds. Exclusion of transient broken H-bonds and transient H-bonds leads to H-bond definition-independent mean lifetimes and activation energies, ~11 kJ/mol, consistent with the reactive flux method and experimental scattering results. Further, we show that power law decay of specific temporal H-bond lifetime probability distributions is associated with librational and translational motions that occur on the time scale (~0.1 ps) of H-bond breaking /re-forming dynamics. While our analysis is diffusion-free, the effect of diffusion on H-bond probability distributions where H-bonds are allowed to break and re-form, switching acceptors in between, is shown to result in neither exponential nor power law decay, similar to the reactive flux correlation function.

  15. Bonds Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar outlines…

  16. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  17. Quantum state discrimination: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Damian; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2008-04-01

    We analyze the problem of finding sets of quantum states that can be deterministically discriminated. From a geometric point of view, this problem is equivalent to that of embedding a simplex of points whose distances are maximal with respect to the Bures distance (or trace distance). We derive upper and lower bounds for the trace distance and for the fidelity between two quantum states, which imply bounds for the Bures distance between the unitary orbits of both states. We thus show that, when analyzing minimal and maximal distances between states of fixed spectra, it is sufficient to consider diagonal states only. Hence when optimal discrimination is considered, given freedom up to unitary orbits, it is sufficient to consider diagonal states. This is illustrated geometrically in terms of Weyl chambers.

  18. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  19. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  20. Geometrical method of decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, C.

    2012-12-01

    The computation of tunes and matched beam distributions are essential steps in the analysis of circular accelerators. If certain symmetries—like midplane symmetry—are present, then it is possible to treat the betatron motion in the horizontal, the vertical plane, and (under certain circumstances) the longitudinal motion separately using the well-known Courant-Snyder theory, or to apply transformations that have been described previously as, for instance, the method of Teng and Edwards. In a preceding paper, it has been shown that this method requires a modification for the treatment of isochronous cyclotrons with non-negligible space charge forces. Unfortunately, the modification was numerically not as stable as desired and it was still unclear, if the extension would work for all conceivable cases. Hence, a systematic derivation of a more general treatment seemed advisable. In a second paper, the author suggested the use of real Dirac matrices as basic tools for coupled linear optics and gave a straightforward recipe to decouple positive definite Hamiltonians with imaginary eigenvalues. In this article this method is generalized and simplified in order to formulate a straightforward method to decouple Hamiltonian matrices with eigenvalues on the real and the imaginary axis. The decoupling of symplectic matrices which are exponentials of such Hamiltonian matrices can be deduced from this in a few steps. It is shown that this algebraic decoupling is closely related to a geometric “decoupling” by the orthogonalization of the vectors E→, B→, and P→, which were introduced with the so-called “electromechanical equivalence.” A mathematical analysis of the problem can be traced down to the task of finding a structure-preserving block diagonalization of symplectic or Hamiltonian matrices. Structure preservation means in this context that the (sequence of) transformations must be symplectic and hence canonical. When used iteratively, the decoupling

  1. Aerospace plane guidance using geometric control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Mark A.; Mease, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    A reduced-order method employing decomposition, based on time-scale separation, of the 4-D state space in a 2-D slow manifold and a family of 2-D fast manifolds is shown to provide an excellent approximation to the full-order minimum-fuel ascent trajectory. Near-optimal guidance is obtained by tracking the reduced-order trajectory. The tracking problem is solved as regulation problems on the family of fast manifolds, using the exact linearization methodology from nonlinear geometric control theory. The validity of the overall guidance approach is indicated by simulation.

  2. Chalcogen bond: a sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-16

    A sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  3. Amino-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Lead to Successful Ring-Opening Polymerization of Poly(ε-caprolactone): Enhanced Interfacial Bonding and Optimized Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Roumeli, Eleftheria; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Tsanaktsis, Vasilios; Terzopoulou, Zoe; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the synthesis, structural characteristics, interfacial bonding, and mechanical properties of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with small amounts (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 wt %) of amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) are reported. This method allows the creation of a covalent-bonding zone on the surface of nanotubes, which leads to efficient debundling and therefore satisfactory dispersion and effective load transfer in the nanocomposites. The high covalent grafting extent combined with the higher crystallinity provide the basis for a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties, which was detected in the composites with up to 1 wt % f-MWCNTs. Increasing filler concentration encourages intrinsic aggregation forces, which allow only minor grafting efficiency and poorer dispersion and hence inferior mechanical performance. f-MWCNTs also cause a significant improvement on the polymerization reaction of PCL. Indeed, the in situ polymerization kinetics studies reveal a significant decrease in the reaction temperature, by a factor of 30-40 °C, combined with accelerated the reaction kinetics during initiation and propagation and a drastically reduced effective activation energy.

  4. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  5. Geometric Effects on Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L

    2007-07-06

    The development of an electron cloud in the vacuum chambers of high intensity positron and proton storage rings may limit the machine performances by inducing beam instabilities, beam emittance increase, beam loss, vacuum pressure increases and increased heat load on the vacuum chamber wall. The electron multipacting is a kind of geometric resonance phenomenon and thus is sensitive to the geometric parameters such as the aperture of the beam pipe, beam shape and beam bunch fill pattern, etc. This paper discusses the geometric effects on the electron cloud build-up in a beam chamber and examples are given for different beams and accelerators.

  6. Random geometric prior forest for multiclass object segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Song, Mingli; Tao, Dacheng; Bu, Jiajun; Chen, Chun

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in object detection have led to the development of segmentation by detection approaches that integrate top-down geometric priors for multiclass object segmentation. A key yet under-addressed issue in utilizing top-down cues for the problem of multiclass object segmentation by detection is efficiently generating robust and accurate geometric priors. In this paper, we propose a random geometric prior forest scheme to obtain object-adaptive geometric priors efficiently and robustly. In the scheme, a testing object first searches for training neighbors with similar geometries using the random geometric prior forest, and then the geometry of the testing object is reconstructed by linearly combining the geometries of its neighbors. Our scheme enjoys several favorable properties when compared with conventional methods. First, it is robust and very fast because its inference does not suffer from bad initializations, poor local minimums or complex optimization. Second, the figure/ground geometries of training samples are utilized in a multitask manner. Third, our scheme is object-adaptive but does not require the labeling of parts or poselets, and thus, it is quite easy to implement. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, we integrate the obtained top-down geometric priors with conventional bottom-up color cues in the frame of graph cut. The proposed random geometric prior forest achieves the best segmentation results of all of the methods tested on VOC2010/2012 and is 90 times faster than the current state-of-the-art method. PMID:25974937

  7. DFT OPTIMIZATION STUDIES OF ALPHA-MALTOSE: ISO-ENERGETIC AND INTERNAL COORDINATE CONTOUR MAPS UPON ROTATION ABOUT THE GLYCOSIDIC BONDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disaccharide alpha-maltose is a molecular template for amylose. Our previous DFT work on maltose is expanded to a set of 63 fully optimized (B3LYP/6-311++G**) conformations. All clockwise, and counter clockwise hydroxyl groups, as well as 'kink' and band-slip conformers, are studied. Adiabati...

  8. Assessment of Orbital-Optimized MP2.5 for Thermochemistry and Kinetics: Dramatic Failures of Standard Perturbation Theory Approaches for Aromatic Bond Dissociation Energies and Barrier Heights of Radical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Soydaş, Emine; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2015-04-14

    An assessment of orbital-optimized MP2.5 (OMP2.5) [ Bozkaya, U.; Sherrill, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 204105 ] for thermochemistry and kinetics is presented. The OMP2.5 method is applied to closed- and open-shell reaction energies, barrier heights, and aromatic bond dissociation energies. The performance of OMP2.5 is compared with that of the MP2, OMP2, MP2.5, MP3, OMP3, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods. For most of the test sets, the OMP2.5 method performs better than MP2.5 and CCSD, and provides accurate results. For barrier heights of radical reactions and aromatic bond dissociation energies OMP2.5-MP2.5, OMP2-MP2, and OMP3-MP3 differences become obvious. Especially, for aromatic bond dissociation energies, standard perturbation theory (MP) approaches dramatically fail, providing mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 22.5 (MP2), 17.7 (MP2.5), and 12.8 (MP3) kcal mol(-1), while the MAE values of the orbital-optimized counterparts are 2.7, 2.4, and 2.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Hence, there are 5-8-folds reductions in errors when optimized orbitals are employed. Our results demonstrate that standard MP approaches dramatically fail when the reference wave function suffers from the spin-contamination problem. On the other hand, the OMP2.5 method can reduce spin-contamination in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) initial guess orbitals. For overall evaluation, we conclude that the OMP2.5 method is very helpful not only for challenging open-shell systems and transition-states but also for closed-shell molecules. Hence, one may prefer OMP2.5 over MP2.5 and CCSD as an O(N(6)) method, where N is the number of basis functions, for thermochemistry and kinetics. The cost of the OMP2.5 method is comparable with that of CCSD for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations, the OMP2.5 method is only half as expensive as CCSD. PMID:26574366

  9. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  10. Guitars, Violins, and Geometric Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita; Haehl, Martha

    2007-01-01

    This article describes middle school mathematics activities that relate measurement, ratios, and geometric sequences to finger positions or the placement of frets on stringed musical instruments. (Contains 2 figures and 2 tables.)

  11. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  12. Algebraic, geometric, and stochastic aspects of genetic operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foo, N. Y.; Bosworth, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Genetic algorithms for function optimization employ genetic operators patterned after those observed in search strategies employed in natural adaptation. Two of these operators, crossover and inversion, are interpreted in terms of their algebraic and geometric properties. Stochastic models of the operators are developed which are employed in Monte Carlo simulations of their behavior.

  13. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  14. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number— in an inertialess environment—is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the “belly phase,” peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  15. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  16. Optimization of amino group density on surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles covalently bonded to a silicone substrate for antibacterial and cell adhesion activities.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Yasuda, Shoji; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Mitsunobu; Ito, Seishiro; Kishida, Akio; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    A composite consisting of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle, the surface of which was modified with amino groups, and a silicone substrate through covalent bonding at their interface was developed, and antibacterial and cell adhesion activities of the composite were evaluated. The density of the amino groups on the TiO2 particle surface was controlled by the reaction time of the modification reaction. The degradation rate of CH3CHO in the presence of the TiO2 particles under UV irradiation decreased with an increase in the amino group density on the TiO2 surface. On the other hand, the number of L929 cells adhering on the TiO2/silicone composite increased with an increase in the amino group density. From the above two results, the optimum density of amino groups for both photoreactivity and cell adhesiveness was estimated to be 2.0-4.0 molecules/nm2. The optimum amino group-modified TiO2/silicone composite sheet (amino group density, 3.0 molecules/nm2) showed an effective antibacterial activity for Escherichia coli bacteria under UV irradiation.

  17. Geometric programming design of spacecraft protective structures to defeat earth-orbital space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.; Price, D. Marvin

    1990-01-01

    A unique methodology providing global optimization of spacecraft protective structures is presented. The Geometric Programming optimization technique, which has a long history of application to structural design problems, is employed to minimize spacecraft weight of protective structural systems exposed to meteoroid and space debris hypervelocity impacts. The space debris and meteoroid environment are defined followed by the formulation of the general weight objective function. The Wilkinson, Burch, and Nysmith hypervelocity impact predictor models are then used in example cases to display Geometric Programming capabilities. Results show that global nonlinear design optimization can be performed for hypervelocity impact models that follow the Geometric Programming form.

  18. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  19. Comprehensive analysis of individual pulp fiber bonds quantifies the mechanisms of fiber bonding in paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Ulrich; Schennach, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The process of papermaking requires substantial amounts of energy and wood consumption, which contributes to larger environmental costs. In order to optimize the production of papermaking to suit its many applications in material science and engineering, a quantitative understanding of bonding forces between the individual pulp fibers is of importance. Here we show the first approach to quantify the bonding energies contributed by the individual bonding mechanisms. We calculated the impact of the following mechanisms necessary for paper formation: mechanical interlocking, interdiffusion, capillary bridges, hydrogen bonding, Van der Waals forces, and Coulomb forces on the bonding energy. Experimental results quantify the area in molecular contact necessary for bonding. Atomic force microscopy experiments derive the impact of mechanical interlocking. Capillary bridges also contribute to the bond. A model based on the crystal structure of cellulose leads to values for the chemical bonds. In contrast to general believe which favors hydrogen bonding Van der Waals bonds play the most important role according to our model. Comparison with experimentally derived bond energies support the presented model. This study characterizes bond formation between pulp fibers leading to insight that could be potentially used to optimize the papermaking process, while reducing energy and wood consumption.

  20. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  1. Guiding light via geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Santamato, Enrico; Assanto, Gaetano; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    All known methods for transverse confinement and guidance of light rely on modification of the refractive index, that is, on the scalar properties of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we disclose the concept of a dielectric waveguide that exploits vectorial spin-orbit interactions of light and the resulting geometric phases. The approach relies on the use of anisotropic media with an optic axis that lies orthogonal to the propagation direction but is spatially modulated, so that the refractive index remains constant everywhere. A spin-controlled cumulative phase distortion is imposed on the beam, balancing diffraction for a specific polarization. As well as theoretical analysis, we present an experimental demonstration of the guidance using a series of discrete geometric-phase lenses made from liquid crystal. Our findings show that geometric phases may determine the optical guiding behaviour well beyond a Rayleigh length, paving the way to a new class of photonic devices. The concept is applicable to the whole electromagnetic spectrum.

  2. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  3. Guiding light via geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Santamato, Enrico; Assanto, Gaetano; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    All known methods for transverse confinement and guidance of light rely on modification of the refractive index, that is, on the scalar properties of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we disclose the concept of a dielectric waveguide that exploits vectorial spin–orbit interactions of light and the resulting geometric phases. The approach relies on the use of anisotropic media with an optic axis that lies orthogonal to the propagation direction but is spatially modulated, so that the refractive index remains constant everywhere. A spin-controlled cumulative phase distortion is imposed on the beam, balancing diffraction for a specific polarization. As well as theoretical analysis, we present an experimental demonstration of the guidance using a series of discrete geometric-phase lenses made from liquid crystal. Our findings show that geometric phases may determine the optical guiding behaviour well beyond a Rayleigh length, paving the way to a new class of photonic devices. The concept is applicable to the whole electromagnetic spectrum.

  4. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  5. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  6. Geometric validation plan for ASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Akira; Matsumoto, Ken; Fujisada, Hiroyuki

    1998-12-01

    The ASTER system is a multispectral imager which covers a spectral range from visible to thermal infrared light by combining three subsystems composed of four telescopes. To ensure the high-quality data products concerning to the geolocation and band-to-band matching performance, the geometric registration is needed. This paper describes the geometric validation procedure for a multi-telescope imager with a cross-track pointing function. The strategy for the maintenance of database files and the preparation a GCP library is also shown.

  7. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  8. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers. PMID:27403589

  9. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-12

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  10. Bonding-restricted structure search for novel 2D materials with dispersed C2 dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the available algorithms for unbiased structure searches are primarily atom-based, where atoms are manipulated as the elementary units, and energy is used as the target function without any restrictions on the bonding of atoms. In fact, in many cases such as nanostructure-assembled materials, the structural units are nanoclusters. We report a study of a bonding-restricted structure search method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) for finding the stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) materials containing dispersed C2 dimers rather than individual C atoms. The C2 dimer can be considered as a prototype of nanoclusters. Taking Si-C, B-C and Ti-C systems as test cases, our method combined with density functional theory and phonon calculations uncover new ground state geometrical structures for SiC2, Si2C2, BC2, B2C2, TiC2, and Ti2C2 sheets and their low-lying energy allotropes, as well as their electronic structures. Equally important, this method can be applied to other complex systems even containing f elements and other molecular dimers such as S2, N2, B2 and Si2, where the complex orbital orientations require extensive search for finding the optimal orientations to maximize the bonding with the dimers, predicting new 2D materials beyond MXenes (a family of transition metal carbides or nitrides) and dichalcogenide monolayers.

  11. Teleportation of geometric structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek; Orłowski, Łukasz

    2009-04-01

    The simplest quantum teleportation algorithms can be represented in geometric terms in spaces of dimensions 3 (for real state vectors) and 4 (for complex state vectors). The geometric representation is based on geometric-algebra coding, a geometric alternative to the tensor-product coding typical of quantum mechanics. We discuss all the elementary ingredients of the geometric version of the algorithm: geometric analogs of states and controlled Pauli gates. A fully geometric presentation is possible if one employs a nonstandard representation of directed magnitudes, formulated in terms of colors defined via stereographic projection of a color wheel, and not by means of directed volumes.

  12. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shenbo

    2015-08-01

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels.

  13. Geometric registration and rectification of spaceborne SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Pang, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of automated location and geometric rectification techniques for digitally processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. A software package has been developed that is capable of determining the absolute location of an image pixel to within 60 m using only the spacecraft ephemeris data and the characteristics of the SAR data collection and processing system. Based on this location capability algorithms have been developed that geometrically rectify the imagery, register it to a common coordinate system and mosaic multiple frames to form extended digital SAR maps. These algorithms have been optimized using parallel processing techniques to minimize the operating time. Test results are given using Seasat SAR data.

  14. Patterned eutectic bonding with Al/Ge thin films for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavracky, Paul M.; Vu, Bao

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, we report our results using eutectic bonding with the aluminum/germanium alloy to create high quality bonds. The results of a series of experiments conducted to optimize eutectic alloy bonding for MEMS are described. Issues discussed include surface preparation, eutectic composition, bonding apparatus and bonding conditions (temperature and time).

  15. Vergence, Vision, and Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Michael P.

    1975-01-01

    Provides a definition of vergence in terms of the curvature of the wave fronts, and gives examples to illustrate the advantages of this approach. The vergence treatment of geometrical optics provides both conceptual and algebraic advantages, particularly for the life science student, over the traditional object distance-image distance-focal length…

  16. Geometric quantum noise of spin.

    PubMed

    Shnirman, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Saha, Arijit; Burmistrov, Igor S; Kiselev, Mikhail N; Altland, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The presence of geometric phases is known to affect the dynamics of the systems involved. Here, we consider a quantum degree of freedom, moving in a dissipative environment, whose dynamics is described by a Langevin equation with quantum noise. We show that geometric phases enter the stochastic noise terms. Specifically, we consider small ferromagnetic particles (nanomagnets) or quantum dots close to Stoner instability, and investigate the dynamics of the total magnetization in the presence of tunneling coupling to the metallic leads. We generalize the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schön effective action and the corresponding semiclassical equations of motion from the U(1) case of the charge degree of freedom to the SU(2) case of the magnetization. The Langevin forces (torques) in these equations are strongly influenced by the geometric phase. As a first but nontrivial application, we predict low temperature quantum diffusion of the magnetization on the Bloch sphere, which is governed by the geometric phase. We propose a protocol for experimental observation of this phenomenon.

  17. Celestial mechanics with geometric algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric algebra is introduced as a general tool for Celestial Mechanics. A general method for handling finite rotations and rotational kinematics is presented. The constants of Kepler motion are derived and manipulated in a new way. A new spinor formulation of perturbation theory is developed.

  18. The geometric oblateness of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, F. A.; Avis, C. C.; Colombo, G.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers photographs of Uranus obtained by the Stratoscope II balloon-borne telescope in 1970. These data have been redigitized and reanalyzed, and the geometric oblateness of Uranus was determined from the isophotes near the limb using an expression in terms of the equatorial and polar radii.

  19. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  20. A geometric approach to direct minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Voorhis, Troy; Head-Gordon, Martin

    The approach presented, geometric direct minimization (GDM), is derived from purely geometrical arguments, and is designed to minimize a function of a set of orthonormal orbitals. The optimization steps consist of sequential unitary transformations of the orbitals, and convergence is accelerated using the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) approach in the iterative subspace, together with a diagonal approximation to the Hessian for the remaining degrees of freedom. The approach is tested by implementing the solution of the self-consistent field (SCF) equations and comparing results with the standard direct inversion in the iterative subspace (DIIS) method. It is found that GDM is very robust and converges in every system studied, including several cases in which DIIS fails to find a solution. For main group compounds, GDM convergence is nearly as rapid as DIIS, whereas for transition metalcontaining systems we find that GDM is significantly slower than DIIS. A hybrid procedure where DIIS is used for the first several iterations and GDM is used thereafter is found to provide a robust solution for transition metal-containing systems.

  1. Nanoparticle fabrication by geometrically confined nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denomme, Ryan C.; Iyer, Krishna; Kreder, Michael; Smith, Brendan; Nieva, Patricia M.

    2013-07-01

    Arrays of metal nanoparticles, typically gold or silver, exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance, a phenomenon that has many applications, such as chemical and biological sensing. However, fabrication of metal nanoparticle arrays with high uniformity and repeatability, at a reasonable cost, is difficult. Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been used before to produce inexpensive nanoparticle arrays through the use of monolayers of self-assembled microspheres as a deposition mask. However, control over the size and location of the arrays, as well as uniformity over large areas is poor, thus limiting its use to research purposes. In this paper, a new NSL method, called here geometrically confined NSL (GCNSL), is presented. In GCNSL, microsphere assembly is confined to geometric patterns defined in photoresist, allowing high-precision and large-scale nanoparticle patterning while still remaining low cost. Using this new method, it is demonstrated that 400 nm polystyrene microspheres can be assembled inside of large arrays of photoresist patterns. Results show that optimal microsphere assembly is achieved with long and narrow rectangular photoresist patterns. The combination of microsphere monolayers and photoresist patterns is then used as a deposition mask to produce silver nanoparticles at precise locations on the substrate with high uniformity, repeatability, and quality.

  2. Processing geometric representations on SIMD computers

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Y.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis contributes to designing parallel algorithms to process border and linear quadtree representations on mesh-connected computers (MCCs) and hypercubes. This thesis consists of two parts. The first part studies some primitive operations on mesh-connected computers and hypercubes. These include various routing tasks and several versions of the parallel prefix algorithms. It is shown how general routings can be done in O(n) time on an n {times} n mesh and O(d{sup 2}) on a d-dimensional hypercube (d-cube). Also presented are optimal routing algorithms for some classes of permutation routings. For the parallel prefix problem, the author describes how the initial prefixes can be computed efficiently when the data are mapped into the MCC or the hypercube in some specific manners. The second part deals with processing border codes and linear quadtrees. These include generating border codes and linear quadtrees from a given image, reconstructing the image from its geometric representations, computing various geometric properties, answering the point-in-region query, performing set operations, etc. For linear quadtrees, algorithms are also designed for finding neighbors of equal or larger size for all nodes simultaneously. A connected component-labeling algorithm is also presented.

  3. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  4. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  5. Geometric hashing and object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Peter F.; Huber, Birkett

    1999-09-01

    We discuss a new geometric hashing method for searching large databases of 2D images (or 3D objects) to match a query built from geometric information presented by a single 3D object (or single 2D image). The goal is to rapidly determine a small subset of the images that potentially contain a view of the given object (or a small set of objects that potentially match the item in the image). Since this must be accomplished independent of the pose of the object, the objects and images, which are characterized by configurations of geometric features such as points, lines and/or conics, must be treated using a viewpoint invariant formulation. We are therefore forced to characterize these configurations in terms of their 3D and 2D geometric invariants. The crucial relationship between the 3D geometry and its 'residual' in 2D is expressible as a correspondence (in the sense of algebraic geometry). Computing a set of generating equations for the ideal of this correspondence gives a complete characterization of the view of independent relationships between an object and all of its possible images. Once a set of generators is in hand, it can be used to devise efficient recognition algorithms and to give an efficient geometric hashing scheme. This requires exploiting the form and symmetry of the equations. The result is a multidimensional access scheme whose efficiency we examine. Several potential directions for improving this scheme are also discussed. Finally, in a brief appendix, we discuss an alternative approach to invariants for generalized perspective that replaces the standard invariants by a subvariety of a Grassmannian. The advantage of this is that one can circumvent many annoying general position assumptions and arrive at invariant equations (in the Plucker coordinates) that are more numerically robust in applications.

  6. A geometrical perspective for the bargaining problem.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong

    2010-01-01

    A new treatment to determine the Pareto-optimal outcome for a non-zero-sum game is presented. An equilibrium point for any game is defined here as a set of strategy choices for the players, such that no change in the choice of any single player will increase the overall payoff of all the players. Determining equilibrium for multi-player games is a complex problem. An intuitive conceptual tool for reducing the complexity, via the idea of spatially representing strategy options in the bargaining problem is proposed. Based on this geometry, an equilibrium condition is established such that the product of their gains over what each receives is maximal. The geometrical analysis of a cooperative bargaining game provides an example for solving multi-player and non-zero-sum games efficiently. PMID:20436675

  7. A geometric approach to quantum state separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagan, E.; Yerokhin, V.; Shehu, A.; Feldman, E.; Bergou, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic quantum state transformations can be characterized by the degree of state separation they provide. This, in turn, sets limits on the success rate of these transformations. We consider optimum state separation of two known pure states in the general case where the known states have arbitrary a priori probabilities. The problem is formulated from a geometric perspective and shown to be equivalent to the problem of finding tangent curves within two families of conics that represent the unitarity constraints and the objective functions to be optimized, respectively. We present the corresponding analytical solutions in various forms. In the limit of perfect state separation, which is equivalent to unambiguous state discrimination, the solution exhibits a phenomenon analogous to a second order symmetry breaking phase transition. We also propose a linear optics implementation of separation which is based on the dual rail representation of qubits and single-photon multiport interferometry.

  8. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  9. Second sphere control of spin state: Differential tuning of axial ligand bonds in ferric porphyrin complexes by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Sengupta, Kushal; Singha, Asmita; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Rana, Atanu; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2016-02-01

    An iron porphyrin with a pre-organized hydrogen bonding (H-Bonding) distal architecture is utilized to avoid the inherent loss of entropy associated with H-Bonding from solvent (water) and mimic the behavior of metallo-enzyme active sites attributed to H-Bonding interactions of active site with the 2nd sphere residues. Resonance Raman (rR) data on these iron porphyrin complexes indicate that H-Bonding to an axial ligand like hydroxide can result in both stronger or weaker Fe(III)-OH bond relative to iron porphyrin complexes. The 6-coordinate (6C) complexes bearing water derived axial ligands, trans to imidazole or thiolate axial ligand with H-Bonding stabilize a low spin (LS) ground state (GS) when a complex without H-Bonding stabilizes a high spin (HS) ground state. DFT calculations reproduce the trend in the experimental data and provide a mechanism of how H-Bonding can indeed lead to stronger metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand donates an H-Bond and lead to weaker metal ligand bonds when the axial ligand accepts an H-Bond. The experimental and computational results explain how a weak Fe(III)-OH bond (due to H-Bonding) can lead to the stabilization of low spin ground state in synthetic mimics and in enzymes containing iron porphyrin active sites. H-Bonding to a water ligand bound to a reduced ferrous active site can only strengthen the Fe(II)-OH2 bond and thus exclusion of water and hydrophilic residues from distal sites of O2 binding/activating heme proteins is necessary to avoid inhibition of O2 binding by water. These results help demonstrate the predominant role played by H-Bonding and subtle changes in its orientation in determining the geometric and electronic structure of iron porphyrin based active sites in nature.

  10. Students' Perceptions of Parental Bonding Styles and Their Academic Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Hyojung; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Boyoung; Lee, Sang Min

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how parental bonding style affects academic burnout in Korean adolescents. Participants were 447 middle school students, who completed the Parental Bonding Instrument and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey. MANCOVA results confirmed that adolescents reporting the optimal bonding parental style, for both mother and…

  11. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  12. The verdict geometric quality library.

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, Patrick Michael; Ernst, C.D. (Elemental Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT); Thompson, David C.; Stimpson, C.J.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Verdict is a collection of subroutines for evaluating the geometric qualities of triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra, and hexahedra using a variety of metrics. A metric is a real number assigned to one of these shapes depending on its particular vertex coordinates. These metrics are used to evaluate the input to finite element, finite volume, boundary element, and other types of solvers that approximate the solution to partial differential equations defined over regions of space. The geometric qualities of these regions is usually strongly tied to the accuracy these solvers are able to obtain in their approximations. The subroutines are written in C++ and have a simple C interface. Each metric may be evaluated individually or in combination. When multiple metrics are evaluated at once, they share common calculations to lower the cost of the evaluation.

  13. Polar metals by geometric design.

    PubMed

    Kim, T H; Puggioni, D; Yuan, Y; Xie, L; Zhou, H; Campbell, N; Ryan, P J; Choi, Y; Kim, J-W; Patzner, J R; Ryu, S; Podkaminer, J P; Irwin, J; Ma, Y; Fennie, C J; Rzchowski, M S; Pan, X Q; Gopalan, V; Rondinelli, J M; Eom, C B

    2016-05-01

    Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals--it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedral--the structural signatures of perovskites--owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties. PMID:27096369

  14. Polar metals by geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. H.; Puggioni, D.; Yuan, Y.; Xie, L.; Zhou, H.; Campbell, N.; Ryan, P. J.; Choi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Patzner, J. R.; Ryu, S.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Irwin, J.; Ma, Y.; Fennie, C. J.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Pan, X. Q.; Gopalan, V.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Gauss’s law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals—it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedra—the structural signatures of perovskites—owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  15. Polar metals by geometric design.

    PubMed

    Kim, T H; Puggioni, D; Yuan, Y; Xie, L; Zhou, H; Campbell, N; Ryan, P J; Choi, Y; Kim, J-W; Patzner, J R; Ryu, S; Podkaminer, J P; Irwin, J; Ma, Y; Fennie, C J; Rzchowski, M S; Pan, X Q; Gopalan, V; Rondinelli, J M; Eom, C B

    2016-05-01

    Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals--it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedral--the structural signatures of perovskites--owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.

  16. Geometric mean for subspace selection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Subspace selection approaches are powerful tools in pattern classification and data visualization. One of the most important subspace approaches is the linear dimensionality reduction step in the Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), which has been successfully employed in many fields such as biometrics, bioinformatics, and multimedia information management. However, the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA has a critical drawback: for a classification task with c classes, if the dimension of the projected subspace is strictly lower than c - 1, the projection to a subspace tends to merge those classes, which are close together in the original feature space. If separate classes are sampled from Gaussian distributions, all with identical covariance matrices, then the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA maximizes the mean value of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergences between different classes. Based on this viewpoint, the geometric mean for subspace selection is studied in this paper. Three criteria are analyzed: 1) maximization of the geometric mean of the KL divergences, 2) maximization of the geometric mean of the normalized KL divergences, and 3) the combination of 1 and 2. Preliminary experimental results based on synthetic data, UCI Machine Learning Repository, and handwriting digits show that the third criterion is a potential discriminative subspace selection method, which significantly reduces the class separation problem in comparing with the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA and its several representative extensions. PMID:19110492

  17. Geometric mean for subspace selection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    Subspace selection approaches are powerful tools in pattern classification and data visualization. One of the most important subspace approaches is the linear dimensionality reduction step in the Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), which has been successfully employed in many fields such as biometrics, bioinformatics, and multimedia information management. However, the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA has a critical drawback: for a classification task with c classes, if the dimension of the projected subspace is strictly lower than c - 1, the projection to a subspace tends to merge those classes, which are close together in the original feature space. If separate classes are sampled from Gaussian distributions, all with identical covariance matrices, then the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA maximizes the mean value of the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergences between different classes. Based on this viewpoint, the geometric mean for subspace selection is studied in this paper. Three criteria are analyzed: 1) maximization of the geometric mean of the KL divergences, 2) maximization of the geometric mean of the normalized KL divergences, and 3) the combination of 1 and 2. Preliminary experimental results based on synthetic data, UCI Machine Learning Repository, and handwriting digits show that the third criterion is a potential discriminative subspace selection method, which significantly reduces the class separation problem in comparing with the linear dimensionality reduction step in FLDA and its several representative extensions.

  18. Simulation on the Measurement Method of Geometric Distortion of Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Shu-lin, Ren

    2016-07-01

    The accurate measurement on the effect of telescope geometric distortion is conducive to improving the astrometric positioning accuracy of telescopes, which is of significant importance for many disciplines of astronomy, such as stellar clusters, natural satellites, asteroids, comets, and other celestial bodies in the solar system. For this reason, the predecessors have developed an iterative self-calibration method to measure the telescope geometric distortion by dithering observations in a dense star field, and achieved fine results. However, the previous work did not make constraints on the density of star field, and the dithering mode, but chose empirically some good conditions (for example, a denser star field and a larger dithering number) to observe, which took up much observing time, and caused a rather low efficiency. In order to explore the validity of the self-calibration method, and optimize its observational conditions, it is necessary to carry out the corresponding simulations. In this paper, we introduce first the self-calibration method in detail, then by the simulation method, we verify the effectiveness of the self-calibration method, and make further optimizations on the observational conditions, such as the density of star field and the dithering number, to achieve a higher accuracy of geometric distortion measurement. Finally, taking consideration of the practical application for correcting the geometric distortion effect, we have analyzed the relationship between the number of reference stars in the field of view and the astrometric accuracy by virtue of the simulation method.

  19. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  20. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  1. An alternative near-neighbor definition of hydrogen bonding in water.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, A D; Buch, V

    2008-03-21

    A definition of hydrogen bonding in water is proposed in which an H...O pair forms a hydrogen bond if (a) an oxygen atom is the nearest nonchemically bonded neighbor of a hydrogen atom; and (b) the hydrogen is the first or the second intermolecular near-neighbor of the oxygen. Unlike the commonly employed hydrogen-bond definitions, this definition does not depend on the choice of geometric or energetic cutoffs applied to continuous distributions of properties. With the present definition, the distribution of O...H bond lengths decays smoothly to zero in a physically reasonable range. After correction for the presence of intermittent hydrogen bonds, this definition appears to provide a more stable description of hydrogen bonds and coordination shells than the more conventional cutoff-based definition. "Partial" H bonds satisfying only one of the two bonding requirements serve as transition states in the H-bond network evolution.

  2. Geometrical Visualisation--Epistemic and Emotional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    A well-documented experience of students of elementary Euclidean geometry is "seeing" a geometric result and being sure about its truth; this sort of experience gives rise to the notion of geometrical visualisation that is developed here. In this essay a philosophical argument for the epistemic potential of geometrical visualisation is reviewed,…

  3. Development of a Geometric Spatial Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesh, Bibi; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Sherrod, Sonya

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the Geometric Spatial Assessment. We detail the development of this instrument which was designed to identify middle school students' strategies and advancement in understanding of four geometric concept domains (geometric spatial visualization, spatial projection, cardinal directions, and periodic patterns)…

  4. Generalized geometric measure of entanglement for multiparty mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tamoghna; Roy, Sudipto Singha; Bagchi, Shrobona; Misra, Avijit; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-08-01

    Computing entanglement of an arbitrary bipartite or multipartite mixed state is in general not an easy task as it usually involves complex optimization. Here we show that, exploiting symmetries of certain multiqudit mixed states, we can compute a genuine multiparty entanglement measure, the generalized geometric measure, for these classes of mixed states. The chosen states have different ranks and consist of an arbitrary number of parties.

  5. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cartesian coordinates for the optimized structures and harmonic frequencies, sample IRC data and plot, grid data for three dimensional potential energy surface and contour plot and data for BOMD simulation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02278a

  6. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Lindsay Christine

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature for an axisymmetric cone geometry were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. The DAKOTA optimization software package was then used to optimize the geometry to maximize the amplification of waves at first mode frequencies and to minimize the amplification of the waves at second mode frequencies, as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. This was accomplished by allowing all geometric parameters in the sensitivity study to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. During this process, boundary layer edge properties were recorded to investigate any correlations. Results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose or an axisymmetric cone with a high degree of concave curvature under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will cause the largest amplification of first mode instability waves.

  7. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  8. SQCD Vacua and Geometrical Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2008-11-23

    We consider the geometrical engineering constructions for the N = 1 SQCD vacua. After one T-duality, these geometries with wrapped D5 branes become N = 1 brane configurations with NS-branes and D4-branes. After performing a flop, the geometries contain branes, antibranes and branes wrapped on non-holomorphic cycles. The various tachyon condensations between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes together with deformations of the cycles give rise to a variety of supersymmetric and metastable non-supersymmetric vacua.

  9. Moving walls and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Samuel, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We unveil the existence of a non-trivial Berry phase associated to the dynamics of a quantum particle in a one dimensional box with moving walls. It is shown that a suitable choice of boundary conditions has to be made in order to preserve unitarity. For these boundary conditions we compute explicitly the geometric phase two-form on the parameter space. The unboundedness of the Hamiltonian describing the system leads to a natural prescription of renormalization for divergent contributions arising from the boundary.

  10. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, Ivan; Endzhievskaya, Irina; Vasilovskaya, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg m3, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W m * °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  11. Measurement error in geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Fruciano, Carmelo

    2016-06-01

    Geometric morphometrics-a set of methods for the statistical analysis of shape once saluted as a revolutionary advancement in the analysis of morphology -is now mature and routinely used in ecology and evolution. However, a factor often disregarded in empirical studies is the presence and the extent of measurement error. This is potentially a very serious issue because random measurement error can inflate the amount of variance and, since many statistical analyses are based on the amount of "explained" relative to "residual" variance, can result in loss of statistical power. On the other hand, systematic bias can affect statistical analyses by biasing the results (i.e. variation due to bias is incorporated in the analysis and treated as biologically-meaningful variation). Here, I briefly review common sources of error in geometric morphometrics. I then review the most commonly used methods to measure and account for both random and non-random measurement error, providing a worked example using a real dataset.

  12. NPP VIIRS Geometric Performance Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Wolfe, Robert E.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on-board the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite is scheduled for launch in October, 2011. It is to provide satellite measured radiance/reflectance data for both weather and climate applications. Along with radiometric calibration, geometric characterization and calibration of Sensor Data Records (SDRs) are crucial to the VIIRS Environmental Data Record (EDR) algorithms and products which are used in numerical weather prediction (NWP). The instrument geometric performance includes: 1) sensor (detector) spatial response, parameterized by the dynamic field of view (DFOV) in the scan direction and instantaneous FOV (IFOV) in the track direction, modulation transfer function (MTF) for the 17 moderate resolution bands (M-bands), and horizontal spatial resolution (HSR) for the five imagery bands (I-bands); 2) matrices of band-to-band co-registration (BBR) from the corresponding detectors in all band pairs; and 3) pointing knowledge and stability characteristics that includes scan plane tilt, scan rate and scan start position variations, and thermally induced variations in pointing with respect to orbital position. They have been calibrated and characterized through ground testing under ambient and thermal vacuum conditions, numerical modeling and analysis. This paper summarizes the results, which are in general compliance with specifications, along with anomaly investigations, and describes paths forward for characterizing on-orbit BBR and spatial response, and for improving instrument on-orbit performance in pointing and geolocation.

  13. Geometric pumping in autophoretic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Montenegro Johnson, Thomas; de Canio, Gabriele; Lobatto-Dauzier, Nicolas; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Pumping at the microscale has important applications from biological fluid handling to lab-on-a-chip systems. It can be achieved either from a global (e.g. imposed pressure gradient) or local forcing (e.g. ciliary pumping). Phoretic slip flows generated from concentration or temperature gradients are examples of such local flow forcing. Autophoresis is currently receiving much attention for the design of self-propelled particles achieving force- and torque-free locomotion by combining two essential surface properties: (i) an activity that modifies the solute content of the particle's environment (e.g. catalytic reaction or solute release), and (ii) a mobility that generates a slip flow from the resulting local concentration gradients. Recent work showed that geometric asymmetry is sufficient for a chemically-homogeneous particle to self-propel. Here we extend this idea to micro-pumping in active channels whose walls possess both chemical activity and phoretic mobility. Using a combination of theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we show that geometrically-asymmetric but chemically-homogeneous channels can generate pumping and analyze the resulting flow patterns.

  14. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  15. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  16. Optimized actuators for ultrathin deformable primary mirrors.

    PubMed

    Laslandes, Marie; Patterson, Keith; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2015-05-20

    A novel design and selection scheme for surface-parallel actuators for ultrathin, lightweight mirrors is presented. The actuation system consists of electrodes printed on a continuous layer of piezoelectric material bonded to an optical-quality substrate. The electrodes provide almost full coverage of the piezoelectric layer, in order to maximize the amount of active material that is available for actuation, and their shape is optimized to maximize the correctability and stroke of the mirror for a chosen number of independent actuators and for a dominant imperfection mode. The starting point for the design of the electrodes is the observation that the correction of a figure error that has at least two planes of mirror symmetry is optimally done with twin actuators that have the same optimized shape but are rotated through a suitable angle. Additional sets of optimized twin actuators are defined by considering the intersection between the twin actuators, and hence an arbitrarily fine actuation pattern can be generated. It is shown that this approach leads to actuator systems with better performance than simple, geometrically based actuators. Several actuator patterns to correct third-order astigmatism aberrations are presented, and an experimental demonstration of a 41-actuator mirror is also presented. PMID:26192533

  17. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  18. Bond percolation in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  19. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  20. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  1. Red-shifted hydrogen bonds and blue-shifted van der Waals contact in the standard Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pan-Pan; Qiu, Wen-Yuan

    2009-09-24

    Standard Watson-Crick adenine-thymine (AT) base pair has been investigated by using the B3LYP functional with 6-31G(d, p) basis set, at which level of theory the geometrical characteristics of the AT base pair are the best in agreement with the experiment. It exhibits simultaneously red-shifted N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds as well as a blue-shifted C-H...O contact. AIM analysis suggests that the blue-shifted C-H...O contact exists as van der Waals interaction, and the electron density rho that reflects the strength of a bond has been used to explain the red- and blue-shifted. By means of NBO analysis, we report a method to estimate the effect of hyperconjugation quantitatively, which combines the electron density in the X-H (X = N, C) sigma bonding orbital with that in the sigma* antibonding orbital. The effect of structural reorganization on the origins of the red- and blue-shifted has been considered by the partial optimization, its behavior on the X-H (X = N, C) bond is quite different. Rehybridization and repolarization models are employed, and they act as bond-shortening effects. The competition between the electrostatic attractions and Pauli/nucleus repulsions is present in the two typical red-shifted N-H...O and N-H...N hydrogen bonds as well as in the blue-shifted C-H...O van der Waals contact. Electrostatic attraction between H and Y atoms (Y = O, N) is an important reason for the red shift, while the nucleus-nucleus repulsion between H and O atoms may be a factor leading to the C-H bond contraction and its blue shift. The electric field effect induced by the acceptor O atom on the C-H bond is also discussed.

  2. Elastic scattering in geometrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebaniak, Zbigniew; Wibig, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental data on proton-proton elastic and inelastic scattering emerging from the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider, calls for an efficient model to fit the data. We have examined the optical, geometrical picture and we have found the simplest, linear dependence of this model parameters on the logarithm of the interaction energy with the significant change of the respective slopes at one point corresponding to the energy of about 300 GeV. The logarithmic dependence observed at high energies allows one to extrapolate the proton-proton elastic, total (and inelastic) cross sections to ultra high energies seen in cosmic rays events which makes a solid justification of the extrapolation to very high energy domain of cosmic rays and could help us to interpret the data from an astrophysical and a high energy physics point of view.

  3. Geometrical setting of solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Fiala, Zdenek

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Solid mechanics within the Riemannian symmetric manifold GL (3, R)/O (3, R). > Generalized logarithmic strain. > Consistent linearization. > Incremental principle of virtual power. > Time-discrete approximation. - Abstract: The starting point in the geometrical setting of solid mechanics is to represent deformation process of a solid body as a trajectory in a convenient space with Riemannian geometry, and then to use the corresponding tools for its analysis. Based on virtual power of internal stresses, we show that such a configuration space is the (globally) symmetric space of symmetric positive-definite real matrices. From this unifying point of view, we shall analyse the logarithmic strain, the stress rate, as well as linearization and intrinsic integration of corresponding evolution equation.

  4. Geometrical characteristics of uniportal VATS

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In terms of accuracy and efficacy Uniportal Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) resections are comparable to standard VATS. In standard three-ports VATS, the geometric configuration of a parallelogram generates interference with the optical source, creating a plane with a torsion angle not favorable on the flat two-dimensional vision of currently available monitors. The potential advantages of single-port VATS approach include not only the one intercostal space incision (reduction of postoperative pain) but also a translational approach of VATS instruments along a sagittal plane. Accordingly, the Uniportal approach enables VATS instruments to draw two parallel lines on the plane, bringing them to approach the target lesion from a caudo-cranial perspective thus achieving a projective plane. As a consequence, taking advantage of the unique spatial features specific to uniportal VATS, the surgeon is enabled to bring the operative fulcrum inside the chest to address the target lesion in a fashion similar to open surgery. PMID:24040527

  5. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  6. Accurate Structure and Dynamics of the Metal-Site of Paramagnetic Metalloproteins from NMR Parameters Using Natural Bond Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal–ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal–ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for 15N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of 15N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  7. On the nature of blueshifting hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yirong; Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Braïda, Benoît; Hiberty, Philippe C; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-01

    The block-localized wave function (BLW) method can derive the energetic, geometrical, and spectral changes with the deactivation of electron delocalization, and thus provide a unique way to elucidate the origin of improper, blueshifting hydrogen bonds versus proper, redshifting hydrogen bonds. A detailed analysis of the interactions of F(3)CH with NH(3) and OH(2) shows that blueshifting is a long-range phenomenon. Since among the various energy components contributing to hydrogen bonds, only the electrostatic interaction has long-range characteristics, we conclude that the contraction and blueshifting of a hydrogen bond is largely caused by electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, lengthening and redshifting is primarily due to the short-range n(Y)→σ*(X-H) hyperconjugation. The competition between these two opposing factors determines the final frequency change direction, for example, redshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅NH(3) and blueshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅OH(2). This mechanism works well in the series F(n)Cl(3)-n CH⋅⋅⋅Y (n=0-3, Y=NH(3), OH(2), SH(2)) and other systems. One exception is the complex of water and benzene. We observe the lengthening and redshifting of the O-H bond of water even with the electron transfer between benzene and water completely quenched. A distance-dependent analysis for this system reveals that the long-range electrostatic interaction is again responsible for the initial lengthening and redshifting.

  8. Microstructural Studies on Bonds and Crystal Growth in a Snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. E.

    2002-12-01

    The role of microstructure in a snowpack influences virtually all of its thermo-mechanical properties. Density, grain size and importantly the structure of the bonds between grains have a very significant influence. We have focused on the microstructure of snow in a number of studies. Among these, the restructuring of a processed snowpack subjected to a persistent temperature gradient resulted in a microstructure, which metamorphosed from an essentially isotropic configuration into what appears to be transversely isotropic. Considering the geometric relationship of the bond to grain to be the significant microstructural consideration, a fabric tensor for snow has recently been developed and demonstrated by application to the evolving microstructure of the processed snow. Although the specific form of the tensor is not unique, it demonstrates promise for using a fabric tensor as a means to quantify the microstructural configuration of a snow pack. Using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to examine the bonds between grains of well-sintered snow, a raised feature that encircled the contact between grains, which we termed a grain boundary ridge, was revealed. The ridge has implications to grain boundary diffusion as a sintering mechanism and may be influenced by contamination concentrated at the grain boundary. Focusing the SEM on the attachment or bond area of very well developed depth hoar crystals revealed a complex microstructure, (of much smaller scale than the crystal itself) which merge into the large striated crystal. The many vacancies and sharp corners in this region should lead to stress concentrations, however, the mechanism of formation and a definitive notion on the role of these microstructural features on strength, beyond mere speculation, is unknown. In another study relevant to depth hoar crystal development, a substrate of large crystals of known crystallographic orientation where placed in a supersaturated vapor environment. The numerous hopper

  9. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  10. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  11. Point-process principal components analysis via geometric optimization.

    PubMed

    Solo, Victor; Pasha, Syed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    There has been a fast-growing demand for analysis tools for multivariate point-process data driven by work in neural coding and, more recently, high-frequency finance. Here we develop a true or exact (as opposed to one based on time binning) principal components analysis for preliminary processing of multivariate point processes. We provide a maximum likelihood estimator, an algorithm for maximization involving steepest ascent on two Stiefel manifolds, and novel constrained asymptotic analysis. The method is illustrated with a simulation and compared with a binning approach. PMID:23020106

  12. Point-process principal components analysis via geometric optimization.

    PubMed

    Solo, Victor; Pasha, Syed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    There has been a fast-growing demand for analysis tools for multivariate point-process data driven by work in neural coding and, more recently, high-frequency finance. Here we develop a true or exact (as opposed to one based on time binning) principal components analysis for preliminary processing of multivariate point processes. We provide a maximum likelihood estimator, an algorithm for maximization involving steepest ascent on two Stiefel manifolds, and novel constrained asymptotic analysis. The method is illustrated with a simulation and compared with a binning approach.

  13. Optimal Biofilm Featues: metabolic and geometric response to multiple oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempes, C.; Okegbe, C.; Mears-Clarke, Z.; Follows, M. J.; Dietrich, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important challenge in understanding complex microbial mat communities is determining how groups of a single species balance metabolic requirements with the dynamics of resource supply. We have investigated this problem in the context of redox resources within a single-species bacterial biofilm. We developed a mathematical model of oxidant availability and metabolic response within biofilm features and we show that observed biofilm geometries maximize cellular reproduction and growth efficiency. Our model accurately predicts the measured distribution of two types of electron acceptors: oxygen, which is available from the environment, and phenazines, redox-active small molecules produced by the bacterium. Because our model is based on resource dynamics, we are also able to predict observed shifts in feature geometry based on changes in the availability of redox resources such as variations in the external availability of oxygen or the removal of phenazines. This analysis suggests various avenues for understanding microstructure and the evolution of spatial metabolism in microbial mats.

  14. Splitting homomorphisms and the Geometrization Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Robert

    2000-09-01

    This paper gives an algebraic conjecture which is shown to be equivalent to Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture for closed, orientable 3-manifolds. It generalizes the Stallings-Jaco theorem which established a similar result for the Poincaré Conjecture. The paper also gives two other algebraic conjectures; one is equivalent to the finite fundamental group case of the Geometrization Conjecture and the other is equivalent to the union of the Geometrization Conjecture and Thurston's Virtual Bundle Conjecture.

  15. Geometric Mathematical Framework for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terze, Zdravko; Vrdoljak, Milan; Zlatar, Dario

    2010-09-01

    The paper surveys geometric mathematical framework for computational modeling of multibody system dynamics. Starting with the configuration space of rigid body motion and analysis of it's Lie group structure, the elements of respective Lie algebra are addressed and basic relations pertinent to geometrical formulations of multibody system dynamics are surveyed. Dynamical model of multibody system on manifold introduced, along with the outline of geometric characteristics of holonomic and non-holonomic kinematical constraints.

  16. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  17. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  18. Geometric feature extraction by a multimarked point process.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Florent; Gimel'farb, Georgy; Descombes, Xavier

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a new stochastic marked point process for describing images in terms of a finite library of geometric objects. Image analysis based on conventional marked point processes has already produced convincing results but at the expense of parameter tuning, computing time, and model specificity. Our more general multimarked point process has simpler parametric setting, yields notably shorter computing times, and can be applied to a variety of applications. Both linear and areal primitives extracted from a library of geometric objects are matched to a given image using a probabilistic Gibbs model, and a Jump-Diffusion process is performed to search for the optimal object configuration. Experiments with remotely sensed images and natural textures show that the proposed approach has good potential. We conclude with a discussion about the insertion of more complex object interactions in the model by studying the compromise between model complexity and efficiency.

  19. Geometric asymmetry driven Janus micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors.The production and application of nano-/micromotors is of great importance. In order for the motors to work, asymmetry in their chemical composition or physical geometry must be present if no external asymmetric field is applied. In this paper, we present a ``coconut'' micromotor made of platinum through the partial or complete etching of the silica templates. It was shown that although both the inner and outer surfaces are made of the same material (Pt), motion of the structure can be observed as the convex surface is capable of generating oxygen bubbles. This finding shows that not only the chemical asymmetry of the micromotor, but also its geometric asymmetry can lead to fast propulsion of the motor. Moreover, a considerably higher velocity can be seen for partially etched coconut structures than the velocities of Janus or fully etched, shell-like motors. These findings will have great importance on the design of future micromotors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, data analysis, Videos S

  20. Geometric Quantization and Foliation Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerritt, Paul

    A standard question in the study of geometric quantization is whether symplectic reduction interacts nicely with the quantized theory, and in particular whether "quantization commutes with reduction." Guillemin and Sternberg first proposed this question, and answered it in the affirmative for the case of a free action of a compact Lie group on a compact Kahler manifold. Subsequent work has focused mainly on extending their proof to non-free actions and non-Kahler manifolds. For realistic physical examples, however, it is desirable to have a proof which also applies to non-compact symplectic manifolds. In this thesis we give a proof of the quantization-reduction problem for general symplectic manifolds. This is accomplished by working in a particular wavefunction representation, associated with a polarization that is in some sense compatible with reduction. While the polarized sections described by Guillemin and Sternberg are nonzero on a dense subset of the Kahler manifold, the ones considered here are distributional, having support only on regions of the phase space associated with certain quantized, or "admissible", values of momentum. We first propose a reduction procedure for the prequantum geometric structures that "covers" symplectic reduction, and demonstrate how both symplectic and prequantum reduction can be viewed as examples of foliation reduction. Consistency of prequantum reduction imposes the above-mentioned admissibility conditions on the quantized momenta, which can be seen as analogues of the Bohr-Wilson-Sommerfeld conditions for completely integrable systems. We then describe our reduction-compatible polarization, and demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between polarized sections on the unreduced and reduced spaces. Finally, we describe a factorization of the reduced prequantum bundle, suggested by the structure of the underlying reduced symplectic manifold. This in turn induces a factorization of the space of polarized sections that agrees

  1. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-12-07

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.

  2. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: a dynamics based approach.

    PubMed

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E

    2014-12-01

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed.

  3. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  4. Theoretical investigation on multiple bonds in terminal actinide nitride complexes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Xiang-Ke; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-09-15

    A series of actinide (An) species of L-An-N compounds [An = Pa-Pu, L = [N(CH2CH2NSiPr(i)3)3](3-), Pr(i) = CH(CH3)2] have been investigated using scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) without considering spin-orbit coupling effects. The ground state geometric and electronic structures and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of actinide compounds were studied systematically in neutral and anionic forms. It was found that with increasing actinide atomic number, the bond length of terminal multiple An-N1 bond decreases, in accordance with the actinide contraction. The Mayer bond order of An-N1 decreases gradually from An = Pa to Pu, which indicates a decrease in bond strength. The terminal multiple bond for L-An-N compounds contains one σ and two π molecular orbitals, and the contributions of the 6d orbital to covalency are larger in magnitude than the 5f orbital based on NBO analysis and topological analysis of electron density. This work may help in understanding of the bonding nature of An-N multiple bonds and elucidating the trends and electronic structure changes across the actinide series. It can also shed light on the construction of novel An-N multiple bonds.

  5. Control of tree water networks: A geometric programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela Perelman, L.; Amin, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a modeling and operation approach for tree water supply systems. The network control problem is approximated as a geometric programming (GP) problem. The original nonlinear nonconvex network control problem is transformed into a convex optimization problem. The optimization model can be efficiently solved to optimality using state-of-the-art solvers. Two control schemes are presented: (1) operation of network actuators (pumps and valves) and (2) controlled demand shedding allocation between network consumers with limited resources. The dual of the network control problem is formulated and is used to perform sensitivity analysis with respect to hydraulic constraints. The approach is demonstrated on a small branched-topology network and later extended to a medium-size irrigation network. The results demonstrate an intrinsic trade-off between energy costs and demand shedding policy, providing an efficient decision support tool for active management of water systems.

  6. Geometric programming prediction of design trends for OMV protective structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, R. A.; Horn, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The global optimization trends of protective honeycomb structural designs for spacecraft subject to hypervelocity meteroid and space debris are presented. This nonlinear problem is first formulated for weight minimization of the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) using a generic monomial predictor. Five problem formulations are considered, each dependent on the selection of independent design variables. Each case is optimized by considering the dual geometric programming problem. The dual variables are solved for in terms of the generic estimated exponents of the monomial predictor. The primal variables are then solved for by conversion. Finally, parametric design trends are developed for ranges of the estimated regression parameters. Results specify nonmonotonic relationships for the optimal first and second sheet mass per unit areas in terms of the estimated exponents.

  7. Geometric precipices in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Watson, Scott

    2008-03-15

    We consider the effects of graviton multiplet fields on transitions between string gas phases. Focusing on the dilaton field, we show that it may obstruct transitions between different thermodynamic phases of the string gas, because the sign of its dimensionally reduced, T-duality invariant, part is conserved when the energy density of the Universe is positive. Thus, many interesting solutions for which this sign is positive end up in a future curvature singularity. Because of this, some of the thermodynamic phases of the usual gravitating string gases behave like superselection sectors. For example, a past-regular Hagedorn phase and an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) phase dominated by string momentum modes cannot be smoothly connected in the framework of string cosmology with positive sources. The singularity separates them like a geometric precipice in the moduli space, preventing the dynamics of the theory from bridging across. Sources which simultaneously violate the positivity of energy and null energy condition (NEC) could modify these conclusions. We provide a quantitative measure of positivity of energy and NEC violations that would be necessary for such transitions. These effects must dominate the Universe at the moment of transition, altering the standard gas pictures. At present, it is not known how to construct such sources from first principles in string theory.

  8. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  9. Phenomenological modeling of geometric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Guo, Qinghua; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Fan, Dianyuan; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Metasurfaces, with their superior capability in manipulating the optical wavefront at the subwavelength scale and low manufacturing complexity, have shown great potential for planar photonics and novel optical devices. However, vector field simulation of metasurfaces is so far limited to periodic-structured metasurfaces containing a small number of meta-atoms in the unit cell by using full-wave numerical methods. Here, focusing on achiral meta-atoms only with electric polarizability and thickness far less than the wavelength of light, and ignoring the coupling between meta-atoms, we propose a general phenomenological method to analytically model the metasurfaces based on the assumption that the meta-atoms possess localized resonances with Lorentz-Drude forms, whose exact form can be retrieved from the full wave simulation of a single element. Applied to phase modulated geometric metasurfaces constituted by identical meta-atoms with different orientations, our analytical results show good agreement with full-wave numerical simulations. The proposed theory provides an efficient method to model and design optical devices based on metasurfaces.

  10. Geometric morphology of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Schlei, B. R.; Prasad, L.; Skourikhine, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate how to derive morphological information from micrographs, i.e., grey-level images, of polymeric foams. The segmentation of the images is performed by applying a pulse-coupled neural network. This processing generates blobs of the foams walls/struts and voids, respectively. The contours of the blobs and their corresponding points form the input to a constrained Delaunay tessellation, which provides an unstructured grid of the material under consideration. The subsequently applied Chordal Axis Transform captures the intrinsic shape characteristics, and facilitates the identification and localization of key morphological features. While stochastic features of the polymeric foams struts/walls such as areas, aspect ratios, etc., already can be computed at this stage, the foams voids require further geometric processing. The voids are separated into single foam cells. This shape manipulation leads to a refinement of the initial blob contours, which then requires the repeated application of the constrained Delaunay tessellation and Chordal Axis Transform, respectively. Using minimum enclosing rectangles for each foam cell, finally the stochastic features of the foam voids are computed.

  11. Phenomenological modeling of geometric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Guo, Qinghua; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Fan, Dianyuan; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Metasurfaces, with their superior capability in manipulating the optical wavefront at the subwavelength scale and low manufacturing complexity, have shown great potential for planar photonics and novel optical devices. However, vector field simulation of metasurfaces is so far limited to periodic-structured metasurfaces containing a small number of meta-atoms in the unit cell by using full-wave numerical methods. Here, focusing on achiral meta-atoms only with electric polarizability and thickness far less than the wavelength of light, and ignoring the coupling between meta-atoms, we propose a general phenomenological method to analytically model the metasurfaces based on the assumption that the meta-atoms possess localized resonances with Lorentz-Drude forms, whose exact form can be retrieved from the full wave simulation of a single element. Applied to phase modulated geometric metasurfaces constituted by identical meta-atoms with different orientations, our analytical results show good agreement with full-wave numerical simulations. The proposed theory provides an efficient method to model and design optical devices based on metasurfaces. PMID:27137005

  12. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects.

  13. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  14. Early Sex Differences in Weighting Geometric Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourenco, Stella F.; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Fabian, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    When geometric and non-geometric information are both available for specifying location, men have been shown to rely more heavily on geometry compared to women. To shed insight on the nature and developmental origins of this sex difference, we examined how 18- to 24-month-olds represented the geometry of a surrounding (rectangular) space when…

  15. On geometric interpretation of the berry phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanaev, M. O.

    2012-03-01

    A geometric interpretation of the Berry phase and its Wilczek-Zee non-Abelian generalization are given in terms of connections on principal fiber bundles. It is demonstrated that a principal fiber bundle can be trivial in all cases, while the connection and its holonomy group are nontrivial. Therefore, the main role is played by geometric rather than topological effects.

  16. Parabolas: Connection between Algebraic and Geometrical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriki, Atara

    2011-01-01

    A parabola is an interesting curve. What makes it interesting at the secondary school level is the fact that this curve is presented in both its contexts: algebraic and geometric. Being one of Apollonius' conic sections, the parabola is basically a geometric entity. It is, however, typically known for its algebraic characteristics, in particular…

  17. Second-quantized formulation of geometric phases

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, Shinichi; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2005-07-15

    The level crossing problem and associated geometric terms are neatly formulated by the second-quantized formulation. This formulation exhibits a hidden local gauge symmetry related to the arbitrariness of the phase choice of the complete orthonormal basis set. By using this second-quantized formulation, which does not assume adiabatic approximation, a convenient exact formula for the geometric terms including off-diagonal geometric terms is derived. The analysis of geometric phases is then reduced to a simple diagonalization of the Hamiltonian, and it is analyzed both in the operator and path-integral formulations. If one diagonalizes the geometric terms in the infinitesimal neighborhood of level crossing, the geometric phases become trivial (and thus no monopole singularity) for arbitrarily large but finite time interval T. The integrability of Schroedinger equation and the appearance of the seemingly nonintegrable phases are thus consistent. The topological proof of the Longuet-Higgins' phase-change rule, for example, fails in the practical Born-Oppenheimer approximation where a large but finite ratio of two time scales is involved and T is identified with the period of the slower system. The difference and similarity between the geometric phases associated with level crossing and the exact topological object such as the Aharonov-Bohm phase become clear in the present formulation. A crucial difference between the quantum anomaly and the geometric phases is also noted.

  18. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  19. Hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in the protonated guanine-cytosine (GC+H)+ base pair.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuexia; Wang, Hongyan; Gao, Simin; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-10-13

    The single proton transfer at the different sites of the Watson-Crick (WC) guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair are studied here using density functional methods. The conventional protonated structures, transition state (TS) and proton-transferred product (PT) structures of every relevant species are optimized. Each transition state and proton-transferred product structure has been compared with the corresponding conventional protonated structure to demonstrate the process of proton transfer and the change of geometrical structures. The relative energies of the protonated tautomers and the proton-transfer energy profiles in gas and solvent are analyzed. The proton-transferred product structure G(+H(+))-H(+)C(N3)(-H(+))(PT) has the lowest relative energy for which only two hydrogen bonds exist. Almost all 14 isomers of the protonated GC base pair involve hydrogen-bonded proton transfer following the three pathways, with the exception of structure G-H(+)C(O2). When the positive charge is primarily "located" on the guanine moiety (H(+)G-C, G-H(+)C(C4), and G-H(+)C(C6)), the H(1) proton transfers from the N(1) site of guanine to the N(3) site of cytosine. The structures G-H(+)C(C5) and G-H(+)C(C4) involve H(4a) proton transfer from the N(4) of cytosine to the O(6) site of guanine. H(2a) proton transfer from the N(2) site of guanine to the O(2) site of cytosine is found only for the structure G-H(+)C(C4). The structures to which a proton is added on the six-centered sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds are more prone to proton transfer in the gas phase, whereas a proton added on the minor groove and the sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds is favorable to the proton transfer in energy in the aqueous phase.

  20. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  1. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  2. Crystal chemistry of natural and synthetic trioctahedral micas: Exploring the limits of geometric crystal chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick H. J.

    Seventy-five synthetic powder trioctahedral mica samples (between Mg, Co, Ni, and Fe end members, with different degrees of oxidation, vacancy and Al/Si contents, and including an OH/F substitution series) were studied by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction. The iron-bearing samples were studied by 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy. Subsets of the samples were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and gas chromatography. Lattice parameters (refined under the 1M stacking polytype, space group C2/m) were determined for all powder samples and iron site populations ([4]Fe 3+, [6]Fe2+, and [6]Fe 2+) were obtained from Mossbauer spectroscopy. The relation (c/a)cosbeta* = 113 was found to hold exactly (within experimental error) for all synthetic powders whereas it does not hold in general for synthetic and natural 1M single-crystals. The above relation is predicted to hold for geometric home-octahedral sheets (having equal M1 and M2 site bond lengths) and not to hold for geometric meso-octahedral sheets (having unequal M1 and M2 site bond lengths). The counter-rotation of the M2 site of 1M single-crystals exactly (within experimental error) follows the geometric meso-octahedral sheet model, which, assuming a uniform octahedral sheet height and site-specific M1 and M2 bond lengths, predicts site-specific flattening angles and a counter-rotation angle for the M2 site which is uniquely determined by the bond length difference between the M1 and M2 sites. A geometric meso-octahedral 2:1 layer silicate was shown to require corrugated tetrahedral sheets composed of bond-distorted tetrahedra. Key geometric meso-octahedral distortions in 1M single-crystals were identified and elucidated: (i) intra-layer top-bottom displacements within a TOT layer; and (ii) a tetrahedral bending angle between the apical bond and the pyramidal base formed by the three basal bonds. Plots

  3. Development of an Explosive Bonding Process for Producing High Strength Bonds between Niobium and 6061-T651 Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Brasher, D; Butler, D; Riddle, R

    2005-09-23

    An explosive bonding procedure for joining 9.5 mm thick niobium plate to 203 mm thick 6061-T651 Al plate has been developed in order to maximize the bond tensile and impact strengths and the amount of bonded material across the surface of the plate. This procedure improves upon previous efforts, in which the 9.5 mm thick niobium plate is bonded directly to 6061-T4 Al plate. In this improved procedure, thin Nb and Al interlayers are explosively clad between the thicker niobium and aluminum plates. Bonds produced using these optimized parameters display a tensile strength of approximately 255 MPa and an impact strength per unit area of approximately 0.148 J/mm{sup 2}. Specialized mechanical testing geometries and procedures are required to measure these bond properties because of the unique bond geometry. In order to ensure that differences in the thermal expansion coefficients of aluminum and niobium do not adversely affect the bond strength, the effects of thermal cycling at temperatures between -22 C and 45 C on the mechanical properties of these bonds have also been investigated by testing samples in both the as-received and thermal cycled conditions. Based on the results obtained from this series of mechanical tests, thermal cycling is shown to have no adverse effect on the resulting tensile and impact strengths of the bonds produced using the optimized bonding parameters.

  4. Rapid bonding of Pyrex glass microchips.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshitake; Morishima, Keisuke; Kogi, Atsuna; Kikutani, Yoshikuni; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2007-03-01

    A newly developed vacuum hot press system has been specially designed for the thermal bonding of glass substrates in the fabrication process of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. This system includes a vacuum chamber equipped with a high-pressure piston cylinder and carbon plate heaters. A temperature of up to 900 degrees C and a force of as much as 9800 N could be applied to the substrates in a vacuum atmosphere. The Pyrex substrates bonded with this system under different temperatures, pressures, and heating times were evaluated by tensile strength tests, by measurements of thickness, and by observations of the cross-sectional shapes of the microchannels. The optimal bonding conditions of the Pyrex glass substrates were 570 degrees C for 10 min under 4.7 N/mm(2) of applied pressure. Whereas more than 16 h is required for thermal bonding with a conventional furnace, the new system could complete the whole bonding processes within just 79 min, including heating and cooling periods. Such improvements should considerably enhance the production rate of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. Whereas flat and dust-free surfaces are required for conventional thermal bonding, especially without long and repeated heating periods, our hot press system could press a fine dust into glass substrates so that even the areas around the dust were bonded. Using this capability, we were able to successfully integrate Pt/Ti thin film electrodes into a Pyrex glass microchip.

  5. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  6. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  7. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  8. Testing the geometric clutch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Charles B

    2004-12-01

    The Geometric Clutch hypothesis is based on the premise that transverse forces (t-forces) acting on the outer doublets of the eukaryotic axoneme coordinate the action of the dynein motors to produce flagellar and ciliary beating. T-forces result from tension and compression on the outer doublets when a bend is present on the flagellum or cilium. The t-force acts to pry the doublets apart in an active bend, and push the doublets together when the flagellum is passively bent and thus could engage and disengage the dynein motors. Computed simulations of this working mechanism have reproduced the beating pattern of simple cilia and flagella, and of mammalian sperm. Cilia-like beating, with a clearly defined effective and recovery stroke, can be generated using one uniformly applied switching algorithm. When the mechanical properties and dimensions appropriate to a specific flagellum are incorporated into the model the same algorithm can simulate a sea urchin or bull sperm-like beat. The computed model reproduces many of the observed behaviors of real flagella and cilia. The model can duplicate the results of outer arm extraction experiments in cilia and predicted two types of arrest behavior that were verified experimentally in bull sperm. It also successfully predicted the experimentally determined nexin elasticity. Calculations based on live and reactivated sea urchin and bull sperm yielded a value of 0.5 nN/microm for the t-force at the switch-point. This is a force sufficient to overcome the shearing force generated by all the dyneins on one micron of outer doublet. A t-force of this magnitude should produce substantial distortion of the axoneme at the switch-point, especially in spoke or spoke-head deficient motile flagella. This concrete and verifiable prediction is within the grasp of recent advances in imaging technology, specifically cryoelectron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. PMID:15567522

  9. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  10. Bond energy effects on strength, cooperativity and robustness of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-10-01

    A fundamental challenge in engineering biologically inspired materials and systems is the identification of molecular structures that define fundamental building blocks. Here, we report a systematic study of the effect of the energy of chemical bonds on the mechanical properties of molecular structures, specifically, their strength and robustness. By considering a simple model system of an assembly of bonds in a cluster, we demonstrate that weak bonding, as found for example in H-bonds, results in a highly cooperative behaviour where clusters of bonds operate synergistically to form relatively strong molecular clusters. The cooperative effect of bonding results in an enhanced robustness since the drop of strength owing to the loss of a bond in a larger cluster only results in a marginal reduction of the strength. Strong bonding, as found in covalent interactions such as disulphide bonds or in the backbone of proteins, results in a larger mechanical strength. However, the ability for bonds to interact cooperatively is lost, and, as a result, the overall robustness is lower since the mechanical strength hinges on individual bonds rather than a cluster of bonds. The systematic analysis presented here provides general insight into the interplay of bond energy, robustness and other geometric parameters such as bond spacing. We conclude our analysis with a correlation of structural data of natural protein structures, which confirms the conclusions derived from our study. PMID:23050078

  11. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers.

    PubMed

    Stagner, L; Heidbrink, W W

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  12. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  13. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-07-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  14. Conceptual aspects of geometric quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.

    2016-10-01

    Geometric quantum computation is the idea that geometric phases can be used to implement quantum gates, i.e., the basic elements of the Boolean network that forms a quantum computer. Although originally thought to be limited to adiabatic evolution, controlled by slowly changing parameters, this form of quantum computation can as well be realized at high speed by using nonadiabatic schemes. Recent advances in quantum gate technology have allowed for experimental demonstrations of different types of geometric gates in adiabatic and nonadiabatic evolution. Here, we address some conceptual issues that arise in the realizations of geometric gates. We examine the appearance of dynamical phases in quantum evolution and point out that not all dynamical phases need to be compensated for in geometric quantum computation. We delineate the relation between Abelian and non-Abelian geometric gates and find an explicit physical example where the two types of gates coincide. We identify differences and similarities between adiabatic and nonadiabatic realizations of quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases.

  15. Geometric quantum discord under noisy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Qiu, Daowen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we mainly analyze the dynamics of geometric quantum discord under a common dissipating environment. Our results indicate that geometric quantum discord is generated when the initial state is a product state. The geometric quantum discord increases from zero to a stable value with the increasing time, and the variations of stable values depend on the system size. For different initial product states, geometric quantum discord has some different behaviors in contrast with entanglement. For initial maximally entangled state, it is shown that geometric quantum discord decays with the increasing dissipated time. It is found that for EPR state, entanglement is more robust than geometric quantum discord, which is a sharp contrast to the existing result that quantum discord is more robust than entanglement in noisy environments. However, for GHZ state and W state, geometric quantum discord is more stable than entanglement. By the comparison of quantum discord and entanglement, we find that a common dissipating environment brings complicated effects on quantum correlation, which may deepen our understanding of physical impacts of decohering environment on quantum correlation. In the end, we analyze the effects of collective dephasing noise and rotating noise to a class of two-qubit X states, and we find that quantum correlation is not altered by the collective noises.

  16. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  17. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  18. The Sibling Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Stephen P.; Kahn, Michael D.

    The relationships among brothers and sisters are infinitely varied, but whatever their characteristics, these bonds last throughout life. This book examines the sibling relationship as a distinctive emotional, passionate, painful, and solacing power. Chapter 1, "Unraveling the Sibling Bond," addresses research on siblings and development of the…

  19. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  20. Universal nanopatternable interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Garland, Shaun; Howland, Michael; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-12-01

    A nanopatternable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oligomer layer is demonstrated as an interfacial adhesive for its intrinsic transferability and universal adhesiveness. Utilizing the well-established surface modification and bonding techniques of PDMS surfaces, irreversible bonding is formed (up to 400 kPa) between a wide range of substrate pairs, representing ones within and across different materials categories, including metals, ceramics, thermoset, and thermoplastic polymers.

  1. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other.

  2. Mother-Child Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Joseph Chilton

    1994-01-01

    Examines the nature of mother-child bonding from the prenatal stage through early infancy, discussing how the mother's actions, even before birth, stimulate her child's senses. Explains the crucial role that physical contact, breastfeeding, and visual stimuli have on mother-child bonding in human and animal newborns. (MDM)

  3. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  4. Bio-inspired interfacial strengthening strategy through geometrically interlocking designs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuming; Yao, Haimin; Ortiz, Christine; Xu, Jinquan; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    Many biological materials, such as nacre and bone, are hybrid materials composed of stiff brittle ceramics and compliant organic materials. These natural organic/inorganic composites exhibit much enhanced strength and toughness in comparison to their constituents and inspires enormous biomimetic endeavors aiming to synthesize materials with superior mechanical properties. However, most current synthetic composites have not exhibited their full potential of property enhancement compared to the natural prototypes they are mimicking. One of the key issues is the weak junctions between stiff and compliant phases, which need to be optimized according to the intended functions of the composite material. Motivated by the geometrically interlocking designs of natural biomaterials, here we propose an interfacial strengthening strategy by introducing geometrical interlockers on the interfaces between compliant and stiff phases. Finite element analysis (FEA) shows that the strength of the composite depends strongly on the geometrical features of interlockers including shape, size, and structural hierarchy. Even for the most unfavorable scenario when neither adhesion nor friction is present between stiff and compliant phases, the tensile strength of the composites with proper interlocker design can reach up to 70% of the ideal value. The findings in this paper would provide guidelines to the improvement of the mechanical properties of current biomimetic composites. PMID:23032427

  5. Tangram solved? Prefrontal cortex activation analysis during geometric problem solving.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Hasan; Shewokis, Patricia A; Izzetoğlu, Meltem; Çakır, Murat P; Onaral, Banu

    2012-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have implicated prefrontal and parietal cortices for mathematical problem solving. Mental arithmetic tasks have been used extensively to study neural correlates of mathematical reasoning. In the present study we used geometric problem sets (tangram tasks) that require executive planning and visuospatial reasoning without any linguistic representation interference. We used portable optical brain imaging (functional near infrared spectroscopy--fNIR) to monitor hemodynamic changes within anterior prefrontal cortex during tangram tasks. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to solve a series of computerized tangram puzzles and control tasks that required same geometric shape manipulation without problem solving. Total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes indicated a significant increase during tangram problem solving in the right hemisphere. Moreover, HbT changes during failed trials (when no solution found) were significantly higher compared to successful trials. These preliminary results suggest that fNIR can be used to assess cortical activation changes induced by geometric problem solving. Since fNIR is safe, wearable and can be used in ecologically valid environments such as classrooms, this neuroimaging tool may help to improve and optimize learning in educational settings. PMID:23366983

  6. Activation of C-H and B-H bonds through agostic bonding: an ELF/QTAIM insight.

    PubMed

    Zins, Emilie-Laure; Silvi, Bernard; Alikhani, M Esmaïl

    2015-04-14

    Agostic bonding is of paramount importance in C-H bond activation processes. The reactivity of the σ C-H bond thus activated will depend on the nature of the metallic center, the nature of the ligand involved in the interaction and co-ligands, as well as on geometric parameters. Because of their importance in organometallic chemistry, a qualitative classification of agostic bonding could be very much helpful. Herein we propose descriptors of the agostic character of bonding based on the electron localization function (ELF) and Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) topological analysis. A set of 31 metallic complexes taken, or derived, from the literature was chosen to illustrate our methodology. First, some criteria should prove that an interaction between a metallic center and a σ X-H bond can indeed be described as "agostic" bonding. Then, the contribution of the metallic center in the protonated agostic basin, in the ELF topological description, may be used to evaluate the agostic character of bonding. A σ X-H bond is in agostic interaction with a metal center when the protonated X-H basin is a trisynaptic basin with a metal contribution strictly larger than the numerical uncertainty, i.e. 0.01 e. In addition, it was shown that the weakening of the electron density at the X-Hagostic bond critical point with respect to that of X-Hfree well correlates with the lengthening of the agostic X-H bond distance as well as with the shift of the vibrational frequency associated with the νX-H stretching mode. Furthermore, the use of a normalized parameter that takes into account the total population of the protonated basin, allows the comparison of the agostic character of bonding involved in different complexes. PMID:25760795

  7. Shape Bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  8. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  9. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Aakeröy, Christer B.; Spartz, Christine L.; Dembowski, Sean; Dwyre, Savannah; Desper, John

    2015-01-01

    As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately. PMID:26306192

  10. Thermodynamics of water structural reorganization due to geometric confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroberg, Wylie; Lichter, Seth

    2015-03-01

    Models of aqueous solvation have successfully quantified the behavior of water near convex bodies. However, many important processes occurring in aqueous solution involve interactions between solutes and surfaces with complicated non-convex geometries. Examples include the folding of proteins, hydrophobic association of solutes, ligand-receptor binding, and water confined within nanotubes and pores. For these geometries, models for solvation of convex bodies fail to account for the added interactions associated with structural confinement. Due to water's propensity to form networks of hydrogen bonds, small alterations to the confining geometry can induce large structural rearrangement within the water. We perform systematic Monte Carlo simulations of water confined to cylindrical cavities of varying aspect ratio to investigate how small geometric changes to the confining geometry may cause large changes to the structure and thermodynamic state of water. Using the Wang-Landau algorithm, we obtain free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities across a broad range of temperatures, and show how these quantities are influenced by the structural rearrangement of water molecules due to geometric perturbations.

  11. Molecular structure, Normal Coordinate Analysis, harmonic vibrational frequencies, Natural Bond Orbital, TD-DFT calculations and biological activity analysis of antioxidant drug 7-hydroxycoumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, S.; Sylvestre, S.; Jayarajan, D.; Amalanathan, M.; Oudayakumar, K.; Gnanapoongothai, T.; Jayavarthanan, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report harmonic vibrational frequencies, molecular structure, NBO and HOMO, LUMO analysis of Umbelliferone also known as 7-hydroxycoumarin (7HC). The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by computation (monomer and dimmer) shows good agreement with experimental XRD data. Harmonic frequencies of 7HC were determined and analyzed by DFT utilizing 6-311+G(d,p) as basis set. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyperconjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincides with the experimental spectra. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Enterococcus faecalis.

  12. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen bonding of compounds based on 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazole in solution: a TDDFT study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Liu, Yufang; Yang, Yonggang; Yang, Dapeng; Sun, Jinfeng

    2014-12-10

    The excited-state properties of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the compounds based on 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazole (6 and its tautomers 6a and 6b) have been investigated using theoretical methods. According to the geometric optimization and IR spectra in the ground and excited states calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods respectively, the type of intramolecular hydrogen bonding N⋯HO in 6 and 6a is demonstrated to be significantly strengthened, while NH⋯O in the tautomers 6a and 6b are proved to be sharply weakened upon excitation to excited state S1. The calculated absorption peaks of 6 are in good accordance with the experimental results. Moreover, other compounds based on 6 that R1 and R2 are both substituted as well as that only R1 is substituted are investigated to understand the effect of substituent on intramolecular hydrogen bonding. It is found that the hydrogen bond strength can be controlled by the inductive field effect of the substituent. In addition, the intramolecular charge transfers (ICT) of the S1 state for 6 and its tautomers 6a and 6b were theoretically investigated by analyses of molecular orbital.

  13. The perception of geometrical structure from congruence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lappin, Joseph S.; Wason, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The principle function of vision is to measure the environment. As demonstrated by the coordination of motor actions with the positions and trajectories of moving objects in cluttered environments and by rapid recognition of solid objects in varying contexts from changing perspectives, vision provides real-time information about the geometrical structure and location of environmental objects and events. The geometric information provided by 2-D spatial displays is examined. It is proposed that the geometry of this information is best understood not within the traditional framework of perspective trigonometry, but in terms of the structure of qualitative relations defined by congruences among intrinsic geometric relations in images of surfaces. The basic concepts of this geometrical theory are outlined.

  14. The geometric phase in nonlinear dissipative systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.Z.; Haken, H. )

    1992-10-30

    In this paper, the authors review the recent progress made in generalizing the concept of the geometric phase to nonlinear dissipative systems. The authors first illustrate the usual form of the parallel transport law with an elementary example of the parallel shift of a line on the complex plane. Important results about the non-adiabatical geometric (Aharonov and Anandan or AA) phase [sup 18] for the Schrodinger equations are reviewed in order to make a comparison with results for dissipative systems. The authors show that a geometric phase can be defined for dissipative systems with the cyclic attractors. Systems undergoing the Hopf bifurcation with a continuous symmetry are shown to possess such cyclic attractors. Examples from laser physics are discussed to exhibit the applicability of our formalism and the widespread existence of the geometric phase in dissipative systems.

  15. Geometric phases in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2016-10-01

    In order to study the behaviour of discrete dynamical systems under adiabatic cyclic variations of their parameters, we consider discrete versions of adiabatically-rotated rotators. Parallelling the studies in continuous systems, we generalize the concept of geometric phase to discrete dynamics and investigate its presence in these rotators. For the rotated sine circle map, we demonstrate an analytical relationship between the geometric phase and the rotation number of the system. For the discrete version of the rotated rotator considered by Berry, the rotated standard map, we further explore this connection as well as the role of the geometric phase at the onset of chaos. Further into the chaotic regime, we show that the geometric phase is also related to the diffusive behaviour of the dynamical variables and the Lyapunov exponent.

  16. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  17. The Pentagon Problem: Geometric Reasoning with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zbiek, Rose Mary

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity, involving pentagons and using a figure manipulator such as The Geometer's Sketchpad, that requires students to reason geometrically without making unsubstantiated assumptions based on diagrams. (MKR)

  18. Geometric methods in computational fluid dynamics. [turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    General methods for the construction of geometric computational fluid dynamic algorithms are presented which simulate a variety of flow fields in various nontrivial regions. Included are: basic developments with tensors; various forms for the equations of motion; generalized numerical methods and boundary conditions; and methods for mesh generation to meet the strong geometric constraints of turbomachines. Coordinate generation is shown generally to yield mesh descriptions from one or more transformations that are smoothly joined together to form a composite mesh.

  19. Machine Learning and Geometric Technique for SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Marin, Miguel; Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo

    This paper describes a new approach for building 3D geometric maps using a laser rangefinder, a stereo camera system and a mathematical system the Conformal Geometric Algebra. The use of a known visual landmarks in the map helps to carry out a good localization of the robot. A machine learning technique is used for recognition of objects in the environment. These landmarks are found using the Viola and Jones algorithm and are represented with their position in the 3D virtual map.

  20. Geometrical expression of excess entropy production.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2011-11-01

    We derive a geometrical expression of the excess entropy production for quasistatic transitions between nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian jump processes, which can be exactly applied to nonlinear and nonequilibrium situations. The obtained expression is geometrical; the excess entropy production depends only on a trajectory in the parameter space, analogous to the Berry phase in quantum mechanics. Our results imply that vector potentials are needed to construct the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium steady states. PMID:22181372

  1. The Geometric Grids of the Hieratic Numeral.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulfotouh, Hossam M. K.

    The paper discusses the geometrical designs of the hieratic numeral signs. It shows the regular-grid-patterns of squares upon which, the shapes of the already decoded hieratic numeral-signs, have been designed. Also, it shows the design of some hieratic numeral signs, based on subdividing the circle; and the hieratic signs of modular notation. It might reveal the basic geometrical level of understanding of anonymous ancient Egyptians who designed them some four thousand years ago.

  2. Dynamics and Control of a Quadrotor with Active Geometric Morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Dustin A.

    Quadrotors are manufactured in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and performance levels to fulfill a multitude of roles. Robodub Inc. has patented a morphing quadrotor which will allow active reconfiguration between various shapes for performance optimization across a wider spectrum of roles. The dynamics of the system are studied and modeled using Newtonian Mechanics. Controls are developed and simulated using both Linear Quadratic and Numerical Nonlinear Optimal control for a symmetric simplificiation of the system dynamics. Various unique vehicle capabilities are investigated, including novel single-throttle flight control using symmetric geometric morphing, as well as recovery from motor loss by reconfiguring into a trirotor configuration. The system dynamics were found to be complex and highly nonlinear. All attempted control strategies resulted in controllability, suggesting further research into each may lead to multiple viable control strategies for a physical prototype.

  3. The Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Milani, Roberto; Pilati, Tullio; Priimagi, Arri; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2016-02-24

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  4. The Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  5. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  6. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials. PMID:26276475

  7. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials.

  8. Application of geometric algebra for the description of polymer conformations.

    PubMed

    Chys, Pieter

    2008-03-14

    In this paper a Clifford algebra-based method is applied to calculate polymer chain conformations. The approach enables the calculation of the position of an atom in space with the knowledge of the bond length (l), valence angle (theta), and rotation angle (phi) of each of the preceding bonds in the chain. Hence, the set of geometrical parameters {l(i),theta(i),phi(i)} yields all the position coordinates p(i) of the main chain atoms. Moreover, the method allows the calculation of side chain conformations and the computation of rotations of chain segments. With these features it is, in principle, possible to generate conformations of any type of chemical structure. This method is proposed as an alternative for the classical approach by matrix algebra. It is more straightforward and its final symbolic representation considerably simpler than that of matrix algebra. Approaches for realistic modeling by means of incorporation of energetic considerations can be combined with it. This article, however, is entirely focused at showing the suitable mathematical framework on which further developments and applications can be built.

  9. Sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations on nitrile hydratase: geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme iron active site.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2006-01-18

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS(-))-, sulfenate (RSO(-))-, and sulfinate (RSO(2)(-))-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO(-) species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by approximately 0.1 A). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe(III) in the active site of NHase as CysS(-), CysSOH, and CysSO(2)(-) both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z(eff) of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO](6) NHase species has a Z(eff) very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe(III) counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong pi back-bonding into the pi antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t(2)(6) low-spin metal to the coordinated NO. PMID:16402841

  10. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  11. Junk-Bond Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a long-predicted decline in the fortunes of small private colleges is beginning to show up in the bond market, as the number of colleges now rated in the junk category has nearly doubled. (EV)

  12. Bonding with your newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your baby begin to feel a strong attachment with each other. You may feel great love ... L, Saison J, et al. Building a secure attachment bond with your baby. Helpguide.org. www.helpguide. ...

  13. Detecting Defective Solder Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R.; Barney, J.; Decker, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Method is noncontact and nondestructive. Technique detects solder bonds in solar array of other large circuit board, using thermal-imaging camera. Board placed between heat lamp and camera. Poor joints indiated by "cold" spots on the infrared image.

  14. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  15. A systematic study on hydrogen bond interactions in sulfabenzamide: DFT calculations of the N-14, O-17, and H-2 NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Nozad, Ahmad G; Najafi, Hamidreza; Meftah, Sakineh; Aghazadeh, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    A systematic computational study was carried out to characterize the hydrogen bond, HB, interactions of sulfabenzamide crystal structure by DFT calculations of electric field gradient, EFG, tensors at the sites of 14N, 17O, and 2H nuclei. The computations were performed with the B3LYP and B3PW91 DFT methods and 6-311+G and 6-311++G* standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 package. To perform the calculations, a hydrogen-bonded heptameric cluster of sulfabenzamide was created by X-ray coordinates where the hydrogen atom positions were optimized and the EFG tensors were calculated for the target molecule. Additional optimization and EFG calculations were also performed for crystalline monomer and an isolated gas-phase sulfabenzamide. The calculated EFG tensors were converted to the experimentally measurable nuclear quadrupole resonance, NQR, parameters: quadrupole coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry parameter, eta(Q). The results reveal that the geometrical and NQR parameters of the optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline phase are different. In addition, the difference between the calculated NQR parameters of the monomer and the target molecule shows how much H-bonding interactions affect the EFG tensors of each nucleus. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that due to the contribution of the target molecule to N-H...O and C-H...O hydrogen bond interactions, the EFG tensors at the sites of N1, O3 and H1 undergo significant changes from monomer to the target molecule in cluster. These features reveal the major role of N-H...O type intermolecular HBs in cluster model of sulfabenzamide which the presence of these interactions can lead to polymorphism directly related to the drug activity and related properties.

  16. Theoretical study of the interplay between lithium bond and hydrogen bond in complexes involved with HLi and HCN.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzhong; Hu, Ting; An, Xiulin; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Gong, Baoan; Sun, Jiazhong

    2009-12-21

    The lithium- and hydrogen-bonded complex of HLi-NCH-NCH is studied with ab initio calculations. The optimized structure, vibrational frequencies, and binding energy are calculated at the MP2 level with 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. The interplay between lithium bonding and hydrogen bonding in the complex is investigated with these properties. The effect of lithium bonding on the properties of hydrogen bonding is larger than that of hydrogen bonding on the properties of lithium bonding. In the trimer, the binding energies are increased by about 19% and 61% for the lithium and hydrogen bonds, respectively. A big cooperative energy (-5.50 kcal mol(-1)) is observed in the complex. Both the charge transfer and induction effect due to the electrostatic interaction are responsible for the cooperativity in the trimer. The effect of HCN chain length on the lithium bonding has been considered. The natural bond orbital and atoms in molecules analyses indicate that the electrostatic force plays a main role in the lithium bonding. A many-body interaction analysis has also been performed for HLi-(NCH)(N) (N=2-5) systems.

  17. Cooperative effects between halogen bonds and pnicogen bonds in XBr∙∙∙OFH2P∙∙∙NH3 (X = F, Cl, CN, NC, OH, and NO2) complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate interplay between halogen bonds and pnicogen bonds in XBr∙∙∙OFH2P∙∙∙NH3 (X = F, Cl, CN, NC, OH, and NO2) complexes at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Cooperative effects are observed when halogen bonds and pnicogen bonds coexist in the same complex. These effects are analyzed in terms of geometric and energetic properties of the complexes. The mechanism of cooperative effects is analyzed in view with molecular electrostatic potential, natural bond orbital, and density difference of molecule formation analyses.

  18. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  19. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  20. Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Geometric Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruskin, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Dynamical Systems and Geometric Mechanics provides a comprehensive tour of two fields that are intimately entwined: dynamical systems is the study of the behavior of physical systems that may be described by a set of nonlinear first-order ordinary differential equations in Euclidean space, whereas geometric mechanics explores similar systems that instead evolve on differentiable manifolds. In the study of geometric mechanics, however, additional geometric structures are often present, since such systems arise from the laws of nature that govern the motions of particles, bodies, and even galaxies. In the first part of the text, we discuss linearization and stability of trajectories and fixed points, invariant manifold theory, periodic orbits, Poincaré maps, Floquet theory, the Poincaré-Bendixson theorem, bifurcations, and chaos. The second part of the text begins with a self-contained chapter on differential geometry that introduces notions of manifolds, mappings, vector fields, the Jacobi-Lie bracket, and differential forms. The final chapters cover Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics from a modern geometric perspective, mechanics on Lie groups, and nonholonomic mechanics via both moving frames and fiber bundle decompositions. The text can be reasonably digested in a single-semester introductory graduate-level course. Each chapter concludes with an application that can serve as a springboard project for further investigation or in-class discussion.

  1. Morphing of geometric composites via residual swelling.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Shillig, Steven A; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques. PMID:26076671

  2. Unifying Geometrical Representations of Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsid, Scott; Serna, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We unify three approaches within the vast body of gauge-theory research that have independently developed distinct representations of a geometrical surface-like structure underlying the vector-potential. The three approaches that we unify are: those who use the compactified dimensions of Kaluza-Klein theory, those who use Grassmannian models (also called gauge theory embedding or models) to represent gauge fields, and those who use a hidden spatial metric to replace the gauge fields. In this paper we identify a correspondence between the geometrical representations of the three schools. Each school was mostly independently developed, does not compete with other schools, and attempts to isolate the gauge-invariant geometrical surface-like structures that are responsible for the resulting physics. By providing a mapping between geometrical representations, we hope physicists can now isolate representation-dependent physics from gauge-invariant physical results and share results between each school. We provide visual examples of the geometrical relationships between each school for electric and magnetic fields. We highlight a first new result: in all three representations a static electric field (electric field from a fixed ring of charge or a sphere of charge) has a hidden gauge-invariant time dependent surface that is underlying the vector potential.

  3. Overview on METEOSAT geometrical image data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diekmann, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    Digital Images acquired from the geostationary METEOSAT satellites are processed and disseminated at ESA's European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany. Their scientific value is mainly dependent on their radiometric quality and geometric stability. This paper will give an overview on the image processing activities performed at ESOC, concentrating on the geometrical restoration and quality evaluation. The performance of the rectification process for the various satellites over the past years will be presented and the impacts of external events as for instance the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 will be explained. Special developments both in hard and software, necessary to cope with demanding tasks as new image resampling or to correct for spacecraft anomalies, are presented as well. The rotating lens of MET-5 causing severe geometrical image distortions is an example for the latter.

  4. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading.

    PubMed

    Altafini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote. PMID:27556642

  5. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote. PMID:27556642

  6. Connexions for the nuclear geometrical collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.; Sparks, N.

    2015-11-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson-Frankfurt model of nuclear rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. The model, also called the geometrical collective model or simply GCM(3), has two hidden mathematical structures, one group theoretic and the other differential geometric. Although the group structure has been understood for some time, the geometric structure is a new feature that this paper investigates in some detail. Using the de Rham Laplacian \\triangle =\\star d \\star d for the kinetic energy extends significantly the physical scope of the GCM(3) model. This Laplacian contains a ‘magnetic’ term due to the connexion between base manifold rotational and fibre vortex degrees of freedom. When the connexion specializes to irrotational flow, the Laplacian reduces to the Bohr-Mottelson kinetic energy operator.

  7. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  8. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, the geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O + OH → H + O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.

  9. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    The geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O+OH→H+O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity. PMID:26224326

  10. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-01

    The geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born-Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O+OH-->H+O2 reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.

  11. The Geometric Phase of Stock Trading.

    PubMed

    Altafini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Geometric phases describe how in a continuous-time dynamical system the displacement of a variable (called phase variable) can be related to other variables (shape variables) undergoing a cyclic motion, according to an area rule. The aim of this paper is to show that geometric phases can exist also for discrete-time systems, and even when the cycles in shape space have zero area. A context in which this principle can be applied is stock trading. A zero-area cycle in shape space represents the type of trading operations normally carried out by high-frequency traders (entering and exiting a position on a fast time-scale), while the phase variable represents the cash balance of a trader. Under the assumption that trading impacts stock prices, even zero-area cyclic trading operations can induce geometric phases, i.e., profits or losses, without affecting the stock quote.

  12. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors. PMID:27193936

  13. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  14. Telencephalon and geometric space in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Juan Pedro; Bingman, Verner Peter; Portavella, Manuel; López, Juan Carlos

    2006-11-01

    Neuroanatomical evidence indicates that the lateral pallium (LP) of ray-finned fishes could be homologous to the hippocampus of mammals and birds. Recent studies have found that hippocampus of mammals and birds is critical for learning geometric properties of space. In this work, we studied the effects of lesions to the lateral pallium of goldfish on the encoding of geometric spatial information. Goldfish with telencephalic lesions were trained to search for a goal in a rectangular-shaped arena containing one different wall that served as the only distinctive environmental feature. Although fish with lateral pallium lesions learned the task even faster than sham and medial pallium (MP)-lesioned animals, subsequent probe trials showed that they were insensitive to geometric information. Sham and medial pallium-lesioned animals could use both geometric and feature information to locate the goal. By contrast, fish with lateral palium lesions relied exclusively on the feature information provided by the wall of a different colour. These results indicate that lesions to the lateral pallium of goldfish, like hippocampal lesions in mammals and birds, selectively impair the encoding of geometric spatial information of environmental space. Thus, the forebrain structures of teleost fish that are neuroanatomically equivalent to the mammalian and avian hippocampus also share a central role in supporting spatial cognition. Present results suggest that the presence of a hippocampal-dependent memory system implicated in the processing of geometric spatial information is an ancient feature of the vertebrate forebrain that has been conserved during the divergent evolution of different vertebrate groups.

  15. Primary School Teacher Candidates' Geometric Habits of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köse, Nilu¨fer Y.; Tanisli, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Geometric habits of mind are productive ways of thinking that support learning and using geometric concepts. Identifying primary school teacher candidates' geometric habits of mind is important as they affect the development of their future students' geometric thinking. Therefore, this study attempts to determine primary school…

  16. Fluxless eutectic bonding of GaAs-on-Si by using Ag/Sn solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eo, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Dae-Seon; Jeong, Ho-Jung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Fluxless GaAs-on-Si wafer bonding using Ag/Sn solder was investigated to realize uniform and void-free heterogeneous material integration. The effects of the diffusion barrier, Ag/Sn thickness, and Ar plasma treatment were studied to achieve the optimal fluxless bonding process. Pt on a GaAs wafer and Mo on a Si wafer act as diffusion barriers by preventing the flow of Ag/Sn solder into both the wafers. The bonding strength is closely related to the Ag/Sn thickness and Ar plasma treatment. A shear strength test was carried out to investigate the bonding strength. Under identical bonding conditions, the Ag/Sn thickness was optimized to achieve higher bonding strength and to avoid the formation of voids due to thermal stress. An Ar plasma pretreatment process improved the bonding strength because the Ar plasma removed carbon contaminants and metal-oxide bonds from the metal surface.

  17. Physical understanding through variational reasoning: electron sharing and covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Ruedenberg, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael W

    2009-03-12

    Energy changes of stationary states resulting from geometric parameter changes in the Hamiltonian can be understood by variational reasoning in terms of the physical attributes of the kinetic and the potential energy functionals. In atoms as well as molecules, the energy minimization determines the ground state as the optimal compromise between the potential pull of the nuclear attractions and the localization-resisting kinetic pressure of the electron cloud. This variational competition is analyzed for the exact ab initio ground-state wave function of the hydrogen molecule ion to elucidate the formation of the bond. Its electronic wave function is shown to differ from the ground-state wave function of the hydrogen atom by polarization, sharing, and contraction, and the corresponding contributions to the binding energy are examined in detail. All told, the critical feature is that a molecular orbital, contracting (in the variational context) toward two nuclei simultaneously, can lower its potential energy while maintaining a certain degree of delocalization. As a consequence, its kinetic energy functional has a lower value than that of an orbital contracting toward a single nucleus equally closely. By contrast, the potential energy functional is lowered equally effectively whether the orbital contracts toward one nucleus or simultaneously toward two nuclei. Because of this weaker kinetic energy pressure, the electrostatic potential pull of the nuclei in the molecule is able to attach the orbital more tightly to each of the nuclei than the pull of the single nucleus in the atom is able to do. The role of the virial theorem is clarified. Generalizations to other molecules are discussed. PMID:19228050

  18. Physical understanding through variational reasoning: electron sharing and covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Ruedenberg, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael W

    2009-03-12

    Energy changes of stationary states resulting from geometric parameter changes in the Hamiltonian can be understood by variational reasoning in terms of the physical attributes of the kinetic and the potential energy functionals. In atoms as well as molecules, the energy minimization determines the ground state as the optimal compromise between the potential pull of the nuclear attractions and the localization-resisting kinetic pressure of the electron cloud. This variational competition is analyzed for the exact ab initio ground-state wave function of the hydrogen molecule ion to elucidate the formation of the bond. Its electronic wave function is shown to differ from the ground-state wave function of the hydrogen atom by polarization, sharing, and contraction, and the corresponding contributions to the binding energy are examined in detail. All told, the critical feature is that a molecular orbital, contracting (in the variational context) toward two nuclei simultaneously, can lower its potential energy while maintaining a certain degree of delocalization. As a consequence, its kinetic energy functional has a lower value than that of an orbital contracting toward a single nucleus equally closely. By contrast, the potential energy functional is lowered equally effectively whether the orbital contracts toward one nucleus or simultaneously toward two nuclei. Because of this weaker kinetic energy pressure, the electrostatic potential pull of the nuclei in the molecule is able to attach the orbital more tightly to each of the nuclei than the pull of the single nucleus in the atom is able to do. The role of the virial theorem is clarified. Generalizations to other molecules are discussed.

  19. A geometric approach to quantum vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Vittorio; Spera, Mauro

    1989-12-01

    In this paper a geometrical description is given of the theory of quantum vortices first developed by Rasetti and Regge [Physica A 80, 217 (1975)] relying on the symplectic techniques of Marsden and Weinstein [J. Phys. D 7, 305 (1983)], and Kirillov-Kostant-Souriau geometric quantization. The RR-current algebra is interpreted as the natural Hamiltonian algebra associated to a certain coadjoint orbit of the group G=SDiff(R3), the KKS prequantization condition of which is related to the Feynman-Onsager relation. This orbit is also shown to possess a G-invariant Kaehler structure, whence, in principle, it is possible to quantize it in a natural way.

  20. Local Geometrical Machinery for Complexity and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    In this Chapter, we present local geometrical machinery for studying complexity and control, consisting of dynamics on Kähler manifolds, which combine three geometrical structures-Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian)-in a mutually compatible way. In other words, every Kähler manifold is simultaneously Riemannian, symplectic and complex (Hermitian). It is well known that Riemannian manifolds represent the stage on which Lagrangian dynamics is set, symplectic manifolds represent the stage for Hamiltonian dynamics, and complex (Hermitian) varieties comprise the stage for quantum dynamics. Therefore, Kähler manifolds represent the richest dynamical stage available where Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and quantum dynamics all dance together.

  1. Geometrical compression of lidar return signals.

    PubMed

    Harms, J; Lahmann, W; Weitkamp, C

    1978-04-01

    The dynamic range of lidar return signals has been calculated for coaxial transmitter-receiver geometries via the spatial distribution of irradiance in the detector plane as a function of distance z. It is shown that the z(-2)dependence from the lidar equation can be converted to almost constant signal amplitude for distances up to 3 km by suitable and realistic choice of the geometric parameters. On the other hand, no signal degradation with respect to the lidar equation occurs at large distances. This geometrical compression of lidar return signal amplitudes is rated superior to electronic compression methods such as gain switching or logarithmic amplification. PMID:20197946

  2. Model-based vision using geometric hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Alexander, III; Patton, Ronald

    1991-04-01

    The Geometric Hashing technique developed by the NYU Courant Institute has been applied to various automatic target recognition applications. In particular, I-MATH has extended the hashing algorithm to perform automatic target recognition ofsynthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. For this application, the hashing is performed upon the geometric locations of dominant scatterers. In addition to being a robust model-based matching algorithm -- invariant under translation, scale, and 3D rotations of the target -- hashing is of particular utility because it can still perform effective matching when the target is partially obscured. Moreover, hashing is very amenable to a SIMD parallel processing architecture, and thus potentially realtime implementable.

  3. Hydrogen bonding in peptide secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Zoltán; Kovács, Attila

    Hydrogen bonding interactions in various peptide secondary structures (β-sheet, 27-ribbon, 310-helix, α-helix, π-helix, β-turn II, and γ-turn) have been investigated in small oligopeptides by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. Besides the primary O...HN interactions, the optimized structures revealed the importance of N...HN hydrogen bonding in several structures. The effect of substitution on the energy and structural properties was investigated comparing the properties of glycine, alanine, valine, and serine. The aliphatic substituents generally weaken the hydrogen bonds, the strongest effects being observed in crowded valine conformers. Additional hydrogen bonding interactions introduced by the OH group of serine can both strengthen (by polarizing the amide moiety through N...H interaction) and weaken (constraining the CO oxygen by O...HO interaction) the backbone hydrogen bonds. The effect of water as a polarizable medium on the energy properties was assessed by the COSMO model.

  4. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  5. Mapping the Geometric Evolution of Protein Folding Motor

    PubMed Central

    Hazam, Prakash Kishore; Shekhar, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide chain has an invariant main-chain and a variant side-chain sequence. How the side-chain sequence determines fold in terms of its chemical constitution has been scrutinized extensively and verified periodically. However, a focussed investigation on the directive effect of side-chain geometry may provide important insights supplementing existing algorithms in mapping the geometrical evolution of protein chains and its structural preferences. Geometrically, folding of protein structure may be envisaged as the evolution of its geometric variables: ϕ, and ψ dihedral angles of polypeptide main-chain directed by χ1, and χ2 of side chain. In this work, protein molecule is metaphorically modelled as a machine with 4 rotors ϕ, ψ, χ1 and χ2, with its evolution to the functional fold is directed by combinations of its rotor directions. We observe that differential rotor motions lead to different secondary structure formations and the combinatorial pattern is unique and consistent for particular secondary structure type. Further, we found that combination of rotor geometries of each amino acid is unique which partly explains how different amino acid sequence combinations have unique structural evolution and functional adaptation. Quantification of these amino acid rotor preferences, resulted in the generation of 3 substitution matrices, which later on plugged in the BLAST tool, for evaluating their efficiency in aligning sequences. We have employed BLOSUM62 and PAM30 as standard for primary evaluation. Generation of substitution matrices is a logical extension of the conceptual framework we attempted to build during the development of this work. Optimization of matrices following the conventional routines and possible application with biologically relevant data sets are beyond the scope of this manuscript, though it is a part of the larger project design. PMID:27716851

  6. Intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty: a deconvolution approach to robust fluence.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yankhua; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-07-21

    A deconvolution algorithm has been developed to obtain robust fluence for external beam radiation treatment under geometrical uncertainties. Usually, the geometrical uncertainty is incorporated in the dose optimization process for inverse treatment planning to determine the additional intensity modulation of the beam to counter the geometrical uncertainty. Most of these approaches rely on dose convolution which is subject to the error caused by patient surface curvature and internal inhomogeneity. In this work, based on an 1D deconvolution algorithm developed by Ulmer and Kaissl, a fluence-deconvolution approach was developed to obtain robust fluence through the deconvolution of the nominal static one given by any treatment planning system. It incorporates the geometrical uncertainty outside the dose optimization procedure and therefore avoids the error of dose convolution. Robust fluences were calculated for a 4 x 4 cm flat field, a prostate IMRT and a head and neck IMRT plan in a commercial treatment planning system. The corresponding doses were simulated for 30 fractions with the random Gaussian distribution of the iso-centers showing good agreement with the nominal static doses. The feasibility of this deconvolution approach for clinical IMRT planning has been demonstrated. Because it is separated from the optimization procedure, this method is more flexible and easier to integrate into different existing treatment planning systems to obtain robust fluence.

  7. Methods and Apparatuses for Signaling with Geometric Constellations in a Raleigh Fading Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use signal constellations, which have unequally spaced (i.e., `geometrically` shaped) points. In many embodiments, the communication systems use specific geometric constellations that are capacity optimized at a specific SNR (signal to noise ratio). In addition, ranges within which the constellation points of a capacity optimized constellation can be perturbed and are still likely to achieve a given percentage of the optimal capacity increase compared to a constellation that maximizes d (sub min) (i.e. minimum distance between constellations) are also described. Capacity measures that are used in the selection of the location of constellation points include, but are not limited to, parallel decode (PD) capacity and joint capacity.

  8. Structure, nonstoichiometry, and geometrical frustration of α -tetragonal boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Naoki; Shirai, Koun; Eckert, Hagen; Kunstmann, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Recent discoveries of supposedly pure α -tetragonal boron require to revisit its structure. The system is also interesting with respect to a new type of geometrical frustration in elemental crystals, which was found in β -rhombohedral boron. Based on density functional theory calculations, the present study has resolved the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of pure α -tetragonal boron. Different from β -rhombohedral boron, the conditions for stable covalent bonding (a band gap and completely filled valence bands) are almost fulfilled at a composition B52 with two 4 c interstitial sites occupied. This indicates that the ground state of pure α -tetragonal boron is stoichiometric. However, the covalent condition is not perfectly fulfilled because nonbonding in-gap states exist that cannot be eliminated. The half occupation of the 4 c sites yields a macroscopic amount of residual entropy, which is as large as that of β -rhombohedral boron. Therefore α -tetragonal boron can be classified as an elemental crystal with geometrical frustration. Deviations from stoichiometry can occur only at finite temperatures. Thermodynamic considerations show that deviations δ from the stoichiometric composition (B52 +δ) are small and positive. For the reported high-pressure syntheses conditions δ is predicted to be about 0.1 to 0.2. An important difference between pure and C- or N-containing α -tetragonal boron is found in the occupation of interstitial sites: the pure form prefers to occupy the 4 c sites, whereas in C- or N-containing forms, a mixture of 2 a , 8 h , and 8 i sites are occupied. The present article provides relations of site occupation, δ values, and lattice parameters, which enable us to identify pure α -tetragonal boron and distinguish the pure form from other ones.

  9. Hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhou; Wang, Donglai; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoming; Tian, Anmin

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated theoretically employing the newly developed density functional M06 with the suitable basis set and the natural bond orbital analysis. Comparing with the hydrogen or halogen bond in the gas phase, we find that the strength of the hydrogen or halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube will become weaker if there is a larger intramolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom donor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen or halogen bond and will become stronger if there is a larger intermolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond. According to the analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential of the carbon nanotube, the driving force for the electron-density transfer is found to be the negative electric field formed in the carbon nanotube inner phase. Our results also show that the X-H bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen bond and the X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the halogen bond are all elongated when encapsulating the hydrogen bond and halogen bond within the carbon nanotube, so the carbon nanotube confinement may change the blue-shifting hydrogen bond and the blue-shifting halogen bond into the red-shifting hydrogen bond and the red-shifting halogen bond. The possibility to replace the all electron nanotube-confined calculation by the simple polarizable continuum model is also evaluated.

  10. Reinforcing Geometric Properties with Shapedoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.; Nickell, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    Shapedoku is a new type of puzzle that combines logic and spatial reasoning with understanding of basic geometric concepts such as slope, parallelism, perpendicularity, and properties of shapes. Shapedoku can be solved by individuals and, as demonstrated here, can form the basis of a review for geometry students as they create their own. In this…

  11. Geometric Models for Collaborative Search and Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitton, Ephrat

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of geometric and graphical models for a variety of information search and filtering applications. These models serve to provide an intuitive understanding of the problem domains and as well as computational efficiencies to our solution approaches. We begin by considering a search and rescue scenario where both…

  12. How Do Young Children Learn Geometric Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohe, Pia

    Twenty children (ages 5 and 6) from each of seven cultural groups (Caucasian, Black, Jewish, Puerto Rican, Chinese, Korean-American and native Korean) were given a copying task of 21 geometric shapes to test the cultural invariancy of Piaget's topological-projective-Euclidean concept acquisition sequence. All subjects were either middle or lower…

  13. Geometric Mean--What Does It Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalder, Robin S.

    2012-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and numerous mathematics educators promote the combination of conceptual understanding and procedural learning in the successful instruction of mathematics. Despite this, when geometric mean is taught in a typical American geometry class, it is taught as a process only despite the many connections…

  14. The geometrical significance of the Laplacian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styer, Daniel F.

    2015-12-01

    The Laplacian operator can be defined, not only as a differential operator, but also through its averaging properties. Such a definition lends geometric significance to the operator: a large Laplacian at a point reflects a "nonconformist" (i.e., different from average) character for the function there. This point of view is used to motivate the wave equation for a drumhead.

  15. Geometric interpretations for resonances of plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Oulton, Rupert F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-01

    The field of plasmonics can be roughly categorized into two branches: surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating in waveguides and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) supported by scattering particles. Investigations along these two directions usually employ different approaches, resulting in more or less a dogma that the two branches progress almost independently of each other, with few interactions. Here in this work we interpret LSPs from a Bohr model based geometric perspective relying on SPPs, thus establishing a connection between these two sub-fields. Besides the clear explanations of conventional scattering features of plasmonic nanoparticles, based on this geometric model we further demonstrate other anomalous scattering features (higher order modes supported at lower frequencies, and blueshift of the resonance with increasing particle sizes) and multiple electric resonances of the same order supported at different frequencies, which have been revealed to originate from backward SPP modes and multiple dispersion bands supported in the corresponding plasmonic waveguides, respectively. Inspired by this geometric model, it is also shown that, through solely geometric tuning, the absorption of each LSP resonance can be maximized to reach the single channel absorption limit, provided that the scattering and absorption rates are tuned to be equal.

  16. Geometric Interpretation of the Pauli Spinor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frescura, F. A. M.; Hiley, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a reexamination of an intuitively geometric view of the nonrelativistic Pauli spinor in a simplified discussion of the connection between the rotation group and special transformations in the plane of projection. This view of the spinor is related to those based on the existence of an istropic or null vector. (SK)

  17. Children's Learning of Geometrical Concepts Through Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Exploratory study aimed to investigate elements of geometrical concepts that children learn through Logo programing. A test designed to assess three components of length and angle was administered to 84 children who had learned Logo for one year and 92 who had not. Data indicated a positive effect of Logo work on some items, but not all.…

  18. Geometric Transformations in Middle School Mathematics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed treatment of geometric transformations in presently available middle grades (6, 7, 8) student mathematics textbooks. Fourteen textbooks from four widely used textbook series were evaluated: two mainline publisher series, Pearson (Prentice Hall) and Glencoe (Math Connects); one National Science Foundation (NSF) funded curriculum…

  19. Modern Geometric Algebra: A (Very Incomplete!) Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Geometric algebra is based on two simple ideas. First, the area of a rectangle is equal to the product of the lengths of its sides. Second, if a figure is broken apart into several pieces, the sum of the areas of the pieces equals the area of the original figure. Remarkably, these two ideas provide an elegant way to introduce, connect, and…

  20. If Only Clairaut Had Dynamic Geometric Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hyewon; Reys, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Geometry is a major area of study in middle school mathematics, yet middle school and secondary students have difficulty learning important geometric concepts. This article considers Alexis-Claude Clairaut's approach that emphasizes engaging student curiosity about key ideas and theorems instead of directly teaching theorems before their…

  1. Impossible Geometric Constructions: A Calculus Writing Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awtrey, Chad

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a writing project that offers students the opportunity to solve one of the most famous geometric problems of Greek antiquity; namely, the impossibility of trisecting the angle [pi]/3. Along the way, students study the history of Greek geometry problems as well as the life and achievements of Carl Friedrich Gauss. Included is…

  2. More Meaning from the Geometric Mean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Bryan C.

    2003-01-01

    Provides classroom suggestions for combining numerical, algebraic, and geometric techniques with the understanding of a simple method for computing square roots. Historical origins of the method illustrate the debt owed to ancient minds living in what are now India, Pakistan, Iraq, and Egypt. (Author/NB)

  3. Geometrizing the Quantum - A Toy Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Benjamin

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the equations of relativistic Bohmian mechanics for multiple bosonic particles have a dual description in terms of a classical theory of conformally 'curved' space-time. This shows that it is possible to formulate quantum mechanics as a purely classical geometrical theory. The results are further generalized to interactions with an external electromagnetic field.

  4. A Geometric Approach to Fair Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbanel, Julius

    2010-01-01

    We wish to divide a cake among some collection of people (who may have very different notions of the comparative value of pieces of cake) in a way that is both "fair" and "efficient." We explore the meaning of these terms, introduce two geometric tools to aid our analysis, and present a proof (due to Dietrich Weller) that establishes the existence…

  5. Geometric Determinants of Human Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tom; Trinkler, Iris; Burgess, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Geometric alterations to the boundaries of a virtual environment were used to investigate the representations underlying human spatial memory. Subjects encountered a cue object in a simple rectangular enclosure, with distant landmarks for orientation. After a brief delay, during which they were removed from the arena, subjects were returned to it…

  6. Geometric approach to dislocation and disclination theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, A.I.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1988-05-01

    Cartan structure equations are used to create a four-dimensional geometric description of dislocations in continuum theory. It is shown that the dislocation distribution is determined by the torsion tensor, while the disclination distribution is determined by the curvature tensor. An analogy to electrodynamics is offered.

  7. Mechanics of tunable helices and geometric frustration in biomimetic seashells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Chen, Zi; Li, Wei; Dai, Pinqiang; Ren, Kun; Lin, Junjie; Taber, Larry A.; Chen, Wenzhe

    2014-03-01

    Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and engineering, ranging from DNA molecules to plant tendrils, from sea snail shells to nanoribbons. While the helical shapes in natural and engineered systems often exhibit nearly uniform radius and pitch, helical shell structures with changing radius and pitch, such as seashells and some plant tendrils, add to the variety of this family of aesthetic beauty. Here we develop a comprehensive theoretical framework for tunable helical morphologies, and report the first biomimetic seashell-like structure resulting from mechanics of geometric frustration. In previous studies, the total potential energy is everywhere minimized when the system achieves equilibrium. In this work, however, the local energy minimization cannot be realized because of the geometric incompatibility, and hence the whole system deforms into a shape with a global energy minimum whereby the energy in each segment may not necessarily be locally optimized. This novel approach can be applied to develop materials and devices of tunable geometries with a range of applications in nano/biotechnology.

  8. Geometrical aspects in optical wave-packet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Masaru; Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    We construct a semiclassical theory for propagation of an optical wave packet in a nonconducting medium with a periodic structure of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, i.e., a nonconducting photonic crystal. We employ a quantum-mechanical formalism in order to clarify its link to those of electronic systems. It involves the geometrical phase, i.e., Berry's phase, in a natural way, and describes an interplay between orbital motion and internal rotation. Based on the above theory, we discuss the geometrical aspects of the optical Hall effect. We also consider a reduction of the theory to a system without periodic structure and apply it to the transverse shift of an optical beam at an interface reflection or refraction. For a generic incident beam with an arbitrary polarization, an identical result for the transverse shift of each reflected or transmitted beam is given by the following different approaches: (i) analytic evaluation of wave-packet dynamics, (ii) total angular momentum (TAM) conservation for individual photons, and (iii) numerical simulation of wave-packet dynamics. It is consistent with a result by classical electrodynamics. This means that the TAM conservation for individual photons is already taken into account in wave optics, i.e., classical electrodynamics. Finally, we show an application of our theory to a two-dimensional photonic crystal, and propose an optimal design for the enhancement of the optical Hall effect in photonic crystals.

  9. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  10. Dialogic Bonds and Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Mabel

    A study of literature cannot be divorced from cultural contexts, nor can it ignore the humanist vision in interpreting literary texts. To discover dialogic bonds and boundaries between the reader and the text, or the writer and the audience, English classes should have two objectives: (1) to explore the diversity of perspectives, and (2) to relate…

  11. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  12. Bonding without Tears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses merits of using sigma-pi model of ethylene as a teaching aid in introductory organic chemistry. The nonmathematical treatment of sigma-pi bonding is then extended to such phenomena as conjugation, hyperconjugation, Markovnikoff addition, aromaticity, and aromatic substitution. (SK)

  13. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  14. Bonding with the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Ground: Archeology and Ethnography in the Public Interest, 1998

    1998-01-01

    An interview with Linda Mayro, archaeologist and cultural resources manager for Pima County, Arizona, discusses efforts of local groups to preserve local Native-American and Mexican cultural-heritage sites in oppositon to commercial land developers. A public information campaign led to passage of a $6.4 million historic preservation bond. (SAS)

  15. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  16. Subgraphs and network motifs in geometric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Alon, Uri

    2005-02-01

    Many real-world networks describe systems in which interactions decay with the distance between nodes. Examples include systems constrained in real space such as transportation and communication networks, as well as systems constrained in abstract spaces such as multivariate biological or economic data sets and models of social networks. These networks often display network motifs: subgraphs that recur in the network much more often than in randomized networks. To understand the origin of the network motifs in these networks, it is important to study the subgraphs and network motifs that arise solely from geometric constraints. To address this, we analyze geometric network models, in which nodes are arranged on a lattice and edges are formed with a probability that decays with the distance between nodes. We present analytical solutions for the numbers of all three- and four-node subgraphs, in both directed and nondirected geometric networks. We also analyze geometric networks with arbitrary degree sequences and models with a bias for directed edges in one direction. Scaling rules for scaling of subgraph numbers with system size, lattice dimension, and interaction range are given. Several invariant measures are found, such as the ratio of feedback and feed-forward loops, which do not depend on system size, dimension, or connectivity function. We find that network motifs in many real-world networks, including social networks and neuronal networks, are not captured solely by these geometric models. This is in line with recent evidence that biological network motifs were selected as basic circuit elements with defined information-processing functions.

  17. A GEOMETRICAL HEIGHT SCALE FOR SUNSPOT PENUMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Puschmann, K. G.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; MartInez Pillet, V. E-mail: brc@iac.e

    2010-09-10

    Inversions of spectropolarimetric observations of penumbral filaments deliver the stratification of different physical quantities in an optical depth scale. However, without establishing a geometrical height scale, their three-dimensional geometrical structure cannot be derived. This is crucial in understanding the correct spatial variation of physical properties in the penumbral atmosphere and to provide insights into the mechanism capable of explaining the observed penumbral brightness. The aim of this work is to determine a global geometrical height scale in the penumbra by minimizing the divergence of the magnetic field vector and the deviations from static equilibrium as imposed by a force balance equation that includes pressure gradients, gravity, and the Lorentz force. Optical depth models are derived from the inversion of spectropolarimetric data of an active region observed with the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the boundary condition for the inference of geometrical heights. The retrieved geometrical height scale permits the evaluation of the Wilson depression at each pixel and the correlation of physical quantities at each height. Our results fit into the uncombed penumbral scenario, i.e., a penumbra composed of flux tubes with channeled mass flow and with a weaker and more horizontal magnetic field as compared with the background field. The ascending material is hotter and denser than their surroundings. We do not find evidence of overturning convection or field-free regions in the inner penumbral area analyzed. The penumbral brightness can be explained by the energy transfer of the ascending mass carried by the Evershed flow, if the physical quantities below z = -75 km are extrapolated from the results of the inversion.

  18. Incarcerated adolescents' distress and suicidality in relation to parental bonding styles.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, E L; Kryzhanovskaya, L A; Koopman, C; Waite, D; Canterbury, R J

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between the bonding style of an incarcerated adolescent with parents and his/her current feelings of self-esteem, hopelessness, and suicidal thoughts and attempts. It also investigates differences between bonding to mother and bonding to father. Some 296 incarcerated adolescents were interviewed using the Parental Bonding Instrument. Significant relationships were found between youths' self-esteem, hoplessness, and suicidal behavior and their bonding style. Youths whose parent(s) had a parental bonding style of affectionless control reported the greatest distress, and youths whose parent(s) had an optimal bonding style reported the least distress. Differences were found between bonding styles with the mother and with the father. Attachment theory may be useful in targeting incarcerated youths who have affectionless control bonding with parent(s) for special interventions since these youths are most at risk for psychosocial problems.

  19. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  20. Molecular structural conformations and hydration of internally hydrogen-bonded salicylic acid: Ab initio and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, K.; Kolandaivel, P.; Kumaresan, R.

    We studied molecular structural conformations and hydration of internally hydrogen-bonded salicylic acid using ab initio and density functional theory methods. Molecular geometries and energetical parameters were obtained in gaseous phase using MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory, implementing the 6-311G(2d,2p) atomic basis set. Chemical hardness and chemical potential were calculated at HF/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory for all the optimized structures, and the principle of maximum hardness was tested. The condensed Fukui functions were calculated using the atomic charges obtained through a natural population analysis scheme for all optimized structures at B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory, and the most reactive sites of the molecules were identified. NMR studies were carried out for all the conformers in gaseous phase on the basis of Cheeseman et al.'s method at B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory; the calculated chemical shift values are discussed. The self-consistent reaction field theory (SCRF) was used to optimize all the conformers in aqueous phase (ɛ = 78.39) at B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory and the solvent effect was studied. The geometrical and energetical parameters of all the conformers are compared and analyzed. The dimeric structure of the most stable conformer in the gaseous phase was optimized at B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory and the interaction energy studied. Selected conformers were allowed to interact with water molecule; optimized parameters are discussed. Vibrational frequency analyses were performed at MP2/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory and the stationary point corresponding to local minima without imaginary frequencies are obtained for all the optimized structures.

  1. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-07-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  2. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  3. Correlation applied to the recognition of regular geometric figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Morales, Yaileth; Vega, Fabio; Díaz, Leonardo; Flórez, Daniel; Torres, Cesar

    2013-11-01

    It developed a system capable of recognizing of regular geometric figures, the images are taken by the software automatically through a process of validating the presence of figure to the camera lens, the digitized image is compared with a database that contains previously images captured, to subsequently be recognized and finally identified using sonorous words referring to the name of the figure identified. The contribution of system set out is the fact that the acquisition of data is done in real time and using a spy smart glasses with usb interface offering an system equally optimal but much more economical. This tool may be useful as a possible application for visually impaired people can get information of surrounding environment.

  4. X-ray CT geometrical calibration via locally linear embedding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mianyi; Xi, Yan; Cong, Wenxiang; Liu, Baodong; Wei, Biao; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    For X-ray computed tomography (CT), geometric calibration and rigid patient motion compensation are inter-related issues for optimization of image reconstruction quality. Non-calibrated system geometry and patient movement during a CT scan will result in streak-like, blurring and other artifacts in reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose a locally linear embedding based calibration approach to address this challenge under a rigid 2D object assumption and a more general way than what has been reported before. In this method, projections are linearly represented by up-sampled neighbors via locally linear embedding, and CT system parameters are iteratively estimated from projection data themselves. Numerical and experimental studies show that images reconstructed with calibrated parameters are in excellent agreement with the counterparts reconstructed with the true parameters. PMID:27002904

  5. Geometric Templates for Improved Tracking Performance in Monte Carlo Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Brian R.; Millman, David L.; Griesheimer, David P.; Gill, Daniel F.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most fundamental parts of a Monte Carlo code is its geometry kernel. This kernel not only affects particle tracking (i.e., run-time performance), but also shapes how users will input models and collect results for later analyses. A new framework based on geometric templates is proposed that optimizes performance (in terms of tracking speed and memory usage) and simplifies user input for large scale models. While some aspects of this approach currently exist in different Monte Carlo codes, the optimization aspect has not been investigated or applied. If Monte Carlo codes are to be realistically used for full core analysis and design, this type of optimization will be necessary. This paper describes the new approach and the implementation of two template types in MC21: a repeated ellipse template and a box template. Several different models are tested to highlight the performance gains that can be achieved using these templates. Though the exact gains are naturally problem dependent, results show that runtime and memory usage can be significantly reduced when using templates, even as problems reach realistic model sizes.

  6. Geometric frustration on a 1/9th site depleted triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, John; Beck, Jarrett

    2013-03-01

    In the searches both for new spin liquid and spin ice (artificial and macroscopic) candidates, geometrically frustrated two-dimensional spin systems have played a prominent role. Here we present a study of the classical antiferromagnetic Ising (AFI) model on the sorrel net, a 1/9th site depleted and 1/7th bond depleted triangular lattice. The AFI model on this corner-shared triangle net is found to have a large residual entropy per spin S/N = 0 . 48185 +/- 0 . 00008 , indicating the sorrel net is highly geometrically frustrated. Anticipating that it may be difficult to achieve perfect bond depletion, we investigate the physics resulting from turning back on the depleted bonds (J2). We present the phase diagram, analytic expressions for the long range partially ordered ground state spin structure for antiferromagnetic J2 and the short range ordered ground state spin structure for ferromagnetic J2, the magnetic susceptibility and the static structure factor. We briefly comment on the possibility that artificial spin ice on the sorrel lattice could by made, and on a recent report [T. D. Keene et al., Dalton Trans. 40 2983 (2011)] of the creation of a 1/9th depleted cobalt hydroxide oxalate. This work was supported by NSERC (JMH) and NSERC USRA (JJB)

  7. New insights into the conformal stability, influence of hydrogen bonding and vibrational analysis of 2,6- and 3,5-Dihydroxyacetophenone - A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragavendran, V.; Muthunatesan, S.

    2016-12-01

    The conformal stability of 2,6-Dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP I) and 3,5-Dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP II) were investigated using Potential Energy Surface scan studies and B3LYP/6-31G** level Density Functional Theory(DFT) calculations. The experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra were recorded in the condensed phase in order to perform detailed vibrational analysis. The optimized geometry and vibrational wavenumbers were determined by using B3LYP/6-31G** level Density Functional Theory calculations. The effect of scaling on the calculated wavenumbers was analyzed by employing unscaled, uniform scaling and selective scaling procedures. A detailed comparative analysis on the effect of hydrogen bonding on the geometry, structural parameters and vibrational wavenumbers has been carried out using the results obtained from PES scan and DFT level calculations. The results from the above studies reveals that, the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bond in DHAP I has significantly altered the geometrical parameters and hence the vibrational wavenumbers. The hydrogen bonding in DHAP I is strong enough to make it more stable compared to that of DHAP II.

  8. Entanglement capacity of nonlocal Hamiltonians: A geometric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, Behzad; Hassan, Ali Saif M.; Joag, Pramod S.

    2009-12-15

    We develop a geometric approach to quantify the capability of creating entanglement for a general physical interaction acting on two qubits. We use the entanglement measure proposed by us for N-qubit pure states [Ali Saif M. Hassan and Pramod S. Joag, Phys. Rev. A 77, 062334 (2008)]. This geometric method has the distinct advantage that it gives the experimentally implementable criteria to ensure the optimal entanglement production rate without requiring a detailed knowledge of the state of the two qubit system. For the production of entanglement in practice, we need criteria for optimal entanglement production, which can be checked in situ without any need to know the state, as experimentally finding out the state of a quantum system is generally a formidable task. Further, we use our method to quantify the entanglement capacity in higher level and multipartite systems. We quantify the entanglement capacity for two qutrits and find the maximal entanglement generation rate and the corresponding state for the general isotropic interaction between qutrits, using the entanglement measure of N-qudit pure states proposed by us [Ali Saif M. Hassan and Pramod S. Joag, Phys. Rev. A 80, 042302 (2009)]. Next we quantify the genuine three qubit entanglement capacity for a general interaction between qubits. We obtain the maximum entanglement generation rate and the corresponding three qubit state for a general isotropic interaction between qubits. The state maximizing the entanglement generation rate is of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger class. To the best of our knowledge, the entanglement capacities for two qutrit and three qubit systems have not been reported earlier.

  9. Universal prediction of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2010-04-01

    A complete exploration of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs) has been undertaken using a combination of statistical analyses of the Cambridge Structural Database and computation of ab initio interaction energies for prototypical hydrogen-bonded fragments. Notable correlations have been revealed between computed energies, hydrogen-bond geometries, donor and acceptor chemistry, and frequencies of occurrence. Significantly, we find that 95% of all observed IHBs correspond to the five-, six- or seven-membered rings. Our method to predict a propensity for hydrogen-bond occurrence in a crystal has been adapted for such IHBs, applying topological and chemical descriptors derived from our findings. In contrast to intermolecular hydrogen bonding, it is found that IHBs can be predicted across the complete chemical landscape from a single optimized probability model, which is presented. Predictivity of 85% has been obtained for generic organic structures, which can exceed 90% for discrete classes of IHB. PMID:20305358

  10. Where's the Orange? Geometric and Extra-Geometric Influences on English Children's Descriptions of Spatial Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Lynn V.; Coventry, Kenny R.; Clibbens, John

    2004-01-01

    The effect of both geometric and extra-geometric factors on children's production of "in" is reported (free-response paradigm). Eighty children across four age groups (means 4;1, 5;5, 6;1, and 7;1) were shown video scenes of puppets placing real objects in various positions with reference to a bowl and a plate. Located objects were placed at three…

  11. Separate geometric and non-geometric modules for spatial reorientation: evidence from a lopsided animal brain.

    PubMed

    Vallortigara, Giorgio; Pagni, Piero; Sovrano, Valeria Anna

    2004-04-01

    Research has proved that disoriented children and nonhuman animals can reorient themselves using geometric and nongeometric features of the environment, showing conjoined use of both types of information to different degree depending on species and developmental level. Little is known of the neurobiological bases of these spatial reorientation processes. Here we take advantage of the neuroanatomical peculiarities of the visual system of birds (showing segregation of information between the two sides of the brain to a considerable degree) to investigate the way in which geometric and nongeometric information is encoded and used by the left and right hemispheres. Domestic chicks were trained binocularly in an environment with a distinctive geometry (a rectangular cage) with panels at the corners providing nongeometric cues. Between trials, chicks were passively disoriented to disable dead reckoning. When tested after removal of the panels, left-eyed chicks, but not right-eyed chicks, reoriented using the residual information provided by the geometry of the cage. When tested after removal of geometric information (i.e., in a square-shaped cage), both right- and left-eyed chicks reoriented using the residual nongeometric information provided by the panels. When trained binocularly with only geometric information, at test, left-eyed chicks reoriented better than right-eyed chicks. Finally, when geometric and nongeometric cues provided contradictory information, left-eyed chicks showed more reliance on geometric cues, whereas right-eyed chicks showed more reliance on nongeometric cues. The results suggest separate mechanisms for dealing with spatial reorientation problems, with the right hemisphere taking charge of large-scale geometry of the environment and with both hemispheres taking charge of local, nongeometric cues when available in isolation, but with a predominance of the left hemisphere when competition between geometric and non-geometric information occurs

  12. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of...

  13. How a Community Decides to Issue Bonds. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandschneider, Philip; And Others

    Intended for local municipal officials and their advisors on public finance issues, this publication describes the legal environment surrounding bonds and examines some of the factors affecting the political feasibility of bond issues. Four categories of state controls of municipal bonds are discussed: limits on the amount of debt municipalities…

  14. The Calculation of Accurate Metal-Ligand Bond Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Partridge, Harry, III; Ricca, Alessandra; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The optimization of the geometry and calculation of zero-point energies are carried out at the B3LYP level of theory. The bond energies are determined at this level, as well as at the CCSD(T) level using very large basis sets. The successive OH bond energies to the first row transition metal cations are reported. For most systems there has been an experimental determination of the first OH. In general, the CCSD(T) values are in good agreement with experiment. The bonding changes from mostly covalent for the early metals to mostly electrostatic for the late transition metal systems.

  15. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, it has been the primary goal of this grant to design and implement software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. The work carried out under this grant was performed jointly with members of the Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) of NASA LaRC, Computer Sciences Corp., and Vigyan Corp. This has resulted in the development of several packages and design studies. Primary among these are the interactive geometric modeling tool, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (smart), and the integration and execution tools provided by the Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE). In addition, it is the purpose of the personnel of this grant to provide consultation in the areas of structural design, algorithm development, and software development and implementation, particularly in the areas of computer aided design, geometric surface representation, and parallel algorithms.

  16. a Modular Geometric Model for Underwater Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, H.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are broken at interfaces between optical media with different refrative indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more plane parallel glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here.

  17. Finsler geometric extension of Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Christian; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2012-03-01

    We construct gravitational dynamics for Finsler spacetimes in terms of an action integral on the unit tangent bundle. These spacetimes are generalizations of Lorentzian metric manifolds which satisfy necessary causality properties. A coupling procedure for matter fields to Finsler gravity completes our new theory that consistently becomes equivalent to Einstein gravity in the limit of metric geometry. We provide a precise geometric definition of observers and their measurements and show that the transformations, by means of which different observers communicate, form a groupoid that generalizes the usual Lorentz group. Moreover, we discuss the implementation of Finsler spacetime symmetries. We use our results to analyze a particular spacetime model that leads to Finsler geometric refinements of the linearized Schwarzschild solution.

  18. Scale-invariant geometric random graphs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Rogers, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We introduce and analyze a class of growing geometric random graphs that are invariant under rescaling of space and time. Directed connections between nodes are drawn according to influence zones that depend on node position in space and time, mimicking the heterogeneity and increased specialization found in growing networks. Through calculations and numerical simulations we explore the consequences of scale invariance for geometric random graphs generated this way. Our analysis reveals a dichotomy between scale-free and Poisson distributions of in- and out-degree, the existence of a random number of hub nodes, high clustering, and unusual percolation behavior. These properties are similar to those of empirically observed web graphs. PMID:27078369

  19. Geometric stability of topological lattice phases

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, T. S.; Möller, Gunnar; Roy, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect illustrates the range of novel phenomena which can arise in a topologically ordered state in the presence of strong interactions. The possibility of realizing FQH-like phases in models with strong lattice effects has attracted intense interest as a more experimentally accessible venue for FQH phenomena which calls for more theoretical attention. Here we investigate the physical relevance of previously derived geometric conditions which quantify deviations from the Landau level physics of the FQHE. We conduct extensive numerical many-body simulations on several lattice models, obtaining new theoretical results in the process, and find remarkable correlation between these conditions and the many-body gap. These results indicate which physical factors are most relevant for the stability of FQH-like phases, a paradigm we refer to as the geometric stability hypothesis, and provide easily implementable guidelines for obtaining robust FQH-like phases in numerical or real-world experiments. PMID:26530311

  20. Topological minimally entangled states via geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerschaper, Oliver; García-Saez, Artur; Orús, Román; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2014-11-01

    Here we show how the Minimally Entangled States (MES) of a 2d system with topological order can be identified using the geometric measure of entanglement. We show this by minimizing this measure for the doubled semion, doubled Fibonacci and toric code models on a torus with non-trivial topological partitions. Our calculations are done either quasi-exactly for small system sizes, or using the tensor network approach in Orús et al (arXiv:1406.0585) for large sizes. As a byproduct of our methods, we see that the minimisation of the geometric entanglement can also determine the number of Abelian quasiparticle excitations in a given model. The results in this paper provide a very efficient and accurate way of extracting the full topological information of a 2d quantum lattice model from the multipartite entanglement structure of its ground states.

  1. The classical geometrization of the electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo Duarte, Celso

    2015-08-01

    Following the line of the history, if by one side the electromagnetic theory was consolidated on the 19th century, the emergence of the special and the general relativity theories on the 20th century opened possibilities of further developments, with the search for the unification of the gravitation and the electromagnetism on a single unified theory. Some attempts to the geometrization of the electromagnetism emerged in this context, where these first models resided strictly on a classical basis. Posteriorly, they were followed by more complete and embracing quantum field theories. The present work reconsiders the classical viewpoint, with the purpose of showing that at first-order of approximation the electromagnetism constitutes a geometric structure aside other phenomena as gravitation, and that magnetic monopoles do not exist at least up to this order of approximation. Even though being limited, the model is consistent and offers the possibility of an experimental test of validity.

  2. The bouncing ball through a geometrical series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Sergio; Alfaro, Luis L.; Chavez, Juan E.; Bastarrachea, Aztlan; Hurtado, Jazmin

    2008-10-01

    The mathematical representation of the physical situation related to a bouncing ball on the floor is an important understanding difficulty for most of the students during the introductory mechanics and mathematics courses. The research group named Physics and mathematics in context from the University of Ciudad Juarez is concerned about the versatility in the change from a mathematical representation to the own physical context of any problem under a traditional instruction. In this case, the main idea is the association of the physical properties of the bouncing ball situation to the nearest mathematical model based on a geometrical series. The proposal of the cognitive development is based on a geometrical series that shows the time the ball takes to stop. In addition, we show the behavior of the ratio of the consecutive heights during the motion.

  3. Robot arm geometric link parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayati, S. A.

    A general method for estimating serial link manipulator geometric parameter errors is proposed in this paper. The positioning accuracy of the end-effector may be increased significantly by updating the nominal link parameters in the control software to represent the physical system more accurately. The proposed method is applicable for serial link manipulators with any combination of revolute or prismatic joints, and is not limited to a specific measurement technique.

  4. Multiphase flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Green, C.T.; Mathew, M.; ,

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. Simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-film flow on smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  5. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  6. Chirality: a relational geometric-physical property.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The definition of the term chirality by Lord Kelvin in 1893 and 1904 is analyzed by taking crystallography at that time into account. This shows clearly that chirality is a relational geometric-physical property, i.e., two relations between isometric objects are possible: homochiral or heterochiral. In scientific articles the relational term chirality is often mistaken for the two valued measure for the individual (absolute) sense of chirality, an arbitrary attributive term.

  7. IMPROVED BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

    1964-04-28

    An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

  8. Disulfide bonds of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee-Quigley, K.; Vedvick, T.; Taylor, P.; Taylor, S.

    1986-05-01

    The positions of the inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges were established for the 11S form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) isolated from Torpedo californica. A major form of AChE localized within the basal lamina of the synapse is a dimensionally asymmetric molecule which contains either two (13S) or three (17S) sets of catalytic subunits linked to collagenous and non-collagenous structural subunits. Limited proteolysis yields a tetramer of catalytic subunits which sediments at 11S. Each catalytic subunit contains 8 cysteine residues. Initially, these Cys residues were identified following trypsin digestion of the reduced protein alkylated with (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate. Peptides were resolved by gel filtration followed by reverse phase HPLC. To determine the disulfide bonding profile, native non-reduced 11S AChE was treated with a fluorescent, sulfhydryl-specific reagent, monobromobimane, prior to proteolytic digestion. One fluorescent Cys peptide was identified indicating that a single sulfhydryl residue was present in its reduced form. Three pairs of disulfide bonded peptides were identified, sequenced, and localized in the polypeptide chain. The Cys residue that is located in the C-terminal tryptic peptide was disulfide bonded to an identical peptide and thus forms the intersubunit crosslink. Finally, the cysteine positions have been compared with the sequence of the homologous protein, thyroglobulin. Both likely share a common pattern of folding.

  9. Cooperativity in Tetrel Bonds.

    PubMed

    Marín-Luna, Marta; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the cooperativity in linear chains of (H3SiCN)n and (H3SiNC)n complexes connected by tetrel bonds has been carried out by means of MP2 and CCSD(T) computational methods. In all cases, a favorable cooperativity is observed, especially in some of the largest linear chains of (H3SiNC)n, where the effect is so large that the SiH3 group is almost equidistant to the two surrounding CN groups and it becomes planar. In addition, the combination of tetrel bonds with other weak interactions (halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, triel, beryllium, lithium, and hydrogen bond) has been explored using ternary complexes, (H3SiCN)2:XY and (H3SiNC)2:XY. In all cases, positive cooperativity is obtained, especially in the (H3SiNC)2:ClF and (H3SiNC)2:SHF ternary complexes, where, respectively, halogen and chalcogen shared complexes are formed. PMID:26756083

  10. Direct bonded space maintainers.

    PubMed

    Santos, V L; Almeida, M A; Mello, H S; Keith, O

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically a bonded space maintainer, which would reduce chair-side time and cost. Sixty appliances were fabricated from 0.7 mm stainless steel round wire and bonded using light-cured composite to the two teeth adjacent to the site of extraction of a posterior primary tooth. Twenty males and sixteen females (age range 5-9-years-old) were selected from the Pedodontic clinic of the State University of Rio de Janeiro. The sixty space maintainers were divided into two groups according to the site in which they were placed: a) absent first primary molar and b) absent second primary molar. Impressions and study models were obtained prior to and 6 months after bonding the appliances. During this period only 8.3% of failures were observed, most of them from occlusal or facial trauma. Student t-test did not show statistically significant alterations in the sizes of the maintained spaces during the trial period.

  11. Theoretical study of the bonding of ammonia, carbon monoxide, and ethylene, to copper atom, dimer, and trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, René

    1995-04-01

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) calculations were performed for the association complexes Cun-L, with n=1, 2, 3 and L=NH3, CO, and C2H4. Two geometries for Cu2-L are considered; with the ligand bonded to a single copper atom (``atop,'' or A), and with the ligand bonded to both atoms (``bridge,'' or B). In addition to A and B, a third geometry was considered for Cu3-L, with the ligand bonded to all three copper atoms; in each case, no minimum was found for that third geometry. I report fully optimized equilibrium geometries and harmonic frequencies calculated within the local spin density (LSD) approximation for all the bound complexes and estimates of their binding energies obtained with a gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functional. Structure A is the most stable in all cases but, for Cu3CO and Cu3C2H4, structure B is only a few kcal/mol higher in energy. The energetic contribution from the geometrical relaxation of Cu3 ranges from essentially zero (Cu3NH3 B) to 3.4 kcal/mol (Cu3CO B). In agreement with previous calculations on Cun-C2H2 and with experiments, the calculated Cun-L binding energy is found to increase with n for all ligands. Although the bonding mechanism differs among the three ligands, repulsion of a filled ligand orbital with the half-filled 4s orbital of copper (or 4s-derived molecular orbitals of Cu2 and Cu3) always plays an important role and is responsible for the smaller binding energies in the CuL complexes. This repulsion decreases from Cu to Cu2 because of charge accumulation in Cu-Cu midbond region and of the greater polarizability of Cu2. The Cu3L binding energies are larger than those of Cu2L mostly because of the greater involvement of copper 4p orbitals in bonding to the ligand. The ligand vibrational frequency shifts relative to the free molecules are compared to experiment and discussed in relation to the nature of the metal-ligand interaction. In particular, an interesting correlation, between the frequency of

  12. Geometric simulation of structures containing rigid units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Much insight into the behaviour of the framework silicates can be obtained from the Rigid Unit model. I review results from geometric analyses [1] of framework structures, quantifying the significance of rigid unit motion in thermal disorder and in defect accomodation, and from a method of simulation [2,3] based on a whole-body `geometric potential' rather than on interatomic potentials. I show the application of the geometric potential to the symmetry-constrained generation of hypothetical zeolite frameworks [4], and to the rapid generation of protein conformations using insights from rigid cluster decomposition [5]. 1. Wells, Dove and Tucker, Journal of Applied Crystallography, 37:536--544 (2004). 2. G.D. Gatta and S.A. Wells, Phys. Chem. Min. 31:1--10 (2004). 3. A. Sartbaeva, S. A. Wells, S. A. T. Redfern, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8173 (2004) 4. M. M. J. Treacy, I. Rivin, E. Balkovsky, K. H. Randall and M. D. Foster, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 74, 121-132 (2004). 5. M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs, and Leslie A. Kuhn, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 19, 1:60 - 69, (2001).

  13. Salt Bridges: Geometrically Specific, Designable Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Jason E.; Kulp, Daniel W.; DeGrado, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, cooperativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction upon formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but at close distances there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms. PMID:21287621

  14. Salt bridges: geometrically specific, designable interactions.

    PubMed

    Donald, Jason E; Kulp, Daniel W; DeGrado, William F

    2011-03-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed, and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, co-operativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction on formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but, at close distances, there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms.

  15. Geometric Phase Effect in Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Hanggi, Petter; Li, Baowen

    2011-03-01

    Nonlinear molecular heat-pumping devices, which operate via explicitly modulating at least two parameters, are crucial for energy control in low dimensional nano-scale systems. We have applied slow two-parameter modulations on such a molecular junctions and consequently uncovered an intrinsic heat flux contribution, additional to the known, usual dynamical heat flux (from hot to cold). This additional heat flux derives from a nontrivial geometric origin that relates to a non-vanishing, so termed finite Berry phase. It provides a free lunch for the pumped heat and even can direct heat flux against the temperature bias. In addition we are able to show that this so pumped energy exhibits a novel robust fractional quantization phenomenon. Interestingly, this additional geometric heat pump mechanism is also shown to cause a breakdown of the heat-flux fluctuation theorem, which holds true for the non-driving, stationary heat flux transfer. The validity of this theorem is guaranteed whenever (i) the geometric phase contribution vanishes and (ii) the cyclic protocol preserves the detailed balance symmetry.

  16. Interacting geometric priors for robust multimodel fitting.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trung Thanh; Chin, Tat-Jun; Schindler, Konrad; Suter, David

    2014-10-01

    Recent works on multimodel fitting are often formulated as an energy minimization task, where the energy function includes fitting error and regularization terms, such as low-level spatial smoothness and model complexity. In this paper, we introduce a novel energy with high-level geometric priors that consider interactions between geometric models, such that certain preferred model configurations may be induced.We argue that in many applications, such prior geometric properties are available and should be fruitfully exploited. For example, in surface fitting to point clouds, the building walls are usually either orthogonal or parallel to each other. Our proposed energy function is useful in dealing with unknown distributions of data errors and outliers, which are often the factors leading to biased estimation. Furthermore, the energy can be efficiently minimized using the expansion move method. We evaluate the performance on several vision applications using real data sets. Experimental results show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods without significant increase in computation.

  17. The geometric phase controls ultracold chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Kendrick, B. K.; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, N.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, the geometric phase is shown to control the outcome of an ultracold chemical reaction. The control is a direct consequence of the sign change on the interference term between two scattering pathways (direct and looping), which contribute to the reactive collision process in the presence of a conical intersection (point of degeneracy between two Born–Oppenheimer electronic potential energy surfaces). The unique properties of the ultracold energy regime lead to an effective quantization of the scattering phase shift enabling maximum constructive or destructive interference between the two pathways. By taking the O + OH → H + O2more » reaction as an illustrative example, it is shown that inclusion of the geometric phase modifies ultracold reaction rates by nearly two orders of magnitude. Interesting experimental control possibilities include the application of external electric and magnetic fields that might be used to exploit the geometric phase effect reported here and experimentally switch on or off the reactivity.« less

  18. A Geometric Theory of Nonlinear Morphoelastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Souhayl; Angoshtari, Arzhang; Goriely, Alain; Yavari, Arash

    2016-08-01

    Many thin three-dimensional elastic bodies can be reduced to elastic shells: two-dimensional elastic bodies whose reference shape is not necessarily flat. More generally, morphoelastic shells are elastic shells that can remodel and grow in time. These idealized objects are suitable models for many physical, engineering, and biological systems. Here, we formulate a general geometric theory of nonlinear morphoelastic shells that describes both the evolution of the body shape, viewed as an orientable surface, as well as its intrinsic material properties such as its reference curvatures. In this geometric theory, bulk growth is modeled using an evolving referential configuration for the shell, the so-called material manifold. Geometric quantities attached to the surface, such as the first and second fundamental forms, are obtained from the metric of the three-dimensional body and its evolution. The governing dynamical equations for the body are obtained from variational consideration by assuming that both fundamental forms on the material manifold are dynamical variables in a Lagrangian field theory. In the case where growth can be modeled by a Rayleigh potential, we also obtain the governing equations for growth in the form of kinetic equations coupling the evolution of the first and the second fundamental forms with the state of stress of the shell. We apply these ideas to obtain stress-free growth fields of a planar sheet, the time evolution of a morphoelastic circular cylindrical shell subject to time-dependent internal pressure, and the residual stress of a morphoelastic planar circular shell.

  19. Geometric phase effects in ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In molecules, the geometric phase, also known as Berry's phase, originates from the adiabatic transport of the electronic wavefunction when the nuclei follow a closed path encircling a conical intersection between two electronic potential energy surfaces. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of the geometric phase has an important effect on ultracold chemical reaction rates. The effect appears in rotationally and vibrationally resolved integral cross sections as well as cross sections summed over all product quantum states. It arises from interference between scattering amplitudes of two reaction pathways: a direct path and a looping path that encircle the conical intersection between the two lowest adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces. Illustrative results are presented for the O+ OH --> H+ O2 reaction and for hydrogen exchange in H+ H2 and D+HD reactions. It is also qualitatively demonstrated that the geometric phase effect can be modulated by applying an external electric field allowing the possibility of quantum control of chemical reactions in the ultracold regime. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1505557 (N.B.) and ARO MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 (N.B.).

  20. Early sex differences in weighting geometric cues.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Stella F; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Fabian, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    When geometric and non-geometric information are both available for specifying location, men have been shown to rely more heavily on geometry compared to women. To shed insight on the nature and developmental origins of this sex difference, we examined how 18- to 24-month-olds represented the geometry of a surrounding (rectangular) space when direct non-geometric information (i.e. a beacon) was also available for localizing a hidden object. Children were tested on a disorientation task with multiple phases. Across experiments, boys relied more heavily than girls on geometry to guide localization, as indicated by their errors during the initial phase of the task, and by their search choices following transformations that left only geometry available, or that, under limited conditions, created a conflict between beacon and geometry. Analyses of search times suggested that girls, like boys, had encoded geometry, and testing in a square space ruled out explanations concerned with motivational and methodological variables. Taken together, the findings provide evidence for an early sex difference in the weighting of geometry. This sex difference, we suggest, reflects subtle variation in how boys and girls approach the problem of combining multiple sources of location information.

  1. Landsat-5 bumper-mode geometric correction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, J.C.; Choate, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) scan mirror was switched from its primary operating mode to a backup mode in early 2002 in order to overcome internal synchronization problems arising from long-term wear of the scan mirror mechanism. The backup bumper mode of operation removes the constraints on scan start and stop angles enforced in the primary scan angle monitor operating mode, requiring additional geometric calibration effort to monitor the active scan angles. It also eliminates scan timing telemetry used to correct the TM scan geometry. These differences require changes to the geometric correction algorithms used to process TM data. A mathematical model of the scan mirror's behavior when operating in bumper mode was developed. This model includes a set of key timing parameters that characterize the time-varying behavior of the scan mirror bumpers. To simplify the implementation of the bumper-mode model, the bumper timing parameters were recast in terms of the calibration and telemetry data items used to process normal TM imagery. The resulting geometric performance, evaluated over 18 months of bumper-mode operations, though slightly reduced from that achievable in the primary operating mode, is still within the Landsat specifications when the data are processed with the most up-to-date calibration parameters.

  2. Geometrical branching model: Correlations and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1988-04-01

    A geometrical model for multiparticle production at low as well as high pT is discussed. Below the threshold of substantial production of jets, the model has geometrical scaling and Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling, the latter being a result of Furry branching in multiplicity distribution at each impact parameter. Above the threshold the production of jets is explicitly taken into account by use of perturbative QCD. The separation into soft and hard components is done in the eikonal formalism consistent with unitarity. Geometrical scaling defines the soft component of the eikonal function. The hard component is related to the jet-production cross section; the pT cutoff is not chosen arbitrarily, but is to be determined by σel and σtot. Forward-backward multiplicity correlation can be calculated separately for the cases of no jets and with jets. The emphasis in this paper is on the formalism of the model. The procedure to determine the multiplicity distribution at all s is discussed.

  3. Average bond energies between boron and elements of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh groups of the periodic table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altshuller, Aubrey P

    1955-01-01

    The average bond energies D(gm)(B-Z) for boron-containing molecules have been calculated by the Pauling geometric-mean equation. These calculated bond energies are compared with the average bond energies D(exp)(B-Z) obtained from experimental data. The higher values of D(exp)(B-Z) in comparison with D(gm)(B-Z) when Z is an element in the fifth, sixth, or seventh periodic group may be attributed to resonance stabilization or double-bond character.

  4. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Asonov, Igor E

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given. PMID:23214773

  5. The two faces of hydrogen-bond strength on triple AAA-DDD arrays.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alfredo Henrique Duarte; Caramori, Giovanni Finoto; Coimbra, Daniel Fernando; Parreira, Renato Luis Tame; da Silva, Éder Henrique

    2013-12-01

    Systems that are connected through multiple hydrogen bonds are the cornerstone of molecular recognition processes in biology, and they are increasingly being employed in supramolecular chemistry, specifically in molecular self-assembly processes. For this reason, the effects of different substituents (NO2, CN, F, Cl, Br, OCH3 and NH2) on the electronic structure, and consequently on the magnitude of hydrogen bonds in triple AAA-DDD arrays (A=acceptor, D=donor) were evaluated in the light of topological [electron localization function (ELF) and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM)], energetic [Su-Li energy-decomposition analysis (EDA) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO)], and geometrical analysis. The results based on local H-bond descriptors (geometries, QTAIM, ELF, and NBO) indicate that substitutions with electron-withdrawing groups on the AAA module tend to strengthen, whereas electron-donating substituents tend to weaken the covalent character of the AAA-DDD intermolecular H-bonds, and also indicate that the magnitude of the effect is dependent on the position of substitution. In contrast, Su-Li EDA results show an opposite behavior when compared to local H-bond descriptors, indicating that electron-donating substituents tend to increase the magnitude of H-bonds in AAA-DDD arrays, and thus suggesting that the use of local H-bond descriptors describes the nature of H bonds only partially, not providing enough insight about the strength of such H bonds.

  6. Understanding the hydrogen bonds in ionic liquids and their roles in properties and reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kun; Zhang, Suojiang; Wang, Jianji

    2016-05-21

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have many potential applications in the chemical industry. In order to understand ILs, their molecular details have been extensively investigated. Intuitively, electrostatic forces are solely important in ILs. However, experiments and calculations have provided strong evidence for the existence of H-bonds in ILs and their roles in the properties and applications of ILs. As a structure-directing force, H-bonds are responsible for ionic pairing, stacking and self-assembling. Their geometric structure, interaction energy and electronic configuration in the ion-pairs of imidazolium-based ILs and protic ionic liquids (PILs) show a great number of differences compared to conventional H-bonds. In particular, their cooperation with electrostatic, dispersion and π interactions embodies the physical nature of H-bonds in ILs, which anomalously influences their properties, leading to a decrease in their melting points and viscosities and thus fluidizing them. Using ILs as catalysts and solvents, many reactions can be activated by the presence of H-bonds, which reduce the reaction barriers and stabilize the transition states. In the dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass by ILs, H-bonds exhibit a most important role in disrupting the H-bonding network of cellulose and controlling microscopic ordering into domains. In this article, a critical review is presented regarding the structural features of H-bonds in ILs and PILs, the correlation between H-bonds and the properties of ILs, and the roles of H-bonds in typical reactions.

  7. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A.; Asonov, Igor E.

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given.

  8. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Asonov, Igor E

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given.

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  13. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  14. A Micromachined Geometric Moire Interferometric Floating-Element Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, S.; Chen, T.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Tedjojuwono, K.; Nishida, T.; Cattafesta, L.; Sheplak, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a floating-element shear stress sensor that permits the direct measurement of skin friction based on geometric Moir interferometry. The sensor was fabricated using an aligned wafer-bond/thin-back process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer. Experimental characterization indicates a static sensitivity of 0.26 microns/Pa, a resonant frequency of 1.7 kHz, and a noise floor of 6.2 mPa/(square root)Hz.

  15. The relative roles of electrostatics and dispersion in the stabilization of halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-11-01

    In this work we highlight recent work aimed at the characterization of halogen bonds. Here we discuss the origins of the σ-hole, the modulation of halogen bond strength by changing of neighboring chemical groups (i.e. halogen bond tuning), the performance of various computational methods in treating halogen bonds, and the strength and character of the halogen bond, the dihalogen bond, and two hydrogen bonds in bromomethanol dimers (which serve as model complexes) are compared. Symmetry adapted perturbation theory analysis of halogen bonding complexes indicates that halogen bonds strongly depend on both dispersion and electrostatics. The electrostatic interaction that occurs between the halogen σ-hole and the electronegative halogen bond donor is responsible for the high degree of directionality exhibited by halogen bonds. Because these noncovalent interactions have a strong dispersion component, it is important that the computational method used to treat a halogen bonding system be chosen very carefully, with correlated methods (such as CCSD(T)) being optimal. It is also noted here that most forcefield-based molecular mechanics methods do not describe the halogen σ-hole, and thus are not suitable for treating systems with halogen bonds. Recent attempts to improve the molecular mechanics description of halogen bonds are also discussed.

  16. Geometrization of the physics with teleparallelism. II. Towards a fully geometric Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, José G.; Torr, Douglas G.; Lecompte, Alvaro

    1992-04-01

    In an accompanying paper (I), it is shown that the basic equations of the theory of Lorentzian connections with teleparallelism (TP) acquire standard forms of physical field equations upon removal of the constraints represented by the Bianchi identities. A classical physical theory results that supersedes general relativity and Maxwell-Lorentz electrodynamics if the connection is viewed as Finslerian. The theory also encompasses a short-range, strong, classical interaction. It has, however, an open end, since the source side of the torsion field equation is not geometric. In this paper, Kaehler's partial geometrization of the Dirac equation is taken as a starting point for the development of fully geometric Dirac equations via the correspondence principle given in I. For this purpose, Kaehler's calculus (where the spinors are differential forms) is generalized so that it also applies when the torsion is not zero. The point is then made that the forms can take values in tangent Clifford algebras rather than in tensor algebras. The basic “Eigenschaft” of the Kaehler calculus also is examined from the physical perspective of dimensional analysis. Geometric Dirac equations of great structural simplicity are finally inferred from the standard Dirac equation by using the aforementioned correspondence principle. The realm of application of the Dirac theory is thus enriched in principle, though only at an abstract level at this point: the standard spinors, which are scalar-valued forms in the Kaehler version of that theory, become Clifford-valued. In addition, the geometrization of the Dirac equation implies a geometrization of the Dirac current. When this current is replaced in the field equations for the torsion, the theory of Paper I becomes fully geometric.

  17. Geometric Approaches to Quadratic Equations from Other Times and Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Patricia R.; Bradley, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on geometric solutions of quadratic problems. Presents a collection of geometric techniques from ancient Babylonia, classical Greece, medieval Arabia, and early modern Europe to enhance the quadratic equation portion of an algebra course. (KHR)

  18. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  19. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Ross H; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4-3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  20. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H. Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-07

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  1. Diffusion-bonded-stacked gallium arsenide for mid- infrared generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Leslie Ann

    One of the limiting factors in mid-infrared nonlinear generation is the availability of adequate crystals. Current mid-infrared nonlinear crystals suffer from poor thermal properties and/or high absorption, minimizing their usefulness for high-peak and high-average-power conversion. While new materials are continually being explored, more than 15 years may be necessary to develop and test a new crystal, with no guarantee of final success. A new nonlinear material has been synthesized, combining the knowledge from two existing fields: quasi- phasematching (QPM) and diffusion bonding. QPM allows the use of well known semiconductors which are not birefringent, but which have good thermal properties, high damage thresholds, and high nonlinear coefficients. Diffusion bonding provides a robust monolithic structure. Prior to this work, bonded semiconductor structures were single interface, with little attention to optical losses. During this work, techniques were developed to precisely thin and clean the wafers in preparation for bonding. Two generations of bonding furnaces were designed and built to provide uniform temperatures and pressures, fully adjustable and repeatable bonding parameters, and multiple-interface capabilities. GaAs wafers were stacked with alternating crystal orientation, and annealed under compression to diffusion bond the interfaces. The quasi-phasematching was controlled by the wafer thickness. Diffusion-bonded stacks of 2 to 50-layers were bonded, and demonstrated close to theoretical conversion efficiency of second- harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation. The quality of the bonds was affected by surface cleanliness and contact uniformity of the interfaces. Conversion efficiency was limited by fabrication techniques, chiefly accurate wafer thinning and process- induced bulk losses. Diffusion-bonded-stacked structures can be optimized for all types of nonlinear devices. This technology can be expanded to other well known semiconductors, and is

  2. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  3. Metal-activated histidine carbon donor hydrogen bonds contribute to metalloprotein folding and function.

    PubMed

    Schmiedekamp, Ann; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    Carbon donor hydrogen bonds are typically weak interactions that contribute less than 2 kcal/mol, and provide only modest stabilization in proteins. One exception is the class of hydrogen bonds donated by heterocyclic side chain carbons. Histidine is capable of particularly strong interactions through the Cepsilon(1) and Cdelta(2) carbons when the imidazole is protonated or bound to metal. Given the frequent occurrence of metal-bound histidines in metalloproteins, we characterized the energies of these interactions through DFT calculations on model compounds. Imidazole-water hydrogen bonding could vary from -11.0 to -17.0 kcal/mol, depending on the metal identity and oxidation state. A geometric search of metalloprotein structures in the PDB identified a number of candidate His C-H...O hydrogen bonds which may be important for folding or function. DFT calculations on model complexes of superoxide reductase show a carbon donor hydrogen bond positioning a water molecule above the active site.

  4. Water lubricates hydrogen-bonded molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panman, Matthijs R.; Bakker, Bert H.; den Uyl, David; Kay, Euan R.; Leigh, David A.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M.; Geenevasen, Jan A. J.; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical behaviour of molecular machines differs greatly from that of their macroscopic counterparts. This applies particularly when considering concepts such as friction and lubrication, which are key to optimizing the operation of macroscopic machinery. Here, using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and NMR-lineshape analysis, we show that for molecular machinery consisting of hydrogen-bonded components the relative motion of the components is accelerated strongly by adding small amounts of water. The translation of a macrocycle along a thread and the rotation of a molecular wheel around an axle both accelerate significantly on the addition of water, whereas other protic liquids have much weaker or opposite effects. We tentatively assign the superior accelerating effect of water to its ability to form a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network between the moving parts of the molecular machine. These results may indicate a more general phenomenon that helps explain the function of water as the ‘lubricant of life’.

  5. Water lubricates hydrogen-bonded molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bakker, Bert H; den Uyl, David; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Geenevasen, Jan A J; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical behaviour of molecular machines differs greatly from that of their macroscopic counterparts. This applies particularly when considering concepts such as friction and lubrication, which are key to optimizing the operation of macroscopic machinery. Here, using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and NMR-lineshape analysis, we show that for molecular machinery consisting of hydrogen-bonded components the relative motion of the components is accelerated strongly by adding small amounts of water. The translation of a macrocycle along a thread and the rotation of a molecular wheel around an axle both accelerate significantly on the addition of water, whereas other protic liquids have much weaker or opposite effects. We tentatively assign the superior accelerating effect of water to its ability to form a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network between the moving parts of the molecular machine. These results may indicate a more general phenomenon that helps explain the function of water as the 'lubricant of life'.

  6. On the bond distance in methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen-Jenkins, Philippa; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Siegbahn, Per; Almloef, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    The equilibrium bond distance in methane was optimized using coupled-pair functional and contracted CI wave functions, and a Gaussian basis that includes g-type functions on carbon and d-type functions on hydrogen. The resulting bond distance, when corrected for core-valence correlation effects, agrees with the experimental value of 2.052 a(0) to within the experimental uncertainty of 0.002 a(0). The main source of error in the best previous studies, which showed discrepancies with experiment of 0.007 a(0) is shown to be basis set incompleteness. In particular, it is important that the basis set be close to saturation, at least for the lower angular quantum numbers.

  7. On the bond distance in methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen-Jenkins, Philippa; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Siegbahn, Per; Almlof, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium bond distance in methane has been optimized using coupled-pair functional and contracted CI wave functions, and a Gaussian basis that includes g-type functions on carbon and d-type functions on hydrogen. The resulting bond distance, when corrected for core-valance correlation effects, agrees with the experimental value of 2.052 a(0) to within the experimental uncertainty of 0.002 a(0). The main source of error in the best previous studies, which showed discrepancies with experiment of 0.007 a(0) is shown to be basis set incompleteness. In particular, it is important that the basis set be close to saturation, at least for the lower angular quantum numbers.

  8. Identifying and Fostering Higher Levels of Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Škrbec, Maja; Cadež, Tatjana Hodnik

    2015-01-01

    Pierre M. Van Hiele created five levels of geometric thinking. We decided to identify the level of geometric thinking in the students in Slovenia, aged 9 to 11 years. The majority of students (60.7%) are at the transition between the zero (visual) level and the first (descriptive) level of geometric thinking. Nearly a third (31.7%) of students is…

  9. Children's Use of Geometric Information in Mapping Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Bowers, Edmond

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating evidence, particularly from research using the disorientation technique, demonstrates early sensitivity to geometric properties of space. However, it is not known whether children can use geometric cues to interpret a map. The current study examined how 3- to 6-year-olds use geometric features of layouts in solving mapping tasks.…

  10. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  11. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  12. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  13. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  14. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  15. Crystallization kinetics: A solution for geometrical impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, R. A.; Saleh, A. M.

    2002-04-01

    Starting from the wrong derivation by Erukhimovitch and Baram of an equation alternative to the classical Kolmogoroff-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami one for the transformed fraction in an infinite specimen, undergoing an isothermal first-order phase transformation, it is shown that a different exact solution of the geometrical problem of impingement can be obtained. Such solution is equivalent to the empirical one already presented by Austin and Rickett more than sixty years ago and allows to better fit experimental results for isothermal transformations. This also suggests that perhaps different statistical derivations could allow to reach the same result.

  16. Geometric Aspects of Biological Sequence Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a geometric framework suitable for studying the relationships among biological sequences. In contrast to previous works, our formulation allows asymmetric distances (quasi-metrics), originating from uneven weighting of strings, which may induce non-trivial partial orders on sets of biosequences. The distances considered are more general than traditional generalized string edit distances. In particular, our framework enables non-trivial conversion between sequence similarities, both local and global, and distances. Our constructions apply to a wide class of scoring schemes and require much less restrictive gap penalties than the ones regularly used. Numerous examples are provided to illustrate the concepts introduced and their potential applications. PMID:19361329

  17. A geometric criterion for adiabatic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, T.J. ); Kovacic, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Chaos in adiabatic Hamiltonian systems is a recent discovery and a pervasive phenomenon in physics. In this work, a geometric criterion is discussed based on the theory of action from classical mechanics to detect the existence of Smale horseshoe chaos in adiabatic systems. It is used to show that generic adiabatic planar Hamiltonian systems exhibit stochastic dynamics in large regions of phase space. To illustrate the method, results are obtained for three problems concerning relativistic particle dynamics, fluid mechanics, and passage through resonance, results which either could not be obtained with existing methods, or which were difficult and analytically impractical to obtain with them.

  18. Geometric derivation of the chronometric redshift.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1993-01-01

    The chronometric redshift-distance relation z = tan 2(1/2rho), where rho is the distance in radians in the Einstein metric, is derived by an elementary geometric analysis comparable to that in traditional analysis of the expanding universe model. The differential dTt of Einstein time evolution Tt through time t, as applied to the local Minkowski coordinates x, takes the form sec2(1/2t). At the point of observation t = rho, implying that for a sufficiently localized source, observed wave lengths are a factor of sec2(1/2rho) greater than the corresponding emitted wave lengths. PMID:11607440

  19. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  20. State-Space Regularization: Geometric Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Kunisch, K.

    1998-05-15

    Regularization of nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems is analyzed for a class of problems that is characterized by mappings which are the composition of a well-posed nonlinear and an ill-posed linear mapping. Regularization is carried out in the range of the nonlinear mapping. In applications this corresponds to the state-space variable of a partial differential equation or to preconditioning of data. The geometric theory of projection onto quasi-convex sets is used to analyze the stabilizing properties of this regularization technique and to describe its asymptotic behavior as the regularization parameter tends to zero.

  1. The minimal geometric deformation approach extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, R.; Ovalle, J.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-11-01

    The minimal geometric deformation approach was introduced in order to study the exterior spacetime around spherically symmetric self-gravitating systems, such as stars or similar astrophysical objects, in the Randall-Sundrum brane-world framework. A consistent extension of this approach is developed here, which contains modifications of both the time component and the radial component of a spherically symmetric metric. A modified Schwarzschild geometry is obtained as an example of its simplest application, and a new solution that is potentially useful to describe stars in the brane-world is also presented.

  2. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  3. Some Geometrical Aspects of M-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azcárraga, José A.; Izquierdo, José M.

    2008-06-01

    Some geometrical aspects of super-p-brane theory, M-theory, and their connection with supergravity, are reviewed. In particular, the different fractions of preserved supersymmetries are discussed both from the algebraic and the supergravity solutions point of view. We also review the `preon conjecture' according to which states preserving a 31/32 fraction of supersymmetries would be the building blocks of M-theory, and on the failed attempts made so far to find these states in terms of supergravity solutions.

  4. Geometric derivation of the quantum speed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Philip J.; Kok, Pieter

    2010-08-15

    The Mandelstam-Tamm and Margolus-Levitin inequalities play an important role in the study of quantum-mechanical processes in nature since they provide general limits on the speed of dynamical evolution. However, to date there has been only one derivation of the Margolus-Levitin inequality. In this paper, alternative geometric derivations for both inequalities are obtained from the statistical distance between quantum states. The inequalities are shown to hold for unitary evolution of pure and mixed states, and a counterexample to the inequalities is given for evolution described by completely positive trace-preserving maps. The counterexample shows that there is no quantum speed limit for nonunitary evolution.

  5. On the minimum of independent geometrically distributed random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Leemis, Lawrence M.; Nicol, David

    1994-01-01

    The expectations E(X(sub 1)), E(Z(sub 1)), and E(Y(sub 1)) of the minimum of n independent geometric, modifies geometric, or exponential random variables with matching expectations differ. We show how this is accounted for by stochastic variability and how E(X(sub 1))/E(Y(sub 1)) equals the expected number of ties at the minimum for the geometric random variables. We then introduce the 'shifted geometric distribution' and show that there is a unique value of the shift for which the individual shifted geometric and exponential random variables match expectations both individually and in the minimums.

  6. Finite octree meshing through topologically driven geometric operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grice, Kurt R.

    1987-01-01

    The octree technique is developed into the finite octree, and an overview is given. Modeler requirements are given. The octree discretization is discussed along with geometric communication operators. Geometric communication operators returning topological associativity and geometric communication operators returning spatial data are also discussed and illustrated. The advantages are given of the boundary representation and of geometric communication operators. The implementation plays an important role in the integration with a variety of geometric modelers. The capabilities of closed loop processes within a complete finite element system are presented.

  7. On homogeneous L-bonds and heterogeneous L-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecny, Jan; Ojeda-Aciego, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we deal with suitable generalizations of the notion of bond between contexts, as part of the research area of Formal Concept Analysis. We study different generalizations of the notion of bond within the ? -fuzzy setting. Specifically, given a formal context, there are three prototypical pairs of concept-forming operators, and this immediately leads to three possible versions of the notion of bond (so-called homogeneous bond wrt certain pair of concept-forming operators). The first results show a close correspondence between a homogeneous bond between two contexts and certain special types of mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices. Later, we introduce the so-called heterogeneous bonds (considering simultaneously two types of concept-forming operators) and generalize the previous relationship to mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices.

  8. Valence bond cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Robert C.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1986-12-01

    We present results of cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding. Using the Generalized Valence Bond (GVB) method, we find a remarkable consistency in the behavoir of bonding orbitals for a variety of systems, including: LiH, CLi4, LiH4 and several hypervalent systems, such as SiH3Li2, SiH4Li2. Our results show that the metal-semiconductor bonding in these systems can be understood in terms of a pairing between McAdon-Goddard type metallic bonding orbitals and a set of equivalent orbitals of the non-metallic species. We propose that the results are relevant to the initial stages of alkali overlayer growth on semiconductor surfaces and lead to a simple picture of the bonding including the transition from a non-conducting to a conducting layer. We have considered numerous proposed hypervalent structures in light of the above results and find that they can be understood.

  9. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  10. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond. PMID:27464738

  11. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond.

  12. Electrons and Hydrogen-Bond Connectivity in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Serra, M.V.; Artacho, Emilio

    2006-01-13

    The network connectivity in liquid water is revised in terms of electronic signatures of hydrogen bonds (HBs) instead of geometric criteria, in view of recent x-ray absorption studies. The analysis is based on ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations at ambient conditions. Even if instantaneous threadlike structures are observed in the electronic network, they continuously reshape in oscillations reminiscent of the r and t modes in ice ({tau}{approx}170 fs). However, two water molecules initially joined by a HB remain effectively bound over many periods regardless of its electronic signature.

  13. Polar flattening and the strength of halogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, Robert; Kolář, Michal H; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-10-13

    The effect of polar flattening on the stability of 32 halogen-bonded complexes was investigated by utilizing CCSD(T)/CBS, DFT, and DFT-SAPT/CBS methods. It is shown that the value of polar flattening increases with the decreasing value of studied isodensity. For the complexes investigated, the polar flattening based on the isodensity of 0.001 au reaches 0.2-0.3 Å and 10-15% in absolute and relative values, respectively. These geometrical changes induce differences in the stabilization energy up to 20%.

  14. Diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2013-11-01

    Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are well suited as structural materials, e.g. for claddings in fission reactors and for plasma facing components in fusion power plants due to their high mechanical and oxidation stability at high temperatures and their high irradiation resistance. PM2000 is an iron based ODS ferritic steel with homogeneously distributed nanometric yttria particles. Melting joining techniques are not suitable for such ODS materials because of the precipitation and agglomeration of the oxide particles and hence the loss of their strengthening effect. Solid state diffusion bonding is thus chosen to join PM2000 and is investigated in this work with a focus on oxide particles. The diffusion bonding process is aided by the computational modeling, including the influence of the ODS particles. For modeling the microstructure stability and the creep behavior of PM2000 at various, diffusion bonding relevant temperatures (50-80% Tm) are investigated. Particle distribution (TEM), strength (tensile test) and toughness (Charpy impact test) obtained at temperatures relevant for bonding serve as input for the prediction of optimal diffusion bonding parameters. The optimally bonded specimens show comparable strength and toughness relative to the base material.

  15. Certain optimal parameters of high-velocity Venturi ejection tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, S. B.; Reznichenko, I. G.; Pavlenko, Y. P.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of the geometrical characteristics of centrifugal nozzles in high velocity Venturi ejection tubes for atomizing liquid in gas cleaning plant is analyzed. An optimal value of the nozzle geometrical characteristic, which is a function of the degree of filling of the nozzle outlet opening by the liquid, is given, at which the throat length is independent of water pressure before the nozzle.

  16. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1992-06-16

    Disclosed is a process for production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about [minus]40 C and 110 C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  17. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Karnowsky, Maurice M.; Yost, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  18. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1990-12-31

    Production of soldiered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about {minus}40{degrees}C and 110{degrees}C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  19. 27 CFR 28.66 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to... of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  20. Impact of geometric uncertainties on dose calculations for intensity modulated radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Runqing

    uniform dose per fraction (EUDf) and NTCP. The dose distribution including geometric uncertainties was determined from integration of the convolution of the static dose gradient with the PDF. Integration of the convolution of the static dose and derivative of the PDF can also be used to determine the dose including geometric uncertainties although this method was not investigated in detail. Local maximum dose gradient (LMDG) was determined via optimization of dose objective function by manually adjusting DVH control points or selecting beam numbers and directions during IMRT treatment planning. Minimum SD (SDmin) is used when geometric uncertainty is corrected with verification imaging. Maximum SD (SDmax) is used when the geometric uncertainty is known to be large and difficult to manage. SDmax was 4.38 mm in anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 2.70 mm in left-right (LR) direction and 4.35 mm in superior-inferior (SI) direction; SDmin was 1.1 mm in all three directions if less than 2 mm threshold was used for uncorrected fractions in every direction. EUDf is a useful QA parameter for interpreting the biological impact of geometric uncertainties on the static dose distribution. The EUD f has been used as the basis for the time-course NTCP evaluation in the thesis. Relative NTCP values are useful for comparative QA checking by normalizing known complications (e.g. reported in the RTOG studies) to specific DVH control points. For prostate cancer patients, rectal complications were evaluated from specific RTOG clinical trials and detailed evaluation of the treatment techniques (e.g. dose prescription, DVH, number of beams, bean angles). Treatment plans that did not meet DVH constraints represented additional complication risk. Geometric uncertainties improved or worsened rectal NTCP depending on individual internal organ motion within patient.