Science.gov

Sample records for oral carnitine therapy

  1. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  2. Oral carnitine supplementation for dyslipidemia in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Naini, Afsoon Emami; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Moghadasi, Mojdeh; Harandi, Asghar Amini

    2012-05-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a commonly observed problem in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients, which results in altered metabolism of fatty acids and subsequently development of dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effect of oral L-carnitine (LC) supplementation on lipid profile of adult MHD patients, we studied 30 of them (19 males, 11 females) who received LC supplementation of 250 mg tablets three times a day for eight weeks. They were compared with 30 matched patients as a control group. Serum lipid profiles were compared before and after the intervention between the two groups. There was a significant decrease of the values of the lipid profile in the intervention group before and after carnitine supplementation including the mean values of total cholesterol (190 ± 36.8 vs. 177 ± 31.2 mg/dL), triglyceride (210 ± 64.7 vs. 190 ± 54.1 mg/dL) and LDL-cholesterol (117 ± 30.1 vs. 106 ± 26.3 mg/dL), while the values did not change siginificantly from base line in the control group. However, the difference for HDL-cholesterol in intervention group was not statistically significant. None of the patients dropped out of the study due to drug side effects. Oral LC supplementation (750 mg/day) is able to improve lipid profile in patients on MHD. Further long-term studies with adequate sample size are needed to define the population of patients who would benefit more from carnitine therapy and the optimal dose and the most efficient route for administration of the drug.

  3. Chronic Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation Drives Marked Plasma TMAO Elevations in Patients with Organic Acidemias Despite Dietary Meat Restrictions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marcus J; Bostwick, Bret L; Kennedy, Adam D; Donti, Taraka R; Sun, Qin; Sutton, V Reid; Elsea, Sarah H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in atherosclerosis, raising concern about L-carnitine, a common supplement for patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) and a TMAO precursor metabolized, in part, by intestinal microbes. Dietary meat restriction attenuates carnitine-to-TMAO conversion, suggesting that TMAO production may not occur in meat-restricted individuals taking supplemental L-carnitine, but this has not been tested. Here, we mine a metabolomic dataset to assess TMAO levels in patients with diverse IEMs, including organic acidemias. These data were correlated with clinical information and confirmed using a quantitative TMAO assay. Marked plasma TMAO elevations were detected in patients treated with supplemental L-carnitine, including those on a meat-free diet. On average, patients with an organic acidemia had ~45-fold elevated [TMAO], as compared to the reference population. This effect was mitigated by metronidazole therapy lasting 7 days each month. Collectively, our data show that TMAO production occurs at high levels in patients with IEMs receiving oral L-carnitine. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of chronic oral L-carnitine supplementation and whether suppression or circumvention of intestinal bacteria may improve L-carnitine therapy.

  4. Carnitine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carnitine (L-g-trimethylamino-ß-hydroxybutyrate) functions metabolically as a covalent molecular chaperone of acyl compounds esterified to its hydroxyl moiety (1,2). The quintessentialmetabolic function of L-carnitine is to shuttle long-chain FAs (LCFAs)2 across the inner mitochondrial membrane to t...

  5. Direct identification of propionylcarnitine in propionic acidaemia: biochemical and clinical results of oral carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Duran, M; Ketting, D; Beckeringh, T E; Leupold, D; Wadman, S K

    1986-01-01

    Urinary short-chain acylcarnitine in a patient with propionic acidaemia and low levels of free carnitine was found to consist mainly of propionylcarnitine. The compound was isolated by sequential paper and thin layer chromatography and identified by ammonia desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Treatment of the patient with oral carnitine supplements led to a near-normalization of the plasma free carnitine concentrations and an increase in his muscle tone. The propionylcarnitine excretion rose and there was a simultaneous decrease in the methylcitrate output. Carnitine treatment did not prevent the occurrence of an episode of metabolic decompensation.

  6. Inflammation and L-carnitine therapy in hemodialysis patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari-Soltani, Saman; Tabibi, Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is a common complication in hemodialysis (HD) patients with no valid treatment strategy. In addition, carnitine deficiency occurs frequently in HD patients because of intradialytic loss of carnitine, impaired de novo carnitine renal synthesis, and reduced dietary intake. It appears that carnitine deficiency is related to inflammation in HD patients. A few clinical trials have investigated the effect of L-carnitine supplement on inflammatory markers in HD patients. All studies in this field, except one, showed that L-carnitine could significantly reduce C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, as two systemic inflammation markers, in HD patients. Therefore, considering high prevalence of inflammation and carnitine deficiency in HD patients, L-carnitine therapy is a reasonable approach for reducing systemic inflammation and its complications in these patients.

  7. Carnitine deficiency in children receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgambat, Kristen; Moudgil, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is known to occur in chronic hemodialysis; however, the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on carnitine homeostasis has not been studied. We hypothesized that children receiving CRRT are at risk for deficiency because of continuous removal, absent intake, decreased production, and comorbidities related to critical illness. Records of patients with acute kidney injury receiving CRRT at Children's National Health System between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed for total carnitine (TC), free carnitine (FC), feeding modality, severity of illness, and survival outcome. The proportion of carnitine-deficient patients at baseline, 1, 2, and ≥3 weeks on CRRT were compared by chi-square, and relationships with other variables assessed by Pearson's correlation and logistic regression. The study group included 42 CRRT patients, age 7.9 + 1.1 years. At baseline, 30.7% and 35.7% of patients were TC and FC deficient. Within 1 week, 64.5% (P = 0.03) and 70% (P = 0.03) were TC and FC deficient, and prevalence of deficiency increased to 80% (P = 0.01) and 90% (P = 0.008) by 2 weeks; 100% of patients were TC and FC deficient after being on CRRT for ≥3 weeks (P = 0.005 and P = 0.01, respectively, vs. baseline). TC and FC levels negatively correlated with days on CRRT (r = -0.39, P = 0.001 and r = -0.35, P = 0.005). Patients with TC and FC deficiency had 5.9 and 4.9 greater odds of death than those with normal levels (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03). Carnitine is significantly and rapidly depleted with longer time on CRRT, and carnitine deficiency is associated with increased mortality. Consequences of deficiency and benefits of supplementation in the pediatric CRRT population should be investigated.

  8. Combination therapy with losartan and L-carnitine protects against endothelial dysfunction of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sleem, Mostafa; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Mangoura, Safwat A

    2014-12-05

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of diabetic cardiovascular complications and angiotensin II appears to play a pivotal role in this setting. The present study aimed to investigate whether the combination therapy with losartan and the nutritional supplement, L-carnitine can provide an additional protection against diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction and elucidate the possible mechanism(s) underlying this effect. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) in rat. Effects of losartan (20 mg/kg, orally, 3 months) and L-carnitine (200 mg/kg, orally, 3 months) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, oxidative stress parameters, endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression (eNOS), and vascular function were evaluated. Our results showed a marked increase in aortic superoxide anion (O2(-)) production and serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level alongside attenuating antioxidant enzyme capacities in diabetic rats. This was associated with a significant increase in anigiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression and TNF-α serum level of diabetic rats alongside reducing aortic eNOS gene expression and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. The single or combined administration of losartan and L-carnitine significantly inhibited these changes. Additionally, the vascular endothelium-dependent relaxation with acetylcholine (ACh) in aortic diabetic rat was significantly ameliorated by the single and combined administration of losartan or L-carnitine. Noteworthy, the combination therapy exhibited a more profound response over the monotherapy. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the combined therapy of losartan and L-carnitine affords additive beneficial effects against diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction, possibly via normalizing the dysregulated eNOS and reducing the inflammation and oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  9. [Therapy of arrhythmia induced by myocardial ischemia. Association of L-carnitine, propafenone and mexiletine].

    PubMed

    Mondillo, S; Faglia, S; D'Aprile, N; Mangiacotti, L; Campolo, M A; Agricola, E; Palazzuoli, V

    1995-12-01

    To assess the anti-arrythmic effect of L-carnitina, propafenone and mexiletine, we tested the drugs in 50 patients with effort angina and ventricular ectopic beats (VEB). The patients were randomized in 5 groups: Group A: was treated with oral L-carnitine at the dose of 2 g x 3 for two weeks. Group B: oral propafenone at the dose of 300 mg x 3 for two weeks. Group C: as group B+L-carnitine+g x 3 at the second weeks. Group D: oral mexiletine at the dose of 200 mg x 3 for two weeks. Group E: as group D+L-carnitine 2 gr x 3 at the second week. After 7 and 14 days of treatment, in all patients an Holter examination was performed. Our results show that L-carnitine exerts a significant reduction of the VEB and its administration potentiates the anti-arrythmic effect of propafenone and mexiletine.

  10. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children with solid malignancies receiving doxorubicin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khositseth, Anant; Jirasakpisarn, Suwadee; Pakakasama, Samart; Choubtuym, Lulin; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies demonstrated l-carnitine decreasing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Our objectives were to study carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children treated with doxorubicin and the effect of short-term l-carnitine supplements. Materials and Methods: Serial carnitine levels and cardiac functions were obtained in children with newly diagnosed solid malignancies before doxorubicin, after cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m2 and ≥300 mg/m2, respectively. Oral l-carnitine 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days were given to the children treated with doxorubicin at cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m2 and ≥300 mg/m2. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were also obtained in those children before and after short-term oral l-carnitine at each cumulative dose of doxorubicin. Results: Five children (3 females), median age of 9.1 years (range 1.5–13 years) with newly diagnosed solid malignancies were enrolled in the study. Free carnitine (FC) tended to decrease while acyl-carnitine (AC) increased making AC/FC ratio increased after cumulative dose of ≥150 and ≥300 mg/m2 but the statistics was not significant. Left ventricular (LV) systolic function was not significantly changed. Interestingly, LV global function (LV myocardial performance index) was significantly increased after 150 mg/m2 (median 0.39, 0.27–0.51) and 300 mg/2 (median 0.46, 0.27–0.50) when compared to baseline (median 0.28, 0.14–0.48) (P=0.05). Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were not significantly changed after oral l-carnitine supplement at cumulative dose of ≥150 mg/m2 (n=6) and ≥300 mg/m2 (n=9). Conclusions: Carnitine levels tended to decrease after doxorubicin treatment. LV global dysfunction was documented early after doxorubicin. However, short-term l-carnitine supplement did not improve cardiac function. PMID:21731215

  11. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    MARCOVINA, SANTICA M.; SIRTORI, CESARE; PERACINO, ANDREA; GHEORGHIADE, MIHAI; BORUM, PEGGY; REMUZZI, GIUSEPPE; ARDEHALI, HOSSEIN

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  12. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential.

  13. Potential Inhibitory Effects of l-Carnitine Supplementation on Tissue Advanced Glycation End Products in Patients with Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Kaida, Yusuke; Adachi, Takeki; Ando, Ryotaro; Okuda, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to cardiovascular disease in patients with hemodialysis (HD). We have recently found that carnitine levels are inversely associated with skin AGE levels in HD patients. We examined whether l-carnitine supplementation reduced skin AGE levels in HD patients with carnitine deficiency. Methods: This was a single-center study. One hundred and two HD patients (total carnitine levels <50 μmol/L) were enrolled and randomized to either oral administration of l-carnitine (900 mg/day) (n=51) or control (n=51). After 6 months, metabolic and inflammatory variables, including serum levels of carnitine, were measured. Skin AGE levels were determined by evaluating skin auto-fluorescence with an AGE-reader. Results: There were no significant differences of clinical variables at baseline between the control and l-carnitine therapy group. Thirty-two patients did not complete the assessment or treatment of the study. Oral l-carnitine supplementation for 6 months significantly increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, total, free, and acyl carnitine levels, while it decreased alanine transaminase, acyl/free carnitine ratio, β2-microglobulin, and skin AGE values. Change in total carnitine values from baseline (Δtotal carnitine) and Δfree carnitine were inversely associated with Δskin AGE levels in l-carnitine-treated patients (p=0.036 and p=0.016, respectively). In multiple regression analysis, Δfree carnitine was a sole independent determinant of Δskin AGEs (R2=0.178). Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that oral l-carnitine supplementation significantly decreased skin AGE levels in HD patients with carnitine deficiency. These observations suggest that supplementation of l-carnitine might be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing the accumulation of tissue AGEs in carnitine-deficient patients with HD. PMID:23909402

  14. L-carnitine in cardiogenic shock therapy: pharmacodynamic aspects and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Corbucci, G G; Loche, F

    1993-01-01

    Following our previous work on biochemical and clinical aspects of cardiogenic shock, we carried out an open study on 27 patients hospitalized in shock condition and investigated for the entire period of permanence in intensive care units (ICU). The subjects were treated with high doses of L-carnitine following previous results on the use of this molecule in conditions of oxidative damage due to acute cellular hypoxia. When compared with the data reported in the literature, the results obtained in this study show a surprisingly positive trend for the carnitine-treated patients in terms of survival rate to the cardiogenic shock. This finding and statistical analysis of the clinical parameters confirm the suggestion that L-carnitine could be credited with a new and interesting role in the therapy of cardiogenic shock.

  15. Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation in low-birth-weight premature infants maintained on human milk.

    PubMed

    Melegh, B; Kerner, J; Sándor, A; Vincellér, M; Kispál, G

    1987-01-01

    Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on fat and protein metabolism have been studied in 20 low-birth-weight premature infants (mean weight at birth 1.519 g, range 1,200-1,880 g) fed with pooled pasteurized human milk. Throughout 7 consecutive days, started at various postnatal ages (range 10-33 days) infants were fed exclusively with milk containing 300 nmol/ml L-carnitine as added supplement. The amount of extra carnitine intake ranged from 42.6 to 72.0 mumol/kg/day. Until day 5 of supplementation there was a continuous increase in the daily urinary excretion of total carnitine, which levelled off thereafter, corresponding approximately to 50% of the extra L-carnitine intake, indicating that a part of the supplement was retained by the body. Total, free and esterified carnitine levels were significantly elevated in the plasma at the end of the study period. The increased levels of acylcarnitines in plasma and urine indicate that the carnitine supplement was taken up by tissues and entered the intermediary metabolism. Plasma triglyceride level was decreased, whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate level was increased at the end of supplementation, indicating an enhanced fat utilization. Plasma and urine analysis also revealed an altered nitrogen handling. There was a marked decrease in plasma urea level as well as a significant fall in the urea and total N excretion, with a trend of decrease in excretion of 3-methylhistidine, suggesting a reduced amino acid and protein catabolism during L-carnitine supplementation.

  16. Carnitine and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, O J

    1996-08-01

    Carnitine plays a central role in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. It transports long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation. Carnitine also modulates the metabolism of coenzyme-A (CoA). It is not surprising that the use of supplementary carnitine to improve physical performance has become widespread in recent years, although there is no unequivocal support to this practice. However, critical reflections and current scientific-based knowledge are important because the implications of reduced or increased carnitine concentrations in vivo are not thoroughly understood. Several rationales have been forwarded in support of the potential ergogenic effects of oral carnitine supplementation. However, the following arguments derived from established scientific observations may be forwarded: (i) carnitine supplementation neither enhances FA oxidation in vivo or spares glycogen or postpones fatigue during exercise. Carnitine supplementation does not unequivocally improve performance of athletes; (ii) carnitine supplementation does not reduce body fat or help to lose weight; (iii) in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is fully active already after a few seconds of intense exercise. Carnitine supplementation induces no further activation of PDC in vivo; (iv) despite an increased acetyl-CoA/free CoA ratio, PDC is not depressed during exercise in vivo and therefore supplementary carnitine has no effect on lactate accumulation; (v) carnitine supplementation per se does not affect the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); (vi) during exercise there is a redistribution of free carnitine and acylcarnitines in the muscle but there is no loss of total carnitine. Athletes are not at risk for carnitine deficiency and do not have an increased need for carnitine. Although there are some theoretical points favouring potential ergogenic effects of carnitine supplementation, there is currently no scientific basis for healthy individuals or athletes to use carnitine

  17. Effect of oral L-carnitine administration on insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Manuel; Hernández-González, Sandra O; Hernández-Salazar, Eduardo; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza

    2008-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to evaluate the effect of oral L-carnitine administration on insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Six subjects received L-carnitine 1 g orally 3 times a day before meals for a period of 4 weeks. Six other individuals took a placebo for the same period of time, as the control group. Before and after the intervention, insulin sensitivity and the lipid profile were estimated. To assess insulin sensitivity, the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique was performed. Wilcoxon's signed rank and the Mann-Whitney U test were used for the statistical analyses. There were no significant differences in basal clinical characteristics between the 2 groups. Insulin sensitivity and the basal lipid profile were similar. There were no significant changes in either group after the intervention in insulin sensitivity (3.2 +/- 1.2 vs. 4.5 +/- 1.7 mg/kg/min, p = 0.115, and 3.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.4 mg/kg/min, p = 0.917, for the placebo and L-carnitine groups, respectively) and in lipid profile. L-Carnitine orally administered for a period of 4 weeks did not modify insulin sensitivity or the lipid profile. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Comparison of the Effects of Varicocelectomy and Oral L-carnitine on Sperm Parameters in Infertile Men with Varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ganji, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicocele is defined as dilated and twisted veins of the pampiniform plexus in the spermatic cord. It is the most common cause of male infertility. There are various medical and surgical procedures for the treatment of this disease. Aim This study was aimed to compare the effects of oral administration of L-Carnitine and varicocelectomy on spermogram parameters. Materials and Methods This study was conducted as a double blind clinical trial without randomization. Inclusion criteria were, all married infertile men with varicocele. Patients chose their treatment personally and spermogram was carried out for all patients before and after the third and sixth months of treatment. Then, the sperm parameters of the two groups were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Results In our study, trend of sperm count in the surgery group changed from 22 to 28.61 million (vs 34.6 to 45.37 in L-Carnitine group), motility changed from 21.74 to 35.38 percent (vs 33.9 to 47.48 in L-Carnitine group), normal sperm morphology changed from 46.25 to 60 percent (vs 56.61 to 69.7 in L-Carnitine group) and volume of semen changed from 3.5 to 4.17 cc (vs 2.95 to 4.33 in L-Carnitine group). These values were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, we can say that medicinal treatment by administration of oral L-Carnitine is as effective as varicocelectomy in improving semen parameters and can be used as an alternative to surgery for varicocele grade II. PMID:27190879

  19. Ameliorating hypertension and insulin resistance in subjects at increased cardiovascular risk: effects of acetyl-L-carnitine therapy.

    PubMed

    Ruggenenti, Piero; Cattaneo, Dario; Loriga, Giacomina; Ledda, Franca; Motterlini, Nicola; Gherardi, Giulia; Orisio, Silvia; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    Insulin resistance, a key component of the metabolic syndrome, is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Acetyl-L-carnitine infusion acutely ameliorated insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetics with insulin resistance. In this sequential off-on-off pilot study, we prospectively evaluated the effects of 24-week oral acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g twice daily) therapy on the glucose disposal rate (GDR), assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, and components of the metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic subjects at increased cardiovascular risk a priori segregated into 2 groups with GDR < or =7.9 (n=16) or >7.9 (n=16) mg/kg per minute, respectively. Baseline GDR and systolic blood pressure were negatively correlated (n=32; P=0.001; r=-0.545), and patients with GDR < or =7.9 mg/kg per minute had higher systolic/diastolic blood pressure than those with higher GDR. Acetyl-L-carnitine increased GDR from 4.89+/-1.47 to 6.72+/-3.12 mg/kg per minute (P=0.003, Bonferroni-adjusted) and improved glucose tolerance in patients with GDR < or =7.9 mg/kg per minute, whereas it had no effects in those with higher GDRs. Changes in GDR were significantly different between groups (P=0.017, ANCOVA). Systolic blood pressure decreased from 144.0+/-13.6 to 135.1+/-8.4 mm Hg and from 130.8+/-12.4 to 123.8+/-10.8 mm Hg in the lower and higher GDR groups, respectively (P<0.05 for both; P<0.001 overall) and progressively recovered toward baseline over 8 weeks posttreatment. Total and high molecular weight adiponectin levels followed specular trends. Diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased only in those with higher GDRs. Treatment was well tolerated in all of the patients. Acetyl-L-carnitine safely ameliorated arterial hypertension, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypoadiponectinemia in subjects at increased cardiovascular risk. Whether these effects may translate into long-term cardioprotection is worth investigating.

  20. Reversible weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate treatment due to carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-sharefi, Ahmed; Bilous, Rudy

    2015-09-02

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with bilateral leg weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate therapy. She was diagnosed with valproate-induced encephalopathy due to carnitine deficiency. Clinical improvement occurred with oral carnitine supplementation. Our case report highlights the importance of considering carnitine deficiency in patients presenting with unexplained neurological signs while on long-term valproate treatment.

  1. Reversible weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate treatment due to carnitine deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-sharefi, Ahmed; Bilous, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with bilateral leg weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate therapy. She was diagnosed with valproate-induced encephalopathy due to carnitine deficiency. Clinical improvement occurred with oral carnitine supplementation. Our case report highlights the importance of considering carnitine deficiency in patients presenting with unexplained neurological signs while on long-term valproate treatment. PMID:26336183

  2. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  3. L-Carnitine Preserves Endothelial Function in a Lamb Model of Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Aramburo, Angela; Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Oishi, Peter E.; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Raff, Gary; Xoinis, Kon; Kalkan, Gohkan; Fratz, Sohrab; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In our model of congenital heart disease (CHD) with increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt), we have recently shown a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased eNOS/Hsp90 interactions that contribute to eNOS uncoupling, increased superoxide levels, and decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that L-carnitine therapy would maintain mitochondrial function, and NO signaling. Methods Thirteen fetal lambs underwent in utero placement of an aortopulmonary graft. Immediately following delivery, lambs received daily treatment with oral L-carnitine or its vehicle. Results L-carnitine-treated lambs had decreased levels of acyl carnitine, and a reduced acyl carnitine: free carnitine ratio compared to vehicle treated Shunt lambs. These changes correlated with increased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) protein and enzyme activity and decreased levels of nitrated CrAT. The lactate: pyruvate ratio was also decreased in L-carnitine-treated lambs. Hsp70 protein levels were significantly decreased and this correlated with increases in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions, NOS activity, NOx levels, and a significant decrease in eNOS-derived superoxide. Further, acetylcholine significantly decreased left pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) only in L-carnitine-treated lambs. Conclusion L-carnitine therapy may improve the endothelial dysfunction noted in children with CHD, and has important clinical implications that warrant further investigation. PMID:23628882

  4. Carnitine deficiency: Risk factors and incidence in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Kawabe, Mika; Takehara, Makoto; Iwano, Sachiko; Kuwabara, Kozue; Kikuchi, Chiya; Wakamoto, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Takehiko; Suzuki, Yuka; Ishii, Eiichi

    2015-09-01

    Carnitine deficiency is relatively common in epilepsy; risk factors reportedly include combination antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy with valproic acid (VPA), young age, intellectual disability, diet and enteral or parenteral feeding. Few studies have examined the correlation between each risk factor and carnitine deficiency in children with epilepsy. We examined the influence of these risk factors on carnitine deficiency, and identified a formula to estimate plasma free carnitine concentration in children with epilepsy. Sixty-five children with epilepsy and 26 age-matched controls were enrolled. Plasma carnitine concentrations were measured using an enzyme cycling assay, and correlations were sought with patients' other clinical characteristics. Carnitine deficiency was found in approximately 17% of patients with epilepsy and was significantly associated with carnitine-free enteral formula only by tube feeding, number of AEDs taken (independent of VPA use), body weight (BW), body height and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis indicated that carnitine concentration (in μmol/L) could be accurately estimated from a formula that does not require blood testing: 42.44+0.14×(BW in kg)-18.16×(feeding)-3.19×(number of AEDs), where feeding was allocated a score of 1 for carnitine-free enteral formula only by tube feeding and 0 for taking food orally (R(2)=0.504, P<0.001). Carnitine-free enteral formula only by tube feeding, multiple AED treatment and low BW are risk factors for carnitine deficiency in children with epilepsy. l-carnitine should be administered to children at risk of deficiency to avoid complications. Treatment decisions can be informed using an estimation formula that does not require blood tests. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.

    PubMed

    Broad, Elizabeth M; Maughan, Ronald J; Galloway, Stuart D

    2008-12-01

    Twenty nonvegetarian active males were pair-matched and randomly assigned to receive 2 g of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LC) or placebo per day for 2 wk. Participants exercised for 90 min at 70% VO2max after 2 days of a prescribed diet (M +/- SD: 13.6 +/- 1.6 MJ, 57% carbohydrate, 15% protein, 26% fat, 2% alcohol) before and after supplementation. Results indicated no change in carbohydrate oxidation, nitrogen excretion, branched-chain amino acid oxidation, or plasma urea during exercise between the beginning and end of supplementation in either group. After 2 wk of LC supplementation the plasma ammonia response to exercise tended to be suppressed (0 vs. 2 wk at 60 min exercise, 97 +/- 26 vs. 80 +/- 9, and 90 min exercise, 116 +/- 47 vs. 87 +/- 25 micromol/L), with no change in the placebo group. The data indicate that 2 wk of LC supplementation does not affect fat, carbohydrate, and protein contribution to metabolism during prolonged moderate-intensity cycling exercise. The tendency toward suppressed ammonia accumulation, however, indicates that oral LC supplementation might have the potential to reduce the metabolic stress of exercise or alter ammonia production or removal, which warrants further investigation.

  6. Serum carnitine as an independent biomarker of malnutrition in patients with impaired oral intake.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Honda, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Murakami, Masashi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Ikegami, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Jiro; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-11-01

    Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound that plays important roles in fatty acid β-oxidation and the control of the mitochondrial coenzyme A/acetyl-CoA ratio. However, carnitine is not added to ordinary enteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition. In this study, we determined the serum carnitine concentrations in subjects receiving ordinary enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases to compare its levels with those of other nutritional markers. Serum samples obtained from 11 EN and 11 TPN patients and 82 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 10 Crohn's disease and 10 ulcerative colitis patients with malnutrition who were barely able to ingest an ordinary diet were also evaluated. Carnitine and its derivatives were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The carnitine concentrations in EN and TPN subjects were significantly lower compared with those of the control subjects. Neither the serum albumin nor the total cholesterol level was correlated with the carnitine concentration, although a significant positive correlation was found between the serum albumin and total cholesterol levels. Indeed, patients with CD and UC showed significantly reduced serum albumin and/or total cholesterol levels, but their carnitine concentrations remained normal. In conclusion, only a complete blockade of an ordinary diet, such as EN or TPN, caused a reduction in the serum carnitine concentration. Serum carnitine may be an independent biomarker of malnutrition, and its supplementation is needed in EN and TPN subjects even if their serum albumin and total cholesterol levels are normal.

  7. Serum carnitine as an independent biomarker of malnutrition in patients with impaired oral intake

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Honda, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Murakami, Masashi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Ikegami, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Jiro; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound that plays important roles in fatty acid β-oxidation and the control of the mitochondrial coenzyme A/acetyl-CoA ratio. However, carnitine is not added to ordinary enteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition. In this study, we determined the serum carnitine concentrations in subjects receiving ordinary enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases to compare its levels with those of other nutritional markers. Serum samples obtained from 11 EN and 11 TPN patients and 82 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 10 Crohn’s disease and 10 ulcerative colitis patients with malnutrition who were barely able to ingest an ordinary diet were also evaluated. Carnitine and its derivatives were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The carnitine concentrations in EN and TPN subjects were significantly lower compared with those of the control subjects. Neither the serum albumin nor the total cholesterol level was correlated with the carnitine concentration, although a significant positive correlation was found between the serum albumin and total cholesterol levels. Indeed, patients with CD and UC showed significantly reduced serum albumin and/or total cholesterol levels, but their carnitine concentrations remained normal. In conclusion, only a complete blockade of an ordinary diet, such as EN or TPN, caused a reduction in the serum carnitine concentration. Serum carnitine may be an independent biomarker of malnutrition, and its supplementation is needed in EN and TPN subjects even if their serum albumin and total cholesterol levels are normal. PMID:25411530

  8. [Carnitine deficiency with valproate sodium therapy--the difference by normal diet and enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Kato, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Valproate sodium (VPA) treatment is known to reduce blood carnitine levels; however, some enteral nutrition formulas contain carnitine. The objective of this study was to verify the hypothesis that blood carnitine levels are lower after VPA treatment in patients on enteral nutrition than in those on normal diet. Forty-five epilepsy patients under medical treatment in our hospital were classified according to their alimentation type into normal diet group (n = 31) and 14 on enteral nutrition group (n = 14). The differences in the blood free carnitine levels between the two groups were evaluated. Plasma free carnitine levels were below the normal value in 15 of 31 patients on normal diet and 13 of 14 patients on enteral nutrition. There was a significant reduction of the levels of carnitine in the enteral nutrition group (p < 0.001). Although normal diet contains sufficient amount of carnitine, most enteral nutrition formulas lack carnitine; and hence, blood carnitine levels in patients on enteral nutrition after VPA treatment is low. It is therefore suggested that carnitine supplemented diet is necessary for patients treated with VPA, especially for those who receive enteral nutrition.

  9. The clinical and metabolic effects of rapid weight loss in obese pet cats and the influence of supplemental oral L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Center, S A; Harte, J; Watrous, D; Reynolds, A; Watson, T D; Markwell, P J; Millington, D S; Wood, P A; Yeager, A E; Erb, H N

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy, safety, and metabolic consequences of rapid weight loss in privately owned obese cats by means of a canned weight-reduction diet and the influence of orally administered L-carnitine on rate of weight loss, routine clinical evaluations, hepatic ultrasonography, plasma amino acid profiles, and carnitine analytes were evaluated. A double-blinded placebo-controlled design was used with cats randomly divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n = 14) received L-carnitine (250 mg PO q24h) in aqueous solution and group 2 (n = 10) received an identical-appearing water placebo. Median obesity (body condition scores and percentage ideal body weight) in each group was 25%. Caloric intake was restricted to 60% of maintenance energy requirements (60 kcal/kg) for targeted ideal weight. The reducing formula was readily accepted by all cats. Significant weight loss was achieved by week 18 in each group without adverse effects (group 1 = 23.7%, group 2 = 19.6%). Cats receiving carnitine lost weight at a significantly faster rate (P < .05). Significant increases in carnitine values developed in each group (P < .02). However, significantly higher concentrations of all carnitine moieties and a greater percentage of acetylcarnitine developed in cats of group 1 (P < .01). The dietary formula and described reducing strategy can safely achieve a 20% weight reduction within 18 weeks in obese cats. An aqueous solution of L-carnitine (250 mg PO q12h) was at least partially absorbed, was nontoxic, and significantly increased plasma carnitine analyte concentrations as well as rate of weight loss.

  10. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  11. Chronic oral ingestion of l-carnitine and carbohydrate increases muscle carnitine content and alters muscle fuel metabolism during exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Benjamin T; Stephens, Francis B; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; Macdonald, Ian A; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that insulin increases muscle total carnitine (TC) content during acute i.v. l-carnitine infusion. Here we determined the effects of chronic l-carnitine and carbohydrate (CHO; to elevate serum insulin) ingestion on muscle TC content and exercise metabolism and performance in humans. On three visits, each separated by 12 weeks, 14 healthy male volunteers (age 25.9 ± 2.1 years, BMI 23.0 ± 0.8 kg m−2) performed an exercise test comprising 30 min cycling at 50%, 30 min at 80%, then a 30 min work output performance trial. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after exercise at 50% and 80% on each occasion. Following visit one, volunteers ingested either 80 g of CHO (Control) or 2 g of l-carnitine-l-tartrate and 80 g of CHO (Carnitine) twice daily for 24 weeks in a randomised, double blind manner. All significant effects reported occurred after 24 weeks. Muscle TC increased from basal by 21% in Carnitine (P < 0.05), and was unchanged in Control. At 50%, the Carnitine group utilised 55% less muscle glycogen compared to Control (P < 0.05) and 31% less pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activation compared to before supplementation (P < 0.05). Conversely, at 80%, muscle PDC activation was 38% higher (P < 0.05), acetylcarnitine content showed a trend to be 16% greater (P < 0.10), muscle lactate content was 44% lower (P < 0.05) and the muscle PCr/ATP ratio was better maintained (P < 0.05) in Carnitine compared to Control. The Carnitine group increased work output 11% from baseline in the performance trial, while Control showed no change. This is the first demonstration that human muscle TC can be increased by dietary means and results in muscle glycogen sparing during low intensity exercise (consistent with an increase in lipid utilisation) and a better matching of glycolytic, PDC and mitochondrial flux during high intensity exercise, thereby reducing muscle anaerobic ATP production. Furthermore, these changes were associated with an

  12. Carnitine in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Gianfranco

    2015-03-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential metabolite that plays a critical role in cell physiology. Carnitine is necessary for fatty acid transport to sites of beta-oxidation in the mitochondria, where it also helps to prevent organic acid accumulation. Because of these key regulatory functions, carnitine represents a crucial determinant of mitochondrial energy metabolism, whose deficiency may lead to metabolic and clinical disturbances. Loss of carnitine through dialytic membranes occurs in maintenance hemodialysis, resulting in potential carnitine depletion and relative increments of esterified carnitine forms. Carnitine supplementation has been reported to counteract some of these alterations and has been associated with some clinical benefits, such as enhanced response to erythropoietin as well as improvement in exercise tolerance, intradialytic symptom, hyperparathyroidism, insulin resistance, inflammatory and oxidant status, protein balance, lipid profile, cardiac function, and quality of life. Carnitine supplementation has an attractive theoretical rationale; however, there are no definitive supportive studies and conclusive evidence that L-carnitine supplementation in maintenance hemodialysis patients could improve these conditions. A trial of carnitine administration could be attempted for 6 to 12 months only in selected patients on dialysis who do not adequately respond to standard therapies, in the presence of symptomatology, and in conjunction with patient dialysis age and documented L-carnitine deficiency.

  13. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  14. L-carnitine supplementation as a potential antioxidant therapy for inherited neurometabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Graziela S; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2014-01-10

    In recent years increasing evidence has emerged suggesting that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. However the clinical use of classical antioxidants in these diseases has been poorly evaluated and so far no benefit has been demonstrated. l-Carnitine is an endogenous substance that acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane necessary for subsequent beta-oxidation and ATP production. Besides its important role in the metabolism of lipids, l-carnitine is also a potent antioxidant (free radical scavenger) and thus may protect tissues from oxidative damage. This review addresses recent findings obtained from patients with some inherited neurometabolic diseases showing that l-carnitine may be involved in the reduction of oxidative damage observed in these disorders. For some of these diseases, reduced concentrations of l-carnitine may occur due to the combination of this compound to the accumulating toxic metabolites, especially organic acids, or as a result of protein restricted diets. Thus, l-carnitine supplementation may be useful not only to prevent tissue deficiency of this element, but also to avoid oxidative damage secondary to increased production of reactive species in these diseases. Considering the ability of l-carnitine to easily cross the blood-brain barrier, l-carnitine supplementation may also be beneficial in preventing neurological damage derived from oxidative injury. However further studies are required to better explore this potential.

  15. Oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P

    1996-08-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS), the best treatment of dehydration due to acute diarrhea, is the most important medical advance of this century since it is key to reducing infant and child morbidity and mortality. Pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea include those which produce enterotoxin at the intestinal mucosal surface, inducing secretion but are not invasive (e.g., Vibrio cholerae); those which invade and disrupt the mucosal lining (e.g., shigella species); and rotavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF ORS is considered a universal ORS. Much research has been done on the ideal composition of an ORS. An ORS must have sufficient sodium to replace losses on a volume to volume basis, a glucose concentration that matches that of sodium to ensure its delivery to the ileum, sufficient amounts of potassium and base (e.g., sodium bicarbonate or trisodium citrate dihydrate) to correct acidosis and to enhance sodium absorption, and sufficient amounts of liquid. The risk of hypernatremia with use of the WHO/UNICEF ORS is a concern since infants and young children have an immature renal concentrating capacity, increased insensible water losses, and an impaired natriuretic response. Neonates and young infants may be prone to relatively slow correction of acidosis. It appears that the potassium content (20 mmol/l) of WHO-ORS should be higher to promote a net positive potassium retention. Too much glucose in the ORS will induce reverse osmosis of water into the gut, effectively making the ORS a dehydrating solution rather than a hydrating solution. Some carbohydrates other than glucose have proven effective glucose substitutes (e.g., sucrose, rice starch and powder, other cereals). Cereals have higher acceptability levels in developing countries. Research is investigating the nutritional benefits of supplementing ORS with micronutrients (e.g., vitamin A, folic acid, and zinc). ORS use with early refeeding has a beneficial effect on nutritional status after an

  16. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are <1% of body stores; 98% of carnitine stores are intracellular (total carnitine levels are 40-50 microM in plasma vs. 2-3 mM in tissue). Carnitine is removed by urinary excretion after reabsorption of 98% of the filtered load; the renal carnitine threshold determines plasma concentrations and total body carnitine stores. Because of its key role in fatty acid oxidation, there has long been interest in the possibility that carnitine might be of benefit in genetic or acquired disorders of energy production to improve fatty acid oxidation, to remove accumulated toxic fatty acyl-CoA metabolites, or to restore the balance between free and acyl-CoA. Two disorders have been described in children where the supply of carnitine becomes limiting for fatty acid oxidation: (1) A recessive defect of the muscle/kidney sodium-dependent, plasma membrane carnitine symporter, which presents in infancy with cardiomyopathy or hypoketotic hypoglycemia; treatment with oral carnitine is required for survival. (2) Chronic administration of pivalate-conjugated antibiotics in which excretion of pivaloyl-carnitine can lead to carnitine depletion

  17. Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency as decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Li, Duoling; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case with late onset riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) characterized by decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum which is consistent with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (CDSP) while just the contrary to a typical MADD. This patient complained with muscle weakness, muscle pain and intermittent vomiting, and was diagnosed as polymyositis, received prednisone therapy before consulted with us. Muscle biopsy revealed mild lipid storage. The findings of serum acyl-carnitines were consistent with CDSP manifesting as decreased free and total carnitines in serum. But oral L-carnitine supplementation was not very effective to this patient and mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene for CDSP was normal. Later, another acyl-carnitine analysis revealed a typical MADD profile in serum, which was characterized by increased multiple acyl-carnitines. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in electron transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene which confirmed the diagnosis of MADD. After administration of riboflavin, he improved dramatically, both clinically and biochemically. Thus, late onset riboflavin-responsive MADD should be included in the differential diagnosis for adult carnitine deficiency.

  18. Immunological responses in patients with tuberculosis and in vivo effects of acetyl-L-carnitine oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Maria; Marcuccio, Carlo; Tortorella, Cosimo; De Simone, Claudio; Antonaci, Salvatore

    1993-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TBC) is characterized by a complex immune response which parallels the clinical course of the disease. In this respect, acquired resistance, delayed hypersensitivity reaction and anergy are the main types of immune reactivity to mycobacterial antigens. In view of the presence of nonspecific and specific immune deficits in TBC patients, a clinical trial was carried out in a group of 20 individuals with active pulmonary TBC by oral administration of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). This drug, which has been shown to possess immunomodulating activities, was able to upregulate the T-dependent antibacterial activity in TBC patients after 30 days' treatment, while the same activity decreased in patients receiving placebo only. On the other hand, ALC did not modify serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, in the same individuals. This cytokine plays a detrimental rather than beneficial role in TBC pathogenesis. In the light of these data, ALC seems to be a powerful immunomodulator in the course of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and other mycobacteriosis. PMID:18475563

  19. Science review: carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity - what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Philippe E R; Penaloza, Andrea; Zahir, Soheil; Gris, Mireille

    2005-10-05

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug and is usually well tolerated, but rare serious complications may occur in some patients receiving VPA chronically, including haemorrhagic pancreatitis, bone marrow suppression, VPA-induced hepatotoxicity (VHT) and VPA-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy (VHE). Some data suggest that VHT and VHE may be promoted by carnitine deficiency. Acute VPA intoxication also occurs as a consequence of intentional or accidental overdose and its incidence is increasing, because of use of VPA in psychiatric disorders. Although it usually results in mild central nervous system depression, serious toxicity and even fatal cases have been reported. Several studies or isolated clinical observations have suggested the potential value of oral L-carnitine in reversing carnitine deficiency or preventing its development as well as some adverse effects due to VPA. Carnitine supplementation during VPA therapy in high-risk patients is now recommended by some scientific committees and textbooks, especially paediatricians. L-carnitine therapy could also be valuable in those patients who develop VHT or VHE. A few isolated observations also suggest that L-carnitine may be useful in patients with coma or in preventing hepatic dysfunction after acute VPA overdose. However, these issues deserve further investigation in controlled, randomized and probably multicentre trials to evaluate the clinical value and the appropriate dosage of L-carnitine in each of these conditions.

  20. Effect of carnitine, acetyl-, and propionylcarnitine supplementation on the body carnitine pool, skeletal muscle composition, and physical performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Morand, Réjane; Bouitbir, Jamal; Felser, Andrea; Hench, Jürgen; Handschin, Christoph; Frank, Stephan; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Pharmacokinetics and effects on skeletal muscle and physical performance of oral acetylcarnitine and propionylcarnitine are not well characterized. We therefore investigated the influence of oral acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and carnitine on body carnitine homeostasis, energy metabolism, and physical performance in mice and compared the findings to non-supplemented control animals. Mice were supplemented orally with 2 mmol/kg/day carnitine, acetylcarnitine, or propionylcarnitine for 4 weeks and studied either at rest or after exhaustive exercise. In the supplemented groups, total plasma and urine carnitine concentrations were significantly higher than in the control group receiving no carnitine, whereas the skeletal muscle carnitine content remained unchanged. The supplemented acylcarnitines were hydrolyzed in intestine and liver and reached the systemic circulation as carnitine. Bioavailability of carnitine and acylcarnitines, determined as the urinary excretion of total carnitine, was in the range of 19 %. Skeletal muscle morphology, including fiber-type composition, was not affected, and oxygen consumption by soleus or gastrocnemius fibers was not different between the groups. Supplementation with carnitine or acylcarnitines had no significant impact on the running capacity, but was associated with lower plasma lactate levels and a higher glycogen content in white skeletal muscle after exhaustive exercise. Oral supplementation of carnitine, acetylcarnitine, or propionylcarnitine in mice is associated with increased plasma and urine total carnitine concentrations, but does not affect the skeletal muscle carnitine content. Despite better preservation of skeletal muscle glycogen and lower plasma lactate levels, physical performance was not improved by carnitine or acylcarnitine supplementation.

  1. Oral carnitine supplementation reduces body weight and insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Mansooreh; Jamilian, Mehri; Ebrahimi, Faraneh Afshar; Rahimi, Maryam; Tajbakhsh, Banafsheh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2016-06-01

    Limited data are available for evaluating the effects of oral carnitine supplementation on weight loss and metabolic profiles of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study was designed to determine the effects of oral carnitine supplementation on weight loss, and glycaemic and lipid profiles in women with PCOS. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 60 overweight patients diagnosed with PCOS were randomized to receive either 250 mg carnitine supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were obtained at the beginning and the end of the study to quantify parameters of glucose homoeostasis and lipid concentrations. At the end of the 12 weeks, taking carnitine supplements resulted in a significant reduction in weight (-2·7 ± 1·5 vs +0·1 ± 1·8 kg, P < 0·001), BMI (-1·1 ± 0·6 vs +0·1 ± 0·7 kg/m(2) , P < 0·001), waist circumference (WC) (-2·0 ± 1·3 vs -0·3 ± 2·0 cm, P < 0·001) and hip circumference (HC) (-2·5 ± 1·5 vs -0·3 ± 1·8 cm, P < 0·001) compared with placebo. In addition, compared with placebo, carnitine administration in women with PCOS led to a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (-0·38 ± 0·36 vs +0·11 ± 0·97 mmol/l, P = 0·01), serum insulin levels (-14·39 ± 25·80 vs +3·01 ± 37·25 pmol/l, P = 0·04), homoeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (-0·61 ± 1·03 vs +0·11 ± 1·43, P = 0·04) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (-3·64 ± 7·00 vs -0·59 ± 3·20 μmol/l, P = 0·03). Overall, 12 weeks of carnitine administration in PCOS women resulted in reductions in weight, BMI, WC and HC, and beneficial effects on glycaemic control; however, it did not affect lipid profiles or free testosterone. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Zac C; Schofield, Christopher; Prinsloo, Peter J J; Sturrock, Nigel D C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcaemia due to hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy is a relatively common occurrence. Standard treatment is with oral calcium and vitamin D replacement therapy; lack of response to oral therapy is rare. Herein we describe a case of hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy in a patient with a complex medical history. We consider the potential causes in the context of calcium metabolism including: poor adherence, hungry bone syndrome, malabsorption, vitamin D resistance, bisphosphonate use and functional hypoparathyroidism secondary to magnesium deficiency. Malabsorption due to intestinal hurry was likely to be a contributory factor in this case and very large doses of oral therapy were required to avoid symptomatic hypocalcaemia.

  3. Effect of systemic carnitine therapy on serum fibronectin level in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Özkan, Ömer Faruk; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Nusran, Gürdal; Aşık, Mehmet; Arslan, Emrah

    2014-04-01

    L-carnitine has been shown to enhance wound healing. There has, however, not been sufficient research on the effect carnitine has on diabetic wound healing. We investigated the relationship between the viability of full thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) and fibronectin (FN) serum levels in diabetic rats that were administered carnitine. A total of 40 rats were divided into four groups of 10 rats each and operated on. The FTSG model was 10 × 3 cm, with the dorsal flap extending from the tip of the scapula to the hip joint. After surgery, group 1 (nondiabetic control, n = 10) and group 2 (diabetic control, n = 10) were given a sterile saline solution at 0.9% with a dose of 100 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally for 7 d after the surgery. Group 3 (diabetic sham, n = 10) contained diabetic rats and did not receive any agent after the surgery. The diabetic rats in group 4 (carnitine study diabetic, n = 10) were given carnitine with a dose of 100 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally for 7 d after the surgery. The percentages of viable areas in groups 1-4 were 70.38 ± 6.10%, 62.66 ± 1.55%, 62.59 ± 2.94%, and 73.48 ± 4.43%, respectively. The mean levels of FN, measured in milligram per deciliter, in groups-4 were 23.57 ± 3.27 mg/dL, 21.58 ± 2.35 mg/dL, 22.04 ± 2.71 mg/dL, and 27.11 ± 2.79 mg/dL, respectively. Furthermore, we found that there was a strong positive correlation (R = 0.509; P = 0.001) between FN and the viability of the FTSG. We demonstrated that administering carnitine leads to an increase in diabetic wound healing. Further increasing the levels of the FN serum might have a role in this process. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acetyl-L-Carnitine as an Adjunctive Therapy in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasi, Seyed-Hesameddin; Heidari, Shahram; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Tabrizi, Mina; Ghaleiha, Ali; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether a previous observed Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) treatment effect could be repeated in an ALC adjunctive therapy treatment trial of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. This was a six-week, randomized clinical trial undertaken in an outpatient child and adolescent…

  5. Acetyl-L-Carnitine as an Adjunctive Therapy in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasi, Seyed-Hesameddin; Heidari, Shahram; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Tabrizi, Mina; Ghaleiha, Ali; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether a previous observed Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) treatment effect could be repeated in an ALC adjunctive therapy treatment trial of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. This was a six-week, randomized clinical trial undertaken in an outpatient child and adolescent…

  6. [Oral ciprofloxacin therapy in salpingitis].

    PubMed

    De Wilde, R

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with clinical pelvic inflammatory disease were studied. Diagnosis was confirmed by laparoscopy. To determine the microbiological etiology, swab specimen for detection of aerobic, anaerobic and chlamydial infections were obtained from the endocervix, fimbriae and cul-de-sac. In 22 of 30 patients, microorganisms were detected. The patients received ciprofloxacin 2 X 750 mg p.o. daily at 12 hours interval for 10 days. During and after therapy, bacteriological examinations of the endocervix were performed. Based on the microbiological evaluation and clinical aspects, the bacteriological response and clinical efficacy were 86%. Laboratory analysis showed no alterations of blood values. As side effects we noticed gastrointestinal complaints (6/30), candidiasis vulvovaginalis (6/30), allergic exanthema (5/30) and non-bacterial cystitis (2/30). Oral ciprofloxacin-monotherapy proved to be safe and effective in pelvic inflammatory disease.

  7. Plasma carnitine concentrations in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Katsutoshi; Miyoshi, Yutaka; Sakai, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for fatty acid (FA) metabolism, the predominant source of ATP in the normal aerobic heart. During myocardial ischemia, FA metabolism is impaired and tissue carnitine levels are depleted. Since the heart cannot synthesize carnitine, plasma carnitine could play an important role in maintaining myocardial carnitine levels during reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of abnormal plasma carnitine concentrations in open heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained from eleven patients before, immediately after, and two hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Total and free carnitine levels were significantly reduced immediately after CPB (p<0.01) and remained depressed until two hours after CPB (p<0.01 vs. pre CPB), while acyl carnitine levels were unchanged over the course of this study. These depressed free carnitine levels might affect cardiac metabolism in the heart after open heart surgery. Carnitine supplement might be a useful adjunct in the therapy after open heart surgery.

  8. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of acetyl-L-carnitine and oxfenicine on aorta stiffness in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Chu; Tseng, Chuen-Den; Lu, Shao-Chun; Liang, Jin-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2010-11-01

    We compared the haemodynamic and metabolic effects of acetyl-L-carnitine (one of the carnitine derivatives) and of oxfenicine (a carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor) in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by a single tail vein injection of 55mgkg(-1) streptozotocin. The diabetic animals daily treated with either acetyl-L-carnitine (150mgkg(-1) in drinking water) or oxfenicine (150mgkg(-1) by oral gavage) for 8weeks,were compared with the untreated age-matched diabetic controls. Arterial wave reflection was derived using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) measurement was used to estimate malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Oxfenicine, but not acetyl-L-carnitine, increased total peripheral resistance in diabetes, which paralleled its elevation in plasma levels of free fatty acids. By contrast, acetyl-L-carnitine, but not oxfenicine, resulted in a significant increase in wave transit time and a decrease in wave reflection factor, suggesting that acetyl-L-carnitine may attenuate the diabetes-induced deterioration in systolic loading condition for the left ventricle. This was in parallel with its lowering of MDA/TBARS content in plasma and aortic walls in diabetes. Acetyl-L-carnitine therapy also prevented the diabetes-related cardiac hypertrophy, as evidenced by the reduction in ratio of the left ventricular weight to body weight.  Acetyl-L-carnitine, but not oxfenicine, attenuates aortic stiffening and cardiac hypertrophy, possibly through its decrease of lipid oxidation-derived MDA/TBARS in the rats with insulin deficiency. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  10. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency: the time-course of blood and urinary acylcarnitine levels during initial L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tomohiro; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hironori; Teramoto, Takahide; Takayanagi, Masaki; Hasegawa, Yuki; Yasuno, Tetsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kondo, Naomi

    2010-07-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) deficiency is one of the most common mitochondrial beta-oxidation defects. A female patient with an infantile form of CPT2 deficiency first presented as having a Reye-like syndrome with hypoglycemic convulsions. Oral L-carnitine supplementation was administered since serum free carnitine level was very low (less than 10 micromol/L), indicating secondary carnitine deficiency. Her serum and urinary acylcarnitine profiles were analyzed successively to evaluate time-course effects of L-carnitine supplementation. After the first two days of L-carnitine supplementation, the serum level of free carnitine was elevated; however, the serum levels of acylcarnitines and the urinary excretion of both free carnitine and acylcarnitines remained low. A peak of the serum free carnitine level was detected on day 5, followed by a peak of acetylcarnitine on day 7, and peaks of long-chain acylcarnitines, such as C16, C18, C18:1 and C18:2 carnitines, on day 9. Thereafter free carnitine became predominant again. These peaks of the serum levels corresponded to urinary excretion peaks of free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and medium-chain dicarboxylic carnitines, respectively. It took several days for oral L-carnitine administration to increase the serum carnitine levels, probably because the intracellular stores were depleted. Thereafter, the administration increased the excretion of abnormal acylcarnitines, some of which had accumulated within the tissues. The excretion of medium-chain dicarboxylic carnitines dramatically decreased on day 13, suggesting improvement of tissue acylcarnitine accumulation. These time-course changes in blood and urinary acylcarnitine levels after L-carnitine supplementation support the effectiveness of L-carnitine supplementation to CPT2-deficient patients.

  11. Science review: Carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity – what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Philippe ER; Penaloza, Andrea; Zahir, Soheil; Gris, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug and is usually well tolerated, but rare serious complications may occur in some patients receiving VPA chronically, including haemorrhagic pancreatitis, bone marrow suppression, VPA-induced hepatotoxicity (VHT) and VPA-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy (VHE). Some data suggest that VHT and VHE may be promoted by carnitine deficiency. Acute VPA intoxication also occurs as a consequence of intentional or accidental overdose and its incidence is increasing, because of use of VPA in psychiatric disorders. Although it usually results in mild central nervous system depression, serious toxicity and even fatal cases have been reported. Several studies or isolated clinical observations have suggested the potential value of oral L-carnitine in reversing carnitine deficiency or preventing its development as well as some adverse effects due to VPA. Carnitine supplementation during VPA therapy in high-risk patients is now recommended by some scientific committees and textbooks, especially paediatricians. L-carnitine therapy could also be valuable in those patients who develop VHT or VHE. A few isolated observations also suggest that L-carnitine may be useful in patients with coma or in preventing hepatic dysfunction after acute VPA overdose. However, these issues deserve further investigation in controlled, randomized and probably multicentre trials to evaluate the clinical value and the appropriate dosage of L-carnitine in each of these conditions. PMID:16277730

  12. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation on Lipid Profile, Anemia, and Quality of Life in Chronic Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Emami Naini, Afsoon; Moradi, Mahnaz; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Amini Harandi, Asghar; Hadizadeh, Mehdi; Shirani, Farhad; Basir Ghafoori, Hamed; Emami Naini, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    In patients on maintenance hemodialysis several factors reduce the body stored carnitine which could lead to dyslipidemia, anemia, and general health in these patients. We evaluated the effect of oral L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles, anemia, and quality of life (QOL) in hemodialysis patients. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis received either L-carnitine 1 g/d (n = 24) or placebo (27 patients) for 16 weeks. At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in triglyceride (−31.1 ± 38.7 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and a significant increase in HDL (3.7 ± 2.8 mg/dL, P < 0.001) levels in the carnitine group. Decrease in total cholesterol (−6.6 ± 16.0 mg/dL, P = 0.075) and increase in hemoglobin (0.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, P = 0.081) concentrations in the carnitine group were not significant. There was no statistically significant changes in LDL in any group (P > 0.05). Erythropoietin dose was significantly decreased in both the carnitine (−4750 ± 5772 mg, P = 0.001) and the placebo group (−2000 ± 4296 mg, P < 0.05). No improvement was observed in QOL scores of two groups. In ESRD patients under maintenance hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine supplementation may reduce triglyceride and cholesterol and increase HDL and hemoglobin and subsequently reduce needed erythropoietin dose without effect on QOL. PMID:22720143

  13. Oral therapy of infant diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ransome-Kuti, O; Bamisaiye, A

    1978-08-26

    Immediate oral therapy at home by the mother using a sugar-salt solution offers a real prospect of reducing mortality from gastroenteritis among preschool children in the developing world. The sugar-salt solution enables the mother to take action against a disease which is the most frequent cause of death among young children. In Lagos, Nigeria, knowledge of the treatment has diffused rapidly in a low-income community served by a clinic run by the Institute of Child Health. In a recent study, women expecting their 1st child and others who had never used the service were able to describe the sugar-salt solution treatment taught to all who attend the clinic. However, of the 217 women who described the method, less than 1/2 (34%) could give the correct proportions of sugar and salt to be used (4 teaspoons and 1/4 teaspoon respectively in a standard local beer bottle filled with water). Most errors involved the use of too much salt. In nearly 1/2 these cases, 4 times too much salt was described, and in 3 cases, 16 times too much salt. Under these circumstances, we can expect a possible increase in children admitted with hypernatremia, a situation which would bring the method into disrepute. Any attempt to transfer health skills to mothers in developing countries must recognize, as in this example, the problems posed by lack of education and unfamiliarity with measurement terms such as "1/4" or even "a teaspoon." What is required is a simple measuring spoon giving the actual quantity to be used. Manufactured on a large scale in plastic, this would be inexpensive. Ideally, every mother of a preschool child should have 1, but where this is not possible, all health workers should have such spoons so that they can measure into a mother's hand the correct amounts. In this way the mother can make correct use of a treatment which has such potential for saving lives.

  14. Regression of oral hairy leukoplakia after orally administered acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L; Herbst, J S; Ablashi, D V; Atherton, S; Frank, B; Rosen, L; Horwitz, S N

    1988-01-15

    To define the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of oral hairy leukoplakia, 13 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men with clinical and histologic evidence of oral hairy leukoplakia were enrolled in an open-label trial of orally administered acyclovir therapy (3.2 g/d for 20 days). Of six patients who received therapy, five exhibited clinical regression. Once therapy was discontinued, recurrences occurred in all responders. Among seven patients who refused therapy, no spontaneous remissions occurred. Before therapy, EBV replication within the leukoplakia was demonstrated by immunofluorescence tissue staining or electron microscopy in five patients who were studied. Human papillomavirus was not detected by immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy from tissue specimens of six patients. After therapy, biopsy specimens from two patients with complete responses revealed a normalization of histologic abnormalities and an inability to detect EBV in previously involved mucosa by immunofluorescence or in situ DNA hybridization assays. It was concluded that EBV replication within the epithelial cells of the tongue is necessary for the development of oral hairy leukoplakia.

  15. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  16. Caloric restriction and L-carnitine administration improves insulin sensitivity in patients with impaired glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Molfino, Alessio; Cascino, Antonia; Conte, Caterina; Ramaccini, Cesarina; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Laviano, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Reduced circulating and tissue carnitine levels, possibly leading to impaired mitochondrial function, have been postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, whether L-carnitine administration may improve insulin sensitivity in patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) is still controversial. The aim of the study was to explore the role of L-carnitine supplementation in influencing insulin sensitivity. A randomized controlled study involving adult outpatients was designed. Adult patients referred to the outpatient clinic and within 10 days of the diagnosis of IFG or DM-2 were consecutively enrolled. Exclusion criteria were concomitant antidiabetic therapy and modifications of lifestyle during the previous 4 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a hypocaloric diet for 10 days (group C; n = 8) or the same dietetic regimen in addition to oral L-carnitine (2 g twice daily) supplementation (group LC; n = 8). Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), fasting plasma insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were assessed at the beginning and end of the study. Data were statistically analyzed using the Student t test for paired and unpaired data. OGTT at 2 hours improved in both groups. Only in the L-carnitine-supplemented group did plasma insulin levels and HOMA-IR significantly decrease when compared to baseline values. Considering the role of caloric restriction in increasing the intestinal uptake of carnitine, the results suggest that oral L-carnitine administration, when associated with a hypocaloric feeding regimen, improves insulin resistance and may represent an adjunctive treatment for IFG and DM-2.

  17. Erythema nodosum and oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, R K

    1978-04-03

    A generalized erythema nodosum developed in a 17 year old girl receiving oral contraceptive therapy, which was immediately discontinued. The erythema failed to respond to tetracycline, potassium iodide or prednisone therapy (partially successful), and recurred 6 times, usually just before menstruation. The recommended therapy is bed rest, salicylates and 10 cm roller elastic bandages. No medication can help in the face of unrestricted physical activity.

  18. [Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy].

    PubMed

    Olivera-Fernandez, R; Fernandez-Ribeiro, F; Piñeiro-Corrales, G; Crespo-Diz, C

    2014-11-03

    Introducción: Los tratamientos antineoplasicos orales presentan ventajas en cuanto a coste, comodidad y mejora potencial en la calidad de vida respecto al tratamiento endovenoso, pero es mas dificil controlar la adherencia y monitorizar los efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la adherencia real en pacientes con antineoplasicos orales en nuestro centro, analizar la influencia de las caracteristicas del paciente y del tratamiento, identificar motivos de no adherencia, oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica y evaluar la posible relacion adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Método: estudio prospectivo observacional de cuatro meses de duracion, en los pacientes con tratamiento antineoplasico oral dispensado desde la consulta de farmacia oncologica. Para la recogida de datos se utilizaron: orden medica, historia clinica y visita con entrevistas al paciente. Resultados: Se evaluaron un total de 141 pacientes. Un 72% se considero totalmente adherente, mientras que en un 28% se detecto algun tipo de no adherencia. El tiempo desde el diagnostico y la presencia de efectos adversos fueron las variables que afectaron a la adherencia. No se pudo demostrar relacion entre adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Conclusiones: La adherencia al tratamiento antineoplasico oral en nuestro centro fue del 72%, identificando oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica dirigidas a prevenir los efectos adversos y a potenciar la adherencia de nuestros pacientes.

  19. Oral health considerations in older women receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Joan C; O'Ryan, Felice; Yang, Jingrong; Hararah, Mohammad K; Gonzalez, Joel R; Gordon, Nancy; Silver, Paula; Ansfield, Alice; Wang, Benjamin; Go, Alan S

    2011-05-01

    Recent reports of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) have increased awareness of oral health in patients receiving osteoporosis therapy. This study describes the demographic, oral health, and clinical characteristics of a contemporary population of women aged 50 and older undergoing oral bisphosphonate treatment who returned a mailed questionnaire pertaining to dental symptoms. The study, as previously reported, was conducted within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. The cohort included 7,909 women with bisphosphonate exposure of at least 1 year, with a subset of 923 women reporting dental symptoms who underwent clinical examination. Overall, the average age was 71 ± 9; 70% were white, and 74% had at least some college education. Nearly two-thirds had received oral bisphosphonate therapy for 3 or more years. Most reported daily tooth brushing, 85% had had a dental examination in the past year, 22% reported denture use, and 6% reported moderate to severe periodontal disease. Oral healthcare patterns varied according to age and race and ethnicity. Five hundred seven (6.4%) women reported a tooth extraction in the prior year, of whom two developed BRONJ (0.4%). Tori or exostoses were found in 28% of examined participants with dental symptoms; these were predominantly in the lingual mandible and palate, with palatal BRONJ occurring in 1.6% of symptomatic participants with palatal tori. In summary, among older women with bisphosphonate exposure, oral health varied according to patient characteristics, and BRONJ occurred more frequently after tooth extraction or on palatal tori. These data support efforts to optimize oral health and to identify risk factors for BRONJ in older individuals receiving bisphosphonate drugs. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Primary carnitine deficiency in a male adult.

    PubMed

    Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Liatis, Stavros; Dalamanga, Maria; Papalambros, Theoharis; Migdalis, Ilias

    2002-01-01

    The case is described of a 36 year-old man who presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness and weight loss. His serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were markedly elevated. The muscle biopsy showed lipid storage myopathy. The muscle carnitine concentration was extremely low (5.6% of normal levels), establishing the diagnosis of myopathic carnitine deficiency. The disorder was considered as primary because there were no indications of any other identifiable condition which could result in a secondary carnitine deficiency. The patient was treated with oral L-carnitine (2 g per day) and showed rapid improvement. Primary myopathic carnitine deficiency is a curable disorder and therefore it should always be considered as a potential diagnosis in cases of myopathy in young adults.

  1. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the body carnitine pool, skeletal muscle energy metabolism and physical performance in male vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Katerina; Kummer, Oliver; Bouitbir, Jamal; Stoffel, Sonja D; Hoerler-Koerner, Ulrike; Bodmer, Michael; Roberts, Paul; Urwyler, Albert; Ehrsam, Rolf; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    More than 95% of the body carnitine is located in skeletal muscle, where it is essential for energy metabolism. Vegetarians ingest less carnitine and carnitine precursors and have lower plasma carnitine concentrations than omnivores. Principle aims of the current study were to assess the plasma and skeletal muscle carnitine content and physical performance of male vegetarians and matched omnivores under basal conditions and after L-carnitine supplementation. Sixteen vegetarians and eight omnivores participated in this interventional study with oral supplementation of 2 g L-carnitine for 12 weeks. Before carnitine supplementation, vegetarians had a 10% lower plasma carnitine concentration, but maintained skeletal muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Skeletal muscle phosphocreatine, ATP, glycogen and lactate contents were also not different from omnivores. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and workload (P max) per bodyweight (bicycle spiroergometry) were not significantly different between vegetarians and omnivores. Sub-maximal exercise (75% VO2max for 1 h) revealed no significant differences between vegetarians and omnivores (respiratory exchange ratio, blood lactate and muscle metabolites). Supplementation with L-carnitine significantly increased the total plasma carnitine concentration (24% in omnivores, 31% in vegetarians) and the muscle carnitine content in vegetarians (13%). Despite this increase, P max and VO2max as well as muscle phosphocreatine, lactate and glycogen were not significantly affected by carnitine administration. Vegetarians have lower plasma carnitine concentrations, but maintained muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Oral L-carnitine supplementation normalizes the plasma carnitine stores and slightly increases the skeletal muscle carnitine content in vegetarians, but without affecting muscle function and energy metabolism.

  2. Oral ixazomib maintenance therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Offidani, Massimo; Corvatta, Laura; Gentili, Silvia; Maracci, Laura; Leoni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Continuous therapy has proven to be an effective therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of both young and elderly multiple myeloma patients. Remarkably, lenalidomide and bortezomib showed to play a crucial role in this setting due to their safety profile allowing long-term exposure. Ixazomib, the first oral proteasome inhibitor to be evaluated in multiple myeloma, exerts substantial anti-myeloma activity as a single agent and particularly in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and it may be an attractive option for maintenance therapy. Here we address the issue of maintenance therapy as part of a therapeutic approach of multiple myeloma patients focusing on the potential role of ixazomib.

  3. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27298725

  4. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  5. Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on insulin sensitivity indices in response to glucose feeding in lean and overweight/obese males.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Stuart D R; Craig, Thomas P; Cleland, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Infusion of carnitine has been observed to increase non-oxidative glucose disposal in several studies, but the effect of oral carnitine on glucose disposal in non-diabetic lean versus overweight/obese humans has not been examined. This study examined the effects of 14 days of L-carnitine L-tartrate oral supplementation (LC) on blood glucose, insulin, NEFA and GLP-1 responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Sixteen male participants were recruited [lean (n = 8) and overweight/obese (n = 8)]. After completing a submaximal predictive exercise test, participants were asked to attend three experimental sessions. These three visits were conducted in the morning to obtain fasting blood samples and to conduct 2 h OGTTs. The first visit was a familiarisation trial and the final two visits were conducted 2 weeks apart following 14 days of ingestion of placebo (PL, 3 g glucose/day) and then LC (3 g LC/day) ingested as two capsules 3×/day with meals. On each visit, blood was drawn at rest, at intervals during the OGTT for analysis of glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Data obtained were used for determination of usual insulin sensitivity indices (HOMA-IR, AUC glucose, AUC insulin, 1st phase and 2nd phase β-cell function, estimated insulin sensitivity index and estimated metabolic clearance rate). Data were analysed using RMANOVA and post hoc comparisons where appropriate. There was a significant difference between groups for body mass, % fat and BMI with no significant difference in age and height. Mean (SEM) plasma glucose concentration at 30 min was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the lean group on the LC trial compared with PL [8.71(0.70) PL; 7.32(0.36) LC; mmol/L]. Conversely, plasma glucose concentration was not different at 30 min, but was significantly higher at 90 min (p < 0.05) in the overweight/obese group on the LC trial [5.09(0.41) PL; 7.11(0.59) LC; mmol/L]. Estimated first phase and second

  6. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  7. Adherence to therapy with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Avorn, Jerry; Wang, Philip S; Winer, Eric P

    2002-05-01

    With the rise in availability and increasing use of oral anticancer agents, concerns about adherence to prescribed regimens will become an increasingly important issue in oncology. Few published studies have focused on adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy, in part because the vast majority of chemotherapy is delivered intravenously in physicians' offices or hospitals. In this article, we review current knowledge of adherence behavior with regard to oral medications in general, including factors associated with adherence and methods for measuring adherence. We also review published studies of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in adult and pediatric populations and adherence issues in cancer prevention. The available evidence reveals that patient adherence to oral chemotherapy recommendations is variable and not easily predicted. Adherence rates ranging from less than 20% to 100% have been reported, and certain populations, such as adolescents, pose particular challenges. Future efforts should focus on improving measurement and prediction of adherence and on developing interventions to improve adherence for both patients in clinical trials and patients being treated outside of the research setting. Assessment of adherence among individuals with cancer and implementation of interventions in situations of poor adherence should improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  9. Carnitine deficiency in diabetes mellitus complications.

    PubMed

    Tamamoğullari, N; Siliğ, Y; Içağasioğlu, S; Atalay, A

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the serum total, free and ester carnitine levels in 24 type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with complications and 15 type II DM patients with no complications were investigated. The patients were investigated in four groups; the control group included the patients with no complications (group 1), the groups including the patients with retinopathy (group 2), hyperlipidemia (group 3), and neuropathy (group 4). In addition, patients were grouped into two. The first group included 10 patients who took insulin by injection (group 5), and the second group included 29 patients using antidiabetic drugs orally (OAD) (group 6). Free and ester carnitine levels were determined by using Boehringer Manheim UV-enzymatic L-carnitine kit. Statistical analysis results showed that both the plasma total and free carnitine levels of groups 2, 3, and 4 were found to be low when compared to the levels of group 1 (p < 0.05). It was observed that the plasma total and free carnitine levels of group 5 were lower when compared to group 6. No significant difference was observed between the plasma ester carnitine levels of all the groups investigated. As a result of this study, it has been thought that carnitine plays an important role in diabetes mellitus complications.

  10. L-carnitine--metabolic functions and meaning in humans life.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Jolanta; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bozena; Bodkowski, Robert; Jamroz, Dorota; Nowakowski, Piotr; Lochyński, Stanisław; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    L-Carnitine is an endogenous molecule involved in fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesized within the human body using amino acids: L-lysine and L-methionine, as substrates. L-Carnitine can also be found in many foods, but red meats, such as beef and lamb, are the best choices for adding carnitine into the diet. Good carnitine sources also include fish, poultry and milk. Essentially, L-carnitine transports the chains of fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing the cells to break down fat and get energy from the stored fat reserves. Recent studies have started to shed light on the beneficial effects of L-carnitine when used in various clinical therapies. Because L-carnitine and its esters help reduce oxidative stress, they have been proposed as a treatment for many conditions, i.e. heart failure, angina and weight loss. For other conditions, such as fatigue or improving exercise performance, L-carnitine appears safe but does not seem to have a significant effect. The presented review of the literature suggests that continued studies are required before L-carnitine administration could be recommended as a routine procedure in the noted disorders. Further research is warranted in order to evaluate the biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological determinants of the response to carnitine supplementation, as well as to determine the potential benefits of carnitine supplements in selected categories of individuals who do not have fatty acid oxidation defects.

  11. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glinski, Ronald W.; Siegel, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB) that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or without

  12. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  13. A prospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral acetyl-L-carnitine for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanjue; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Baorui; Liu, Ping; Wu, Changping; Zheng, Rongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Deng, Yongchuan; Zheng, Leizhen; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Bin; Ouyang, Xuenong; Gao, Jianfei; Xu, Nong; Li, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Su; Liang, Chaofan; Yao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The study was carried out as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and paralleled clinical study. A total of 239 patients with CIPN were selected as the study subjects. Of the 239 subjects, 118 subjects received 3 g/day ALC orally for 8 weeks and 121 received a placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement of peripheral neuropathy by at least one grade. Patient status was assessed at week 4, 8 and 12 after enrollment into the study. In both the full analysis set (FAS) and the per-protocol set (PPS), peripheral sensory neuropathy was significantly ameliorated in the ALC group with 50.5 and 51.6% patients meeting the primary endpoint at week 8, compared with 24.1 and 23.1% of patients in the placebo group (P<0.001 in both sets). Secondary endpoints, such as the nerve electrophysiological examination and the Karnofsky physical score were also significantly improved in patients receiving ALC treatment, as compared with the placebo group (FAS, P=0.0463 and P=0.022; PPS, P=0.0076 and P=0.0064, respectively). Cancer-associated fatigue was significantly alleviated following ALC treatment in the PPS (P=0.0135). In the safety analysis set, the difference in adverse events incidence between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.3903). There were only two severe adverse events in the ALC group, which were not associated with the effect of ALC. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that in Chinese patients with cancer, oral administration of ALC is effective at ameliorating peripheral sensory neuropathy induced by chemotherapy, as well as reducing of cancer-associated fatigue and improving physical conditions.

  14. A prospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral acetyl-L-carnitine for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuanjue; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Baorui; Liu, Ping; Wu, Changping; Zheng, Rongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Deng, Yongchuan; Zheng, Leizhen; Xu, Qing; Jiang, Bin; Ouyang, Xuenong; Gao, Jianfei; Xu, Nong; Li, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Su; Liang, Chaofan; Yao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). The study was carried out as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and paralleled clinical study. A total of 239 patients with CIPN were selected as the study subjects. Of the 239 subjects, 118 subjects received 3 g/day ALC orally for 8 weeks and 121 received a placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement of peripheral neuropathy by at least one grade. Patient status was assessed at week 4, 8 and 12 after enrollment into the study. In both the full analysis set (FAS) and the per-protocol set (PPS), peripheral sensory neuropathy was significantly ameliorated in the ALC group with 50.5 and 51.6% patients meeting the primary endpoint at week 8, compared with 24.1 and 23.1% of patients in the placebo group (P<0.001 in both sets). Secondary endpoints, such as the nerve electrophysiological examination and the Karnofsky physical score were also significantly improved in patients receiving ALC treatment, as compared with the placebo group (FAS, P=0.0463 and P=0.022; PPS, P=0.0076 and P=0.0064, respectively). Cancer-associated fatigue was significantly alleviated following ALC treatment in the PPS (P=0.0135). In the safety analysis set, the difference in adverse events incidence between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.3903). There were only two severe adverse events in the ALC group, which were not associated with the effect of ALC. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that in Chinese patients with cancer, oral administration of ALC is effective at ameliorating peripheral sensory neuropathy induced by chemotherapy, as well as reducing of cancer-associated fatigue and improving physical conditions. PMID:28105133

  15. Carnitine in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bach, A C

    1982-12-01

    The oxidation of long-chain fatty acids is carnitine-dependent. Indeed, only when they are bound to carnitine, in the form of acyl-carnitines, do fatty acids penetrate into the mitochondria to be oxidized. To meet the need for carnitine, animals depend on both endogenous synthesis and an exogenous supply. A diet rich in meat supplies a lot of carnitine, while vegetables, fruits, and grains furnish relatively little. Although it has a low molecular weight and acts at low doses in a vital metabolic pathway, carnitine should not be considered a vitamin, but rather a nutritive substance. Indeed, it seems that the diet of the adult human need not necessarily furnish carnitine: the healthy organism, given a balanced nutrition (sufficiently rich in lysine and methionine), may well be able to meet all its needs. Furthermore, it seems that a reduction of the exogenous supply of carnitine results in a lowering of its elimination in the urine. However, dietary carnitine is more important during the neonatal period. The transition from fetal to extrauterine life is accompanied by an increased role of lipids in meeting energy needs. This change is accompanied by a rise in the body of the levels of carnitine, which is mainly supplied in the maternal milk. Finally, this review briefly surveys the illnesses in which a dietary carnitine supplement proves useful.

  16. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  17. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy caused by carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Zucker, Stephen D

    2008-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential co-factor in fatty acid metabolism. Carnitine deficiency can impair fatty acid oxidation, rarely leading to hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who developed acute mental status changes, asterixis, and diffuse muscle weakness. Her ammonia level was elevated at 276 microg/dL. Traditional ammonia-reducing therapies were initiated, but proved ineffective. Pharmacologic, microbial, and autoimmune causes for the hyperammonemia were excluded. The patient was severely malnourished and her carnitine level was found to be extremely low. After carnitine supplementation, ammonia levels normalized and the patient's mental status returned to baseline. In the setting of refractory hyperammonemia, this case illustrates how careful investigation may reveal a treatable condition.

  18. Sibutramine and L-carnitine compared to sibutramine alone on insulin resistance in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Gravina, Alessia; Mereu, Roberto; D'Angelo, Angela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of one year of treatment with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared to sibutramine on body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance state in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-four patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) >8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take sibutramine 10 mg plus L-carnitine 2 g or sibutramine 10 mg in monotherapy. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP). There was a decrease in body weight, BMI, HbA(1c), FPI, HOMA-IR, and RBP-4 in both groups, even when the values obtained with sibutramine plus L-carnitine were lower than the values obtained in sibutramine group. There was a faster decrease of FPG, PPG, TC, LDL-C, resistin and Hs-CRP with sibutramine plus L-carnitine even when no differences between the two groups were obtained. Furthermore, only sibutramine plus L-carnitine improved Tg, and visfatin. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a faster improvement of lipid profile, insulin resistance parameters, glycemic control, and body weight compared to sibutramine.

  19. Carnitine revisited: potential use as adjunctive treatment in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Power, R A; Hulver, M W; Zhang, J Y; Dubois, J; Marchand, R M; Ilkayeva, O; Muoio, D M; Mynatt, R L

    2007-04-01

    This study examined the efficacy of supplemental L: -carnitine as an adjunctive diabetes therapy in mouse models of metabolic disease. We hypothesised that carnitine would facilitate fatty acid export from tissues in the form of acyl-carnitines, thereby alleviating lipid-induced insulin resistance. Obese mice with genetic or diet-induced forms of insulin resistance were fed rodent chow +/- 0.5% L: -carnitine for a period of 1-8 weeks. Metabolic outcomes included insulin tolerance tests, indirect calorimetry and mass spectrometry-based profiling of acyl-carnitine esters in tissues and plasma. Carnitine supplementation improved insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in genetically diabetic mice and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet, without altering body weight or food intake. In severely diabetic mice, carnitine supplementation increased average daily respiratory exchange ratio from 0.886 +/- 0.01 to 0.914 +/- 0.01 (p < 0.01), reflecting a marked increase in systemic carbohydrate oxidation. Similarly, under insulin-stimulated conditions, carbohydrate oxidation was higher and total energy expenditure increased from 172 +/- 10 to 210 +/- 9 kJ kg fat-free mass(-1) h(-1) in the carnitine-supplemented compared with control animals. These metabolic improvements corresponded with a 2.3-fold rise in circulating levels of acetyl-carnitine, which accounts for 86 and 88% of the total acyl-carnitine pool in plasma and skeletal muscle, respectively. Carnitine supplementation also increased several medium- and long-chain acyl-carnitine species in both plasma and tissues. These findings suggest that carnitine supplementation relieves lipid overload and glucose intolerance in obese rodents by enhancing mitochondrial efflux of excess acyl groups from insulin-responsive tissues. Carefully controlled clinical trials should be considered.

  20. Impact of L-carnitine on plasma lipoprotein(a) concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Maria-Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Toth, Peter P.; Jones, Steven R.; Muntner, Paul; Blaha, Michael J.; Andrica, Florina; Martin, Seth S.; Borza, Claudia; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Ray, Kausik K.; Rysz, Jacek; Hazen, Stanley L.; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of L-carnitine on plasma Lp(a) concentrations through systematic review and meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to 31st January 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I2 statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of Lp(a) levels following L-carnitine supplementation (WMD: −8.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.09, −7.55, p < 0.001). When the studies were categorized according to the route of administration, a significant reduction in plasma Lp(a) concentration was observed with oral (WMD: −9.00 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.29, −7.72, p < 0.001) but not intravenous L-carnitine (WMD: −2.91 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.22, 4.41, p = 0.436). The results of the meta-regression analysis showed that the pooled estimate is independent of L-carnitine dose (slope: −0.30; 95% CI: −4.19, 3.59; p = 0.878) and duration of therapy (slope: 0.18; 95% CI: −0.22, 0.59; p = 0.374). In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests a significant Lp(a) lowering by oral L-carnitine supplementation. Taking into account the limited number of available Lp(a)-targeted drugs, L-carnitine might be an effective alternative to effectively reduce Lp(a). Prospective outcome trials will be required to fully elucidate the clinical value and safety of oral L-carnitine supplementation. PMID:26754058

  1. Impact of L-carnitine on plasma lipoprotein(a) concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Serban, Maria-Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Muntner, Paul; Blaha, Michael J; Andrica, Florina; Martin, Seth S; Borza, Claudia; Lip, Gregory Y H; Ray, Kausik K; Rysz, Jacek; Hazen, Stanley L; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-12

    We aimed to assess the impact of L-carnitine on plasma Lp(a) concentrations through systematic review and meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to 31(st) January 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of Lp(a) levels following L-carnitine supplementation (WMD: -8.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.09, -7.55, p < 0.001). When the studies were categorized according to the route of administration, a significant reduction in plasma Lp(a) concentration was observed with oral (WMD: -9.00 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.29, -7.72, p < 0.001) but not intravenous L-carnitine (WMD: -2.91 mg/dL, 95% CI: -10.22, 4.41, p = 0.436). The results of the meta-regression analysis showed that the pooled estimate is independent of L-carnitine dose (slope: -0.30; 95% CI: -4.19, 3.59; p = 0.878) and duration of therapy (slope: 0.18; 95% CI: -0.22, 0.59; p = 0.374). In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests a significant Lp(a) lowering by oral L-carnitine supplementation. Taking into account the limited number of available Lp(a)-targeted drugs, L-carnitine might be an effective alternative to effectively reduce Lp(a). Prospective outcome trials will be required to fully elucidate the clinical value and safety of oral L-carnitine supplementation.

  2. Metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in human adults: Identification and quantification of urinary and fecal metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Chenard, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine is not totally absorbed and is in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of methyl-{sup 3}H L-carnitine with a meal to subjects who had been adapted to a low-carnitine diet or a high-carnitine diet. Urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 d following administration of the test dose. Total radioactive metabolites excreted ranged from 13 to 34% (low carnitine diet) and 27 to 46% (high carnitine diet) of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were ({sup 3}H)trimethylamine N-oxide (8 to 39% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and ({sup 3}H)gamma-butyrobetaine (0.09 to 8% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 42 to 95% (high carnitine diet) and 190 to 364% (low carnitine diet) of intake. These results indicate that oral carnitine is 54 to 87% bioavailable from normal Western diets; the percentage of intake absorbed is related to the quantity ingested.

  3. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Lehman, L.J.; Olson, L.

    1986-05-01

    Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of (methyl-/sup 3/H)epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as (/sup 3/H)carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat.

  4. Oral Antimycobacterial Therapy in Chronic Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Wonder P.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Richmond, Bradley W.; Isom, Joan; Burke, Victoria E.; Algood, Holly; Braun, Nicole; Taylor, Thyneice; Pandit, Kusum V.; Aboud, Caroline; Yu, Chang; Kaminski, Naftali; Boyd, Alan S.; King, Lloyd E.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease for which there are limited therapeutic options. This is the first randomized, placebo-controlled study to demonstrate that antimycobacterial therapy reduces lesion diameter and disease severity among patients with chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of once-daily antimycobacterial therapy on the resolution of chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized, placebo-controlled, single-masked trial on 30 patients with symptomatic chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions deemed to require therapeutic intervention. SETTING A tertiary referral dermatology center in Nashville, Tennessee. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomized to receive either the oral concomitant levofloxacin, ethambutol, azithromycin, and rifampin (CLEAR) regimen or a comparative placebo regimen for 8 weeks with a 180-day follow-up. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Participants were monitored for absolute change in lesion diameter and decrease in granuloma burden, if present, on completion of therapy. OBSERVATIONS In the intention-to-treat analysis, the CLEAR-treated group had a mean (SD) decrease in lesion diameter of −8.4 (14.0) mm compared with an increase of 0.07 (3.2) mm in the placebo-treated group (P = .05). The CLEAR group had a significant reduction in granuloma burden and experienced a mean (SD) decline of −2.9 (2.5) mm in lesion severity compared with a decline of −0.6 (2.1) mm in the placebo group (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Antimycobacterial therapy may result in significant reductions in chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesion diameter compared with placebo. These observed reductions, associated with a clinically significant improvement in symptoms, were present at the 180-day follow-up period. Transcriptome analysis of sarcoidosis CD4+ T cells revealed reversal of pathways associated with disease severity and enhanced T-cell function following T

  5. Photodynamic therapy in treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Rabinovich, I M; Guseva, A V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the rationale for the application of photodynamic therapy in complex treatment of patient with severe oral lichen planus. Complex clinical and laboratory examination and treatment was performed in 54 patients divided on 3 groups. Diagnosis of oral lichen planus was based on clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features. Group 1 received standard treatment, in the second group photodynamic therapy was conducted in addition to conventional treatment, patients in the third group received only photodynamic therapy. The study results proved photodynamic therapy to be useful tool in complex treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

  6. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  7. L-carnitine supplementation in childhood epilepsy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, D C; Bohan, T P; Coulter, D L; Dreifuss, F E; Greenwood, R S; Nordli, D R; Shields, W D; Stafstrom, C E; Tein, I

    1998-11-01

    In November 1996, a panel of pediatric neurologists met to update the consensus statement issued in 1989 by a panel of neurologists and metabolic experts on L-carnitine supplementation in childhood epilepsy. The panelists agreed that intravenous L-carnitine supplementation is clearly indicated for valproate (VPA)-induced hepatotoxicity, overdose, and other acute metabolic crises associated with carnitine deficiency. Oral supplementation is clearly indicated for the primary plasmalemmal carnitine transporter defect. The panelists concurred that oral L-carnitine supplementation is strongly suggested for the following groups as well: patients with certain secondary carnitine-deficiency syndromes, symptomatic VPA-associated hyperammonemia, multiple risk factors for VPA hepatotoxicity, or renal-associated syndromes; infants and young children taking VPA; patients with epilepsy using the ketogenic diet who have hypocarnitinemia; patients receiving dialysis; and premature infants who are receiving total parenteral nutrition. The panel recommended an oral L-carnitine dosage of 100 mg/kg/day, up to a maximum of 2 g/day. Intravenous supplementation for medical emergency situations usually exceeds this recommended dosage.

  8. Carnitine prolongs the half-life of ethanol in broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, M O; Cha, Y S; Sachan, D S

    1994-09-01

    The object was to determine if carnitine attenuated ethanol metabolism in broilers similar to that reported in the rats. Two groups (n = 5) of 5-week-old broilers were given for 10 days the feed with or without 0.5% L-carnitine supplement. A single oral dose of ethanol on day 8 was followed by serial blood samples which were analysed for ethanol. Another dose of ethanol was given on day 10 and 2 hr later, plasma and liver were collected and analysed for ethanol, total lipid, triglycerides and carnitine. The carnitine supplemented diet prolonged the half-life of ethanol due to attenuation of ethanol metabolism which is similar to that reported earlier in rodents. The increases in plasma and hepatic acylcarnitines indicate that supplementary carnitine lessens the load of free acyl groups in the liver by eventual oxidation or excretion.

  9. [Carnitine - mitochondria and beyond].

    PubMed

    Nałęcz, Katarzyna A; Nałęcz, Maciej J

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine [(3R)-3-hydroxy-4-(trimethylazaniumyl)butanoate] in mammals is mainly delivered with diet. It enters the cell due to the activity of organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5), it can be as well transported by CT2 (SLC22A16) and a transporter of neutral and basic amino acids ATB(0, +) (SLC6A14). The hydroxyl group of carnitine is able to form esters with organic acids (xenobiotics, fatty acids) due to the activity of acylcarnitine transferases. Carnitine is necessary for transfer of fatty acids to mitochondria: in functioning of the so-called carnitine shuttle an essential role is fulfilled by palmitoylcarnitine transferase 1, carnitine carrier (SLC25A20) in the inner mitochondrial membrane and palmitoylcarnitine transferase 2. Oxidation of fatty acids takes also place in peroxisomes. The produced medium-chain acyl derivatives are exported as acylcarnitines, most probably by OCTN3 (Slc22a21). It has been postulated that acylcarnitines can cross the outer mitochondrial membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and/or through the palmitoycarnitine transferase 1 oligomer. Mutations of genes coding carnitine plasma membrane transporters result in the primary carnitine deficiency, with symptoms affecting normal functioning of muscles (including heart) and brain. Mechanisms regulating functioning of these transporters have been presented with emphasis on their role as potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Striae distensae of augmented breasts after oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Har-Shai, Y; Barak, A; Taran, A; Weissman, A

    1999-02-01

    A case of striae distensae (SD) of bilateral augmented breasts following oral contraceptive therapy is presented. Striae maturation and the prevention of additional skin marks was achieved with immediate cessation of oral contraceptive pill therapy and long-term daily topical application of tretinoin cream. It is suggested that patients who are candidates for breast augmentation surgery should be informed of the possible risk of developing SD if they are taking or planning to take the contraceptive pill.

  11. L-Carnitine status in end-stage renal disease patients on automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Arduini, Arduino; Rossi, Claudia; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Posari, Cosima; Sacchetta, Paolo; Urbani, Andrea; Bonomini, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Carnitine metabolism in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD), particularly automated PD (APD), has not been extensively evaluated. Here, we examined levels of a large number of carnitine species in plasma from adult uremic patients treated with continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) or APD, vetting whether L-carnitine may be used in the solution bag for APD therapy. Plasma levels of carnitine and its esters were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry in 14 patients on CAPD (3 × 1.5 % glucose daily and icodextrin overnight), 16 patients on APD (tidal modality), and 8 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. PD groups did not differ with regard to demographic characteristics, renal function, dialysis features, peritoneal function, or biochemistry. In five APD patients, we also examined the safety and efficacy of L-carnitine (5 g) addition to one night-dwell solution bag over five consecutive days. Several abnormalities were found in plasma carnitine species of PD patients as compared to controls, mainly represented by a reduction of free carnitine and an increase in acetyl-carnitine, dicarboxylic and other carnitines. The main carnitine species (free carnitine, acetyl-carnitine) were significantly lower in plasma from APD than CAPD patients. APD patients tolerated L-carnitine supplementation well, laboratory, physical and dialysis parameters proving stable. Plasma carnitine metabolism is abnormal in patients on PD, and may be influenced by the PD modality. Given the good tolerability and potential advantages of carnitine used in the PD fluid, L-carnitine-containing solution bags in APD treatment definitely merit further evaluation.

  12. Orlistat and L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone on insulin resistance in obese diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Ferrari, Ilaria; D'Angelo, Angela; Fogari, Elena; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    Our study wants to evaluate the effects of one year treatment with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone on body weight, glycemic and lipid control, and insulin resistance state in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-eight patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take orlistat 120 mg three times a day plus L-carnitine 2 g one time a day or orlistat 120 mg three times a day. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI), HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed a faster, and better decrease of body weight, HbA(1c), FPG, PPG, LDL-C, HOMA-IR with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat. A faster improvement of TC, Tg, FPI, resistin, RBP-4, visfatin, and Hs-CRP was reached with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat. We can safely conclude that the association of orlistat plus L-carnitine was better than orlistat in improving body weight, glycemic and lipid profile, insulin resistance, and inflammatory parameters and no significant adverse events were recorded.

  13. Oral surgery in patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Vicente Barrero, Mario; Knezevic, Milan; Tapia Martín, Manuel; Viejo Llorente, Aurora; Orengo Valverde, Juan Carlos; García Jiménez, Francisco; López Pérez, Omar; Domínguez Sarmiento, Sergio; Díaz Cremades, Jose Manuel; Castellano Reyes, Juan

    2002-01-01

    There is an evident need for procedural protocol for oral surgery patients who undergo oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) because of: 1) the possible severity of complications and 2) the growing demand for OAT, which in some cases may be as much as 8% of the oral surgery patients that are referred to the hospital from primary care centers. In this study, the authors define the parameters for creating a proto- col applicable to this group of patients. The conclusion is that it is not necessary to suspend OAT before surgery; rather, these procedures should be performed under multidisciplinary medical control. The authors demonstrate that it is possible to perform oral surgery on OAT patients, without having to sus- pend treatment beforehand. A longitudinal study was performed in OAT patients that required some type of oral surgical procedures. After an INR control, the patient underwent surgery and afterwards the patient was given tranexamic acid as a mouth rinse. Postoperative hemorrhage was classified as slight when it lasted less than 5 minutes, moderate when it lasted longer than five minutes, and severe when it required blood transfusion. The study was performed over a 5-year period (1996-2000), by the maxillofacial surgery department. In that time period, 125 patients with OAT were treated; 90 of them were males and 35 were females. Tooth extraction was per- formed in 229 sessions and a total of 367 teeth were extracted, with an average of 1.6% per session. With regards to postoperative hemorrahage, it was slight in 210 cases (91.7%), moderate in 18 (7.9%) and severe only in one case (0.4%). All the variables were compared and no statistically significant differences were found. We believe that OAT should not be suspended before oral surgery, but it surgery should be performed under multidisciplinary control-especially in the case of the elderly (over 65) or with those patients that have other concomitant illnesses such as renal insufficiency or anemia or other

  14. L-Carnitine and Acetyl-L-carnitine Roles and Neuroprotection in Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gustavo C; McKenna, Mary C

    2017-06-01

    L-Carnitine functions to transport long chain fatty acyl-CoAs into the mitochondria for degradation by β-oxidation. Treatment with L-carnitine can ameliorate metabolic imbalances in many inborn errors of metabolism. In recent years there has been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential of L-carnitine and its acetylated derivative acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) for neuroprotection in a number of disorders including hypoxia-ischemia, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease and in conditions leading to central or peripheral nervous system injury. There is compelling evidence from preclinical studies that L-carnitine and ALCAR can improve energy status, decrease oxidative stress and prevent subsequent cell death in models of adult, neonatal and pediatric brain injury. ALCAR can provide an acetyl moiety that can be oxidized for energy, used as a precursor for acetylcholine, or incorporated into glutamate, glutamine and GABA, or into lipids for myelination and cell growth. Administration of ALCAR after brain injury in rat pups improved long-term functional outcomes, including memory. Additional studies are needed to better explore the potential of L-carnitine and ALCAR for protection of developing brain as there is an urgent need for therapies that can improve outcome after neonatal and pediatric brain injury.

  15. Comparison between orlistat plus l-carnitine and orlistat alone on inflammation parameters in obese diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Ferrari, Ilaria; D'Angelo, Angela; Fogari, Elena; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of 1-year treatment with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone on body weight, glycemic and lipid control, and inflammatory parameters in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-eight patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomized to take orlistat 120 mg three times a day plus L-carnitine 2 g one time a day or orlistat 120 mg three times a day. We evaluated the following parameters at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months: body weight, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c) ), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), adiponectin (ADN), leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), vaspin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP). We observed a better decrease in body weight, glycemic profile, HOMA-IR, LDL-C, and ADN and a faster improvement in FPI, TC, Tg, leptin, TNF-α, Hs-CRP with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone. We also recorded an improvement in vaspin with orlistat plus l-carnitine not reached with orlistat alone. Orlistat plus L-carnitine gave a better improvement in body weight, glycemic and lipid profile compared to orlistat alone; furthermore, a faster and better improvement in inflammatory parameters was observed with orlistat plus L-carnitine compared to orlistat alone. © 2010 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  16. Quantitative estimation of absorption and degradation of a carnitine supplement by human adults.

    PubMed

    Rebouche, C J

    1991-12-01

    Results of kinetic and pharmacokinetic studies have suggested that dietary carnitine supplements are not totally absorbed, and are in part degraded in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. To determine the metabolic fate of dietary carnitine supplements in humans, we administered orally a tracer dose of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine with a meal to five normal adult males, who had been adapted to a high-carnitine diet plus carnitine supplement (2 g/d) for 14 days. Appearance of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine and metabolites in serum, and urinary and fecal excretion of radiolabeled carnitine and metabolites was monitored for 5 to 11 days following administration of the test dose. Maximum concentration of [methyl-3H]L-carnitine in serum occurred at 2.0 to 4.5 hours after administration of the tracer, indicating relatively slow absorption from the intestinal lumen. Total radioactive metabolites excreted in urine and feces ranged from 47% to 55% of the ingested tracer. Major metabolites found were [3H]trimethylamine N-oxide (8% to 49% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in urine) and [3H]gamma-butyrobetaine (0.44% to 45% of the administered dose; excreted primarily in feces). Urinary excretion of total carnitine was 16% to 23% of intake. Fecal excretion of total carnitine was negligible (less than 2% of total carnitine excretion).

  17. The Efficacy of Medical Treatment of Peyronie's Disease: Potassium Para-Aminobenzoate Monotherapy vs. Combination Therapy with Tamoxifen, L-Carnitine, and Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Yong; Jeong, Hyeong Guk; Park, Jong Jin; Chae, Ji Yun; Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Je Jong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment of Peyronie's disease. Materials and Methods A total of 109 patients with Peyronie's disease who had been treated from January 2011 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Forty-four patients (Group 1) were treated with 12 mg of potassium para-aminobenzoate daily. Sixty-five patients (Group 2) were treated with combination therapy: tamoxifen (20 mg) and acetyl-L-carnitine (300 mg) twice daily in addition to a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. Ability to perform sexual intercourse, pain during erection, size of plaque, and penile curvature angle were assessed. Results In Group 1, 30 of 44 patients (68.2%) discontinued treatment within 12 weeks, while 5 patients (7.7%) in Group 2 discontinued treatment. Pain during erection and plaque size were improved in both groups but showed no statistical difference due to the high dropout rate in Group 1. In both groups, penile curvature was improved, but demonstrated no statistical difference between the treatment groups. However, combination therapy demonstrated a better response rate in patients whose penile curvature angle was less than 30° (44.4% vs. 79.1%, p=0.048). The rate of successful sexual intercourse was significantly higher in Group 2 (42.8% vs. 78.3%, p=0.034). The number of patients who underwent surgical correction despite medical treatment was significantly higher in Group 1 (35.7% vs. 13.3%, p=0.048). Conclusions Early medical combination therapy in Peyronie's disease may present better results in patients whose curvature angle is less than 30°. PMID:27169128

  18. Oral reconstructive and corrective considerations in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert

    2005-09-01

    This paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. It is intended to provide information for the dental profession and other interested parties. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of oral reconstructive and corrective procedures used in periodontal therapy. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of this subject.

  19. The effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation in migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tarighat Esfanjani, Ali; Mahdavi, Reza; Ebrahimi Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Talebi, Mahnaz; Nikniaz, Zeinab; Safaiyan, Abdolrasool

    2012-12-01

    Given the conflicting results about the positive effects of magnesium and L-carnitine and as there is no report concerning concurrent supplementation of magnesium and L-carnitine on migraine prophylaxis, the effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation on migraine indicators were assessed. In this clinical trial, 133 migrainous patients were randomly assigned into three intervention groups: magnesium oxide (500 mg/day), L-carnitine (500 mg/day), and Mg-L-carnitine (500 mg/day magnesium and 500 mg/day L-carnitine), and a control group. After 12 weeks of supplementation, the checklist of migraine indicators including migraine attacks/month, migraine days/month, and headache severity was completed, and serum concentrations of magnesium and L-carnitine were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and enzymatic UV test, respectively. The results showed a significant reduction in all migraine indicators in all studied groups (p < 0.05). The ANOVA results showed a significant reduction in migraine frequency across various supplemented and control groups (p = 0.008). By separating the effects of magnesium supplementation from other confounding factors such as routine treatments using the repeated measures and nested model, it was clarified that magnesium supplementation had a significant effect on all migraine indicators. Oral supplementation with magnesium oxide and L-carnitine and concurrent supplementation of Mg-L-carnitine besides routine treatments could be effective in migraine prophylaxis; however, larger trials are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  20. Carnitine derivatives: clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-03-01

    Carnitine and its derivatives are natural substances involved in both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes the recent progress in the field in relation to the molecular mechanisms. The pool of different carnitine derivatives is formed by acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), and isovaleryl-carnitine. ALC may have a preferential effect on the brain tissue. ALC represents a compound of great interest for its wide clinical application in various neurological disorders: it may be of benefit in treating Alzheimer's dementia, depression in the elderly, HIV infection, chronic fatigue syndrome, peripheral neuropathies, ischemia and reperfusion of the brain, and cognitive impairment associated with various conditions. PLC has been demonstrated to replenish the intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle by the propionyl-CoA moiety, a greater affinity for the sarcolemmal carrier, peripheral vasodilator activity, a greater positive inotropism, and more rapid entry into myocytes. Most studies of the therapeutic use of PLC are focused on the prevention and treatment of ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, hypertrophic heart disease, and peripheral arterial disease. ALC and PLC are considered well tolerated without significant side-effects. A number of therapeutic effects possibly come from the interaction of carnitine and its derivatives with the elements of cellular membranes.

  1. [Slow replenishment of carnitine level after long-term treatment with pivampicillin/pivmecillinam].

    PubMed

    Diep, Q N; Bøhmer, T; Storrøsten, O T; Holme, J I; Torvik, A; Loennecken, C W; Monstad, P; Jellum, E

    1994-05-30

    Long-term treatment with pivampicillin and pivmecillinam for 6-24 months in five adults and one child reduced the total serum carnitine concentrations to 3.7-14.0 mumol/l (reference value 25-66 mumol/l). The muscle carnitine was reduced to 0.3-0.7 mumol/g wet weight (reference value 3-5 mumol/g) in two cases. All patients had asthenia and muscle symptoms with weakness and pain. One showed signs of carnitine depletion in the liver, with increased secretion of dicarboxylic acids (C6, C8, C10) in urine and limited ketone body formation during prolonged fasting (32 hours). The serum carnitine increased slowly after cessation of therapy and reached normal concentrations after 6-12 months. All symptoms caused by carnitine depletion disappeared after the serum carnitine reached 20 mumol/l. This was achieved on a normal diet without carnitine supplement.

  2. A Systematic Review of Adherence to Oral Antineoplastic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Amoyal, Nicole; Nisotel, Lauren; Fishbein, Joel N.; MacDonald, James; Stagl, Jamie; Lennes, Inga; Temel, Jennifer S.; Safren, Steven A.; Pirl, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral antineoplastic therapies not only improve survival but also reduce the burden of care for patients. Yet patients and clinicians face new challenges in managing adherence to these oral therapies. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess rates and correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies and interventions aimed at improving adherence. Methods. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a comprehensive literature search of the Ovid MEDLINE database from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2015, using relevant terminology for oral antineoplastic agents. We included observational, database, and intervention studies. At least two researchers evaluated each paper to ensure accuracy of results and determine risk of bias. Results. We identified 927 records from the search and screened 214 abstracts. After conducting a full-text review of 167 papers, we included in the final sample 51 papers on rates/correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy and 12 papers on intervention studies to improve adherence. Rates of adherence varied widely, from 46% to 100%, depending on patient sample, medication type, follow-up period, assessment measure, and calculation of adherence. Of the intervention studies, only 1 of the randomized trials and 2 of the cohort studies showed benefit regarding adherence, with the majority suffering high risk of bias. Conclusions. Although no reliable estimate of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies can be gleaned from the literature, a substantial proportion of patients struggle to adhere to these medications as prescribed. The few intervention studies for adherence have notable methodological concerns, thereby limiting the evidence to guide practice in promoting medication adherence among patients with cancer. Implications for Practice: Given the tremendous growth and development of oral antineoplastic therapies in the last decade, significant

  3. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Oliveira, Thaís Marchini; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathophysiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment. current studies define oral mucositis as a very frequent and painful inflammation with ulcers on the oral mucosa that are covered by a pseudo membrane. The incidence and severity of lesions are influenced by patient and treatment variables. Oral mucositis is a result of two major mechanisms: direct toxicity on the mucosa and myelosuppression due to the treatment. Its pathophysiology is composed of four interdependent phases: an initial inflammatory/vascular phase; an epithelial phase; an ulcerative/bacteriological phase; and a healing phase. It is considered a potential source of life-threatening infection and often is a dose-limiting factor in anticancer therapy. Some interventions have been shown to be potentially effective to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Further intensive research through well-structured clinical trials to obtain the best scientific evidence over the standard therapy of oral mucositis is necessary to attain ideal parameters for radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  4. Oral mucosa and therapy of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Landová, Hana; Daněk, Zdeněk; Gajdziok, Jan; Vetchý, David; Stembírek, Jan

    2013-02-01

    Oral mucosa is one of the specific surfaces of the human body, which is permanently exposed to external factors related with food intake, breathing and speaking processes, which can lead to the onset of some problems. Disorders of the oral mucosa are a group of diseases, affecting, in the course of life, the majority of the population. Many of the oral mucosa ailments are manifested by lesions. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common of these diseases. Despite much clinical and research attention, its causes remain poorly understood and treatment is only symptomatic. RAS is reported to affect up to 25% of the population worldwide. Topical or systemic therapy (corticosteroids, antiseptics, anti-inflamatory drugs, immunomodulating agents, etc.) can be used for treatment of RAS-associated symptoms. In general, topical therapy should be preferred due to the smaller drug load of the organism. In both cases, the active substance has to be in suitable dosage form. Recently, besides the conventional ways of application (rinses), the main disadvantage of which is the short time of resistance in the oral cavity, mucoadhesive dosage forms are used. The aim of this article is to give a theoretical overview of the oral mucosa topic and its most frequent disease - recurrent aphthous stomatitis in terms of various types of the disease classification, diagnosis and therapy, and in terms of the usage of various types of active substances and medical forms. oral mucosa recurrent aphthous stomatitis therapy mucoadhesive dosage forms.

  5. Editorial: Oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    1975-01-11

    Much clinical experience has been gained in the use of the glucose/electrolyte oral solutions in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Those patients who are in shock or too weak to drink need intravenous fluids to correct their total deficit. With isotonic polyelectrolyte fluids rehydration may be achieved in 2-4 hours. Subsequently, most of these patients can be given oral fluids to replace continuing stool loss. Patients who are not in shock and who are sufficiently strong to drink at the outset nearly always can be rehydrated with oral fluids alone. Vomiting is most likely caused by acidosis and volume depletion, and these can be corrected in severely dehydrated patients by intravenous therapy and by oral therapy in those not in shock and able to drink by oral therapy. Proponents of oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for diarrhea, like other proponents of new treatments, have great visions of its benefits to the world, yet these visions require validation. The biggest problem will be getting glucose and electrolytes to where they are most needed -- at the level of home and village.

  6. Analytical approaches to determination of carnitine in biological materials, foods and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Monika; Starek, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    l-Carnitine is a vitamin-like amino acid derivative, which is an essential factor in fatty acid metabolism as acyltransferase cofactor and in energy production processes, such as interconversion in the mechanisms of regulation of cetogenesis and termogenesis, and it is also used in the therapy of primary and secondary deficiency, and in other diseases. The determination of carnitine and acyl-carnitines can provide important information about inherited or acquired metabolic disorders, and for monitoring the biochemical effect of carnitine therapy. The endogenous carnitine pool in humans is maintained by biosynthesis and absorption of carnitine from the diet. Carnitine has one asymmetric carbon giving two stereoisomers d and l, but only the l form has a biological positive effect, thus chiral recognition of l-carnitine enantiomers is extremely important in biological, chemical and pharmaceutical sciences. In order to get more insight into carnitine metabolism and synthesis, a sensitive analysis for the determination of the concentration of free carnitine, carnitine esters and the carnitine precursors is required. Carnitine has been investigated in many biochemical, pharmacokinetic, metabolic and toxicokinetic studies and thus many analytical methods have been developed and published for the determination of carnitine in foods, dietary supplements, pharmaceutical formulations, biological tissues and body fluid. The analytical procedures presented in this review have been validated in terms of basic parameters (linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision). This article presented the impact of different analytical techniques, and provides an overview of applications that address a diverse array of pharmaceutical and biological questions and samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  8. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  9. Low Level Laser Therapy: A Panacea for oral maladies

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Vartika; Kalra, Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the applications of low level laser therapy on various soft and hard oral tissues. A variety of therapeutic effects of Low Level Laser Therapy have been reported on a broad range of disorders. It has been found amenably practical in dental applications including soft as well as hard tissues of the oral cavity. LLLT has been found to be efficient in acceleration of wound healing, enhanced remodelling and bone repair, regeneration of neural cells following injury, pain attenuation, endorphin release stimulation and modulation of immune system. The aforementioned biological processes induced by Low level lasers have been effectively applied in treating various pathological conditions in the oral cavity. With is article, we attempt to review the possible application of Low Laser Therapy in the field of dentistry. PMID:26557737

  10. Oral therapy for Peyronie’s disease, does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Harlow, Brittani

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a localized, wound-healing, connective tissue disorder of the penis characterized by scarring of the tunica albuginea. This fibrous inelastic scar leads to penile pain, penile deformity and erectile dysfunction (ED), and a difficulty performing coitus. Over the past several decades, a myriad of oral agents for the treatment of PD have been studied and suggested. While the gold standard of care remains surgical therapy, many physicians continue to prescribe oral and intralesional injections for treatment during the acute phase of the disease. This article seeks to summarize the different oral therapy agents for PD and the research associated with each medication. While the American Urological Association has not recommended most of the mentioned medications for the treatment of PD, two newer therapies have shown success and have the potential of becoming baseline treatments for the acute phase of PD. PMID:27298776

  11. Design of amphotericin B oral formulation for antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Zhiwen

    2017-11-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) remains the "gold standard" for systemic antifungal therapy, even though new drugs are emerging as the attractive antifungal agents. Since AmB has negligible oral absorption as a consequence of its unfavorable physicochemical characterizations, its use is restricted to parenteral administration which is accompanied by severe side effects. As greater understanding of the gastrointestinal tract has developed, the advanced drug delivery systems are emerging with the potential to overcome the barriers of AmB oral delivery. Much research has demonstrated that oral AmB formulations such as lipid formulations may have beneficial therapeutic efficacy with reduced adverse effects and suitable for clinical application. Here we reviewed the different formulation strategies to enhance oral drug efficacy, and discussed the current trends and future perspectives for AmB oral administration in the treatment of antifungal infections.

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid affect rotenone-induced damage in nigral dopaminergic neurons of rat brain, implication for Parkinson's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan A; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Shaalan, Aly A

    2012-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease are not fully understood, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and environmental toxins may be involved. The current research was directed to investigate the protective role of two bioenergetic antioxidants, acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid, in rotenone-parkinsonian rats. Ninety six male rats were divided into five groups. Group I is the vehicle-injected group, group II is the disease control group and was injected with six doses of rotenone (1.5 mg/kg/48 h, s.c.). Groups III, IV and V received rotenone in addition to acetyl-L-carnitine (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.), α-lipoic acid (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or their combination, respectively. Results showed that rotenone-treated rats exhibited bradykinesia and motor impairment in the open-field and square bridge tests. In addition, ATP level was decreased whereas lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls increased in the striata of rotenone-treated rats as compared to vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine or α-lipoic acid improved the motor performance and reduced the level of lipid peroxides in rat brains as compared to rotenone group. Further, ATP production was enhanced along with acetyl-L-carnitine treatments (p≤0.05). Taken together, our study reinforces the view that acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid are promising candidates for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease.

  13. L-carnitine administration and withdrawal affect plasma and hepatic carnitine concentrations, plasma lipid and lipoprotein composition, and in vitro hepatic lipogenesis from labeled mevalonate and oleate in normal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bell, F P; Vidmar, T J; Raymond, T L

    1992-04-01

    Carnitine was administered to normal rabbits to investigate the possible effects of pharmacologic doses on various aspects of normal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Carnitine concentrations were measured in the plasma and liver of normal rabbits that received L-carnitine orally [40 mg/(kg.d)] for 21 d and after withdrawal from the carnitine supplement for 21 d. Plasma lipids, plasma lipoprotein composition and in vitro hepatic lipid biosynthesis from [2-14C]mevalonate and [1-14C]oleate were also measured. Threefold elevations in plasma carnitine with carnitine treatment were essentially reversed after 48 h of carnitine withdrawal, but elevated hepatic carnitine accumulation (twofold) persisted for 21 d, suggesting that the accumulated carnitine constituted a pool that is only slowly miscible with plasma. The rabbits withdrawn from L-carnitine for 21 d experienced a 35% decrease in plasma cholesterol, a 50% decrease in VLDL cholesterol, and an increase in the protein content of HDL and of intermediate density lipoprotein + LDL. Additionally, the proportion of [14C]oleate incorporated into hepatic phospholipids increased 35% at the expense of triglyceride and the ratio of hepatic [14C]cholesterol to [14C]squalene derived from [14C]mevalonate increased over twofold following carnitine withdrawal. These studies provide evidence that normal lipid homeostasis can be altered by supplemental carnitine and that the perturbations are reflected by changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins and in the proportions of the hepatic lipids synthesized.

  14. Efficacy of oral cobalamin (vitamin B12) therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Fothergill, Helen; Mecili, Mustapha

    2010-02-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is particularly common in the elderly (> 15%). Management of cobalamin deficiency with cobalamin injections is well codified at present, but new routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) are being studied, especially oral cobalamin therapy for food-cobalamin malabsorption. The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of oral cobalamin treatment in elderly patients. To reach this objective, PubMed data were systematically searched for English and French articles published from January 1990 to July 2008. Data from our research group on cobalamin deficiency (Groupe d'Etude des CAREnce vitamine B12 - CARE B12) were also analyzed. Three prospective randomized studies, a systematic review by the Cochrane group and five prospective cohort studies were found and provide evidence that oral cobalamin treatment may adequately treat cobalamin deficiency. The efficacy was particularly highlighted when looking at the marked improvement in serum vitamin B12 levels and hematological parameters, for example hemoglobin level, mean erythrocyte cell volume and reticulocyte count. The effect of oral cobalamin treatment in patients presenting with severe neurological manifestations has not yet been adequately documented. Oral cobalamin treatment avoids the discomfort, inconvenience and cost of monthly injections. Our experience and the present analysis support the use of oral cobalamin therapy in clinical practice.

  15. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy.

  16. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  17. Transient carnitine transport defect with cholestatic jaundice: report of one case in a premature baby

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Seok; Choo, Young Kwang; Lee, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Carnitine (β-hydroxy-γ-trimethylaminobutyric acid) is involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix and the removal of potentially toxic acylcarnitine esters. Transient carnitine transport defect is a rare condition in newborns reported in 1/90,000 live births. In this paper, we describe a case of transient carnitine transport defect found in a premature baby who had prolonged cholestatic jaundice and poor weight gain, and who responded dramatically to oral carnitine supplementation. PMID:22375151

  18. [Oral or trandsdermanl hormone replacement therapy reduces interleukine-6 levels].

    PubMed

    Saucedo García, Renata; Basurto Acevedo, Lourdes; Rico Rosillo, Guadalupe; Galván, Rosa E; Zárate Treviño, Arturo

    2006-03-01

    To compare the effect of oral and transdermal estrogen replacement therapy (ET) on circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) in post-menopausal women. Prospective open trial study in 55 healthy hysterectomized postmenopausal women with a mean age of 52 years. Twenty-seven women received oral conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg daily) and the remaining 28 received transdermal estrogen replacement therapy (50 microg/day) during 6 months. At baseline both groups were similar as to age, body weight, and body mass index as well as serum levels of LH, FSH, 17-beta estradiol (E2) and IL-6. Baseline elevated IL-6 levels decreased significantly (p<0.05) after both oral and transdermal estrogen replacement therapy; this decrement showed no difference between the two groups. After the follow-up there were no differences in body weight and body mass index between groups; however, in the oral group there was a trend to increment this parameters. Serum levels of E2 and IL-6 were negatively correlated in the two groups and IL-6 was positively correlated with body mass index in untreated women and this correlation was the same in women with estrogen replacement therapy. The decrement of IL-6 after estrogen replacement therapy was similar for both routes of administration; in addition IL-6 had a negative correlation with E2 and a positive correlation with body mass index.

  19. L-carnitine ameliorates cancer cachexia in mice by regulating the expression and activity of carnitine palmityl transferase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Wu, Han-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Qi; Chen, Qing; Liu, Bin; Wu, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Liang

    2011-07-15

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by progressive weight loss with the depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Impaired fatty acid oxidation mainly resulting from the decrease of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II activities in the liver is an important factor that contributes to cancer cachexia . Although recent studies suggest a potential application of L-carnitine in treatment of cancer cachexia, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aim to assess the effects of L-carnitine on the activity and expression of CPT I and II in the liver of cachectic cancer mice. Our results show that the inoculation of colon-26 adenocarcinoma cells into mice led to cancer cachexia characterized by notable decreases in food intake, gastrocnemius muscle and epididymus fat weight. In addition, the mRNA level and activity of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and II, and serum levels of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine were markedly decreased in cachectic mice, accompanied by marked increases in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). A continuous oral treatment with L-carnitine at 18 mg/kg per day increased dietary uptake, gastrocnemius muscle weight and epididymus fat weight, increased blood glucose and serum albumin levels, and decreased total cholesterol level in cancer cachectic mice, but did not affect tumor growth. These effects of L-carnitine on cancer cachexia mice were accompanied by the upregulation of mRNA level of CPT I and II and increased enzyme activity of CPT I in the liver, as well as the downregulation of serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Moreover, free carnitine levels were negatively correlated with serum TNF-α or IL-6 level. These results indicate that L-carnitine ameliorates cancer cachexia by regulating serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels and modulating the expression and activity of CPT in the liver.

  20. Erythema multiforme limited to the oral mucosa in a teenager on oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Jawetz, Robert E; Elkin, Avigayil; Michael, Lisa; Jawetz, Sheryl A; Shin, Helen T

    2007-10-01

    Erythema multiforme has been linked to numerous drugs and infectious agents. A link to oral contraceptive use has been reported in the past in the adult population but thus far has not been reported in children or adolescents. We report the case of an 18-yr-old female who developed oral erosions consistent with erythema multiforme two and a half weeks after initiating therapy with an oral contraceptive agent. A thorough examination for other inciting factors was negative, and the lesions slowly resolved over the course of 3 weeks. This case illustrates that erythema multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adolescents with oral erosions who have been prescribed oral contraceptives.

  1. Disorders of carnitine biosynthesis and transport.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Carnitine is a hydrophilic quaternary amine that plays a number of essential roles in metabolism with the main function being the transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. Carnitine can be endogenously synthesized. However, only a small fraction of carnitine is obtained endogenously while the majority is obtained from diet, mainly animal products. Carnitine is not metabolized and is excreted in urine. Carnitine homeostasis is regulated by efficient renal reabsorption that maintains carnitine levels within the normal range despite variabilities in dietary intake. Diseases occurring due to primary defects in carnitine metabolism and homeostasis are comprised in two groups: disorders of carnitine biosynthesis and carnitine transport defect. While the hallmark of carnitine transport defect is profound carnitine depletion, disorders of carnitine biosynthesis do not cause carnitine deficiency due to the fact that both carnitine obtained from diet and efficient renal carnitine reabsorption can maintain normal carnitine levels with the absence of endogenously synthesized carnitine. Carnitine transport defect phenotype encompasses a broad clinical spectrum including metabolic decompensation in infancy, cardiomyopathy in childhood, fatigability in adulthood, or absence of symptoms. The phenotypes associated with the carnitine transport defect result from the unavailability of enough carnitine to perform its functions particularly in fatty acid β-oxidation. Carnitine biosynthetic defects have been recently described and the phenotypic consequences of these defects are still emerging. Although these defects do not result in carnitine deficiency, they still could be associated with pathological phenotypes due to excess or deficiency of intermediate metabolites in the carnitine biosynthetic pathway and potential carnitine deficiency in early stages of life when brain and other organs develop. In addition to these two

  2. Oral Therapy of Diabetes Insipidus with Chlorpropamide

    PubMed Central

    Cushard, William G.; Beauchamp, Charles J.; Martin, Neil D.

    1971-01-01

    Chlorpropamide was found to be an effective antidiuretic agent in vasopressin-sensitive diabetes insipidus. Full clinical use of this action is limited by the frequent occurrence of hypoglycemia on higher doses. This complication can be avoided, however, by restricting the dose and by employing combination therapy with hydrochlorothiazide. PMID:5563815

  3. Pre-clinical Models for Oral and Periodontal Reconstructive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, G.; Seol, Y.J.; Gruber, R.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new medical formulations (NMF) for reconstructive therapies has considerably improved the available treatment options for individuals requiring periodontal repair or oral implant rehabilitation. Progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine modalities strongly depends on validated pre-clinical research. Pre-clinical testing has contributed to the recent approval of NMF such as GEM 21S® and INFUSE® bone grafts for periodontal and oral regenerative therapies. However, the selection of a suitable pre-clinical model for evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a NMF remains a challenge. This review is designed to serve as a primer to choose the appropriate pre-clinical models for the evaluation of NMF in situations requiring periodontal or oral reconstruction. Here, we summarize commonly used pre-clinical models and provide examples of screening and functional studies of NMF that can be translated into clinical use. PMID:19887682

  4. Effects of oral motor therapy in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sığan, Seray Nural; Uzunhan, Tuğçe Aksu; Aydınlı, Nur; Eraslan, Emine; Ekici, Barış; Çalışkan, Mine

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Oral motor dysfunction is a common issue in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Drooling, difficulties with sucking, swallowing, and chewing are some of the problems often seen. In this study, we aimed to research the effect of oral motor therapy on pediatric CP patients with feeding problems. Materials and Methods: Included in this single centered, randomized, prospective study were 81 children aged 12-42 months who had been diagnosed with CP, had oral motor dysfunction and were observed at the Pediatric Neurology outpatient clinic of the Children's Health and Diseases Department, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University. Patients were randomized into two groups: The training group and the control group. One patient from the training group dropped out of the study because of not participating regularly. Following initial evaluation of all patients by a blinded physiotherapist and pedagogue, patients in the training group participated in 1 h oral motor training sessions with a different physiotherapist once a week for 6 months. All patients kept on routine physiotherapy by their own physiotherapists. Oral motor assessment form, functional feeding assessment (FFA) subscale of the multidisciplinary feeding profile (MFP) and the Bayley scales of infant development (BSID-II) were used to evaluate oral motor function, swallowing, chewing, the gag reflex, the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex, tongue, jaw, and mouth function, severity of drooling, aspiration, choking, independent feeding and tolerated food texture during the initial examination and 6 months later. Results: When the initial and post-therapy FFA and BSID-II scores received by patients in the training and the study group were compared, the training group showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Oral motor therapy has a beneficial effect on feeding problems in children with CP. PMID:24101813

  5. Oral methotrexate therapy for chronic rheumatoid arthritis ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, L R; Espinoza, C G; Vasey, F B; Germain, B F

    1986-09-01

    Eight patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and cutaneous vasculitis ulcerations resistant to conventional therapy were treated successfully with a low-dose intermittent regimen of oral methotrexate. Objective clinical response was prompt and complete resolution was observed at about 12 weeks of therapy. The drug was well tolerated. Mild gastrointestinal side effects were the most common untoward reaction. We conclude that methotrexate therapy is an effective agent for some of the extraarticular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis including vasculitis, and further clinical evaluation should be a consideration.

  6. Efficacy of l-carnitine administration on fatigue, nutritional status, oxidative stress, and related quality of life in 12 advanced cancer patients undergoing anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gramignano, Giulia; Lusso, Maria Rita; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Elena; Serpe, Roberto; Deiana, Laura; Lamonica, Giovanna; Dessì, Mariele; Spiga, Carla; Astara, Giorgio; Macciò, Antonio; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2006-02-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional symptom that is described in terms of perceived energy, mental capacity, and psychological status: it can impair daily functioning and lead to negative effects on quality of life. It is one of the most common side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In recent studies, l-carnitine (LC) supplementation has been demonstrated to be able to improve fatigue symptoms in patients with cancer. In the present study we tested the efficacy and safety of LC supplementation in a population of patients who had advanced cancer and developed fatigue, high blood levels of reactive oxygen species, or both. As outcome measures we evaluated fatigue and quality of life in relation to oxidative stress, nutritional status, and laboratory variables, mainly levels of reactive oxygen species, glutathione peroxidase, and proinflammatory cytokines. From March to July 2004, 12 patients who had advanced tumors (50% at stage IV) at different sites were enrolled (male-to-female ratio 2:10, mean age 60 y, range 42-73). Patients were only slightly anemic (hemoglobin 10.9 g/dL) and hemoglobin levels did not change after treatment. LC was administered orally at 6 g/d for 4 wk. All patients underwent antineoplastic treatment during LC supplementation. Fatigue, as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form, decreased significantly, particularly for the General and Physical scales, and for quality of life in each subscale of quality of life in relation to oxidative stress. Nutritional variables (lean body mass and appetite) increased significantly after LC supplementation. Levels of reactive oxygen species decreased and glutathione peroxidase increased but not significantly. Proinflammatory cytokines did not change significantly. Improvement of symptoms with respect to fatigue and quality of life in relation to oxidative stress may be explained mainly by an increase in lean body mass, which may be considered the most important nutritional or

  7. [Photodrugtherapy of psoriasis with oral psoralen and black light therapy].

    PubMed

    Corrales Padilla, H

    1975-01-01

    Oral 4, 5', 8 trimethoxypsoralen (TMP) or 8-M-methoxypsoralen (8 MP) plus black light therapy of psoriasis produced disappearing of lesions in 6 out of 8 pacients treated with TMP and in 6 out of 7 treated with 8 MP. In three patients treated with the first drug, a paired comparision demonstrated that the ingestion of it, when followed of black exposure, is more effective than the exposure to conventional ultraviolet light. Parrish et al. have shown this for oral methoxalen and long wave ultraviolet light. Combined TMP or 8-MP and black light therapy inhibits epidermal DNA synthesis and this is the scientific base of its application in the therapy of psoriasis, disease in which an accelerated celular cicle and DNA synthesis has been postulated.

  8. Effects of combination of sibutramine and L-carnitine compared with sibutramine monotherapy on inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Gravina, Alessia; Mereu, Roberto; D'Angelo, Angela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of 12-month treatment with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared with sibutramine alone on body weight, glycemic control, insulin resistance, and inflammatory state in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Two hundred fifty-four patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (glycated hemoglobin [HbA(1c)] >8.0%) in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomized to take sibutramine 10 mg plus L-carnitine 2 g or sibutramine 10 mg in monotherapy. We evaluated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin, vaspin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a faster improvement of fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, lipid profile, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein compared with sibutramine alone. Furthermore, there was a better improvement of body weight, HbA(1c), fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, vaspin, and adiponectin with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared with sibutramine alone. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a better and faster improvement of all the analyzed parameters compared with sibutramine alone without giving any severe adverse effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    2004-11-22

    Although advertised on the Internet for weight loss, prevention of aging and enhancement of athletic and sexual performance, levocarnitine has only one well-established indication, and that is for treatment of carnitine deficiency. In clinical trials, the drug also seems to have had modest effects in some other conditions, particularly intermittent claudication and recovery after myocardial infarction, but more studies are needed.

  10. Carnitine and fat oxidation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Francis B; Galloway, Stuart D R

    2013-01-01

    Fat and carbohydrate are the primary fuel sources for mitochondrial ATP production in human skeletal muscle during endurance exercise. However, fat exhibits a relatively low maximal rate of oxidation in vivo, which begins to decline at around 65% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO₂max) when muscle glycogen becomes the major fuel. It is thought that if the rate of fat oxidation during endurance exercise could be augmented, then muscle glycogen depletion could be delayed and endurance improved. The purpose of the present review is to outline the role of carnitine in skeletal muscle fat oxidation and how this is influenced by the role of carnitine in muscle carbohydrate oxidation. Specifically, it will propose a novel hypothesis outlining how muscle free carnitine availability is limiting to the rate of fat oxidation. The review will also highlight recent research demonstrating that increasing the muscle carnitine pool in humans can have a significant impact upon both fat and carbohydrate metabolism during endurance exercise which is dependent upon the intensity of exercise performed. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Risk assessment for carnitine.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, John N; Shao, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential amino acid-like compound involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria during the beta-oxidation process. Carnitine has become an increasingly popular ingredient in dietary supplements, especially weight loss and some sports nutrition products. A number of clinical trials have been conducted examining the effect of carnitine supplementation on weight loss and energy balance. Regarding safety, systematic evaluation of the research designs and data do not provide a basis for risk assessment and the usual safe upper level of intake (UL) derived from it unless the newer methods described as the observed safe level (OSL) or highest observed intake (HOI) are utilized. The OSL risk assessment method indicates that the evidence of safety is strong at intakes up to 2000mg/day l-carnitine equivalents for chronic supplementation, and this level is identified as the OSL. Although much higher levels have been tested without adverse effects and may be safe, the data for intakes above 2000mg/day are not sufficient for a confident conclusion of long-term safety.

  12. Oral lichen planus: therapy and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Loré, Bruno; Saraceno, Rosita; Poladas, Giulio; Fida, Monika; Khoury, Charbel; Arcuri, Claudio; Magnato, Roberto

    2016-12-16

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous disease of chronic inflammatory nature. Although many therapeutic options are available, none are curative. The aim of this article was to describe a therapeutic algorithm that take into consideration the clinical futures of oral LP (OLP). Patients affected by symptomatic OLP were enrolled into three groups to receive cyclosporine mouthwash, retinoic acid lotion 0.05%, and autologous platelet- rich plasma (PRP) gel in the treatment of reticular, plaque-like, and erosive-type respectively. The products were applied as follows: retinoic acid BID for 8 weeks, cyclosporine mouthwash OD for 8 weeks, PRP once a week for 8 weeks. Patients were assessed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Improvement was evaluated as complete response, partial response and no response. A total of 20 Caucasian patients, 8 male and 12 female, mean age 56 years (range 40-74) concluded the study. Seven patients showed a complete response, 7 patients a partial response, and 6 patients no response. We propose a therapeutic algorithm that take into consideration the clinical features and symptoms of OLP. Long-term experience on larger series of cases are necessary to confirm our data.

  13. [Antibiotic therapy of bacterial infections of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F; Castorina, A

    1989-09-30

    More than 300 commencial bacterial species may be found in the oral cavity. Other microorganisms, such as mycoplasms, mycetes, protozoa and viruses are present as well. The virulency of the saprofites and additional contamination by outside microorganisms are factors determining the development of infectious process in the oral tissues. Moreover, streptococci and anaerobes are the most frequent aetiology agents. The antibiotic therapy should comply with the general treatment criteria, on the one hand, and should be specific for these microorganism, on the other. The penicillines (ampicillin, bacampicillin and especially amoxycillin) process pharmacokinetic properties which make them a favorable choice for treatment. These drugs are effective in case of streptococcal infections, with cariogenic processes involvement and dissemination (endocarditis, glomerulonephritis). Other, frequently used drugs are spiramycin, erythromycin, josamycin and myocamycin that are selectively taken up by the oral tissues and present in large quantities in the saliva. The macrolides have a large spectrum of action on microorganisms normally found in the oral cavity. Lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) are active on anaerobes and are drugs of choice for treatment of staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Tetracycline therapy is restricted usually to parodontite cases caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. In conclusion, the choice of antibacterial therapy should be based on the bacterial aetiology, as well as on the intrinsic drug characteristics (pharmacokinetic, side effects, toxicity etc.).

  14. Role of carnitine in disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential nutrient that plays a vital role in energy production and fatty acid metabolism. Vegetarians possess a greater bioavailability than meat eaters. Distinct deficiencies arise either from genetic mutation of carnitine transporters or in association with other disorders such as liver or kidney disease. Carnitine deficiency occurs in aberrations of carnitine regulation in disorders such as diabetes, sepsis, cardiomyopathy, malnutrition, cirrhosis, endocrine disorders and with aging. Nutritional supplementation of L-carnitine, the biologically active form of carnitine, is ameliorative for uremic patients, and can improve nerve conduction, neuropathic pain and immune function in diabetes patients while it is life-saving for patients suffering primary carnitine deficiency. Clinical application of carnitine holds much promise in a range of neural disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, hepatic encephalopathy and other painful neuropathies. Topical application in dry eye offers osmoprotection and modulates immune and inflammatory responses. Carnitine has been recognized as a nutritional supplement in cardiovascular disease and there is increasing evidence that carnitine supplementation may be beneficial in treating obesity, improving glucose intolerance and total energy expenditure. PMID:20398344

  15. Supplemental oxygen therapy: Important considerations in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Gupta, Pranav; Khatana, Shruti; Bhagol, Amrish

    2011-01-01

    The administration of supplemental oxygen is an essential element of appropriate management for a wide range of clinical conditions; crossing different medical and surgical specialities. The present review summarizes the role of supportive oxygen therapy in various clinical conditions encountered in our day-to-day practice in the speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery; including major trauma, shock, sepsis; perioperative and postoperative considerations and in patients with various other medical comorbidities. Regular and judicious use of oxygen as a drug is thus recommended in our day-to-day practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery to reduce the morbidity and improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:22442602

  16. Targeted therapy of oral hairy leukoplakia with gentian violet.

    PubMed

    Bhandarkar, Sulochana S; MacKelfresh, Jamie; Fried, Levi; Arbiser, Jack L

    2008-04-01

    Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a common oral manifestation of HIV infection. Clinically, these lesions appear as white plaques on the edges of the tongue. Pathophysiologically, these lesions occur because of infection of oral epithelium with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). No universally effective therapy exists for OHL. We have previously shown that EBV infection and EBV viral products induce the generation of reactive oxygen. We have also demonstrated that the Food and Drug Administration-approved over-the-counter medication gentian violet is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen species. We thus chose to treat a patient with biopsy-proven OHL with topical gentian violet. Gentian violet solution was applied topically to the tongue of a patient with OHL. Complete clinical resolution was noted after three treatments. Treatment with topical gentian violet resulted in resolution of the lesions. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are required. The application of gentian violet can be used as a method to OHL treatment. Gentian violet is an inexpensive and safe therapy and, given that it inhibits reactive oxygen, this old therapy is now a targeted novel therapy.

  17. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  18. Carnitine metabolism in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Coker, Mahmut; Coker, Canan; Darcan, Sükran; Can, Sule; Orbak, Zerrin; Gökşen, Damla

    2002-06-01

    In diabetes mellitus (DM), increased fatty acids have negative effects on pancreatic beta-cell functions, in addition to enhanced mitochondrial transportation of fatty acids related to decreased insulin levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate lipid metabolism in children with DM by measuring plasma fatty acids and carnitine fractions to reveal relationships between carnitine status and increased fatty acid oxidation. Increased plasma fatty acids (except for arachidonic acid, there were no significant differences in the ratio of each specific fatty acid to total fatty acids), lipoprotein (a), acyl carnitine levels and urinary total and free acyl carnitine excretion, and decreased plasma free carnitine levels, were found in children with DM. There were no correlations between the duration of DM or HbA1c and study parameters. It is recommended that plasma free carnitine determinations should be made even if the patient has good metabolic control.

  19. The Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Administration on Persons with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    2006-01-01

    Since previous investigations reported improvements in cognition of patients with dementia after acetyl-L-carnitine therapy and since there is an increased risk for persons with Down syndrome to develop Alzheimer disease, this study was designed to investigate the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine administration on neurological, intellectual, and…

  20. The Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Administration on Persons with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    2006-01-01

    Since previous investigations reported improvements in cognition of patients with dementia after acetyl-L-carnitine therapy and since there is an increased risk for persons with Down syndrome to develop Alzheimer disease, this study was designed to investigate the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine administration on neurological, intellectual, and…

  1. Cholera, diarrhea, and oral rehydration therapy: triumph and indictment.

    PubMed

    Guerrant, Richard L; Carneiro-Filho, Benedito A; Dillingham, Rebecca A

    2003-08-01

    Cholera drove the sanitary revolution in the industrialized world in the 19th century and now is driving the development of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the developing world. Despite the long history of cholera, only in the 1960s and 1970s was ORT fully developed. Scientists described this treatment after the discovery of the intact sodium-glucose intestinal cotransport in patients with cholera. This new understanding sparked clinical studies that revealed the ability of ORT to reduce the mortality associated with acute diarrheal disease. Despite the steady reductions in mortality due to acute dehydrating diarrheal diseases achieved by ORT, the costly morbidity due to these diseases remains, the result of a failure to globalize sanitation and to control the developmental impact of diarrheal diseases and their associated malnutrition. New advances in oral rehydration and nutrition therapy and new methods to recognize its costs are discussed in this review.

  2. Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Weibert, R T

    1992-10-01

    The literature on dental surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is reviewed, and methods of managing anticoagulant therapy to minimize the risk of complications are discussed. Although blood loss during and after oral surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drugs can be substantial, research indicates that most bleeding incidents are not serious and can be controlled by local measures. Studies of 241 anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing more than 500 dental extractions during the 1950s and 1960s showed that only 9 had postoperative bleeding. More recent studies indicate that continued anticoagulation can increase the frequency of prolonged bleeding and delay wound healing. An antifibrinolytic mouthwash containing tranexamic acid can effectively suppress postoperative bleeding. Gelatin sponges, oxidized cellulose, and microcrystalline collagen are other useful hemostatic agents. A reduction in the intensity of anticoagulation therapy has been recommended; the prothrombin time should be measured shortly before the procedure in such patients. In many patients the duration of subtherapeutic anticoagulation must be minimized to reduce the possibility of thromboembolism. An option for high-risk patients is to switch them to heparin. Each patient must be evaluated individually, and the level of risk of the dental procedure and the risk of thromboembolism should be taken into account. In patients taking oral anticoagulants who must undergo dental surgery, careful control of the intensity of anticoagulation and improved methods of local hemostasis can minimize the risk of hemorrhagic complications and thromboembolism.

  3. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  4. Anti-adipogenic and antiviral effects of l-carnitine on hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tsukuda, Yoko; Suda, Goki; Tsunematsu, Seiji; Ito, Jun; Sato, Fumiyuki; Terashita, Katsumi; Nakai, Masato; Sho, Takuya; Maehara, Osamu; Shimazaki, Tomoe; Kimura, Megumi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ogawa, Koji; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Chuma, Makoto; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been reported to hijack fatty acid metabolism in infected hepatocytes, taking advantage of lipid droplets for virus assembly. In this study, we analyzed the anti-HCV activity of l-carnitine, a substance involved in the transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. JFH-1 or HCV replicon-transfected Huh7.5.1 cells were treated with or without l-carnitine to examine its anti-HCV effects. The effects of l-carnitine on HCV entry, HCV-induced adipogenesis and lipid droplet formation, and HCV-induced oxidative stress were examined. Treatment of JFH-1-infected cells with l-carnitine inhibited HCV propagation in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, l-carnitine had no anti-HCV activity in the HCV replicon system, which is lacking viral assembly. In addition, l-carnitine did not affect HCV entry. However, l-carnitine treatment decreased intracellular lipid droplets, which are crucial for HCV assembly in JFH-1-infected cells. The expression level of CPT-1 was decreased in JFH-1-infected cells, and l-carnitine treatment restored this expression. HCV-infected cells exhibited increased production of reactive oxygen species and glutathione oxidation. l-carnitine decreased oxidative stress induced by JFH-1-infection, as shown by glutathione/glutathione disulfide assays and MitoSOX staining. l-carnitine exhibited anti-HCV activity, possibly by inhibiting HCV assembly and through its anti-adipogenic activity in HCV-infected cells. Moreover, l-carnitine has antioxidant properties in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Overall, these results indicated that l-carnitine may be an effective adjunctive agent in antiviral therapies to treat chronic hepatitis C. J. Med. Virol. 89:857-866, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [A cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in a child: primary carnitine deficiency].

    PubMed

    Baragou, S; Pio, M; Di Bernardo, S; Ksontini, T Boulos; Dommange, S Jiekak; Bonafe, L; Meijboom, E; Sekarski, N

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this case report was to show the importance to research metabolic etiology, especially a carnitine deficiency in dilated cardiomyopathy of children. A three years old Togolese child presented muscular hypotonia, dyspnea. Examination showed left galop murmur and systolic murmur 2/6. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly (CTI: 0.66), electrocardiogram, a sinusal rythm, left ventricle hypertrophy and T wave abnormalities. Echocardiogram showed a markedly dilated left ventricle with reduced systolic function (EF: 0.43; reference range 0.55-0.80) and moderate mitral regurgitation. The inflammatory signs where negatives. Magnetic resonance imaging don't show signs of ischemic or myocarditis. The levels of free and total plasmatic carnitine decreased: 3μmol/L (N: 18-48μmol/L) and 5μmol/l (N: 29-70μmol/L) respectively. Mutation analysis of the gene SLC22A5 confirms the diagnosis of primary systemic carnitine deficiency. Treatment with oral carnitine was started at 200mg/kg per day. Within three weeks of treatment, we observed the decrease of all symptoms and the left ventricular size and function normalized (EF: 0.62). He has now been on oral carnitine for live. Primary carnitine deficiency is a cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in child. It must systematically be suspected when a child presents a primitive cardiomyopathy. The treatment with oral carnitine for live is simple, with excellent prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, Gérald E.; Humbert, Philippe; Berardesca, Enzo; Gaspard, Ulysse; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral) and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin. PMID:24455744

  7. Oral iron therapy and chronic idiopathic urticaria: sideropenic urticaria?

    PubMed

    Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio; Cannavò, Serafinella Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is frequent, remains often idiopathic despite diagnostic efforts, and sometimes poorly responds to oral antihistamines and/or corticosteroids. We noticed that hyposideremia is often found in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria poorly responsive to usual treatments (prCIU), and oral iron therapy is frequently associated to improvement or resolution of urticaria. Between 2003 and 2012, we observed 122 patients with prCIU, of which 81 had moderate hyposideremia at our first visit. They continued the antihistamines already practiced and received oral iron therapy for 30 or 45 days. Two months after our first visit, all had normal serum iron levels; 64 reported complete remission of urticaria and 17 reported improvement superior to 80%. No adverse reactions to treatment were observed. Follow-up visits confirmed stability of results over 6 months. Our preliminary data show that hyposideremia is the only abnormality in many patients with prCIU, and restoration of normal iron serum levels is associated to remission or remarkable clinical improvement of urticaria. In consideration of low cost and potential benefits for some patients, determination of serum levels of iron could be introduced in the diagnostic workup of chronic urticaria, maybe as a second-level exam in patients without other relevant clinical or laboratory abnormalities.

  8. Relative Carnitine Deficiency in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipek, Pauline A.; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T.; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J. Jay

    2004-01-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine ([rho] less than 0.001), and pyruvate ([rho]=0.006) were significantly reduced…

  9. Relative Carnitine Deficiency in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipek, Pauline A.; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T.; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J. Jay

    2004-01-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine ([rho] less than 0.001), and pyruvate ([rho]=0.006) were significantly reduced…

  10. Nonsurgical Management of Oral Mucocele by Intralesional Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rupam; Sarkar, Soumyabrata; Kabiraj, Arpita; Maji, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral mucocele is a common lesion resulting from an alteration of minor salivary glands due to mucus accumulation. Rapid appearance, specific location, history of trauma, bluish colour, and consistency help in the diagnosis. Conventional surgical removal is the treatment of choice but has several disadvantages like damage to adjacent ducts with further development of satellite lesions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of intralesional corticosteroid injection (betamethasone) as a nonsurgical treatment procedure in oral mucoceles. Material and Method. A total of 20 cases (males and females, 10–30 years of age) with clinically diagnosed oral mucoceles were given 1 mL of betamethasone intralesionally. All the patients were examined after a period of 7, 14, and 21 days to evaluate the response of the lesion towards treatment and consequently given the 2nd, 3rd, 4th injections. If the lesion resolved after one or two injections, the treatment was discontinued. Results. Out of the 20 cases, 18 of them showed complete regression of the lesion whereas the remaining 2 cases showed decrease in size. All the patients received maximum of 4 consecutive shots in weekly interval. Conclusion. Intralesional corticosteroid therapy can be considered as the first choice in the treatment of oral mucoceles. PMID:27822227

  11. Dosage and formulation issues: oral vitamin E therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Westergren, Tone; Kalikstad, Betty

    2010-02-01

    Oral vitamin E is used in several childhood diseases, but dosage recommendations differ. Few oral products have a marketing authorization for therapeutic use in children. Preliminary data indicate differences in bioavailability among the various vitamin E compounds. Our objective was to review published data on oral vitamin E therapy in neonates and children in order to establish dosage recommendations at a local level. A literature search was conducted, including Medline Ovid, EMBASE (1980-Feb 2008), Cochrane databases, product monographs, handbooks, and textbooks. The main vitamin E compounds being used in children are alpha-tocopherol, alpha-tocopheryl acetate, and tocofersolan. The most data are available on tocopheryl acetate, both in neonates and older children. In children with malabsorption disorders, tocofersolan appears to have an increased bioavailability compared to tocopherol or tocopheryl acetate. Published data on pharmacokinetics and dosages for clinical use are few and heterogeneous. No pharmacokinetic studies were found for tocofersolan in neonates and infants. There are few comparative studies on pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children. Dosages used in clinical studies and dosage recommendations in handbooks differ considerably. The differences in dosing recommendations in children may be due to lack of systematic studies. Existing published data on oral vitamin E do not provide a basis for evaluation of dosage recommendations in children. Comparative clinical studies are required for scientific evaluation of pharmacokinetics, dosage regimens, and efficacy/ADR assessments in children.

  12. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  13. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  14. New oral anticoagulants and dual antiplatelet therapy: Focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-12-15

    The combination of AF and coronary artery disease not only is a common clinical setting, it is also a complex setting to deal with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, and it is associated with significantly higher mortality rates. Unfortunately, there are no sufficient data available to optimally guide clinical practice in such settings. This review focuses specifically on newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) associated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There are no randomized studies comparing vitamin K antagonists and NOACs in patients with AF undergoing PCI either for acute coronary syndromes or for stable patients, i.e. those patients who have an indication to receive DAPT. Moreover, new antiplatelet agents such as ticagrelor and prasugrel have entered the market for acute coronary syndromes. So far, there are no large-scale randomized studies published evaluating these newer antiplatelet agents in patients with AF receiving either vitamin K antagonists or NOACs, adding to the uncertainty on how to use these antithrombotics in combination when both coronary artery disease (unstable or stable patients) and AF converge in a given patient. The lack of large outcome trials and the large number of possible combinations are reflected in the wide variety of practices in the real world. To date, given the lack of data, watchfulness when using NOACs as component of DAPT or triple oral antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  15. Oral Rehydration Therapy for Preoperative Fluid and Electrolyte Management

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hideki; Sasaki, Toshio; Fujita, Hisae

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Preoperative fluid and electrolyte management is usually performed by intravenous therapy. We investigated the safety and effectiveness of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for preoperative fluid and electrolyte management of surgical patients. Methods: The study consisted of two studies, designed as a prospective observational study. In a pilot study, 20 surgical patients consumed 1000 mL of an oral rehydration solution (ORS) until 2 h before induction of general anesthesia. Parameters such as serum electrolyte concentrations, fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) as an index of renal blood flow, volume of esophageal-pharyngeal fluid and gastric fluid (EPGF), and patient satisfaction with ORT were assessed. In a follow-up study to assess the safety of ORT, 1078 surgical patients, who consumed ORS until 2 h before induction of general anesthesia, were assessed. Results: In the pilot study, water, electrolytes, and carbohydrate were effectively and safely supplied by ORT. The FENa value was increased at 2 h following ORT. The volume of EPGF collected following the induction of anesthesia was 5.3±5.6 mL. In the follow-up study, a small amount of vomiting occurred in one patient, and no aspiration occurred in the patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that ORT is a safe and effective therapy for the preoperative fluid and electrolyte management of selected surgical patients. PMID:21897763

  16. Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer in the DMH-chemical carcinogenesis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Mori, Federica; Di Napoli, Arianna; Mancini, Rita; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Virmani, Ashraf; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Dietary agents are receiving much attention for the chemoprevention of cancer. While curcumin is known to influence several pathways and affect tumor growth in vivo, carnitin and its congeners play a variety of important metabolic functions: are involved in the oxydation of long-chain fatty acids, regulate acyl-CoA levels and influence protein activity and stability by modifying the extent of protein acetylation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of carnitines in the prevention of cancer development using the 1,2,-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis model. We also assessed whether their combination was able to give rise to increased protection from cancer development. Mice treated with DMH were dosed orally with curcumin and/or carnitine and acylcarnitines for 20 weeks. At the end of the treatment colon samples were collected, and scored for multiple ACF and adenomas. We observed that carnitine and acyl-carnitines had same, if not higher, efficacy than curcumin alone in inhibiting the formation of neoplastic lesions induced by DMH treatment. Interestingly, the combination of curcumin and acetyl-L-carnitine was able to fully inhibit the development of advanced adenoma lesions. Our data unveil the antitumor effects of carnitines and warrant additional studies to further support the adoption of carnitines as cancer chemopreventative agents.

  17. Cardio-protective effects of carnitine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Malone, John I; Cuthbertson, David D; Malone, Michael A; Schocken, Douglas D

    2006-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin-induced diabetes (STZ-D) in rats has been associated with carnitine deficiency, bradycardia and left ventricular enlargement. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine whether oral carnitine supplementation would normalize carnitine levels and cardiac function in STZ-D rats. Methods Wistar rats (48) were made hyperglycemic by STZ at 26 weeks of age. Same age normal Wistar rats (24) were used for comparison. Echocardiograms were performed at baseline 2, 6, 10, and 18 weeks after STZ administration in all animals. HbA1c, serum carnitine and free fatty acids (FFA) were measured at the same times. Since STZ-D rats become carnitine deficient, 15 STZ-D rats received supplemental oral carnitine for 16 weeks. Results The heart rates for the STZ-D rats (290 ± 19 bpm) were less than control rats (324 ± 20 bpm) (p < 0.05). After 4 weeks of oral carnitine supplementation, the serum carnitine and heart rates of the STZ-D rats returned to normal. Dobutamine stress increased the heart rates of all study animals, but the increase in STZ-D rats (141 ± 8 bpm) was greater than controls (79 ± 8 bpm) (p < 0.05). The heart rates of STZ-D rats given oral carnitine, however, were no different than controls (94 ± 9 bpm). The left ventricular mass/body weight ratio (LVM/BW) in the diabetic animals (2.7 ± 0.5) was greater than control animals (2.2 ± 0.3) (p < 0.05) after 18 weeks of diabetes. In contrast, the LVM/BW (2.3 ± .2) of the STZ-D animals receiving supplemental carnitine was the same as the control animals at 18 weeks. Conclusion Thus, supplemental oral carnitine in STZ-D rats normalized serum carnitine, heart rate regulation and left ventricular size. These findings suggest a metabolic mechanism for the cardiac dysfunction noted in this diabetic animal model. PMID:16423284

  18. Dental phobia is no contraindication for oral implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Enkling, Norbert; Hardt, Katharina; Katsoulis, Joannis; Ramseier, Christoph A; Colombo, Alessandra; Jöhren, Peter; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2013-04-01

    Dental phobia is a psychological disease and a possible contraindication for implant therapy. The study aimed to show that implant therapy in dental-phobic patients (DP, test group) after adequate psychological and dental pretreatment (PDPT) is successfully possible and results in a similar implant prognosis as in nonfearful patients (NF, control group). 15 DP with PDPT and 15 NF were treated with dental implants and were re-evaluated 2 to 4 years after denture-mounting regarding: alteration of dental anxiety (Hierarchical Anxiety Questionnaire [HAQ], Visual Analog Scale [VAS]), patient satisfaction and compliance, implant success, and peri-implant health. Statistical tests of non-inferiority DP versus NF were performed with Hodges-Lehmann estimators and respective one-sided 97.5% confidence intervals of Moses, and pairwise testings with Mann-Whitney test. The DP test group rated its anxiety significantly lower at follow- up than at baseline (PHAQ < .001). However, at follow-up, anxiety was still higher in DP than in NF (PHAQ = .046; PVAS < .001). Implant success at follow-up was 100%. Oral health was equally good in DP and NF patients. At follow-up, all patients were satisfied with implant therapy, but compliance was better for NF (100%) than for DP (73% dental checkup; 67% dental hygienist). Implant therapy can be successfully performed in DP patients with PDPT as phobia is not negatively influenced by the invasive implant therapy. However, motivation for professional maintenance programs remains challenging.

  19. Review on development and community implementation of oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P G; Mondal, S K; Ghosh, S; Gupta, D N; Sikder, S N; Sircar, B K

    1994-01-01

    The review of the current status and implementation of Oral Rehydration Therapy at the community level have been presented in this communication with special emphasis on its development, ORS access rate, ORS use rate and home available fluids. The global ORS supply has gone up an increased eleven folds since 1981. Similarly the ORS access rate has also increase from 46% to 68% in 1991. However, the global ORS use rate was low (21%). The major constraints during ORT implementation which have been reported by several scientists are also discussed.

  20. Enzymology of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Strijbis, Karin; Vaz, Frédéric M; Distel, Ben

    2010-05-01

    The water-soluble zwitterion carnitine is an essential metabolite in eukaryotes required for fatty acid oxidation as it functions as a carrier during transfer of activated acyl and acetyl groups across intracellular membranes. Most eukaryotes are able to synthesize carnitine endogenously, besides their capacity to take up carnitine from the diet or extracellular medium through plasma membrane transporters. This review discusses the current knowledge on carnitine homeostasis with special emphasis on the enzymology of the four steps of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

  1. Carnitine in the treatment of valproic acid-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Philippe E R; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    clinical benefit in terms of liver protection or hastening of recovery from unconsciousness has not been established clearly. Prophylactic carnitine supplementation is also advocated during VPA therapy in high-risk pediatric patients. Further controlled, randomized, and probably multicenter trials are required to better delineate the therapeutic and prophylactic roles of l-carnitine and the optimal regimen of administration in the management of VPA toxicity.

  2. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. L-carnitine supplementation in patients with advanced cancer and carnitine deficiency: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Ricardo A; Dvorkin, Ella; Homel, Peter; Culliney, Bruce; Malamud, Stephen; Lapin, Jeanne; Portenoy, Russell K; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2009-04-01

    Carnitine deficiency is prevalent in populations with chronic illness, including cancer. In a recent open-label study, L-carnitine supplementation was well tolerated and appeared to improve fatigue and other outcomes in cancer patients. To further evaluate this finding, adult patients with advanced cancer, carnitine deficiency (free carnitine more than 35 micromol/L for males or less than 25 micromol/L for females, or acyl/free carnitine ratio of more than 0.4), moderate to severe fatigue, and a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of 50 or more, were randomly assigned to receive either L-carnitine (0.5 g/day for two days, followed by 1g/day for two days, and then 2g/day for 10 days) or placebo. This double-blind phase was followed by an open-label phase, during which all patients received L-carnitine supplementation for two weeks. Outcomes included the fatigue subscale of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An), the Linear Analog Scale Assessments (LASA), the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), and the KPS. Twenty-nine patients (12 placebo, 17 L-carnitine) were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis. From baseline to the end of the double-blind phase, serum total and free L-carnitine increased from 32.9+/-3.8 to 56.6+/-20.5 (P=0.004), and from 22.9+/-19.4 to 45.3+/-17.2 (P=0.004), respectively, in the L-carnitine-treated group, and from 28.2+/-10.2 to 36.2+/-8.7 (P=ns), and from 22.6+/-7.9 to 28.7+/-8.6 (P=ns) in the placebo group, respectively. The planned ITT analysis revealed no significant improvement in any of the study's endpoints, and these negative findings were not different when data from two patients who did not adhere to the protocol were eliminated. However, an exploratory covariate analysis that excluded these two protocol violators and included outcome data from both the double-blind and open-label phases demonstrated significantly improved fatigue on the FACT-An fatigue subscale (P<0.03), and significantly improved FACT

  4. Application of Stem Cells in Oral Disease Therapy: Progresses and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Yi; Zhou, Niu; Ouyang, Hong; Ding, Junjun; Cheng, Bin; Sun, Jianbo

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated and pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells with a more specific function. Stem cell therapies become preferred methods for the treatment of multiple diseases. Oral and maxillofacial defect is one kind of the diseases that could be most possibly cured by stem cell therapies. Here we discussed oral diseases, oral adult stem cells, iPS cells, and the progresses/challenges/perspectives of application of stem cells for oral disease treatment. PMID:28421002

  5. L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine improve endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats: different participation of NO and COX-products.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Rosario; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Perez-Guerrero, Concepción; Gomez-Amores, Lucia; Vazquez, Carmen M; Herrera, M Dolores

    2005-09-09

    L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine are supplements to therapy in cardiovascular pathologies. Their effect on endothelial dysfunction in hypertension was studied after treatment with either 200 mg/kg of L-carnitine or propionyl-L-carnitine during 8 weeks of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Endothelial function was assessed in aortic rings by carbachol-induced relaxation (CCh 10(-8) to 10(-4) M) and factors involved were characterized in the presence of the inhibitors: L-NAME, indomethacin, the TXA2/PGH2 Tp receptor antagonist ICI-192,605 and the thromboxane synthetase inhibitor-Tp receptor antagonist, Ro-68,070. The effect on phenylephrine-induced contractions was also observed. To identify the nature of vasoactive COX-derived products, enzyme-immunoassay of incubation media was assessed. Involvement of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by incubating with superoxide dismutase and catalase. Nitric oxide production was evaluated by serum concentration of NO2+NO3.Treatment with both compounds improved endothelial function of rings from SHR without blood pressure change. Propionyl-L-carnitine increased NO participation in WKY and SHR. L-carnitine reduced endothelium-dependent responses to CCh in WKY due to an increase of TXA2 production. In both SHR and WKY, L-carnitine enhanced concentration of PGI2 and increased participation of NO. Results in the presence of SOD plus catalase show that it might be related to antioxidant properties of L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine. Comparison between the effect of both compounds shows that both may reduce reactive oxygen species and increase NO participation in endothelium-dependent relaxations in SHR. However, only L-carnitine was able to increase the release of the vasodilator PGI2 and even enhanced TXA2 production in normotensive rats.

  6. Inhibition of Gene Expression of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter and Antioxidant Enzymes in Oxazaphosphorines-Induced Acute Cardiomyopathic Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that high therapeutic doses of oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO), are associated with cardiomyopathy. This study investigated whether oxazaphosphorines alter the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and antioxidant genes and if so, whether these alterations contribute to CP and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups namely, control, L carnitine, CP, IFO, CP plus L carnitine and IFO plus L carnitine. In cardiac and kidney tissues, CP and IFO significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2. Oxazaphosphorines significantly increased serum acyl-carnitine/free carnitine ratio and urinary carnitine excretion and significantly decreased total carnitine in cardiac tissues. Interestingly, carnitine supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression changes-induced by oxazaphosphorines to the control values, except OCTN2 expression remained inhibited by IFO. Data from this study suggest that: (1) Oxazaphosphorines decreased myocardial carnitine content following the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in cardiac tissues. (2) Oxazaphosphorine therapy increased urinary loss of carnitine secondary to the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in proximal tubules of the kidney. (3) Carnitine supplementation attenuates CP but not IFO-induced inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in heart and kidney tissues. PMID:22701146

  7. Bridging of oral anticoagulation therapy for invasive procedures.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2005-09-01

    The management of patients who need temporary interruption of chronic oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy for an elective surgical or invasive procedure is problematic and complex. Patient and procedural risk factors for thrombosis and bleeding, anticoagulant-related risks of bleeding, and clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event need to be assessed and properly risk-stratified in the perioperative period. Certain procedures, such as dental, endoscopic, and cutaneous procedures, can be completed without discontinuing OAC, but most procedures with a high bleeding risk (including major surgeries) will necessitate temporary discontinuation of OAC. Bridging therapy with shorter-acting anticoagulants, such as heparin, for patients at intermediate to high risk of thromboembolism represents one strategy to maintain functional anticoagulation during this period. Large, prospective cohort studies and registries of patients on chronic OAC who underwent bridging therapy mostly with low-molecular-weight heparin have been completed recently. This paper reviews these clinical data on bridging therapy and provides an evidence-based perioperative management strategy for the at-risk patient on chronic OAC.

  8. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  9. The reduction of heat production in exercising pigeons after L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Janssens, G P; Buyse, J; Seynaeve, M; Decuypere, E; De Wilde, R

    1998-04-01

    Four groups (CS,CR,PS,PR) of nine trained male racing pigeons were deprived of feed for 1 d and then subjected to a respiration chamber test in order to study the effect of oral 1-carnitine supplementation on the energy metabolism during flight. One week before, groups CS and CR were orally supplemented with 90 mg of 1-carnitine daily, whereas PS and PR were given a placebo. Groups CS and PS underwent flight simulation by electrostimulation of the breast muscles. Flight simulation increased heat production, kept respiratory quotient from decreasing, decreased thyroxine levels, and increased weight loss. L-Carnitine decreased the rise in heat production during electrostimulation but did not influence respiratory quotient, weight loss, or thyroid hormones. L-Carnitine supplementation in pigeons improves fatty acid combustion efficiency during heavy exercise.

  10. Plasma L-carnitine levels of obese and non-obese polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Celik, Fatih; Kose, Mesut; Yilmazer, Mehmet; Köken, Gülengül N; Arioz, Dagistan Tolga; Kanat Pektas, Mine

    2017-01-31

    It is well-known that plasma L-carnitine concentrations are significantly decreased in obese individuals. A study showed that L-carnitine concentrations are significantly lower in lean PCOS patients than in lean healthy women. Thus, it has been suggested that lowered L-carnitine is associated with PCOS. This study also showed that the women with PCOS had significantly lower L-carnitine levels than those of the healthy controls. In addition, this study hypothesised that low L-carnitine levels in PCOS patients were associated with obesity and/or insulin resistance. Moreover, plasma L-carnitine concentrations were found to be statistically similar in PCOS patients and healthy controls, when controlled for obesity. This study implied that L-carnitine could be used as an adjunctive therapy in the management of insulin resistance or obesity in women who have PCOS. Further research might be planned to clarify the clinical effects of L-carnitine administration in PCOS patients with insulin resistance and/or obesity.

  11. Effect of L-carnitine Supplementation on Nutritional Status and Physical Performance Under Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Singh, Som Nath

    2015-04-01

    L-carnitine is popular as a potential ergogenic aid because of its role in the conversion of fat into energy. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of short term supplementation of L-carnitine on metabolic markers and physical efficiency tests under short term calorie restriction. Male albino rats were divided into four groups (n = 12 in each)-control, calorie restricted (CR for 5 days, 25 % of basal food intake), L-carnitine supplemented (CAR, given orally for 5 days at a dose of 100 mg/kg), CR with L-carnitine supplementation (CR + CAR). Food intake and body weight of the rats were measured along with biochemical variables like blood glucose, tissue glycogen, plasma and muscle protein and enzymatic activities of CPT-1 (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1) and AMP kinase. Results demonstrated that L-carnitine caused marked increase in muscle glycogen, plasma protein, CPT-1 activity and swim time of rats (P < 0.05) on short term supplementation. In addition to the substantive effects caused by CR alone, L-carnitine under CR significantly affected muscle glycogen, plasma protein, CPT-1 activity and AMP kinase (P < 0.05). Short term CR along with L-carnitine also resulted in increased swim time of rats than control, CR and L-carnitine treated rats (P < 0.05). The present study was an attempt towards developing an approach for better adherence to dietary restriction regimen, with the use of L-carnitine.

  12. The plasma carnitine concentration regulates renal OCTN2 expression and carnitine transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Regula; Todesco, Liliane; Novakova, Katarina; Mevissen, Meike; Stieger, Bruno; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2010-06-10

    Previous findings in rats and in human vegetarians suggest that the plasma carnitine concentration and/or carnitine ingestion may influence the renal reabsorption of carnitine. We tested this hypothesis in rats with secondary carnitine deficiency following treatment with N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP) for 2 weeks and rats treated with excess L-carnitine for 2 weeks. Compared to untreated control rats, treatment with THP was associated with an approximately 70% decrease in plasma carnitine and with a 74% decrease in the skeletal muscle carnitine content. In contrast, treatment with L-carnitine increased plasma carnitine levels by 80% and the skeletal muscle carnitine content by 50%. Treatment with L-carnitine affected neither the activity of carnitine transport into isolated renal brush border membrane vesicles, nor renal mRNA expression of the carnitine transporter OCTN2. In contrast, in carnitine deficient rats, carnitine transport into isolated brush border membrane vesicles was increased 1.9-fold compared to untreated control rats. Similarly, renal mRNA expression of OCTN2 increased by a factor of 1.7 in carnitine deficient rats, whereas OCTN2 mRNA expression remained unchanged in gut, liver or skeletal muscle. Our study supports the hypothesis that a decrease in the carnitine plasma and/or glomerular filtrate concentration increases renal expression and activity of OCTN2.

  13. Oral anatomy laboratory examinations in a physical therapy program.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days. During the time that a tagged examination is being created, student productivity may be reduced as the anatomy laboratory is inaccessible to students. Further, the type of questions that can be asked in a tagged laboratory examination may limit student assessment to lower level cognitive abilities and may limit the instructors' ability to assess the students' understanding of anatomical and clinical concepts. Anatomy is a foundational science in the Physical Therapy curriculum and a thorough understanding of anatomy is necessary to progress through the subsequent clinical courses. Physical therapy curricula have evolved to reflect the changing role of physical therapists to primary caregivers by introducing a greater scope of clinical courses earlier in the curriculum. Physical therapy students must have a thorough understanding of clinical anatomy early in the education process. However, traditional anatomy examination methods may not be reflective of the clinical thought processes required of physical therapy students. Traditional laboratory examination methods also reduce student productivity by limiting access during examination set-up and breakdown. To provide a greater complexity of questions and reduced overall laboratory time required for examinations, the Physical Therapy Program at Mercer University has introduced oral laboratory examinations for the gross anatomy course series. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Relative carnitine deficiency in autism.

    PubMed

    Filipek, Pauline A; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J Jay

    2004-12-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine (p < 0.001), and pyruvate (p = 0.006) were significantly reduced while ammonia and alanine levels were considerably elevated (p < 0.001) in our autistic subjects. The relative carnitine deficiency in these patients, accompanied by slight elevations in lactate and significant elevations in alanine and ammonia levels, is suggestive of mild mitochondrial dysfunction. It is hypothesized that a mitochondrial defect may be the origin of the carnitine deficiency in these autistic children.

  15. The adverse effects of long-term l-carnitine supplementation on liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, D-M; Wang, M-X; Fan, C-Y; Zhou, F; Wang, S-J; Kong, L-D

    2015-11-01

    Levo-Carnitine (l-carnitine) is widely used in health and food. This study was to focus on the adverse effects of 8-week oral supplementation of l-carnitine (0.3 and 0.6 g/kg) in female and male Sprague Dawley rats. l-carnitine reduced body and fat weights, as well as serum, liver, and kidney lipid levels in rats. Simultaneously, hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation and lipid synthesis were disturbed in l-carnitine-fed rats. Moreover, l-carnitine accelerated reactive oxygen species production in serum and liver, thereby triggering hepatic NOD-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation to elevate serum interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 levels in rats. Alteration of serum alkaline phosphatase levels further confirmed liver dysfunction in l-carnitine-fed rats. Additionally, l-carnitine may potentially disturb kidney function by altering renal protein levels of rat organic ion transporters. These observations may provide the caution information for the safety of long-term l-carnitine supplementation.

  16. Carnitine status of pregnant women: effect of carnitine supplementation and correlation between iron status and plasma carnitine concentration.

    PubMed

    Keller, U; van der Wal, C; Seliger, G; Scheler, C; Röpke, F; Eder, K

    2009-09-01

    It has been shown that plasma carnitine concentrations markedly decline during gestation in women. The reason for this, however, is unknown. One objective of this study was to investigate the effect of carnitine supplementation on plasma carnitine concentrations in pregnant women. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced plasma carnitine concentrations during gestation are caused by a reduced carnitine synthesis because of a diminished iron status. Healthy pregnant women (n=26) were randomly assigned in two groups receiving either a L-carnitine supplement (500 mg L-carnitine per day as L-carnitine L-tartrate) (n=13) or placebo (n=13) from the 13th week of gestation to term. In the control group, there was a marked reduction of plasma carnitine concentration from the 12th week of gestation to term. This reduction was prevented by the supplementation of carnitine. In the control group, there was a positive relationship between the parameters of iron status (mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and ferritin) and plasma concentration of carnitine (P<0.05). Moreover, there were inverse correlations between the concentrations of ferritin and the carnitine precursor gamma-butyrobetaine in plasma, and between gamma-butyrobetaine and carnitine in plasma (P<0.05). This study confirms that plasma carnitine concentrations decline in the course of pregnancy, an effect that can be prevented by the supplementation of carnitine. Data of this study, moreover, suggest that the decline of plasma carnitine concentration during pregnancy could be caused by a reduced rate of carnitine biosynthesis, possibly because of an inadequate iron status.

  17. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Engel, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine was administered intravenously to six normal subjects, one patient with primary muscle carnitine deficiency (MCD), and four patients with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD). Specific radioactivity was followed in plasma for 28 d. A three-compartment model (extracellular fluid, muscle, and ''other tissues'') was adopted. Rate constants, fluxes, pool sizes, and turnover times were calculated. Results of these calculations indicated reduced transport of carnitine into muscle in both forms of primary carnitine deficiency. However, in SCD, the reduced rate of carnitine transport was attributed to reduced plasma carnitine concentration. In MCD, the results are consistent with an intrinsic defect in the transport process. Abnormal fluctuations of the plasma carnitine, but of a different form, occurred in MCD and SCD. The significance of these are unclear, but in SCD they suggest abnormal regulation of the muscle/plasma carnitine concentration gradient. In 8 of 11 subjects, carnitine excretion was less than dietary carnitine intake. Carnitine excretion rates calculated by kinetic compartmental analysis were higher than corresponding rates measured directly, indicating degradation of carnitine. However, we found no radioactive metabolites of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine in urine. These observations suggest that dietary carnitine was metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Evaluation of Serum Carnitine Levels for Pediatric Patients Receiving Carnitine-Free and Carnitine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel; Mulroy, Cecilia; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carnitine is a carrier molecule transporting long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into the mitochondria for fatty acid β-oxidation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of carnitine supplementation in parenteral nutrition (PN) within the pediatric population. Our goal was to determine a weight range for which empiric carnitine supplementation is justified and to determine a weight range at which a carnitine level should first be drawn to confirm a deficiency prior to supplementation. Secondarily, we tried to determine a relationship among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study to evaluate 2 groups of pediatric patients (weighing 0.68 kg to 60 kg) who were NPO and receiving PN. The first group of patients (n = 454) received carnitine supplementation (15 mg/kg/day) upon initiation of PN. The second group (n = 299) did not receive carnitine supplementation until they were determined to have a carnitine deficiency. Results: The data indicated that 82% of the patients weighing less than 5 kg were deficient. Patients weighing more than 5 kg had serum carnitine levels within the normal range. Therefore, patients receiving PN and weighing less than 5 kg should be supplemented with carnitine. Comparison of triglyceride, glucose, and carnitine showed no statistically significant difference (P = .1936). Conclusion: Patients weighing more than 5 kg should have serum carnitine levels drawn within 7 days to determine whether supplementation is needed. There is no statistical correlation among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24958973

  19. The Evolution of Transdermal/ Topical Overactive Bladder Therapy and Its Benefits Over Oral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Multiple antimuscarinic agents are available for the treatment of overactive bladder. Many of the agents have undergone reformulation in an attempt to improve patient adherence and drug tolerability. Oxybutynin evolved from an immediate-release pill to a once-daily oral preparation, and is now available as a transdermal patch and gel. This article discusses the clinical impact of oxybutynin reformulation and reviews the evolution and benefits of transdermal therapy. PMID:19609406

  20. The Evolution of Transdermal/Topical Overactive Bladder Therapy and Its Benefits Over Oral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Multiple antimuscarinic agents are available for the treatment of overactive bladder. Many of the agents have undergone reformulation in an attempt to improve patient adherence and drug tolerability. Oxybutynin evolved from an immediate-release pill to a once-daily oral preparation, and is now available as a transdermal patch and gel. This article discusses the clinical impact of oxybutynin reformulation and reviews the evolution and benefits of transdermal therapy. PMID:19390669

  1. Primary systemic carnitine deficiency: a Turkish case with a novel homozygous SLC22A5 mutation and 14 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Berna Seker; Kor, Deniz; Mungan, Neslihan Onenli; Erdem, Sevcan; Ceylaner, Serdar

    2015-09-01

    Systemic primary carnitine deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of carnitine transporter. Main features are cardiomyopathy, myopathy and hypoglycemic encephalopathy. We report a Turkish case with a novel SLC22A5 gene mutation presented with a pure cardiac phenotype. During the 14-year follow-up study, cardiac functions were remained within a normal range with oral L-carnitine supplementation.

  2. Evaluation of social marketing of oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Koul, P B; Murali, M V; Gupta, P; Sharma, P P

    1991-09-01

    Attempts, at social marketing of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) through television, in changing the knowledge and practice of mothers with regard to its use was assessed. One hundred and eighty seven consecutive mothers (38 excluded due to non use of ORT) were administered a preplanned questionnaire to assess their socio-economic profile, educational status, concept of diarrhea and correct use of ORT. Fifty nine mothers who watched these programmes on TV regularly formed the study group. These were compared with 90 mothers who had gained such knowledge from non-television sources. The correct application of knowledge of ORT was significantly better in study group compared with control group. The educational status of mothers had a positive impact on motivation to use ORT at home in the study group. Mass media campaigns through "TV spots" is an effective way of improving knowledge of mothers on ORT in a developing country.

  3. [New therapies for diabetes: beyond injectable insulin and oral antidiabetics].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, John Edwin Feliciano; Ariza, Iván Darío Sierra

    2008-01-01

    New medicines for the therapy of the type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been incorporated in the list of traditional drugs: oral agents and injectable insulin. These treatment alternatives have a new mechanism of action that takes advantage of the antidiabetic properties of certain peptides such as amylin and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), whose levels are wanting or insufficient in diabetes. This is attained through amylin and GLP-1 analogues, although it can also be achieved by inhibiting the enzyme that degrades the latter. Furthermore, a new system to administer insulin in a noninvasive way through inhalation has become available in the market. This paper summarizes the most important and updated findings on the action mechanism, efficacy, adverse effects and indications of these innovative drugs.

  4. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  5. Improvement of oral anticoagulation therapy by INR self-management.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Dieter; Piper, Cornelia

    2004-05-01

    Thromboembolic complications after valve replacement are significantly reduced if the INR is increased from 1.0 to 2.0. Hemorrhagic events increase exponentially with more intensive oral anticoagulation. In INR (patient) self-testing (PST), patients self-check their INR after being appropriately educated and supplied with a coagulometer. Patients contact their home physician if the actual INR tends to run outside an individually defined target INR corridor for correction. For patient self-management (PSM), subjects are trained to self-test their INR and to adjust the anticoagulant dose according to their anticoagulation state. The median difference between self-tested and laboratory-tested INRs was < 5.0%, indicating no significant differences between the two methods. PSM resulted in a significantly more stable oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT), which was the strongest predictor for a low complication rate after valve replacement surgery. Lower rates of thromboembolism (0.9 versus 3.6% per patient-year; pt-yr) and bleeding (4.5 versus 10.9% per pt-yr) (p < 0.001) were seen in PSM subjects than with conventional INR management. A switch from conventional to PSM resulted in a 30% reduction in complication rates in the German Experience with Low Intensity Anticoagulation (GELIA) study. After appropriate education and provision with a handy coagulometer, the vast majority of patients after valve replacement can self-check INRs and adjust the anticoagulant dosage accordingly. PSM results in a significantly more stable oral anticoagulation treatment and consequently in lower incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding events.

  6. [Maternal practices in infantile diarrheic disease and oral rehydration therapy].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Larrauri, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine therapeutic practices used by mothers from Coatepec, Veracruz, in case of diarrheic episodes in their children under 5 years of age, the degree of generalization, and the relationship with the social frame that sustains them. A sample of 300 families was randomly selected from a total of 15,740. Quantitative and qualitative information was gathered through structured open surveys. Non-parametric statistical analysis of the therapeutic practices was performed and their relationship with socioeconomic variables was analyzed. The two practices considered to obstruct the oral rehydration therapy most, were common: infrequent use of oral rehydration serum (ORS) and contraindicated medication. Non-parametric analysis indicated a significant relationship between contraindicated practices and a mistaken concept of dehydration. On the other hand, the relationship between a correct concept of dehydration and a) using ORS, b) not using contraindicated medication and c) limiting the use of traditional medicine was also significant. Socioeconomic variables had no significant relationship with any particular practice nor with the concept of dehydration. Qualitative interpretation describes how the social meanings that sustain these practices are constructed and reproduced through social nets. The participation of health suppliers in the reproduction of therapeutic practices should be further investigated, as well as their relationship with the reproduction patterns of social meaning through the nets of social aid.

  7. Hypofractionated radiation therapy of oral melanoma in five cats.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, John; Denman, David L; Hohenhaus, Ann E; Patnaik, Amiya K; Bergman, Philip J

    2004-01-01

    Five cats with melanoma involving the oral cavity were treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Cobalt photons were used to administer three fractions of 8.0 Gray (Gy) for a total dose of 24 Gy. Four cats received radiation on days 0, 7, and 21 and one cat received radiation on days 0, 7, and 13. One of the cats received additional irradiation following the initial treatment course. Two cats received chemotherapy. Their age ranged from 11 to 15 years with a median age of 12 years. Three cats had a response to radiation, including one complete response and two partial responses. All five cats were euthanized due to progression of disease, with one cat having evidence of metastatic disease at the time of euthanasia. The median survival time for the five cats was 146 days (range 66-224 days) from the start of RT. The results of this study suggest that oral melanoma in cats may be responsive to hypofractionated RT, but response does not seem to be durable.

  8. Safety assessment of oral photodynamic therapy in rats.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carla R; Lerman, Mark A; Patel, Niraj; Grecco, Clovis; Costa, Carlos A de Souza; Amiji, Mansoor M; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the synergism of a photosensitive drug (a photosensitizer) and visible light to destroy target cells (e.g., malignant, premalignant, or bacterial cells). The aim of this study was to investigate the response of normal rat tongue mucosa to PDT following the topical application of hematoporphyrin derivative (Photogem®), Photodithazine®, methylene blue (MB), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with MB. One hundred and thirty three rats were randomly divided in various groups: the PDT groups were treated with the photosensitizers for 10 min followed by exposure to red light. Those in control groups received neither photosensitizer nor light, and they were subjected to light exposure alone or to photosensitizer alone. Fluorescent signals were obtained from tongue tissue immediately after the topical application of photosensitizers and 24 h following PDT. Histological changes were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 7, and 15 days post-PDT treatment. Fluorescence was detected immediately after the application of the photosensitizers, but not 24 h following PDT. Histology revealed intact mucosa in all experimental groups at all evaluation time points. The results suggest that there is a therapeutic window where PDT with Photogem®, Photodithazine®, MB, and MB-loaded PLGA nanoparticles could safely target oral pathogenic bacteria without damaging normal oral tissue.

  9. Photodynamic Therapy in Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Diana; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common chronic immunologic mucocutaneous disorder. Although there are many presenting treatments, some of them proved its failure. Recently, the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been expanding due to its numerous advantages, as it is safe, convenient, and non-invasive and has toxic effect towards selective tissues. This article provides comprehensive review on OLP, its etiology, clinical features and recent non-pharmacological treatments. We also describe the topical PDT and its mechanisms. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of PDT in treatment of OLP through collecting the data of the related clinical studies. We searched in PubMed website for the clinical studies that were reported from 2000 to 2014 using specific keywords: “photodynamic therapy” and “treatment of oral lichen planus”. Inclusion criteria were English publications only were concerned. In the selected studies of photodynamic treatment, adult patients (more than 20 years) were conducted and the OLP lesions were clinically and histologically confirmed. Exclusion criteria were classical and pharmacological treatments of OLP were excluded and also the using of PDT on skin lesions of lichen planus. We established five clinical studies in this review where all of them reported improvement and effectiveness of PDT in treatment of OLP lesions. The main outcome of comparing the related clinical studies is that the photodynamic is considered as a safe, effective and promising treatment modality for OLP. PMID:25883701

  10. Abbreviated oral itraconazole therapy for tinea corporis and tinea cruris.

    PubMed

    Sanmano, B; Hiruma, M; Mizoguchi, M; Ogawa, H

    2003-09-01

    The present study was designed to determine the lowest dose of orally administered itraconazole and the shortest duration of therapy necessary for treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. For all patients, the itraconazole dose was 100 mg twice a day immediately after meals. Twenty-eight patients received itraconazole on days 1 and 8, 12 patients received itraconazole on days 1 and 2, and five patients received itraconazole only on day 1. Clinical and mycological evaluations were performed at baseline and on day 14. Based on the clinical and mycological responses, treatment efficacy was classified as excellent, good, fair, or poor. "Excellent" and "good" responses made up 86% of the first group, 100% of the second group, and 20% of the third group. A comparison of efficacy ratings of the three regimens showed that the patients who received a single 200-mg dose had a significantly inferior outcome compared with the other two groups. We conclude that an abbreviated oral regimen of itraconazole for treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris requires a total dose of at least 400 mg to induce a favorable outcome.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... into energy. Fatty acid oxidation takes place within mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers in cells. ... to a substance known as carnitine to enter mitochondria. Once these fatty acids are inside mitochondria, carnitine ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... into energy. Fatty acid oxidation takes place within mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers in cells. ... fats called long-chain fatty acids cannot enter mitochondria unless they are attached to carnitine. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase ...

  13. Oral therapy for onychomycosis: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Daniel Coelho; Lamas, Ana Paula Botto; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-02-01

    Onychomycosis is a very common fungal infection of the nail apparatus; however, it is very hard to treat, even when the causative agent is identified, and usually requires prolonged systemic antifungal therapy. Until the 1990s, oral treatment options included only griseofulvin and ketoconazole, and the cure rate was very low. New generations of antimycotics, such as fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine have improved treatment success. Literature was identified by performing a PubMed Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) search. Prospective and randomized clinical trials were chosen to be included in this review. Forty-six trials were included. Fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine are effective in the treatment of onychomycosis and have a good safety profile. When a dermatophyte is the pathogen, terbinafine produces the best results. For Candida and nondermatophyte infections, the azoles, mainly itraconazole, are the recommended therapy. In the majority of the studies, terbinafine treatment showed a higher cure ratio than the other drugs for dermatophyte onychomycosis.

  14. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  15. Screening of carnitine and biotin deficiencies on tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Kubota, Mitsuru; Nambu, Ryusuke; Kagimoto, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    It is important to assess pediatric patients for nutritional deficiency when they are receiving specific interventions, such as enteral feeding. We focused on measurement of C0 and 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5-OH) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), which is performed as part of the newborn mass screening. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of MS/MS for screening carnitine and biotin deficiencies. Forty-two children (24 boys, 18 girls) were enrolled between December 2013 and December 2015. Blood tests, including measurement of serum free carnitine via the enzyme cycling method, and acylcarnitine analysis on MS/MS of dried blood spot (DBS), were performed for the evaluation of nutrition status. Median patient age was 2 years (range, 2 months-14 years). Mean serum free carnitine was 41.8 ± 19.2 μmol/L. In six of the 42 patients, serum free carnitine was <20 μmol/L (range, 4.0-18.7 μmol/L). C0 and C5-OH measured on MS/MS of DBS were 33.8 ± 20.2 nmol/mL and 0.48 ± 0.22 nmol/mL, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.89, P < 0.001) between serum free carnitine and C0 measured on the same day. In one patient on hydrolyzed formula, C5-OH was >1.00 nmol/L. Therapy-resistant eczema was improved by treatment with additional biotin and a non-hydrolyzed formula. C0 and C5-OH, measured on MS/MS of DBS, were useful for screening carnitine and biotin deficiencies. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. CPEO and carnitine deficiency overlapping in MELAS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C C; Chuang, Y H; Tsai, J L; Jong, H J; Shen, Y Y; Huang, H L; Chen, H L; Lee, H C; Pang, C Y; Wei, Y H

    1995-09-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies that has distinct clinical features including stroke-like episodes with migraine-like headache, nausea, vomiting, encephalopathy and lactic acidosis. We report a 27-year-old woman who presented with partial seizure, stroke-like episodes including hemiparesis, hemianopia and hemihypethesia, sensorineural hearing loss, migraine-like headache, and lactic acidosis. Brain computed tomographic scan showed encephalomalacia in the right parieto-occipital area and recent hypodensity in the left temporoparieto-occipital area with cortical atrophy. Muscle biopsy revealed ragged-red fibers and paracrystaline inclusions in the mitochondria. Genetic study revealed an A to G point mutation at nucleotide position (np) 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. External ophthalmoplegia and ptosis were also found during two exaggerated episodes in this patient. Therefore, the overlapping syndrome of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia in the MELAS syndrome is considered in this case. Furthermore, we also found carnitine deficiency in this patient and she was responsive well to steroid therapy. Muscle biopsy also revealed excessive lipid droplets deposits. Therefore, the carnitine deficiency may occur in MELAS syndrome with the A to G point mutation at np 3243. We recommend the steroid or carnitine supplement therapy be applied to the MELAS syndrome with carnitine deficiency.

  17. Alteration of urinary carnitine profile induced by benzoate administration.

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, T

    1991-01-01

    To study the effect of sodium benzoate on carnitine metabolism, the acylcarnitine profile in the urine of five normal volunteers and two patients with urea cycle disorders was examined with fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The volunteer subjects were given 5 g of sodium benzoate orally and the two patients with urea cycle disorders (carbamyl phosphate synthetase deficiency type I and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency) were already undergoing treatment with sodium benzoate and L-carnitine. The amount of benzoylcarnitine excretion depended on the dose of both sodium benzoate and L-carnitine in a reciprocal relation. Increased excretions of acetylcarnitine and propionylcarnitine were also noted after sodium benzoate administration. The alteration of the urinary aclycarnitine profile was consistent with the change of mitochondrial CoA profile predicted by in vitro studies of an animal model. It is suggested that urinary acylcarnitine analysis is important to assess the effect of benzoate administration on mitochondrial function in vivo. Supplementation with carnitine may be necessary to minimise the adverse effects of sodium benzoate treatment in hyperammonaemia. PMID:1863104

  18. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  19. Toxicity of valproic acid in mice with decreased plasma and tissue carnitine stores.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Andrea Caroline; Todesco, Liliane; Beier, Konstantin; Terracciano, Luigi; Sägesser, Hans; Reichen, Jürg; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a decrease in carnitine body stores is a risk factor for valproic acid (VPA)-associated hepatotoxicity and to explore the effects of VPA on carnitine homeostasis in mice with decreased carnitine body stores. Therefore, heterozygous juvenile visceral steatosis (jvs)(+/-) mice, an animal model with decreased carnitine stores caused by impaired renal reabsorption of carnitine, and the corresponding wild-type mice were treated with subtoxic oral doses of VPA (0.1 g/g b.wt./day) for 2 weeks. In jvs(+/-) mice, but not in wild-type mice, treatment with VPA was associated with the increased plasma activity of aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, jvs(+/-) mice revealed reduced palmitate metabolism assessed in vivo and microvesicular steatosis of the liver. The creatine kinase activity was not affected by treatment with VPA. In liver mitochondria isolated from mice that were treated with VPA, oxidative metabolism of l-glutamate, succinate, and palmitate, as well as beta-oxidation of palmitate, were decreased compared to vehicle-treated wild-type mice or jvs(+/-) mice. In comparison to vehicle-treated wild-type mice, vehicle-treated jvs(+/-) mice had decreased carnitine plasma and tissue levels. Treatment with VPA was associated with an additional decrease in carnitine plasma (wild-type mice and jvs(+/-) mice) and tissue levels (jvs(+/-) mice) and a shift of the carnitine pools toward short-chain acylcarnitines. We conclude that jvs(+/-) mice reveal a more accentuated hepatic toxicity by VPA than the corresponding wild-type mice. Therefore, decreased carnitine body stores can be regarded as a risk factor for hepatotoxicity associated with VPA.

  20. Protective role of L-carnitine supplementation against exhaustive exercise induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Síktar, Elif; Ekinci, Deniz; Síktar, Erdinç; Beydemir, Sükrü; Gülçin, Ilhami; Günay, Mehmet

    2011-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate temperature dependent effects of oral l-carnitine supplementation on exhaustive exercise induced oxidative damage in rats. 42 male Spraque Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven experimental groups. These groups were formed as three non-carnitine exercise groups, three carnitine-exercise groups and a sedentary group. l-carnitine was given intraperitoneally to the carnitine-exercise groups 1h before the exercise in 100mg/kg. Blood was collected to measure paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol concentrations. These biomarkers were measured in venous blood samples collected before and after the rats swam in pools at different water temperatures (18°C, 28°C and 38°C). In the non-carnitine group, exercise caused a significant decrease in PON1 activity and a significant elevation in MDA concentration at 28°C compared to the sedentary group. No significant alterations were evidenced in LDL and cholesterol concentrations upon exercise. The decrease in PON1 activity became higher with increasing temperature whereas the elevation in MDA levels increased at 18°C. In the l-carnitine supplementation group, recovery in PON1 activity was observed significant at 28°C and very significant at 38°C. MDA concentration was almost the same with that of the non-carnitine group at 18 and 38°C, but it significantly decreased at 28°C. Considering the recovery in PON1 and MDA levels at 28°C, which is the temperature of the sedentary group; our results suggest that l-carnitine supplementation has a protective role on exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress. Findings of this study also demonstrate influences of thermal stress on these parameters during exhaustive exercise.

  1. Oral dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement therapy in women with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Gebre-Medhin, G; Husebye, E S; Mallmin, H; Helström, L; Berne, C; Karlsson, F A; Kämpe, O

    2000-06-01

    Patients with primary adrenocortical failure (Addison's disease) have abnormally low levels of DHEA and androgens relative to age. To define a suitable dose, the effect of oral dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement therapy in women with Addison's disease (n = 9) was evaluated. DHEA was administered as a daily oral dose of either 50 mg (n = 5) or 200 mg (n = 4). Blood sampling and measurements of insulin sensitivity (as measured with euglycemic insulin clamp technique) and body composition (as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) were performed before and during DHEA treatment and at a 3-month follow up. DHEA and DHEA(S) levels were restored to normal in those patients receiving 50 mg whereas DHEA(S) level was slightly above the normal reference value in those receiving 200 mg. Circulating levels of androgens (androstenedione, testosterone and testosterone/SHBG ratio) were normalized in all patients. A slight rise in IGF-1 levels was seen in both groups as was a decrease in the levels of low and high density lipoproteins. No effect on blood glucose levels or insulin sensitivity was seen and no change of body composition was observed. No serious side-effects were seen, but some of the patients experienced increased apocrine sweat secretion (n = 7), itchy scalp (n = 2) and acne (n = 7), all of which were reversed when DHEA was discontinued. A daily replacement dose of 50 mg of DHEA results in near physiological levels of DHEA, DHEA(S) androstenedione and testosterone in women with Addison's disease, without severe side-effects.

  2. [Effects of L-carnitine in poultry].

    PubMed

    Leibetseder, J

    1995-01-01

    Because of the well established function of carnitine possible effects of carnitine were studied in poultry. In trial I it was investigated if carnitine and its precursors (lysine, methionine) reduce the formation of abdominal fat in broilers. Chickens (10 groups of 10 chickens each) were fed different diets (control, lysine and methionine in excess and deficient, respectively, with or without 5% fat supplement, L-carnitine and DL-carnitine supplement, respectively). Performance (body weight gain, feed conversion), amount of abdominal fat and carnitine concentration in blood, muscles (M. sartorius, M. pectoralis superficialis, cardiac), liver and kidney were determined. Performance and abdominal fat were influenced by dietary fat, lysine and methionine as expected and were not altered by carnitine. Excess and deficiency of lysine and methionine did not influence, fat supplement reduced and carnitine supplementation significantly increased tissue concentration of carnitine. In trial II it was studied if supplementation of a commercial layers' ration with either 500 mg L-carnitine or 500 mg nicotinic acid or both per kg reduces the cholesterol concentration in yolk. Influence on body weight, feed intake, laying performance, serum and yolk cholesterol concentration could not be observed, but yolk concentration of carnitine was significantly increased in supplemented groups. Trial III should clarify if the L-carnitine content in broiler parent stock ration influences hatchability. Four groups of 1350 hens each were fed a commercial all-mash supplemented with 0, 20, 50 and 100 mg L-carnitine, respectively. Hatching rate was increased from 83% to 87% and from 82.4% to 85.3% in groups supplemented with 50 and 100 mg L-carnitine, respectively, and in randomly sampled eggs of these groups carnitine concentration in yolk was higher.

  3. Effects of L-carnitine administration on left ventricular remodeling after acute anterior myocardial infarction: the L-Carnitine Ecocardiografia Digitalizzata Infarto Miocardico (CEDIM) Trial.

    PubMed

    Iliceto, S; Scrutinio, D; Bruzzi, P; D'Ambrosio, G; Boni, L; Di Biase, M; Biasco, G; Hugenholtz, P G; Rizzon, P

    1995-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of L-carnitine administration on long-term left ventricular dilation in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction. Carnitine is a physiologic compound that performs an essential role in myocardial energy production at the mitochondrial level. Myocardial carnitine deprivation occurs during ischemia, acute myocardial infarction and cardiac failure. Experimental studies have suggested that exogenous carnitine administration during these events has a beneficial effect on function. The L-Carnitine Ecocardiografia Digitalizzata Infarto Miocardico (CEDIM) trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial in which 472 patients with a first acute myocardial infarction and high quality two-dimensional echocardiograms received either placebo (239 patients) or L-carnitine (233 patients) within 24 h of onset of chest pain. Placebo or L-carnitine was given at a dose of 9 g/day intravenously for the first 5 days and then 6 g/day orally for the next 12 months. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were evaluated on admission, at discharge from hospital and at 3, 6 and 12 months after acute myocardial infarction. A significant attenuation of left ventricular dilation in the first year after acute myocardial infarction was observed in patients treated with L-carnitine compared with those receiving placebo. The percent increase in both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes from admission to 3-, 6- and 12-month evaluation was significantly reduced in the L-carnitine group. No significant differences were observed in left ventricular ejection fraction changes over time in the two groups. Although not designed to demonstrate differences in clinical end points, the combined incidence of death and congestive heart failure after discharge was 14 (6%) in the L-carnitine treatment group versus 23 (9.6%) in the placebo group (p = NS). Incidence of ischemic events during follow-up was similar in the

  4. Bullous Lichen Planus treated with Oral Minipulse Therapy: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha, K; Boyapati, Ramanaryana; Kumar D.R., Shravan

    2014-01-01

    Oral Lichen planus (OLP) is a common mucocutaneous disorder with a multifactorial aetiology, affecting the women more commonly than men. Most OLP are asymptomatic, except the atrophic and erosive forms.Till date many treatment modalities are implicated to treat this disorder, but no therapy is considered as the single most effective, without side-effects and remission of the lesion. As the treatment of OLP is challenging to the oral practitioners, here we report a case of successful management of extensive, symptomatic bullous and erosive oral lichen planus with a novel treatment protocol- oral minipulse therapy with betamethasone. PMID:25654047

  5. Carnitine and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Randall L

    2009-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals demonstrate that "lipid over supply" causes or worsens insulin resistance via multiple mechanisms involving the accumulation of intracellular lipids in multiple tissues. In particular, the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives/metabolites in muscle inhibits both insulin signaling and glucose oxidation. Therefore agents that ameliorate the accumulation of fatty acyl CoA derivatives and/or their metabolites would be beneficial in the treatment or prevention of insulin resistance and T2D. Hyperinsulemic/euglycemic clamp studies in humans and carnitine supplementation studies in rodents provide "proof-of-concept" that carnitine is effective at improving insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and in reversing abnormalities of fuel metabolism associated with T2D. Carefully controlled clinical trials are warranted to determine the efficacy dietary carnitine supplementation as an adjunctive treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  6. Carnitine in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mingrone, Geltrude

    2004-11-01

    Carnitine, the L-beta-hydroxy-gamma-N-trimethylaminobutyric acid, is synthesized primarily in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine. Carnitine covers an important role in lipid metabolism, acting as an obligatory cofactor for beta-oxidation of fatty acids by facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial membrane as acylcarnitine esters. Furthermore, since carnitine behaves as a shuttle for acetyl groups from inside to outside the mitochondrial membrane, it covers also a key role in glucose metabolism and assists in fuel-sensing. A reduction of the fatty acid transport inside the mitochondria results in the cytosolic accumulation of triglycerides, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Acute hypercarnitinemia stimulates nonoxidative glucose disposal during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp in healthy volunteers. Similar results were obtained in type 2 diabetic patients. The above findings were confirmed in healthy volunteers using the minimal modeling of glucose kinetics. The total end-clamp glucose tissue uptake was significantly increased by the administration of doses of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) from 3.8 to 5.2 mg/kg/min, without a significant dose-response effect. In conclusion, both L-carnitine and ALC are effective in improving insulin-mediated glucose disposal either in healthy subjects or in type 2 diabetic patients. Two possible mechanisms might be invoked in the metabolic effect of carnitine and its derivative: the first is a regulation of acetyl and acyl cellular trafficking for correctly meeting the energy demand; the second is a control action in the synthesis of key glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes.

  7. Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy: from cancer treatment to survivorship.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Thariat, Juliette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Barasch, Andrei; Murphy, Barbara A; Kolnick, Leanne; Popplewell, Leslie; Maghami, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time.

  8. Deficiency of Carnitine in Cachectic Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rudman, Daniel; Sewell, Charles W.; Ansley, Joseph D.

    1977-01-01

    Carnitine is synthesized from lysine and methionine. In the rat, inadequate intake of either of these essential amino acids causes carnitine depletion. Inasmuch as protein deficiency is common in the hospital population, we have investigated the possible occurrence of nosocomial carnitine deficiency. Fasting serum carnitine concentration was measured in 16 normal and 247 patients in 16 disease groups. Normal range of carnitine was 55-103 μM. Only the cirrhotic group showed significant (P < 0.05) hypocarnitinemia. 14 of 36 hospitalized cirrhotics had subnormal values for serum carnitine. The creatinine/height index, midarm muscle circumference, and triceps skin-fold thickness indicated protein-calorie starvation in the 14 hypocarnitinemic liver patients. In six of the hypocarnitinemic cirrhotics (average serum level 50% of normal), spontaneous dietary intakes of carnitine, lysine, and methionine were measured and found to be only 5-15% as great as in six normocarnitinemic, healthy controls. When these six cirrhotic and six normal subjects were given the same lysine-rich, methionine-rich, and carnitine-free nutritional intake, the normals maintained normal serum carnitine levels and excreted 100 μmol/day, whereas the cirrhotics' serum level fell to 25% of normal, and urinary excretion declined to 15 μmol/day. Seven hypocarnitinemic cirrhotics died. Postmortem concentrations of carnitine in liver, muscle, heart, kidney, and brain averaged only one-fourth to one-third those in corresponding tissues of eight normally nourished nonhepatic patients who died after an acute illness of a 1-3-day duration. These data show that carnitine depletion is common in patients hospitalized for advanced cirrhosis, and that it results from three factors: substandard intake of dietary carnitine; substandard intake of lysine and methionine, the precursors for endogenous carnitine synthesis; and loss of capacity to synthesize carnitine from lysine and methionine. PMID:893675

  9. Oral therapy in children with cholera: a comparison of sucrose and glucose electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Islam, S; Brown, K H; Islam, A; Kabir, A K; Chowdhury, A M; Ali, M A

    1980-01-01

    We performed a double-blind trial comparing sucrose electrolyte oral solution with glucose electrolyte oral solution in children less than 5 years of age with severe cholera-like diarrhea. Of 111 patients studied (102 with bacteriologically confirmed cholera), 55 received sucrose solution and 56 received glucose solution. The success rates, as defined by the absence of the need to give unscheduled intravenous therapy, were similar in the two groups (73% and 77% in the sucrose and glucose groups, respectively). There was no difference in purging rates between the two groups. The primary determinant of success for oral fluid regardless of the sugar was the purging rate. Sucrose malabsorption was responsible for oral therapy failure in one child. This study demonstrates that sucrose is an effective alternative to glucose in the oral therapy solution, but either must be used in conjunction with intravenous solution when treating severe dehydrating diarrhea.

  10. The new paradigm of hepatitis C therapy: integration of oral therapies into best practices.

    PubMed

    Afdhal, N H; Zeuzem, S; Schooley, R T; Thomas, D L; Ward, J W; Litwin, A H; Razavi, H; Castera, L; Poynard, T; Muir, A; Mehta, S H; Dee, L; Graham, C; Church, D R; Talal, A H; Sulkowski, M S; Jacobson, I M

    2013-11-01

    Emerging data indicate that all-oral antiviral treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) will become a reality in the near future. In replacing interferon-based therapies, all-oral regimens are expected to be more tolerable, more effective, shorter in duration and simpler to administer. Coinciding with new treatment options are novel methodologies for disease screening and staging, which create the possibility of more timely care and treatment. Assessments of histologic damage typically are performed using liver biopsy, yet noninvasive assessments of histologic damage have become the norm in some European countries and are becoming more widespread in the United States. Also in place are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiatives to simplify testing, improve provider and patient awareness and expand recommendations for HCV screening beyond risk-based strategies. Issued in 2012, the CDC recommendations aim to increase HCV testing among those with the greatest HCV burden in the United States by recommending one-time testing for all persons born during 1945-1965. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force adopted similar recommendations for risk-based and birth-cohort-based testing. Taken together, the developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment will likely increase demand for therapy and stimulate a shift in delivery of care related to chronic HCV, with increased involvement of primary care and infectious disease specialists. Yet even in this new era of therapy, barriers to curing patients of HCV will exist. Overcoming such barriers will require novel, integrative strategies and investment of resources at local, regional and national levels. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Viral Hepatitis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The new paradigm of hepatitis C therapy: integration of oral therapies into best practices

    PubMed Central

    Afdhal, N H; Zeuzem, S; Schooley, R T; Thomas, D L; Ward, J W; Litwin, A H; Razavi, H; Castera, L; Poynard, T; Muir, A; Mehta, S H; Dee, L; Graham, C; Church, D R; Talal, A H; Sulkowski, M S; Jacobson, I M for the New Paradigm of HCV Therapy Meeting Participants

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY. Emerging data indicate that all-oral antiviral treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) will become a reality in the near future. In replacing interferon-based therapies, all-oral regimens are expected to be more tolerable, more effective, shorter in duration and simpler to administer. Coinciding with new treatment options are novel methodologies for disease screening and staging, which create the possibility of more timely care and treatment. Assessments of histologic damage typically are performed using liver biopsy, yet noninvasive assessments of histologic damage have become the norm in some European countries and are becoming more widespread in the United States. Also in place are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiatives to simplify testing, improve provider and patient awareness and expand recommendations for HCV screening beyond risk-based strategies. Issued in 2012, the CDC recommendations aim to increase HCV testing among those with the greatest HCV burden in the United States by recommending one-time testing for all persons born during 1945–1965. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force adopted similar recommendations for risk-based and birth-cohort-based testing. Taken together, the developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment will likely increase demand for therapy and stimulate a shift in delivery of care related to chronic HCV, with increased involvement of primary care and infectious disease specialists. Yet even in this new era of therapy, barriers to curing patients of HCV will exist. Overcoming such barriers will require novel, integrative strategies and investment of resources at local, regional and national levels. PMID:24168254

  12. Use of Low Level Laser Therapy for Oral Lichen Planus: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, O; Boostani, N; Jajarm, HH; Falaki, F; Tabesh, A

    2013-01-01

    Oral Lichen Planus is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Erosive/ ulcerative oral lichen planus is often a painful condition that tends to become malignant, urging appropriate therapy. Laser therapy has recently been suggested as a new treatment option without significant side effects. This article presents two cases of erosive/ ulcerative oral lichen planus, who had not received any treatment before, treated with 630 nm low level laser. Lesion type and pain was recorded before and after treatment. Severity of lesions and pain were reduced after treatment. Low Level Laser Therapy was an effective treatment with no side effects and it may be considered as an alternative therapy for erosive/ulcerative oral lichen planus. PMID:24724146

  13. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Suma, G. N.; Arora, Madhu Pruthi; Lakhanpal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone) in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions). PMID:25709329

  14. Design of quality indicators for oral nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Gimenez Verotti, Cristiane Comeron; de Miranda Torrinhas, Raquel Susana Matos; Pires Corona, Ligiana; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-06-01

    Objetivo: los indicadores de calidad en la terapia nutricional han sido propuestos como herramientas útiles para mejorar la terapia nutricional (TN). Este estudio pretende diseñar indicadores de calidad de terapia nutricional oral (ICTNO) factibles en el control de calidad de TN oral. Métodos: el diseño de ICTNO fue realizado por una comisión de nutrición clínica compuesta por brasileños expertos en TN del International Life Science Institute (ILSI). Más tarde, la aprobación de estos ICTNO fue valorada con análisis psicométricos recogiendo las opiniones de otros brasileños dedicados independientemente a la TN (n = 40) vía SurveyMonkey (encuesta por internet). Esta consistió en cuatro atributos valorando cada ICTNO (simplicidad, utilidad, objetividad y bajo precio) seguida de una escala Likert con cinco puntos. Resultados: los expertos en TN de ILSI proporcionaron el diseño de 12 QIONT, que fueron todos consistentemente (Alfa de Cronbach = 0,84) clasificados como válidos por expertos independientes en NT. Por orden de relevancia, los nuevos ICTNO valoraron: la frecuencia de screening nutricional, la prescripción de suplementos de nutrición oral para pacientes desnutridos que ya reciben dieta oral, la prescripción de suplementos de nutrición oral para pacientes con bajo riesgo nutricional que ya reciben dieta oral, el consejo nutricional, la adhesión al suplemento nutricional oral, los pacientes hospitalizados con dieta oral insuficiente y prescripción de suplementos nutricionales orales, los pacientes de UCI con dieta oral insuficiente y prescripción de suplementos nutricionales orales, el consejo de nutrición oral en pacientes de UCI, el consejo de nutrición oral en pacientes en planta, la intolerancia al volumen de suplemento oral debido a dosificación inadecuada, la intolerancia al sabor del suplemento oral y la intolerancia al volumen de suplemento oral. Conclusión: según la opinión experta, 12 potenciales y factibles nuevos ICTNO

  15. FREE FATTY ACIDS PROFILING IN RESPONSE TO CARNITINE SYNERGIZE WITH LUTEIN IN DIABETIC RATS.

    PubMed

    Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Moselhy, Said S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the fatty acids profiling in diabetic rats induced by sterptozocine (STZ) and their response to administration of lutein and carnitine. Ninety male albino rats were divided into 6 groups as follows: Normal control. The remaining rats were injected i.p a single dose of STZ (65 mg /kg bw) for induction of diabetes. Diabetic rats were grouped as: GP II: (Untreated): GP III: Rats were given orally with L-lutein (100 mg/kg bw).GP IV: Rats were given carnitine (30 μg/kg) i.p. GP V: Rats were given carnitine and lutein GP VI were given metformin (100mg/kg bw/d) for 6 weeks. Treatment of diabetic rats with lutein, L-carnitine, combined decreased the levels of glucose, HA1C compared with untreated diabetic (p<0.001). Administration of L-lutein, carnitine, combined to normal rats significantly decreased the levels of myristic, palmitice, palmitoleic, stearic, linoleic, α-linolenic, arachidic and eicosadienoic when compared with control normal rats (p<0.001). Abnormalities of fatty acids composition was observed in diabetic rats. Combination treatment with lutein and carnitine could ameliorate deleterious effect induced by STZ and attenuate the changed fatty acid composition.

  16. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  17. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  18. Generalized Pustular Psoriasis and Hepatic Dysfunction Associated with Oral Terbinafine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Jwa, Seung-Wook; Jang, Bong-Seok; Kim, Moon-Bum; Oh, Chang-Keun; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Kwon, Kyung-Sool

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of 61-yr-old man with stable psoriasis who progressively developed generalized pustular eruption, erythroderma, fever, and hepatic dysfunction following oral terbinafine. Skin biopsy was compatible with pustular psoriasis. After discontinuation of terbinafine and initiating topical corticosteroid and calcipotriol combination with narrow band ultraviolet B therapy, patient'S condition slowly improved until complete remission was reached 2 weeks later. The diagnosis of generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) induced by oral terbinafine was made. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GPP accompanied by hepatic dysfunction associated with oral terbinafine therapy. PMID:17297275

  19. Carnitine for prevention of antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity: a randomized, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hatamkhani, Shima; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Abdollahi, Alireza; Jafari, Sirous

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the potential benefits of oral carnitine in preventing antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity (ATDH) were evaluated. Fifty-four patients in the carnitine and 62 patients in the placebo group completed the study. The carnitine group received 1000 mg oral carnitine solution twice daily for 4 weeks. The placebo group received 10 mL of oral placebo solution twice daily for 4 weeks. ATDH was defined as an increase in the serum level of aspartate aminotransferase or alanine aminotransferase greater than three or five times of the upper limit of normal with or without clinical symptoms of hepatotoxicity, respectively. During the study period, 29 (25%) patients experienced ATDH. Among these patients, nine (16.7%) and 20 (32.3%) were in the carnitine and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.049). Based on multivariate logistic regression model, age over 35 years old (odds ratio [OR] = 7.01, P = 0.002), human immunodeficiency virus infection (OR = 40.4, P < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (OR = 37.6, P = 0.001), and placebo treatment (OR = 0.1, P = 0.01) were identified as predisposing factors for ATDH. Results of our preliminary clinical trial suggested that cotreatment with 2000 mg oral L-carnitine solution daily for 4 weeks significantly decreased the rate of ATDH. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S P; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-05-30

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab.

  1. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S.P.; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab. PMID:25918252

  2. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Victora, C. G.; Bryce, J.; Fontaine, O.; Monasch, R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  3. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Victora, C G; Bryce, J; Fontaine, O; Monasch, R

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  4. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D’Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections. Methods Thirty-nine articles that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were independently reviewed by two calibrated reviewers, each using a standard form. Information was extracted on a number of variables, including study design, study population, sample size, interventions, blinding, outcome measures, methods, results, and conclusions for each article. Areas of discrepancy between the two reviews were resolved by consensus. Studies were weighted as to the quality of the study design, and recommendations were based on the relative strength of each paper. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization. Results For all cancer treatments, the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection was found to be 7.5% pretreatment, 39.1% during treatment, and 32.6% after the end of cancer therapy. Head and neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy were each independently associated with a significantly increased risk for oral fungal infection. For all cancer treatments, the prevalence of oral colonization with fungal organisms was 48.2% before treatment, 72.2% during treatment, and 70.1% after treatment. The prophylactic use of fluconazole during cancer therapy resulted in a prevalence of clinical fungal infection of 1.9%. No information specific to oral fungal infections was found on quality of life or cost of care. Conclusions There is an increased risk of clinically significant oral fungal infection during cancer therapy. Systemic antifungals are effective in the prevention of clinical oral fungal infection in patients receiving cancer therapy. Currently available topical antifungal

  5. Initiation of insulin therapy in elderly patients taking oral antidiabetes drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Norma; Moisan, Jocelyne; Sirois, Caroline; Poirier, Paul; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background We sought to estimate the rate of initiation of insulin therapy among elderly patients using oral anti-diabetes drugs and to identify the factors associated with this initiation. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study involving people aged 66 or more years who were newly dispensed an oral antidiabetes drug. Individuals who had received acarbose or a thiazolidinedione were excluded. The rate of insulin initiation was calculated by use of the Kaplan–Meier method. Factors associated with insulin initiation were identified by multivariable Cox regression analyses. Results In this cohort of 69 674 new users of oral antidiabetes drugs, insulin was initiated at rate of 9.7 cases per 1000 patient-years. Patients who had initially received an insulin secretagogue (rather than metformin), who were prescribed an oral antidiabetes drug by an endocrinologist or an internist, who received higher initial doses of an oral antidiabetes drug, who received oral corticosteroids, used glucometer strips, or were admitted to hospital in the year before initiation of oral antidiabetes therapy, or who received 16 or more medications were more likely than those without these characteristics to have insulin therapy initiated. In contrast, patients who received thiazides or who used up to 12 medications (v. none) were less likely to have insulin therapy initiated. Interpretation Several factors related to drugs and health services are associated with the initiation of insulin therapy in elderly patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs. It is unclear whether these factors predict secondary failure of oral antidiabetes drugs or instead reflect better management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19546456

  6. CARNITINE HOMEOSTASIS, MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitines are involved in mitochondrial transport of fatty acids and are of critical importance for maintaining normal mitochondrial function. This review summarizes recent experimental and clinical studies showing that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to a disruption of carnitine homeostasis may play a role in decreased NO signaling and the development of endothelial dysfunction. Future challenges include development of agents that can positively modulate L-carnitine homeostasis which may have high therapeutic potential. PMID:20648231

  7. Prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS children in highly active antiretroviral therapy era. A literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Octavio; Castillo, Nydia

    2015-08-01

    SummaryHighly active antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality related to HIV infection, including oral opportunistic infections. This paper offers an analysis of the scientific literature on the epidemiological aspects of oral candidiasis in HIV-positive children in the combination antiretroviral therapy era. An electronic databases search was made covering the highly active antiretroviral therapy era (1998 onwards). The terms used were oral lesions, oral candidiasis and their combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy and HIV/AIDS children. The following data were collected from each paper: year and country in which the investigation was conducted, antiretroviral treatment, oral candidiasis prevalence and diagnostic parameters (clinical or microbiological). Prevalence of oral candidiasis varied from 2.9% in American HIV-positive children undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy to 88% in Chilean HIV-positive children without antiretroviral therapy. With respect to geographical location and antiretroviral treatment, higher oral candidiasis prevalence in HIV-positive children on combination antiretroviral therapy/antiretroviral therapy was reported in African children (79.1%) followed by 45.9% reported in Hindu children. In HIV-positive Chilean children on no antiretroviral therapy, high oral candidiasis prevalence was reported (88%) followed by Nigerian children (80%). Oral candidiasis is still frequent in HIV-positive children in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era irrespective of geographical location, race and use of antiretroviral therapy.

  8. Molecular Imaging and Oral Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Maryam; Darijani, Mansoreh; Momeni, Fatemeh; Moradi, Pouya; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Masoudifar, Aria; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2017-10-01

    Oral cancer is known as one of relatively common type of cancer worldwide. Despite the easy access of the oral cavity to examination, oral tumors are diagnosed in more advanced stages of the disease. Imaging techniques have been recently emerged as non-invasive approaches to detect molecular and cellular changes in living cells and organisms. These techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) could help physicians to screen patients with oral tumors particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in early stage of the disease. In this review, we discuss that early detection and diagnosis of oral tumors through using more robust and precise imaging techniques and a variety of cellular/molecular biomarkers not only could lead to more effective and less aggressive form of treatment for the disease but also could improve survival rates and lower treatment costs. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3055-3060, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A review on adherence management in patients on oral cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Wood, Leslie

    2012-09-01

    There is currently an ongoing paradigm shift in cancer treatment from intravenous (IV) chemotherapeutics to oral therapies. Additionally, the increased use of long-term maintenance therapy with oral targeted agents or chemotherapy is contributing to a shift toward a chronic-disease model. This shift is creating challenges and responsibilities for health care professionals in patient adherence management. This article will inform health care professionals of current trends and describe ways that they can overcome common barriers to adherence. A comprehensive review of recommendations and evidence derived from oncological studies describing adherence to oral targeted therapies and maintenance chemotherapy will provide guidance for the use of emerging oral maintenance therapies. Articles in the scientific literature were reviewed if published between January 1985 and November 2010. Searches were conducted using the PubMed database-search terms included "oral therapy," "chemotherapy," "cancer," and "adherence" or "compliance." The change from IV therapy administered and monitored in hospitals or clinics to self-administered outpatient oral treatments decreases the likelihood of adherence. Methods, such as patient education and monitoring and involvement of family or caretakers, can improve adherence in patients undergoing treatment. At treatment onset, oncology nurses can engage patients directly in a collaborative dialogue, and when issues affecting adherence arise, oncology nurses may limit nonadherence by providing individually tailored educational material. A practical approach to patient education, along with building strong health care provider-patient relationships, can help patients overcome nonadherence to new oral anticancer therapies and treatment paradigms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional support and cardioprotection with L-carnitine: prescription appropriateness and safety concerns in Mexican neonates.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Valdés-Alanis, Analleli; Castro-Pastrana, Lucila I; Galar-Martinez, Marcela; Romero-Castillo, Carolina Angélica

    2011-01-01

    Medication errors are probably more common in neonates than is generally appreciated. In Mexican pediatric hospitals, L-carnitine is mainly used for nutritional support and to treat cardiomyopathy secondary to neonatal asphyxia. Using a longitudinal-retrospective approach we assessed the appropriateness of all L-carnitine prescriptions written during a 12-month period at a NICU of a second-level hospital located in Toluca, Mexico. Reports of adverse reactions possibly related to L-carnitine therapy were collected and characterized. Overall, administration of L-carnitine was considered justified and appropriate only in 18% of patients. 60.7% of L-carnitine prescriptions were rated as inappropriate because the prescribed doses fell outside the recommendations. The overall rate of ADRs calculated from the patient population was 18.03%. All of them were of gastrointestinal type: abdominal cramps (8 cases, 61.54%) and vomiting (5 cases, 38.46%). Our results supported the establishment of an L-carnitine rational use policy at the NICU of the hospital under study.

  11. The mdx mouse as a model for carnitine deficiency in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zolkipli, Zarazuela; Mai, Lydia; Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Tein, Ingrid

    2012-11-01

    Muscle and cardiac metabolism are dependent on the oxidation of fats and glucose for adenosine triphosphate production, for which L-carnitine is an essential cofactor. We measured muscle carnitine concentrations in skeletal muscles, diaphragm, and ventricles of C57BL/10ScSn-DMDmdx/J mice (n = 10) and compared them with wild-type C57BL/6J (n = 3), C57BL/10 (n = 10), and C3H (n = 12) mice. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was measured in quadriceps/gluteals and ventricles of mdx and wild-type mice. We found significantly lower tissue carnitine in quadriceps/gluteus (P < 0.05) and ventricle (P < 0.05), but not diaphragm of mdx mice, when compared with controls. CS activity was increased in mdx quadriceps/gluteus (P < 0.03) and ventricle (P < 0.02). This suggests compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Decreased tissue carnitine has implications for reduced fatty acid and glucose oxidation in mdx quadriceps/gluteus and ventricle. The mdx mouse may be a useful model for studying the role of muscle carnitine deficiency in DMD bioenergetic insufficiency and providing a targeted and timed rationale for L-carnitine therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Outpatient management of oral vitamin K antagonist therapy: defining and measuring high-quality management.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine W; Ansell, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is the mainstay of prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease. However, it remains one of the leading causes of harmful medication errors and medication-related adverse events. The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are directly dependent upon the quality of dose and anticoagulation management, but the literature is not robust with regards to what constitutes such management. This review focuses on, and attempts to define, the parameters of high-quality anticoagulation management and identifies the appropriate outcome measures constituting high-quality management. Elements discussed include the most fundamental measure, time in therapeutic range, along with other parameters including therapy initiation, time to therapeutic range, dosing management when patients are not in therapeutic range, perioperative dosing management, patient education, and other important outcome measures. Healthcare providers who manage oral anticoagulation therapy should utilize these parameters as a measure of their performance in an effort to achieve high-quality anticoagulation management.

  13. Suppression of aflatoxin B1-induced lipid abnormalities and macromolecule-adduct formation by L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Sachan, D S; Yatim, A M

    1992-01-01

    The fatty liver and hypolipidemia caused by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats fed Purina Rat Chow with or without L-carnitine supplement for 6 weeks. In Experiment 1, the rats (n = 20) were divided into four groups, i.e., nonsupplemented control (NSC), nonsupplemented AFB1 (NSA), carnitine supplemented control (CSC), and carnitine supplemented AFB1 (CSA). The NSA and CSA groups were given an oral dose of [3H]AFB1 (1 mg/kg) 6 hr before kill. In Experiment 2 (n = 10) there were only NSA and CSA groups and they were killed 24 hr post-AFB1 administration. Hepatic and plasma concentrations of total lipid, triglycerides, AFB1-macromolecules adducts and urinary excretion of AFB1 were determined. Carnitine supplementation ameliorated AFB1-induced hepatic steatosis and hypolipidemia. Supplementary carnitine reduced covalent binding of AFB1 to hepatic DNA, RNA, and protein. The carnitine effect was more pronounced after 24 hr than after 6 hr of AFB1 treatment. We conclude that supplementary carnitine suppressed AFB1-induced fatty liver and AFB1-macromolecule adduct formation in the rat.

  14. Carnitine status of lactoovovegetarians and strict vegetarian adults and children.

    PubMed

    Lombard, K A; Olson, A L; Nelson, S E; Rebouche, C J

    1989-08-01

    Because carnitine is contained primarily in meats and dairy products, vegetarian diets provide a model for assessing the impact of prolonged low carnitine intake on carnitine status. Plasma carnitine concentrations and urinary carnitine excretion were measured in adults and children consuming a strict vegetarian, lactoovovegetarian, or mixed diet. In adults plasma carnitine concentration and urinary carnitine excretion of strict vegetarians and lactoovovegetarians were significantly lower than those in the mixed-diet group but were not different from each other. In children significant differences were found between all three diet groups for both plasma carnitine concentration and urinary carnitine excretion. The differences in plasma carnitine concentrations were greater in children than in adults, possibly reflecting the effects of growth and tissue deposition. Small differences between diet groups in adults do not suggest a nutritionally significant difference in carnitine status. Whether vegetarian children are at greater risk for overt deficiency is not answered.

  15. Adherence, compliance and persistence to oral antineoplastic therapy: a review focused on chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Bellavia, Giuseppe; Ferraù, Francesco; Valerio, Maria Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    To date, orally administered chemotherapy and biologic agents represent a significant percentage of all antineoplastic treatments in several types of cancer, which are most likely to increase in the near future. In this scenario, the issue of adherence and persistence to oral therapy is a key issue since poor compliance to oral antineoplastic treatments may negatively influence patients' clinical outcomes and, in turn, cause an increase in costs, number of hospitalizations and time spent in the hospital. The issue of adherence to new oral chemotherapeutic and/or biologic agents has not been deeply evaluated and data published in medical literature are quite scarce. Adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon, which may be influenced by patient- and health-care provider-related factors, anticancer therapy itself, education and socioeconomic aspects. Patients' selection plays, therefore, a key role in maximizing adherence and persistence to oral therapies. Treating health-care practitioners should first evaluate patient reliability to avoid prescribing oral treatments to patients with socioeconomic and medical conditions, which may predict poor adherence. Adherence and persistence to new oral biologic agents, which are linked to several side effects and whose use is constantly widening, should represent a main endpoint of clinical research in the nearest future.

  16. Phage Therapy: A New Horizon in the Antibacterial Treatment of Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shlezinger, Mor; Khalifa, Leron; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Resch, Grégory; Que, Yok-Ai; Beyth, Shaul; Dorfman, Elisheva; Hazan, Ronen; Beyth, Nurit

    2017-01-01

    Dental diseases are perhaps the most prevalent infection-related diseases in humans. Biofilm is involved in almost every infectious disease compromising oral health, notably caries, periodontal disease, gingivitis, endodontic infections and peri-implantitis. Current therapies of biofilm-derived oral infections lack sensitivity; they are not species-specific and kill pathogenic species as well as commensal species, which are protective against the formation of pathogenic biofilms. Moreover, antibiotics have a limited effect on biofilm and are almost unused in oral diseases. A promising alternative approach is bacteriophage (phage) therapy. Phages play a key role in the natural balance in a predator-prey relationship with bacteria and thus have the potential to be efficient anti-bacterial agents. Phages are highly efficient against biofilm, strain specific and easy to isolate and manipulate. Thus, like in many other medicinal fields, phage therapy offers new horizons to dentistry, both therapeutics and research. The present review presents the etiology of common oral diseases, characterization of the infection and the treatment challenges of phage therapy in dentistry. Recent findings and development in the use of phages for prevention, control, and treatment of oral infections as well as possibilities of engineering the oral microbiome are discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  18. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  19. Pregnancy increases urinary loss of carnitine and reduces plasma carnitine in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Woon; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2005-05-01

    This study compared plasma and urinary carnitine concentrations in pregnant and non-pregnant Korean women. The subjects were fifty pregnant women and thirty non-pregnant women aged 24-28 years. During the first trimester, dietary carnitine intakes in the pregnant women were much lower than in non-pregnant women (70.00 (SD 29.22) micromol/d), but over the course of pregnancy carnitine intake increased from 44.64 (SD 24.84) micromol/d during the first trimester to 96.11 (SD 36.56) micromol/d during the third trimester. Pregnant women had a significantly lower plasma carnitine concentration than non-pregnant women. Plasma concentrations of non-esterified carnitine, acid-soluble acylcarnitine and total carnitine were significantly lower during the second and third trimesters than the first. Plasma acid-insoluble acylcarnitine levels, which tended to be higher in the non-pregnant women compared with the pregnant women, increased significantly as gestation proceeded. The urinary excretion of non-esterified carnitine, acid-soluble acylcarnitine and total carnitine was significantly higher in the pregnant women during the first and second trimesters than in non-pregnant women and decreased significantly as gestation proceeded. We found that there was a significant decrease in plasma carnitine level even though dietary carnitine intake increased as gestation proceeded. The low urinary excretion of carnitine in late pregnancy may be caused by an increased demand during pregnancy.

  20. Specific alkylation of a histidine residue in carnitine acetyltransferase by bromoacetyl-l-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J. F. A.; Tubbs, P. K.

    1970-01-01

    Incubation of carnitine acetyltransferase with low concentrations of bromoacetyl-l-carnitine causes a rapid and irreversible loss of enzyme activity; one mol of inhibitor can inactivate one mol of enzyme. Bromoacetyl-d-carnitine, iodoacetate or iodoacetamide are ineffective. l-Carnitine protects the transferase from bromoacetyl-l-carnitine. Investigation shows that the enzyme first reversibly binds bromoacetyl-l-carnitine with an affinity similar to that shown for the normal substrate acetyl-l-carnitine; this binding is followed by an alkylation reaction, forming the carnitine ester of a monocarboxymethyl-protein, which is catalytically inactive. The carnitine is released at an appreciable rate by spontaneous hydrolysis, and the resulting carboxymethyl-enzyme is also inactive. Total acid hydrolysis of enzyme after treatment with 2-[14C]bromoacetyl-l-carnitine yields N-3-carboxy[14C]methylhistidine as the only labelled amino acid. These findings, taken in conjunction with previous work, suggest that the single active centre of carnitine acetyltransferase contains a histidine residue. PMID:5461620

  1. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  2. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  3. Ocular changes with oral and transepidermal diethylcarbamazine therapy of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1981-07-01

    Twenty men with moderate infection of Onchocerca volvulus were studied in a double-masked, controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with topical DEC lotion. Visual acuity and colour vision did not alter during the 6 months of observation, although 2 patients receiving DEC lotion and 3 patients receiving oral DEC developed either visual field constriction or optic atrophy. Fluffy corneal opacities were common in both groups. Intraocular microfilariae also appeared in both groups but to a greater extent in those receiving DEC lotion. New chorioretinal changes developed in 4 men receiving lotion and in only 1 receiving tablets. It is concluded that DEC lotion offers no advantage over tablets in the treatment of ocular onchocerciasis and in fact may be associated with more ocular complications than the conventional oral treatment.

  4. Ocular changes with oral and transepidermal diethylcarbamazine therapy of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1981-01-01

    Twenty men with moderate infection of Onchocerca volvulus were studied in a double-masked, controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with topical DEC lotion. Visual acuity and colour vision did not alter during the 6 months of observation, although 2 patients receiving DEC lotion and 3 patients receiving oral DEC developed either visual field constriction or optic atrophy. Fluffy corneal opacities were common in both groups. Intraocular microfilariae also appeared in both groups but to a greater extent in those receiving DEC lotion. New chorioretinal changes developed in 4 men receiving lotion and in only 1 receiving tablets. It is concluded that DEC lotion offers no advantage over tablets in the treatment of ocular onchocerciasis and in fact may be associated with more ocular complications than the conventional oral treatment. Images PMID:7020746

  5. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Hamid R.; Janket, Sok J.; Baird, Alison E.; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” or “anticoagulation” and combined them with the search results of “dental”, “oral surgery” or “periodontal”. We restricted the results to “human” and “English”. Results: The early coagulation cascade, the new cell-based coagulation model, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conventional antithrombotics, and new oral anticoagulants were reviewed. The new direct factor Xa inhibitors and the direct thrombin inhibitor (s), called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) have rapid onset of action, fast elimination on cessation, and fewer drug-drug or drug-food interactions than warfarin. However, the lack of antidotes raises concerns that some dental procedures may trigger serious hemorrhagic events. Additionally, careful perioperative withdrawal and resumption protocols for the DOAs are reviewed, because DOAs’ blood levels are dependent on renal function. Also, various reversal strategies in the event of excessive bleedings are summarized. Perioperative management of dental patients taking new DOAs and conventional oral anticoagulants are also discussed. However, the perioperative strategies for DOAs are yet to be validated in randomized trials. Key words:Coagulation cascade, cell-based coagulation model, factor Xa inhibitors, direct thrombin inhibitors, prothrombin complex concentrates. PMID:23524440

  6. Muscle carnitine availability plays a central role in regulating fuel metabolism in the rodent.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Constantin, Despina; Leighton, Brendan; Poucher, Simon M; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2017-09-01

    Meldonium inhibits endogenous carnitine synthesis and tissue uptake, and accelerates urinary carnitine excretion, although the impact of meldonium-mediated muscle carnitine depletion on whole-body fuel selection, and muscle fuel metabolism and its molecular regulation is under-investigated. Ten days of oral meldonium administration did not impact on food or fluid intake, physical activity levels or body weight gain in the rat, whereas it depleted muscle carnitine content (all moieties), increased whole-body carbohydrate oxidation and muscle and liver glycogen utilization, and reduced whole-body fat oxidation. Meldonium reduced carnitine transporter protein expression across muscles of different contractile and metabolic phenotypes. A TaqMan PCR low-density array card approach revealed the abundance of 189 mRNAs regulating fuel selection was altered in soleus muscle by meldonium, highlighting the modulation of discrete cellular functions and metabolic pathways. These novel findings strongly support the premise that muscle carnitine availability is a primary regulator of fuel selection in vivo. The body carnitine pool is primarily confined to skeletal muscle, where it regulates carbohydrate (CHO) and fat usage. Meldonium (3-(2,2,2-trimethylhydrazinium)-propionate) inhibits carnitine synthesis and tissue uptake, although the impact of carnitine depletion on whole-body fuel selection, muscle fuel metabolism and its molecular regulation is under-investigated. Male lean Zucker rats received water (control, n = 8) or meldonium-supplemented water (meldonium, n = 8) for 10 days [1.6 g kg(-1) body mass (BM) day(-1) days 1-2, 0.8 g kg(-1)  BM day(-1) thereafter]. From days 7-10, animals were housed in indirect calorimetry chambers after which soleus muscle and liver were harvested. Food and fluid intake, weight gain and physical activity levels were similar between groups from days 7 to 10. Compared to control, meldonium depleted muscle total carnitine (P < 0

  7. Effect of L-carnitine on plasma glycemic and lipidemic profile in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, A R; Shakerhosseini, R; Saadat, N; Taleban, F; Pordal, A; Gollestan, B

    2005-04-01

    We designed this study to investigate the effects of oral L-carnitine administration on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and lipid parameters in patients with diabetes mellitus type II. The effect of L-carnitine on FPG and lipid parameters was investigated in 22 male and 13 female type II diabetic patients; the mean age +/- s.d. was 51.3 +/- 3.7 y. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups (L-carnitine and placebo group) and 1 g of L-carnitine or of placebo was given orally three times a day for a period of 12 weeks. FPG in the L-carnitine group decreased significantly from 143 +/- 35 to 130 +/- 33 mg/dl (P = 0.03), and we observed a significant increase of triglycerides (TG) from 196+/-61 to 233+/-12 mg/dl (P = 0.05), of Apo A1 from 94 +/- 20 to 103 +/- 23 mg/dl (P = 0.02), and of Apo B100 from 98 +/- 18 to 108 +/- 22 mg/dl (P = 0.02) after 12 weeks of treatment. There was no significant change in LDL-C, HDL-C, HbA1C, LP(a) or total cholesterol. L-Carnitine significantly lowers FPG but increases fasting triglyceride in type II diabetic patients.

  8. Photodynamic Therapy As a Promising Method Used in the Treatment of Oral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Prażmo, Ewa J; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Łapiński, Mariusz; Mielczarek, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) consists of three elements: photosensitizer, light and oxygen. The photosensitizer has the property of selective accumulation in abnormal or infected tissues without causing any damage to the healthy cells. This innovative therapeutic method has already been successfully adapted in many fields of medicine, e.g. dermatology, gynecology, urology and cancer therapy. Dentistry is also beginning to incorporate photodisinfection for treatment of the oral cavity. The antibacterial and fungicidal properties of the photosensitizer have been used to achieve better results in root canal treatment, periodontal therapy and the eradication of candidiasis in prosthodontics. The aim of this article is to discuss the effectiveness of photodynamic methods in the diagnosis and therapy of selected oral diseases. Scientific data and published papers regarding the antibacterial properties of PDT will be subjected to analysis. Photodynamic therapy will be discussed as an alternative treatment protocol in oncology, endodontics, periodontology and other fields of dentistry.

  9. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and pharmacological

  10. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  11. Novel oral taxane therapies: recent Phase I results

    PubMed Central

    Flores, John Paul; Saif, M Wasif

    2015-01-01

    The oral taxanes are analogues of existing taxanes with a possible broad range of antitumor activity. They also have the potential advantages of ease of administration, better efficacy and lesser toxicity than currently available taxanes. These drugs have been used in several Phase I clinical trials, the methodology and results of which will be reviewed here. PMID:26146540

  12. Myocardial infarction and left ventricular remodeling: results of the CEDIM trial. Carnitine Ecocardiografia Digitalizzata Infarto Miocardico.

    PubMed

    Colonna, P; Iliceto, S

    2000-02-01

    Left ventricular dilatation after acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a powerful predictor of progressive functional deterioration, culminating in heart failure and death. The most important determinants of post-MI left ventricular remodeling are the size of the infarct, the degree of residual stenosis in the infarct-related artery, and the viability of the infarct zone. In addition to reperfusion therapy and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, metabolic intervention with L-carnitine may represent a therapeutic approach for preventing left ventricular dilatation and preserving cardiac function. Ongoing studies with early metabolic intervention with carnitine in the acute phase of infarction may prove successful in protecting the microcirculation against ischemic damage and enhancing its ability to respond to blood flow resumption. The results of the multicenter, randomized, double-blind Carnitine Ecocardiografia Digitalizzata Infarto Miocardico (CEDIM) trial suggest that the early and long-term administration of L-carnitine attenuates progressive left ventricular dilatation after acute anterior MI. Results show significant, consistent reductions in end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume in patients who received L-carnitine compared with placebo. The ongoing CEDIM-2 trial (projected 4000 patients with acute MI) will assess the efficacy of L-carnitine in reducing the combined incidence of death and heart failure at 6 months. In addition to standard reperfusion therapy and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, metabolic intervention with L-carnitine may be a therapeutic approach for preventing left ventricular dilatation and preserving cardiac function by limiting infarct size, decreasing residual stenosis in the infarct-related artery, and increasing viability of the infarct zone.

  13. Topical and systemic therapies for oral and perioral herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-04-01

    Oral and perioral herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in healthy individuals often present with signs and symptoms that are clearly recognized by oral health care providers (OHCPs). Management of these infections is dependent upon a variety of factors and several agents may be used for treatment to accelerate healing and decrease symptoms associated with lesions. This article will review the pertinent aspects of topical and systemic therapies of HSV infections for the OHCP.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  15. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  16. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Trinacty, Connie M; Adams, Alyce S; Soumerai, Stephen B; Zhang, Fang; Meigs, James B; Piette, John D; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001) to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white) in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1) time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2) primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill); (3) time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4) long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed) over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7) and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes. PMID:19200387

  17. Oral Propranolol as an Alternative Therapy for Orbital Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia With Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    McClintic, Elysa A; Ting, Andrew; Yeatts, R Patrick

    An 8-year-old female patient presented with left upper eyelid swelling and erythema. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an orbital mass involving the left lacrimal gland with subsequent incisional biopsy leading to the diagnosis of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia. Initially prescribed an oral corticosteroid, alternative management was sought after 4 months due to unwanted side effects of steroid therapy. Oral propranolol (2 mg/kg/day) was initiated with concurrent steroid taper. Interval decrease in lesion size was observed on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging with complete resolution of subjective symptoms (Fig. 1). She remains stable 14 months after starting beta-blocker therapy. To our knowledge, our case is the second case report suggesting oral beta-blocker may be an alternative therapy for orbital angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia.

  18. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  19. Carnitine in bacterial physiology and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Jamie A.

    2015-01-01

    Carnitine is a quaternary amine compound found at high concentration in animal tissues, particularly muscle, and is most well studied for its contribution to fatty acid transport into mitochondria. In bacteria, carnitine is an important osmoprotectant, and can also enhance thermotolerance, cryotolerance and barotolerance. Carnitine can be transported into the cell or acquired from metabolic precursors, where it can serve directly as a compatible solute for stress protection or be metabolized through one of a few distinct pathways as a nutrient source. In this review, we summarize what is known about carnitine physiology and metabolism in bacteria. In particular, recent advances in the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways as well as the use of carnitine as an electron acceptor have addressed some long-standing questions in the field. PMID:25787873

  20. Peripapillary subretinal neovascularization in sarcoidosis: remission and exacerbation during oral corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji; Shiraki, Kunihiko; Yasunari, Takaharu; Kohno, Takeya; Miki, Tokuhiko

    2002-01-01

    In sarcoidosis, peripapillary subretinal neovascularization is rare. The role of corticosteroid therapy for subretinal neovascularization is controversial. A 38-year-old female patient weighing 38 kg with histologically diagnosed sarcoidosis presented with peripapillary subretinal neovascularization, retinal phlebitis, a hyperemic disc, and snowball vitreous opacities in the left eye. Oral betamethasone therapy at an initial dose of 3 mg/day reduced the size of subretinal neovascular membrane, and the membrane became fibrous. Despite the total initial 140 mg of betamethasone given over 2.5 months and the additional total 700 mg of prednisolone given over the next 2 months, the subretinal neovascularization recurred. Six months after the first recurrence, a second recurrence developed during the tapering-off period of oral corticosteroid therapy. At the second recurrence, the oral corticosteroid therapy was ineffective in reducing the size of the neovascular membrane. In our patient, oral corticosteroids temporarily suppressed peripapillary subretinal neovascularization but failed to prevent extension of neovascular membrane to the fovea because of recurrent sarcoidosis. Over time, oral corticosteroids appear to lose their effectiveness for treating repeated recurrence of peripapillary subretinal neovascularization associated with sarcoidosis.

  1. Herpes simplex virus detection in oral mucosa lesions in patients undergoing oncologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda Tebache, Ester; Brethauer Meier, Ursula; Jiménez Moraga, Marco; Morales Figueroa, Rocío; Rojas Castro, Jaime; Le Fort Canales, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) has been a frequent detection in gingivitis and ulcerations of oral mucosa in patients undergoing oncologic therapy. In these patients, lesions tend to show atypical clinical patterns, leading to misdiagnosis. To detect HSV, using an ELISA test, in oral lesions of patients under oncologic therapy, to determine localization of these lesions in the oral cavity, to relate their presence with the general diagnosis of the patient and to compare the test results with the previous clinical diagnosis of the lesions. Thirty lesions where examined in nineteen pediatric patients under oncologic therapy. Direct samples of all lesions were taken and an ELISA test for HSV type I and II was applied to them. General diagnosis of the patients was consigned, as well as localization of the lesions in the oral cavity and clinical diagnosis of them. A database was elaborated with all the information. 33% of lesions were positive to the test, most of them in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Localization of lesions was not restricted to areas of mucosa attached to periosteum, but also in areas like the dorsum of the tongue. Positive predictivity of clinical diagnosis was 56,25% and negative predictive index was 92,86%. Sensitivity of the test was 90% and specificity was 65%. It is very important to corroborate clinical diagnosis of gingivitis and ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity of patients under oncologic therapy with laboratory tests, because of the atypical clinical presentation that can lead to misdiagnosis.

  2. L-Carnitine supplementation to reverse hyperammonemia in a patient undergoing chronic valproic acid treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Cecilia; Guevara, Natalia; Silveira, Alicia; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid is a broad-spectrum anticonvulsant that has also gained attention in the psychiatric setting. With respect to safety, valproic acid may induce a seemingly rare condition, hyperammonemia, which can induce a wide variety of symptoms ranging from irritability to coma. The proposed mechanism of hyperammonemia involves depletion of carnitine and overproduction of a toxic metabolite, 4-en-valproic acid, both of which impair the urea cycle and thus ammonia elimination. Carnitine is a commonly used antidote for acute intoxication of valproic acid, but is not a therapeutic option for management of chronic adults with adverse effects related to valproic acid. We herein report a case involving a woman with epilepsy who developed hyperammonemia after a change in her anticonvulsant therapy. She reported increased seizures and gastrointestinal disturbances. Her ammonia, valproic acid, 4-en-valproic acid, and carnitine levels were monitored. Her ammonia level was elevated and her carnitine level was at the inferior limit of the population range. She was supplemented with carnitine at 1 g/day. After 1 month, her ammonia level decreased, her carnitine level increased, and her seizures were better controlled. Carnitine supplementation was useful for reversal of her hyperammonemia, allowing her to continue valproic acid for seizure control. PMID:28425821

  3. L-Carnitine supplementation to reverse hyperammonemia in a patient undergoing chronic valproic acid treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Cecilia; Guevara, Natalia; Silveira, Alicia; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta

    2017-06-01

    Valproic acid is a broad-spectrum anticonvulsant that has also gained attention in the psychiatric setting. With respect to safety, valproic acid may induce a seemingly rare condition, hyperammonemia, which can induce a wide variety of symptoms ranging from irritability to coma. The proposed mechanism of hyperammonemia involves depletion of carnitine and overproduction of a toxic metabolite, 4-en-valproic acid, both of which impair the urea cycle and thus ammonia elimination. Carnitine is a commonly used antidote for acute intoxication of valproic acid, but is not a therapeutic option for management of chronic adults with adverse effects related to valproic acid. We herein report a case involving a woman with epilepsy who developed hyperammonemia after a change in her anticonvulsant therapy. She reported increased seizures and gastrointestinal disturbances. Her ammonia, valproic acid, 4-en-valproic acid, and carnitine levels were monitored. Her ammonia level was elevated and her carnitine level was at the inferior limit of the population range. She was supplemented with carnitine at 1 g/day. After 1 month, her ammonia level decreased, her carnitine level increased, and her seizures were better controlled. Carnitine supplementation was useful for reversal of her hyperammonemia, allowing her to continue valproic acid for seizure control.

  4. Studies concerning the ergogenic value of protein supply and 1-carnitine in elite junior cyclists.

    PubMed

    Drăgan, G I; Wagner, W; Ploeşteanu, E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of protein supply and 1-carnitine were recorded in a group of junior elite cyclists by a prospective double blind placebo controlled trial for six weeks (Refit milk powder containing about 90% proteins and 5% mineral salts-Ca, P, K, Na and 1-carnitine tablets). Seven top junior cyclists received orally 1 g protein/kg.d as supplement of food for six weeks and 2 g 1-carnitine, also orally, per day, 10 days before an important competition; other 7 cyclists received the same regimen as placebo. Significant and favourable changes were recorded in the treated group for the strength index, lean body mass, fat mass, TWP (total work-kgm, performed on cycloergometer 1', serum proteins, serum Hb, serum calcium) changes which did not appear in the control group. Serum cholesterol, creatinine, thymol test and serum GPT did not change significantly in either group. All athletes were under medical supervision, had a controlled training programme and food and received daily only vitamins and mineral salts. The treated group supported better the stress-induced efforts and obtained higher performances in the international competition which took place at the end of the experiment. Based on these data the authors recommend a supply of protein ratio up to 3.2 g/kg.d, six weeks before competition and 2 g 1-carnitine daily, also orally, 10 to 14 days before competition, including the day of competition, for cyclists, in order to improve the biological potential of the body.

  5. Oral Nanostructured Lipid Carriers Loaded with Near-Infrared Dye for Image-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Kaikai; Zhou, Yiwen; Ding, Ling; Ullah, Aftab; Hu, Qi; Sun, Minjie; Oupický, David

    2016-09-28

    Photothermal therapy exerts its anticancer effect by converting laser radiation energy into hyperthermia using a suitable photosensitizer. This study reports development of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) suitable for noninvasive oral delivery of a near-infrared photosensitizer dye IR780. The carrier encapsulating the dye (IR780@NLCs) was stable in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions and showed greatly enhanced oral absorption of IR780 when compared with the free dye. As a result of increased oral bioavailability, enhanced accumulation of the dye in subcutaneous mouse colon tumors (CT-26 cells) was observed following oral gavage of IR780@NLCs. Photothermal antitumor activity of orally administered IR780@NLCs was evaluated following local laser irradiation of the CT-26 tumors. We observed significant effect of the photothermal IR780@NLCs treatment on the rate of the tumor growth and no toxicity associated with the oral administration of IR780@NLCs. Overall, orally administered IR780@NLCs represents a safe and noninvasive method to achieve systemic tumor delivery of a photosensitizing dye for applications in photothermal anticancer therapies.

  6. Bilateral nasal bone osteophytosis associated with short-term oral isotretinoin therapy for cystic acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Novick, N L; Lawson, W; Schwartz, I S

    1984-10-01

    Bilateral 2.5 and 3.0 mm nasal bone osteophytes developed five weeks following the initiation of oral isotretinoin therapy (50 mg daily) for severe cystic acne vulgaris in a healthy 30-year-old white woman who had undergone uneventful rhinoplasty 12 years earlier. Histologically mature bone fragments were removed at surgery. Vitamin A and its analogs have been reported to cause hyperostosis of the vertebrae and long bones, but no known reports link them to nasal bone changes. Clinically significant nasal bone osteophytosis may be another adverse reaction to oral isotretinoin therapy.

  7. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  8. The effect of L-carnitine on T-maze learning ability in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lohninger, S; Strasser, A; Bubna-Littitz, H

    2001-06-01

    L-carnitine is of considerable interest because of its capacity to counteract several physiological and pathological phenomena typical of brain aging processes. We examined the effects of L-carnitine on the learning ability of old rats. 100 mg/kg per body weight per day L-carnitine was administered orally to old (21 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats (OLD-CAR) for a period of 2 months. Old (21 months, OLD-CO) and young (7 months, YG-CO) control animals received tap water exclusively. Performance of the OLD-CAR and OLD-CO was compared with that of YG-CO in a multiple T-maze. The mean run time values showed a significant (P=0.01) difference of the OLD-CAR rats to the OLD-CO but no significant differences between OLD-CAR and YG-CO. For the T-maze parameter mean correct responses we were able to demonstrate that L-carnitine treated old rats made significantly (P=0.03) less errors and significantly (P=0.01) more animals reached the T-maze goal compared with OLD-CO but no significant differences were observed between OLD-CAR and YG-CO. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that carnitine treatment improves the learning ability of old rats and seems to be able to reduce the loss of cognitive functions that occur with aging.

  9. Oral health education and therapy reduces gingivitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Maria L; Geurs, Nicolaas C; Bain, Jennifer L; Kaur, Maninder; Vassilopoulos, Philip J; Cliver, Suzanne P; Hauth, John C; Reddy, Michael S

    2014-02-01

    Pregnant women demonstrate increases in gingivitis despite similar plaque levels to non-pregnant counterparts. To evaluate an intensive protocol aimed at reducing gingivitis in pregnant women and provide pilot data for large-scale randomized controlled trials investigating oral hygiene measures to reduce pregnancy gingivitis and alter maternity outcomes. One hundred and twenty participants between 16 and 24 weeks gestation with Gingival Index (GI) scores ≥2 at ≥50% of tooth sites were enrolled. Plaque index (PI), gingival inflammation (GI), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were recorded at baseline and 8 weeks. Dental prophylaxis was performed at baseline and oral hygiene instructions at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Pregnancy outcomes were recorded at parturition. Mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare clinical measurements at baseline and 8 weeks. Statistically significant reductions in PI, GI, PD, and CAL occurred over the study period. Mean whole mouth PI and GI scores decreased approximately 50% and the percentage of sites with PI and GI ≥2 decreased from 40% to 17% and 53% to 21.8%, respectively. Mean decreases in whole mouth PD and CAL of 0.45 and 0.24 mm, respectively, were seen. Intensive oral hygiene regimen decreased gingivitis in pregnant patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Positive influence of L-carnitine on the different muscle fibres types of racing pigeons.

    PubMed

    Chang, M H; Tsai, F H; Chou, S J; Wang, J H; Lo, D Y; Zheng, Z Z; Chan, K W; Lai, J M

    2014-08-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), Ca(2+) ATPase, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), are involved in energy metabolism. These enzymes can be used as indicators of the energy capacity of aerobic cells. The study investigated the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on M. pectoralis superficialis, M. pectoralis profundus, M. extensor carpi radialis muscle and M. flexor carpi ulnaris. Twenty-eight racing pigeons hatched at the same time were divided randomly into three groups. Eight pigeons, which were used as the control group, were sacrificed at 92-day old. The remaining twenty pigeons continued training until they reached 157-day old, with half the pigeons getting 25 mg/head/day of L-carnitine, while the other half given the same amount of water. The pigeons were assessed by histochemical methods and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To assess influence of L-carnitine on muscle fibre composition and the performance of three genes' mRNA, this study applied SDH localization, SDH, Ca(2+) ATPase and LDH mRNA expression to examine the results after oral administration of L-carnitine in vivo in racing pigeons. The results showed that L-carnitine significantly elevated the amount of white muscle fibre type IIa (p < 0.05). The mRNA expression quantities of SDH and LDH gene was higher via RT-PCR method. However, the expression of Ca(2+) ATPase remains similar. In conclusion, appropriate oral administration of L-carnitine of 25 mg/pigeon/day will result in an improvement of muscles related to flying.

  11. Effect of L-Carnitine in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis on Energy Metabolism Using Indirect Calorimetry: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Iwata, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Background L-carnitine supplementation has been suggested to show several favorable effects on patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). However, there have been no reports regarding the effect of L-carnitine on energy metabolism in patients with LC using indirect calorimetry which is a well-established method for assessing the degree of liver malnutrition. We examined the effect of L-carnitine in patients with LC on energy metabolism using indirect calorimetry. Methods A total of 13 LC patients who are scheduled to be treated with L-carnitine (1,800 mg/day) were analyzed in this study. None of the patients previously received L-carnitine. An evaluation of the nutritional status was performed at the initiation of L-carnitine therapy and after 4 weeks of L-carnitine therapy. We evaluated the effect of L-carnitine on the nutritional status and energy metabolism by comparing various clinical variables at these two time points. In addition, the changes in the nutritional status of the patients were also evaluated using indirect calorimetry. Results After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases, the mean substrate oxidation rates of carbohydrate (%C) increased from 37.6% to 48.2%, the mean substrate oxidation rates of fat (%F) decreased from 40.2% to 31.9% and the mean substrate oxidation rates of protein (%P) decreased from 22.2% to 19.9%. In a subgroup analysis of patients with baseline non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ) < 0.85, the mean %C increased from 15.3% to 34.2%, the mean %F decreased from 59.9% to 45.1%, and the mean %P decreased from 24.8% to 20.6%. After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases (n = 13), the mean value of npRQ increased in comparison with the baseline levels, although the difference was not significant (0.868 ± 0.060 vs. 0.838 ± 0.097, P = 0.19). Conversely, in patients with baseline npRQ < 0.85, the npRQ value significantly increased after 4 weeks treatment of L-carnitine compared with the baseline levels (0.827 ± 0.030 vs

  12. Beneficial effect of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and L-carnitine combination in preference to each in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moeinian, Mahsa; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Mozaffari, Shilan; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Baeeri, Maryam; Navaea-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the beneficial effect of the combination of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei, and L-carnitine in a rat colitis model. METHODS: Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral butyrate, L-carnitine, Lactobacillus casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups included negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic, histopathological examinations, and biomarkers such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interlukin-1β (IL-1β), myeloperoxidase (MPO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and ferric reduced ability of plasma (FRAP) were determined in the colon. RESULTS: The combination therapy exhibited a significant beneficial effect in alleviation of colitis compared to controls. Overall changes in reduction of TNF-α (114.66 ± 18.26 vs 171.78 ± 9.48 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), IL-1β (24.9 ± 1.07 vs 33.06 ± 2.16 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), TBARS (0.2 ± 0.03 vs 0.49 ± 0.04 μg/mg protein, P < 0.01), MPO (15.32 ± 0.4 vs 27.24 ± 3.84 U/mg protein, P < 0.05), and elevation of FRAP (23.46 ± 1.2 vs 15.02 ± 2.37 μmol/L, P < 0.05) support the preference of the combination therapy in comparison to controls. Although the monotherapies were also effective in improvement of colitis markers, the combination therapy was much better in improvement of colon oxidative stress markers including FRAP, TBARS, and MPO. CONCLUSION: The present combination is a suitable mixture in control of experimental colitis and should be trialed in the clinical setting. PMID:25152589

  13. Insight into barriers against optimal adherence to oral hormonal therapy in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Margaret C; Hudis, Clifford A

    2008-04-01

    Suboptimal adherence to prescribed oral anticancer agents has been demonstrated in several studies. Understanding the barriers to treatment compliance is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of oral agents available to treat women with breast cancer. To identify barriers that affect patient adherence to oral hormonal medications, a self-reported, 30-question Internet survey was posted on the Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization Web site, www.y-me.org, from June 30, 2005, through October 31, 2005. Of the 542 respondents who began the survey, 328 completed it. Of those who answered the question related to whether healthcare professionals encouraged adherence, only 44.2% reported receiving instruction on the importance of taking oral medication as directed at every office visit. For 33%, the topic was reportedly discussed only once, and this occurred before treatment. Although 83.6% of patients indicated that they were taking their oral therapy as directed, only 57.4% rated their ability to adhere to therapy as excellent (not missing a single dose in the past month). The most frequently cited factors for increasing compliance to oral medications were knowing adherence could improve clinical outcomes (88.7%) and better management of treatment-related side effects (60.2%). The results of this survey suggest that treatment adherence could be improved if healthcare professionals discuss and emphasize (1) the importance of taking oral medications as directed and (2) the effect of adherence on clinical outcomes. Additional research is needed to evaluate the optimal methods for improving compliance with oral therapy.

  14. Examining the use of oral rehydration salts and other oral rehydration therapy for childhood diarrhea in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Blum, Lauren S; Oria, Prisca A; Olson, Christine K; Breiman, Robert F; Ram, Pavani K

    2011-12-01

    Reductions in the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in sub-Saharan Africa highlight the need to examine caregiver perceptions of ORT during diarrheal episodes. Qualitative research involving group discussions with childcare providers and in-depth interviews with 45 caregivers of children < 5 years of age who had experienced diarrhea was conducted in one rural and urban site in Kenya during July-December 2007. Diarrhea was considered a dangerous condition that can kill young children. Caregivers preferred to treat diarrhea with Western drugs believed to be more effective in stopping diarrhea than ORT. Inconsistent recommendations from health workers regarding use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) caused confusion about when ORS is appropriate and whether it requires a medical prescription. In the rural community, causal explanations about diarrhea, beliefs in herbal remedies, cost, and distance to health facilities presented additional barriers to ORS use. Health communication is needed to clarify the function of ORT in preventing dehydration.

  15. Examining the Use of Oral Rehydration Salts and Other Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhea in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Lauren S.; Oria, Prisca A.; Olson, Christine K.; Breiman, Robert F.; Ram, Pavani K.

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in sub-Saharan Africa highlight the need to examine caregiver perceptions of ORT during diarrheal episodes. Qualitative research involving group discussions with childcare providers and in-depth interviews with 45 caregivers of children < 5 years of age who had experienced diarrhea was conducted in one rural and urban site in Kenya during July–December 2007. Diarrhea was considered a dangerous condition that can kill young children. Caregivers preferred to treat diarrhea with Western drugs believed to be more effective in stopping diarrhea than ORT. Inconsistent recommendations from health workers regarding use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) caused confusion about when ORS is appropriate and whether it requires a medical prescription. In the rural community, causal explanations about diarrhea, beliefs in herbal remedies, cost, and distance to health facilities presented additional barriers to ORS use. Health communication is needed to clarify the function of ORT in preventing dehydration. PMID:22144457

  16. Effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive therapy of Gram-negative bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Kutob, Leila F; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-11-01

    There is paucity of data evaluating intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch options for Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs). This retrospective cohort study examined the effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive treatment of Gram-negative BSI. Patients with Gram-negative BSI hospitalised for <14 days at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2013 and discharged on oral antibiotics were included in this study. The cohort was stratified into three groups based on bioavailability of oral antibiotics prescribed (high, ≥95%; moderate, 75-94%; and low, <75%). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine treatment failure. Among the 362 patients, high, moderate and low bioavailability oral antibiotics were prescribed to 106, 179 and 77 patients, respectively, for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Mean patient age was 63 years, 217 (59.9%) were women and 254 (70.2%) had a urinary source of infection. Treatment failure rates were 2%, 12% and 14% in patients receiving oral antibiotics with high, moderate and low bioavailability, respectively (P = 0.02). Risk of treatment failure in the multivariate Cox model was higher in patients receiving antibiotics with moderate [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-38.5; P = 0.005] and low bioavailability (aHR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.9-51.5; P = 0.003) compared with those receiving oral antimicrobial agents with high bioavailability. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of oral antibiotics with high bioavailability for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Risk of treatment failure increases as bioavailability of the oral regimen declines.

  17. Prevention and management of antineoplastic therapy induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bey, Afshan; Ahmed, Syed S; Hussain, Bilal; Devi, Seema; Hashmi, Sarwat H

    2010-07-01

    With the scientific advancements in the management of malignant diseases, the treatment is expensive and bears high morbidity in term of oral mucositis. It is a debilitating condition and has been researched extensively for its pathogenesis and treatment. Various treatment options include barrier forming, mucosal protectants, mouth rinses, growth factors, lasers and midline-sparing procedures. Some agents are used locally while others are administered systemically. Despite the availability of a wide range of treatment options for mucositis, a cost-effective treatment is yet to be evolved.

  18. Gene therapy in the management of oral cancer: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ayllón Barbellido, Sonia; Campo Trapero, Julián; Cano Sánchez, Jorge; Perea García, Miguel A; Escudero Castaño, Nayra; Bascones Martínez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy essentially consists of introducing specific genetic material into target cells without producing toxic effects on surrounding tissue. Advances over recent decades in the surgical, radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatment of oral cancer patients have not produced a significant improvement in patient survival. Increasing interest is being shown in developing novel therapies to reverse oral epithelial dysplastic lesions. This review provides an update on transfer techniques, therapeutic strategies, and the clinical applications and limitations of gene therapy in the management of oral cancer and precancer. We highlight the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy (e.g., 5-Fluoracil) and immunotherapy, given the promising results obtained in the use of adenovirus to act at altered gene level (e.g., p53). Other techniques such as suicide gene therapy, use of oncolytic viruses or the use of antisense RNA have shown positive although very preliminary results. Therefore, further research into these promising gene therapy techniques is required to assess their true efficacy and safety in the management of these lesions.

  19. Treatment of oral fungal infections using antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a systematic review of currently available evidence.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Romanos, Georgios E

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to review the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of oral fungal infections. To address the focused question "Should PDT be considered a possible treatment regimen for oral fungal infections?" PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1997 up to March 2014 using various combinations of the following key words: "Candida albicans"; "Candidiasis"; "Candidosis"; "denture stomatitis"; "oral" and "photodynamic therapy". Original studies, experimental studies and articles published solely in English language were sought. Letters to the editor, historic reviews and unpublished data were excluded. Pattern of the present literature review was customized to mainly summarize the pertinent information. Fifteen studies (3 clinical and 12 experimental) were included. All studies reported antimicrobial PDT to be an effective antifungal treatment strategy. One study reported PDT and azole therapy to be equally effective in the treatment of oral fungal infections. Methylene blue, toluidine blue and porphyrin derivative were the most commonly used photosensitizers. The laser wavelengths and power output ranged between ∼455 nm-660 nm and 30 mW-400 mW. The energy fluence ranged between 26-245 J cm(-2) and the duration or irradiation ranged between 10 seconds and 26 minutes. Clinical effectiveness of antimicrobial PDT as a potent therapeutic strategy for oral fungal infections requires further investigations.

  20. Oral ofloxacin therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in mice after irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Ledney, G D

    1990-01-01

    Death subsequent to whole-body irradiation is associated with gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with the new quinolone ofloxacin for orally acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 7.0 Gy of bilateral radiation from 60Co. A dose of 10(7) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Only 4 of 20 untreated mice (20%) survived for at least 30 days compared with 19 of 20 mice (95%) treated with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). P. aeruginosa was isolated from the livers of 21 to 28 untreated mice (75%), compared with only 2 of 30 treated mice (P less than 0.005). Ofloxacin reduced colonization of the ileum by P. aeruginosa; 24 of 28 untreated mice (86%) harbored the organisms, compared with only 5 of 30 (17%) with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). This experiment was replicated twice, and similar results were obtained. These data illustrate the efficacy of the quinolone ofloxacin for oral therapy of orally acquired P. aeruginosa infection in irradiated hosts. PMID:2117418

  1. Non-oral dopaminergic therapies for Parkinson’s disease: current treatments and the future

    PubMed Central

    Ray Chaudhuri, K; Qamar, Mubasher A; Rajah, Thadshani; Loehrer, Philipp; Sauerbier, Anna; Odin, Per; Jenner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract has now been recognized to affect all stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The consequences lead to problems with absorption of oral medication, erratic treatment response, as well as silent aspiration, which is one of the key risk factors in developing pneumonia. The issue is further complicated by other gut abnormalities, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and an altered gut microbiota, which occur in PD with variable frequency. Clinically, these gastrointestinal abnormalities might be associated with symptoms such as nausea, early-morning “off”, and frequent motor and non-motor fluctuations. Therefore, non-oral therapies that avoid the gastrointestinal system seem a rational option to overcome the problems of oral therapies in PD. Hence, several non-oral strategies have now been actively investigated and developed. The transdermal rotigotine patch, infusion therapies with apomorphine, intrajejunal levodopa, and the apomorphine pen strategy are currently in clinical use with a few others in development. In this review, we discuss and summarize the most recent developments in this field with a focus on non-oral dopaminergic strategies (excluding surgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation) in development or to be licensed for management of PD. PMID:28725704

  2. Non-oral dopaminergic therapies for Parkinson's disease: current treatments and the future.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, K; Qamar, Mubasher A; Rajah, Thadshani; Loehrer, Philipp; Sauerbier, Anna; Odin, Per; Jenner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract has now been recognized to affect all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). The consequences lead to problems with absorption of oral medication, erratic treatment response, as well as silent aspiration, which is one of the key risk factors in developing pneumonia. The issue is further complicated by other gut abnormalities, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and an altered gut microbiota, which occur in PD with variable frequency. Clinically, these gastrointestinal abnormalities might be associated with symptoms such as nausea, early-morning "off", and frequent motor and non-motor fluctuations. Therefore, non-oral therapies that avoid the gastrointestinal system seem a rational option to overcome the problems of oral therapies in PD. Hence, several non-oral strategies have now been actively investigated and developed. The transdermal rotigotine patch, infusion therapies with apomorphine, intrajejunal levodopa, and the apomorphine pen strategy are currently in clinical use with a few others in development. In this review, we discuss and summarize the most recent developments in this field with a focus on non-oral dopaminergic strategies (excluding surgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation) in development or to be licensed for management of PD.

  3. A novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy[S

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Gao, Feng; Meriwether, David; Grijalva, Victor; Springstead, James R.; Palgnachari, Mayakonda N.; Namiri-Kalantari, Ryan; Su, Feng; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Wagner, Alan C.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tomato plants were constructed with an empty vector (EV) or a vector expressing an apoA-I mimetic peptide, 6F. EV or 6F tomatoes were harvested, lyophilized, ground into powder, added to Western diet (WD) at 2.2% by weight, and fed to LDL receptor-null (LDLR−/−) mice at 45 mg/kg/day 6F. After 13 weeks, the percent of the aorta with lesions was 4.1 ± 4%, 3.3 ± 2.4%, and 1.9 ± 1.4% for WD, WD + EV, and WD + 6F, respectively (WD + 6F vs. WD, P = 0.0134; WD + 6F vs. WD + EV, P = 0.0386; WD + EV vs. WD, not significant). While body weight did not differ, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), total cholesterol, triglycerides, and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels were less in WD + 6F mice; P < 0.0295. HDL cholesterol and paroxonase-1 activity (PON) were higher in WD + 6F mice (P = 0.0055 and P = 0.0254, respectively), but not in WD + EV mice. Plasma SAA, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LPA, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) levels positively correlated with lesions (P < 0.0001); HDL cholesterol and PON were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). After feeding WD + 6F: i) intact 6F was detected in small intestine (but not in plasma); ii) small intestine LPA was decreased compared with WD + EV (P < 0.0469); and iii) small intestine LPA 18:2 positively correlated with the percent of the aorta with lesions (P < 0.0179). These data suggest that 6F acts in the small intestine and provides a novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy. PMID:23378594

  4. [Dentistry oral hygiene and endocarditis. Pathophysiology and prophylactic therapy].

    PubMed

    Santacroce, Luigi; Cagiano, Raffaele; Carlaio, Roberto G; Del Prete, Raffaele; Bottalico, Lucrezia

    2008-10-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a cardiac pathology of bacterial, viral or more rarely mycotic origin developing on the surfaces of the endocardium or heart valves. Predisposing conditions are congenital malformations of the heart or valvular acquired alterations, as well as the presence of a valvular prosthesis. The microorganisms involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of the damage of such infection (bacterias, viruses or yeasts) determine the formation of the endocardic vegetations typical of this condition. Such lesions can be located on the valvular or the parietal endocardium and sometimes on the endothelium of a great artery. In despite of the elevated standards of instrumental investigations and therapeutic protocols, the bacterial endocarditis represents a pathology of wide interest, scientific and social, due to its high rate of incidence, morbility and mortality. Still now infectious endocarditis causes death in 20-30% of the patients. Although the significant progress on prevention of the infectious diseases and of the cross infections in dentistry practice, from the tartar ablation up to the oncologic oral surgery, still now the skills of oral hygiene and dentistry represent a potential threat for the development of an infectious endocarditis in predisposed patients. The authors, on the base of the revision of the literature and of their own clinical experience, show the etiology, pathophysiology and the clinical pictures related to such complex disease.

  5. Postoperative Bleeding Risk for Oral Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeuch, Jürgen; Haase, Martina; Semmusch, Jan; Eichhorn, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Object. To determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding for oral osteotomy carried out under continued monoantiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and dual therapy with clopidogrel/aspirin. Design. Retrospective single center observatory study of two study groups and a control group. Methods. A total of 64 and 60 oral osteotomy procedures carried out under continued monoclopidogrel therapy and dual clopidogrel/aspirin therapy, respectively, were followed for two weeks for postoperative bleeding. Another 281 similar procedures were also followed as a control group. All oral osteotomy procedures were carried out on an outpatient basis. Results. We observed postoperative bleeding in 2/281 (0.7%) cases in the control group, in 1/64 (1.6%) cases in the clopidogrel group, and in 2/60 (3.3%) cases in the dual clopidogrel/aspirin group. The corresponding 95% confidence intervals are 0–1.7%, 0–4.7%, and 0–7.8%, respectively, and the incidences did not differ significantly among the three groups (P > 0.09). Postoperative hemorrhage was treated successfully in all cases with local measures. No changes of antiplatelet medication, transfusion, nor hospitalisation were necessary. No major cardiovascular events were recorded. Conclusions. Our results indicate that minor oral surgery can be performed safely under continued monoantiplatelet medication with clopidogrel or dual antiplatelet medication with clopidogrel/aspirin. PMID:25632402

  6. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to treat chemotherapy-induced oral lesions: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Breno Amaral; Melo Filho, Mário Rodrigues; Simões, Alyne

    2016-03-01

    The development of Angular Cheilitis and the reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus, could be related to a decrease in the resistance of the immune system in the infected host, being common in cancer patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. The objective of the present manuscript is to report Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a treatment of infected oral lesions of patients submitted to chemotherapy.

  7. Effects of oral tacrolimus as a rapid induction therapy in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ken; Inoue, Takuya; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Narabayashi, Ken; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Nogami, Koji; Hida, Nobuyuki; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kenji; Umegaki, Eiji; Nakamura, Shiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy and safety of rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus without a meal in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Between May 2010 and August 2012, 49 steroid-refractory UC patients (55 flare-ups) were consecutively enrolled. All patients were treated with oral tacrolimus without a meal at an initial dose of 0.1 mg/kg per day. The dose was adjusted to maintain trough whole-blood levels of 10-15 ng/mL for the first 2 wk. Induction of remission at 2 and 4 wk after tacrolimus treatment initiation was evaluated using Lichtiger’s clinical activity index (CAI). RESULTS: The mean CAI was 12.6 ± 3.6 at onset. Within the first 7 d, 93.5% of patients maintained high trough levels (10-15 ng/mL). The CAI significantly decreased beginning 2 d after treatment initiation. At 2 wk, 73.1% of patients experienced clinical responses. After tacrolimus initiation, 31.4% and 75.6% of patients achieved clinical remission at 2 and 4 wk, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus shortened the time to achievement of appropriate trough levels and demonstrated a high remission rate 28 d after treatment initiation. Rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus appears to be a useful therapy for the treatment of refractory UC. PMID:25684955

  8. Case reports: minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation resolves during oral isotretinoin therapy.

    PubMed

    Soung, Jennifer; Cohen, Justine; Phelps, Robert; Cohen, Steven R

    2007-12-01

    Although disfiguring hyperpigmentation is a well-defined complication of minocycline therapy, modalities to reverse the phenomenon are unpredictable. We report a case of minocycline-induced, blue-black pigmentation in a 23-year-old Hispanic man, which resolved after treatment with oral isotretinoin for acne vulgaris.

  9. Oral Vancomycin Therapy in a Child with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Buness, Cynthia; Miloh, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare progressive liver disease characterized by cholestasis and bile duct fibrosis, has no accepted, effective therapy known to delay or arrest its progression. We report a 15 year old female patient diagnosed with PSC and moderate chronic active ulcerative colitis (UC) who achieved normalization of her liver enzymes and bile ducts, and resolution of her UC symptoms with colonic mucosal healing, after treatment with a single drug therapy of the antibiotic oral vancomycin. We postulate that the oral vancomycin may be acting both as an antibiotic by altering the intestinal microbiome and as an immunomodulator. Oral vancomycin may be a promising treatment for PSC that needs to be further studied in randomized trials. PMID:27738604

  10. Administration of Coagulation-Altering Therapy in the Patient Presenting for Oral Health and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Halaszynski, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Oral health care providers are concerned with how to manage patients prescribed coagulation-altering therapy during the perioperative/periprocedural period for dental and oral surgery interventions. Management and recommendation can be based on medication pharmacology and the clinical relevance of coagulation factor levels/deficiencies. Caution should be used with concurrent use of medications that affect other components of the clotting mechanisms; prompt diagnosis and any necessary intervention to optimize outcome is warranted. However, evidence-based data on management of anticoagulation therapy during oral and maxillofacial surgery/interventions is lacking. Therefore, clinical understanding and judgment are needed along with appropriate guidelines matching patient- and intervention-specific recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [L-carnitine: metabolism, functions and value in pathology].

    PubMed

    Jacob, C; Belleville, F

    1992-11-01

    Although L-carnitine is not considered as an essential nutrient, endogenous synthesis may fail to ensure adequate L-carnitine levels in neonates, especially those born prematurely. Free L-carnitine is found in many foods, mainly those from animal sources. Absorption of free L-carnitine is virtually complete. Lysine and methionine are necessary ingredients for the biosynthesis of L-carnitine. All tissues in the body can produce deoxy-carnitine but, in humans, the enzyme that enables hydroxylation of deoxy-carnitine to carnitine is found only in the liver, brain and kidneys. Complex exchanges of carnitine and its precursors occur between tissues. Muscles take up carnitine from the bloodstream and contain most of the body carnitine stores. L-carnitine and L-carnitine esters are eliminated mainly through the kidneys, which may play a central role in the homeostasis of this compound. Thyroid hormones adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), and diet all influence urinary excretion of L-carnitine. Free L-carnitine can be assayed in plasma and urine and is occasionally measured in muscle biopsy specimens. Plasma L-carnitine levels may not accurately reflect L-carnitine body stores. L-carnitine ensures transfer of fatty acids to the mitochondria where they undergo oxidation. This process is associated with production of short-chain acylcarnitine which exit from the mitochondria or peroxisomes. L-carnitine ensures regeneration of coenzyme A and is thus involved in energy metabolism. L-carnitine also ensures elimination of xenobiotic substances. Carnitine deficiencies are common. Currently, these deficiencies are classified into two groups. In deficiencies with myopathy, only the muscles are deficient in L-carnitine, perhaps as a result of a primary anomaly of the L-carnitine transport system in muscles. In systemic deficiencies, L-carnitine levels are low in the plasma and in all body tissues. Systemic L-carnitine deficiencies are usually the result of a variety of disease states

  12. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women.

  13. Influence of acetyl-L-carnitine infusion on haemodynamic parameters and survival of circulatory-shock patients.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, A; Corbucci, G G; De Blasi, R A; Antonelli, M; Bagiella, E; D'Iddio, S; Trevisani, C

    1991-01-01

    The clinical use of acetyl carnitine in circulatory shock has its theoretical basis in the ability of this molecule to restore enzyme activity inhibited by hypoxia, acting as an acetyl donor. Moreover the action of carnitine on an injured myocardium encouraged us to examine the clinical effect of this drug during heart failure. A double-blind clinical study was performed in ten Italian intensive care units on 115 patients with septic, cardiac of traumatic shock, by using acetyl-L-carnitine infusion for 12 hours, with a previous single bolus intravenously. The results showed a good response to the drug in terms of blood oxygenation during the course of sepsis and heart failure. The heart rate as well as right atrial pressure decreased significantly in patients with cardiogenic shock. In septic patients systolic and mean arterial pressures increased also. The present data suggests the use of acetyl-L-carnitine as an adjuvant to the commonly used therapy in hypoxic conditions.

  14. Perceived Effectiveness, Self-efficacy, and Social Support for Oral Appliance Therapy Among Older Veterans With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Nancy J; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Michael N; Hays, Ron D; Col, Nananda; Patterson, Emily S; Jouldjian, Stella; Josephson, Karen; Fung, Constance H

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a prevalent sleep disorder among older adults. Oral appliances are increasingly prescribed as therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. Adherence to oral appliance therapy is highly variable. Based on value-expectancy theory and other social-psychological theories, adherence to oral appliance therapy may be influenced by patients' perceived effectiveness of the therapy, self-efficacy, and availability of social support. We examined these perceptions among older adults with obstructive sleep apnea who were prescribed oral appliance therapy. We mailed surveys to all patients aged ≥65 years who had been prescribed oral appliance therapy for obstructive sleep apnea over the prior 36 months at a Veterans Affairs medical center. We examined frequencies of responses to items that assessed perceived effectiveness, self-efficacy, and social support for nightly use of oral appliances from friends, family, or health care staff. Thirty-nine individuals responded (response rate, 30%; mean [SD] age 71.4 [SD 6.3] years; 97% male). Thirty-six percent of the respondents perceived regular use of oral appliance therapy to be effective in managing obstructive sleep apnea; 39% agreed that they felt confident about using oral appliances regularly; 41% felt supported by people in their life in using oral appliance therapy; and 38% agreed that health care staff would help them to use their oral appliance regularly. These rates represented less than half of respondents despite the finding that 65% of patients believed that they would use their oral appliance regularly. Although oral appliance therapy is increasingly prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea, only about one third of older adults prescribed it perceived it to be an effective treatment, were confident about oral appliance use, and/or believed that they would receive needed support. Future research is needed to better understand older adults' perceptions so that interventions can be designed to improve the

  15. [Improvements in oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Briongos Figuero, Sem; García Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Badimón, Juan José

    2013-12-07

    For the last decades vitamin K antagonists have been the most effective anticoagulant treatment of atrial fibrillation. New molecules are being designed, mainly due to the great amount of disadvantages in the management of conventional anticoagulation. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban will soon be available as an alternative to warfarin/acenocumarol. All of them have demonstrated to be non-inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism, with even dabigatran 150 mg bid and apixaban being superior. They have also a lower risk of bleeding, especially regarding severe/fatal and intracranial hemorrhages. This is a real revolution. The advance of these new anticoagulants will be limited only by the higher cost, and will progressively become the protagonists of oral anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

  16. Oral antihyperglycemic therapy for type 2 diabetes: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Eric S

    2002-01-16

    Oral agents are the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for type 2 diabetes, and physicians now have a number of agents to choose from. However, more choices translate into more complex decision making. Many patients with diabetes have associated comorbidities, and most diabetic patients will require more than 1 agent to achieve good glycemic control. This article illustrates several of the pharmacologic approaches to type 2 diabetes through 4 situations that use principles of evidence-based medicine. The scenarios also highlight some of the difficulties in choosing the optimal pharmacologic treatment regimen for individual patients. Physicians should also recognize that type 2 diabetes is a multisystem disorder that requires multidisciplinary care, including education and ongoing counseling for effective patient self-management of the disease. Finally, patient preferences are a vital component of informed decision making for pharmacologic treatment of diabetes.

  17. Long-term oral antiarrhythmic therapy with mexiletine.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N P; Pantridge, J F; Adgey, A A

    1978-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with ischaemic heart disease received oral mexiletine for the control or prevention of ventricular arrhythmias. The most frequently used doses were 200, 250, and 300 mg 8-hourly. The treatment period varied from 2 days to more than 1 year (median 3 months). No ventricular arrhythmias were detected in more than one-half of the patients. Severe side effects occurred in 15 (31%) of the 48 patients. Major ventricular arrhythmias were observed in 14 (29%) of the 48 patients at a time when the majority had plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. The value of mexiletine in the management of patients at risk of sudden death is likely to be limited. PMID:687477

  18. Adverse effects of oral antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kayaaslan, Bircan; Guner, Rahmet

    2017-01-01

    Oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs) are currently the backbone of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection treatment. They are generally well-tolerated by patients and safe to use. To date, a significant number of patients have been treated with NAs. Safety data has accumulated over the years. The aim of this article is to review and update the adverse effects of oral NAs. NAs can cause class adverse effects (i.e., myopathy, neuropathy, lactic acidosis) and dissimilar adverse effects. All NAs carry a “Black Box” warning because of the potential risk for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, these adverse effects are rarely reported. The majority of cases are associated with lamivudine and telbivudine. Adefovir can lead to dose- and time-dependent nephrotoxicity, even at low doses. Tenofovir has significant renal and bone toxicity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, bone and renal toxicity in patients with CHB are not as prominent as in HIV infection. Entecavir and lamivudine are not generally associated with renal adverse events. Entecavir has been claimed to increase the risk of lactic acidosis in decompensated liver disease and high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. However, current studies reported that entecavir could be safely used in decompensated cirrhosis. An increase in fetal adverse events has not been reported with lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir use in pregnant women, while there is no adequate data regarding entecavir and adefovir. Further long-term experience is required to highlight the adverse effects of NAs, especially in special patient populations, including pregnant women, elderly and patients with renal impairment. PMID:28261380

  19. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. Aim: This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. Results: The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Conclusions: Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis. PMID:27688443

  20. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis.

  1. Acetyl-l-carnitine and oxfenicine on cardiac pumping mechanics in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Ko, Wen-Je; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chang, Chun-Yi; Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with diabetes, one objective is an improvement of cardiac metabolism to alleviate the left ventricular (LV) function. For this study, we compared the effects of acetyl-l-carnitine (one of the carnitine derivatives) and of oxfenicine (a carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor) on cardiac pumping mechanics in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats, with a particular focus on the pressure-flow-volume relationship. Diabetes was induced by a single tail vein injection of 55 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. The diabetic animals were treated on a daily basis with either acetyl-L-carnitine (1 g L(-1) in drinking water) or oxfenicine (150 mg kg(-1) by oral gavage) for 8 wk. They were also compared with untreated age-matched diabetic controls. LV pressure and ascending aortic flow signals were recorded to calculate the maximal systolic elastance (E max) and the theoretical maximum flow (Q max). Physically, E max reflects the contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart, whereas Q max has an inverse relationship with the LV internal resistance. When comparing the diabetic rats with their age-matched controls, the cardiodynamic condition was characterized by a decline in E max associated with the unaltered Q max. Acetyl-l-carnitine (but not oxfenicine) had reduced cardiac levels of malondialdehyde in these insulin-deficient animals. However, treating with acetyl-l-carnitine or oxfenicine resulted in an increase in E max, which suggests that these 2 drugs may protect the contractile status from deteriorating in the diabetic heart. By contrast, Q max showed a significant fall after administration of oxfenicine, but not with acetyl-L-carnitine. The decrease in Q max corresponded to an increase in total vascular resistance when treated with oxfenicine. Acetyl-l-carnitine, but not oxfencine, optimizes the integrative nature of cardiac pumping mechanics by preventing the diabetes-induced deterioration in myocardial intrinsic contractility

  2. Tumor-targeting bacterial therapy: A potential treatment for oral cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SAI; XU, XIAOPING; ZENG, XIN; LI, LONGJIANG; CHEN, QIANMING; LI, JING

    2014-01-01

    Certain obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria, which exhibit an inherent ability to colonize solid tumors in vivo, may be used in tumor targeting. As genetically manipulated bacteria may actively and specifically penetrate into the tumor tissue, bacterial therapy is becoming a promising approach in the treatment of tumors. However, to the best of our knowledge, no reports have been published thus far regarding the bacterial treatment of oral cancer, one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. In this review, the progress in the understanding of bacterial strategies used in tumor-targeted therapy is discussed and particular bacterial strains that may have great therapeutic potential in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tumor-targeted therapy are predicted as determined by previous studies. PMID:25364397

  3. Effects of L-carnitine supplement on serum inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein (a), and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients with Lp (a) hyperlipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Azam; Tabibi, Hadi; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2010-10-01

    Inflammation, oxidative stress, and high concentration of serum lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] are common complications in hemodialysis patients. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of L-carnitine supplement on serum inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), Lp (a), and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients with Lp (a) hyperlipoproteinemia [hyper Lp (a)]. This was an unblinded, randomized clinical trial. Thirty-six hyper Lp (a) hemodialysis patients (23 men and 13 women) were randomly assigned to either a carnitine or control group. Patients in the carnitine group received 1000 mg/d oral L-carnitine for 12 weeks, whereas patients in the control group did not receive any L-carnitine supplement. At baseline and the end of week 12, 5 mL of blood were collected after a 12- to 14-hours fast and serum free carnitine, CRP, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, Lp (a), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein were measured. Serum free carnitine concentration increased significantly by 86% in the carnitine group at the end of week 12 compared with baseline (P<0.001), while serum CRP and IL-6 showed a significant decrease of 29% (P<0.05) and 61% (P<0.001), respectively. No significant changes were observed in serum free carnitine, CRP, and IL-6 in the control group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean changes of serum interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, Lp (a), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations. L-carnitine supplement reduces inflammation in hemodialysis patients, but has no effect on hyper Lp (a) and oxidative stress.

  4. Cancer incidence attributable to the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Grevers, Xin; Grundy, Anne; Poirier, Abbey E.; Khandwala, Farah; Feldman, Matthew; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Brenner, Darren R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hormonal contraceptives and hormone replacement therapies are classified as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We sought to estimate the proportion and total number of cancers attributable to the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta in 2012. Methods: Population attributable risks were used to estimate the proportion of attributable cases for each associated cancer site. Relative risk estimates were obtained from the most relevant and recent epidemiologic literature. Prevalences of the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta were collected from Alberta's Tomorrow Project. Specific cancer incidence data were obtained from the Alberta Cancer Registry for the year 2012. Results: Overall, 6.3% of breast cancers (n = 135) diagnosed in Alberta in 2012 were estimated to be attributable to the use of oral contraceptives, and the exposure potentially prevented about 57.3% of endometrial cancers (n = 276) and 29.1% of ovarian cancers (n = 52). About 15.5% of breast cancers (n = 258) and 8.9% of ovarian cancers (n = 13) were estimated to be attributable to the use of hormone therapy, whereas 11.3% of endometrial cancers (n = 48) were possibly prevented by the exposure. Interpretation: Based on our estimates, oral contraceptive use resulted in a net protective effect among the cancer sites studied, thus reducing the cancer burden in Alberta in 2012. The use of hormone therapy was estimated to increase the cancer burden in the province, therefore the risk and benefit of hormone therapy should be carefully considered before use. PMID:28018891

  5. Inflammation and Oral Cancer: An Update Review on Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Anuprita; Anand, Rahul; Patil, Shankar Gouda; Rao, Roopa S; Augustine, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    In the recent past, numerous inflammation-mediated molecular pathways have been explored and studied as important events in carcinogenesis with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These pathways are engaged in numerous stages during tumorigenesis; which includes processes, like initiation, promotion, malignant conversion, invasion and metastasis. The inflammation-mediated/related carcinogenesis pathways reported in OSCC involves COX-2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p38a MAP kinase, NF-kB, STAT, RhoC, PPARy, etc. Many researchers are trying to target these pathways to explore more effective therapeutic interventions in OSCC. The aim of the present paper is to briefly discuss these pathways, with special emphasis on the therapeutic utilities. The therapeutic targets for the aforementioned pathways were searched in databases pubmed and scopus with no restriction to date of publication. Articles published in English medical literature on OSCC were selected for discussion. The recent combinations, modifications in dosage and frequency, or the use of new anti-inflammatory compounds, may exemplify the next generation care for OSCC.

  6. The potential management of oral candidiasis using anti-biofilm therapies.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Warren; Joseph, Thomson P; Wang, Wendong; Padhiar, Arshad A; Zhong, Mintao

    2017-09-01

    Candida albicans is a minor component of the oral microbiota and an opportunistic pathogen that takes advantage of the immunocompromised host and causes oral mucositis and oral candidiasis. This organism is able to undergo phenotypic modification from a yeast to hyphae growth phase, one of the key arsenals for immune cell evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. The latter property coupled with overgrowth and immune compromising factors such as HIV/AIDS, cancer treatments, organ transplantation, diabetes, corticosteroid use, dentures, and broad-spectrum antibiotic use have modified the fungus from a normal component of the microflora to a foe of an oral cavity and resulting in reduced sensitivity towards commonly utilised antifungal agents. Hence, the need for alternative therapy to curb this plight is of importance. Making use of biomolecules produced by Streptococcus mutans, application of lactoferrin which is a nonspecific host defense factor found in saliva with metal chelating and broader antimicrobial properties, use of probiotics which have the capacity to boost the host immunity through eliciting Immunoglobulin A synthesis, and perturbing the pathogen's environment via competition of space and food, and application of photodynamic therapy can help to manage the burden of oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... bring certain types of fats (fatty acids) into mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers within cells. ... within cells. Without carnitine, fatty acids cannot enter mitochondria and be used to make energy. Reduced energy ...

  8. Efficacy of surgical laser therapy in the management of oral pigmented lesions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Vohra, Fahim; Akram, Zohaib; Ghani, Siti Mariam Ab; Al-Hamoudi, Nawwaf; Javed, Fawad

    2017-08-01

    Oral pigmentation, especially in the gingiva poses esthetic problems. Laser therapy has been widely used for cosmetic therapy in dentistry. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the efficacy of surgical laser therapy (SLT) in the management of oral pigmented lesions (OPL). The addressed focused question was "Is SLT effective in the management of OPL?" Databases (MEDLINE via PubMed; EMBASE; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases) were searched from 1970 up to and including February 2017. Ten studies were included. The reported number of OPL ranged between 8 and 140. Oral pigmented sites included, gingiva, buccal and labial mucosa, alveolar mucosa and lips. Lasers used in the studies included Q-switched alexandrite, Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet, diode, Erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet and carbon dioxide laser. Laser wavelength, power output and number of irradiations were 635-10,600nm, 1-10W and 1 to 9 times, respectively. The follow up period ranged from 6 to 24months. All studies reported SLT to be effective in the treatment of OPL. In five studies, recurrence of OPL occurred which ranged from 21.4% to 45%. Lasers are effective in the management of OPL including physiologic gingival pigmentation, smokers' melanosis and pigmentation in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome. Different laser types (CO2, Er:YAG and Diode) showed comparable outcomes in the treatment of OPL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carnitine Deficiency as the Possible Etiology of Idiopathic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Trivellato, Mario; De Palo, Elio; Gatti, Rosalba; Parenti, Anna; Piazza, Mario

    1984-01-01

    Idiopathic mitral valve prolapse (IMVP) is a very common cardiac abnormality that may be linked to carnitine deficit (inadequate nutritional intake or absorption). One patient with IMVP and related symptoms that were resistant to drug therapy was fully studied. Free plasma carnitine and 24-hour free urine carnitine were measured twice, 10 days apart, after an overnight fast. Findings: Free plasma carnitine 23 and 28 μM/L (our laboratory N=38±2 μM/L); free urine C 25 and 44 μM/24 hr (N=255±66 μM/24 hr); FFA 0.88 mEq/L, Duncombe method (N=0.09-0.60); LDL 42% (N = 44-65); cholesterol 161 mg/dl (N = 180-280); triglycerides 84 mg/dl (N = 50-172); SGOT 79 MU/ml (N = up to 40); SGPT 147 MU/ml (N = up to 40); OCT 11.2 MU/ml (N = up to 10.0); aldolase 11.5 MU/ml (N = up to 3.1, Bruns method). Deltoid biopsy: light microscopy showed the presence of optically empty vacuoles; electron microscopy showed lipid droplets near the subsarcolemma area and intermyofibrillar spaces. The mitochondria contained electron dense granules. The electromyogram was also abnormal. In a random sample of four patients with IMVP and related classic symptoms, we have found low levels of plasma and/or urinary carnitine in each case. This study may be the first step towards L-carnitine therapy for what has previously appeared to be idiopathic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:15226877

  10. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation to suckling piglets on carcass and meat quality at market age.

    PubMed

    Lösel, D; Rehfeldt, C

    2013-07-01

    In a previous study, carnitine supplementation to piglets during the suckling period resulted in an increased total muscle fibre number at weaning in piglets of low birth weight. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether this effect is maintained until market age and whether this would attenuate the negative consequences of low birth weight on carcass and meat quality. Using a split-plot design with litter as block, sex as whole plot and treatment as subplot, the effects of early-postnatal l-carnitine supplementation on female and castrated male piglets of low birth weight were investigated on a total of 56 German Landrace piglets from 14 litters. From days 7 to 27 of age piglets were orally supplemented once daily with 400 mg of l-carnitine dissolved in 1 ml of water or received an equal volume of water without carnitine. From weaning (day 28) until slaughter (day 166 of age) all pigs were fed standard diets. At weaning, carnitine-supplemented piglets had a twofold increased concentration of free carnitine (P < 0.001) and a lower concentration of non-esterified fatty acids (P < 0.05) in blood plasma indicating that carnitine became bioavailable and increased fatty acid utilization during the period of supplementation. Growth performance was not influenced by treatment in any growth period. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed no differences in body composition between groups in weeks 12, 16 and 20 of age. LW at slaughter, carcass weight, measures of meat yield and fat accretion, as well as body composition by chemical analyses and dissection of primal cuts did not differ between treatments. No differences between control and carnitine-treated pigs in total fibre number (P = 0.85) and fibre cross-sectional area (P = 0.68) in m. semitendinosus (ST) measured at slaughter could be observed. The carnitine group tended to exhibit a smaller proportion of slow-twitch oxidative fibres (P = 0.08), a greater proportion of fast-twitch glycolytic

  11. Oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving anti-retroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Baghirath, P V; Krishna, A B; Gannepalli, A; Ali, M M

    2013-12-01

    To assess and compare the oral manifestations of HIV-infected paediatric patients undergoing ART (anti-retroviral therapy) and those not undergoing ART. A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst the 5-12 years old, HIV positive children (receiving and not receiving ART) registered at Nireekshana ART centre, Hyderabad and HIV negative children enrolled in a nearby school. HIV-related oral lesions were diagnosed according to WHO criteria. Information on age, gender, place of residence (urban/rural), socio-economic status, duration of HIV infection, duration of ART therapy, use of traditional medicine, presence of HIV-related systemic disease was recorded. CD4+ cell count was also determined for each subject. Chi-square test, stepwise multiple linear and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. For all tests, confidence interval and p value were set at 95 % and p ≤ 0.05, respectively. Twelve percent and 21.3 % of the study participants were on short-term and long-term ART (Group I), respectively. A greater proportion of HIV patients receiving treatment had CD4+ cell counts of more than 750 cells/mm(3). Nearly 81.3 % of HIV patients receiving long-term therapy did not have any oral lesions. Around half of the participants not receiving treatment suffered from HIV-related oral lesions. The best predictors for presence of oral lesions were socio-economic status, group (ART treatment), duration of HIV infection and CD4+ cell count. The results of the present study demonstrated that ART proved to be effective in reducing the prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions.

  12. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    PubMed

    Abeles, Shira R; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances.

  13. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  14. L-Carnitine improves gastrointestinal disorders and altered the intestinal microbiota in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Irie, Junichiro; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Kikuchi, Rieko; Yoshida, Tadashi; Murai, Seizo; Watanabe, Miwako; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis also manifest gastrointestinal symptoms, such as constipation, caused by restriction of water intake and the loss of body water balance. Because dietary carnitine deficiency is considered to cause smooth muscle dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract similarly to that in skeletal muscles, carnitine deficiency in hemodialysis patients may be one cause of gastrointestinal discomfort and dysfunctions. We performed a multicenter nonrandomized single-arm prospective clinical trial. Fifteen Japanese patients receiving hemodialysis were administered L-carnitine tablets (900 mg) for 3 months, and clinical and biochemical analyses were performed before and after treatment. The serum total carnitine level was increased significantly by supplementation with L-carnitine for 3 months (from 40.9 ± 2.6 μmol/l to 172.3 ± 19.0 μmol/l, p<0.05). The myasthenia score was decreased significantly by the supplementation (from 1.3 ± 0.3 to 0.8 ± 0.2, p<0.05). The frequency of passing stool tended to increase with the treatment for 3 months (from 4.2 ± 0.5 times/week to 4.8 ± 0.5 times/week). A phyla-level analysis of the microbiota showed that the composition of the individual microbiota was not different between before and after supplementation. A genus-level analysis, however, revealed that the relative abundance of genus Clostridium subcluster 4 was significantly decreased by the supplementation (from 7.7 ± 1.9% to 4.7 ± 1.3%, p<0.05). Oral supplementation of L-carnitine to the patients receiving hemodialysis improved not only their muscle discomfort but also their gastrointestinal disorders and microbiota, although its effect on the prognosis of hemodialysis patients should be further investigated.

  15. L-Carnitine improves gastrointestinal disorders and altered the intestinal microbiota in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    IRIE, Junichiro; KANNO, Yoshihiko; KIKUCHI, Rieko; YOSHIDA, Tadashi; MURAI, Seizo; WATANABE, Miwako; ITOH, Hiroshi; HAYASHI, Matsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis also manifest gastrointestinal symptoms, such as constipation, caused by restriction of water intake and the loss of body water balance. Because dietary carnitine deficiency is considered to cause smooth muscle dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract similarly to that in skeletal muscles, carnitine deficiency in hemodialysis patients may be one cause of gastrointestinal discomfort and dysfunctions. We performed a multicenter nonrandomized single-arm prospective clinical trial. Fifteen Japanese patients receiving hemodialysis were administered L-carnitine tablets (900 mg) for 3 months, and clinical and biochemical analyses were performed before and after treatment. The serum total carnitine level was increased significantly by supplementation with L-carnitine for 3 months (from 40.9 ± 2.6 μmol/l to 172.3 ± 19.0 μmol/l, p<0.05). The myasthenia score was decreased significantly by the supplementation (from 1.3 ± 0.3 to 0.8 ± 0.2, p<0.05). The frequency of passing stool tended to increase with the treatment for 3 months (from 4.2 ± 0.5 times/week to 4.8 ± 0.5 times/week). A phyla-level analysis of the microbiota showed that the composition of the individual microbiota was not different between before and after supplementation. A genus-level analysis, however, revealed that the relative abundance of genus Clostridium subcluster 4 was significantly decreased by the supplementation (from 7.7 ± 1.9% to 4.7 ± 1.3%, p<0.05). Oral supplementation of L-carnitine to the patients receiving hemodialysis improved not only their muscle discomfort but also their gastrointestinal disorders and microbiota, although its effect on the prognosis of hemodialysis patients should be further investigated. PMID:28243546

  16. [Changes in myocardium, skeletal muscle and liver of rats fed carnitine-deficient diet and treated with carnitine optical isomers].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Iezhitsa, I N; Pisarev, V B; Snigur, G L; Kravchenko, M S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was a comparative assessment of L-, D-and DL-carnitine effect on morphometric and histological parameters of myocardium, skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius) and liver in 60 rats fed carnitine-deficient diet. Carnitine-deficient diet fed 2 months resulted in a substantial reduction of carnitine concentration in blood plasma of rats. In carnitine-deficient animals, lipid vacuoles were found to accumulate within the hepatocytes in all the zones of hepatic lobules, which mainly had the character of micro- and macrovesicular steatosis. This was accompanied by a reduction of skeletal muscle fiber and cardiomyocyte average thickness. L-carnitine administration resulted in the compensation of carnitine deficiency in animals with alimentary carnitine deficient state, while the racemate and D-stereoisomere did not affect its content in blood. Pharmacological correction of carnitine deficiency with L-carnitine prevented the development of liver fatty dystrophy to a greater degree, than the administration of other carnitine stereoisomeres and promoted the restoration of muscular fiber thickness of skeletal muscles. DL-carnitine administration was accompanied by a moderate correction of fatty dystrophy and did not prevent the development of skeletal muscles atrophy. D-carnitine stereoisomere did not prevent liver fatty dystrophy, but it reduced its severity. Correction of carnitine deficiency with D- stereoisomere was not accompanied by essential morphological and morphometric differences in degree of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  17. L-carnitine supplementation in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mitwalli, Ahmed Hassan; Al-Wakeel, Jamal S; Alam, Awatif; Tarif, Nauman; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Rashed, Mohamed; Al Nahed, Nora

    2005-01-01

    L-Carnitine supplementation has shown beneficial effects in patients on hemodialysis. We studied 36 ESRD adult patients with a mean age of 47.5 +/- 15 years to evaluate the effect of L-Carnitine supplementation on hemoglobin, lipid levels and physical performance in patients on hemodialysis. The study group consisted of 18 randomly selected patients who received L-Carnitine 15 mg/kg and the control group consisted of 18 randomly selected patients who received equal volume of normal saline as a placebo three times a week for six months. Laboratory tests were performed at baseline, then monthly until the end of the study. A significant increase in the hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (HCT) in the presence of unchanged doses of erythropoietin hormonal supplementation was observed (pre 79 +/- 7.5 gm/l, post 103 +/- 10.6 gm/l) P< 0.001 (pre 24+/- 2 %, post 33 +/- 4%) P< 0.001 respectively) in the L-Carnitine treated group. Similarly total serum cholesterol (TCL) and serum triglyceride (TG) levels showed a statistically significant decrease in the study group, TCL (pre 4.6 +/- 1.2, post 3.7 +/- 1.1 mmol/L), P < 0.03 and TG (pre 3.1 +/- 1.7, post 1.8 +/- 0.6 mmol/L) P < 0.004. The physical performance as assessed by mild and moderate exercise showed a trend towards improvement. There was a significant increase in free carnitine and total carnitine levels in the L-Carnitine treated group. In conclusion, these results demostrate positive effect of L-Carnitine supplementation in the hemodialysis patients marked by an increase in Hb, HCT, a decrease in TCL and TG and improved physical performance in comparison to the control group.

  18. Systemic primary carnitine deficiency with hypoglycemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jae Sung; Lee, Eun Joo; Park, Hyung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypoglycemia in children is not an uncommon disease that can be encountered in the Emergency Department. Most cases of childhood hypoglycemia are caused by ketotic hypoglycemia due to missed meals. Often, hypoketotic hypoglycemia can also occur, which suggests hyperinsulinemia or a defect in fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine is essential for long chain fatty acids transfer into mitochondria for oxidation. We present a case of systemic primary carnitine deficiency who presented with seizures due to hypoketotic hypoglycemia. PMID:28164076

  19. TransOral Robotic Photodynamic Therapy for the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Harry; Finlay, Jarod; Cengel, Keith; Zhu, Timothy; O’Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for head and neck carcinomas with little experience in the oropharynx due to technical challenges in achieving adequate exposure. We present the case of a patient with a second right tonsil carcinoma following previous treatment with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative chemoradiation for a left tonsil carcinoma. Repeat TORS for the right tonsil carcinoma reviewed multiple positive surgical margins. The power output from the robotic camera was modified to facilitate safe intraoperative three dimensional visualization of the tumor bed. The robotic arms facilitated clear exposure of the tonsil and tongue base with stable administration of the fluence. Real-time measurements confirmed stable photobleaching with augmentation of the prescribed light fluence secondary to light scatter in the oropharynx. We report a potential new role using TORS for exposure and accurate PDT in the oropharynx. PMID:21333937

  20. Suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir for recurrent herpes labialis: efficacy and tolerability in an open-label, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley C

    2007-04-01

    Oral valacyclovir's efficacy and tolerability as suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy were compared for recurrent herpes labialis (RHL). Subjects with a history of at least 3 RHL episodes in the past year were randomized to receive 6 months of oral valacyclovir episodic therapy at the first sign of prodrome (two 2-g doses separated by 12 hours) and 6 months of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy (1 g once daily) for 6 months in open-label, crossover fashion. The mean +/- SE number of recurrences per 120 days of follow-up (primary endpoint) was lower with suppressive therapy (0.30 +/- 0.41) than episodic therapy (0.71 +/- 0.79) (P < .005). The probability of remaining recurrence free over 6 months was significantly higher with suppressive therapy than episodic therapy. The median time to first recurrence was 81 days with episodic therapy and was not calculable (> 180 days) for suppressive therapy (P = 0.021). Data for secondary efficacy endpoints (pain severity score, mean duration of recurrences, maximal total lesion area) showed approximately a 30% to 50% reduction in mean values with suppressive therapy compared with episodic therapy, but results were statistically significantly different between the regimens for pain severity only. The percentage of subjects with at least one adverse event over 6 months of treatment that was considered to be drug related was 3% with suppressive therapy and 6% with episodic therapy. Suppressive therapy with oral valacyclovir was more effective than episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir in reducing the frequency of recurrences of herpes labialis and prolonging the time to first recurrence and was also similarly well-tolerated.

  1. Prostacyclin and Oral Vasodilator Therapy in Sarcoidosis-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Vij, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether recent advances in pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy can be safely applied to sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH). Evidence for prostacyclin (PG) therapy in SAPH is limited. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of 46 patients with sarcoidosis, 26 of whom had SAPH. Thirteen received PG as monotherapy or in combination with oral vasodilators. RESULTS: Follow-up right-sided heart catheterization at a mean of 12.7 months revealed improved cardiac output, cardiac index, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Functional class and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels also improved in patients treated with PG. No significant change in oxygen requirement was seen with vasodilator therapy initiation. At 2 years, 15 patients with SAPH survived, including eight on PG, and at 5 years, seven survived, including five on PG. Survival was significantly reduced in patients with SAPH compared with patients who had sarcoidosis without pulmonary hypertension. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of PG therapy in SAPH is not associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients with severe SAPH showed significant hemodynamic and clinical improvement on long-term IV or subcutaneous PG therapy and had survival outcomes similar to patients with moderate SAPH on oral vasodilator therapy. PMID:26437815

  2. Metronidazole for bacterial vaginosis. A comparison of vaginal gel vs. oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; McGregor, J A; Hillier, S L; Eschenbach, D A; Kreutner, A K; Galask, R P; Martens, M

    2000-11-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel with oral metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Nonpregnant women with BV were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, investigator-blind treatment trial. Patients were randomly assigned to either 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel (5 g twice daily for five days) or oral metronidazole (500 mg twice daily for seven days). Follow-up visits occurred approximately two and five weeks after initiation of therapy. BV was clinically eliminated at the first follow-up visit in 83.7% (36/43, 95% CI 72.3-95.1%) of the intravaginal group and 85.1% (40/47, 95% CI 74.6-95.6%) of the oral group. At the final visit, BV was eliminated in 70.7% (29/41, 95% CI 56.3-85.1%) of the intravaginal group and 71.1% (32/45, 95% CI 57.4-84.8%) of the oral group. Significantly more patients in the oral treatment group (51.8%) reported gastrointestinal complaints as compared to the intravaginal treatment group (32.7%, P = .04). The efficacy of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel twice daily for five days in treating BV was similar to that of standard oral metronidazole treatment and was associated with fewer gastrointestinal complaints.

  3. Utility of metformin as an adjunct to hydroxycitrate/carnitine for reducing body fat in diabetics.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1998-11-01

    Excessive exposure of tissues to fatty acids is likely to be the chief cause of the various dysfunctions that lead to sustained hyperglycemia in type II diabetes. These dysfunctions are likely to be substantially reversible if body fat and dietary fat can be greatly reduced. Disinhibition of hepatic fatty acid oxidation with hydroxycitrate (HCA) and carnitine has considerable potential as a new weight-loss strategy, but in diabetics runs the risk of further enhancing excessive hepatic gluconeogenesis. Since the clinical utility of metformin in diabetes is probably traceable to inhibition of gluconeogenesis, its use as an adjunct to HCA/carnitine treatment of obesity in diabetics deserves evaluation, particularly as metformin therapy itself tends to reduce body weight. A consideration of relevant evidence suggests that metformin therapy will not impede the activation of fatty acid oxidation by HCA/carnitine, and is likely to potentiate the appetite-suppressant and thermogenic benefits of this strategy. Indeed, since metformin has been reported to lower body weight and improve cardiovascular risk factors in obese non-diabetics, a broader application of a metformin/HCA/carnitine therapy for obesity can be contemplated.

  4. Prospects in the Application of Photodynamic Therapy in Oral Cancer and Premalignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Rajan; Lee, Nathan V.; Liu, Kelly Y. P.; Poh, Catherine F.

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a global health burden with significantly poor survival, especially when the diagnosis is at its late stage. Despite advances in current treatment modalities, there has been minimal improvement in survival rates over the last five decades. The development of local recurrence, regional failure, and the formation of second primary tumors accounts for this poor outcome. For survivors, cosmetic and functional compromises resulting from treatment are often devastating. These statistics underscore the need for novel approaches in the management of this deadly disease. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that involves administration of a light-sensitive drug, known as a photosensitizer, followed by light irradiation of an appropriate wavelength that corresponds to an absorbance band of the sensitizer. In the presence of tissue oxygen, cytotoxic free radicals that are produced cause direct tumor cell death, damage to the microvasculature, and induction of inflammatory reactions at the target sites. PDT offers a prospective new approach in controlling this disease at its various stages either as a stand-alone therapy for early lesions or as an adjuvant therapy for advanced cases. In this review, we aim to explore the applications of PDT in oral cancer therapy and to present an overview of the recent advances in PDT that can potentially reposition its utility for oral cancer treatment. PMID:27598202

  5. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  6. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care

  7. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Penn, D; Wolf, H

    1983-06-01

    To investigate whether L-carnitine supplementation may correct nutritional carnitine deficiency and associated metabolic disturbances in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition, an intravenous fat tolerance test (1 gm/kg Intralipid over four hours) was performed in 29 premature infants 6 to 10 days of age (15 receiving carnitine supplement 10 mg/kg . day L-carnitine IV, and 14 receiving no supplement). Total carnitine plasma values were normal or slightly elevated in supplemented but decreased in nonsupplemented infants. In both groups, fat infusion resulted in an increase in plasma concentrations of triglycerides, free fatty acids, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, and short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine, but total carnitine values did not change. After fat infusion, the free fatty acids/D-beta-hydroxybutyrate ratios were lower and the increase of acylcarnitine greater in supplemented infants of 29 to 33 weeks' gestation than in nonsupplemented infants of the same gestational age. This study provides evidence that premature infants of less than 34 weeks' gestation requiring total parenteral nutrition develop nutritional carnitine deficiency with impaired fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Carnitine supplementation improves this metabolic disturbance.

  8. L-propionylcarnitine effects on cardiac carnitine content and function in secondary carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Broderick, T L; DiDomenico, D; Shug, A L; Paulson, D J

    1995-04-01

    Long-term treatment with sodium pivalate, a compound conjugated to carnitine and excreted in the urine, results in carnitine deficiency and cardiac dysfunction. Since L-propionylcarnitine (LPC) is generally of benefit to cardiac function, it was of interest to determine whether it is effective in preventing the reductions in both heart carnitine content and function from occurring in carnitine deficiency. Secondary carnitine deficiency was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by supplementing the drinking water with 20 mM sodium pivalate for 26 weeks. Control animals received an equimolar concentration of sodium bicarbonate. At 13 weeks into treatment, a subgroup of control and sodium pivalate animals were given 80 mg/kg of LPC in their drinking water. Following treatment, isolated working hearts were perfused with buffer containing 11 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate. Hearts from sodium pivalate treated animals demonstrated a severe reduction in tissue carnitine. When mechanical function was measured in these hearts, heart rate, rate-pressure product, and aortic flow were significantly depressed. Treatment with LPC, however, prevented the depletion in cardiac carnitine content and improved these cardiac parameters. Our results demonstrate that LPC treatment is beneficial in preventing the depression in cardiac function from occurring in this model of secondary carnitine deficiency.

  9. Sulphurous mineral water oral therapy: effects on erythrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria Cristina; Teodori, Laura; Accorsi, Augusto; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Campanella, Luigi; Baldoni, Francesco; Dachà, Marina

    2008-10-01

    The ingestion of water containing hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is common in spring sulphurous mineral water (SMW) therapy. We hypothesized that observed detrimental effects are related to the alteration of erythrocytes metabolism caused by H(2)S. To verify our hypothesis, we treated 20 healthy volunteers with SMW and evidenced an increase of methemoglobin concentration, an inhibition of both erythrocyte glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities. To investigate the mechanism of H(2)S effect on GAPDH activity, an in vitro study was performed by incubating both erythrocytes from 12 healthy volunteers and purified GAPDH with buffered [(35)S]-H(2)S labelled sulphurous water. The interaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H), was also investigated. The results indicate that a direct reaction between GAPDH and H(2)S does not occur and the observed decrease of GAPDH activity is to ascribe to the reaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H). This may lead to GAPDH inhibition by two ways, namely (i) cellular NAD(+)(H) reduced availability and (ii) catalytic site blockage. In conclusion, our results show that among the detrimental effects of SMW administration are erythrocyte GAPDH and G6PDH activity inhibition and increased methemoglobin concentration. A mechanism to explain the occurrence of these biochemical events is also proposed.

  10. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.A.

    1987-03-01

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-(/sup 14/C)carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by approx.20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels.

  11. Altered carnitine transport in pressure-overload hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.; Reibel, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously observed reduced carnitine levels in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for reduced myocardial carnitine content, carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Hearts were excised from sham-operated and aortic-constricted rats 3 weeks following surgery and perfused at 60 mm Hg aortic pressure with buffer containing various concentrations of L-/sup 14/C-carnitine. Carnitine uptake by control and hypertrophied hearts was linear throughout 30 minutes of perfusion with 40 ..mu..M carnitine. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by 25% in hypertrophied hearts at each time point examined. The reduction in uptake by hypertrophied hearts was also evident when hearts were perfused with 100 or 200 ..mu..M carnitine. When 0.05 mM mersalyl acid was included in the buffer to inhibit the carrier-mediated component of transport, no difference in carnitine uptake was observed indicating that the transport of carnitine by diffusion was unaltered in the hypertrophied myocardium. Carrier-mediated carnitine uptake (total uptake - uptake by diffusion) was significantly reduced by approximately 40% in hypertrophied hearts at all concentrations examined. Thus, the reduction in carnitine content in the pressure-overload hypertrophied rat heart appears to be due to a reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake by the heart.

  12. Mandibular advancement oral appliance therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea: effect on awake calibre of the velopharynx.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C F; Love, L L; Peat, D; Fleetham, J A; Lowe, A A

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of action of oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea are poorly understood. Videoendoscopy of the upper airway was used during wakefulness to examine whether the changes in pharyngeal dimensions produced by a mandibular advancement oral appliance are related to the improvement in the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea. Fifteen patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea (median (range) apnoea index (AI) 4(0-38)/h, apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) 28(9-45)/h) underwent overnight polysomnography and imaging of the upper airway before and after insertion of the oral appliance. Images were obtained in the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and velopharynx at end tidal expiration during quiet nasal breathing in the supine position. The cross sectional area and diameters of the upper airway were measured using image processing software with an intraluminal catheter as a linear calibration. AI decreased to a median (range) value of 0 (0-6)/h (p<0.01) and AHI to 8 (1-28)/h (p<0.001) following insertion of the oral appliance. The median (95% confidence interval) cross sectional area of the upper airway increased by 18% (3 to 35) (p<0.02) in the hypopharynx and by 25% (11 to 69) (p<0.005) in the velopharynx, but not significantly in the oropharynx. Although in general the shape of the pharynx did not change following insertion of the oral appliance, the lateral diameter of the velopharynx increased to a greater extent than the anteroposterior diameter. Following insertion of the oral appliance the reduction in AHI was related to the increase in cross sectional area of the velopharynx (p = 0.01). A mandibular advancement oral appliance increases the cross sectional area of the upper airway during wakefulness, particularly in the velopharynx. Assuming this effect on upper airway calibre is not eliminated by sleep, mandibular advancement oral appliances may reduce the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea by maintaining patency of the velopharynx

  13. Role of oral rehydration therapy in controlling epidemic of cholera and watery diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kamalesh

    2003-06-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is basically oral administration of liquid containing various electrolytes in specific proportions to prevent and treat dehydration. This treatment facilitates safe and optimal absorption of water and essential electrolytes such as sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride in dehydrated patients. Successful ORT was experienced in cholera patients in Kolkata and Dhaka which was followed by the development of oral rehydration salt (ORS). This procedure can be safely implemented at home. ORT reduced mortality rate both in cholera and non-cholera watery diarrhoea. The various health authorities must support preparedness before pre-positioning of adequate stocks of ORS packets for emergency situations. Health workers should have been the knowledge to prepare ORS solutions.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Kreimann, E L; Itoiz, M E; Longhino, J; Blaumann, H; Calzetta, O; Schwint, A E

    2001-12-15

    We have proposed and validated the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) studies and shown that boronophenylalanine delivers potentially therapeutic 36.9 +/- 17.5 ppm boron to tumor tissue with tumor:normal tissue and tumor:blood ratios of 2.4:1 and 3.2:1, respectively. Here we report the first evidence of the usefulness of BNCT for the treatment of oral cancer in an experimental model. We assessed the response of hamster cheek pouch tumors, precancerous tissue, and normal oral tissue to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT using the thermalized epithermal beam of the RA-6 Reactor at the Bariloche Atomic Center. BNCT leads to complete remission by 15 days posttreatment in 78% of tumors and partial remission in an additional 13% of tumors with virtually no damage to normal tissue.

  15. Oral but not transdermal estrogen replacement therapy changes the composition of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, Michal; Fait, Tomas; Kovar, Jan; Poledne, Rudolf; Ceska, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The role of hormone replacement therapy and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in cardiovascular disease prevention has not been unambiguously defined yet. The metabolic effects of estrogens may vary depending upon the route of administration. Therefore, we compared the impact of unopposed oral or transdermal ERT on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in 41 hysterectomized women. This was an open-label, randomized, crossover study (with 2 treatments and 2 periods). The 41 hysterectomized women were randomized to receive oral or transdermal 17beta-estradiol in the first or second of two 12-week study periods. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were assayed before and after each treatment using standard automated methods. Lipid content of lipoprotein subclasses was assessed by sequential ultracentrifugation. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) was calculated as log(triglyceride [TG]/high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol). The difference between the 2 forms of administration was tested using a linear mixed model. The change from baseline for each of the forms was tested using paired t test. Oral ERT resulted in a significant increase in HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels, whereas it significantly decreased total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increased TG concentrations. Transdermal ERT had no such effect. Oral ERT led to a significant TG enrichment of HDL (0.19 +/- 0.06 vs 0.27 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P < .001) and LDL particles (0.23 +/- 0.08 vs 0.26 +/- 0.10 mmol/L, P < .001) compared with baseline, whereas transdermal therapy did not have any effect on lipoprotein subclasses composition. The difference between the 2 treatments was statistically significant for HDL-TG and LDL-TG (0.27 +/- 0.07 vs 0.19 +/- 0.05 mmol/L, P < .001 and 0.26 +/- 0.10 vs 0.22 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P< .001, respectively). The transdermal but not oral ERT significantly reduced the AIP compared with baseline (-0.17 +/- 0.26 vs -0.23 +/- 0.25, P = .023), making the

  16. L-Carnitine, but not coenzyme Q10, enhances the anti-osteoporotic effect of atorvastatin in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Murad, Hussam A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Statins’ therapy in osteoporosis can aggravate muscle damage. This study was designed to assess which agent, L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10, could enhance the anti-osteoporotic effect of atorvastatin while antagonizing myopathy in ovariectomized rats. Methods: Forty-eight female Sprague Dawley rats were used; forty rats were ovariectomized while eight were sham-operated. Eight weeks post-ovariectomy, rats were divided into ovariectomized-untreated group and four ovariectomized-treated groups (n=8) which received by gavage (mg/(kg∙d), for 8 weeks) 17β-estradiol (0.1), atorvastatin (50), atorvastatin (50)+L-carnitine (100), or atorvastatin (50)+coenzyme Q10 (20). At the end of therapy, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and serum levels of bone metabolic markers (BMMs) and creatine kinase (CK) were measured. Femurs were used for studying the breaking strength and histopathological changes. Results: Treatment with atorvastatin+L-carnitine restored BMD, BMC, and bone strength to near normal levels. Estrogen therapy restored BMD and BMC to near normal levels, but failed to increase bone strength. Although atorvastatin and atorvastatin+coenzyme Q10 improved BMD, BMC, and bone strength, they failed to restore levels to normal. All treatments decreased BMMs and improved histopathological changes maximally with atorvastatin+L-carnitine which restored levels to near normal. Atorvastatin aggravated the ovariectomy-induced increase in CK level while estrogen, atorvastatin+L-carnitine, and atorvastatin+coenzyme Q10 decreased its level mainly with atorvastatin+L-carnitine which restored the level to near normal. Conclusions: Co-administration of L-carnitine, but not coenzyme Q10, enhances the anti-osteoporotic effect of atorvastatin while antagonizing myopathy in ovariectomized rats. This could be valuable in treatment of osteoporotic patients. However, further confirmatory studies are needed. PMID:26739525

  17. Plasma carnitine concentrations after chronic alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Płudowski, Paweł; Konarzewska, Emilia; Szulc, Agata; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-05-31

    Carnitine transports fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where the fatty acids are oxidized. Chronic alcohol consumption reduces the concentration of carnitine and interferes with oxidative processes occurring in the cell. The assessment of carnitine concentrations in plasma of chronically intoxicated alcohol dependent persons in a 49-day abstinence period. The study included 31 patients (5 women and 27 men) aged from 26 to 60 years (44.6 ± 8.9) and 32 healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men) aged 22-60 years (39.8 ± 9.4). The patients' alcohol dependence ranged from 2 to 30 years (13.6 ± 7.5). Examined subjects consumed 75-700 g of ethanol/day (226.9 ± 151.5). Plasma concentrations of free and total carnitine were measured three times: at the first (T0), 30th (T30) and 49th (T49) day of hospital detoxification. Free (FC) and total (TC) carnitine were determined by the spectrophotometric method. Plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentration was calculated from the difference between TC and FC; then the AC/FC ratio was calculated. To determine statistically significant differences for related variables, Student's t-test was used. At T0, alcoholics had significantly lower concentration of FC and TC (p < 0.05) in plasma, as compared to the control group. In comparison to controls, at T30, plasma TC and FC (p < 0.01) as well as AC (p < 0.001) were reduced. The lowest concentration of TC, FC and AC (p < 0.001)was found at T49. The ratio of AC/FC at T0 had a tendency to be higher in alcoholics than in the control group (p = 0.05), whereas at T49 it was significantly lower in alcoholics as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.05). Chronic alcohol intoxication causes a plasma deficiency of carnitine. Forty-nine days of abstinence showed a significant decrease in the concentration of TC, FC and AC. Further research is necessary to clarify whether a low level of plasma carnitine after chronic alcohol intoxication is caused by the uptake of blood

  18. Interaction of St John's wort with low-dose oral contraceptive therapy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pfrunder, Arabelle; Schiesser, Monika; Gerber, Simone; Haschke, Manuel; Bitzer, Johannes; Drewe, Juergen

    2003-01-01

    Aims Breakthrough bleeding or even unwanted pregnancies have been reported in women during concomitant therapy with oral contraceptives and St John's wort extract. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of St John's wort extract on oral contraceptive therapy with respect to ovarian activity, breakthrough bleeding episodes and the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol and 3-ketodesogestrel. Methods Eighteen healthy females were treated with a low-dose oral contraceptive (0.02 mg ethinyloestradiol, 0.150 mg desogestrel) alone (control cycle) or combined with 300 mg St John's wort extract given twice daily (cycle A) or three times daily (cycle B). Ovarian activity was assessed by measuring follicle maturation and serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations. The number of breakthrough bleeding episodes and the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol and 3-ketodesogestrel were assessed under steady-state conditions. Results During concomitant administration of low-dose oral contraceptive and St John's wort, there was no significant change in follicle maturation, serum oestradiol or progesterone concentrations when compared with oral contraceptive treatment alone. However, significantly more subjects reported intracyclic bleeding during cycles A (13/17 (77%), P < 0.015) and cycle B (15/17 (88%), P < 0.001) than with oral contraceptives alone (6/17 (35%)). The AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax of ethinyloestradiol remained unchanged during all study cycles, whereas the AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax of 3-ketodesogestrel decreased significantly from 31.2 ng ml−1 h to 17.7 ng ml−1 h (43.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI) −49.3, −38.5, P = 0.001) and from 3.6 ng ml −1 to 3.0 ng ml −1(17.8%; CI −29.9, −5.7, P = 0.005), respectively, during cycle A and by 41.7% (CI −47.9, −35.6; P = 0.001) and by 22.8% (CI −31.2, −13.3; P < 0.001) during cycle B respectively, compared with the control cycle. Conclusions There was no evidence of ovulation during low

  19. Effectiveness of a standardized patient education program on therapy-related side effects and unplanned therapy interruptions in oral cancer therapy: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Riese, C; Weiß, B; Borges, U; Beylich, A; Dengler, R; Hermes-Moll, K; Welslau, M; Baumann, W

    2017-06-09

    Oral agents for cancer treatment are increasingly prescribed due to their benefits. However, oral cancer medications are difficult to handle and have a considerable potential for side effects. This type of therapy requires a high level of self-management competence by the patient. A standardized patient education program provided by physicians and oncology nurses may positively influence the handling of oral agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized patient education program provided by specially trained oncology nurses on therapy management regarding side effects and unplanned therapy interruptions. One hundred sixty-five patients from 28 office-based oncology practices from all over Germany participated in this cluster-randomized controlled study. Patients of both intervention (n = 111) and standard care groups (n = 54) received the usual oncologist counseling; in addition, the patients from the intervention group (k = 17 practices) received an education from specially trained oncology nurses. The time of observation was 3 months per patient. The patients of the intervention group reported fewer side effects (skin rash, pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting). Patients in the standard care group interrupted the therapy more frequently without informing their oncologist, compared to the intervention group. Patients benefit from a standardized patient education program provided by specially trained oncology nurses. They tend to handle side effects and critical situations better.

  20. Initial antibiotic therapy for alligator bites: characterization of the oral flora of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Flandry, F; Lisecki, E J; Domingue, G J; Nichols, R L; Greer, D L; Haddad, R J

    1989-02-01

    An open thumb fracture resulting from an alligator bite became infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, Enterobacter agglomerans, and Citrobacter diversus. The patient was treated by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. We obtained cultures from the mouth of ten alligators to characterize their oral flora. Initial empiric therapy after alligator bites should be directed at gram-negative species, in particular, Aeromonas hydrophila and anaerobic species including Clostridium. Of the numerous fungi that were isolated, none has been reported to result in wound infection after alligator bites.

  1. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Pretherapy interventions to modify salivary dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Fox, P.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a common side effect of cancer therapies. Salivary secretions are reduced rapidly after starting head and neck radiotherapy. Salivary gland dysfunction has also been linked to bone marrow transplantation and to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Salivary gland stimulation during radiation has been suggested as a means of reducing radiation damage. Results of an ongoing study investigating the effects of pilocarpine on radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction suggest that parotid function was preserved, but not submandibular/sublingual function. Also, patients receiving pilocarpine had less frequent oral complaints. Further research is necessary to develop means of preventing or alleviating the salivary side effects of cancer therapies. 37 references.

  2. A review of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy for dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deanna G; Wilkerson, Eric C; Love, W Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologic surgeons will increasingly encounter patients on novel oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications. We conducted a complete overview of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and side effects of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies along with dietary supplements with anticoagulant or antiplatelet properties. A PubMed search was completed for "aspirin," "warfarin," "clopidogrel," "dabigatran," "rivaroxaban," "apixaban," "prasugrel," and "ticagrelor." Review articles and publications emphasizing perioperative management of oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications were selected. An additional PubMed search was completed for "hemorrhage," "bleeding," and "thrombosis" in conjunction with "dermatology," "dermatologic surgery," and "cutaneous surgery." Aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin have shortfalls in dosing, monitoring, and efficacy. Several trials show superior efficacy with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, with equal or reduced risk of bleeding compared with warfarin. Prasugrel and ticagrelor may be associated with an increased bleeding risk. Many over-the-counter medications also have anticoagulant properties with associated bleeding risks that cannot be overlooked. There are few publications evaluating the novel oral anticoagulants' effects on outpatient surgical procedures. Novel anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs are revolutionizing therapy for cardiovascular diseases. As these medications become more prevalent, dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons must be mindful of the bleeding risk that will apply in our everyday practices. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Responsiveness to parenteral iron therapy in children with oral iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Akin, Mehmet; Atay, Enver; Oztekin, Osman; Karadeniz, Cem; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul; Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdogan, Firat

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous (IV) ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are used for treating Fe deficiency in children with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA). An optimal treatment has yet to be determined. There are relatively little publications on the responsiveness to IV iron therapy in children with IRIDA. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy given to 11 children, ranging in age from 2 to 13 years (mean 4.8 years), with iron-deficiency anemia who were unresponsive to oral iron therapy. The hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean) of the 11 children with IRIDA were 7.7 g/dL and 4.8 ng/mL at diagnosis. Both hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased to 9.5 g/dL, and 24 ng/mL, respectively, at 6 weeks after the first therapy. Although the level of hemoglobin was steady at 6 months after the first, and 6 weeks after the second therapy, the ferritin levels continued to increase up to 30 ng/mL and 47 ng/mL at 6 months after the first and 6 weeks after the second therapy, respectively. We recommend that IRIDA should be considered in patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause that is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. Our results suggest that IV iron therapy should be administered only once in cases of IRIDA. Continued administration of IV iron would be of no benefit to increase hemoglobin levels. On the contrary, ferritin levels may continue to increase resulting in untoward effects of hyperferritinemia.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... into energy. Fatty acid oxidation takes place within mitochondria , which are the energy-producing centers in cells. ... to a substance known as carnitine to enter mitochondria. Once these fatty acids are joined with carnitine, ...

  5. Patterns of Care in Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Erqi L; Chin, Alexander L; Lee, Nancy Y; Tsai, C Jillian

    2017-07-15

    To characterize the patterns of care and potential barriers to access to care for elderly patients with oral cavity cancer in the adjuvant setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base and identified patients with resected oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, who survived for ≥3 months after surgery. We used logistic regression models to assess the association between age (<70, 70-79, and ≥80 years) and the receipt of adjuvant therapy within 3 months of surgery. We additionally assessed the association between patient and tumor characteristics and the receipt of adjuvant therapy among those aged ≥70 years. A total of 25,829 patients were included in the study. Compared with those aged <70 years, older patients were more likely to have no neck dissection or have fewer lymph nodes dissected and were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy than younger patients. Among our cohort, 11,361 patients (44%) had pathologic T3-T4 disease or N2-N3 disease, and 4185 patients (16%) had extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margins. In multivariate analyses controlling for comorbidity and demographic characteristics, older age was independently associated with lower odds of receiving adjuvant radiation therapy in the subgroup with T3 or T4 disease or N2 or N3 disease and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the positive extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margin subgroup. Among elderly patients, both greater patient distance from reporting facility and older age were associated with lower odds of receiving both adjuvant radiation therapy (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.81) and chemoradiation therapy (odds ratio 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.79). In a national hospital-based cohort of patients with oral cavity cancer, elderly patients were less likely to receive adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation therapy. Greater patient distance from reporting

  6. [A case of possible retroperitoneal metastasis of breast cancer successfully treated with oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy after TC therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Takeshita, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Morise, Masaki; Suzuki, Tetsutarou; Kishi, Shinya; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Akiko

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of possible retroperitoneal metastasis of breast cancer successfully treated with oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy after docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) therapy. A 57-year-old woman with a history of bilateral breast cancer showed an increase in tumor markers during treatment with oral anastrozole as postoperative adjuvant therapy 4 years after her second cancer surgery. After careful examination, the patient was diagnosed as having multiple bone metastases and her medication was changed to oral letrozole. After 3 months, the patient developed left back pain and was referred to our hospital. CT scanning showed an enhanced mass in the region from the left perirenal and posterior pararenal spaces to the left psoas major muscle and the anterior aspect of the left iliacus muscle, suggesting retroperitoneal metastasis. TC therapy was performed and, as a result, tumor markers decreased and the mass disappeared on CT imaging. After discontinuation of TC therapy, the tumor markers increased again, following which oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy were administered, and the tumor markers decreased. At the time of this writing, the patient is still undergoing therapy, and no recurrence has been observed. We concluded that oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy were useful in the present case and were associated with few adverse effects.

  7. Inhibition of carnitine biosynthesis by valproic acid in rats--the biochemical mechanism of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Farkas, V; Bock, I; Cseko, J; Sandor, A

    1996-11-08

    The anticonvulsive drug, valproic acid (VPA), inhibits the biosynthesis of carnitine, and may contribute in this way to carnitine deficiency associated with VPA therapy. The conversion of [3H]-butyrobetaine into [3H]-carnitine was determined 60 min following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.2 mmol/kg VPA in rats. The fraction of radioactivity found in [3H]-carnitine in the liver decreased from 63.2 +/- 1.50% to 39.2 +/- 1.11% (mean +/- SEM). Total carnitine in the liver also decreased, whereas the precursor butyrobetaine increased from 5.01 +/- 0.71 nmol/g to 8.22 +/- 0.82 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). VPA also exhibited a dramatic effect on the conversion of an unlabeled loading amount of butyrobetaine. The increment in total carnitine caused by butyrobetaine in liver was reduced from 161 +/- 15.4 nmol/g to 53.2 +/- 5.11 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM). These data prove that VPA reduces the flux through butyrobetaine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.1.). The drug in vitro, however, did not inhibit the enzyme directly. Searching for the mechanism of action, we found that VPA decreased the level of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG; a cofactor of butyrobetaine hydroxylase) from 73.5 +/- 2.90 nmol/g to 52.9 +/- 2.2 nmol/g (mean +/- SEM) in the liver. The level of 1-glutamate showed a rather dramatic decrease in the liver. Moreover, alpha-KG proved to have a protective role against VPA in the [3H]-butyrobetaine conversion experiment.

  8. Role of carnitine in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity: evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies with carnitine supplementation and carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Keller, Janine; Eder, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    Although carnitine is best known for its role in the import of long-chain fatty acids (acyl groups) into the mitochondrial matrix for subsequent β-oxidation, carnitine is also necessary for the efflux of acyl groups out of the mitochondria. Since intracellular accumulation of acyl-CoA derivatives has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, carnitine supplementation has gained attention as a tool for the treatment of insulin resistance. More recent studies even point toward a causative role for carnitine insufficiency in developing insulin resistance during states of chronic metabolic stress, such as obesity, which can be reversed by carnitine supplementation. The present review provides an overview about data from both animal and human studies reporting effects of either carnitine supplementation or carnitine deficiency on parameters of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in order to establish the less well-recognized role of carnitine in regulating glucose homeostasis. Carnitine supplementation studies in both humans and animals demonstrate an improvement of glucose tolerance, in particular during insulin-resistant states. In contrast, less consistent results are available from animal studies investigating the association between carnitine deficiency and glucose intolerance. The majority of studies dealing with this question could either find no association or even reported that carnitine deficiency lowers blood glucose and improves insulin sensitivity. In view of the abovementioned beneficial effect of carnitine supplementation on glucose tolerance during insulin-resistant states, carnitine supplementation might be an effective tool for improvement of glucose utilization in obese type 2 diabetic patients. However, further studies are necessary to explain the conflicting observations from studies dealing with carnitine deficiency.

  9. Therapy after single oral agent failure: adding a second oral agent or an insulin mixture?

    PubMed

    Malone, James K; Beattie, Scott D; Campaigne, Barbara N; Johnson, Patricia A; Howard, Andrew S; Milicevic, Zvonko

    2003-12-01

    to compare the glycemic response to an insulin lispro mixture (25% insulin lispro and 75% NPL) twice daily plus metformin (Mix25+M) with glibenclamide plus metformin (G+M), in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with a single oral agent. 597 patients treated in a randomized, open-label, 16-week parallel study. Variables evaluated: hemoglobin A1C (A1C), patient symptoms, hypoglycemia rate (episodes/patient/30 days), and incidence (% patients experiencing > or =1 episode). For a subset of patients (N=120), fasting, 1-h, and 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (FPG, 1-h ppPG, 2-h ppPG) in response to a standardized test meal (STM) and self-monitored blood glucose (BG) profiles were measured. improved A1C at endpoint for both groups, and A1C changes from baseline to endpoint were not significantly different between treatments (Mix25+M, -1.87+/-1.35% vs. G+M, -1.98+/-1.28%; p=0.288). Among patients completing STM; endpoint 2-h ppPG was significantly lower with Mix25+M (9.05+/-3.32 mmol/l vs. 12.31+/-3.65 mmol/l; p<0.001), as was 2-h ppPG excursion (2-h ppPGex)(0.38+/-3.23 mmol/l vs. 2.88+/-1.98 mmol/l; p<0.001). Percentage of patients achieving postprandial BG targets (<10 mmol/l) at endpoint was significantly greater with Mix25+M (80% vs. 48%; p<0.001). Although, overall hypoglycemia rates were similar, percentage of patients experiencing and rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia was less with Mix25+M (1% vs. 5%; p<0.01, and 0.01 vs. 0.08 episodes/pt/30 d; p=0.007). Patients reported less polyuria with Mix25+M (p<0.001). in patients with type 2 diabetes failing on metformin or a sulfonylurea, Mix25+M provided similar overall glycemic control, lower ppPG, reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia, and fewer hyperglycemic symptoms compared to G+M.

  10. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  11. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity. PMID:26421283

  12. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Lúcia; Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Macedo, Daniela; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity.

  13. Treatment of Oral Candidiasis Using Photodithazine®- Mediated Photodynamic Therapy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    G. Basso, Fernanda; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the treatment of oral candidiasis in a murine model using Photodithazine® (PDZ). This model of oral candidiasis was developed to allow the monitoring of the infection and the establishment of the aPDT treatment. Six-week-old female mice were immunosuppressed and inoculated with C. albicans to induce oral candidiasis. PDZ-mediated aPDT and nystatin treatment were carried out for 5 consecutive days with one application per day. The macroscopic evaluation of oral lesions was performed. After each treatment, the tongue was swabbed to recover C. albicans cells. Viable colonies were quantified and the number of CFU/ml determined. The animals were sacrificed 24 hours and 7 days after treatment and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis and analysis of inflammatory cytokines expression (IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6) by RT-qPCR. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. PDZ-mediated aPDT was as effective as Nystatin (NYS group) in the inactivation of C. albicans, reducing 3 and 3.2 logs10 respectively, 24 h after treatment (p<0.05). Animals underwent PDZ-mediated aPDT showed complete remission of oral lesions, while animals treated with NYS presented partial remission of oral lesions in both periods assessed. Histological evaluation revealed mild inflammatory infiltrate in the groups treated with aPDT and NYS in both periods assessed. The aPDT induced the TNF-α expression when compared with the control (P-L-) (p<0.05), 24 h and 7 days after treatment. In summary, the murine model developed here was able to mimic the infection and PDZ-mediated aPDT was effective to treat mice with oral candidiasis. PMID:27253525

  14. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not.

  15. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not. PMID:18299720

  16. The effect of low level laser therapy in different wavelengths in the treatment of oral mucositis—proposal for extra-oral implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, J. J. C.; Queiroga, A. S.; de Biase, R. C. C. G.; Leite, E. P.; Cabral Júnior, C. R.; Limeira Júnior, F. A.

    2009-09-01

    The oral mucositis is the most frequent acute oral complication resulting from antineoplastic treatment and may worsen the clinical condition of the patient and interfere with his/her quality of life. This study aimed to comparatively evaluate, from a clinical point of view, the effect of Laser Therapy λ660 nm (wavelength of the red Laser) and λ830 nm (wavelength of the infrared Laser), at extra-oral points, in remission of severity of oral mucositis and pain associated with it in pediatric oncological patients undergoing chemotherapy with the anticancer drug methotrexate, noting which of the two wavelength is the most appropriate to this new technique. The sample consisted of 13 patients placed at random in each group and subjected to sessions of Low Level Laser Therapy, at pre-determined extra-oral points for five consecutive days, starting at the beginning of the observation of mucositis injuries. It became possible to note that from the group of patients in the group of Laser λ830 nm ( n = 6; 46.15%), four ( n = 4; 66.67%) of these patients had remission of injuries to grade 0 (WHO), and as for pain, five patients ( n = 5; 83.33%) showed no painful symptoms for mucositis injuries. In the Laser λ660 nm group ( n = 7; 53.85%), only two patients ( n = 2; 28.57%) achieved a regression of lesions to grade 0 (WHO), while four patients ( n = 4; 57.14%) had no pain. So, the extra-oral application of Laser Therapy was effective in treating injuries of oral mucositis in the patients treated; and Laser Therapy in the infrared spectrum (λ830 nm) was more effective in the treatment of oral mucositis injuries compared to the red spectrum (λ660 nm), which can be explained by the greater power of penetration of infrared rays, acting in a more expressive way in deeper places.

  17. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  18. A novel treatment for subclinical hyperthyroidism: a pilot study on the beneficial effects of l-carnitine and selenium.

    PubMed

    Nordio, M

    2017-05-01

    The definition itself of subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHyper) and, therefore, the therapeutic approach to patients with SHyper still remains undefined and controversial. Therefore, the interest of finding a novel and alternative therapy for SHyper has caught the attention. An observational pilot study was performed to assess the effects of l-carnitine and selenium in the management of SHyper symptoms and endocrine profile in patients affected by this disease. Patients with TSH levels between 0.1-0.4 mIU/L and positive antibodies were recruited in this study. Subjects received orally one tablet containing 500 mg of l-carnitine and 83 mcg of selenium (L-Carn + Se), daily for 1 month. The primary outcome was the improvement of the quality of life (QoL) with the disappearance of main symptoms (subjective symptomatology) associated to SHyper, evaluated through a 9-items short form survey. Secondary outcomes included TSH, fT3, and fT4, TPOAb, TgAb measurement. Primary and secondary outcomes were evaluated at baseline, after the completion of treatment and after a successive month without treatment. After 1-month treatment, the subjective symptomatology significantly dropped from 25.61 ± 1.19 to 12.11 ± 1.15 (p < 0.05). On the other hand, during the following 1-month period without treatment, it increased back to 23.33 ± 1.35 (p < 0.05). Thyroid hormones and auto-antibodies remained in their normal range. The present pilot study has shown that L-Carn + Se significantly reduced symptoms associated with SHyper, improving QoL of patients, without significant modifications of their endocrine profile. In addition, it is noteworthy that the extension of treatment seems necessary to prevent symptoms reappearance. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to address clinicians to define the appropriate treatment-settings for this disorder.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  20. L-carnitine in beta thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Rashid; Jain, Abhay; Udani, Amish; Puri, Vipla; Kotian, Mallika

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine L-carnitine levels in regularly transfused and chelated beta thalassemia patients (n=40; mean age, 17.5+/-5.0 years). Ten age matched controls were also studied. The mean L-carnitine level in thalassemic patients was 23.71+/- 7.3 microM as compared to control 29.26+/-2.37 microM (P<0.0001). Mean carnitine was significantly lower (P=0.037) in those with ferritin greater than 2000 ng/dL (22.80+/-6.97 microM) in comparison to those with ferritin less than 2000 ng/dL (30.1+/-7.77 microM). Although carnitine levels in non vegetarians was higher (26.91+/-8.4 microM) than in vegetarians (22.34+/-6.55 microM), this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.072). We conclude that L-carnitine levels were found to be lower in thalassemics as compared to age matched controls.

  1. Effects of carnitine coingested caffeine on carnitine metabolism and endurance capacity in athletes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Y S; Choi, S K; Suh, H; Lee, S N; Cho, D; Li, K

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether caffeine (CAF), carnitine (CAR), or CAF+CAR mixture administration affects exercise endurance time via carnitine metabolism. Water (CON), CAF, CAR, or CAF+CAR mixture was administered to five male rugby athletes participating in this study by a randomized double-blind fashion who were made to ride a cycle ergometer for exercise. The CAF effect on exercise endurance time was small, but the CAR trial significantly increased the exercise endurance time compared with CON trial; a further CAF+CAR mixture trial had greater effects on the exercise endurance time than those of a CON, CAF, or CAR trial. A CAR or CAF+CAR mixed trial increased urinary nonesterified carnitine (NEC) and total carnitine (TCAR), but no changes were observed in acid-soluble acylcarnitine (ASAC) and acid-insoluble acylcarnitine (AIAC) excretion. A CAR or CAF+CAR mixed trial resulted in higher levels of plasma NEC, ASAC, and TCAR fractions than the CON and CAF trials did on exhaustion time. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid in blood were significantly increased at exhaustion time, but they were not affected in the CAF or the CAR trial. These results suggest that carnitine ingestion could promote fat oxidation, resulting in higher endurance performance in athletes, and especially these ergogenic effects of carnitine coingested with caffeine may be greater than those of carnitine alone.

  2. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  3. Metabolic effects of L-carnitine on type 2 diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Casariego, A; Burgos-Peláez, R; Martínez-Faedo, C; Calvo-Gracia, F; Valero-Zanuy, M Á; Luengo-Pérez, L M; Cuerda-Compés, C

    2013-04-01

    Carnitine is an endogenous metabolite and exogenous nutrient with a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Plasma levels of carnitine are reduced in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). The aim was to evaluate the metabolic effects of the administration of L-carnitine in T2DM. A systematic review was performed. Relevant randomized, controlled-trials trials were searched in Pubmed, Trip Database and Cochrane Library, and selected when they had enough methodological quality assessed with the Jadad scale. Article search strategy included "Carnitine" OR "L-carnitine" AND "Diabetes -Mellitus" OR "Diabetes mellitus, type 2" OR "Noninsulindependent-diabetes mellitus". Meta-analysis was performed, and the difference of means calculated with a 95% confidence interval. Heterogeneity was evaluated with the Q statistic. The systematic review included 4 trials with 284 patients. Oral L-carnitine lowered fasting plasma glucose [-14.3 mg/dl (CI95% - 23.2 to -5.4); p=0,002], total cholesterol [-7.8 mg/dL (95%CI -15.5 to -0.1); p=0.09], low density lipoprotein [-8.8 mg/dl (CI95% -12.2 to -8.5), p<0.0001], apolipoprotein-B100 [-7.6 mg/dl (CI95% -13.6 to -1.6); p=0.013] and apolipoprotein-A1 [-6.0 mg/dl (CI95% -10.5 a -1.5); p=0.523]. There was no significant heterogeneity. The changes in triglycerides, lipoprotein (a) or HbA(1c) were not significant. The administration of L-carnitine in type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an improvement in glycaemia and plasma lipids. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Suicide gene therapy using adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Kagami, Hideaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Fukuhara, Hirokazu; Tohnai, Iwai; Ueda, Minoru; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Recently, suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) administration was evaluated for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of suicide gene therapy using the replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell lines. To evaluate transduction efficiency, each cell line was transduced in vitro with an adenovirus vector containing the beta-galactosidase gene. By 24 hours after transduction, nearly 100% of the cells were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10, and from 30 to 10% at an MOI of 1. Next, each cell line was transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the HSVtk gene, and a subsequent administration of GCV for the assessment of suicide gene therapy. A subsequent administration of GCV resulted in complete tumor cell death. In addition, we conducted a morphological analysis of that cell death using video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast microscopy, and we observed that it included both apoptosis and necrosis after HSVtk gene and GCV treatment. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy induced remarkable cytotoxicity with a bystander effect in human oral squamous cell carcinoma thus suggesting an effective treatment strategy for that tumor.

  5. Oral nitrate therapy does not affect glucose metabolism in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Duffy, Stephen J; Formosa, Melissa F; Ahimastos, Anna A; Thompson, Bruce R; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2009-11-01

    1. Previously, we demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) may be an important mediator of peripheral glucose disposal. The aim of the present study was to determine whether acute oral nitrate therapy improves glucose metabolism in healthy individuals. 2. Healthy men (n = 10), aged between 19 and 46 years, participated in a randomized cross-over placebo-controlled study. During Visit 1, participants received a dose-graded intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside (SNP; titrated from a dose of 0.5 microg/kg per min to a maximum of 2 microg/kg per min and delivered at a rate of 2 mL/min over 30 min). On Visits 2, 3 and 4, participants received oral extended-release isosorbide mononitrate (120 mg), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (160 mg) and placebo in a randomized Latin square design (one treatment per visit). The main outcome measures were plasma glucose and insulin levels and glucose tolerance determined by an oral glucose tolerance test following the SNP infusion and 3 h after nitrate/placebo administration. Exhaled NO, cGMP and pulmonary blood flow were also measured for 3 h after administration of nitrate/placebo and after SNP infusion. 3. None of the nitrate interventions influenced measures of glucose metabolism. Following SNP infusion, there was no change in plasma glucose (P = 0.42) or insulin (P = 0.25) levels, and the response to a glucose load did not different from baseline (P = 0.46). Similarly, neither of the oral nitrates altered plasma glucose (P = 0.24) or insulin levels (P = 0.90) or glucose tolerance (P = 0.56) compared with placebo. 4. In conclusion, these results indicate that acute oral nitrate therapy does not influence glucose metabolism. Studies using NO donors in a chronic setting are required to clarify the role of NO in mediating peripheral glucose uptake.

  6. Experimental study of antiangiogenic gene therapy targeting VEGF in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasuo; Ueno, Hikaru; Katagiri, Masataka; Oneyama, Takahiro; Shimomura, Kana; Sakurai, Satoshi; Mataga, Izumi; Moride, Michiko; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2010-02-01

    It is well known that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in local growth and metastasis of oral cancer; therefore, inhibiting angiogenesis is considered to be effective for treating oral cancer. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of systemically available antiangiogenic gene therapy targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is one of the most important angiogenesis accelerators. We administered a soluble form of VEGF receptor-expressing gene incorporated into adenovirus (AdVEGF-ExR) intraperitoneally to nude mice to which oral cancer cell lines (SAS, HSC-3, and Ca9-22) had been transplanted subcutaneously in vivo to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor proliferation. Then, we measured tumor volumes over time, and tumors were enucleated and examined histopathologically and immunohistologically at 28 days after AdVEGF-ExR administration. Compared to the controls to which we administered AdLacZ or saline, significant antiproliferative effects were observed (P < 0.05) in the AdVEGF-ExR administration group, and extensive tumor necrosis was found histopathologically. Immunohistochemical analysis with CD34 (NU-4A1) revealed tumor angiogenesis was suppressed significantly (P < 0.05), and that with ssDNA revealed apoptosis induction was significantly high (P < 0.05) in the AdVEGF-ExR group. However, analysis with Ki-67 (MIB-1) revealed tumor proliferative capacity was not significantly different between the groups. Consequently, we consider that AdVEGF-ExR administration achieved tumor growth suppression by inhibiting angiogenesis and inducing apoptosis, but not by inhibiting the proliferative capacity of tumor cells. Neither topical administration of a soluble form of VEGF receptor (sVEGFR) to the tumor nor a megadose was needed to achieve this inhibition effect. These results suggest gene therapy via sVEGFR would be an effective oral cancer therapy and benefit future clinical applications.

  7. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  8. Implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy: a community-based participatory project.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Maya; Wüthrich, Erika; Stauffer, Yvonne; Herczeg, Franziska; Fattinger, Karin; Hirter, Kathrin; Papalini, Marianne; Herrmann, Luzia

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at developing and implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy. The number of persons with chronic diseases who live at home is increasing. They have to manage multiple diseases and complex treatments. One such treatment is oral anticoagulation therapy, a high risk variable dose medication. Adherence to oral anticoagulation therapy is jeopardised by limited information about the medications, their risk and complications, the impact of individual daily routine and the limited inclusion of family members in education. Hence, improved and tailored education is essential for patients and families to manage oral anticoagulation therapy at home. A community-based participatory research design combined with the Precede-Proceed model was used including a systematic literature review, posteducation analysis, an online nurse survey, a documentation analysis and patient/family interviews. The study was conducted between April 2010-December 2012 at a department of general internal medicine in a teaching hospital in Switzerland. Participants were the department's nursing and medical professionals including the patients and their families. The evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy emerged comprising a learning assessment, teaching units, clarification of responsibilities of nurse professionals and documentation guidelines. The inclusion of the whole department has contributed to the development and implementation of this evidence-based patient family education on oral anticoagulation therapy, which encompasses local characteristics and patient preferences. This education is now being used throughout the department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment.

  10. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  11. Carnitine metabolism in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, S; Reichen, J

    1997-01-01

    Carnitine metabolism was studied in 79 patients with chronic liver disease, including 22 patients with noncirrhotic liver disease and 57 patients with different types of cirrhosis (22 patients with hepatitis B- or C-associated cirrhosis, 15 patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis, 15 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC], and 5 patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis), and compared with 28 control subjects. In comparison with control subjects, patients with noncirrhotic liver disease showed no change in the plasma carnitine pool, whereas patients with cirrhosis had a 29% increase in the long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. Analysis of subgroups of patients with cirrhosis showed that patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis had an increase in the total plasma carnitine concentration (67.8 +/- 29.5 vs. 55.2 +/- 9.9 micromol/L in control subjects), resulting from increases in both the short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine concentration. In this group of patients, the acylcarnitine concentrations showed a close correlation with the total carnitine concentration, and the total carnitine concentration with the serum bilirubin concentration. Urinary excretion of carnitine was not different between patients with noncirrhotic or cirrhotic liver disease and control patients. However, patients with PBC showed an increased urinary excretion of total carnitine (52.5 +/- 40.0 vs. 28.0 +/- 16.7 micromol carnitine/mmol creatinine), resulting from an increase in the fractional excretion of both free carnitine and short-chain acylcarnitine. The current studies show that patients with cirrhosis are normally not carnitine deficient. Patients with alcohol-induced cirrhosis have increased plasma carnitine concentrations, which may result from increased carnitine biosynthesis because of increased skeletal muscle protein turnover. The increase in the fractional carnitine excretion in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis may result from competition of bile acids and

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of oral versus injectable disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Longbrake, Erin E; Cross, Anne H; Salter, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of oral disease-modifying therapies fundamentally changed the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, impressions of their relative efficacy and tolerability are primarily founded on expert opinion. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether oral disease-modifying therapies were better tolerated and/or more effective for controlling multiple sclerosis compared to injectable therapies in clinical practice. Methods Single-center, retrospective cohort study. 480 patients initiated oral (fingolimod, teriflunomide, or dimethyl fumarate) or injectable therapy between March 2013–March 2015 and follow-up data was collected for 5–31 months. Outcomes included on-drug multiple sclerosis activity and drug discontinuation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to control for baseline differences and sensitivity analyses using propensity-weighted matching were performed. Results A higher proportion of teriflunomide-treated patients experienced multiple sclerosis activity compared to those treated with injectable therapies (p = 0.0053) in the adjusted model. Breakthrough multiple sclerosis was equally prevalent among fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate-treated compared to injectable therapy-treated patients. Of patients initiating a disease-modifying therapy, 32–46% discontinued or switched treatments during the study. After controlling for baseline differences, discontinuation rates were comparable across treatment groups. Conclusions In this cohort, oral and injectable disease-modifying therapies were equally well tolerated, but teriflunomide appeared less effective for controlling multiple sclerosis activity than injectable therapies. Further study is needed. PMID:28280599

  13. Insulin-based versus triple oral therapy for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: which is better?

    PubMed

    Lingvay, Ildiko; Legendre, Jaime L; Kaloyanova, Polina F; Zhang, Song; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip

    2009-10-01

    Early use of insulin after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is met with resistance because of associated weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fear of decreased compliance and quality of life (QoL). In treatment-naive patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, insulin and metformin were initiated for a 3-month lead-in period, then patients were randomly assigned to insulin and metformin (insulin group) or metformin, pioglitazone, and glyburide (oral group) for 36 months. Hypoglycemic events, compliance, A1C, weight, QoL, and treatment satisfaction were assessed. Of 29 patients randomly assigned into each group, 83% (insulin group) and 72% (oral group) completed this 3-year study. At study completion, A1C was 6.1 +/- 0.6% (insulin group) versus 6.0 +/- 0.8% (oral group). Weight increased similarly in both groups (P = 0.09) by 4.47 kg (95% CI 0.89-8.04 kg) (insulin group) and 7.15 kg (95% CI 4.18-10.13 kg) (orals group). Hypoglycemic events did not differ between groups (mild 0.51 event/person-month in the insulin group vs. 0.68 event/person-month in the orals group, P = 0.18 and severe 0.04 event/person-year in the insulin group vs. 0.09 event/person-year in the orals group, P = 0.53). Compliance, QoL, and treatment satisfaction were similar between groups, with 100% of patients randomly assigned to insulin willing to continue such treatment. When compared with a clinically equivalent treatment regimen, insulin-based therapy is effective and did not cause greater weight gain or hypoglycemia nor decrease compliance, treatment satisfaction, or QoL. Insulin is safe, well-accepted, and effective for ongoing treatment of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  14. Endometrial Hyperplasia Risk in Relation to Recent Use of Oral Contraceptives and Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epplein, Meira; Reed, Susan D.; Voigt, Lynda F.; Newton, Katherine M.; Holt, Victoria L.; Weiss, Noel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Examine the relationship between recent use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) risk. Methods Cases comprised women diagnosed with complex EH (n=289) or atypical EH (n=173) between 1985-2003. One age-matched control was selected for each case; excluded were women with a prior hysterectomy or diagnosis of EH or endometrial cancer. Hormone use in the six months prior to the date of the case’s first symptoms was ascertained using a pharmacy database and medical records. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results Three (1.1%) cases had used oral contraceptives, compared to sixteen (6.0%) controls (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.0–0.6). Fifty-one (16.8%) cases had taken estrogen-only hormone therapy, in contrast to two (0.7%) controls (OR = 37.6, 95% CI: 8.8–160.0). The risk of EH among estrogen plus progestin hormone users did not differ from that of non-users (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4–1.1). Conclusions This study suggests that previous findings of the association of estrogen-only hormone therapy with increased risk of EH and the lack of an association between estrogen plus progestin hormone therapy and EH risk are likely to apply to both complex EH and atypical EH. Further examination of the association between oral contraceptives and EH, with greater numbers of OC users, is warranted. PMID:19064186

  15. The efficacy of sequential therapy using pazufloxacin followed by oral fluoroquinolones for treatment of pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Muratani, Tetsuro; Akasaka, Soichiro; Yamada, Yoji; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of sequential therapy of pazufloxacin (PZFX), which is a parenteral fluoroquinolone, followed by oral fluoroquinolones [tosufloxacin tosilate (TFLX) or levofloxacin (LVFX)] for treatment of pyelonephritis, was evaluated. Patients with pyelonephritis who had fever (≥37.5 °C), pyuria (≥10 white blood cells/high-power field), and bacteriuria (≥10(4) colony-forming units/ml) were eligible for this study. PZFX (500 mg) was given intravenously twice a day for at least 3 days. If the patients were clinically improved, TFLX (150 mg) or LVFX (100 mg) was then administered orally three times a day for at least 5 days. Patients underwent clinical and microbiological evaluation at 5-9 days after final drug administration. Clinical and microbiological efficacy could be assessed in 21 of 25 cases enrolled. Both clinical and microbiological efficacy rates were 81.0 % (17/21 cases). In the effective cases, the mean administration time was 4.2 days for PZFX and 6.0 days for oral fluoroquinolones. The mean time to defervescence was 3.4 days for the effective cases. In the four treatment failure cases, three quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and a quinolone-resistant Enterococcus faecalis were isolated. This sequential therapy seemed to be clinically effective in the treatment of pyelonephritis; however, the prevalence of quinolone-resistant E. coli should be taken into account.

  16. Intravenous Iron Sucrose for Children with Iron Deficiency Failing to Respond to Oral Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crary, Shelley E.; Hall, Katherine; Buchanan, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Background For decades parenteral iron has been used in patients with iron deficiency unresponsive to oral iron therapy and in hemodialysis-dependent patients receiving erythropoietin. Newer intravenous (IV) iron formulations such as iron sucrose have replaced high molecular weight iron dextran in dialysis patients; however, the use of parenteral iron in children without renal disease has not been well defined. Procedure Pharmacy records were reviewed on children (≤ 18 yrs of age) who received IV iron sucrose at Children's Medical Center Dallas between January 1, 2004 and June 30, 2009. Patients who received iron sucrose for chronic renal disease were excluded from analysis. Results Thirty-eight children received iron sucrose for non-renal indications, 13 with iron deficiency refractory to oral iron therapy, 13 with iron malabsorption or dependence on parenteral nutrition, 7 for chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, and 5 for miscellaneous indications. Among these 38 children, who received a total of 510 doses of IV iron sucrose, there were only 6 adverse reactions. Patients in all categories had a good response to the iron sucrose, with a median hemoglobin rise of 1.9 – 3.1 g/dl depending on the indication. Conclusions Parenteral iron is a safe and effective means to treat iron deficiency in children who cannot receive or do not respond to oral iron due to intolerance, poor adherence or iron malabsorption. PMID:21298748

  17. New directions in type 2 diabetes mellitus: an update of current oral antidiabetic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. L.; Brillon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviewed the relevant literature including published clinical trials and reviews on currently available oral hypoglycemic agents. Results showed that the benefits of glycemic control have been established through multiple clinical trials. Long-term control of blood glucose levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients will decrease the incidence and prolong the time until progression of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Our increased understanding of the pathophysiology behind type 2 diabetes has led to the development of many new agents that are aimed at treating the underlying insulin resistance and relative insulinopenia. The sulfonylureas as a group have been used for many years and act by stimulating insulin secretion. They are useful alone or as combination therapy with insulin or another oral hypoglycemic agent. The biguanides act by decreasing hepatic glucose production and by increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors act nonsystemically by blocking the metabolism of digested polysaccharides and therefore lowering the amount of carbohydrate absorbed in a meal. Benzoic acid derivatives act in a manner similar to that of sulfonylureas by enhancing pancreatic insulin production. They offer a shorter duration of action, lowering the risk of hypoglycemia. The thiazolidinediones increase peripheral insulin sensitivity and are effective as both monotherapy and combination therapy. Oral hypoglycemic agents, when properly administered, are very effective in controlling type 2 diabetes and preventing long-term complications. PMID:10643211

  18. Currently approved and emerging oral therapies in multiple sclerosis: An update for the ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Christopher; Bhatti, M Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Although our understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) has grown substantially, its cause remains unknown. Nonetheless, in the past 3 decades, there have been tremendous advancements in the development of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). In July 1993, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first disease-modifying drug-interferon β- and there are currently 13 medications approved for use in relapsing MS. All the early medications are administered either as a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, and despite the clinical efficacy and safety of these medications, many patients were hampered by the inconvenience of injections and injection-related side effects. In September 2010, the first oral DMD-fingolimod-was approved. Since then, 2 additional oral DMDs (teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate) have been approved, and several other oral medications are being evaluated in extensive MS development programs. Because of frequent ocular involvement, ophthalmologists are often involved in the care of MS patients and therefore need to be aware of the current treatment regimens prescribed by neurologists, some of which can have significant ophthalmic adverse events. We update the current advancements in the treatment of MS and discuss the published clinical data on the efficacy and safety of the currently approved and emerging oral therapies in MS.

  19. Clinical guidelines for oral appliance therapy in the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, J; Balasubramaniam, R; Darendeliler, M A; Cheng, A T; Waters, K; Sullivan, C E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide guidelines for the use of oral appliances (OAs) for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in Australia. A review of the scientific literature up to June 2012 regarding the clinical use of OAs in the treatment of snoring and OSA was undertaken by a dental and medical sleep specialists team consisting of respiratory sleep physicians, an otolaryngologist, orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and an oral medicine specialist. The recommendations are based on the most recent evidence from studies obtained from peer reviewed literature. Oral appliances can be an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of snoring and OSA across a broad range of disease severity. However, the response to therapy is variable. While a significant proportion of subjects have a near complete control of the apnoea and snoring when using an OA, a significant proportion do not respond, and others show a partial response. Measurements of baseline and treatment success should ideally be undertaken. A coordinated team approach between medical practitioner and dentist should be fostered to enhance treatment outcomes. Ongoing patient follow-up to monitor treatment efficacy, OA comfort and side effects are cardinal to long-term treatment success and OA compliance. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy and postpartum: pathophysiology and effect of oral versus intravenous iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khalafallah, Alhossain A; Dennis, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization's global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.

  1. Combination oral antiangiogenic therapy with thalidomide and sulindac inhibits tumour growth in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, H M W; Panigrahy, D; Yuan, J; D'Amato, R J

    1999-01-01

    Neovascularization facilitates tumour growth and metastasis formation. In our laboratory, we attempt to identify clinically available oral efficacious drugs for antiangiogenic activity. Here, we report which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can inhibit corneal neovascularization, induced by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This antiangiogenic activity may contribute to the known effects of NSAIDs on gastric ulcers, polyps and tumours. We found that sulindac was one of the most potent antiangiogenic NSAIDs, inhibiting bFGF-induced neovascularization by 50% and VEGF-induced neovascularization by 55%. Previously, we reported that thalidomide inhibited growth factor-induced corneal neovascularization. When we combined sulindac with thalidomide, we found a significantly increased inhibition of bFGF- or VEGF-induced corneal neovascularization (by 63% or 74% respectively) compared with either agent alone (P< 0.01). Because of this strong antiangiogenic effect, we tested the oral combination of thalidomide and sulindac for its ability to inhibit the growth of V2 carcinoma in rabbits. Oral treatment of thalidomide or sulindac alone inhibited tumour growth by 55% and 35% respectively. When given together, the growth of the V2 carcinoma was inhibited by 75%. Our results indicated that oral antiangiogenic combination therapy with thalidomide and sulindac may be a useful non-toxic treatment for cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408702

  2. Carnitine for fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Aaron M; Wasdell, Michael; Spiwak, Rae; Rowell, Greg; Nathwani, Shabita

    2010-02-17

    Fatigue is reported to occur in up to 92% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described as the most debilitating of all MS symptoms by 28% to 40% of MS patients. To assess whether carnitine (enteral or intravenous) supplementation can improve the quality of life and reduce the symptoms of fatigue in patients with MS-related fatigue and to identify any adverse effects of carnitine when used for this purpose. A literature search was performed using Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (21 May 2009), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) "The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 2, MEDLINE (PubMed) (1966-21 May 2009), EMBASE (1974-21 May 2009). Reference lists of review articles and primary studies were also screened. A hand search of the abstract book of recent relevant conference symposia was also conducted. Personal contact with MS experts and a manufacturer (Source Naturals, United States) of carnitine formulation was contacted to determine if they knew of other clinical trials. No language restrictions were applied. Full reports of published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of any carnitine intervention in adults with a clinical diagnosis of fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis were included. Data from the eligible trials was extracted and coded using a standardized data extraction form and entered into RevMan 5. Discrepancies were to be resolved by discussion with a third reviewer however this was not necessary. The quality items to be assessed were method of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding (participants, investigators, outcome assessors and data analysis), intention-to-treat analysis and completeness of follow up. The search identified one randomized cross-over trial. In this study patients were exposed to both acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR(tm)) 2 grams daily and amantadine 200 mg daily in adult patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive MS. The effects of

  3. Carnitine for fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tejani, Aaron M; Wasdell, Michael; Spiwak, Rae; Rowell, Greg; Nathwani, Shabita

    2012-05-16

    Fatigue is reported to occur in up to 92% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and has been described as the most debilitating of all MS symptoms by 28% to 40% of MS patients. To assess whether carnitine (enteral or intravenous) supplementation can improve the quality of life and reduce the symptoms of fatigue in patients with MS-related fatigue and to identify any adverse effects of carnitine when used for this purpose. A literature search was performed using Cochrane MS Group Trials Register (09 September 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) "The Cochrane Library 2011, issue 3", MEDLINE (PubMed) (1966-09 September 2011), EMBASE (1974-09 September 2011), and www.clinicaltrials.gov for ongoing trials retrieval. Reference lists of review articles and primary studies were also screened. A hand search of the abstract book of recent relevant conference symposia was also conducted. Personal contact with MS experts and a manufacturer (Source Naturals, United States) of carnitine formulation was contacted to determine if they knew of other clinical trials. No language restrictions were applied. Full reports of published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials of any carnitine intervention in adults affected by multiple sclerosis with a clinical diagnosis of fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis were included. Data from the eligible trials was extracted and coded using a standardized data extraction form and entered into RevMan 5. Discrepancies were to be resolved by discussion with a third reviewer, however this was not necessary.The quality items to be assessed were method of randomization, allocation concealment, blinding (participants, investigators, outcome assessors and data analysis), intention-to-treat analysis and completeness of follow up. The search identified one ongoing randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial (expected completion 2013) and one completed randomized, active

  4. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  5. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Emily Cornforth; di San Filippo, Cristina Amat; Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi C.; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency is caused by defective OCTN2 carnitine transporters encoded by the SLC22A5 gene. Lack of carnitine impairs fatty acid oxidation resulting in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatic encephalopathy, skeletal and cardiac myopathy. Recently, asymptomatic mothers with primary carnitine deficiency were identified by low carnitine levels in their infant by newborn screening. Here we evaluate mutations in the SLC22A5 gene and carnitine transport in fibroblasts from symptomatic patients and asymptomatic women. Carnitine transport was significantly reduced in fibroblasts obtained from all patients with primary carnitine deficiency, but was significantly higher in the asymptomatic women’s than in the symptomatic patients’ fibroblasts (p<0.01). By contrast, ergothioneine transport (a selective substrate of the OCTN1 transporter, tested here as a control) was similar in cells from controls and patients with carnitine deficiency. DNA sequencing indicated an increased frequency of nonsense mutations in symptomatic patients (p<0.001). Expression of the missense mutations in CHO cells indicated that many mutations retained residual carnitine transport activity, with no difference in the average activity of missense mutations identified in symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients. These results indicate that cells from asymptomatic women have on average higher levels of residual carnitine transport activity as compared to that of symptomatic patients due to the presence of at least one missense mutation. PMID:21922592

  6. L-Carnitine supplementation reduces oxidized LDL cholesterol in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Mariano; Vacante, Marco; Avitabile, Teresio; Malaguarnera, Marcella; Cammalleri, Lisa; Motta, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes are under high oxidative stress, and levels of hyperglycemia correlate strongly with levels of LDL oxidation. Carnitine favorably modulates oxidative stress. This objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of L-carnitine on the reduction of oxidized LDL cholesterol in patients with type 2 diabetes. Eighty-one patients with diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups for 3 mo. The 2 groups received either 2 g L-carnitine once daily (n = 41) or placebo (n = 40). The following variables were assessed at baseline, after washout, and at 1, 2, and 3 mo of treatment: body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B-100, oxidized LDL cholesterol, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and conjugated dienes. At the end of the study period, the L-carnitine-treated patients showed significant improvements compared with the placebo group in the following markers: oxidized LDL levels decreased by 15.1 compared with 3.0 U/L (P < 0.001); LDL cholesterol decreased by 0.45 compared with 0.16 mmol/L (P < 0.05); triglycerides decreased by 1.02 compared with 0.09 mmol/L (P < 0.001); apolipoprotein A1 concentrations decreased by 0.12 compared with 0.03 mg/dL (P < 0.05); apolipoprotein B-100 concentrations decreased by 0.13 compared with 0.04 mg/dL (P < 0.05); thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance concentrations decreased by 1.92 compared with 0.05 (P < 0.001), and conjugated diene concentrations decreased by 0.72 compared with 0.11 in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Our study indicates that oral administration of L-carnitine reduces oxidized LDL cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Does carnitine have a role in fat absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Leichter, J.; Ottem, A.; Hahn, P.

    1987-08-24

    The effect of D-carnitine and tetradecylglycidic acid (TDGA), an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, on intestinal absorption of palmitic acid was determined. The proximal intestinal segment was ligated in adult male rats and filled with 0.5 ..mu..Ci of /sup 14/C-palmitic acid alone or with either D-carnitine or TDGA. Thirty minutes alter the radioactivity was determined in the intestinal lumen, intestinal wall and plasma. The absorption of palmitic acid was decreased in the presence of D-carnitine (10 mg/ml) as evidenced by significantly lower levels of radioactivity in the gut wall and the plasma and by significantly greater residual radioactivity in the lumenal contents. L-carnitine had no effect on plasma radioactivity but if D- and L-carnitine were given together the effect of D-carnitine was still in evidence. TDGA also inhibited intestinal absorption of palmitic acid. 8 references, 2 tables.

  8. Determinants of use rate of oral rehydration therapy for management of childhood diarrhoea in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Atkinson, D; Underwood, P

    2000-09-01

    In rural Bangladesh, mothers were interviewed to identify factors that determine the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for management of diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. The point prevalence of diarrhoea among 1,600 children was 11.6%, with 46% having acute watery diarrhoea. The overall ORT-use rate was 29%; only 17% of the cases used it adequately. Common reasons for not using ORS included misperception about diarrhoea and age of patients. Other reasons included incorrect assessments, severity, and difficulties with the administration of oral rehydration solutions. Promotion of ORT can be effected by improving the level of understanding of mothers with regard to assessment of severity, early initiation of treatment regardless of age, sex, type of diarrhoea, breast-feeding, and nutrition status.

  9. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  10. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco; Abenavoli, Fabio M; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Alessio D; Scacco, Salvatore; Papa, Francesco; Inchingolo, Angelo M; Dipalma, Gianna

    2011-07-19

    Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients.

  11. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Results Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. Conclusions We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients. PMID:21771331

  12. Oral anticoagulation to reduce risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased incidence and severity of strokes. The burden of AF-related stroke is expected to increase in parallel with the aging of the population. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin has been the pharmacologic standard for stroke risk reduction in patients with AF. When used with close attention to dosing and monitoring, warfarin is effective prophylactic therapy against thromboembolic stroke. However, it is underused by physicians, in part because of the known risks of adverse events with warfarin. Consequently, many patients with AF live with an avoidably elevated risk of stroke. New options, ie, oral anticoagulants with novel mechanisms of action, have recently been approved to reduce the risk of stroke in AF, and others are in development. These newer agents may address some of the complexities of warfarin use while providing similar or better efficacy and safety.

  13. INFLUENCE OF OZONE THERAPY ON ORAL TISSUE IN MODELING OF CHRONIC RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS.

    PubMed

    Kovach, I; Kravchenko, L; Khotimska, Yu; Nazaryan, R; Gargin, V

    2017-03-01

    Chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis (CRAS) belongs to the group of chronic, inflammatory, ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ozone on the morphofunctional peculiarities of the soft tissues in modeling chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. We performed experimental investigation for study of the morpho-functional state of tissues of the oral mucosa in CRAS with using of previously proposed and widely used modeling scheme with ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide. Two groups of animals were formed (Dutch rabbits, males, aging three-month, weighting 2-2.4 kg). Group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was our comparison group. Other group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was treated by ozone therapy. Histological investigation has been performed. Microscopical examination of tissue had shown that ozone therapy reduces inflammation and edema and is useful in wound healing in soft tissue as disappearance of necrobiotic processes, epithelialization of aphthous defect, growth of akantotic bands, pronounced reducing of inflammatory cells and changing of cellular ratio (with of neutrophils part from 38.30±2.46% to 6.34±0.63%, eosinophils from 5.49±0.23% to 2.87±0.05%), restoration of the cellular layers of the epithelium, moderately pronounced sclerosis of the papillary layer of the lamina propria. Described results allow to conclude that correction of tissual changes in chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis could be obtained with ozone therapy using.

  14. Surviving with Lung Cancer: Medication-Taking and Oral Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    WICKERSHAM, Karen E.; HAPP, Mary Beth; BENDER, Catherine M.; ENGBERG, Sandra J.; TARHINI, Ahmad; ERLEN, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a “window” into participants’ process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs. PMID:24702721

  15. Oral antiplatelet therapy in diabetes mellitus and the role of prasugrel: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillegass, William B; Brott, Brigitta C; Dobbs, James C; Papapietro, Silvio E; Misra, Vijay K; Zoghbi, Gilbert J

    2011-01-01

    Diabetics have a prothrombotic state that includes increased platelet reactivity. This contributes to the less favorable clinical outcomes observed in diabetics experiencing acute coronary syndromes as well as stable coronary artery disease. Many diabetics are relatively resistant to or have insufficient response to several antithrombotic agents. In the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention, hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel is particularly common among diabetics. Several strategies have been examined to further enhance the benefits of oral antiplatelet therapy in diabetics. These include increasing the dose of clopidogrel, triple antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol, and new agents such as prasugrel. The large TRITON TIMI 38 randomized trial compared clopidogrel to prasugrel in the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes. The diabetic subgroup (n = 3146) experienced considerable incremental benefit with a 4.8% reduction in cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke at 15-month follow-up with prasugrel treatment. Among diabetics on insulin this combined endpoint was reduced by 7.9% at 15 months. Major bleeding was not increased in the diabetic subgroup. This confirms the general hypothesis that more potent oral antiplatelet therapy can partially overcome the prothrombotic milieu and safely improve important clinical outcomes in diabetics. PMID:21822392

  16. A Comparative Study of Oral Cyclosporine and Betamethasone Minipulse Therapy in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Kim, Sang Lim; Lee, Kyou Chae; Kim, Min Ji; Park, Kyung Hea; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Various systemic agents have been assessed for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA); however, there is a paucity of comparative studies. Objective To assess and compare cyclosporine and betamethasone minipulse therapy as treatments for AA with regard to effectiveness and safety. Methods Data were collected from 88 patients who received at least 3 months of oral cyclosporine (n=51) or betamethasone minipulse therapy (n=37) for AA. Patients with ≥50% of terminal hair regrowth in the alopecic area were considered responders. Results The responder of the cyclosporine group was 54.9% and that of the betamethasone minipulse group was 37.8%. In the cyclosporine group, patients with mild AA were found to respond better to the treatment. Based on the patient self-assessments, 70.6% of patients in the cyclosporine group and 43.2% of patients in the betamethasone minipulse group rated their hair regrowth as excellent or good. Side effects were less frequent in the cyclosporine group. Conclusion Oral cyclosporine appeared to be superior to betamethasone minipulse therapy in terms of treatment effectiveness and safety. PMID:27746635

  17. From Therapy to Instruction: The Effect of Systemic Strategies on the Oral Performance of Foreign Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Solarte, Ana Clara; Sánchez Solarte, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a group intervention based on strategies derived from the systemic therapy model--brief strategic therapy. These strategies aimed at decreasing the anxiety levels commonly found in oral performance tasks related to L2 learning. Thirteen students from different semesters who belonged to two foreign language…

  18. Comparison of Low-Level Laser Therapy versus Ozone Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Erisen, Merve

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment options for oral lichen planus (OLP) are numerous and include topical and systemic agents. Intralesional and systemic corticosteroids are used; however, the therapeutic results are often disappointing. Objective To compare the influence of ozone, laser, and topical corticosteroid therapies in the treatment of OLP. Methods One hundred twenty adult patients with ≤3 cm atrophic-erosive biopsy-proven OLPs in the tongue or buccal mucosa were recruited into the study. They were randomly assigned, by preoperative envelope drawing, to be treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT group), ozone therapy (ozonated group), and topical corticosteroid therapy (positive control group). A placebo treatment containing base ointment without the active corticosteroid component was administered to patients in the negative control group. Response rate scores were determined on the basis of changes in the appearance score and pain score of the lesions between baseline and after each treatment. Results The study subjects consisted of 56 male and 64 female OLP patients with a combined mean age of 42.6±8.3 years (range, 28~55 years). No statistically significant difference was detected in clinical severity among the groups. The sign scores decreased in almost all scoring groups; however, statistically significant improvement was found in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Symptom improvement was achieved after treatment with LLLT, ozone, and corticosteroid (p<0.05). The efficacy indices were significantly higher in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Conclusion Ozone and corticosteroid therapies were more effective than 808-nm LLLT in the treatment of OLP. PMID:26512161

  19. [Circulating immune complexes and complement fragment iC3b in chronic polyarthritis during 12 months therapy with oral enzymes in comparison with oral gold].

    PubMed

    Kullich, W; Schwann, H

    1992-01-01

    In the course of a double-blind randomized study lasting 1 year 19 patients suffering from ensured rheumatoid arthritis (ARA criteria) were treated with oral hydrolytic enzymes or oral gold salts. The effects of these therapies were examined in regard to changes in serum concentrations of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and the complement component iC3b. After 12 months treatment with oral enzymes we determined a therapeutically wanted significant decrease of CIC whereas CIC increased up to 6 months. The best but not significant result under therapy with oral gold salts concerning CIC was a decrease in 6 out of 9 patients after 9 months. The complement component iC3b diminished with either therapy during the first 6 months and increased afterwards. As well as the reduction of circulating immune complexes, the intensified inactivation of C3b into iC3b during the second half-year with both treatments indicates that there might be a slight improvement of the pathologically changed immunoreactions after 6 months only. Concerning the examined laboratory parameters, no significant difference was found between both therapies.

  20. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered. PMID:25639592

  1. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-03-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered.

  2. Prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy in management protocols of patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Bejarano, Elena-Beatriz; Serrera-Figallo, María-Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Corrales, Aida; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) linked to bisphosphonate treatment has specific characteristics that render its therapeutic management challenging for clinicians. Poor response to standard treatment makes it essential to take special precautions when treating this type of disease; therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy have been proposed as effective and helpful tools in these situations. Objectives This article seeks to assess published evidence in order to evaluate the different protocols used for antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy in the general context of patients treated with bisphosphonates. Material and Methods A literature review of the last 10 years was carried out in PubMed using the following keywords: “antibiotic prophylaxis and osteonecrosis,” “bisphosphonates AND osteonecrosis AND dental management,” “bisphosphonate AND osteonecrosis AND antibiotic prophylaxis AND oral surgery.” A total of 188 articles were obtained, of which 18 were ultimately selected. Results and Discussion In patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates without chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, antibiotic prophylaxis prior to oral surgery is an important tool to avoid osteonecrosis and promote healing of the affected area. If the patient previously exhibited chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis after tooth extraction, antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent recurrent osteonecrosis and promote healing of the extraction site. If chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis is already present, antibiotic therapy is a vital part of conservative management to reduce the symptomatology of MRONJ and keep it from worsening. Finally, a lack of clinical data and randomized controlled trials makes it difficult to choose the most appropriate protocol for the various clinical situations studied. Key words:Bisphosphonates, antibiotic prophylaxis, maxillary osteonecrosis, antibiotic treatment. PMID

  3. Comparison of oral and intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Aydin; Kahramaner, Zelal; Cosar, Hese; Turkoglu, Ebru; Kanik, Ali; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Ozer, Esra Arun

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and complications of oral and intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration. A total of 75 term and near-term (>35 weeks) neonates with hypernatremic dehydration (Na ≥ 150 mmol/L) were included in this retrospective study. The patients were divided into two groups according to therapy approach for rehydration (breast milk-oral formula and intravenous fluid). The decline in sodium concentration (<0.5 mmol/L/h was regarded as safe drop) and complications were analyzed. The mean gestational age, birth weight and age at admission were 38.9 ± 1.4(36-42) weeks, 3341 ± 504 (2500-4500) gram and 4.3 ± 2.6 (1-17) day, respectively. Fever (61.8%) and jaundice (39.4%) were the most common presenting signs. Forty-four (58.6%) of the infants were treated with breast milk and/or oral formula (group 1) and 31 (41.4%) of the infants were treated with IV fluid (group 2). In group 1 and group 2, respectively, mean % weight loss, 5 and 7.5; median serum sodium at admission, 153 and 152 mmol/L; median change in sodium at 12 hours, 7 and 11 mmol/L; and median change in sodium at 24 hours, 10 and 15 mmol/L. The decline in sodium concentration was more safely in group 1 than group 2 at both 12 and 24 hours of rehydration. One patient had convulsion associated with cerebral edema in group 2. Otherwise no complication was observed in both groups. Enteral route for fluid replacement may be safe and effective and may be an alternative to intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration when clinical situation is stable.

  4. Adherence and discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Borges, Anna Paula de Sá; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira

    2014-02-01

    Oral treatment in women with breast cancer has been increasingly used. However, a potentially negative side of oral medication is poor patient adherence and/or discontinuation, which reduces the treatment effectiveness, accelerating progression of the disease and reducing the patient survival rate. To compare the rates of adherence and/or discontinuation and the methodologies used to assess these outcomes. It was conducted an integrative review of original articles published from 2000 to 2012, in which their primary outcome was to quantify medication adherence and/or discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Original studies were searched in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase and SciELO databases. The Medical Subject Heading was used to define descriptors. The descriptor "breast neoplasms" was used in all combinations. Each of the descriptors "medication adherence" and "patient compliance" were combined with each of the following descriptors "tamoxifen", "aromatase inhibitors", "selective estrogen receptor modulators", or the terms "letrozole", "anastrozole", and "exemestane". Twenty-four original articles were included. Our study showed a wide range of adherence and discontinuation rates, ranging from 45-95.7 and 12-73 %, respectively. Regarding the methodological development of the selected articles, a high prevalence (87.5 %) of prospective and/or retrospective longitudinal studies was found. In addition, there was a high prevalence of studies using a database (70.8 %). Among some of the studies, it was shown that patient adherence to hormonal therapy gradually reduces, while discontinuation increases during the treatment. It was observed a great diversity among rates of adherence and/or discontinuation of hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may be due to a lack of methodology standardization. Therefore, adequate and validated methods to ensure reliability of the results and allow comparison in the

  5. Safety and efficacy of bone wax in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Krasny, Marta; Krasny, Kornel; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions, apart from neoplastic diseases, remain the major cause of death in developed countries; therefore, the number of patients receiving oral anticoagulants is constantly increasing. Anticoagulant therapy considerably reduced mortality in patients with history of myocardial infarction among others. Although many interventions may be performed without withdrawal of the anticoagulant and tooth extraction was qualified as a procedure of low hemorrhage risk, a majority of dentists refer the patient to a cardiologist several days before the elective tooth extraction to withdraw anticoagulants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bone wax used to stop bleeding after dental procedures in a group of patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy and find an answer to a question, whether it is justified to temporarily withdraw anticoagulants for this type of procedures. The study involved 176 patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy undergoing tooth extraction (154 subjects) or surgical extraction of a retained tooth (48 subjects). After the procedure, in each case the alveolus was filled with bone wax to stop bleeding. In all patients involved in the study bleeding from the alveolus was successfully stopped during the procedure. None of the subjects reported increased bleeding from the operational site after coming back home. Bone wax is a good, efficient, and safe material to block bleeding from the alveolus following tooth extractions, also in patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy. The study demonstrated that withdrawal or adjustment of anticoagulant therapy is not necessary before an elective tooth extraction.

  6. Oxidative stress parameters in urine from patients with disorders of propionate metabolism: a beneficial effect of L:-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Graziela S; Biancini, Giovana B; Mescka, Caroline; Wayhs, Carlos Y; Sitta, Angela; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen R

    2012-01-01

    Propionic (PA) and methylmalonic (MMA) acidurias are inherited disorders caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, respectively. Affected patients present acute metabolic crises in the neonatal period and long-term neurological deficits. Treatments of these diseases include a protein restricted diet and L: -carnitine supplementation. L: -Carnitine is widely used in the therapy of these diseases to prevent secondary L: -carnitine deficiency and promote detoxification, and several recent in vitro and in vivo studies have reported antioxidant and antiperoxidative effects of this compound. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress parameters, isoprostane and di-tyrosine levels, and the antioxidant capacity, in urine from patients with PA and MMA at the diagnosis, and during treatment with L: -carnitine and protein-restricted diet. We verified a significant increase of isoprostanes and di-tyrosine, as well as a significant reduction of the antioxidant capacity in urine from these patients at diagnosis, as compared to controls. Furthermore, treated patients presented a marked reduction of isoprostanes and di-tyrosine levels in relation to untreated patients. In addition, patients with higher levels of protein and lipid oxidative damage, determined by di-tyrosine and isoprostanes levels, also presented lower urinary concentrations of total and free L: -carnitine. In conclusion, the present results indicate that treatment with low protein diet and L: -carnitine significantly reduces urinary biomarkers of protein and lipid oxidative damage in patients with disorders of propionate metabolism and that L: -carnitine supplementation may be specially involved in this protection.

  7. L-carnitine supplementation and adipokines in patients with end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Csiky, B; Nyul, Z; Tóth, G; Wittmann, I; Melegh, B; Rauh, M; Rascher, W; Sulyok, E

    2010-11-01

    Chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients frequently encounter carnitine depletion, elevated adipose tissue-derived hormones/cytokines, that may contribute to accelerated arteriosclerosis. 10 non-diabetic HD patients were studied over 28 weeks. In the 12 weeks treatment period 1 g L-carnitine was given iv after each HD session. Measurements of plasma free- and acylcarnitines, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, resistin and ghrelin were performed at baseline, at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12 (treatment period) and at weeks 24-28 (post-treatment period). L-carnitine supplementation resulted in progressive increase of free- and acylcarnitine levels. Plasma levels of insulin, resistin, leptin and ghrelin remained at the already elevated baseline values. L-carnitine therapy induced a significant increase in plasma adiponectin from 20.2 ± 12.7 μg/ml (baseline) to 32.7 ± 20.2 μg/ml in week 2 (p<0.05) and 35.4 ± 19.6 μg/ml in week 12 (p < 0.03), which remained unchanged in the post-carnitine period. Plasma insulin levels correlated positively with leptin (r = 0.525, p<0.0001) and resistin (r = 0.284, p<0.005); adiponectin levels correlated inversely with leptin (r = -0.255, p<0.02) and resistin (r = -0.213, p<0.04) irrespective of carnitine status. Plasma levels of adipokines and related hormones are greatly elevated in patients on regular HD. L-carnitine administration further augmented the plasma levels of protective adiponectin, therefore it may have a role in preventing cardiovascular complications of uremia.

  8. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  9. Topical tacrolimus and periodontal therapy in the management of a case of oral chronic GVHD characterized by specific gingival localization.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  10. Topical Tacrolimus and Periodontal Therapy in the Management of a Case of Oral Chronic GVHD Characterized by Specific Gingival Localization

    PubMed Central

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement. PMID:24639902

  11. Lightpipe device for delivery of uniform illumination for photodynamic therapy of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and efficient lightpipe device to deliver light to the human oral cavity for photodynamic therapy was designed and fabricated, having dimensions 6.8 mm × 6.8 mm × 46 mm. An average irradiance of 76 mW/cm2 with an average deviation of 5% was measured on a square 25 mm2 treatment field for an input power of 100 mW. The device limits irradiation of healthy tissue and offers potential for improvement over the current treatment procedure, which requires shielding of the whole cavity to avoid damage to healthy tissue. PMID:21629308

  12. Mineral derivatives in alleviating oral mucositis during cancer therapy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Oral mucositis (mouth ulcers) is a cancer therapy side effect. Costly treatment interventions are often neglected in favor of cost-effective agents. This review assessed the general efficacy of mineral derivatives (a cost-effective agent) in alleviating oral mucositis (OM) during cancer therapy compared to the standard care, or placebo—including a decision tree to aide healthcare workers. Data Sources. Electronic searches of MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CANCERLIT via PubMed, and CINAHL via EBSCO (year 2000 to 11 September 2014) were undertaken for randomised controlled trials. A meta-search strategy extracted content from aggregate online databases. Review Methods. Randomized controlled trials were assessed (participants, intervention, outcome, results, and risk of bias) for inclusion. The author abstracted binary and continuous data synthesised to Hedges’ g in a random effects model. The primary outcome measures were severity (incidence of peak oral mucositis, duration of oral mucositis, and time to onset); secondary outcome measures were the incidence of pain, and analgesic use. Serum mineral levels, total parenteral nutrition, and adverse events were discussed. The decision tree was mapped using sensitivity, specificity, pre-test and post-test Bayesian probability. Results. 1027 citations were identified and 16 studies were included (n = 1120; mean age 49 years). Cancer therapies consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Outcome mineral derivatives were zinc (n = 549), calcium phosphate (n = 227), povidone-iodine (n = 228), or selenium (n = 116). Severity was measured across variable OM grading systems: In 13 studies, individuals in treatment groups (n = 958) experienced peak OM less than controls (g = −0.47, 95% CI −0.7 to −0.2, p = 0.0006); time to OM onset was significantly delayed in treatment than controls (g = −0.51, 95% CI−0.8 to −0.2, p = 0.0002; five studies

  13. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    PubMed

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  14. The effect of magnesium oral therapy on spasticity in a patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rossier, P; van Erven, S; Wade, D T

    2000-11-01

    The effects of magnesium glycerophosphate oral therapy on spasticity was studied in a 35-year-old woman with severe spastic paraplegia resulting from multiple sclerosis (MS). We found a significant improvement in the spasticity after only 1 week from the onset of the treatment on the modified Ashworth scale, an improvement in the range of motion and in the measures of angles at resting position in lower limbs. No side-effects were reported and there was no weakness in the arms during the treatment.

  15. Use of Orally Disintegrating Olanzapine During Electroconvulsive Therapy for Prevention of Postictal Agitation.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Adriana P; Janjua, A Umair; Tang, Yilang; Syre, Sharyn R; Job, Gregory; McDonald, William M

    2016-11-01

    A major medical problem for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the occurrence of postictal agitation (PIA). This phenomenon is associated with confusion and disorientation that can have severe clinical implications for the safety of the patient and health care professionals. Many different pharmacological strategies have been used to prevent PIA. We present data on 40 patients who suffered from PIA after a course of ECT and evaluate the prophylactic use of orally disintegrating olanzapine in the prevention of PIA in subsequent ECT treatments.

  16. [Correlation between serum L-carnitine concentration and neutrophil engraftment in patients treated with cord blood transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sano, Fuminori; Kondo, Toshinori; Matsuhashi, Yoshiko; Hyo, Rui; Koresawa, Risa; Susuki, Seiko; Hayashi, Kiyoto; Tasaka, Taizo; Wada, Hideho; Sugihara, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    In cord blood transplantation (CBT), the amount of time elapsing until hematological engraftment has effects on the transplantation results. Carnitine deficiency has been reported to cause erythropoietin refractory anemia in chronic hemodialysis patients and thrombocytopenia or leukopenia of cirrhosis, and carnitine supplementation can improve hematopoiesis in patients with hepatic or renal failure. Patients who receive CBT may suffer from carnitine deficiency, but no studies have investigated the carnitine status of such patients. Herein, we determined the concentration of free carnitine (FC) and investigated the correlation between FC and engraftment in patients who received CBT. Twenty-three patients who received CBT at our hospital during the period from April 2013 to January 2015 were enrolled in this study. One patient was excluded because of graft failure, such that 22 patients were ultimately evaluable. FC concentrations of the patients were sequentially monitored at 4 time points (before conditioning therapy, day 0, day 7, and day 14), basic laboratory data were collected, and their correlations with engraftment were analyzed. FC concentrations of the patients were generally low (before conditioning therapy: 33.1, day 0: 43.2, day 7: 38.3, and day 14: 37.8 μmol/l). Significant inverse correlations were observed between FC concentrations and the number of days required for neutrophil engraftment on day 0 and day 14 (before conditioning therapy: P=0.15, r=-0.33, day 0: P=0.04, r=-0.43, day 7: P=0.30, r=-0.23, and day 14: P=0.01, r=-0.55). These results suggest carnitine to be an important nutrient that promotes hematopoietic recovery after CBT.

  17. Economic Burden of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in the Era of Oral Targeted Therapies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Jain, Nitin; Ayer, Turgay; Wierda, William G.; Flowers, Christopher R.; O’Brien, Susan M.; Keating, Michael J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Oral targeted therapies represent a significant advance for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); however, their high cost has raised concerns about affordability and the economic impact on society. Our objective was to project the future prevalence and cost burden of CLL in the era of oral targeted therapies in the United States. Methods We developed a simulation model that evaluated the evolving management of CLL from 2011 to 2025: chemoimmunotherapy (CIT) as the standard of care before 2014, oral targeted therapies for patients with del(17p) and relapsed CLL from 2014, and for first-line treatment from 2016 onward. A comparator scenario also was simulated where CIT remained the standard of care throughout. Disease progression and survival parameters for each therapy were based on published clinical trials. Results The number of people living with CLL in the United States is projected to increase from 128,000 in 2011 to 199,000 by 2025 (55% increase) due to improved survival; meanwhile, the annual cost of CLL management will increase from $0.74 billion to $5.13 billion (590% increase). The per-patient lifetime cost of CLL treatment will increase from $147,000 to $604,000 (310% increase) as oral targeted therapies become the first-line treatment. For patients enrolled in Medicare, the corresponding total out-of-pocket cost will increase from $9,200 to $57,000 (520% increase). Compared with the CIT scenario, oral targeted therapies resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $189,000 per quality-adjusted life-year. Conclusion The increased benefit and cost of oral targeted therapies is projected to enhance CLL survivorship but can impose a substantial financial burden on both patients and payers. More sustainable pricing strategies for targeted therapies are needed to avoid financial toxicity to patients. PMID:27870563

  18. Effect of L-carnitine on the kinetics of carnitine, acylcarnitines and butyrobetaine in long-term haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vernez, Laurence; Dickenmann, Michael; Steiger, Jürg; Wenk, Markus; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2006-02-01

    The current study was performed to investigate the kinetics of carnitine, individual acylcarnitines and butyrobetaine in patients on haemodialysis. Eight stable long-term haemodialysis patients were studied under basal conditions (no carnitine supplementation) and 3 weeks after intravenous supplementation with l-carnitine (10 or 20 mg/kg body weight) after each haemodialysis session. The kinetic studies included serial determinations of carnitine and metabolites just before, during or between haemodialysis sessions. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Before haemodialysis, the plasma concentrations were (micromol/l) 15.1+/-0.6 (mean+/-SEM) for carnitine, 5.9+/-0.7 for acetylcarnitine, 0.66+/-0.04 for propionylcarnitine and 0.98+/-0.08 for butyrobetaine (basal conditions) or 142+/-23 for carnitine, 69+/-12 for acetylcarnitine, 6.0+/-1.1 for propionylcarnitine and 2.6+/-0.3 for butyrobetaine (carnitine 20 mg/kg). During haemodialysis, the plasma concentrations dropped by approximately 80% for all compounds determined, with extraction coefficients ranging from 0.65 to 0.86. In patients supplemented with 20 mg/kg carnitine, the amount of carnitine removed by haemodialysis equalled 42% of the dose administered, consisting of 2.08 mmol carnitine, 1.03 mmol acetylcarnitine and 0.051 mmol propionylcarnitine. Between the haemodialysis sessions, carnitine, acylcarnitines and butyrobetaine reached apparent steady-state concentrations within 1 day both under basal conditions and after supplementation. Patients on haemodialysis have reduced carnitine, acylcarnitine and butyrobetaine plasma levels, which can be increased by supplementing carnitine. Propionylcarnitine, an important constituent of the acylcarnitine pool, can be removed by haemodialysis. Removal of potentially toxic acyl-groups may represent a mechanism for a beneficial effect of carnitine in these patients.

  19. Oral propranolol therapy for infantile hemangiomas beyond the proliferation phase: a multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zvulunov, Alex; McCuaig, Catherine; Frieden, Ilona J; Mancini, Anthony J; Puttgen, Kate B; Dohil, Magdalene; Fischer, Gayle; Powell, Julie; Cohen, Bernard; Ben Amitai, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapies for infantile hemangiomas were considered effective only during the proliferative phases. Recently reported beneficial effects of propranolol may extend beyond the proliferative phase of infantile hemangiomas. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of oral propranolol therapy for infantile hemangiomas beyond the proliferative phase of these lesions. Members of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology were invited to participate in a multicenter retrospective study. Only children with infantile hemangiomas with documented cessation of lesions' growth or those older than 12 months of age were eligible for the study. Clinical and demographic information and digital photographs before, at the start, and following the treatment were collected. Scaled panels of photographs were distributed among preselected experienced pediatric dermatologists. Visual analog scale was used to assess photographs for each case. Paired t-test was used for statistical analyses. Data on 49 eligible patients from eight pediatric dermatology centers was collected. Seven cases were excluded because of insufficient photographic documentation. The age of the patients at the start of propranolol therapy ranged 7 to 120 months (mean 28 mos, median 22 mos). The duration of propranolol therapy ranged 1 to 8 months (mean 3.6 mos). The mean visual analog scale score before the treatment was 6.8 ± 2.15, and mean reduction in the visual analog scale score at the assessment was 2.6 ± 1.74 (p < 0.001). The rate of visual analog scale reduction was 0.4 per month before the start of the therapy, while this rate was accelerated to 0.9 per months following the therapy (p < 0.001). No significant side effects were reported. We conclude that propranolol is effective in infantile hemangiomas, including post-proliferative phase, and should be considered as the first-line therapy in that setting.

  20. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: Introduction to novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    González Bárcenas, Martha L; Pérez Aisa, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  1. Oral rehydration therapy in a rehydration centre at a teaching hospital in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Patidar, J V; Shaik, R

    1989-11-04

    A study was carried out to delineate the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for gastro-enteritis in a unit that had previously used intravenous therapy (IVT) almost exclusively. Most children with dehydrating gastro-enteritis who were 5% or less dehydrated received ORT initially, while those who were more severely affected were given IVT. The success rate using ORT alone was 73%, which was much lower than that achieved in other studies. Possible factors associated with this poor outcome are discussed. It was concluded that with the exceptions of lactose intolerance and coexisting infection, lack of commitment to ORT and the easy access to IVT must have contributed significantly to the suboptimal outcome.

  2. Effective dosing of L-carnitine in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background L-carnitine supplementation has been associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, ventricular arrhythmia, and angina in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, on account of strict homeostatic regulation of plasma L-carnitine concentrations, higher doses of L-carnitine supplementation may not provide additional therapeutic benefits. This study aims to evaluate the effects of various oral maintenance dosages of L-carnitine on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidities in the setting of acute MI. Methods After a systematic review of several major electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library) up to November 2013, a meta-analysis of five controlled trials (n = 3108) was conducted to determine the effects of L-carnitine on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidities in the setting of acute MI. Results The interaction test yielded no significant differences between the effects of the four daily oral maintenance dosages of L-carnitine (i.e., 2 g, 3 g, 4 g, and 6 g) on all-cause mortality (risk ratio [RR] = 0.77, 95% CI [0.57-1.03], P = 0.08) with a statistically insignificant trend favoring the 3 g dose (RR = 0.48) over the lower 2 g dose (RR = 0.62), which was favored over the higher 4 g and 6 g doses (RR = 0.78, 0.78). There was no significant differences between the effects of the daily oral maintenance dosages of 2 g and 6 g on heart failure (RR = 0.53, 95% CI [0.25-1.13], P = 0.10), unstable angina (RR = 0.90, 95% CI [0.51-1.58], P = 0.71), or myocardial reinfarction (RR = 0.74, 95% CI [0.30-1.80], P = 0.50). Conclusions There appears to be no significant marginal benefit in terms of all-cause mortality, heart failure, unstable angina, or myocardial reinfarction in the setting of acute MI for oral L-carnitine maintenance doses of greater or less than 3 g per day. PMID:25044037

  3. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on respiratory distress syndrome development and prognosis in premature infants: A single blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet Adnan; Kardas, Zehra; Kardas, Fatih; Gunes, Tamer; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of L-carnitine therapy on the occurrence and prognosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). A single blind, randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 130 infants with gestational ages of 28-36 weeks. Infants were assigned to experimental groups (groups 1 and 2) and control groups (groups 3 and 4). Groups 1 and 3 consisted of infants with RDS, and groups 2 and 4 groups were composed of infants without RDS. The experimental groups were treated with carnitine. No statistically significant differences in serum carnitine levels were detected between the study and the control groups on day 1 of treatment (P=0.06). However, on day 7 of treatment, serum carnitine levels in the experimental groups were significantly increased (P=0.02), as compared with the control groups. The surfactant requirement value, which is how many rounds of surfactant therapy were required, was 1.56±0.97 in group 1, and 2.12±0.99 in group 3 (P<0.001). The mean duration of mechanical ventilation required was 3.04±3.60 days in group 1, and 4.73±5.63 days in group 3 (P<0.001). The present results indicate that carnitine supplementation in premature infants with RDS may help to increase carnitine levels, thus decreasing the duration of mechanical ventilation and surfactant requirement.

  4. Bleeding complications in oral anticoagulant therapy. An analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, F J; Rosendaal, F R; Vandenbroucke, J P; Briët, E

    1993-07-12

    Insufficient data are available about the safety of oral anticoagulant therapy. The specialized organization of thrombosis services in the Netherlands can provide important information on the bleeding risk and various risk factors for bleeding in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy. In a follow-up study over a 12-month period beginning in January 1988 on all patients treated by the Leiden Thrombosis Service, the frequency of bleeding complications was assessed. A Poisson regression model was used to assess the relative contribution to the bleeding risk of age, sex, target zone (intensity of anticoagulant effect aimed at), achieved intensity of anticoagulant therapy (International Normalized Ratio), and the type of coumarin derivative used. Six thousand eight hundred fourteen patients experienced 1003 bleeding complications (16.5 per 100 treatment-years), 162 of which were major bleeds (2.7 per 100 treatment-years). Bleeding increased significantly with age (32% increase for all bleeding, 46% for major bleeding for every 10-year increase in age in comparison with age < 40 years). Women had more minor bleeding complications than men, whereas both sexes experienced major bleeding in an equal frequency. There was no influence of target zone, while every one-point increase in International Normalized Ratio gave 42% more major bleeding (54% more regarding all bleeding). Use of acenocoumarol resulted in fewer bleeds (26% less regarding all bleeding and 46% less regarding major bleeding) than use of phenprocoumon. The risk of anticoagulant therapy in a routine, real-life situation is similar as in the setting of several well-organized clinical trials. The risk of bleeding complications rises significantly with age and with the achieved intensity of anticoagulation, and is dependent on the type of coumarin derivative that is used.

  5. Antiplatelet versus oral anticoagulant therapy as antithrombotic prophylaxis after mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Domenico; Di Mauro, Michele; Bitton Worms, Keren; Bolotin, Gil; Russo, Claudio; Trunfio, Salvatore; Scrofani, Roberto; Antona, Carlo; Actis Dato, Guglielmo; Casabona, Riccardo; Colli, Andrea; Gerosa, Gino; Renzulli, Attilio; Serraino, Filiberto; Scrascia, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Salvatore; De Bonis, Michele; Taramasso, Maurizio; Delgado, Luis; Tritto, Francesco; Marmo, Joseph; Parolari, Alessandro; Myaseodova, Veronika; Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Nicolini, Francesco; Gherli, Tiziano; Whitlock, Richard; Conte, Manuela; Barili, Fabio; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lorusso, Roberto; Sciatti, Edoardo; Marinelli, Daniele; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Calafiore, Antonio Maria; Sheikh, Azmat; Alfonso, Juan Jaime; Glauber, Mattia; Miceli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    To verify the rate of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications during the first 6 months after mitral valve repair and to assess whether the type of antithrombotic therapy influenced clinical outcome. Retrospective data were retrieved from 19 centers. Inclusion criteria were isolated mitral valve repair with ring implantation. Exclusion criteria were ongoing or past atrial fibrillation and any combined intraoperative surgical procedures. The study cohort consisted of 1882 patients (aged 58 ± 15 years; 36% women), and included 1517 treated with an oral anticoagulant (VKA group) and 365 with antiplatelet drugs (APLT group). Primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of arterial thromboembolic events within 6 months and primary safety outcome was the incidence of major bleeding within 6 months. Propensity matching was performed to obtain 2 comparable cohorts (858 vs 286). No differences were detected for arterial embolic complications in matched cohort (1.6% VKA vs 2.1% APLT; P = .50). Conversely, patients in the APLT group showed lower incidence of major bleeding complications (3.9% vs 0.7%; P = .01). Six-month mortality rate was significantly higher in the VKA group (2.7% vs 0.3%; P = .02). Multivariable analysis in the matched cohort found VKA as independent predictor of major bleeding complications and mortality at 6 months. Vitamin K antagonist therapy was not superior to antiplatelet therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications after mitral valve repair. Our data suggest that oral anticoagulation may carry a higher bleeding risk compared with antiplatelet therapy, although these results should be confirmed in an adequately powered randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Downregulation of Oxidative and Nitrosative Apoptotic Signaling by L-Carnitine in Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Rejaie, Salem S.; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that ifosfamide (IFO) therapy is associated with sever nephropathy in the form of Fanconi syndrome. Although oxidative stress has been reported as a major player in IFO-induced Fanconi syndrome, no mechanism for this effect has been ascertained. Therefore, this study has been initiated to investigate, on gene expression level, the mechanism of IFO-induce nephrotoxicity and those whereby carnitine supplementation attenuates this serious side effect of IFO. To achieve the ultimate goals of this study, adult male rats were assigned to one of four treatment groups, namely, control, L-carnitine, IFO, and IFO plus L-carnitine. Administration of IFO for 5 days significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production in kidney tissues. In addition, IFO significantly increased mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-9, and caspase-3 and significantly decreased expression of glutathione peroxides (GPx), catalase (CAT), and Bcl2 in kidney tissues. Administration of L-carnitine to IFO-treated rats resulted in a complete reversal of the all biochemical and gene expression changes, induced by IFO, to the control values. Data from this study suggest that L-carnitine prevents the development of IFO-induced nephrotoxicity via downregulation of oxidative and nitrosative apoptotic signaling in kidney tissues. PMID:23213347

  7. Comparison of Vitamin E and L-Carnitine, Separately or in Combination in Patients With Intradialytic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Tayebi Khosroshahi, Hamid; Habibi Asl, Bohlul; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Chaichi, Parastoo; Ghanbarpour, Amin; Hossein Badie, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background The most common complications during dialysis are hypotension and muscle cramps. There are many strategies to prevent and treat these complications. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate effects of vitamin E and L-carnitine supplementation alone and in combination on intradialytic complications. Patients and Methods In a prospective study, 20 patients with end stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis that had intradialytic complications such as hypotension, muscle cramp, nausea, vomiting and headache were studied. These patients were studied in four 45 day periods, beginning with no treatment (step 1), receiving vitamin E (200 IU/d) (step 2), receiving L-carnitine (500 mg/d) (step 3) and their combination (step 4). Intradialytic complications were recorded in each step and compared between treatments. Results All three treatments significantly reduced frequency of muscle cramps in comparison to baseline values. Vitamin E alone and in combination with L-carnitine reduced the frequency of muscle cramps more effectively. Hypotension was significantly lower in combination therapy in comparison to baseline values and vitamin E treatment. Conclusions Vitamin E and L-carnitine both have comparative effects on intradialytic complications. As the combination use of vitamin E and L-carnitine could more effectively reduce the intradialytic complications, it is recommended for daily use in hemodialysis patients. PMID:24350082

  8. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia: Presentation With Hyperferritinemia and Response to Oral Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E.; Majewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases. PMID:23319530

  9. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia: presentation with hyperferritinemia and response to oral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2013-02-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases.

  10. High-dose oral tegafur-uracil maintenance therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Motohara, Takeshi; Saito, Fumitaka; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Fukumatsu, Yukitoshi; Tohya, Toshimitsu; Shibata, Saburo; Mimori, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and toxicity of oral administration of tegafur-uracil (UFT) at a high dose, 600 mg/day, based on the tegafur dose, against uterine cervical cancer. Methods This study consisted of a retrospective analysis. From April 1986 to March 1997, 309 patients with uterine cervical cancer were registered. Oral UFT was administered to 162 patients for maintenance therapy after an initial treatment (the UFT group). The other 147 patients were not treated with UFT (the control group). The survival rate was calculated for both groups and statistically analyzed using the log-rank test. Adverse events were compared between the UFT and control groups. Results In the UFT group, 103 patients (63.6%) received UFT for ≥90 days. The drug dose was 600 mg/day for 137 patients (84.6%) and 300 to 400 mg/day for the remainder. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the UFT group than in the control group (p<0.05). The prognosis was particularly favorable in stage III cases, in cases of squamous cell carcinoma, and in cases that were treated by radiotherapy. The most frequent side effects were nausea/vomiting (12.2%), appetite loss (10.1%), and leukopenia/neutropenia (5.8%). Conclusion High-dose oral UFT maintenance treatment prolonged the disease-free survival and overall survival of patients with uterine cervical cancer, particularly of those with advanced disease. PMID:25686399

  11. Oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical outcomes in a context of specialized oral care using low-level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; Lopes, Roberta Marques da Graça; Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Brumatti, Melina; Vince, Carolina Sgaroni Camargo; de Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini; Vogel, Cristina; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    OM is a painful inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, derived from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High OM severity is frequently present in HSCT pediatric patients, who exhibit multiple painful ulcers that limit their mastication and swallowing, leading to poor nutritional status. Few studies have demonstrated OM clinical outcomes in young patients undergoing HSCT. Feasibility of oral care and LLLT on OM prophylaxis and treatment is also poorly discussed. The aim of this study was to describe a specialized oral care protocol that included LLLT for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes after OM prevention and treatment. Data from OM-related morbidity were collected from 51 HSCT pediatric patients treated daily with LLLT, followed by standard oral care protocols. All the patients, even infants and young children, accepted the daily oral care and LLLT well. The majority (80.0%) only exhibited erythema in the oral mucosa, and the maximum OM degree was WHO II. Patients who had undergone autologous and HLA-haploidentical transplants showed OM with the lowest severity. The frequency of total body irradiation and methotrexate prescriptions was higher in adolescents when compared with infants (p = 0.044), and adolescents also exhibited OM more severely than infants and young children. We found that good clinical outcomes were obtained using this therapy, mainly in regard to the control of OM severity and pain reduction in the oral cavity. Specialized oral care, including LLLT, is feasible and affordable for HSCT pediatric patients, although some adaptation in the patient's oral hygiene routine must be adopted with help from parents/companions and clinical staff.

  12. Rumen bypass and biodistribution of l-carnitine from dual-layered coated pellets in cows, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing-Ri; Lee, Eung-Seok; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2008-07-09

    A ruman bypass delivery system was investigated to improve the delivery efficiency of L-carnitine in biological samples of cows. Highly water-soluble L-carnitine used for dietary supplement in ruminants was chosen. L-Carnitine-loaded compact pellets were prepared by extrusion method and then coated with various coating materials such as ethylcellulose (EC), Eudragit E100 (E100), Eudragit RS100 (RS100), stearyl alcohol and glyceryl monostearate, for single-layered coated pellets (SCP). Two types of dual-layered coated pellets (DCP) were also designed as DCP-A (inner E100/outer EC) or DCP-B (inner EC/outer E100). Preparation of compact pellet and methods of polymeric coatings are the most important strategies for modulated release and rumen bypass efficiency based on chewing behaviors and physiology of veterinary species. DCPs were more efficient in retarding L-carnitine release in rumen fluid (pH 6.8) than the SCP but DCP-B gave much faster release in abomasums fluid (pH 1.2). Both DCP-A and DCP-B showed high in vivo rumen bypass efficiency in cows compared with the nonprotected preparation and most of l-carnitine was readily absorbed. DCP-B was also efficient for delivering L-carnitine in biological samples of cows, mainly in muscle but no statistical differences were observed among the tested preparations after the multiple oral feeding to cows for 3 months. Interestingly, DCP-B produced higher L-carnitine levels in milk in a dose-dependent manner. However, delivery efficiency of L-carnitine preparations in biological samples of cows would rather be more dependent on feeding schedules.

  13. Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections in HIV: therapy and emerging problems - a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K M; Rao, U K; Nittayananta, W; Liu, H; Owotade, F J

    2016-04-01

    Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections are recognized features of HIV infection even after four decades of the epidemic. The therapeutic options, challenges of therapy, and evolving patterns of opportunistic infections were evaluated by the workshop. It was observed that high Candida counts and infection are still more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals even in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, one or more non-Candida albicans are present in some HIV-positive individuals. While Candida species are more virulent in HIV infection, similar virulence may be present in other states of immunosuppression. Consequently, the interplay between host factors and virulence ultimately determines the clinical outcomes. Adverse clinical outcomes such as candidemia and other deep fungal infections are on the increase in HIV infection. Disseminated histoplasmosis and penicilliosis have been reported, especially with low CD4 counts. Even with advances in antifungal therapy, mortality and morbidity from deep fungal infections have not changed significantly. In addition, long-term exposure to common antifungal drugs such as fluconazole has led to the development of antifungal resistance in 6% to 36%. Development of new antifungal therapeutic agents and the use of alternative therapies may offer breakthrough. In addition, effective strategies to enhance the host immune status are being explored. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  15. Trichophytum rubrum endonyx onychomycosis resistant to standard oral and topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Patrick M; Telang, Gladys H; Jellinek, Nat

    2015-09-17

    We present a 45 year-old man with an eight-year history of discoloration of the nail plate on his left hallux. He had been treated with two courses of oral terbinafine and topical 8% ciclopirox for presumed onychomycosis. On exam, his left great toenail contained a wide yellow-white longitudinal band involving a majority of the nail plate. No subungual debris, hyperkeratosis, or paronychial inflammation was present in the affected nail. Histopathology of the nail plate revealed numerous fungal elements arranged transversely and longitudinally, solely within the keratin layers of the nail plate; these were highlighted with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain confirming endonyx onychomycosis. Cultures grew Trichophyton rubrum. All types of onychomycosis under the new classification system proposed by Hay et al. have now been associated with T. rubrum. Endonyx related to T. rubrum may be a particularly difficult infection to treat with oral or topical agents owing to the absence of robust local immune response and limited drug penetration to the interior nail plate. Physicians should be aware that this type of infection may require treatment with dual-agent therapy or alternative modalities including chemical or surgical plate avulsion or photodynamic therapy.

  16. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with two photosensitizers on two oral streptococci: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahabi, S.; Fekrazad, R.; Ayremlou, S.; Taheri, S.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Kalhori, K. A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Periodontal diseases are caused by infection of tissues supporting the teeth due to complex aggregate of bacteria known as biofilm and firstly colonized by streptococci. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of Radachlorin® and Toluidine Blue O (TBO)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the viability of two oral streptococci. Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis were subjected to either TBO or Radachlorin®, Then exposed to two different diode laser light at energy densities of 3, 6 J/cm2 at 633 nm and 6, 12 J/cm2 at 662 nm, respectively. The control groups were subjected to laser light alone, photosensitizer alone or received neither photosensitizer nor light exposure. The suspensions were then spread over specific agar mediums and viable microorganisms were counted after overnight incubation aerobically at 37°C, 5% CO2 and then reported as colony forming unit. The results indicated that photosensitization by the energy density of 6 J/cm2 with Radachlorin® and both 3 and 6 J/cm2 with TBO caused significant reduction in bacterial colony formation ( p < 0.05). Radachlorin® and TBO-mediated photodynamic therapy seem to show excellent potential in significantly killing of two oral streptococci in vitro.

  17. Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; ρlvarez, Beatriz; Mejima, Mio; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yuko; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nochi, Tomonori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Aladin, Farah; Marcotte, Harold; Frenken, Leon G.J.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hammarström, Lennart; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in children in developing countries. We have developed a system for prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus disease using transgenic rice expressing the neutralizing variable domain of a rotavirus-specific llama heavy-chain antibody fragment (MucoRice-ARP1). MucoRice-ARP1 was produced at high levels in rice seeds using an overexpression system and RNAi technology to suppress the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins. Orally administered MucoRice-ARP1 markedly decreased the viral load in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. The antibody retained in vitro neutralizing activity after long-term storage (>1 yr) and boiling and conferred protection in mice even after heat treatment at 94°C for 30 minutes. High-yield, water-soluble, and purification-free MucoRice-ARP1 thus forms the basis for orally administered prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infections. PMID:23925294

  18. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in obstructive sleep apnea patients referred for oral appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Almeida, Fernanda R; Santos, Camila D; Valdrighi, Natalia Y; Nascimento, Liliane S; Dal'Fabbro, Cibele; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia Rita A

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients referred for oral appliance therapy. Eighty-seven patients (46 men and 41 women), between 18 and 65 years of age, with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5 and < 30 (events by sleep hour), and body mass index (BMI) of =or< 30 Kg/m(2) were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of signs and symptoms of TMD. Statistical analyses included correlations assessed by Pearson's test. Fifty-two percent of patients presented symptoms of TMD. Thirty-two patients (average age 47 +/- 11 years, AHI 17.3 +/- 8.7, BMI 25.9 +/- 3.8 kg/m(2)) completed the study. According to the Scoring Protocol for Graded Chronic Pain (Axis II-RDC/TMD), 75% of the patients presented chronic pain related to TMD, categorized as low disability grade I (< 50 points for pain intensity, and < 3 disability points). The most common TMD diagnosis was myofascial pain with and without limited mouth opening and arthralgia (50%). The high prevalence of TMD in the current study indicates that patients with OSAS referred for oral appliance therapy require specific evaluation related to TMD.

  19. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:28328969

  20. Hemolysis after Oral Artemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lingscheid, Tilman; Steiner, Florian; Stegemann, Miriam S.; Bélard, Sabine; Menner, Nikolai; Pongratz, Peter; Kim, Johanna; von Bernuth, Horst; Mayer, Beate; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Salama, Abdulgabar; Suttorp, Norbert; Zoller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of delayed hemolysis 2–6 weeks after treatment of severe malaria with intravenous artesunate have been described. We performed a prospective observational study of patients with uncomplicated malaria to investigate whether posttreatment hemolysis also occurs after oral artemisinin-based combination therapy. Eight of 20 patients with uncomplicated malaria who were given oral artemisinin-based combination therapy met the definition of posttreatment hemolysis (low haptoglobin level and increased lactate dehydrogenase level on day 14). Five patients had hemolysis persisting for 1 month. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had a median decrease in hemoglobin level of 1.3 g/dL (interquartile range 0.3–2.0 g/dL) in the posttreatment period, and patients without posttreatment hemolysis had a median increase of 0.3 g/dL (IQR −0.1 to 0.7 g/dL; p = 0.002). These findings indicate a need for increased vigilance for hemolytic events in malaria patients, particularly those with predisposing factors for anemia. PMID:27434054

  1. Carnitine supplementation effects on nonenzymatic antioxidants in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress.

    PubMed

    Bucioli, Sérvio A; De Abreu, Luiz C; Valenti, Vitor E; Vannucchi, Helio

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exercise stress increases oxidative stress in rats. However, antioxidant supplement therapy effects on reactive oxygen substances are conflicting. We evaluated the effects of carnitine on renal nonenzymatic antioxidants in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress. Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: (a) control group (not submitted to exercise stress), (b) exercise stress group, and (c) exercise stress and carnitine group. The rats from group 3 were treated with gavage administration of 1 ml of carnitine (5 mg·kg⁻¹) for 7 consecutive days. The animals from groups 2 and 3 were submitted to a bout of swimming exhaustive exercise stress. Kidney samples were analyzed for reactive substances to thiobarbituric acid by malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and vitamin-E levels. Carnitine treatment attenuated MDA increase caused by exercise stress (1: 0.16 ± 0.02 vs. 2: 0.34 ± 0.07 vs. 3: 0.1 ± 0.01 mmmol per milligram of protein; p < 0.0001). It also increased the renal levels of GSH (1: 23 ± 4 vs. 2: 23 ± 2 vs. 3: 58 ± 9 μmol per gram of protein; p < 0.0001); however, it did not change renal vitamin E (1: 24 ± 5 vs. 2: 27 ± 1 vs. 3: 28 ± 5 μM per gram of tissue; p < 0.001). In conclusion, carnitine improved oxidative stress and partially improved the nonenzymatic antioxidant activity in young rats submitted to exhaustive exercise stress.

  2. Prevalence of residual excessive sleepiness during effective oral appliance therapy for sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, A E R; Dieltjens, M; Wouters, K; De Volder, I; Van de Heyning, P H; Braem, M J; Vanderveken, O M

    2014-02-01

    Oral appliance therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) can yield to complete therapeutic response (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]<5 events/h), though some patients show little or no improvement in daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of residual excessive sleepiness (RES) despite effective treatment with OAm therapy is unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of RES in patients treated with a titratable custom-made duobloc OAm. A prevalence study was performed, collecting data from 185 patients with an established diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) under OAm therapy with a titratable custom-made duobloc device (baseline data were male:female ratio, 129:56; age, 48±9 years; body mass index [BMI], 27±4 kg/m2; Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] score, 10±5; and AHI, 19±12 events/h). A full-night polysomnography was performed at baseline and after 3 months of OAm therapy. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the ESS with RES defined as an ESS score of 11 or higher out of 24, despite complete therapeutic response. Out of 185 patients, 84 patients (45%) showed a complete therapeutic response with an AHI of <5 events per hour after 3 months of OAm therapy. Despite this normalization of AHI, 27 out of these 84 patients (32%) showed RES and had a significantly higher baseline ESS (15±4 vs. 9±4; P<.001) and were younger (43±9 vs. 47±9; P=.028) compared to patients without RES. RES under OAm therapy showed a prevalence of up to 32% in SDB patients effectively treated with respect to AHI. Patients with RES were younger and had higher baseline daytime sleepiness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  4. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors.

  5. Supportive care needs in newly diagnosed oral cavity cancer patients receiving radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Ching; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chien; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to examine changes in physical symptom severity, functional status, supportive care needs, and related factors in oral cavity cancer patients during 6 months after beginning radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT). A prospective longitudinal study was conducted involving oral cavity cancer patients from an RT clinic at a medical center in northern Taiwan. Patients were assessed for supportive care needs and physical symptoms at five time points: before the beginning of RT or CCRT and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after beginning RT or CCRT. The generalized estimating equation was used to identify predictors of overall needs as well as six specific dimensions of needs. A total of 82 patients completed the 6 months of follow-up. Patients had moderate to high levels of supportive care needs over the 6 months. Although the highest information need was at the pretreatment phase, in general, the peak for overall and individual care needs was at 2 months since first receiving RT or CCRT. Patients without religious beliefs as well as those with higher educational level, functional level, overall physical symptom severity, and baseline anxiety reported more supportive care needs. Anxiety level before treatment was the most common factor across most supportive care needs. Individual physical symptoms, including fatigue, swallowing difficulty, and oral mucositis, were significantly related to higher physical and daily living needs. A systematic clinical assessment to detect patients' care needs is necessary to improve the provision of timely cancer care and meet patients' healthcare needs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  7. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time.

  8. Carnitine is associated with fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Adenier, Hervé; Perrin, Yolande

    2007-12-01

    The finding of acylcarnitines alongside free carnitine in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species, using tandem mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography shows a link between carnitine and plant fatty acid metabolism. Moreover the occurrence of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines suggests that carnitine is connected to diverse fatty acid metabolic pathways in plant tissues. The carnitine and acylcarnitine contents in plant tissues are respectively a hundred and a thousand times lower than in animal tissues, and acylcarnitines represent less than 2% of the total carnitine pool whereas this percentage reaches 30% in animal tissues. These results suggest that carnitine plays a lesser role in lipid metabolism in plants than it does in animals.

  9. Insulin versus an oral antidiabetic agent as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes after failure of an oral antidiabetic regimen: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, JM; Brown, Lauren C; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Although evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus provide clear recommendations for initial