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Sample records for oral cavity carcinoma

  1. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  2. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  3. Clinical features of multiple primary carcinomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Dong; Ma, Xin; Han, Yao-Lun; Peng, Li-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate the clinical characteristics of multiple primary carcinomas of the oral cavity. The clinical records of 1,024 patients who were treated during follow-up for oral cancer at the Department of Stomatology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, between March 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical characteristics of 961 patients who developed single primary oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) during follow-up and 54 patients who subsequently developed multiple primary carcinomas in the oral cavity were compared. Multiple primary carcinomas exhibited a female predilection, were most prevalent in the gingiva, and tended to show earlier tumor and nodal stages, as compared with single primary carcinomas. The local recurrence rate was higher for multiple primary carcinomas, as compared with single primary carcinomas, and was demonstrated to increase with the number of multiple primary occurrences. The cumulative incidence rates for metachronous second primary carcinomas following the onset of the first carcinoma at 10 years was 8.0%. Recurrence of multiple primary carcinomas did not decrease the survival rates of the patients assessed in the present study. Furthermore, differences were detected in the clinical characteristics between patients with single oral SCC and those with multiple primary oral carcinomas. The results of the present study indicated that early diagnosis and treatment and close long-term follow-up are required for patients with multiple primary oral carcinomas. PMID:28352343

  4. An afterloading technique suitable for carcinomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Beorchia, A; Fongione, S; Pizzi, G; Guglielmi, R; Mandoliti, G; Cereghini, M; Ceschia, T; Contento, G

    1991-05-01

    The authors describe an afterloading brachytherapy to treat oral cavity carcinomas. Catheters for arterial/venous catheterization are inserted percutaneously in the target volume. The internal needles are then removed and replaced with iridium wires inside tubes to form wire loops. This technique has proven to be simple, quick and safe.

  5. Current Management of Advanced Resectable Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ow, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is the most common site of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, a disease which results in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Though the primary modality of treatment for patients with oral cavity cancer remains surgical resection, many patients present with advanced disease and are thus treated using a multi-disciplinary approach. Patients with extracapsular spread of lymphatic metastasis and surgical margins that remain positive have been found to be at high risk for local-regional recurrence and death from disease, and are most often recommended to receive both post-operative radiation as well as systemic chemotherapy. The basis for this approach, as well as scientific developments that underly future trials of novels treatments for patients with high-risk oral cavity cancer are reviewed. PMID:21461056

  6. Multiple verrucous carcinomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2015-03-01

    The author herein reports a case of multiple verrucous carcinomas (VCs) of the left lower gingiva. A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of gingival tumor. A biopsy revealed severe dysplasia. Surgical resection was performed. Grossly, there were three verrucous lesions (25, 20, 10 mm) in the left lower gingiva. Histologically, 2 tumors (4, 2 mm) were found in addition to the grossly visible 3 tumors. All the 5 tumors were VCs. The tumors showed verrucous and papillary proliferation of squamous epithelium with little cellular atypia. No invasive features were recognized. The dermis showed lymphocytic infiltration. The surrounding mucosa showed many broad foci of squamous cell carcinoma in situ and severe dysplasia (high grade intraepithelial neoplasm). Gradual merges between the VCs and squamous cell carcinoma in situ or severe dysplasia were frequently recognized. Immunohistochemically, the VC tumor cells and squamous lesions were negative for human papilloma virus antigens. P53 protein was expressed in all the VCs and squamous epithelial lesions: it was accentuated in the basal and suprabasal cells of VC. Ki-67 antigen was also expressed in the 5 VCs and in the squamous lesion, and Ki-67 labeling index ranged from 8 to 16 % in VC and from 37 to 62 % in the squamous lesions. These data support the multicentric nature of VC and that the severe dysplasia-carcinoma in situ sequence have been proposed in the etiology of VC.

  7. Low prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in oral cavity carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence shows that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is preferentially associated with some head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), with variable infection rates reported. Methods We assessed HPV involvement in HNSCC using the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, which can detect 37 different HPV types. We examined the prevalence of HPV infection in 92 HNSCCs (oropharynx, oral cavity, and other HNSCC sites). Results HPV was frequently detected in oropharyngeal cancers (OPCs) (16/22, 73%), but was uncommon in oral cavity cancers (2/53, 4%), and in other HNSCC subsites (1/17, 6%). HPV positive tumors were associated with patients that were 40-60 years old (p = 0.02), and node positive (p = < 0.0001). HPV 16 was the most prevalent type, but other types detected included 6, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 52/58. Conclusion Our results show that in contrast to oropharyngeal cancers, oral cancers and other HNSCCs infrequently harbor HPV. PMID:20226055

  8. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma in the oral cavity: a huge oral cavity mass with neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Jun; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Bae, Seong Hoon; Park, Ah Young; Choi, Eun Chang; Choi, Hong-Shik

    2013-11-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CEPA) is a rare, aggressive, poorly understood malignancy. In CEPA, an epithelial malignancy develops in association with a primary or recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma is very difficult to identify before surgery because the clinical presentation of many cases is similar to that of pleomorphic adenomas. The risk for malignancy increases with the duration of a mixed tumor. Treatment of CEPA must be individualized on the basis of the tumor location, involvement of adjacent structures, histologic subtype, and grade. The authors recently experienced a case of CEPA arising in the oral cavity with neck metastasis. The patient was a 70-year-old man presenting a huge mass that was present for 20 years and that slowly grew on the left side of the neck. We treated it with a total excision with wide margins and neck dissection. There was no recurrence during the follow-up period of 5 years up until now. We present a case of an unusually huge CEPA in the oral cavity.

  9. Outcomes of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Luc GT; Ganly, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Background Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) is uncommon in young patients and rare in the pediatric population. OCSCC is believed to behave aggressively in this age group, but the existing literature is limited to case reports. The objective of this study was to compare survival outcomes in pediatric and adult patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Population-based study of 54 pediatric (age ≤ 20) and 22,162 adult cases of OCSCC, recorded in the SEER cancer registry. Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox multivariable regression was used to control for covariates including gender, stage, histologic grade and treatment modality. Results Pediatric patients with OCSCC experienced significantly better DSS than adult patients (75.3% vs. 63.5%, p=0.02). Pediatric patients were also more likely to be female (37.0% vs. 31.7%, p=0.04) and to receive surgery (87.0% vs. 68.6%, p<0.001). When these factors, as well as non-significant differences in rates of metastases and histologic grade were controlled for on multivariable analysis, the pediatric and adult groups experienced equivalent DSS (p=0.64). Conclusions Pediatric patients with OCSCC experience better survival than adult patients. When differences in patient, tumor and treatment-related characteristics are adjusted for, the two groups experience equivalent survival. PMID:20188621

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma first presenting as a tumor of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Alrumaih, Redha Ali; Arian, Asif Ali; Alhedyani, Alanoud A; Al-Zaher, Nabil; Dababo, M Anas

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common neoplasm worldwide; HCC metastasis is common affecting 50% of cases. However, metastasis to the oral cavity is extremely infrequent. We present a case of hepatocellular cancer first presenting as a mass lesion at the upper alveolus and review metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma to the oral cavity in 73-year-old male patient.

  11. Oral Cavity Carcinoma: Current Management, Controversies, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Steven B.; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity carcinoma (OCC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with head and neck cancer. Although the incidence has decreased over the last decade, outcomes remain stagnant with only a 5% improvement in overall survival in the last 20 years. Although surgical resection remains the primary treatment modality, several areas of controversy exist with regard to work-up, management of the primary and neck tumors, and adjuvant therapy. As surgical techniques evolve, so has the delivery of radiotherapy and systemic treatment, which have helped to improve the outcomes for patients with advanced disease. Recently, the addition of cetuximab has shown promise as a way to improve outcomes while minimizing toxicity, and this remains an active area of study in the adjuvant setting. Advances in microvascular free-flap reconstruction have extended the limits of resection and enabled enhanced restoration of function and cosmesis. While these advances have led to limited survival benefit, evaluation of alternative modalities has gained interest on the basis of success in other head and neck subsites. Organ preservation with definitive chemoradiotherapy, though proven in the larynx and pharynx, remains controversial in OCC. Likewise, although the association of human papillomavirus is well established in oropharyngeal carcinoma, it has not been proven in the pathogenesis or survival of OCC. Future study of the molecular biology and pathogenesis of OCC should offer additional insight into screening, treatment selection, and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26351335

  12. ASC contributes to metastasis of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Chun-Nan; Kao, Huang-Kai; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Cheng, Hsiao-Yun; Liang, Ying; Liou, Willisa; Liang, Chih-lung; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2016-01-01

    ASC (Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a CARD) acts as a platform protein in the inflammasome cascade of some cancer types. However, its potential involvement in OSCC (oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma) has not yet been determined. Here, we investigated the potential role of ASC in OSCC. RT-qPCR analysis of 20 paired tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples revealed that the mRNA levels of ASC, along with IL-1β, CASP1, and NLRP3 in ASC-associated NLRP3 inflammasome were significantly elevated in OSCC tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of these four proteins in 111 clinical specimens revealed that high-level expression of ASC was significantly associated with tumor stage, node stage (p=0.001), overall stage (p<0.001), extracapsular spread (p<0.001), perineural invasion (p=0.004) and tumor depth (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis further revealed that high-level ASC expression was correlated with poorer overall survival (p=0.001), disease-specific survival (p<0.001) and disease-free survival (p<0.001). Studies using OSCC cell lines indicated that high-level ASC expression enhanced cell migration and invasion, and experiments using an orthotropic nude mouse model confirmed that ASC overexpression induced metastasis of OSCC cells. This is the first report to show that ASC contributes to OSCC metastasis, and that high-level ASC expression is a marker for poor prognosis in OSCC patients. PMID:27367024

  13. [Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx].

    PubMed

    Villagómez-Ortíz, Vicente José; Paz-Delgadillo, Diana Estela; Marino-Martínez, Iván; Ceseñas-Falcón, Luis Ángel; Sandoval-de la Fuente, Anabel; Reyes-Escobedo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck comprises a group of neoplasms that share a similar anatomical origin. Most originate from the epithelium of the aerodigestive tract and 90% correspond to squamous cell carcinoma. In the last 15 years, an increase in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma induced by human papillomavirus (HPV) has been seen, mainly types 16 and 18, which are the most frequent found in cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, and types 6 and 11 in laryngeal cancer. There are reports in the literature that show HPV as the leading cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Determine the prevalence of infection with high-risk HPV in patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. An observational, cross-sectional, descriptive, unblinded study was performed. Prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in DNA samples from tumour tissue of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. Typing was subsequently performed in HPV positive samples in order to detect types 18, 16, 11 and 6, using custom primers. A total of 45 patients were included. The association between laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and HPV was established in two patients, which represented an overall prevalence of 4.4% in our population, and 10% for laringeal tumours. There is a low prevalence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, in our population. Prospective studies on younger patients could provide more information. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis in oral cavity and lower lip squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alaeddini, Mojgan; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the lip and oral cavity differ in various aspects; therefore a clarification of the distinctions among these sites may help to better understand the biologic behavior of neoplasms occurring in these locations. Considering that angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are two major elements that can influence various aspects of tumor biology, we aimed to compare these factors between squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip and oral cavity. A total of 84 primary squamous cell carcinomas including 45 oral and 39 lower lip tumors were selected and immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibody against D2-40 and CD105. Mean microvessel density was assessed in tumoral tissue, while lymphatic vessel density was calculated in both neoplastic tissue and invasion front. Data were statistically analyzed using t-test and p-values of <0.05 were considered significant. We found a mean microvessel density±standard deviation of 31.94±18.9 in oral cavity and 27.54±20.8 in lower lip squamous cell carcinomas, with no significant difference (p=0.32). Mean lymphatic vessel density±standard deviation was 13.05±8.2 and 16.57±10.79 in of oral cavity and lower lip neoplastic tissue, respectively. The corresponding values were 9.94±5.59 and 12.50±7.8 in the invasive front. Significant differences were not observed in either of the lymphatic vessel density variables between the two sites. According to our results, it seems that the search for additional factors other than those related to the vasculature should continue, to help clarify the differences in biologic behavior between lower lip and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA content in reactive hyperplasia, precancerosis, and carcinomas of the oral cavity. A cytophotometric study.

    PubMed

    Doseva, D; Christov, K; Kristeva, K

    1984-01-01

    Cytophotometry has been used to study DNA content in oral epithelial cells of Feulgen-stained specimens from a total of 43 patients: 3 with erythema exudativum multiforme (EEM), 5 with pemphigus, 3 with stomatitis aphtosa, 5 with lichen ruber planus, 8 with leukoplakia, and 19 with carcinomas. In contrast to reactive hyperplasia (EEM, pemphigus, stomatitis aphthosa) leukoplakia has histograms closest to those of carcinoma, with a high percentage of cells in the polyploid regions. This emphasizes the significance of cytophotometry for diagnosis of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity.

  16. Human papillomavirus in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas in the central region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Petito, Guilherme; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Dos Santos; Santos, Sílvia Helena de Rabello; Silva, Antonio Marcio Teodoro Cordeiro; Alencar, Rita de Cassia; Gontijo, Antonio Paulo; Saddi, Vera Aparecida

    Molecular studies about carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx demonstrate the presence of human papilomavirus genome in these tumors, reinforcing the participation of human papilomavirus in oral carcinogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of human papilomavirus and genotype distribution of HPV16 and HPV18 in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas, as well as their association with clinical characteristics of the tumors. This is a retrospective study, with clinical data collected from 82 patients. Human papilomavirus detection was conducted on specimens of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas included in paraffin blocks. Patients were assisted in a cancer reference center, in the central region of Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. Polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection and genotyping of human papilomavirus. Among the patients evaluated, 78% were male. The average age of the group was about 58 years. Risk factors, such as smoking (78%) and alcohol consumption (70.8%) were recorded for the group. HPV DNA was detected in 21 cases (25.6%; 95% confidence interval 16.9-36.6) of which 33.3% were HPV16 and 14.3% were HPV18. The presence of lymph node metastases and registered deaths were less frequent in human papilomavirus positive tumors, suggesting a better prognosis for these cases; however, the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. The results obtained in the present study, with respect to the presence of the high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, highlight the importance of human papilomavirus vaccination in the control of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of promoter mutations in the TERT gene in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Chun-I; Pickering, Curtis R; Huang, Yenlin; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Kao, Huang-Kai; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2017-06-01

    Mutations in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter contribute to increased TERT activity. The purpose of the present study was to assess the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Total DNA was extracted from 201 oral cavity SCC tumors and adjacent normal tissues. Primers were used to amplify the sequence region containing 2 TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) that were then sequenced using the Sanger method. Sequencing revealed that 52.5% (104/201) and 12.9% (26/201) of oral cavity SCC tumor tissues and 6.0% (12/201) and 2.5% (5/201) of adjacent normal tissues contained C228T and C250T mutations, respectively. In addition, the C228T mutation was significantly associated with betel nut chewing. Our results show that mutations in the TERT promoter occur in patients with oral cavity SCC at a high frequency. This suggests that somatic TERT promoter mutations could play a vital role in the pathogenesis and progression of oral cavity SCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1131-1137, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Radiology-Pathology Correlation.

    PubMed

    Uraizee, Imran; Cipriani, Nicole A; Ginat, Daniel T

    2017-09-06

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma in the oral cavity is an uncommon salivary gland malignancy that has a propensity for perineural spread. A high-grade variant is evidenced by an abundance of pleomorphic cells, loss of the classic biphasic epithelial-myoepithelial growth pattern, and comedonecrosis, as well as elevated Ki-67. CT and MRI can both be useful for demonstrating the extent of invasion in oral cavity-associated adenoid cystic carcinoma, which can attain the inferior alveolar nerve for perineural spread by direct invasion through the mandible. Reflecting the aggressive nature of this high-grade malignancy, (18)FDG-PET can demonstrate hypermetabolism and can be useful for staging. These features are exemplified in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article.

  19. Metachronous metastasis to the oral cavity from carcinoma rectum - a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Usman, Nawaz; Kattepur, Abhay; Gopinath, Kodaganur S

    2014-12-01

    The common patterns of dissemination and recurrence of rectal cancer are known and well documented. However extravisceral involvement is a relatively uncommon entity. Therefore, these metastases are not well studied in sufficiently large numbers to formulate evidence based recommendations regarding their optimal treatment. This report describes a case of carcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the oral cavity causing symptoms severe enough to necessitate operative management.

  20. A population-based analysis of verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose E; Kuan, Edward C; Arshi, Armin; St John, Maie A

    2017-08-29

    To describe the incidence and determinants of survival of patients with verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the oral cavity between the years of 1973 and 2012 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Retrospective cohort study using a national database. The SEER registry was utilized to calculate survival trends for patients with VC of the oral cavity between 1973 and 2012. Patient data was then analyzed with respect to histopathology, age, sex, race, stage, grade, and treatment modalities (surgery and radiation therapy). Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated. A total of 1,481 cases of VC of the oral cavity were identified. The cohort was composed of 50.5% males. The mean age at diagnosis was 69.5 years. The oral tongue was the most common primary site (28.9%), followed by the alveolar ridge (21.4%) and buccal mucosa (19.0%). The vast majority of cases (79.1%) presented with stage I and stage II disease. Nodal disease was present in only 1.6% of cases. The median OS was 94.6 months. Eighty-seven percent of cases underwent surgery, and 11.5% received both surgery and radiation therapy. Overall survival at 2, 5, and 10 years was 83%, 64%, and 42%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, advanced age (P < 0.001) and stage (P < 0.001) were associated with worse OS, whereas surgery improved OS (P = 0.047). We provide the first population-based analysis of prognostic factors affecting survival outcomes in patients with oral cavity VC. Verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity is associated with a generally favorable prognosis. Age, stage, nodal status, and surgical therapy are independent predictors of OS. 4. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. CT imaging correlates of genomic expression for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pickering, C R; Shah, K; Ahmed, S; Rao, A; Frederick, M J; Zhang, J; Unruh, A K; Wang, J; Ginsberg, L E; Kumar, A J; Myers, J N; Hamilton, J D

    2013-09-01

    Imaging correlates of genetic expression have been found for prognostic and predictive biomarkers of some malignant diseases, including breast and brain tumors. This study tests the hypothesis that imaging findings correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Surplus frozen tissue from 27 untreated patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who underwent preoperative CT imaging was analyzed for gene expression. A team of neuroradiologists blinded to the genomic analysis results reviewed an extensive list of CT findings. The imaging correlated with genomic expression for cyclin D1, angiogenesis-related genes (vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands), which relate to enhancement on the basis of other tumor types; and epidermal growth factor receptor, which may relate to proliferation and mass effect. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 correlated with the enhancement of the primary tumor (P = .018 and P = .025, respectively), whereas the epidermal growth factor receptor correlated with mass effect (P = .03). Other exploratory correlations included epidermal growth factor receptor to perineural invasion (P = .05), and certain vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands to mass effect (P = .03) and increased (P = .01) or decreased (P = .02) primary tumor size. We report that CT imaging correlates with gene expression in untreated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Enhancement of the primary tumor and degree of mass effect correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers, which are also potential drug targets. Eventually, treatment decisions may be aided by combining imaging findings into meaningful phenotypes that relate directly to genomic biomarkers.

  2. TPS-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation in patients with oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Meng, J; Zhang, J; Zhuang, Q-W; Wang, X; Li, Z-P; Gu, Q-P

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy as well as the complications involved in the use of interstitial Iodine-125 implantation for the treatment of oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas. Fifteen patients with oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas received treatment planning system (TPS)-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation. The apparent activity per particle ranged from 0.6 mCi (2.22MBq) to 0.7 mCi (2.59MBq). The matched peripheral dose delivered by radioactive seeds ranged from 90 to 120 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment and the postoperative complications were evaluated during follow-up. The seeds were implanted successfully in all 15 patients and median number of seeds implanted was 36.53. CT scans were performed in all patients at 1-6 months postoperatively. During follow-up at 6-27 months, seed migration occurred and a good local tumor control was achieved with an overall response of 86.7%. No severe side effects were observed. TPS-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation is an effective and safe procedure with minimal invasiveness for the treatment of oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas, and it effectively prevents the recurrence of cancer and short-term lymphatic metastasis.

  3. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Heera, R; Ayswarya, T; Padmakumar, SK; Ismayil, P

    2016-01-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC) is an aggressive, high-grade, variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is uncommon in the oral cavity but slightly more common in the oropharynx. We present two cases of BSCC, one arising in the floor of the mouth and the other arising on the lateral border of the tongue. The diagnosis of this subtype of SCC is important owing to its particular behavior, with an aggressive course, a high incidence of local recurrence, regional lymph node metastases and mortality rate. PMID:27721627

  4. Pseudoangiomatous squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity of a dog.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Tim; Barnard, Sandra; Fleis, Rebekah; Peters, Rachel

    2010-03-01

    An 8-year-old, spayed, female Labrador Retriever mixed-breed dog was presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals with an invasive oral mass involving the upper left fourth premolar and first molar teeth. Initial biopsy results suggested a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, whereas further histologic examination of the surgically removed mass revealed a hemangiosarcoma-like mass composed of numerous vascular clefts and variable numbers of keratinizing epithelial cells. Histologic and immunohistochemical characteristics were compatible with pseudoangiomatous squamous cell carcinoma, a well-recognized human variant of acanthomatous squamous cell carcinoma. Because of histomorphologic similarities with canine gingival hemangiosarcoma, diagnosticians should be aware of the present tumor variant as a differential diagnosis for vascular-like growths in the oral cavity of dogs.

  5. Possible routes of spread of carcinoma of the maxillary sinus to the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Doig, T N; McDonald, S W; McGregor, I A

    1998-01-01

    Carcinomas arising in the maxillary sinus, occasionally present clinically in the oral cavity along the occlusal ridge of the upper alveolus. The mechanism of this spread has not been investigated but it may resemble invasion of the mandible by oral carcinomas, which tend to invade the soft tissues rather than eroding through bone. In Britain, such patients are usually edentulous. This project examines deficiencies in the bony walls of the maxillary sinus to determine possible routes of spread. Maxillae were obtained from one side of 17 dissecting room cadavers, aged 71-95 years; 15 were edentulous. The roof of the maxillary sinus was removed in all specimens. Five maxillae were each cut into six slices, 0.5 cm thick, in a vertical bucco-lingual plane. In all, soft tissues were removed by treatment in dilute bleach. Histological sections, cut in the horizontal plane, were prepared of a further three maxillae. Several possible routes were identified by which tumors could spread from the sinus to the oral cavity: 1) directly through foramina in its floor; 2) through numerous foramina in its floor to the marrow cavity of the alveolar process, which mostly contained fat amongst narrow bony trabeculae. (The marrow cavity, in turn, had numerous communications with the occlusal surface); 3) through foramina which carried branches of the superior alveolar nerves and vessels; 4) through deficiencies in the bony walls of the sinus at the neurovascular grooves and elsewhere.

  6. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  7. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Yang, Zhi-Ning; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Wu, Li-li; Lin, Zhi-xiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  8. Adjuvant radiotherapy is not supported in patients with verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Suresh; Pai, Sara I; Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the impact of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with verrucous carcinoma (VC) as compared to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Cross-sectional population analysis. Cases of nonmetastatic VC/SCC of the oral cavity were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (1988-2013). Kaplan-Meier survivals, stratified according to T stage, were compared between VC and SCC for treatment with or without adjuvant RT. A total of 18,819 VC/SCC cases were identified. There were 581 (3.1%) VC (mean age 69.6 years, 48.9% female) versus 18,238 (97.0%) SCC (mean age, 65.3, 37.1% female) patients. Verrucous carcinoma patients receiving surgery alone (N = 539) demonstrated a trend toward improved OS versus VC patients receiving surgery and RT (N = 40) (117.0 vs. 71.4 months, respectively, P = 0.119). There was a statistically significant improvement in DSS in VC patients receiving surgery alone (217.2 vs. 110.9 months, P = 0.05). Verrucous carcinoma patients treated with adjuvant RT demonstrated a trend toward a worse OS (71.4 vs. 93.0 months, P = 0.992) and DSS (110.9 vs. 162.3 months, P = 0.275) compared to SCC treated with adjuvant RT, suggesting a different biology and radiosensitivity between VC and SCC. Verrucous carcinoma treated with adjuvant RT had a worse OS and DSS compared to both VC treated with surgery alone and SCC treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Consideration should be given to surgical re-section rather than adjuvant RT in patients with positive margins or local recurrence. 2C. Laryngoscope, 127:1334-1338, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Mast Cells: Key Players in the Shadow in Oral Inflammation and in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Gaje, Pusa Nela; Amalia Ceausu, Raluca; Jitariu, Adriana; Stratul, Stefan Ioan; Rusu, Laura-Cristina; Popovici, Ramona Amina; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Although mast cells (MCs) have been discovered over 130 years ago, their function was almost exclusively linked to allergic affections. At the time being, it is well known that MCs possess a great variety of roles, in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. In the oral tissues, MCs release different proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), that promote leukocyte infiltration in various inflammatory states of the oral cavity. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process and, as a consequence, their number changes in different pathologic conditions of the oral cavity, like gingivitis, periodontitis, and so on. MCs also represent a rich source of proteases, especially of mast cell tryptase and chymase, which directly degrade the extracellular matrix through their proteolytic activity and thus indirectly stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate invasion and metastasis. It may be stated that mast cells could have an impact on primary tumor development, progression, and metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma. By understanding the role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of different inflammatory and tumor diseases of the oral cavity, these cells may become therapeutic targets that could possibly improve the prognosis and survival of these patients.

  10. Mast Cells: Key Players in the Shadow in Oral Inflammation and in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gaje, Pusa Nela; Amalia Ceausu, Raluca; Jitariu, Adriana; Popovici, Ramona Amina; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Although mast cells (MCs) have been discovered over 130 years ago, their function was almost exclusively linked to allergic affections. At the time being, it is well known that MCs possess a great variety of roles, in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. In the oral tissues, MCs release different proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), that promote leukocyte infiltration in various inflammatory states of the oral cavity. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process and, as a consequence, their number changes in different pathologic conditions of the oral cavity, like gingivitis, periodontitis, and so on. MCs also represent a rich source of proteases, especially of mast cell tryptase and chymase, which directly degrade the extracellular matrix through their proteolytic activity and thus indirectly stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate invasion and metastasis. It may be stated that mast cells could have an impact on primary tumor development, progression, and metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma. By understanding the role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of different inflammatory and tumor diseases of the oral cavity, these cells may become therapeutic targets that could possibly improve the prognosis and survival of these patients. PMID:27847826

  11. Retrospective cohort study of prognostic factors in patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, José F; Carrillo, Liliana C; Cano, Ana; Ramirez-Ortega, Margarita C; Chanona, Jorge G; Avilés, Alejandro; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Corona-Rivera, Jaime; Ochoa-Carrillo, Francisco J; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F

    2016-04-01

    Prognostic factors in oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are debated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of prognostic factors with oncologic outcomes. Patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC treated from 1997 to 2012 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Associations of prognostic factors with locoregional recurrence (LRR) or overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the logistic regression and the Cox models. Six hundred thirty-four patients were included in this study; tumor size, surgical margins, and N classification were associated with LRR (p < .0001); considering histopathology: perineural invasion, lymphocytic infiltration, infiltrative borders, and N classification were significant determinants of LRR. Tumor size, N classification, alcoholism, and surgical margins were associated with OS (p < .0001); considering pathologic prognostic factors, perivascular invasion, islands borders, and surgical margins were independently associated with OS (p < .0001). Surgical margins, perineural and perivascular invasion, lymphocytic infiltration, and infiltrative patterns of tumor invasion are significant prognostic factors in oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  14. Cytotoxicity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil towards human oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sertel, Serkan; Eichhorn, Tolga; Plinkert, Peter K; Efferth, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) accounts for 2% to 3% of all malignancies and has a high mortality rate. The majority of anticancer drugs are of natural origin. However, it is unknown whether the medicinal plant Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) is cytotoxic towards head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Cytotoxicity of thyme essential oil was investigated on the HNSCC cell line, UMSCC1. The IC₅₀ of thyme essential oil extract was 369 μg/ml. Moreover, we performed pharmacogenomics analyses. Genes involved in the cell cycle, cell death and cancer were involved in the cytotoxic activity of thyme essential oil at the transcriptional level. The three most significantly regulated pathways by thyme essential oil were interferon signaling, N-glycan biosynthesis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) signaling. Thyme essential oil inhibits human HNSCC cell growth. Based on pharmacogenomic approaches, novel insights into the molecular mode of anticancer activity of thyme are presented.

  15. Efficacy of per oral access in the surgical management of T2/T3 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Battoo, Azhar J; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor; Hedne, Naveen; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Trivedi, Nirav; Iyer, Subramania; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham

    2012-12-01

    Transcutaneous "access" procedures still continue to be widely employed for surgical management of medium-sized (T2, T3) oral cavity tumors in spite of the almost 4-cm mouth opening available to the surgeon to access the oral cavity. We undertook a retrospective study to objectively evaluate "per oral access" in managing these tumors with regard to the ability to achieve a clear surgical margin and enable reconstruction of resultant defect. Case series with chart review. Tertiary academic hospital. Seventy-nine consecutive patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma excised by per oral approach were analyzed. Multiple patient- and tumor-related factors known to influence status of surgical margins were analyzed. The overall frequency of clear, close, and involved margins was noted, as well as 5-year local control rate. The method of reconstruction employed was evaluated. The close/involved margins were more frequent with larger tumors and tumors exhibiting perineural infiltration, but none were statistically significant (P > .12). The overall frequency of clear, close, and involved margins was 81%, 11%, and 8%, respectively. Tongue and buccal mucosa sites constituted approximately 85% of the cases and had an 85% clear margin rate. Five-year local control rate was 70.35%. Fifty-three free flaps reconstruction were undertaken without any additional "access" procedure. Our results demonstrate ability to obtain comparable tumor clearance rates employing per oral access, without compromising ability to perform optimal reconstruction. We suggest per oral access should be the access of choice for medium-sized oral cavity tumors, and additional access procedures should only be considered if the initial access proves inadequate.

  16. Characterization of dendritic cells in lip and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Nádia Lago; Gonçalves, Andréia Souza; Martins, Allisson Filipe Lopes; Arantes, Diego Antônio Costa; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2016-07-01

    There may be differences in the antitumor immunity induced by dendritic cells (DCs) during the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) located in the lip rather than in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the number of immature and mature DCs in SCC and potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity and lip. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the number (cells/mm(2) ) of immature (CD1a(+) ) or mature (CD83(+) ) DCs in samples of oral cavity SCC (OCSCC) (n = 39), lip SCC (LSCC) (n = 23), leukoplakia (LK) (n = 21), actinic cheilitis (AC) (n = 13), and normal mucosa of the oral cavity (OC control, n = 12) and the lip (lip control, n = 11). The number of CD1a(+) cells tended to be higher in the OC control samples compared with the LK (P = 0.04) and OCSCC (P = 0.21). Unlike, this cell population was lower in the lip control than in AC or LSCC (P < 0.05). The number of CD83(+) cells was increased in the LSCC samples compared with the AC and lip control (P = 0.0001) and in OCSCC compared with both the LK (P = 0.001) and OC control (P = 0.0001) samples. LSCC showed an elevated number of CD1a(+) and CD83(+) cells compared with OCSCC (P = 0.03). The population of mature DCs was lower than the population of immature DCs in all of the tested groups (P < 0.05). There were a greater number of both mature and immature DC populations in the LSCC samples than in the OCSCC, which could contribute to establishing a more effective immune antitumor response for this neoplasm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The author herein reports a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the hard palate. An 84-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of oral discomfort. Oral examination revealed a pedunculated verrucous tumor (15 x 15 mm) in the hard palate. A biopsy revealed verrucous tumor. Resection of the lesion with wide margins was performed. Grossly, the palate tumor was pedunculated and verrucous, but a depressed area (8 x 7 mm) was recognized. Microscopically, the verrucous ares showed verrucous proliferation of squamous epithelium with little cellular atypia, and was interpreted as VC without invasion. The depressed lesion was obvious SCC with invasion. There were direct transitions between the VC and SCC. Immunohistochemically, the VC and SCC tumor cells were negative for human papilloma virus antigens. P53 protein was expressed in both VC and SCC, though the expression in SCC was much more strong and broad than that in VC. The Ki-67 antigen was also expressed in the VC and SCC, and Ki-67 labeling index ranged was 12% in VC and 64% in SCC. These findings indicate that SCC may arise within VC.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The author herein reports a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the hard palate. An 84-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of oral discomfort. Oral examination revealed a pedunculated verrucous tumor (15 x 15 mm) in the hard palate. A biopsy revealed verrucous tumor. Resection of the lesion with wide margins was performed. Grossly, the palate tumor was pedunculated and verrucous, but a depressed area (8 x 7 mm) was recognized. Microscopically, the verrucous ares showed verrucous proliferation of squamous epithelium with little cellular atypia, and was interpreted as VC without invasion. The depressed lesion was obvious SCC with invasion. There were direct transitions between the VC and SCC. Immunohistochemically, the VC and SCC tumor cells were negative for human papilloma virus antigens. P53 protein was expressed in both VC and SCC, though the expression in SCC was much more strong and broad than that in VC. The Ki-67 antigen was also expressed in the VC and SCC, and Ki-67 labeling index ranged was 12% in VC and 64% in SCC. These findings indicate that SCC may arise within VC. PMID:22670182

  20. Inositol hexaphosphate and paclitaxel: symbiotic treatment of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Janus, Seth C; Weurtz, Beverly; Ondrey, Frank G

    2007-08-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB is an early response gene that has been associated with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) progression. NF-kappaB activation is induced by some chemotherapy agents, including paclitaxel. The activation of this gene can be correlated with apoptosis resistance. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a naturally occurring polyphosphorylated carbohydrate. NF-kappaB levels were evaluated in oral cavity HNSCC lines after treatment with paclitaxel and IP6, alone and in combination. Resulting levels of cell death and apoptosis were assessed, and conclusions are drawn regarding a possible synergistic relationship between paclitaxel and IP6. NF-kappaB activation in cancer cells treated with paclitaxel and IP6, alone and in combination, was measured by transient transfection, and results were interpreted by luminometry. Cell proliferation of treated cells was measured by MTT assay. Cell viability and apoptosis of cancer cells treated with paclitaxel and IP6 combinations were quantitated by trypan blue staining and Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay, respectively. IP6 was observed to significantly downregulate NF-kappaB activation in both NA and CA-9-22 oral cavity HNSCC cell lines. Paclitaxel treatments caused increased NF-kappaB activation in the same cell lines. IP6 was observed to mitigate paclitaxel-induced NF-kappaB activation in the CA-9-22 cell line. IP6, when combined with paclitaxel, reduces CA-9-22 cell proliferation, increases cell death, and increases apoptosis, when compared with treatment with paclitaxel alone. IP6 reduces paclitaxel induced NF-kappaB activation and increases paclitaxel-mediated cell killing and apoptosis. As a well-tolerated and safe supplement, IP6 deserves further study in the treatment of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

  1. Verrucous carcinoma and squamous cell papilloma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Hilal; Agacayak, Serkan; Kavak, Gulten; Ozcan, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) of oral cavity is a rare variant of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and squamous papilloma is a benign proliferation of the stratified squamous epithelium, which results in a papillary or verrucous exophytic mass. There is a certain clinical similarity between squamous cell papilloma and VC. We presented a report of two cases which are VC and squamous cell papilloma that are showed the same clinical appearance but different pathological appearance, with a review of the literature. PMID:26430380

  2. FGFR Family Members Protein Expression as Prognostic Markers in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koole, Koos; Clausen, Martijn J A M; van Es, Robert J J; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Melchers, Lieuwe J; Koole, Ron; Langendijk, Johannes A; van Diest, Paul J; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Schuuring, Ed; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor family member proteins (FGFR1-4) have been identified as promising novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in a wide spectrum of solid tumors. The present study investigates the expression and prognostic value of four FGFR family member proteins in a large multicenter oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cohort. Protein expression of FGFR1-4 was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays containing 951 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded OCSCC and OPSCC tissues from the University Medical Center Utrecht and University Medical Center Groningen. Protein expression was correlated to overall survival using Cox regression models, and bootstrapping was performed as internal validation. FGFR proteins were highly expressed in 39-64 % of OCSCC and 63-79 % of OPSCC. Seventy-three percent (299/412) of OCSCC and 85 % (305/357) of OPSCC highly co-expressed two or more FGFR family member proteins. FGFR1 protein was more frequently highly expressed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative OPSCC than HPV-positive OPSCC (82 vs. 65 %; p = 0.008). Furthermore, protein expression of FGFR family members was not related to overall survival in OCSCC or OPSCC (p > 0.05). FGFR family members are frequently highly expressed in OCSCC and OPSCC. These FGFR family member proteins are therefore potential targets for novel therapies that are urgently required to improve survival of OCSCC and OPSCC patients.

  3. Basal stem cells contribute to squamous cell carcinomas in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Han; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2013-05-01

    The cells of origin of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) are unknown. We used a cell lineage tracing approach (adult K14-CreER(TAM); ROSA26 mice transiently treated with tamoxifen) to identify and track normal epithelial stem cells (SCs) in mouse tongues by X-gal staining and to determine if these cells become neoplastically transformed by treatment with a carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO). Here, we show that in normal tongue epithelia, X-gal(+) cells formed thin columns throughout the entire epithelium 12 weeks after tamoxifen treatment, indicating that the basal layer contains long-lived SCs that produce progeny by asymmetric division to maintain homeostasis. Carcinogen treatment results in a ~10-fold reduction in the total number of X-gal(+) clonal cell populations and horizontal expansion of X-gal(+) clonal cell columns, a pattern consistent with symmetric division of some SCs. Finally, X-gal(+) SCs are present in papillomas and invasive OCSCCs, and these long-lived X-gal(+) SCs are the cells of origin of these tumors. Moreover, the resulting 4-NQO-induced tumors are multiclonal. These findings provide insights into the identity of the initiating cells of oral cancer.

  4. The effects of geography on survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Jean Nguyen, T T; Jeffery, Caroline C; O'Connell, Daniel A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Seikaly, Hadi

    2015-06-01

    To assess the survival outcomes of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) by differing geographical location. Demographic, pathologic, treatment, and survival data was obtained from OCSCC patients from 1998-2010 in Alberta, Canada. 554 patients were included from 660 OCSCC patients. Overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survivals were estimated with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. Patients were grouped by geographic locations. Patients from urban locations had improved overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survival compared to rural locations (p<0.05). Two and five year estimates of overall survival were significantly higher in the urban cohort at 84% and 78%, versus rural with 48% and 44%, respectively (p<0.05). Disease-specific and disease-free survival rates were also superior in the urban group (p<0.05). Diagnosis to treatment time for all 3 geographical groups was not found to be statistically significant (p>0.05). This study shows that patients with OCSCC living in urban settings have improved survival compared to rural groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young adults: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Ewa; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wegner, Anna; Pienkowski, Piotr; Pazdrowski, Jakub; Luczewski, Lukasz; Sowka, Marcin; Golusinski, Pawel; Malicki, Julian; Golusinski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a disease of middle-aged to elderly adults. However, an increased incidence of HNSCC in young people under 45 years of age has been reported recently. In the present review, we focused on the epidemiology and aetiology of HNSCC in adults under 45 years of age. Methods We reviewed literature related to HNSCC in adult patients less than 45 years of age and discussed current treatment options and prognosis. Results HNSCC in young adults is associated with a higher incidence rate in nonsmokers, lower female-to-male ratio, a higher percentage of oral cavity and oropharynx tumours, and fewer second primary tumours. However, aside from traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol exposure, the causes of these cancers in young adults remain unclear. Agents that might contribute to risk include infection with high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes as well as genetic factors or immunodeficiency status. The expected increase in incidence and mortality of the young with HNSCC may become a major public health concern if current trends persist, particularly lifestyle habits that may contribute to this disease. Conclusions Given the younger age and potential long-term adverse sequelae of traditional HNSCC treatments, young adults should be treated on a case-by-case basis and post-therapy quality of life must be considered in any treatment-decision making process. PMID:24587773

  6. Evaluation and staging of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx: limitations despite technological breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Zafereo, Mark E

    2013-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) and squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) represent two distinct disease entities. SCCOC continues to be related to tobacco risk factors, and the current anatomic staging system provides useful prognostic value. Most patients with SCCOP in Western countries now have HPV-associated tumors, and tumor HPV status is considered the most important prognostic factor. Smoking status is emerging as an important prognostic factor for HPV-driven SCCOP, independent of tumor HPV status. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and FDG-PET/CT imaging are diagnostic staging tools useful in select patients with SCCOC and SCCOP.

  7. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  8. Epstein-barr virus latent membrane protein 1 polymorphism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other oral cavity tumors in Russia.

    PubMed

    Senyuta, Natalia; Yakovleva, Larissa; Goncharova, Elena; Scherback, Liana; Diduk, Sergey; Smirnova, Ksenia; Maksimovich, Dmitry; Gurtsevitch, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    The genetic structure of EBV LMP1 alleles isolated from tumor, blood, and throat washing samples of 22 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, 17 patients with other non-EBV-related tumors of the oral cavity, and 19 blood donors have been studied in representatives of Central Russia and the Republics of Northern Caucasus, regions which are non-endemic for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The analysis of the LMP1 alleles collected revealed that they practically matched previously described LMP1 variants; however, some characteristic features were also detected. In particular, the G212S substitution in LMP1 isolates investigated was not observed at all. Tumor samples obtained from nasopharyngeal carcinoma and other tumors of the oral cavity did not differ significantly either in the frequency of "high oncogenic" LMP1 alleles with 10 aa and/or 23 aa deletions (LMP1(China1) and/or LMP1(Med+)), nor in the number of 11 aa repeats and the frequency of 5 aa motif insertions. No differences in the frequency of amino acid substitutions between LMP1 alleles obtained from tumor and throat washing samples of both patient groups were also detected. The data obtained may indicate that in both nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and patients with other tumors of the oral cavity, the EBV strains with similar LMP1 variants are found to persist. This observation allows us to suggest that in non-endemic areas, EBV strains with any LMP1 alleles can initiate the nasopharyngeal carcinoma development but only in those individuals who have a genetic predisposition to the disease and are subjected to specific environmental, and/or dietary factors present in certain geographic areas.

  9. Ki-67 and p53 correlation prognostic value in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and tongue.

    PubMed

    Motta, Rafael Da Ros; Zettler, Claudio Galeano; Cambruzzi, Eduardo; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Berni, Renata Brutti

    2009-01-01

    Epidermoid carcinomas represent from 90% to 95% of oral cavity malignant neoplasias, making up 13,470 cases/year. To correlate p53 and Ki-67 expressions in mouth and tongue carcinomas with lymph node status, gender, histological grade, tumor volume and pathological stage. We carried out a retrospective study of 28 cases of mouth and tongue epidermoid carcinomas. They were submitted to immunohistochemical study in order to check the expression of p53 and Ki-67 antibodies and statistically compare them in terms of lymph node status, gender, histological grade, tumor volume and pathological staging. The individually analyzed p53 proved to have statistical significance (p<0.05) when compared to tumor volume (p=0.029). Despite a strong tendency, the p53/tumor volume relation was not significant. When p53 + Ki67 were analyzed, tumor volume had p < 0.05 (p = 0.029). Literature shows that the expression of p53 and Ki-67 is related to the presence of metastasis to lymph nodes and a worse prognosis. In oral cavity and tongue epidermoid carcinomas, p53 and Ki-67 are related to larger tumors, metastasis to lymph nodes and very likely to a worse prognosis.

  10. Incidence and Outcomes of Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Fourth Primary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Adel, Mohamad; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fang, Ku-Hao; Wang, Yu-Chien; Chang, Kai-Ping; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Yang, Lan Yan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and outcomes of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and fourth primary tumors (PTs) in a betel-chewing endemic area. We retrospectively examined the records of 1836 OSCC patients who underwent radical tumor resection between 1996 and 2014. The outcome measures included the incidence and number of multiple PTs, the main risk factors, and their associations with overall survival (OS). Of the 1836 patients, 1400 (76.3%) had a single PT, 344 (18.7%) a second PT, 67 (3.6%) a third PT, and 25 (1.4%) a fourth PT. Univariate analyses (log-rank test) identified the following factors as significantly associated with a fourth PT: simultaneous first and second PTs, betel quid chewing, buccal subsite, and pT3–4 status. After allowance for the potential confounding effect of other risk factors, all of these factors retained their independent prognostic significance in stepwise multivariate analyses, the only exception being betel chewing. The incidences of second, third, and fourth PTs at 5 and 10 years were 20.2%/34.6%, 4.0%/8.6%, and 1.0%/2.3%, respectively. The 5 and 10-year OS rates (calculated from the diagnosis of each PTs) for patients with a single, second, third, and fourth PTs were 68%/61%, 43%/37%, 45%/39%%, and 30%/30%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among patients with a fourth PT, those who underwent radical surgery showed a significantly higher 3-year OS than those who did not (57% vs 13%; P = 0.0442). Fourth PTs are rarely observed in OSCC patients in a betel quid-chewing endemic area. Long-term survival rates of patients treated with radical surgery seems acceptable, being 4-fold higher than their counterparts. PMID:27015170

  11. Multiple and Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity After Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiuhong; Xing, Yuzhen; Cheng, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common secondary solid tumors in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, according to previous reports, multiple and recurrent OSCC is very rare. The presented case shows the susceptibility to the development of secondary malignancies, particularly oral cancer, of patients who present with chronic graft-versus-host disease after HSCT. OSCC after HSCT appears to be more invasive and has a tendency to recur, with a poor prognosis. Therefore, regular and thorough evaluations of the oral mucosa are recommended for all patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and have chronic graft-versus-host disease.

  12. Obtaining Normal Tissue Constraints Using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in Patients with Oral Cavity, Oropharnygeal, and Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, William K.J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal tissue dose constraints while maintaining planning target volume (PTV) prescription without reducing PTV margins. Sixteen patients with oral cavity carcinoma (group I), 27 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (group II), and 28 patients with laryngeal carcinoma (group III) were reviewed. Parotid constraints were a mean dose to either parotid < 26 Gy (PP1), 50% of either parotid < 30 Gy (PP2), or 20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy (PP3). Treatment was intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). All patients met constraints for cord and brain stem. The mandibular constraints were met in 66%, 29%, and 57% of patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers, respectively. Mean dose of 26 Gy (PP1) was achieved in 44%, 41%, and 38% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients. PP2 (parotid constraint of 30 Gy to less than 50% of one parotid) was the easiest to achieve (group I, II, and III: 82%, 76%, and 78%, respectively). PP3 (20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy) was difficult, and was achieved in 25%, 17%, and 35% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients, respectively. Mean parotid dose of 26 Gy was met 40% of the time. However, a combination of constraints allowed for sparing of the parotid based on different criteria and was met in high numbers. This was accomplished without reducing PTV-parotid overlap. What dose constraint best correlates with subjective and objective functional outcomes remains a focus for future study.

  13. The use of examination under anaesthesia and panendoscopy in patients presenting with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kerawala, Cyrus J; Bisase, Brian; Lee, Jon

    2009-10-01

    Although examination under anaesthesia and panendoscopy (EUAP) has traditionally been used in the assessment of patients presenting with oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the era of modern medicine with its advanced imaging techniques has meant that the indications for this technique have potentially reduced. In an attempt to quantify the current use of EUAP in the UK, a structured telephone questionnaire was undertaken of 50 maxillofacial units. Information was gathered regarding whether the technique was adopted on a routine or selective basis. Likewise perceived disadvantages were sought. Twenty-two units (44%) carried out EUAP on all patients presenting with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC. Of the remaining 28 units, all employed EUAP on a selective basis, the most commonly for the assessment of the primary tumour. The most common perceived disadvantage of carrying out EUAP routinely was its potential to increase the waiting time to definitive treatment. These results suggest a gradual move towards the selective use of EUAP in patients presenting with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC.

  14. Ipsilateral irradiation for well lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx: results on tumor control and xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Laura; Martín, Margarita; López, Mario; Marín, Alicia; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background In head and neck cancer, bilateral neck irradiation is the standard approach for many tumor locations and stages. Increasing knowledge on the pattern of nodal invasion leads to more precise targeting and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morbidity and tumor control for patients with well lateralized squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx were treated with a prospective management approach using ipsilateral irradiation between 2000 and 2007. This included 8 radical oropharyngeal and 12 postoperative oral cavity carcinomas, with Stage T1-T2, N0-N2b disease. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence was determined. Late xerostomia was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, five-year overall survival and loco-regional control rates were 82.5% and 100%, respectively. No local or contralateral nodal recurrences were observed. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland was 4.72 Gy and to the contralateral submandibular gland was 15.30 Gy. Mean score for dry mouth was 28.1 on the 0-100 QLQ-H&N35 scale. According to CTCAE v3 scale, 87.5% of patients had grade 0-1 and 12.5% grade 2 subjective xerostomia. The unstimulated salivary flow was > 0.2 ml/min in 81.2% of patients and 0.1-0.2 ml/min in 19%. None of the patients showed grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusion In selected patients with early and moderate stages, well lateralized oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas, ipsilateral irradiation treatment of the primary site and ipsilateral neck spares salivary gland function without compromising loco-regional control. PMID:19723329

  15. Peritumoral interstitial double-nuclide double-compound lymphoscintigraphy (PIDDL) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Munz, D.L.; Jung, H.

    1985-05-01

    PIDDL is a new two-phase lymphoscintigraphic approach developed by MUNZ et al. for identification of lymph node drainage groups of primary tumors followed by direct visualization of metastases in the nodes. The present study was done to test the diagnostic usefulness of PIDDL in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. 58 patients of either sex, aged 31-86 years, were examined prior to surgery. In the first phase of PIDDL, lymph node groups draining the primary lesions were identified after peritumoral interstitial injection of 1.52.0 mCi Tc-99m antimony trisulfide colloid or Tc-99m human serum albumin microcolloid. In the second phase, metastases located in the draining lymph nodes were visualized following peritumoral interstitial injection of 200-300 ..mu..Ci Ga-67 citrate. Ga-67 accumulated in 71% of lymph node drainage groups identified. No GA-67 uptake was observed in lymph nodes other than those identified by the radiocolloid. Based on the radiocolloid lymphoscintigraphic data, selective lymph node dissection was performed in 41 of the patients examined. The study concludes that PIDDL offers a promising approach for the noninvasive assessment of lymph node metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

  16. NBI utility in the pre-operative and intra-operative assessment of oral cavity and oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Piovesana, Marco; Gatto, Annalisa; Torelli, Lucio; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Boscolo Nata, Francesca

    Despite advances in the surgical management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the identification of synchronous lesions, precancerous lesions around the main tumor, or the unknown primary in the case of neck metastasis remains a problem, as these lesions may be invisible to the naked eye or with standard white light (WL) endoscopy. However, the advent of tools such as narrow-band imaging (NBI) could help the clinician. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of NBI during the pre-operative and intra-operative stages of management of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. NBI was used pre-operatively in 47 patients with oral or oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma to identify the involvement of adjacent subsites, multifocality, synchronous lesions or an unknown primary. NBI was used intra-operatively in 30 patients to better define the tumor limits and guide the resection. The advantage of NBI versus WL endoscopy was analyzed by calculating the true and false positive rate pre-operatively, and the need for resection enlargements, histology of the enlargement, and the rate of clear margins at definitive histology, intra-operatively. Pre-operatively, the diagnostic gain of NBI was 8.5%, allowing identification of three synchronous tumors and one unknown primary. Intra-operatively, NBI improved the definition of tumor limits in 67.7% of cases, with resection enlargements showing dysplasia and carcinoma in 8 and 12 patients, respectively; we obtained 74.2% negative margins at histology. NBI could represent an added value in the pre-operative and intra-operative assessment of oral cavity and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-operative infection by pathogenic micro-organisms in the oral cavity of patients with prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Senpuku, H; Tada, A; Uehara, S; Kariyama, R; Kumon, H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the change in the oral cavity microflora of 14 patients who had undergone a radical prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The detection of micro-organisms in the oral cavity was compared before and after the surgical procedure. Post-operative infection, defined as those patients who had increased Candida species counts and/or pathogenic bacteria only at the post-operative examination, was observed in 10 patients. Six patients showed increased Candida species counts at the post-operative examination compared with the pre-operative examination. In five patients, pathogenic bacterial species were detected at the post-operative examination but not at the pre-operative examination. One patient had detectable pathogenic bacterial species only at the post-operative examination along with increased Candida species counts. Our findings suggest that pre-operative oral hygiene to remove bacterial and Candida species from patients who are scheduled for surgical procedures is important for satisfactory clinical outcomes.

  18. HIF1-Alpha Expression Predicts Survival of Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Mercante, Ana Maria da Cunha; Louro, Iúri Drumond; Gonçalves, Antônio José; de Carvalho, Marcos Brasilino; da Silva, Eloiza Helena Tajara; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Álvares

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an important cause of death and morbidity wordwide and effective prognostic markers are still to be discovered. HIF1α protein is associated with hypoxia response and neovascularization, essential conditions for solid tumors survival. The relationship between HIF1α expression, tumor progression and treatment response in head and neck cancer is still poorly understood. Patients and Methods In this study, we investigated HIF1α expression by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays and its relationship with clinical findings, histopathological results and survival of 66 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower mouth. Results Our results demonstrated that high HIF1α expression is associated with local disease-free survival, independently from the choice of treatment. Furthermore, high expression of HIF1α in patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy was associated with survival, therefore being a novel prognostic marker in squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth. Additionally, our results showed that MVD was associated with HIF1α expression and local disease relapse. Conclusion These findings suggest that HIF1α expression can be used as a prognostic marker and predictor of postoperative radiotherapy response, helping the oncologist choose the best treatment for each patient. PMID:23028863

  19. The Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Chaisuparat, Risa; Limpiwatana, Seehachart; Kongpanitkul, Sanida; Yodsanga, Somchai; Jham, Bruno C

    2016-09-01

    The Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in many malignancies, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC), a low-grade variant of OSCC, remains unknown. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the activation level of important markers of the Akt/mTOR pathway in OVC and to compare the results with OSCC samples. The expression of p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and p-RPS6 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 30 OSCC cases, 18 OVC cases, and 30 control cases (normal epithelium overlying fibromas). Statistical analysis was performed to determine the differences in protein expression between samples. All OVC cases were positive for p-Akt (Thr308), p-Akt (Ser473), and p-RPS6. There were significant differences in expression level of all studied proteins between OVC and control, as well as between OVC and OSCC. However, OVC showed significant lower staining scores than OSCC. Our findings demonstrate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is upregulated in OVC, indicating a role for this pathway in the development and progression of this malignancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cervical lymph node metastasis in adenoid cystic carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx: A collective international review.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Carlos; Barnes, Leon; Silver, Carl E; Rodrigo, Juan P; Shah, Jatin P; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Cardesa, Antonio; Pitman, Karen T; Kowalski, Luiz P; Robbins, K Thomas; Hellquist, Henrik; Medina, Jesus E; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Coca-Pelaz, Andrés; Bradley, Patrick J; Gnepp, Douglas R; Teymoortash, Afshin; Strojan, Primož; Mendenhall, William M; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Bishop, Justin A; Devaney, Kenneth O; Thompson, Lester D R; Hamoir, Marc; Slootweg, Pieter J; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Williams, Michelle D; Wenig, Bruce M; Skálová, Alena; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to suggest general guidelines in the management of the N0 neck of oral cavity and oropharyngeal adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) in order to improve the survival of these patients and/or reduce the risk of neck recurrences. The incidence of cervical node metastasis at diagnosis of head and neck AdCC is variable, and ranges between 3% and 16%. Metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes of intraoral and oropharyngeal AdCC varies from 2% to 43%, with the lower rates pertaining to palatal AdCC and the higher rates to base of the tongue. Neck node recurrence may happen after treatment in 0-14% of AdCC, is highly dependent on the extent of the treatment and is very rare in patients who have been treated with therapeutic or elective neck dissections, or elective neck irradiation. Lymph node involvement with or without extracapsular extension in AdCC has been shown in most reports to be independently associated with decreased overall and cause-specific survival, probably because lymph node involvement is a risk factor for subsequent distant metastasis. The overall rate of occult neck metastasis in patients with head and neck AdCC ranges from 15% to 44%, but occult neck metastasis from oral cavity and/or oropharynx seems to occur more frequently than from other locations, such as the sinonasal tract and major salivary glands. Nevertheless, the benefit of elective neck dissection (END) in AdCC is not comparable to that of squamous cell carcinoma, because the main cause of failure is not related to neck or local recurrence, but rather, to distant failure. Therefore, END should be considered in patients with a cN0 neck with AdCC in some high risk oral and oropharyngeal locations when postoperative RT is not planned, or the rare AdCC-high grade transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cervical lymph node metastasis in adenoid cystic carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx: A collective international review☆

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Carlos; Barnes, Leon; Silver, Carl E.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Shah, Jatin P.; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Cardesa, Antonio; Pitman, Karen T.; Kowalski, Luiz P.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Hellquist, Henrik; Medina, Jesus E.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Coca-Pelaz, Andrés; Bradley, Patrick J.; Gnepp, Douglas R.; Teymoortash, Afshin; Strojan, Primož; Mendenhall, William M.; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Bishop, Justin A.; Devaney, Kenneth O.; Thompson, Lester D.R.; Hamoir, Marc; Slootweg, Pieter J.; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Williams, Michelle D.; Wenig, Bruce M.; Skálová, Alena; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish general guidelines in the management of the N0 neck of oral cavity and oropharyngeal adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) in order to improve the survival of these patients and/or reduce the risk of neck recurrences. The incidence of cervical node metastasis at diagnosis of head and neck AdCC is variable, and ranges between 3% and 16%. Metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes of intraoral and oropharyngeal AdCC varies from 2% to 43%, with the lower rates pertaining to palatal AdCC and the higher rates to base of the tongue. Neck node recurrence may happen after treatment in 0–14% of AdCC, is highly dependent on the extent of the treatment and is very rare in patients who have been treated with therapeutic or elective neck dissections, or elective neck irradiation. Lymph node involvement with or without extracapsular extension in AdCC has been shown in most reports to be independently associated with decreased overall and cause-specific survival, probably because lymph node involvement is a risk factor for subsequent distant metastasis. The overall rate of occult neck metastasis in patients with head and neck AdCC ranges from 15% to 44%, but occult neck metastasis from oral cavity and/or oropharynx seems to occur more frequently than from other locations such as the sinonasal tract and major salivary glands. Nevertheless, the benefit of elective neck dissection (END) in AdCC is not comparable to that of squamous cell carcinoma, because the main cause of failure is not related to neck or local recurrence, but rather, to distant failure. Therefore, END should be considered in patients with a cN0 neck with AdCC in some high risk oral and oropharyngeal locations when postoperative RT is not planned, or the rare AdCC-high grade transformation. PMID:27017314

  2. The Failure Patterns of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-University of Iowa Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min . E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Chang, Kristi; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Tan Huaming; Wacha, Judith C; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Buatti, John M.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Determine the failure patterns of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and July 2005, 55 patients with oral cavity SCC were treated with IMRT for curative intent. Forty-nine received postoperative IMRT, 5 definitive IMRT, and 1 neoadjuvant. Three target volumes were defined (clinical target CTV1, CTV2, and CTV3). The failure patterns were determined by coregistration or comparison of the treatment planning computed tomography to the images obtained at the time of recurrence. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 17.1 months (range, 0.27-59.3 months). The median follow-up for living patients was 23.9 months (range, 9.3-59.3 months). Nine patients had locoregional failures: 4 local failures only, 2 regional failures only, and 3 had both local and regional failures. Five patients failed distantly; of these, 3 also had locoregional failures. The 2-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant disease-free survival was 68%, 74%, 85%, 82%, and 89%, respectively. The median time from treatment completion to locoregional recurrence was 4.1 months (range, 3.0-12.1 months). Except for 1 patient who failed in contralateral lower neck outside the radiation field, all failed in areas that had received a high dose of radiation. The locoregional control is strongly correlated with extracapsular extension. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated RT is effective for oral cavity SCC. Most failures are in-field failures. Further clinical studies are necessary to improve the outcomes of patients with high-risk features, particularly for those with extracapsular extension.

  3. Podoplanin expression correlates with sentinel lymph node metastasis in early squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerhard Frank; Fritzsche, Florian R; Züllig, Lena; Storz, Martina; Graf, Nicole; Haerle, Stephan K; Jochum, Wolfram; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Moch, Holger

    2011-09-15

    In patients with early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), occult lymph node metastasis is difficult to predict by clinical or pathological parameters. However, such parameters are necessary to select patients either for elective neck dissection or the sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure. The membrane glycoprotein podoplanin is normally expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. Recently, expression of podoplanin by cancer cells was demonstrated to promote tumor cell motility and tumor lymphangiogenesis in vitro. The value of cancer cell-expressed podoplanin was to be determined as a predictive marker for SLN metastasis in early HNSCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx. One hundred twenty patients with HNSCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx undergoing a SLN biopsy were enrolled in this prospective clinical trial of SLN biopsy. Cancer cell-expressed podoplanin was determined by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Podoplanin expression was quantified by the intensity reactivity score and categorized into expression and nonexpression. SLN examination revealed occult metastasis in 45 patients (37.5%). Twenty-nine of 120 (24.2%) primary HNSCC showed podoplanin expression. Podoplanin expression correlated significantly with SLN metastasis (p = 0.029) and remained a significant predictor for lymph node status even after controlling for tumor stage (p = 0.028). As a predictive marker for SLN metastasis, however, podoplanin expression reached a sensitivity of a mere 36% and a specificity of 83%. Podoplanin expression is associated with metastasis to lymph nodes in vivo. Podoplanin immunohistochemistry in early HNSCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx may help to select patients for the SLN procedure and to identify patients with increased risk for presence of occult lymph node metastasis in the neck.

  4. Collision Tumour of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma in the Oral Cavity of a Dog.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P; Ramírez, G A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-year-old, male cocker spaniel was presented with a gingival proliferative lesion in the rostral maxilla and enlargement of the regional lymph node. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a collision tumour composed of two malignant populations, epithelial and melanocytic, with metastasis of the neoplastic melanocytes to the regional lymph node. The epithelial component consisted of trabeculae and islands of well-differentiated squamous epithelium immunoreactive to cytokeratins. The melanocytic component had a varying degree of pigmentation of polygonal and spindle-shaped cells, growing in nests or densely packed aggregates and immunolabelled with S100, melanoma-associated antigen (melan A), neuron-specific enolase and vimentin antibodies. Protein markers involved in tumorigenesis or cell proliferation (i.e. COX-2, p53, c-kit and Ki67), were overexpressed by the neoplastic cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an oral collision tumour involving malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the dog.

  5. Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Paz, Dante; Kao, Huang-Kai; Huang, Yenlin; Chang, Kai-Ping

    2017-08-10

    Prognosis of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma remains a challenge for clinicians despite progress in its diagnosis and treatment over the past decades. In this review, we assessed clinicopathological factors and potential biomarkers along with their prognostic relevance in an attempt to develop optimal treatment strategies for these patients. In addition to several pathologic factors that have been proposed to improve prognostic stratification and treatment planning in the eighth edition of the American Joint Committee staging manual on cancer, we reviewed some other imaging and clinicopathological parameters demonstrated to be closely associated with patient prognosis, along with the biomarkers related to novel target or immune therapy. Evaluation of current literature regarding the prognostic stratification used in contemporary clinicopathological studies and progress in the development of targeted or immune therapy may help these patients benefit from tailored and personalized treatment and obtain better oncological results.

  6. Short-term variation in labelling index as a predictor of radiotherapy response in human oral cavity carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestrini, R.; Molinari, R.; Costa, A.; Volterrani, F.; Gardani, G.

    1984-07-01

    In vitro determination of (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling index (LI) was carried out on squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity from 52 patients before and during radiotherapy. Pretreatment LI values ranged from 0.01% to 50%. After administration of the first 10 Gy in five consecutive daily fractions, a decrease in LI was observed in 39 cases and an enhancement in 13 cases, with an overall median 70% decrease in the initial value. The type of variation induced by radiotherapy was not related to pretreatment LI except for tumors with a very low proliferative activity, which all showed a marked increase in LI. Pretreatment LI was not indicative of short- or long-term response to radiotherapy, whereas the variation induced on LI after 10 Gy was related to the clinical outcome.

  7. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  8. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2009-10-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 {+-} 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 {+-} 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 {+-} 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 {+-} 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 {+-} 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 {+-} 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 {+-} 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 {+-} 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  9. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  10. Clinical Implications of FADD Gene Amplification and Protein Overexpression in Taiwanese Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Huei-Tzu; Cheng, Sou-De; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Wang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Shiang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of 11q13.3 is a frequent event in human cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This chromosome region contains several genes that are potentially cancer drivers, including FADD (Fas associated via death domain), an apoptotic effector that was previously identified as a novel oncogene in laryngeal/pharyngeal cancer. This study was designed to explore the role of FADD in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) samples from Taiwanese patients, by assessing copy number variations (CNVs) and protein expression and the clinical implications of these factors in 339 male OSCCs. The intensity of FADD protein expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was strongly correlated with gene copy number amplification, as analyzed using a TaqMan CNV assay. Both FADD gene copy number amplification and high protein expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Patients with both FADD copy number amplification and high protein expression had the shortest disease-free survival (DFS; P = 0.074 and P = 0.002) and overall survival (OS; P = 0.011 and P = 0.027). After adjusting for primary tumor status, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and age at diagnosis, DFS was still significantly lower in patients with either copy number amplification or high protein expression (hazard ratio [H.R.] = 1.483; 95% confidence interval [C.I.], 1.044–2.106). In conclusion, our data reveal that FADD gene copy number and protein expression can be considered potential prognostic markers and are closely associated with lymph node metastasis in patients with OSCC in Taiwan. PMID:27764170

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and circulating tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wikner, Johannes; Gröbe, Alexander; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Due to a lack of substantial improvement in the outcome of patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the past decades, current staging methods need to be revised. This disease is associated with poor survival rates despite considerable advances in diagnosis and treatment. The early detection of metastases is an important indicator of survival, prognosis and relapse. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying metastasis is crucial. Exploring alternative measures apart from common procedures is needed to identify new prognostic markers. Similar to previous findings predominantly for other solid tumours, recently published studies demonstrate that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) might serve as prognostic markers and could supplement routine staging in OSCC. Thus, the detection of CTCs/DTCs is a promising tool to determine the individual need for therapeutic intervention. Encouraging results and new approaches point to the future use of targeted therapies for OSCC, an exceedingly heterogeneous subgroup of head and neck cancer. This review focuses on summarising technologies currently used to detect CTCs/DTCs. The translational relevance for OSCC is highlighted. The inherent challenges in detecting CTCs/DTCs will be emphasised. PMID:24829858

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wikner, Johannes; Gröbe, Alexander; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2014-05-10

    Due to a lack of substantial improvement in the outcome of patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the past decades, current staging methods need to be revised. This disease is associated with poor survival rates despite considerable advances in diagnosis and treatment. The early detection of metastases is an important indicator of survival, prognosis and relapse. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying metastasis is crucial. Exploring alternative measures apart from common procedures is needed to identify new prognostic markers. Similar to previous findings predominantly for other solid tumours, recently published studies demonstrate that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) might serve as prognostic markers and could supplement routine staging in OSCC. Thus, the detection of CTCs/DTCs is a promising tool to determine the individual need for therapeutic intervention. Encouraging results and new approaches point to the future use of targeted therapies for OSCC, an exceedingly heterogeneous subgroup of head and neck cancer. This review focuses on summarising technologies currently used to detect CTCs/DTCs. The translational relevance for OSCC is highlighted. The inherent challenges in detecting CTCs/DTCs will be emphasised.

  13. Nuclear Survivin as a Prognostic Factor in Squamous-Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Andrea; Mascitti, Marco; Rubini, Corrado; Bambini, Fabrizio; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Lo Russo, Lucio; Sartini, Davide; Emanuelli, Monica; Procaccini, Maurizio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Oral squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) and most human tumors are characterized by an imbalance of regulatory mechanisms controlling cell processes such as apoptosis. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family, is overexpressed in most solid and hematological malignancies and correlates with a reduced overall survival rate. Thus, the aim of this study was to find a correlation between nuclear Survivin expression and clinicopathologic data and the prognosis in OSCC patients. A total of 152 OSCC samples were investigated by immunohistochemistry for nuclear Survivin expression. Then, Survivin was scored semiquantitatively using an immunoreactivity score (IRS), calculated by multiplying the percentage of positive cells with the staining intensity. Using a digital image analysis software, OSCC patients were stratified into 4 groups. Results showed that patients with a lower IRS score displayed better survival rates than patients with a higher IRS score, reaching statistical significance. As the expression of Survivin at the nuclear level seems to suggest a poor prognosis in OSCC patients, the evaluation of nuclear Survivin IRS may be a useful tool to identify patients with more aggressive and disseminated disease, influencing follow-up and therapeutic protocols.

  14. Clinical significance in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma of pathogenic somatic mitochondrial mutations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsiung; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, I-How; Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsieh, Ling-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations affecting the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been frequently observed in human cancers and proposed as important oncological biomarkers. However, the clinical significance of mtDNA mutations in cancer remains unclear. This study was therefore performed to explore the possible clinical use in assessing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of pathogenic mtDNA mutations. The entire mitochondrial genome of 300 OSCC with their matched control DNAs was screened by direct sequencing and criteria were set to define a pathogenic somatic mutation. The patients' TP53 R72P genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The relationships between pathogenic somatic mutations, clinicopathogical features, TP53 R72P genotype and clinical prognosis were analyzed. Overall, 645 somatic mtDNA mutations were identified and 91 of these mutations were defined as pathogenic. About one quarter (74/300) of the OSCC tumor samples contained pathogenic mutations. Individuals with the TP53 R allele had a higher frequency of pathogenic somatic mutation than those with the PP genotype. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that TP53 R allele patients with pathogenic somatic mutations demonstrated a significant association with a poorer disease-free survival than other individuals (HR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.15-2.57; p = 0.009) and this phenomenon still existed after adjusting for mtDNA haplogroup, tumor stage with treatment regimens, differentiation and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.40; p = 0.03). Subgroup analyses showed that this phenomenon was limited to patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy after surgery. The results strongly indicated that pathogenic mtDNA mutations are a potential prognostic marker for OSCCs. Furthermore, functional mitochondria may play an active role in cancer development and the patient's response to radiotherapy/chemo-radiotherapy.

  15. Determinants for further wishes for cosmetic and reconstructive interventions in 1652 patients with surgical treated carcinomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Henrik; Spalthoff, Simon; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Lommen, Julian; Kübler, Norbert R; Krüskemper, Gertrud; Rana, Majeed; Sander, Karoline

    2017-12-01

    The impairment of the appearance is a major problem for patients with carcinomas of the oral cavity. These patients want to recover their preoperative facial appearance. Some do not realize that this is not always possible and hence develop a desire for further cosmetic and reconstructive surgery (CRS) which often causes psychological problems. The desire of patients for CRS (N = 410; 26%) has been acquired in this DÖSAK rehab study including multiple reasons such as medical, functional, aesthetic and psychosocial aspects. They relate to the parameters of diagnosis, treatment and postoperative rehabilitation. Patients without the wish for CRS (N = 1155; 74%) served as control group. For the surgeons, knowledge of the patient's views is relevant in the wish for CRS. Nevertheless, it has hardly been investigated for patients postoperatively to complete resection of oral cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, questionnaires with 147 variables were completed during control appointments. Thirty-eight departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery took part, and 1652 German patients at least 6 months after complete cancer resection answered the questions. Additionally, a physician's questionnaire (N = 1489) was available. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS vers. 22. The patient's assessment of their appearance and scarring are the most important criteria resulting in wishes for CRS. Furthermore, functional limitations such as eating/swallowing, pain of the facial muscles, numb regions in the operating field, dealing with the social environment, return to work, tumour size and location, removal and reconstruction are closely related. The wish for CRS depends on diverse functional psychosocial and psychological parameters. Hence, it has to be issued during conversation to improve rehabilitation. A decision on the medical treatment can be of greater satisfaction if the surgeon knows the patients' needs and is able to compare them with the

  16. Selected parameters of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis prior to and after surgical treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Jadwiga; Korabiowska, Monika; Hönig, Johannes F; Grohmann, Ulrike; Undas, Anetta; Bartkowski, Stanislaw B; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Selected parameters of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis were evaluated in 20 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (stages T2/4 N0/3 M0). The control group consisted of 10 healthy age-matched men. The clotting time, calcium plasma clotting time, prothrombin time index and fibrinogen levels in the patients were similar to those observed in the controls. Increased fibrin degradation products (FDP) to 480 and 80 microg/min were found in patients before and after surgical treatment, respectively. We conclude that, in patients treated surgically because of carcinoma of the oral cavity, there might be increased activity of the fibrinolytic system both prior to and after operation.

  17. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus genome and latent infection gene expression in normal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; de Rivera, Michelle Wendoline Garcia-Niño; Hoshino, Miyako; Sakashita, Hideaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Inoue, Harumi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nozaki, Tadashige; González-López, Blanca Silvia; Ide, Fumio; Kusama, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    A relationship between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cancer of lymphoid and epithelial tissues such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma, and oral cancer has been reported. EBV is transmitted orally and infects B cells and epithelial cells. However, it has remained uncertain whether EBV plays a role in carcinogenesis of oral mucosal tissue. In the present study, we detected the EBV genome and latent EBV gene expression in normal mucosal epithelia, epithelial dysplasia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to clarify whether EBV is involved in carcinogenesis of the oral cavity. We examined 333 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples (morphologically normal oral mucosa 30 samples, gingivitis 32, tonsillitis 17, oral epithelial dysplasia 83, OSCC 150, and NPC 21). EBV latent infection genes (EBNA-2, LMP-1) were detected not only in OSCC (50.2 %, 10.7 %) but also in severe epithelial dysplasia (66.7 %, 44.4 %), mild to moderate epithelial dysplasia (43.1 %, 18.5 %), gingivitis (78.1 %, 21.9 %), and normal mucosa (83.3 %, 23.3 %). Furthermore, the intensity of EBV latent infection gene expression (EBER, LMP-1) was significantly higher in severe epithelial dysplasia (94.4 %, 72.2 %) than in OSCC (34.7 %, 38.7 %). These results suggest that EBV latent infection genes and their increased expression in severe epithelial dysplasia might play an important role in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity.

  18. Oral Verrucous Carcinoma Mimicking a Chronic Candidiasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natália Galvão; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma has a special propensity to mimic benign lesions of the oral cavity. A case of the oral verrucous carcinoma in maxillary alveolar ridge, extending to buccal vestibule, cheek, and labial mucosa, which was diagnosed and initially treated as chronic candidiasis, is presented. Clinical, histopathological, and therapeutic considerations related to diagnosis of the verrucous carcinoma in the oral cavity are discussed. PMID:22720181

  19. Deletion mapping on the short arm of chromosome 3 in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Thakker, N.S.; Wu, C.L.; Read, A.P.

    1994-09-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) indicative of presence of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p is commonly observed in carcinomas of various tissues. We have examined LOH on chromosome 3p in 27 oral squamous cell carcinomas using 15 highly informative microsatellite polymorphisms and constructed a deletion map of chromosome 3p. Overall, LOH at one or more loci was observed in 14 tumours ({approximately}52%). A majority of these tumors ({approximately}93%) show loss in more than one area. Three distinct regions were identified. 3p13 - 3p21.1, 3p21.2 - 3p23 and 3p25. These data suggest a role for at least three tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p in oral squamous carcinomas. The regions of deletions overlap with those described for carcinomas of other tissues and parallel those observed in lung carcinomas. This may reflect the common etiology of the two cancers.

  20. Epithelial dysplasia in oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-09-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering.

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity often overexpresses p16 but is rarely driven by human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Zafereo, Mark E.; Xu, Li; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Viamonte, Carlo A.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a causal and prognostic factor for oropharyngeal cancer, but its role in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) is unclear. We sought to clarify HPV's role in SCCOC. Materials and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed SCCOC (N=460) were prospectively recruited, treated, and followed at one institution. p16/HPV status was determined by p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) (N=210), PCR-based HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA testing (N=403), and/or HPV in situ hybridization (ISH) (N=178). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests were used to compare survival by p16/HPV status. Results p16 expression was detected in 30% of tumors (62/210) and HPV 16/18 E6/7 DNA in 28% (114/403), although correlation between these two assays was poor (r=−0.01). Patients with p16-positive tumors were more likely to be younger and have primary tumors of the oral tongue. Only 4% of tumors (7/171) were positive for HPV by ISH. Comparisons of patients with p16-positive and p16-negative tumors, patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by PCR, and patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors by ISH showed no significant differences in disease-specific or disease-free survival by p16/HPV status. When we applied a more stringent definition of HPV positivity based on a combination of assay results, only 10 of 166 tumors were HPV positive, and there were no significant differences in demographic, exposure, clinical, or survival characteristics between these patients and the 156 HPV-negative patients. Conclusions Very few patients with SCCOC have HPV-driven tumors. SCCOC that overexpresses p16 may be a unique subset deserving of further study. PMID:27086486

  2. An oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma quantitative histomorphometric-based image classifier of nuclear morphology can risk stratify patients for disease-specific survival.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Lewis, James S; Dupont, William D; Plummer, W Dale; Janowczyk, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-08-04

    Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of head and neck carcinoma. Its incidence is increasing worldwide, and it is associated with major morbidity and mortality. It is often unclear which patients have aggressive, treatment refractory tumors vs those whose tumors will be more responsive to treatment. Better identification of patients with high- vs low-risk cancers could help provide more tailored treatment approaches and could improve survival rates while decreasing treatment-related morbidity. This study investigates computer-extracted image features of nuclear shape and texture on digitized images of H&E-stained tissue sections for risk stratification of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients compared with standard clinical and pathologic parameters. With a tissue microarray cohort of 115 retrospectively identified oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients, 50 were randomly chosen as the modeling set, and the remaining 65 constituted the test set. Following nuclear segmentation and feature extraction, the Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to identify the five most prognostic quantitative histomorphometric features from the modeling set. These top ranked features were then combined via a machine learning classifier to construct the oral cavity histomorphometric-based image classifier (OHbIC). The classifier was then validated for its ability to risk stratify patients for disease-specific outcomes on the test set. On the test set, the classifier yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.72 in distinguishing disease-specific outcomes. In univariate survival analysis, high-risk patients predicted by the classifier had significantly poorer disease-specific survival (P=0.0335). In multivariate analysis controlling for T/N-stage, resection margins, and smoking status, positive classifier results were independently predictive of poorer disease-specific survival: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval)=11.023 (2

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Patterns of Failure and Predictors of Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Kozak, Margaret M.; Maxim, Peter G.; Murphy, James D.; Hsu, Annie; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC). We report clinical outcomes and failure patterns for these patients. Methods and Materials: Between October 2002 and June 2009, 37 patients with newly diagnosed SCC of the OC underwent postoperative (30) or definitive (7) IMRT. Twenty-five patients (66%) received systemic therapy. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 10-87 months). The median interval from surgery to RT was 5.9 weeks (range, 2.1-10.7 weeks). Results: Thirteen patients experienced local-regional failure at a median of 8.1 months (range, 2.4-31.9 months), and 2 additional patients experienced local recurrence between surgery and RT. Seven local failures occurred in-field (one with simultaneous nodal and distant disease) and two at the margin. Four regional failures occurred, two in-field and two out-of-field, one with synchronous metastases. Six patients experienced distant failure. The 3-year actuarial estimates of local control, local-regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival were 67%, 53%, 81%, and 60% among postoperative patients, respectively, and 60%, 60%, 71%, and 57% among definitive patients. Four patients developed Grade {>=}2 chronic toxicity. Increased surgery to RT interval predicted for decreased LRC (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Local-regional control for SCC of the OC treated with IMRT with or without surgery remains unsatisfactory. Definitive and postoperative IMRT have favorable toxicity profiles. A surgery-to-RT interval of <6 weeks improves local-regional control. The predominant failure pattern was local, suggesting that both improvements in target delineation and radiosensitization and/or dose escalation are needed.

  4. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan-Chun; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Li-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-09-01

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems.

  5. Oral cavity eumycetoma.

    PubMed

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Stuani, Maria Luiza de Toledo; Stuani, Luís Antonio Sasso

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal) or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  6. Metastatic Tumours to the Oral Cavity: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Astreidis, Ioannis T.; Kontos, Konstantinos I.; Lazaridou, Maria N.; Bourlidou, Eleni T.; Gerasimidou, Domniki K.; Vladika, Natalia P.; Mangoudi, Doxa L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Metastatic tumours to the oral cavity from distant organs are uncommon and represent approximately 1 - 3% of all oral malignancies. Such metastases can occur to the bone or to the oral soft tissues. Almost any malignancy from any site is capable of metastasis to the oral cavity and a wide variety of tumours have been reported to spread to the mouth. Methods Careful examination of the oral cavity and a high degree of clinical suspicion as well as a multidisciplinary approach are suggested. Results In this article we present three patients, a female and two males with metastatic tumours to the oral cavity, who were referred to our Department. The primary tumours were invasive lobular breast carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma respectively. Conclusions Metastases to the oral cavity are quite uncommon among population. They usually present with symptoms similar to odontogenic infections and benign tumours, causing a delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904182

  7. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development.

  8. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development. PMID:25654476

  9. The effects of tumor size, degree of differentiation, and depth of invasion on the risk of neck node metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Haksever, Mehmet; Inançlı, Hasan Mete; Tunçel, Umit; Kürkçüoğlu, Sefik Sinan; Uyar, Melek; Genç, Omer; Irkkan, Ciğdem

    2012-03-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor in patients with head and neck carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the effects of three different variables-tumor size, degree of differentiation, and depth of invasion-on the risk of neck node metastasis in 50 adults who had been treated with surgery for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Primary tumor depth and other pathologic features were determined by reviewing the pathology specimens. Preoperatively, 36 of the 50 patients were clinically N0; however, occult lymph node metastasis was found in 13 of these patients (36.1%). The prevalence of neck node metastasis in patients with T1/T2 and T3/T4 category tumors was 51.5 and 58.8%, respectively. The associations between the prevalence of neck node metastasis and both the degree of differentiation and the depth of invasion were statistically significant, but there was no significant association between neck node metastasis and tumor size. We conclude that the prevalence of neck lymph node metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity increases as the tumor depth increases and as the degree of tumor differentiation decreases from well to poor, as has been shown in previous studies. It is interesting that tumor size, which is the most important component of the TNM system, was not significantly associated with neck node involvement.

  10. The Number of Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes and Pathological Tumor Depth Predicts Prognosis in Patients With Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The objective of this retrospective study was twofold: (1) to investigate prognostic factors for clinical outcomes in patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and (2) to identify specific prognostic subgroups that may help to guide treatment decisions. Methods and Materials: We examined 102 patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were followed for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of local control, neck control, distant metastasis, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival served as main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates were as follows: local control (79%), neck control (64%), distant metastases (27%), disease-free survival (48%), disease-specific survival (52%), and overall survival (42%). Multivariable analysis showed that the number of pathologically positive nodes ({>=}4 vs. {<=}3) was a significant predictor of neck control, distant metastasis, and disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates. In addition, the presence of tumor depth of {>=}11 mm (vs. <11 mm) was a significant predictor of distant metastasis, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates. The combination of the two predictors (26.5%, 27/102) was independently associated with poorer neck control (p = 0.0319), distant metastasis (p < 0.0001), and disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p < 0.0001) rates. Conclusions: In patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, the presence of at least 4 pathologically positive lymph nodes and of a pathological tumor depth {>=}11 mm identifies a subset of subjects with poor clinical outcomes. Patients carrying both risk factors are suitable candidates for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  11. Comparison of thallium-201 SPET and CT/MRI in the detection of residual/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Kang; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Huang, Wen-Sheng

    2004-04-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and conventional imaging, comprising computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in the detection of residual/recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Thirty-two patients with clinically suspected recurrent SCC of the oral cavity were recruited. All patients underwent (201)Tl SPET and CT or MRI within 2 weeks. The final diagnoses were based on the histology of the biopsy specimen. (201)Tl SPET and CT/MRI both accurately detected 17 of 18 residual/recurrent tumours. CT/MRI yielded eight false-positive studies, whereas (201)Tl SPET successfully excluded all tumours. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of (201)Tl SPET for the detection of recurrent oral SCC were 94%, 100%, 100%, 93% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of CT/MRI for the detection of recurrent oral SCC were 94%, 43%, 68%, 86% and 72%, respectively. Thallium-201 SPET is more accurate than conventional imaging (CT or MRI) in differentiating residual/recurrent oral SCC from post-therapy changes.

  12. [The presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in microinvasive in situ spinocellular carcinoma of the oral cavity. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Mignogna, M D; Duraccio, R; Carbone, R; Mignogna, R E; Lo Muzio, L

    1997-06-01

    The authors examined 15 cases of in situ and early oral SCC to detect the presence of HPV genoma. They proceeded to in situ hybridization on paraffined specimens utilizing DNA-biotinylated fragments in commercial kit (Vyra Type in situ, Life Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD, USA). HPV-DNA was detected in 9 cases: 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35 serotypes were detected. The distribution of viral serotypes by sites showed a prevalence of 16/18 serotype in tongue and floor of the mouth carcinoma, a prevalence of 6/11 serotype in gingiva, hard palate and buccal mucosa carcinoma, and 31/33/35 in commissura. The results suggest an important role of HPV in oral carcinogenesis, but further investigations are necessary to confirm these data on larger groups of patients to obtain a higher significance of the results.

  13. Clinicopathological significance of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin proteins in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Shanshan; Zhou, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Wenyu; Zhang, Lun

    2017-01-01

    Background Zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB-1), a member of the ZFH family, plays a key role in epithelial–mesenchymal transition during tumor progression in various cancers. However, little information is available on ZEB-1 expression in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods The expression levels of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 120 patients with OSCC treated by curative operation, and then the correlations between ZEB-1 and E-cadherin expression and clinical factors were evaluated, including patient prognosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays were performed to assess mRNA levels of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin in 20 matched OSCC specimens. Results Patients were followed up for a median period of 66 months (range 8−116 months), and 5-year overall survival was 68.3%. Positive ZEB-1 and E-cadherin immunostaining reactivity was detected in 64 (53.3%) and 53 (44.2%) patients, respectively. There was a negative correlation between ZEB-1 expression and E-cadherin expression. In addition, overexpression of ZEB-1 was significantly associated with recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and pathologic grading of patients, loss of E-cadherin was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and pathologic grading of patients. Univariate analysis showed that increased ZEB-1 expression, loss of E-cadherin expression, lymph node metastasis, recurrence, and pathology grade were prognostic factors. In multivariate analysis, increased ZEB-1 expression and recurrence remained independent prognostic factors. In particular, patients with both ZEB-1 positivity and loss of E-cadherin expression had a poorer prognosis. qRT-PCR showed that ZEB-1 mRNA expression was higher in OSCC compared to the adjacent nontumorous tissues, while E-cadherin mRNA expression was lower in tumor tissues. Conclusion This study shows that overexpression of ZEB-1 and loss of E-cadherin expression are significantly

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx in patients aged 18-45 years: A case-control study to evaluate the risk factors with emphasis on stress, diet, oral hygiene, and family history.

    PubMed

    Dholam, K P; Chouksey, G C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx is reported in young adults. However, there is a paucity regarding etiology and risk factors. To evaluate the exposure potential carcinogenic factors among a sample aged 45 years and younger, diagnosed with SCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Eighty-five case samples aged 18-45 years, diagnosed with SCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx were compared with 85 controls who had never had cancer, matched for age and sex. This study was conducted by questionnaire-based interviews. Questionnaire contained items about exposure to the following risk factors: Caries prevalence, oral hygiene status, dental trauma, dental visit, stress, family history of cancer, environmental exposure to potential carcinogens, diet, body mass index (BMI), habits such as smoking, tobacco chewing, betel quid/pan, or supari. Odds ratios (ORs) of oral and pharyngeal cancer and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Elevated OR was seen in young adults who had poor oral hygiene, stress, dental trauma, low BMI, family history of cancer, exposure to environmental carcinogens, and habit of placement of quid for 11-20 years. An increased risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer was seen in cases who had poor oral hygiene, stress, dental trauma, low BMI, family history of cancer, exposure to environmental carcinogens, and habit of placement of quid.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Ana Lucia Noronha; Correr, Wagner Rafael; Azevedo, Luciane Hiramatsu; Kern, Vivian Galletta; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    Oral cancer is a public health problem with relevant incidence in the world population. The affected patient usually presents advanced stage disease and the consequence of this delay is a reduction in survival rates. Given this, it is essential to detect oral cancer at early stages. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that can improve cancer detection in real time. It is a fast and accurate technique, relatively simple, which evaluates the biochemical composition and structure using the tissue fluorescence spectrum as interrogation data. Several studies have positive data regarding the tools for differentiating between normal mucosa and cancer, but the difference between cancer and potentially malignant disorders is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fluorescence spectroscopy in the discrimination of normal oral mucosa, oral cancer, and potentially malignant disorders. The fluorescence spectroscopy was evaluated in 115 individuals, of whom 55 patients presented oral squamous cell carcinoma, 30 volunteers showing normal oral mucosa, and 30 patients having potentially malignant disorders. The spectra were classified and compared to histopathology to evaluate the efficiency in diagnostic discrimination employing fluorescence. In order to classify the spectra, a decision tree algorithm (C4.5) was applied. Despite of the high variance observed in spectral data, the specificity and sensitivity obtained were 93.8% and 88.5%, respectively at 406 nm excitation. These results point to the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy as an important tool for oral cancer diagnosis and potentially malignant disorders.

  16. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control.

  17. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromatic analysis of autofluorescence emitted from squamous cell carcinomas arising in the oral cavity: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Onizawa, K; Yoshida, H; Saginoya, H

    2000-02-01

    Chromatic analysis was carried out to characterize the color quality of autofluorescence emitted from oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and to objectively compare autofluorescence among various tissues. The following specimens were studied: 33 SCC, 3 epithelial dysplasias, 39 benign lesions, 31 dorsa of the tongue and 18 dental plaques. Autofluorescence depicted on fluorescence photographs was measured with a chroma meter. Chromatic values of autofluorescence differed significantly between SCC and non-cancerous tissues and between different stages of SCC. Autofluorescence of SCC tended to shift from orange to reddish orange with advancement of stage. These results suggest that autofluorescence of oral SCC chromatically differs from that of other tissues and depends on the stage of cancer.

  19. Cervical level IIb metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kou, Yurong; Zhao, Tengfei; Huang, Shaohui; Liu, Jie; Duan, Weiyi; Wang, Yunjing; Wang, Zechen; Li, Delong; Ning, Chunliu; Sun, Changfu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether level IIb dissection should be performed or avoided in the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma by meta-analysis. Articles that were published before June 2017 were searched electronically in four databases (Web of Science, PubMed, Ovid and China National Knowledge Infrastructure) without any date or language restrictions by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and full-text papers which investigated the cervical metastases to level IIb from primary head and neck cancers and were deemed potentially relevant were screened. Data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3. Four hundred and fifty-five abstracts and 129 full-text papers were screened, and 22 studies were included in the analysis. Among the 2001 patients included, 112 patients had level IIb metastases, the pooled frequency of which was 6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.0-7.0). Among the 400 patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma from 12 studies, 37 patients had level IIb metastases, the pooled incidence of which was 7% (95% CI: 5.0-10.0). Metastases to level IIb always went together with level IIa, and only three patients were found to have isolated level IIb metastases without involving the other levels. Due to the low frequency of level IIb nodal metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients and rare occurrence of isolated level IIb, level IIb dissection could be avoided when the primary lesions were in early stages (T1 and T2), with the exception of tongue cancer. It is recommended to dissect level IIb tongue cancers without considering the stages of primary lesions and the lymph nodes status. It is also suggested that level IIb dissection should be performed in patients preoperatively or intraoperatively found with multilevel neck metastasis, especially level IIa metastasis.

  20. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is associated with epithelial dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Chaisuparat, Risa; Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Yodsanga, Somchai

    2013-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6), a downstream effector of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (mTOR), is activated in many cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the role of RPS6 in the progression of potentially malignant disorders (or premalignant lesions) to OSCC is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of RPS6 in epithelial dysplasia and OSCC to determine the association of RPS6 in tumor progression. In our study, an immunohistochemical analysis of RPS6 was performed on tissue microarrays containing 30 control samples, 15 epithelial dysplasia cases, and 53 OSCC cases. Correlations between the clinicopathologic features of OSCC and RPS6 expression were analyzed using the Chi-square test. We found RPS6 phosphorylation (p-RPS6) in 15/30 (50 %) control normal oral mucosa samples, 15/15 (100 %) epithelial dysplasia cases, and 47/53 (88.68 %) OSCC cases. The frequency of p-RPS6 in epithelial dysplasia or OSCC showed a statistically significant difference compared to control (P < 0.001). However, there were no significant correlations between p-RPS6 and the clinicopathologic features of OSCC. Our findings suggest that RPS6 activation is associated with the early events of tumor progression, suggesting p-RPS6 as a potential marker for early detection of oral cancer.

  1. Human Papillomavirus and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Correlation With Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Park, Mina; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Koh, Yoon Woo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Jinna

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parameters on the basis of the status of human papillomavirus (HPV) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and oropharynx by use of histogram analysis. A total of 22 consecutive patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC underwent DCE-MRI before receiving treatment. DCE parameter maps of the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the flux rate constant (kep), and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) were obtained. The histogram parameters were calculated using the entire enhancing tumor volume and were compared between the patient subgroups on the basis of HPV and EGFR biomarker statuses. The cumulative histogram parameters of K(trans) and kep showed lower values in the HPV-negative and EFGR-overexpression group than in the HPV-positive EGFR-negative group. These differences were statistically significant for the mean (p = 0.009), 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile values of K(trans) and for the 25th percentile value of kep when correlated with HPV status in addition to the mean K(trans) value (p = 0.047) and kep value (p = 0.004) when correlated with EGFR status. No statistically significant difference in ve was found on the basis of HPV and EGFR status. DCE-MRI is useful for the assessment of the tumor microenvironment associated with HPV and EGFR biomarkers before treatment of patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal SCC.

  2. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  3. Analysis of the parameters relating to failures above the clavicles in patients treated by postoperative irradiation for squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity or oropharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx were treated from January 1955 through August 1976 with surgical excision followed by irradiation. Twelve patients had T/sub 2/ lesions and 90 had T/sub 3/ or T/sub 4/ lesions. Failures above the clavicles were associated with disease present at the margins of resection, location of the recurrence close to the periphery, or outside of the irradiated portals. Failures in the neck essentially were a result of no elective irradiation. In patients with disease present at the margins of resection, there is a risk both of gross residual disease and hypoxic microscopic disease left behind; 4500 to 5000 rad is not adequate for a significant control rate. In situations where there is definite disease at the margin of resection, 6500 rad, or in specific situations, 7000 rad, should be given through reduced fields.

  4. The importance of immunohistochemical expression of EGFr in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smid, Ernst J.; Stoter, T. Rianne; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leemans, C. Rene; Slotman, Ben J.; Langendijk, Johannes A. . E-mail: j.a.langendijk@rt.umcg.nl

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of epidermal growth factor (EGFr) expression in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) treated with curative surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study included 165 OCSCC patients. The expression of EGFr was assessed on paraffin-embedded tissue of the primary tumor by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody directed against EGFr. Intensity of the EGFr expression was scored by two authors blinded for the clinical outcome. Results: In the univariate analysis, locoregional control at 3 years (LRC) in the EGFr-negative cases was 69% compared with 77% in the EGFr-positive cases (p 0.22). In the multivariate analysis for local control, a significant interaction was found between EGFr and overall treatment time of radiation (OTT). After stratification for EGFr expression, the OTT was of no importance in the EGFr-negative cases, whereas a significant difference in LRC was found in the EGFr-positive cases, in which the LRC after 3 years was 69% and 94% in case of an OTT of 0-42 days and >42 days, respectively (p = 0.009; hazard ratio = 3.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-8.96). No significant association was found between EGFr expression and overall survival. Conclusions: In the present study, no association was found between EGFr expression and outcome regarding locoregional control and overall survival. However, the results of the present study suggest that patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity with high EGFr expression benefit more from a reduction of the overall treatment time of postoperative radiation than those with low EGFr expression.

  5. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity in Nonsmoking Women: A New and Unusual Complication of Chemotherapy for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dominic W.; Hirsch, David; Delacure, Mark; Downey, Andrea; Kerr, Alexander R.; Bannan, Michael; Andreopoulou, Eleni; Safra, Tamar; Muggia, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe occurrences of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients who had received long-term pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods. In our cohort of patients on maintenance PLD for ovarian and related mullerian epithelial malignancies, we encountered two patients with invasive SCC of the oral cavity (one of them multifocal) and one with high-grade squamous dysplasia. Review of patients at our institution receiving PLD for recurrent ovarian cancer identified three additional patients. The duration of treatment, cumulative PLD dose, human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity, BRCA status, stage at diagnosis, outcome, and other characteristics are reviewed. Results. All five cases were nonsmokers with no known risk factors for HPV and four were negative for p16 expression. Four of the patients had known BRCA mutations whereas one tested negative. Cumulative doses of PLD were >1,600 mg/m2 given over 30–132 months. Three had SCCs staged as T1N0 oral tongue, alveolar ridge (gingival), and multifocal oral mucosa; one had a T2N0 oral tongue; and one had dysplasia. After excision, two were given radiation but recurred shortly thereafter; the others remain well and have had no further exposure to cytotoxic drugs, including PLD. Conclusion. Awareness of this possible long-term complication during PLD treatment should enhance the likelihood of early detection of oral lesions in these patients. Decisions to continue maintenance PLD after complete response of the original cancer should perhaps consider the benefits of delaying ovarian cancer recurrence versus the possible risk for a secondary cancer. PMID:22622148

  6. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes the lips, the inside ... oropharynx. The oropharynx is the part of the throat just behind the mouth. It begins where the ...

  7. DAP1 high expression increases risk of lymph node metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Santos, M; Maia, L L; Silva, C V M; Peterle, G T; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-09-08

    Death-associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a member of the DAP family. Its expression is associated with cell growth and normal death of the neoplastic cells, regulated by the mammalian target of the rapamycin protein. Activated DAP1 negatively regulates autophagy, which has been associated with the development and progression of several diseases, such as cancer, and with prognosis and survival of diverse tumor types. Therefore, in this study we analyzed DAP1 expression in 54 oral squamous cell carcinoma tumor samples and in 20 non-tumoral margins by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that DAP1 is more frequently expressed in tumor tissues compared with marginal non-tumoral cells. Additionally, high DAP1 expression is associated with a 4-fold increase in the risk of lymph node metastases. Our results suggest that the DAP1 protein can be used as a potential marker of lymph node metastases predisposition, helping define the best therapy for each patient to minimize risk of developing metastases.

  8. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-02-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.

  9. The added value of a portable gamma camera for intraoperative detection of sentinel lymph node in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, M; Paredes, P; Sieira, R; Vidal-Sicart, S; Marti, C; Pons, F

    2014-01-01

    The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity is still subject to debate although some studies have reported its feasibility. The main reason for this debate is probably due to the high false-negative rate for floor-of-mouth tumors per se. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with a T1N0 floor-of-mouth squamous cell carcinoma who underwent the sentinel lymph node procedure. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging were performed for lymphatic mapping with a conventional gamma camera. Sentinel lymph nodes were identified at right Ib, left IIa and Ia levels. However, these sentinel lymph nodes were difficult to detect intraoperatively with a gamma probe owing to the activity originating from the injection site. The use of a portable gamma camera made it possible to localize and excise all the sentinel lymph nodes. This case demonstrates the usefulness of this tool to improve sentinel lymph node detecting in floor-of-mouth tumors, especially those close to the injection area.

  10. Overexpression of Rap-1A indicates a poor prognosis for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and promotes tumor cell invasion via Aurora-A modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Han; Chuang, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Fang, Fu-Min; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Su, Li-Jen; Shiu, Li-Yen; Leu, Steve; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2013-02-01

    The functions of Rap-1A in oral carcinogenesis are largely unexplored. In this study, we examined the expression of Rap-1A at different malignant stages of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC). Semiquantitative RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blotting were used to evaluate Rap-1A mRNA and protein expressions, respectively, in paired OCSCC patient specimens. To determine the possible correlation between Rap-1A expression and various clinical characteristics, 256 samples from patients with OCSCC were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Strong Rap-1A expression was a significant prognostic marker and predictor of aggressive OCSCC. The overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were significantly correlated with strong expression of Rap-1A (P < 0.001). Functionally, overexpressed Rap-1A could promote oral cancer cell migration and invasion by Transwell chambers and wound healing assay. Conversely, the suppression of Rap-1A expression using Rap-1A-mediated siRNA was sufficient to decrease cell motility. Furthermore, our data also illustrated that Aurora-A could not only induce mRNA and protein expressions of Rap-1A for enhancing cancer cell motility but also co-localize and form a complex with Rap-1A in the oral cancer cell line. Finally, immunohistochemical staining, indirect immunofluorescence, and Western blotting analysis of human aggressive OCSCC specimens revealed a significantly positive correlation between Rap-1A and Aurora-A expression. Taken together, our results suggest that the Aurora-A/Rap-1A pathway is associated with survival, tumor progression, and metastasis of OCSCC patients. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-22

    Oral Cavity Neoplasm; Oropharyngeal Neoplasm; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  12. Outcome Prediction After Surgery and Chemoradiation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx: Use of Baseline Perfusion CT Microcirculatory Parameters vs. Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Anand, Sharma K.; Glavina, Gordana; Day, Terry; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether pretreatment perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may predict outcome in chemoradiated patients with oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with SCCA were examined before treatment. The primary site was oral cavity in 6, oropharynx in 7, and hypopharynx in 8 patients; there were 11 T2, 6 T3, and 4 T4 tumors. PCT was performed at the level of largest tumor diameter based on standard neck CT. The data were processed to obtain blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product (PS). Regions of interest were free-hand positioned on the lesions to obtain PCT measurements. Tumor volume was also calculated. Follow-up was performed with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and endoscopy. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for comparison between the subgroups. A regression model was constructed to predict recurrence based on the following predictors: age, gender, tumor (T) and nodal (N) stage, tumor volume, and PCT parameters. Results: BF{sub mean}, BF{sub max}, BV{sub mean}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, PS{sub mean}, and PS{sub max} were significantly different between patients with and without tumor recurrence (0.0001, p < 0.04). T stage, tumor volume, N stage, BF{sub max}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, and radiation dose (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for recurrence. Cox proportional hazards model for tumor recurrence revealed significantly increased risk with high tumor volume (p = 0.00001, relative risk [RR] 7.4), low PS{sub mean} (p = 0.0001, RR 14.3), and low BF{sub max} (p = 0.002, RR 5.9). Conclusions: Our data suggest that PCT parameters have a prognostic role in patients with SCCA.

  13. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Oral cavity cancer: epidemiology and early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Y; Yaffi, V; Abu-Elnaaj, I

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity (Oral cancer) is the 11th most common malignancy in the world, despite the general global trend of a slight decrease in the incidence of oral cancer, tongue cancer incidence is increasing. About 90% of tumors are subtyped to oral Squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The incidence and mortality of this tumor shows variability according to the geographic location in which it is diagnosed, however in the last decade an increase was seen in the percentage of young patients, especially patients with tongue cancer. The overall prognosis of this cancer is roughly 55-65%, this is probably due to late diagnosis. Early diagnosis of oral cancer is the most important factor affecting the overall survival and prognosis, thus several diagnosis methods have been developed in the past few years. Still, the prognosis did not improve as expected. Oral cancer biomarkers in saliva is as easy body fluid, for noninvasive detection. Several researches identified several possible biomarkers, but none was specific. In our review, the incidence and mortality of oral tumors pose a main health problem in many aspects all around the world, as well as differences in behavior of these tumors. We witnessed more cases of anterior tongue cancers affecting mainly the young age patient group, a two decades younger than the normal risk group of oral cancer. Several countries in Europe showed a significant increase of oral cancer prevalence, such as Germany, especially in men. Similar behavior was also reported in the United States, which showed a change in the risk groups. Studies have reported an alarming lack of awareness about oral cancer, its symptoms and early diagnosis. These gaps in knowledge need to be addressed by further public education, possibly targeted at high-risk groups. With the knowledge of possible, specific, early biomarkers, primary detection could improve the prognosis tremendously. Research on the salivary biomarkers of the disease would help to develop

  15. Risk Factors Associated with Disease Recurrence in Patients with Stage III/IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Treated with Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noble, Anisha R; Greskovich, John F; Han, Jaehong; Reddy, Chandana A; Nwizu, Tobenna I; Khan, Mumtaz F; Scharpf, Joseph; Adelstein, David J; Burkey, Brian B; Koyfman, Shlomo A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify variables associated with high risk of failure in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCC-OC). This retrospective study included 191 patients with stage III-IVb SCC-OC treated with post-operative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) between 1995 and 2013. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed; variables associated with inferior DFS were identified. Seventy-five patients (39%) recurred. DFS and five-year OS were 52% and 54%, respectively. Poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.03), recurrent tumors (p=0.02) and high nodal ratio (p=0.02) were associated with an increased risk of recurrence. CRT was associated with improved DFS in patients with positive margins and/or extracapsular extension (p=0.021). Tumors that are recurrent, high grade, or have high nodal ratio are at risk of recurrence. Presence of these disease features should be taken into consideration for better risk stratification. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. p16 expression independent of human papillomavirus is associated with lower stage and longer disease-free survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Virk, Sohaib A; Lum, Trina; Gao, Kan; Clark, Jonathan R; Gupta, Ruta

    2016-08-01

    There is limited information regarding the incidence of p16 expression, its association with human papillomavirus (HPV) and prognosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The role of p16 in OSCC is evaluated in 215 cases using tissue microarrays (TMAs). p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridisation were performed on TMAs following histopathology review of 215 patients with OSCC in the Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute database. Thirty-seven (17.2%) cases showed p16 expression without association with HPV. p16 expression significantly decreased with increasing pT category (p=0.002). p16 expression was associated with longer disease-specific survival on univariable analysis (p=0.044) but not on multivariable analysis adjusting for depth of invasion. Amongst patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy, patients with p16 expression had significantly longer disease-free and overall survival. p16 expression was seen in early stage OSCCs and was associated with better survival following surgery and radiotherapy. While not an independent predictor of survival, p16 may mediate its effects by contributing to reduced proliferative capacity, leading to smaller tumour size and lower invasive potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Missense mutations in the TP53 DNA-binding domain predict outcomes in patients with advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    TP53 mutations have been linked to reduced survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the impact of different types of TP53 mutations remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carriage of missense mutations in the TP53 DNA binding domain (DBD missense mutations) is associated with decreased disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.002) in a cohort of 345 OSCC patients. In contrast, DSS of patients bearing all of the remaining TP53 mutations did not differ from that observed in wild-type TP53 patients (P=0.955). Our classification method for TP53 mutations was superior to previously reported approaches (disruptive, truncating, Evolutionary Action score, mutations in L2/L3/LSH) for distinguishing between low- and high-risk patients. When analyzed in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, TP53 DBD missense mutations were an independent prognostic factor for shorter DSS (P=0.014) alongside with advanced AJCC T- and N-classifications and the presence of extracapsular spread. A scoring system that included the four independent prognostic factors allowed a reliable patient stratification into distinct risk groups (high-risk patients, 16.2%). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TP53 DBD missense mutations combined with clinicopathological factors for improving the prognostic stratification of OSCC patients. PMID:27283772

  18. Missense mutations in the TP53 DNA-binding domain predict outcomes in patients with advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lapke, Nina; Lu, Yen-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-07-12

    TP53 mutations have been linked to reduced survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the impact of different types of TP53 mutations remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carriage of missense mutations in the TP53 DNA binding domain (DBD missense mutations) is associated with decreased disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.002) in a cohort of 345 OSCC patients. In contrast, DSS of patients bearing all of the remaining TP53 mutations did not differ from that observed in wild-type TP53 patients (P=0.955). Our classification method for TP53 mutations was superior to previously reported approaches (disruptive, truncating, Evolutionary Action score, mutations in L2/L3/LSH) for distinguishing between low- and high-risk patients. When analyzed in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, TP53 DBD missense mutations were an independent prognostic factor for shorter DSS (P=0.014) alongside with advanced AJCC T- and N-classifications and the presence of extracapsular spread. A scoring system that included the four independent prognostic factors allowed a reliable patient stratification into distinct risk groups (high-risk patients, 16.2%). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TP53 DBD missense mutations combined with clinicopathological factors for improving the prognostic stratification of OSCC patients.

  19. Oral Carcinoma Cuniculatum: A New Entity in the Clinicopathological Spectrum of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Alka; Mane, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum is principally recognized as a variant of carcinoma involving foot. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes Oral Carcinoma Cuniculatum (OCC) as a distinct and rare clinicopathological variant of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). OCC is confused clinically and histologically with Verrucous Carcinoma (VC) and is often misdiagnosed as either VC or OSCC. To best of our knowledge, till date, only 50 cases of this tumour have been reported in oral cavity (including the present case) and only limited number of cases have been reported from Indian subcontinent. Pathognomonic feature of OCC is proliferation of stratified squamous epithelium and its infiltration into underlying stroma forming a complex pattern of keratin cores and keratin filled crypts. These complex crypts give it a likeness of rabbit burrow hence, the name cuniculatum (cuniculatus=‘rabbit warren’). The report aims to present a case of OCC of mandibular gingiva, discuss its diagnostic features and highlight its differences from VC and OSCC. PMID:28274074

  20. miR182 activates the Ras–MEK–ERK pathway in human oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma by suppressing RASA1 and SPRED1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Wei; Li, Jichen; Wu, Liji; Song, Mei; Meng, Qinggang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The constitutive activation of the Ras–MEK–ERK signaling pathway in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been found to be tightly controlled at multiple levels under physiological conditions. RASA1 and SPRED1 are two important negative regulators of this pathway, but the exact regulating mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the potential regulating mechanisms involved in the Ras–MEK–ERK signaling pathway in OSCC. Materials and methods MicroRNA (miRNA) expression was detected by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of RASA1, SPRED1, and signaling proteins were detected by Western blot. Cell growth was determined using CCK-8 reagent, colony formation was stained by crystal violet, and cell invasion was tested using transwell chambers. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were then analyzed by flow cytometry. The binding of miR182 with RASA1 or SPRED1 was evaluated by luciferase reporter assays on a dual-luciferase reporter system. Results The expression of miR182 was found to be upregulated significantly in malignant oral carcinoma tissues compared with the adjacent nonmalignant tissues, and was inversely correlated with protein levels of RASA1 and SPRED1. Overexpression of miR182 in OSCC cell lines sustained Ras–MEK–ERK signaling-pathway activation, and promoted cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, colony formation, and invasion capacity, whereas miR182 downregulation alleviated these properties significantly in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR182 exerted its oncogenic role in OSCC by directly targeting and suppressing RASA1 and SPRED1. Conclusion Our results bring new insights into the important role of miR182 in the activation of the Ras–MEK–ERK signaling pathway, and suggest that miR182 may be used as a potential target for treatment of OSCC, prompting further investigation into miRNA antisense oligonucleotides for cancer therapy. PMID:28223824

  1. [Soft tissue pathologies of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Margotta, V; Capogreco, M

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent form of neoplasia in the oral cavity is the squamous cell carcinoma (about 90% of cases) representing the 3-5% of all malignant tumors with about 56% of mortality rate, at 5 years from the diagnosis. In general, the neoplastic disease is now unanimly considered as a multifactorial and multiphasic pathology. Multiphasic since the carcinogenic process consists in the cellular capacity to acquire oncological potentialities through several stages such as: moltiplication (a), transmission (b) of malignity caracteristics to progenic cells, invasivity (c), capacity to give metastasis (d) and also resistance to chemiotherapy. Multifactorial since in the onset of the disease intrinsic and extrinsic factors are certainly involved. In the carcinogenic process of CCS a high percentage has been noticed of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm (P) of cromosoms 3 and 9, which contains the tumor-suppressor genes p53 and DDC (Deleted in colon rectal cancer). In the onset of VADS carcinoma and in particular of oral CCS, it has also been formulated the hypothesis of an intrinsic genetic factor (Llewellyn et al., 2001) between patients, also young, who present the neoplasia even trough they have never been exposed to extrinsic risk factors such as smoke and alcohol. Since part of patients with oral CCS do not always refer a common risk factors history as possible extrinsic neoplasia causes, it has been formulated the hypothesis that some viral infections, for their oncogenic capacity, could be the main ethiological factors predisposing to this neoplasia. The HPV are responsible, either in the oral cavity or on the epidermis, for benign proliferations such as: Verruca Vulgaris, Condyloma Acuminatum, Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia, Squamous Cell Papillomas, but also lesions that are potentially or certainly malignant such as CCS and Verrucous Carcinoma. The molecular analysis performed show that proteins produced from E6 and E7 portions of viral genoma (HPV 16

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Progressive, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cyst Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

  3. Treatment Results of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Coexistence of Multiple Minor Risk Factors Results in Higher Recurrence Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). Materials and Methods: This study included 302 OSCC patients who were treated by radical surgery and PORT. Indications for PORT include Stage III or IV OSCC according to the 2002 criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer, the presence of perineural invasion or lymphatic invasion, the depth of tumor invasion, or a close surgical margin. Patients with major risk factors, such as multiple nodal metastases, a positive surgical margin, or extracapsular spreading, were excluded. The prescribed dose of PORT ranged from 59.4 to 66.6Gy (median, 63Gy). Results: The 3-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 73% and 70%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that differentiation, perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, bone invasion, location (hard palate and retromolar trigone), invasion depths {>=}10mm, and margin distances {<=}4mm were significant prognostic factors. The presence of multiple significant factors of univariate analysis correlated with disease recurrence. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 82%, 76%, and 45% for patients with no risk factors, one or two risk factors, and three or more risk factors, respectively. After multivariate analysis, the number of risk factors and lymphatic invasion were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: PORT may be an adequate adjuvant therapy for OSCC patients with one or two risk factors of recurrence. The presence of multiple risk factors and lymphatic invasion correlated with poor prognosis, and more aggressive treatment may need to be considered.

  4. Trends in Incidence and Age Distribution of Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, 1978–2007

    PubMed Central

    Nyi, M-P Nyi; Gibson, TN; Hanchard, B; Waugh, N; McNaughton, D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several countries have reported increasing incidence of oral cavity and oropharyngeal (OCOP) squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) over recent years, particularly among young men and primarily in tongue and tonsil subsites, attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This study examines trends in incidence and age distribution of OCOP SCC in Jamaica over a 30-year period. Methods: We extracted all cases of OCOP SCC archived in the Jamaica Cancer Registry files over the 30 year-period from 1978 to 2007 and grouped them according to anatomical site (International Classification of Diseases; ICD-9), age and gender. The data were used to calculate age-standardized rates (ASRs) and age-specific incidence rates (ASIRs). Results: There were 384 patients (age range 21 to 94 years; male to female ratio 2.6:1) with OCOP SCC; the majority (85.4%) was > 50 years. Age-standardized rates of all OCOP SCC combined were higher in males than in females and there was a decrease in both genders over the study period. Tongue and tonsil were the commonest subsites, and males showed decreasing ASR in both. Females showed decreasing ASR in tongue and fluctuation in tonsil SCCs. The highest ASIRs for tongue and tonsil SCC were consistently seen in patients older than 50 years of age. Conclusion: The incidence of OCOP SCC is decreasing and continues to predominate among older men. The decreasing trend in incidence of tongue and tonsil SCC is unlike that reported elsewhere. This may be due to differences in sexual practices, small size of this study, or a lag time in emergence of a new trend. PMID:25303245

  5. The protective effect of p16(INK4a) in oral cavity carcinomas: p16(Ink4A) dampens tumor invasion-integrated analysis of expression and kinomics pathways.

    PubMed

    Isayeva, Tatyana; Xu, Jie; Ragin, Camille; Dai, Qian; Cooper, Tiffiny; Carroll, William; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Wenig, Bruce; Rosenthal, Eben; Grizzle, William; Anderson, Joshua; Willey, Christopher D; Yang, Eddy S; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    A large body of evidence shows that p16(INK4a) overexpression predicts improved survival and increased radiosensitivity in HPV-mediated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.(OPSCC). Here we demonstrate that the presence of transcriptionally active HPV16 in oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas does not correlate with p16(INK4a) overexpression, enhanced local tumor immunity, or improved outcome. It is interesting that HPV-mediated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas can be categorized as having a 'nonaggressive' invasion phenotype, whereas aggressive invasion phenotypes are more common in HPV-negative squamous cell carcinomas. We have developed primary cancer cell lines from resections with known pattern of invasion as determined by our validated risk model. Given that cell lines derived from HPV-mediated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas are less invasive than their HPV-negative counterparts, we tested the hypothesis that viral oncoproteins E6, E7, and p16(INK4a) can affect tumor invasion. Here we demonstrate that p16(INK4a) overexpression in two cancer cell lines (UAB-3 and UAB-4), derived from oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas with the most aggressive invasive phenotype (worst pattern of invasion type 5 (WPOI-5)), dramatically decreases tumor invasiveness by altering expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes. Pathway analysis integrating changes in RNA expression and kinase activities reveals different potential p16(INK4a)-sensitive pathways. Overexpressing p16(INK4a) in UAB-3 increases EGFR activity and increases MMP1 and MMP3 expression, possibly through STAT3 activation. Overexpressing p16(INK4a) in UAB-4 decreases PDGFR gene expression and reduces MMP1 and MMP3, possibly through STAT3 inactivation. Alternatively, ZAP70/Syk might increase MUC1 phosphorylation, leading to the observed decreased MMP1 expression.

  6. Human papillomavirus 16 and 18 in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and sexual practices: A pilot study at a Tertiary Care Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, Sanjeev; Nandi, Sourabh; Marwah, Nisha; Mehta, Promod; Tripathi, Mayank; Netrapal; Gogna, Shekhar; Karwasra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy in India and tobacco and betel nut chewing are well established risk factors. Despite successful campaigns to help people shun this habit in developing countries the incidence has rather gone up and HPV and sexual practices are now definitely implicated for this. Aim: An attempt was made to generate Indian data on role of HPV and sexual practices in relation to OSCC. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study was conducted on 50 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Tissue biopsies from fifty patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were subjected to PCR analysis to look for presence of HPV 16 and 18. Fifty patients with benign lesions were taken as control. Statistical Methods Used: The data was statistically analysed using SPSS version 22 and chi square test. Results: 42% of OSCC patients were found to harbour HPV 16 and 18 whereas only 8% of patients with benign lesions had HPV 16 and 18. A significant number of HPV positive patients i.e. 9 out of 21 gave history of multiple sexual partners and oral sex. Conclusions: This high percentage of HPV in OSCC in an Indian population from a tertiary care centre in north India and its association with prevailing sexual practices is quite significant. PMID:27390494

  7. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  8. Identification of a High-Risk Group Among Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and pT1-2N0 Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 classification system, pT1-2N0 oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is considered an early-stage cancer treatable with surgery alone (National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2010 guidelines). Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of surgery alone for pT1-2N0 OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: Among 1279 previously untreated OSCC patients referred to our hospital between January 1996 and May 2008, we identified 457 consecutive patients with pT1-2N0 disease. All had radical tumor excision with neck dissection. A total of 387 patients showing pathologic margins greater than 4 mm and treated by surgery alone were included in the final analysis. All were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates in the entire group of pT1-2N0 patients were as follows: local control, 91%; neck control, 92%; distant metastases, 1%; disease-free survival, 85%; disease-specific survival, 93%; and overall survival, 84%. Multivariate analysis identified poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater as independent risk factors for neck control, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival. A scoring system using poor differentiation and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The presence of both poorly differentiated tumors and a tumor depth of 4 mm or greater resulted in significantly poorer 5-year neck control (p < 0.0001), disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p = 0.0046) rates. Conclusion: The combination of poor differentiation and pathologic tumor depth of 4 mm or greater identified a subset of pT1-2N0 OSCC patients with poor outcome, who may have clinical benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy.

  9. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3-4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3-4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098).Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in

  10. The microbial flora associated with oral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Byakodi, Raghavendra; Krishnappa, R; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana; Shetti, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    oral squamous cell carcinoma harbor significantly more microbial flora. Emphasis has to be given to preventing microbial flora in the oral cavity and treating these patients with appropriate antimicrobial agents, thus reducing their morbidity.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in the assessment of mandibular invasion by squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Influence on surgical management and post-operative course.

    PubMed

    Farrow, E S; Boulanger, T; Wojcik, T; Lemaire, A-S; Raoul, G; Julieron, M

    2016-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of the bone for invasion by oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma remains challenging. The aim of our study was to compare the accuracy of MRI and CT in detecting mandibular invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, with histologic results as the reference standard, and to assess the influence on surgical management and post-operative course. Patients who were clinically suspected of having bone invasion from oral cavity carcinoma were retrospectively included. A single senior radiologist reviewed MRI images and CT-scans, independently, for the presence or absence of mandibular invasion. The different surgical procedures were compared in terms of length of hospital stay and occurrence of surgical complications. Histological mandibular invasion occurred in 9 of 35 patients (25.7%). None of the preoperative imaging tests failed to detect bone invasion which resulted in a sensitivity of 100% for both MRI and CT. CT had slightly higher specificity than MRI (61.9% and 57.1% respectively) in predicting bone invasion, but no statistically significant difference was found (P=0.32). Specificity of CT and MRI was higher in the edentulous group (75% and 625% respectively) than in the dentate group (53.8% both), although no statistically significant difference was found. The length of hospital stay was increased in the segmental resection group (25±14.5 days) compared to the marginal resection group (13±4.6 days; P=0.004) and to the hemimandibulectomy group (15±7.2 days; P=0.014). Occurrence of post-operative complications, across all categories, was increased in the segmental resection group (70%, n=7/10; P=0.006) compared to the marginal resection group (8.3%, n=1/12) and to the hemimandibulectomy group (23.1%, n=3/13; P=0.04). MRI and CT being equivalent in detecting mandibular invasion, we suggest MRI as single imaging technique in the preoperative assessment of oral cavity SCC. Specificity could be increased if combined with

  12. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Three Related Kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei).

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard; Killick, Rowena; Barrows, Michelle; Stidworthy, Mark

    2017-02-11

    We report three kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) with squamous cell carcinoma affecting the gingiva. These cases occurred in rapid succession in a related group of individuals of similar age, suggesting a familial tendency to this condition and a typical age of presentation. Other conditions affecting the oral cavity can mimic the appearance of oral squamous cell carcinoma in this species, and so knowledge of this condition can assist the veterinarian in making rapid decisions regarding prognosis and improving the welfare of these animals.

  13. High expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in the tumor-associated neo-vasculature is associated with worse prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Laimer, Johannes; Chaux, Alcides; Schäfer, Georg; Obrist, Peter; Brunner, Andrea; Kronberger, Irmgard E; Laimer, Klaus; Gurel, Bora; Koller, Johann-Benedikt; Seifarth, Christof; Zelger, Bettina; Klocker, Helmut; Rasse, Michael; Doppler, Wolfgang; Bander, Neil H

    2012-08-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane protein expressed in prostate cancer as well as in the neo-vasculature of nonprostatic solid tumors. Here, we determined the expression pattern of PSMA in the vasculature of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Using a previously validated antibody, PSMA staining distribution and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression status was evaluated in a cohort of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=96) using immunohistochemistry and was correlated with clinicopathological features as well as outcome. Twenty-four (25%) cases showed no detectable PSMA staining, 48 (50%) demonstrated positive immunoreactivity for PSMA in less than 50% of microvessels and 24 (25%) cases showed strong endothelial PSMA expression in more than 50% of tumor-associated microvessels. High endothelial PSMA expression was associated with greatly reduced survival (18.2 vs 77.3 months; P=0.0001) and maintained prognostic significance after adjusting for grade and stage in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=2.19, P=0.007). Furthermore, we observed a strong association between endothelial PSMA and cancer cell-specific COX2 expression. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for the prognostic significance of endothelial PSMA expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and, suggest a potential interaction between arachidonic acid metabolites and endothelial PSMA expression in the tumor neo-vasculature.

  14. Autoimmune Disease Manifestations in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Magliocca, Kelly R; Fitzpatrick, Sarah G

    2017-03-01

    Immune-related disorders of the oral cavity may occur as primary disease process, secondary to systemic disease or neoplasm, or as a reaction to medications and other agents. The entities represented within this group may vary significantly by severity, clinical presentation, microscopic presentation, and special testing results. The selected immune-related conditions of the oral cavity in this article are categorized and presented by their prototypical tissue reaction patterns: vesiculobullous, including acantholytic and subepithelial separation; psoriasiform; spongiotic; and lichenoid reaction patterns.

  15. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  16. Urinary-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon

    2007-10-15

    OSCC (oral squamous cell carcinoma) is the most common oral malignancy and is estimated to affect approx. 350000 new patients worldwide this year. OSCC is characterized by a high degree of morbidity and mortality, as most patients exhibit local, regional and distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Recent genome-wide screening efforts have identified the serine proteinase uPA (urinary-type plasminogen activator, also known as urokinase) as a strong biomarker for prediction of poor disease outcome and a key candidate for molecular classification of oral neoplasms using a 'gene signature' approach. The proteinase uPA binds a surface-anchored receptor designated uPAR (uPA receptor), focalizing proteolytic activity to the pericellular milieu. Furthermore, uPA-uPAR can interact with transmembrane proteins to modify multiple signal transduction pathways and influence a wide variety of cellular behaviours. Correlative clinical data show elevated uPA-uPAR in oral tumour tissues, with tumours exhibiting high levels of both uPA and uPAR as the most invasive. Combined in vitro, pre-clinical and clinical data support the need for further analysis of uPA-uPAR as a prognostic indicator as well as a potential therapeutic target in OSCC.

  17. Robot-assisted Supraomohyoid neck dissection via a modified face-lift or retroauricular approach in early-stage cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: a comparative study with conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Shin; Kim, Won Shik; Hong, Hyun Jun; Ban, Myung Jin; Lee, Dongwon; Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang

    2012-11-01

    Supraomohyoid neck dissection (SOND) in clinical N0 (cN0) neck of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is performed by many head and neck surgeons showing improved regional control and disease-specific survival. However, disfiguring neck scars have been accepted to be unavoidable. In this study, we sought to introduce and evaluate the feasibility of our surgical technique to hide the external scar of neck dissection using the robotic system via a modified face-lift or retroauricular approach. Twenty-six patients with cN0 oral cavity SCC were divided into two groups of robot-assisted neck dissection and conventional neck dissection via external cervical incision. The operation time, amount and duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, complications, number of retrieved lymph nodes, and satisfaction scores were compared. Mean operation time was longer in the robot-assisted group (157 ± 22 min) than the conventional group (78 ± 16 min) (P < 0.001). However, the amount and duration of drainage, hospital stay, retrieved lymph nodes, and complications were comparable. Because the postoperative scar was hidden by the auricle and hair, the satisfaction score was significantly higher in the robot-assisted group (P < 0.001). Robot-assisted SOND via a modified face-lift or retroauricular approach in cN0 oral cavity SCC was feasible compared to conventional technique and showed a clear cosmetic benefit. Longer operation time remains the drawback of this procedure. However, it could be considered for patients who require SOND and prefer to avoid external neck scar.

  18. Evaluation of sentinel lymph node size and shape as a predictor of occult metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Linnea; Bilde, Anders; Charabi, Birgitte; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton; von Buchwald, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate sentinel lymph node size as a predictor of metastasis in N0 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated by individual sentinel node biopsy (SNB) guided neck dissection. In addition, to evaluate lymph node shape as an indicator of malignancy. A retrospective study based on data from 50 patients with clinically N0 neck and oral squamous cell carcinoma stage T1-2N0M0, SNB and consecutive neck dissection was performed. Excised sentinel nodes were measured in three axes by the surgeons before undergoing histopathological examination. Measured sentinel node axis lengths were compared with the histopathological results. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel 2008 for Mac, version 12.0. A total of 167 sentinel nodes was excised with a median of 3.3 per patient. Following SNB 18% of the patients was upstaged at the subsequent histopathological examination. This correlates to 7% of the total number of sentinel nodes. The diameters of all three axes were compared for both negative and positive nodes. The positive nodes were not significantly larger. The sensitivity and specificity of lymph node size as a criterion for staging were calculated at several thresholds. There was no tendency that lymph node shape changed towards spherical when positive for metastases. There is a tendency that the risk of metastases and upstaging increases with increasing maximum and partly minimum diameter. However, in this study it was not possible to establish a suitable threshold level with both high sensitivity and specificity based on size and shape. Other features of the lymph node must be considered if an accurate staging of N0 patients is to be performed.

  19. Exhaled breath and oral cavity VOCs as potential biomarkers in oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bouza, M; Gonzalez-Soto, J; Pereiro, R; de Vicente, J C; Sanz-Medel, A

    2017-03-01

    Corporal mechanisms attributed to cancer, such as oxidative stress or the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, seem to be responsible for the generation of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that could be used as non-invasive diagnosis biomarkers. The present work presents an attempt to use VOCs from exhaled breath and oral cavity air as biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. A total of 52 breath samples were collected (in 3 L Tedlar bags) from 26 OSCC patients and 26 cancer-free controls. The samples were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. Different statistical strategies (e.g., Icoshift, SIMCA, LDA, etc) were used to classify the analytical data. Results revealed that compounds such as undecane, dodecane, decanal, benzaldehyde, 3,7-dimethyl undecane, 4,5-dimethyl nonane, 1-octene, and hexadecane had relevance as possible biomarkers for OSCC. LDA classification with these compounds showed well-defined clusters for patients and controls (non-smokers and smokers). In addition to breath analysis, preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the possibility of lesion-surrounded air (analyzed OSCC tumors are in the oral cavity) as a source of biomarkers. The oral cavity location of the squamous cell carcinoma tumors constitutes an opportunity to non-invasively collect the air surrounding the lesion. Small quantities (20 ml) of air collected in the oral cavity were analyzed using the above methodology. Results showed that aldehydes present in the oral cavity might constitute potential OSCC biomarkers.

  20. Hamartomas of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali

    2015-01-01

    The majority of oral diseases present as growths and masses of varied cellular origin. Such masses may include simple hyperplasia, hamartoma, choristoma, teratoma, benign or malignant neoplasms. The distinguishing features of hamartomatous lesions are not certain, and often these non-neoplastic masses are indiscreetly denoted as neoplasms without weighing their pathology or biological behaviour. Essentially, understanding the dynamics of each of these disease processes forms an integral part of the appropriate treatment planning. PMID:26539384

  1. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  2. Radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.T.; Rabuzzi, D.D.; Sagerman, R.H.; King, G.A.; Gacek, R.R.

    1980-12-01

    Twenty-five patients with primary epithelial carcinoma of the nasal cavity without nodal or distant metastases were treated by irradiation between 1967 and 1978. Small field beam-directed techniques delivered 6000 to 7000 rads with conventional fractionation. Control of the primary tumor was achieved in 21 (84%) patients after irradiation. All five treatment failures (one infield only, three infield recurrence with lymph node metastases, and one regional cervical node metastasis) were evident within six months; all five patients died of cancer. The adjusted actuarial survival rate at three years was 76%. Failure in the untreated neck was only 5% when the primary carcinoma was controlled and 16% overall. The literature has been reviewed with attention to tumor control rates and survival.

  3. NID2 and HOXA9 promoter hypermethylation as biomarkers for prevention and early detection in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma tissues and saliva

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Preston, R; Soudry, E; Acero, J; Orera, M; Moreno-López, L; Macía-Colón, Germán; Jaffe, A; Berdasco, M; Ili-Gangas, C; Brebi-Mieville, P; Fu, Y; Engstrom, C; Irizarry, R; Esteller, M; Westra, W; Koch, W; Califano, J; Sidransky, D

    2011-01-01

    Differentially methylated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) biomarkers, identified in-vitro and validated in well-characterized surgical specimens, have shown poor clinical correlation in cohorts with different risk profiles. To overcome this lack of relevance we used the HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, publicly available methylation and expression array data, and Quantitative Methylation Specific PCR to uncover differential methylation in OSCC clinical samples with heterogeneous risk profiles. A two stage-design consisting of Discovery and Prevalence screens was used to identify differential promoter methylation and deregulated pathways in patients diagnosed with OSCC and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Promoter methylation of KIF1A (κ = 0.64), HOXA9 (κ = 0.60), NID2 (κ = 0.60), and EDNRB (κ = 0.60) had a moderate to substantial agreement with clinical diagnosis in the Discovery screen. HOXA9 had 68% sensitivity, 100% specificity and a 0.81 AUC. NID2 had 71% sensitivity, 100% specificity and a 0.79 AUC. In the Prevalence screen HOXA9 (κ = 0.82) and NID2 (κ = 0.80) had an almost perfect agreement with histologic diagnosis. HOXA9 had 85% sensitivity, 97% specificity and a 0.95 AUC. NID2 had 87% sensitivity, 95% specificity and a 0.91 AUC. A HOXA9 and NID2 gene panel had 94% sensitivity, 97% specificity and a 0.97 AUC. In saliva from OSCC cases and controls HOXA9 had 75% sensitivity, 53% specificity and a 0.75 AUC. NID2 had 87% sensitivity, 21% specificity and a 0.73 AUC. This Phase I Biomarker Development Trial identified a panel of differentially methylated genes in normal and OSCC clinical samples from patients with heterogeneous risk profiles. This panel may be useful for early detection and cancer prevention studies. PMID:21558411

  4. Prions and the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Bagg, J; Ironside, J W; Will, R G; Scully, C

    2003-10-01

    Prion diseases have recently emerged as a significant challenge to health-care workers, including those involved in dentistry. Abnormal prion proteins are resistant to complete inactivation by conventional sterilization techniques. In the last decade, a new form of prion disease emerged in the UK, termed "variant CJD", thought to be acquired by consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-contaminated food products. At present, CJD is an invariably fatal disease with no immediate prospect of treatment or vaccination. Of concern with the variant form of CJD, unlike the more classic forms of the disease, is the appearance of significant levels of infectivity outside the central nervous system. This raises concerns for the potential transmission of prion proteins via surgical procedures from individuals in the asymptomatic stage of the disease. This article reviews the existing knowledge base on the nature of prions, their distribution in oral tissues, and the implications for dental treatment.

  5. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  10. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  11. [Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    A, Burgos; R, Kaplan; N, Rodríguez; Meza, Vetanzo; Morelatto, R; Piccinni, D

    2008-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm and it is only 0.5% of the malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity, and less than 10% of all the malignant melanomas. The mean age for patients with oral melanoma is from 40 to 70 years; with a higher frequency between the 50 and 60 years. Pigmentation areas are frequently noted before diagnosis of this neoplasm. Some predisposing factors are mechanical traumas resulting from not well adapted prostheses, solar radiation, and chem-icals. Although oral cavity melanomas can remain asymptomatic during a time, the clinical presentations include hemorrhage, ulceration and pain. Melanomas grow fast, generally in a vertical growth phase, with early invasion of bones and lymphatic nodes. The prognosis for patients with melanoma is poor with a 5-year survival rate. The election treatment is surgical. The early diagnosis, the recognition of the lesions for doctors and odontologists, and the biopsy of recent or old pigmentation areas in the mouth that they have some changes (ulceration, bleeding, etc.) will contribute to offer patients a more effective treatment and a higher survival rate. We will present the case study of a 78-year-old male patient with a tumor in the dental ridge surrounded by melanotic spots, which was diagnosed as invasive melanoma and confirmed with immunohistochemical techniques.

  12. Diagnostic Concordance Characteristics of Oral Cavity Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tatli, Ufuk; Erdoğan, Özgür; Uğuz, Aysun; Üstün, Yakup; Sertdemır, Yaşar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic concordance characteristics of oral cavity lesions by comparing the clinical diagnosis of the lesions with the histopathologic diagnosis. Material and Method. A retrospective analysis was conducted on the patients, who were admitted with oral cavity pathology and underwent biopsy procedure between 2007 and 2011. The oral cavity lesions were classified into 6 different groups as odontogenic cysts, nonodontogenic cysts, odontogenic tumors, nonodontogenic tumors, malignant tumors, and precancerous lesions in accordance with the 2005 WHO classification. The diagnoses were also recategorized into 3 groups expressing prognostic implications as benign, precancerous, and malignant. The initial clinical diagnoses were compared with the histopathologic diagnoses. Data were analyzed statistically. Results. A total of 2718 cases were included. Histopathologic diagnosis did not match the clinical diagnosis in 6.7% of the cases. Nonodontogenic tumors and malignant tumors had the highest misdiagnosis rates (11.5% and 9%, resp.), followed by odontogenic tumors (7.7%), precancerous lesions (6.9%), and odontogenic cysts (4.4%). Clinicians were excelled in diagnosis of benign and precancerous lesions in clinical setting. Conclusion. The detailed discordance characteristics for each specific lesion should be considered during oral pathology practice to provide early detection without delay. PMID:24453906

  13. Antioxidant enzymes in oral verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ting-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Han; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Ger, Luo-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a non-metastasizing variant of welldifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, which has been associated with reactive oxygen species generated by betel quid chewing. Salivary antioxidant systems have been suggested to play a protective role in reducing the oxidative damage. Herein, we investigated the difference of the enzymatic antioxidant system expressions in oral verrucous carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The enzymatic antioxidant system expressions, including manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in a series of 202 surgically resected oral squamous cell carcinoma and 20 oral verrucous carcinoma specimens, using tissue microarray slides. The immuno-staining intensities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were strongest in the oral squamous cell carcinoma group than in verrucous carcinoma. The catalase expression showed no difference between different pathological groups. The different degrees of superoxide dismutase and glutathione expressions in verrucous carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma may be helpful for pathologists to differentiate these two entities, especially between oral verrucous carcinoma and well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Preoperative concurrent chemotherapy with S-1 and radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: Phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to identify a recommended dose for S-1, used in combination with 40-Gy radiation. Methods Thirty patients, 15 each with stage III and IVA oral carcinoma, were enrolled. All patients received a total dose of 40-Gy. For the S-1 treatment, patients were given either the standard Japanese dose, calculated according to body surface area, or a reduced dose. Groups consisting of at least three patients were given S-1 according to one of 8 regimens. Results Hematologic toxicity was mild and reversible. The most common nonhematologic toxicity was mucositis. At level 8 that was the standard S-1 dose for 5 days per week for 4 weeks, dose-limiting toxicity was observed when 2 patients had grade 4 mucositis. This level was thus deemed the maximum tolerated dose for the regimen. Conclusions The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was the reduced dose of S-1 given for 5 days per week, for 4 consecutive weeks. Preoperative S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy was well tolerate and feasible and warrants a phase II study. PMID:20406445

  15. Performance of 18F-FDG PET/contrast-enhanced CT in the staging of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, C A; Balink, H; Roodenburg, J L N; Dol, J; de Visscher, J G A M

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of integrated whole body positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced CT (PET/CECT) as a one step examination in the initial staging of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Seventy three consecutive OOSCC patients who underwent PET/CECT for initial staging and tumour resection and neck dissection as primary treatment, were included. For each PET/CECT result, the contribution of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG)-uptake and radiologic criteria was assessed. PET/CECT results were correlated to histological specimens obtained with tumour resection and neck dissection. For detecting the primary tumour PET/CECT showed a sensitivity of 96% and for detecting cervical metastases a sensitivity and specificity of 89% and 81%, respectively. In the clinically N0 subgroup (n=37), PET/CECT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 64% and 81%, respectively. In five of six patients PET/CECT detected a second primary tumour. The results show that the use of diagnostic PET/CECT as a one step examination is a reliable alternative for PET/CT in combination with a separate diagnostic CT in patients with OOSC for initial staging. The need for treatment of the neck in the clinically negative neck should not be based on PET/CECT results only, due to the risk of missing a small metastasis.

  16. Oral cavity lipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byeong-Gi; Choi, Dong-Ju; Park, Jun-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral lipomas are a rare clinical entity, comprising only 0.1% to 5% of all benign tumors in the intraoral cavity. A 56-year-old woman suffering from diabetes presented with this relatively rare intraoral lipoma and was treated by surgical excision under general anesthesia. Because the mass was located adjacent to the mental foramen, a precise dissection was necessary to ensure minimal nerve damage. No abnormalities or recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up and the patient did not complain of numbness. We studied the occurrence of oral lipoma in this diabetic patient and reviewed the relationship between oral lipoma and diabetes in the literature. PMID:26339582

  17. [The effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Fazzi, M; Vescovi, P; Savi, A; Manfredi, M; Peracchia, M

    1999-10-01

    As shown by the growing numbers of users attending the public drug addiction services, drug abuse is a phenomenon that is constantly spreading. It is important that dentists are aware of the oral problems linked to drug abuse. This study examines the general effects and oral implications of the illegal substances used by the majority of drug addicts. The main dental complications of cannabinoids are the increased incidence of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, the presence of xerostomia and severe gingivitis. Depending on how it is taken, cocaine may cause ischemic necrosis of the palate, inflammation, ulceration and gingival retraction, as well as an increased incidence of bruxism. Hallucinogens have few direct oral effects, but among these it is worth recalling xerostomia, increased bruxism and oral problems linked to malnutrition caused by ecstasy. Turning to the opioids, heroin is the drug primarily used by the majority of drug addicts. Its oral effects mainly take the form of dental decay, showing a particular form and extent linked either directly or indirectly to heroin use. This results in "typical" or "atypical" caries pathologies directly linked to the effects of heroin. Given the extent of this phenomenon, it is important that dentists are aware of the problems linked to drug abuse that they may have to treat.

  18. Bioengineering in the oral cavity: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, L; Belli, E; Nava, C; Mici, E; Calvo, A; D’Alessandro, B; De Ponte, FS

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, there are no studies reported in the literature on the possible use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, or synthetic hyaluronic acid medications in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper is to report the use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and synthetic hyaluronic acid medications to improve wound healing in the oral cavity by stimulating granulomatous tissue. Methods From 2007 to 2011, 80 patients (median age 67 years) suffering from oral mucosal lesions participated in this double-blind study. The patients were divided into two groups, each consisting of 40 patients. One group received conventional medications, while the other group of patients were treated with the advanced medications. Results Advanced medications allowed re-epithelialization of the wound margin in 2–20 days, whereas patients receiving conventional medication showed a median healing duration of 45 days. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that treating oral mucosal wounds with advanced medication has an advantage with regard to wound healing time, allowing patients to have a rapid, functional, and esthetic recovery. PMID:24143092

  19. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity: use of laser capture microdissection for the construction and analysis of stage-specific cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Leethanakul, C; Patel, V; Gillespie, J; Shillitoe, E; Kellman, R M; Ensley, J F; Limwongse, V; Emmert-Buck, M R; Krizman, D B; Gutkind, J S

    2000-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer among men in the developed world affecting the oral cavity, salivary glands, larynx and pharynx. Utilizing tissue from patients with HNSCC, we sought to systematically identify and catalog genes expressed in HNSCC progression. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of laser capture microdissection for procuring pure populations of cells from patient tissue sets comprised of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and matching normal tissue. From the estimated 5000 cells procured for each sample, we were able to extract total RNA (14.7-18.6 ng) of sufficient quality to transcribe GAPDH by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The RNA was used for the synthesis of blunt-ended, double-strand complementary DNAs (cDNAs) by oligo (dT)-mediated reverse transcription, followed by addition of linkers. Primers specific for these linkers with uracil deglycosylase-compatible ends were used to amplify these cDNAs by PCR and the product was subcloned into the pAMP10 cloning vector. Ninety-six clones from each of six libraries were randomly sequenced and results indicated that 76-96% of the inserts represent either anonymous expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (25-48%), known genes (9-29%) or novel sequences (27-51%), respectively, with very little redundancy. These results demonstrate that high quality, representative cDNA libraries can be generated from microdissected OSCC tissue. Furthermore, these finding suggest the existence of at least 132 novel genes expressed in our cDNA libraries, which may have a role in the pathogenesis of HNSCC, and may represent novel markers for early detection as well as targets for pharmacological intervention in this disease.

  20. [Oral cavity changes in alcoholic patients].

    PubMed

    Esguep, A; Ceballos, M; Smith, P

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this study was to look for pathological changes in the oral cavity in a group of 40 non cirrhotic male alcoholics, ranging in age from 30 to 40 years old. These subjects were compared with a group of 40 non alcoholic male subjects of similar age. The presence of lip, dental, periodontal, salivary gland and oral mucosa lesions was recorded. In alcoholics, pigmented lesions were observed in the lips in all the subjects (compared to 36% of controls), in the cheek mucosa in 65% and in the palate mucosa in 35.5%. Sixty five percent of alcoholics were partially edentate (compared to 32.5% of controls). It is concluded that the consideration of oral changes as a whole could be useful in the diagnosis of occult alcoholism. Moreover these patients have an important need of odontological attention that has to be considered.

  1. Oral verrucous carcinoma and ameloblastoma: a rare coincidence.

    PubMed

    Dalirsani, Zohreh; Falaki, Farnaz; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Vazifeh Mostaan, Leila

    2015-03-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) is a rare malignancy of the oral cavity that was first described by Ackerman. This tumor is a well-differentiated low-grade, slow growing cancer that is locally invasive without metastasis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most common odontogenic tumors, which originates from the odontogenic epithelium. Verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma is a rare phenomenon. A case of verrucous carcinoma along with central ambloblastoma in a 49-year-old man, which was referred with a painless exophytic lesion with a verrucous and granular surface, is reported. Panoramic radiography revealed a well-defined radiolucency with sclerotic borders. To the best available knowledge, this phenomenon has not yet been reported. Verrucous carcinoma could occur in the wall of odontogenic cysts and tumors and should be considered during the differential diagnosis of a radiolucency, which is observed in the jaws with rapid growth or which presents some changes from its previous appearance.

  2. Oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytometric parameters of prognostic interest.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Bustillo, Ramón; Corchero-Martín, Guadalupe; García-Montesinos-Perea, Belén; Gonzalez-Terán, Tomás; Sánchez-Santolino, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    The present study was made in order to find possible prognostic factors in oral squamous cell carcinoma, given that it is a frequent disease (3-4% of all malignant tumors) and is the cause of a high morbidity and mortality which justifies any attempt to contribute something towards the understanding of this pathology. 81 oral squamous cell carcinomas, treated with the same procedure, and retrieved from the archive of the Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla (Santander) were studied. Flow cytometry was carried out on 67 of the samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the cellular proliferative index and the mitotic index, ploidy and the S-phase factor. Likewise, none of the cytometric variables studied presented any association with the appearance of local relapse, distant metastases or survival. These variables cannot be used as a prognostic factors in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity.

  3. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kakisi, Ourania K; Kechagia, Argiro S; Kakisis, Ioannis K; Rafailidis, Petros I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2010-04-01

    The recent increase in the incidence of tuberculosis, combined with an emerging global resistance to antituberculous drugs, warrants an increased awareness of the involvement of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in persistent or atypical lesions in the oral cavity. We sought to review the published reports of mycobacterial infection of the oral cavity found in the literature in otherwise uncompromised patients, from 1950 to the present day, and analyzed the documented manifestations. M. tuberculosis infects all parts of the mouth (soft and hard palate, uvula, buccal mucosa, gingivae, lips, tongue, maxilla, and mandible) more often in men than in women, appearing predominantly in the form of ulcerative lesions. It was found as a secondary infection in 58% (54% pulmonary, 4% extrapulmonary) of patients and as a primary infection in 42% of patients. Carcinomas are found to co-exist in the same lesion site in 3% of patients. In approximately 50% of patients, an oral manifestation of TB has led to the diagnosis of a previously unknown systemic infection, which resulted in a timely and effective treatment. The investigation for tuberculosis should therefore be actively pursued in the dental surgery. Diagnostic work-up for systemic involvement and control of healthcare-associated spread is important, while therapeutic options are still considered adequate.

  4. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Genden, Eric M.; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  5. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induces apoptosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Involvement of DNA-damage-triggering sub-G(1) arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Kang Il; Seo, Seong Jin; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo; Moon, Eunpyo; Baek, Seung Jae; Lee, Keunho; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in physics have made possible the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP induces death of various cancer cell types, thus offering a promising alternative treatment, the mechanism of its therapeutic effect is little understood. In this study, we report for the first time that NTP led to apoptotic cell death in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interestingly, NTP induced a sub-G(1) arrest in p53 wild-type OSCCs, but not in p53-mutated OSCCs. In addition, NTP increased the expression levels of ATM, p53 (Ser 15, 20 and 46), p21, and cyclin D1. A comet assay, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry of γH2AX suggested that NTP-induced apoptosis and sub-G(1) arrest were associated with DNA damage and the ATM/p53 signaling pathway in SCC25 cells. Moreover, ATM knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effect of NTP on cell death, sub-G(1) arrest and related signals. Taken together, these results indicate that NTP induced apoptotic cell death in p53 wild-type OSCCs through a novel mechanism involving DNA damage and triggering of sub-G(1) arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP in OSCC.

  6. Trends in frequency and prevalence of oral cancer and oral squamous cell carcinoma in Mexicans. A 20 years retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Peniche-Becerra, Adriana-Graciela; Quezada-Rivera, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    To establish the time trends of the frequency and prevalence of oral cavity cancer in regard to age and gender in a 20-years (time period 1989 - 2008) cohort of Mexicans. 13,235 head and neck biopsies from the archive of the Oral Pathology Laboratory, Dental School, National Autonomous University of Mexico were revised. The cases with diagnoses of oral cancer were selected. Gender and age at diagnosis was obtained from medical records. The frequency and prevalence of oral cavity cancer and oral squamous cell carcinoma were assessed biannually in regard to the total number of population served by the oral pathology laboratory. The statistical significance of trends was established using the linear logistic regression (curve estimation) test (s 0.05). 298 cases (138 males; 160 females) of oral cancer were included; 167 (92 females; 75 males; female:male ratio: 1.1:1) corresponded to oral squamous cell carcinoma. From 1989 to 2008 the prevalence of oral cancer and oral squamous cell carcinoma increased 200% (s 0.05) and 100% (s 0.000) respectively. The increase of frequency and prevalence was observed in both genders however only in females was significant (s 0.000). We do not identify changes in the age at diagnosis. Oral cancer, specifically oral squamous cell carcinoma, has increase in Mexicans females in the last 20 years.

  7. FT-IR microscopy imaging on oral cavity tumours, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Rubini, C.; Tosi, G.

    2005-06-01

    Changes in the biochemistry of oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR microscopy. Various aspects of squamous cell carcinomas of cheek mucosa, of tongue, of gingiva, and of the floor of the mouth have been analyzed through FT-IR imaging with the aim to relate spectral patterns with histopathological results. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wavenumber or band ratio images allowed a quali- and quantitative evaluation of the changes in the proliferating activity from displastic to neoplastic states. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and histological findings.

  8. Oral Cavity Cancer: Risk Factors, Pathology, and Management.

    PubMed

    Ernani, Vinicius; Saba, Nabil F

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity cancers are predominantly squamous cell carcinomas, which arise from premalignant lesions through a multistep carcinogenesis process. Tobacco and alcohol are the major etiologic factors, although human papillomavirus has also recently been implicated as a causative agent. The possibility of a second primary malignancy should be considered during the diagnostic evaluation of head and neck cancers, as well as during the posttreatment surveillance phase. The goals of treatment are not only to improve survival outcomes but also to preserve organ function. These cancers are generally treated with a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. A multidisciplinary approach, involving surgeons, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists, as well as dentists, dietitians, and rehabilitation therapists, is generally required for optimal treatment planning and management of patients with head and neck cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Ultrasound Backscatter Microscopy for Imaging of Oral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Matthew; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Sun, Yang; Zhou, Feifei; Dobbie, Allison; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Tinling, Steve P.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Monsky, Wayne L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Marcu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), or ultrasound biomicroscopy, is a noninvasive, label-free, and ionizing radiation–free technique allowing high-resolution 3-dimensional structural imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate UBM for resolving anatomic features associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Methods The study was conducted in a hamster buccal pouch model. A carcinogen was topically applied to cheeks of 14 golden Syrian hamsters. Six additional hamsters served as healthy controls. A high-frequency (41 MHz, 6-mm focal depth, lateral and axial resolutions of 65 and 37 μm, respectively) UBM system was used for scanning the oral cavity after 14 weeks of carcinogen application. Histologic analyses were conducted on scanned regions. Results The histologic structure of buccal tissue and microvasculature networks could be visualized from the UBM images. Epithelial and mucosal hypertrophy and neoplastic changes were identified in animals subjected to the carcinogen. In animals with invasive squamous cell carcinoma, lesion development and destruction of the structural integrity of tissue layers were noted. Conclusions In this pilot study, UBM generated sufficient contrast for morphologic features associated with oral carcinoma compared to healthy tissue. This modality may present a practical technique for detection of oral neoplasms that is potentially translatable to humans. PMID:24065260

  10. Miswak in oral cavity - An update.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Akhilanand; Patil, Ranjit; Nagar, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Miswak, scientifically known as Salvadora persica, is a species of Salvadora belonging to family Salvadoraceae. It is considered as "Nature's little toothbrush" as it is a popular chewing stick throughout Indian subcontinent. In India, it is commonly known as arak tree, meswak, peelu, kharjal or jhank. It also serves as a natural toothpaste with antibacterial, anti-caries, anti-periopathic disinfectant having anti-plaque and anti-fungal properties. Miswak sticks are being used by majority of people who cannot afford to buy the commercial western toothbrush and toothpaste mainly in rural areas of developing countries. The present review is an attempt to define the potential of the miswak in preventing and treating the common diseases of oral cavity and teeth.

  11. [Consequences of piercing within oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Gerreth, Karolina; Gerreth, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Tatooing and invasive forms of body art, such as piercing, have become very popular in Western culture among youth. Literature studies show that the oral cavity is one of the most popular places where rings are installed. However, not everyone is aware of the potential consequences that can develop as a consequence of the piercing. Among early complications are aching, swelling, trouble with swallowing, chewing and speech difficulties. Jewellery can also cause unnatural, increased production of saliva. Infection is also a major risk of the procedure itself. Along with these complications there are also many cases of blood vessel and nerve damage in the patients. Other complications that are possible are: irritation to the gums, teeth injuries, as well as enamel chipping. Piercing should always be taken into consideration during diagnostic procedures. Complete information about piercing complications, as well as information about the necessary post-piercing hygiene, should be given to the patient and to the parents of minors.

  12. Commensal communism and the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B; Wilson, M

    1998-09-01

    The world we live in contains unimaginable numbers of bacteria, and these and other single-celled creatures represent the major diversity of life on our planet. During the last decade or so, the complexity and intimacy of the interactions which occur between bacteria and host eukaryotic cells during the process of infection have begun to emerge. The study of such interactions is the subject of the new discipline of cellular microbiology. This intimacy of bacteria/host interactions creates a major paradox. The average human being is 90% bacteria in terms of cell numbers. These bacteria constitute the commensal or normal microflora and populate the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and the surface of the skin. In bacterial infections, much of the pathology is due to the release of a range of bacterial components (e.g., modulins such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, DNA, molecular chaperones), which induce the synthesis of the local hormone-like molecules known as pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, such components must also be constantly released by the vast numbers of bacteria constituting the normal microflora and, as a consequence, our mucosae should constantly be in a state of inflammation. This is patently not the case, and a hypothesis is forwarded to account for this "commensal paradox", namely, that our commensal bacteria and mucosal surfaces exist in a state of bio-communism, forming a unified "tissue" in which interactions between bacteria and epithelia are finely balanced to ensure bacterial survival and prevent the induction of damaging inflammation. Evidence is emerging that bacteria can produce a variety of proteins which can inhibit the synthesis/release of inflammatory cytokines. The authors predict that such proteins are simply one part of an extensive signaling system which occurs between bacteria and epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces such as those found in the oral cavity.

  13. Unusual Dermoid Cyst in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Evanice Menezes Marçal; Volpato, Luis Evaristo Ricci; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira; Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; Botelho, Gilberto de Almeida; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Dermoid cysts in oral cavity are unusual lesions. Their etiology is not yet clear and can be associated with trapped cells as a result of the inclusion error resulting in the development into the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm tissues. The aim of this case report is to evidence the presence of a dermoid cyst in the floor of mouth surgically removed. In the present case, the lesion showed soft consistency, floating, regular borders, smooth surface, and the same color as the adjacent mucosa, asymptomatic and measuring 4.5 × 5.5 cm in its greatest diameter. The initial diagnostic was ranula in consequence of the similarity with clinical characteristics and localization. After surgical removal lesion, a fibrotic capsule was identified with a friable material with intensive yellow color. The microscopic exam showed cystic lesion with cavity lined by squamous stratified epithelium hyperorthokeratinized. Cutaneous attachments, such as sebaceous glands and hair follicles, were present in connective adjacent tissue. Surgical intervention is elective in these situations. All dentists must have a thorough knowledge of this unusual lesion. PMID:24818032

  14. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  15. Adverse drug reactions in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Lucio; Guida, Laura; Di Masi, Maria; Buccelli, Claudio; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Di Fede, Olga; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Several drugs may have a number of adverse reactions (ADRs) involving the oro-facial region. The dose of the drug and the time required for the reaction to take place are relevant parameters; nonetheless, ADRs mechanisms are not always known and ADRs are not always predictable since aspects other than drug pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics, as well as various interacting variables contribute to the final outcome. All tissues and many functions of the oral cavity can be affected. In particular, salivary function is frequently involved and hypo-salivation is the main manifestation; several mucosal lesions with different morphology (ulcerations, vesiculobullous lesions, white lesions, pigmentations, swelling) are also possible. Taste, sensation and trigeminal function alterations have been reported and the recent evidence regarding the occurrence of jawbones osteonecrosis, especially in bisphosphonates treated patients, is increasing. Clinical management may be quite difficult due to the multiplicity of involved classes of drugs and substances (dental materials, foods), the variety of affected tissues and functions, the type of produced lesions and disturbances, the complexity of related pathogenetic mechanisms (if known), the difficulties in assessing causality and managing drug withdrawal and/or dose adjustment, as well as in establishing specific treatments, if any. In this paper the most common and significant oral ADRs, their related aspects and importance (including medico-legal implications) for health care providers will be discussed.

  16. Exploring bacterial flora in oral squamous cell carcinoma: a microbiological study.

    PubMed

    Metgud, R; Gupta, K; Gupta, J

    2014-02-01

    The oral cavity contains a unique and diverse microflora. While most of these organisms exhibit commensalism, shifts in bacterial community dynamics cause pathological changes within the oral cavity and at distant sites. We assessed the microbial flora using cultured saliva and oral swabs from subjects with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy controls. Microbial samples were collected from the carcinoma site, contralateral healthy mucosa, and saliva of the study group and samples were collected from healthy mucosa and saliva of controls. Samples were stored on ice and transported to the laboratory for culture. The median number of colony forming units (CFU)/ml at carcinoma sites was significantly greater than at the contralateral healthy mucosa. Similarly, in saliva of carcinoma subjects, the median number of CFU/ml was significantly greater than in saliva of control subjects.

  17. Cardiac metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pattni, Neeraj; Rennie, Andrew; Hall, Timothy; Norman, Aidan

    2015-09-09

    We present a case of isolated cardiac metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. An 89-year-old woman was due to undergo curative resection of a histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the retromolar region. On admission, it was noted that there were ECG changes, and following further investigations, the patient was diagnosed with a cardiac metastasis of her oral malignancy. The presentation, including the diagnostic difficulties, as well as the clinical features of this rare case, are discussed.

  18. [Prognostic and predictive value of koilocytosis, expression of e6 hpv types 16/18, p16ink4a, p53 in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx, associated with human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Riaboshapka, A N

    2014-11-01

    To determine the predictive and prognostic value of koilocytosis, expression of E6 HPV types 16/18, p16INK4a, p53 in patients with locally advanced HPV-associated squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx. In biopsy specimens of squamous cell carcinomas of oral cavity and oropharynx from 60 patients performed koylocytes count, immunohistochemical detection of HPV 16/18 types E6 protein, proteins p16INK4a and p53. Koilocytosis was detected in 50 patients (83.3%); in all 60 patients (100%) were simultaneous expression of p16INK4a and E6 HPV types 16/18; p53 expression was found in 37 patients (61.7%). After combined treatment (induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) stable disease (SD) was detected in 11 patients (18.3%), partial response (PR) - in 25 patients (41.7%), complete response (CR) - in 24 patients (40.0%). There were no cases of disease progression. Treatment effect correlated with expression of p16INK4a (ρ = 0.3, p = 0.024) and expression of p53 (ρ = - 0.3, p = 0.019). Patients with a low expression of p16INK4a (2 points) and high expression of p53 (4 "+") had a high level of SD and had no CR. For all patients, the median of overall survival (OS) was 17 months, 1-year cumulative survival rate was 66.7%, 2-year cumulative survival rate - 35.0%. Median of overall survival was correlated with koilocytosis (ρ=0.5, p<0,001) and expression of E6 HPV types 16/18 (ρ=0.9, p<0.001), p16INK4a (ρ=0.9, p=0.037), p53 (ρ=-0.9; p<0.001). Patients with low expression of p53 (0 and 1 "+") had cumulative 1-year survival rates 87% and 90%, respectively (p<0.001), 2-year survival rates - 52% and 80%, respectively (p=0.015). In the Cox proportional hazards model the significant prognostic factors were prevalence of primary tumor (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 - 3.5, p=0.003) and p53 expression (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1=1.7, p=0.016). High expression of p16INK4a associated with a high effect of combined treatment, high expression of a p53 - with low effect of

  19. Pretreatment Primary Tumor SUVmax Measured by FDG-PET and Pathologic Tumor Depth Predict for Poor Outcomes in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The pathologic tumor depth is an independent prognosticator for local control (LC) and survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We sought to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All patients underwent 2-deoxy-2[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed for {>=}24 months after surgery or until death. The optimal cutoff value for the primary tumor SUVmax was selected according to the 5-year LC rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 26 months (39 months for surviving patients). A cutoff SUVmax of 19.3 provided the greatest prognostic information for the 5-year LC rate (55% vs. 88%, p = 0.0135). A tumor depth {>=}12 mm appeared to be the most appropriate cutoff for predicting the 5-year LC rate (76% vs. 95%, p = 0.0075). A scoring system using the primary tumor SUVmax and tumor depth was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. Patients with both a SUVmax of {>=}19.3 and tumor depth of {>=}12 mm (n = 8) had significantly poorer 5-year LC, 5-year disease-free, 5-year disease-specific, and 5-year overall survival rates compared with the other patient groups. Conclusion: The combination of the primary tumor SUVmax ({>=}19.3) and pathologic tumor depth ({>=}12 mm) identified a subgroup of OSCC patients at greatest risk of poor LC and death.

  20. Preoperative [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Standardized Uptake Value of Neck Lymph Nodes Predicts Neck Cancer Control and Survival Rates in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) depends heavily on locoregional control. In this prospective study, we sought to investigate whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value of the neck lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) may predict prognosis in OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All subjects underwent a [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan within 2 weeks before radical surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in the presence of pathologic risk factors. Optimal cutoff values of SUVnodal-max were chosen based on 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. The optimal cutoff value for SUVnodal-max was 5.7. Multivariate analyses identified the following independent predictors of poor outcome: SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 for the 5-year neck cancer control rate, distant metastatic rate, DFS, DSS, and extracapsular spread (ECS) for the 5-year DSS and OS. Among ECS patients, the presence of a SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 identified patients with the worst prognosis. Conclusion: A SUVnodal-max of 5.7, either alone or in combination with ECS, is an independent prognosticator for 5-year neck cancer control and survival rates in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes.

  1. Influence of Pathological Nodal Status and Maximal Standardized Uptake Value of the Primary Tumor and Regional Lymph Nodes on Treatment Plans in Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Wang, H.-M.; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, C.-Y.; Ng, S.-H.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: A better understanding of the prognostic factors in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may optimize the therapeutic approach. In this study, we sought to investigate whether the combination of clinical information, pathologic results, and preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes might improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 consecutive OSCC patients were investigated. All participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. The duration of follow-up was at least 24 months in all surviving patients. The optimal cutoff values for SUVmax at the primary tumor (SUVtumor-max) and regional lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) were selected according to the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: In multivariate analysis, a cutoff SUVtumor-max of 8.6, a cutoff SUVnodal-max of 5.7, and the presence of pathologic lymph node metastases were found to be significant prognosticators for the 5-year DFS. A scoring system using these three prognostic factors was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The 5-year rates for patients with a score between 0 and 3 were as follows: neck control, 94%, 86%, 77%, 59% (p < 0.0001); distant metastases, 1%, 7%, 22%, 47% (p < 0.0001); disease-specific survival, 93%, 85%, 61%, 36%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Based on the study findings, the combined evaluation of pathologic node status and SUVmax at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes may improve prognostic stratification in OSCC patients.

  2. Nuclear factor κB and cyclooxygenase-2 immunoexpression in oral dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Pontes, Flávia Sirotheau Corrêa; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; de Carvalho, Pedro Luiz; Pereira, Erika Martins; de Abreu, Michelle Carvalho; de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; dos Santos Pinto, Décio

    2013-02-01

    Oral leukoplakia is the main potentially malignant oral lesion, and oral squamous cell carcinoma accounts for more than 95% of all malignant neoplasms in the oral cavity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the immunoexpression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins in dysplastic oral lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical reactions were performed on 6 inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, 28 oral leukoplakia, and 15 oral squamous cell carcinoma paraffin-embedded samples. Immunoperoxidase reaction for NF-κB and COX-2 was applied on the specimens, and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Using the analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc statistical analyses, a significantly increased immunoexpression for NF-κB was observed when oral squamous cell carcinoma samples were compared with the other groups studied. However, using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post hoc tests, a statistically significant result for COX-2 expression was obtained only when the moderate dysplasia group was compared with the inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia group. Nuclear factor κB may participate in the malignant phenotype acquisition process of the oral squamous cell carcinoma in its late stages, whereas COX-2 may be involved in the early stages of oral carcinogenesis process.

  3. In vivo OCT study of neoplastic alterations of the oral cavity mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomina, Julia V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Myakov, Alexey V.

    2004-07-01

    The goal of our study was to conduct a statistical evaluation of the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect neoplasia in vivo in oral cavity. The study enrolled 97 patients (35 volunteers with healthy mucosa of the oral cavity-group I, 41 patients with benign conditions-group II, 21 patients with dysplasia or carcinoma-group III). The diagnosis was established by a histopathology examination of biopsy material. Each biopsy site was imaged by OCT beforehand. Sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 98% were observed as a result of OCT image recognition of dysplastic/malignant versus benign/reactive conditions in the oral cavity. The interobserver agreement kappa was 0.76. Such sensitivity and specificity makes OCT a promising tool for non-invasive evaluation of tissue sites suspicious for high-grade dysplasia and cancer.

  4. Screening for Oral Cavity Cancer: A 1-year Experience of a Regional Hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chi, T H; Yuan, C H; Chen, R F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the risk factors affecting precancerous lesions, and cancer of oral cavity, and to assess efficacy of visual screening for oral mucosal lesions. The medical records of patients older than 30 years of age with history of habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing that received screening for oral mucosal lesions between January 2012 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' age, gender, risk factors, screening findings, and histopathology results of biopsy were included for further analysis. A total of 1341 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 1080 males and 261 females ranging from 30 to 96 years of age, with a mean age of 53.9±13.6 years. After screening, 226 (16.9%) were found to be positive of oral lesions. Among these 226 patients, 69 (30.5%) underwent biopsy under local anesthesia, and the histopathology showed malignancy in 13 (5.8%). All of the confirmed malignant cases were squamous cell carcinoma. Among them, 12 received further staging examination and one was lost to follow-up resulting in unknown stage. The early stage oral cavity cancer (stage I and II) accounted for 84.6% (11/13). The detection rate of early stage oral cavity cancer in our study was reasonable. Therefore, visual screening for oral cavity cancer is recommended for patients with habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing.

  5. Evaluation of the Helicobacteraceae in the oral cavity of dogs.

    PubMed

    Craven, Melanie; Recordati, Camilla; Gualdi, Valentina; Pengo, Graziano; Luini, Mario; Scanziani, Eugenio; Simpson, Kenneth W

    2011-11-01

    To determine the Helicobacter spp present in the oral cavity of dogs and the relationship of those organisms with gastric Helicobacter spp to better define the potential for dog-human and dog-dog transmission. Saliva and dental plaque from 28 dogs and gastric biopsy specimens from a subset of 8 dogs. PCR-based screening for Helicobacter spp was conducted on samples obtained from the oral cavity of 28 dogs. Comparative analysis was conducted on Helicobacteraceae 16S rDNA clone libraries from the oral cavity and stomach of a subset of 8 dogs (5 vomiting and 3 healthy) that had positive PCR results for Helicobacter spp. Helicobacteraceae DNA was identified in the oral cavity of 24 of 28 dogs. Analysis of cloned 16S rDNA amplicons from 8 dogs revealed that Wolinella spp was the most common (8/8 dogs) and abundant (52/57 [91%] clones) member of the Helicobacteraceae family in the oral cavity. Only 2 of 8 dogs harbored Helicobacter spp in the oral cavity, and 1 of those was coinfected with Helicobacter heilmannii and Helicobacter felis in samples obtained from the stomach and saliva. Evaluation of oral cavity DNA with Wolinella-specific PCR primers yielded positive results for 16 of 20 other dogs (24/28 samples were positive for Wolinella spp). Wolinella spp rather than Helicobacter spp were the predominant Helicobacteraceae in the oral cavity of dogs. The oral cavity of dogs was apparently not a zoonotically important reservoir of Helicobacter spp that were non-Helicobacter pylori organisms.

  6. Preliminary Experiments Regarding the Potential Use of Selenium Nanoparticles in the Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Christopher Edward

    The purpose of the research covered in this thesis was to determine the candidacy of rSeNPs for the core component of a nanoparticle-based method for selectively targeting and treating oral HNSCC, with the option for multiple treatments delivered in such a manner. Success of the in vitro experiments performed for this thesis was qualified as the IC50 of the cancer cells, after a three-day exposure, being less than that of non-cancerous cells. For the recommended future experiments, success of the in vitro experiments should be qualified as the IC50 of the cancer cells, after a three-day exposure, being at least two orders of magnitude less than that of non-cancerous cells. Success of the planned orthotopic mouse experiments should be qualified as significant decreases in tumor size as a result of exposure to the conjugated selenium nanoparticles, coupled with long-term survival of the mice exposed to the nanoparticles and the prevention of metastasis. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  7. Melatonin: potential functions in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Cutando, Antonio; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Arana, Carlos; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Reiter, Russel J

    2007-06-01

    Melatonin is synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland and other organs. The pattern of melatonin secretion is controlled by an endogenous circadian timing system and conveys information about the light-dark cycle to the organism, thereby organizing its seasonal and circadian rhythms. Melatonin has powerful antioxidant effects, functions in an immunomodulatory role, may protect against certain cancers, delays some age-related processes, stimulates the synthesis of type I collagen fibers, and promotes bone formation. An extensive review was made (e.g., using PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Knowledge) of the literature. Melatonin, which is released into the saliva, may have important implications for dental disorders, especially in periodontal disease. Diseases of the periodontium are known to be aggravated by free radicals and by alterations in the immune response to microorganisms that are present in plaque. In response to periodontal inflammation, the blood and salivary levels of melatonin may increase. Melatonin may play a role in protecting the oral cavity from tissue damage that is due to oxidative stress, and it may contribute to the regeneration of alveolar bone through the stimulation of type I collagen fiber production and the modulation of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity.

  8. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  9. Electronic Cigarette: Role in the Primary Prevention of Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Teresa; Trapasso, Serena; Puzzo, Lidia; Allegra, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cigarette smoke has been identified as the main cause of oral cavity carcinoma. Recently, the electronic cigarette, a battery-operated device, was developed to help smokers stop their tobacco addiction. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of electronic cigarettes and to establish the possible role of such device in the primary prevention of oral cavity cancer. SUBJECTS AND METHODS This study included 65 subjects who were divided into three groups (smokers, e-cigarette smokers, and nonsmokers). All subjects were submitted to cytologic examination by scraping of oral mucosa. The slides were microscopically evaluated through a micronucleus assay test. RESULTS The prevalence of micronuclei was significantly decreased in the e-cigarette smoker group. There were no statistically significant differences in micronuclei distribution according to the type of cigarette, gender, and age. CONCLUSIONS The use of electronic cigarettes seems to be safe for oral cells and should be suggested as an aid to smoking cessation. PMID:27773997

  10. Measurement of epithelial thickness within the oral cavity using optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestin, S.; Betz, C.; Kraft, M.

    2010-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising method in the early diagnosis of oral cavity cancer. The objective of the present study is to determine normal values of epithelial thickness in the oral cavity, as no such data are to be found in the literature. In healthy test persons, epithelial thickness of the oral mucosa was determined with the help of OCT separately for each side at nine different locations. Special attention was directed to those sites having the highest incidence for the development of dysplasias and carcinomas. Depending on the location within the oral cavity, the epithelium demonstrated a varying thickness. The highest values were found in the region of the tongue and the cheek, whereas the floor of the mouth showed the thinnest epithelium. Our data serve as reference values for detecting oral malignancy and determining the approximate grade of dysplasia. In this circumstance, a differentiated view of the different regions is important due to the variation in thickness of the epithelium within the normal oral cavity.

  11. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a 10 year old boy.

    PubMed

    Khan, M H; Naushad, Q N

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity a type of Oral Cancer in young patients is a very rare occurrence particularly during the first decade of life. Oral cancer is predominantly an aggressive neoplasm of middle-aged people where 96% of the patients are more than 40 years of age and it occurs mainly due to the excessive consumption of tobacco and alcohol. In South-East Asia it has a higher rate of occurrence than the rest of the world, partly due to increased consumption of chewing tobacco and various harmful spices, areca nuts and betel quids. These rare varieties of aggressive neoplasm commonly affect tongue and lip. This report describes a case of squamous cell carcinoma in a 10 year old boy who had an exophytic type of granulomatous lesion with some indurated borders which diffusely involved the left side of the hard palate, alveolar mucosa, left maxillary antrum and aggressively emerged within the left orbit by engulfing the left inferior rectus muscle. The purpose of this case report is to provide information that younger group can suffer from oral squamous cell carcinoma though it is very rare and this younger group would appear to have a biologically more aggressive tumor and they require more complex treatment. The role of more aggressive initial therapy must be considered.

  12. Isolation and identification methods of Rothia species in oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Uchibori, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Mashimo, Chiho; Nambu, Takayuki; Saito, Masanori; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Ochiai, Tomoko

    2017-03-01

    Rothia dentocariosa and Rothia mucilaginosa which are Gram-positive bacteria are part of the normal flora in the human oral cavity and pharynx. Furthermore, Rothia aeria, which was first isolated from air samples in the Russian space station Mir, is predicted to be an oral inhabitant. Immunocompromised patients are often infected by these organisms, leading to various systemic diseases. The involvement of these organisms in oral infections has attracted little attention, and their distribution in the oral cavity has not been fully clarified because of difficulties in accurately identifying these organisms. A suitable selective medium for oral Rothia species, including R. aeria, is necessary to assess the veritable prevalence of these organisms in the oral cavity. To examine the bacterial population in the oral cavity, a novel selective medium (ORSM) was developed for isolating oral Rothia species in this study. ORSM consists of tryptone, sodium gluconate, Lab-Lemco powder, sodium fluoride, neutral acriflavin, lincomycin, colistin, and agar. The average growth recovery of oral Rothia species on ORSM was 96.7% compared with that on BHI-Y agar. Growth of other representative oral bacteria, i.e. genera Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Neisseria, and Corynebacterium, was remarkably inhibited on the selective medium. PCR primers were designed based on partial sequences of the 16S rDNA genes of oral Rothia species. These primers reacted to each organism and did not react to other non-oral Rothia species or representative oral bacteria. These results indicated that these primers are useful for identifying oral Rothia species. A simple multiplex PCR procedure using these primers was a reliable method of identifying oral Rothia species. The proportion of oral Rothia species in saliva samples collected from 20 subjects was examined by culture method using ORSM. Rothia dentocariosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, and R. aeria accounted for 1.3%, 5.9%, and 0.8% of the total cultivable

  13. Oral verrucous carcinoma: A retrospective analysis for clinicopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Sonalika, Wanjari G; Anand, Tegginamani

    2016-01-01

    To study the clinicopathological features of oral verrucous carcinoma (VC). Archives of the department were retrieved for verrucous lesions. After thorough histopathologic examination, 10 cases were confirmed as VC. Age, sex, site, tobacco habit, clinical presentation, and histologically, the presence of dysplasia and koilocytic changes were studied. Oral VC showed a distinct male preponderance with male:female ratio of 8:2 and occurring predominantly in sixth and seventh decade. Tobacco association in the form of chewing (50%), smoking (40%) or both (10%) was found in all the cases. In chewers, the site of lesion corresponded to the site of tobacco placement that is gingivobuccal sulcus. In smokers, the posterior part of the oral cavity was affected, and the lesions were extensive. Painless, exophytic, cauliflower-like growth was the most common presentation with surrounding whitish (leukoplakic) mucosa. Fifty percentage of the cases showed human papilloma virus-induced changes in the epithelium. Dysplasia was seen in two cases. Oral VCs are invariably associated with tobacco habits. In smokers, the lesions are extensive, affecting the posterior parts of the oral cavity. Although evidence of viral infection was seen but its role as an etiological agent is still controversial. Site and depth of the biopsy along with thorough histopathological sampling is essential to avoid erroneous diagnosis.

  14. Melatonin and cancer: current knowledge and its application to oral cavity tumours.

    PubMed

    Cutando, Antonio; Aneiros-Fernández, José; Aneiros-Cachaza, José; Arias-Santiago, Salvador

    2011-09-01

    Melatonin (MLT) is a molecule secreted by the pineal gland in cyclical periods. In mammals, MLT is involved in physiological processes, such as sleep/wake regulation in the circadian cycle. It has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, functions as an immunomodulator, and stimulates bone metabolism. MLT is also involved in tumour processes in breast, prostate, liver, and bone cancers, among others, and in oral cavity tumours like epidermoid carcinoma. We are gradually increasing our knowledge of the underlying mechanism of MLT action in the aforementioned tumour processes, in which MT1, MT2, MT3, and RZR receptors appear to play a highly important role. These receptors belong to a large family of G-protein-coupled transmembrane receptors, some of which have been linked to melatonin's anticancer action, to tumour growth, and to prognosis. The objective of this article is to provide a clear review of research into the range of MLT functions, focusing specifically on MT receptors. We aim to contribute interesting, new approaches to research into oral cavity tumours. An extensive review of the research literature was conducted using PubMed, Science Direct, ISI Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane base. This study highlights the growing importance of MLT in the prognosis and treatment of certain tumours, including epidermoid carcinoma in the oral cavity. Moreover, it opens up a highly original, encouraging line of research in the field of tumours. MLT contributes to protecting the oral cavity from tissue damage caused by receptor action. Experimental evidence suggests that it may be useful in the treatment and prognosis of tumour processes in the oral cavity. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. [Physical examination of oral cavity and physiological variations].

    PubMed

    Joly, Aline; Huttenberger, Brigitte; Pare, Arnaud

    2017-02-20

    Clinical examination from front to rear of oral cavity, mouth closed then open. Inspection and bimanuel exam. Face examination but also cervical lymph nodes, skin and mucous. Early diagnosis of oral cancer. To reduce diagnostic wavering and patient's stress, physiological varants are important to know. In most cases, clinical examination is enough for diagnosis.

  16. Vesiculobullous disease of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Zunt, S L

    1996-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical features of vesiculobullous diseases with oral manifestations. Oral vesiculobullous diseases may be viral, immunologically mediated, drug induced, hereditary, or traumatic in origin. A general approach to the diagnosis is outlined, including immunofluorescent testing of suspected vesiculobullous disease. Recommendations for treatment of oral vesiculobullous diseases are included.

  17. Diagnostic Biomarkers in Oral Verrucous Carcinoma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Sepanta; Mashhadiabbas, Fatemeh; Ahsaie, Mitra Ghazizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC), a low-grade variant of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), is most frequently seen in the oral cavity. No clear etiology has been found for this lesion, but human papilloma virus, chewing betel nuts, and ultraviolet radiation are suggested as probable causes. Differential diagnosis of OVC is challenging for oral pathologists. The aim of this study was to review the molecular-based approaches for differential diagnosis of OVC. An electronic search was conducted in Medline and Scopus from January 2004 to July 2015 limited to English language publications. Published papers on verrucous carcinoma (VC) were found according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and analyzed qualitatively. Data extraction were performed according to PRISMA statement. A total of 423 articles were reviewed; out of which, 26 articles completely fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most of the included studies investigated proliferative and apoptotic biomarkers such as p53 and Ki67. No definite conclusion was drawn for cytoskeletal biomarkers due to variability of factors and lack of significant expression. However, it seems that cytokeratin10 (CK 10) can be useful for differentiation of OVC and benign squamous lesions. Among cell surface and extracellular matrix biomarkers tissue biomarkers, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, CD31 and CD68 seem to be useful for differentiation of OVC and OSCC and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) can help in differentiation of OVC from oral epithelial dysplasia. Differences among OVC, OSCC and normal epithelium in expression profiles of the investigated biomarkers help in their differential diagnosis; although, clinicohistopathological similarities among verrucous hyperplasia, noninvasive OVC and invasive well-differentiated OSCC make the diagnosis difficult. Further studies are required to better differentiate these oral lesions.

  18. Optical diagnostics in the oral cavity: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, P; Holtzman, J; Epstein, J; Le, A

    2014-01-01

    As the emphasis shifts from damage mitigation to disease prevention or reversal of early disease in the oral cavity, the need for sensitive and accurate detection and diagnostic tools become more important. Many novel and emergent optical diagnostic modalities for the oral cavity are becoming available to clinicians with a variety of desirable attributes including: (i) non-invasiveness, (ii) absence of ionizing radiation, (iii) patient-friendliness, (iv) real-time information (v) repeatability, and (vi) high-resolution surface and subsurface images. In this article, the principles behind optical diagnostic approaches, their feasibility and applicability for imaging soft and hard tissues, and their potential usefulness as a tool in the diagnosis of oral mucosal lesions, dental pathologies, and other dental applications will be reviewed. The clinical applications of light-based imaging technologies in the oral cavity and of their derivative devices will be discussed to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of emergent diagnostic modalities. PMID:20561224

  19. An explosion in the oral cavity by a firecracker.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Explosive oral cavity injuries make restoring optimal oral function a challenge. An explosion in the oral cavity can cause burns and concomitant smoke inhalation injury to the upper airway.We present the case of a patient in whom the middle and lower thirds of the face were destroyed when a firecracker exploded in his oral cavity. Gunpowder tattooing caused by the explosion was present on the retropharyngeal space. He had an open fracture of the mandibular symphysis and inhalation burns of the upper airway were suspected. Tracheostomy was performed because we could not rule out inhalation burns of the upper airway. After close observation, his cardiopulmonary function and vital signs were stable, and we prepared him for reconstructive surgery.

  20. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. A phase 2 trial of surgery with perioperative INGN 201 (Ad5CMV-p53) gene therapy followed by chemoradiotherapy for advanced, resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx: report of the Southwest Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Yoo, George H; Moon, James; Leblanc, Michael; Lonardo, Fulvio; Urba, Susan; Kim, Harold; Hanna, Ehab; Tsue, Terry; Valentino, Joseph; Ensley, John; Wolf, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of treating patients with high-risk stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx with perioperative adenovirus-p53 (INGN 201) gene therapy along with surgery and chemoradiotherapy. A phase 2 study in a multi-institutional setting within the Southwest Oncology Group. Thirteen individuals who met the following entry criteria: newly diagnosed, previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx; selected stage III or IV disease without distant metastases; and surgically resectable disease. Surgery, perioperative INGN 201 gene therapy, and postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Overall patient status, tumor status, adverse effects, accrual rate, and percentage of patients successfully receiving the required doses of INGN 201. All 13 patients received surgery and perioperative INGN 201 injections in the primary tumor bed and the ipsilateral neck. In addition, 3 patients received injections in the contralateral neck. Three patients did not receive chemoradiotherapy. One patient had a grade 2 fistula of the oral cavity. Of the 10 patients with evaluable data, 2 experienced grade 4 adverse events, 1 owing to hypokalemia, hyponatremia, vomiting, leukopenia, and neutropenia and 1 owing to increased aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels. Seven other patients experienced grade 3 adverse events. The estimate of 1-year progression-free survival is 92%. This trial demonstrated the feasibility of handling and delivering a very complex gene vector safely in multiple cooperative group institutions without significant incident. Intraoperative INGN 201 gene therapy is technically feasible, but it has many logistical problems when performed in a multi-institutional setting. Regulatory requirements might have hindered accrual in this multi-institutional setting. Disease control seems to be promising; however, no definitive conclusion can be

  2. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  3. Survival of patients with oral cavity cancer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002-2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany.

  4. Oral carcinoma cuniculatum in a young child.

    PubMed

    Hutton, A; McKaig, S; Bardsley, P; Monaghan, A; Parmar, S

    2010-01-01

    From the Department of Dental Specialties, Birmingham Children's Hospital. This case study describes a rare case of oral carcinoma cuniculatum in a 7-year-old female. She presented with an enlarged mass of the anterior maxilla arising from the gingiva. An anterior maxillectomy with immediate prosthetic replacement and obturation of the residual defect were carried out. The management of this case was challenging given the rare nature of the disease, unclear etiology, the patient's young age and the mutilating effects of surgery. The treatment involved a large multidisciplinary team. The provision of obturators was particularly difficult due to poor patient compliance and the extent of surgery carried out in a growing child. Oral cancer in children under 15 years old is extremely rare and this is the youngest case of oral carcinoma cuniculatum reported in the literature.

  5. Application of direct oral microscopy in evaluating mucosal margins around invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Michcik, Adam; Michajłowski, Igor; Starzyńska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel, non-invasive diagnostic technique, which aids clinical examination of the oral cavity. The oral mucosa is examined at multiple magnifications and features such as sub-epithelial mucosal vessels, surface patterns, colour tone, transparency and the exact demarcation of mucosal lesions are estimated. The incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) oscillates between 1.9% and 3.5%, which makes it the eighth most common carcinoma occurring around the world and in Poland. The 5-year survival rates oscillate between 20% and 30%. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate clinically unchanged mucosal margins around OSCC by direct oral microscopy. The authors approached the question whether the borders of mucosal margins around OSCC established via direct oral microscopy differ from those established based on clinical examination. Material and methods Fifteen patients diagnosed with OSCC were enrolled. Patients were first clinically examined to evaluate the extent of the tumour and to plan resection margins. Eventually, direct oral microscopy was performed to establish the width of the subclinically unchanged mucosal margins based on a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae, followed by comparison with those established by clinical evaluation. Results Histopathologic results of biopsies from areas indicated by direct oral microscopy revealed dysplasia in 86.7% of patients, whereas biopsies from areas indicated by clinical examination revealed dysplasia only in 40% of individuals, resulting in the need for widening of mucosal margins. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy enables detection of dysplasia within clinically unaltered mucosal margins around OSCC, which results in more precise establishing of resection boundaries, contributing to improvement of resection totality. PMID:26759543

  6. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. Oral Cavity as an Extragastric Reservoir of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Pradeep S.; Kamath, Kavitha P.; Patil, Shankargouda; Preethanath, R. S.; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several studies were reported on the prevalence, and relationship between the existence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity and in stomach of patients. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the existing literature on the presence of H. pylori in the oral cavity and its link to gastric infection, the existence of coinfection, and the impact of anti-H. pylori therapy on the dental plaque and vice versa. Method. Two authors independently searched the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The articles were analyzed critically and all qualified studies were included. The search was carried out by using a combined text and the MeSH search strategies: using the key words Helicobacter, Helicobacter pylori, and H. pylori in combination with dental plaque, periodontitis, and oral hygiene. Results. The data was presented in 8 tables and each topic separately discussed. Conclusion. Based on the systematic review of the available literature on H. pylori infection and its presence in the oral cavity, it can be concluded that dental plaque can act as a reservoir, and proper oral hygiene maintenance is essential to prevent reinfection. Due to the diversified methods and population groups involved in the available literature, no concrete evidence can be laid down. Further studies are necessary to establish the role of H. pylori in the oral cavity and its eradication on preventing the gastroduodenal infection. PMID:24701355

  8. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  10. Applications of flexible hollow waveguides in the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannot, Israel; Calderon, Shlomo; Dror, Jacob; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1995-05-01

    Flexible plastic waveguides were used in several fields of dentistry for treatments in the oral cavity. Soft tissue lesions were treated applying CO2 laser energy. A new technique for dental implants was suggested using a combination of Er-YAG and CO2 laser energy. Cavity preparation in the teeth was performed using the Er-YAG laser radiation and CO2 energy transmitted by the waveguides was used for root canal treatments.

  11. Factors associated with lip and oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Isabella Lima Arrais; de Medeiros, Júlia Julliêta; Rodrigues, Larycia Vicente; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Lima Neto, Eufrásio de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with the occurrence of primary cancer of the lip and oral cavity regions compared to other types of head and neck cancers according to demographic, socioeconomic data and lifestyle, in Brazil, from 2000 to 2011. A study was conducted using Hospital Cancer Records (Instituto Nacional do Câncer), from 2000 to 2011, totaling 23,153 cases. Data were analyzed by binary logistic regression (response category: primary cancers located in the lip and oral cavity; comparison category; other types of primary cancer in the head and neck, which does not affect the lip and oral cavity) at a significance level α = 5%. The study showed factors associated with higher incidence of cancer in the lip and oral cavity: being of advanced age (OR = 1.16), not having a family history of cancer (OR = 2.38), alcohol consumption (OR = 1.17); former tobacco use (OR = 1.51) or current tobacco use (OR = 1.65); having a previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment (OR =1.66). Being female (OR = 0.92), having completed basic (OR = 0.71) and higher (OR = 0.46) education and having previous diagnosis of cancer with treatment (OR = 0.74) constituted factors associated with lower prevalence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity. Age, absence of family history of cancer, smoking habits and alcohol consumption, and previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment were associated with a higher incidence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity.

  12. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  13. Clinical and mycological analysis of dog’s oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Rosema; Mattei, Antonella Souza; Waller, Stefanie Bressan; Madrid, Isabel Martins; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; de Oliveira Nobre, Márcia; Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; de Mello, João Roberto Braga; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2013-01-01

    The oral microbiota of humans and animals is made up of a wide variety of yeasts and bacteria, but microbiota of dogs is not totally described. Although such identification is an important step to establish the etiopathogenesis and adequate therapy for the periodontal disease The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate oral alterations with the presence of yeasts in oral cavity of female dogs. After clinical evaluation samples from healthy and from dogs with oral diseases were obtained from three different oral sites by swabs, curettes, millimeter periodontal probes and HA membrane tip in cellulose ester. Yeast identification was performed through macroscopic and microscopic colony features and biochemical tests. Dental calculus was the most prevalent occurrence in the oral cavity of 59 females. However, the isolation of yeasts was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in animals suffering from halitosis. Eleven yeast species were identified, namely: Malassezia pachydermatis, Rhodotorula spp., Candida albicans, C. catenulata, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. parapsilosis, C. intermedia, Trichosporon asahii, T. mucoides and Cryptococcus albidus. It could be concluded that the yeasts are part of the microbiota from the different sites of the oral cavity of the female canines studied without causing any significant alterations except halitosis. PMID:24159296

  14. Clinical and mycological analysis of dog's oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Santin, Rosema; Mattei, Antonella Souza; Waller, Stefanie Bressan; Madrid, Isabel Martins; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; de Oliveira Nobre, Márcia; Nascente, Patrícia da Silva; de Mello, João Roberto Braga; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2013-01-01

    The oral microbiota of humans and animals is made up of a wide variety of yeasts and bacteria, but microbiota of dogs is not totally described. Although such identification is an important step to establish the etiopathogenesis and adequate therapy for the periodontal disease The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate oral alterations with the presence of yeasts in oral cavity of female dogs. After clinical evaluation samples from healthy and from dogs with oral diseases were obtained from three different oral sites by swabs, curettes, millimeter periodontal probes and HA membrane tip in cellulose ester. Yeast identification was performed through macroscopic and microscopic colony features and biochemical tests. Dental calculus was the most prevalent occurrence in the oral cavity of 59 females. However, the isolation of yeasts was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in animals suffering from halitosis. Eleven yeast species were identified, namely: Malassezia pachydermatis, Rhodotorula spp., Candida albicans, C. catenulata, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. parapsilosis, C. intermedia, Trichosporon asahii, T. mucoides and Cryptococcus albidus. It could be concluded that the yeasts are part of the microbiota from the different sites of the oral cavity of the female canines studied without causing any significant alterations except halitosis.

  15. Global transcription of CRISPR loci in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lum, Andrew G; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Naidu, Mayuri; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-05-21

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are active in acquired resistance against bacteriophage and plasmids in a number of environments. In the human mouth, CRISPR loci evolve to counteract oral phage, but the expression of these CRISPR loci has not previously been investigated. We sequenced cDNA from CRISPR loci found in numerous different oral bacteria and compared with oral phage communities to determine whether the transcription of CRISPR loci is specifically targeted towards highly abundant phage present in the oral environment. We found that of the 529,027 CRISPR spacer groups studied, 88 % could be identified in transcripts, indicating that the vast majority of CRISPR loci in the oral cavity were transcribed. There were no strong associations between CRISPR spacer repertoires and oral health status or nucleic acid type. We also compared CRISPR repertoires with oral bacteriophage communities, and found that there was no significant association between CRISPR transcripts and oral phage, regardless of the CRISPR type being evaluated. We characterized highly expressed CRISPR spacers and found that they were no more likely than other spacers to match oral phage. By reassembling the CRISPR-bearing reads into longer CRISPR loci, we found that the majority of the loci did not have spacers matching viruses found in the oral cavities of the subjects studied. For some CRISPR types, loci containing spacers matching oral phage were significantly more likely to have multiple spacers rather than a single spacer matching oral phage. These data suggest that the transcription of oral CRISPR loci is relatively ubiquitous and that highly expressed CRISPR spacers do not necessarily target the most abundant oral phage.

  16. Does buccal cancer have worse prognosis than other oral cavity cancers?

    PubMed

    Camilon, P Ryan; Stokes, William A; Fuller, Colin W; Nguyen, Shaun A; Lentsch, Eric J

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether buccal squamous cell carcinoma has worse overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity. Retrospective analysis of a large population database. We began with a Kaplan-Meier analysis of OS and DSS for buccal versus nonbuccal tumors with unmatched data, followed by an analysis of cases matched for race, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, and treatment modality. This was supported by a univariate Cox regression comparing buccal cancer to nonbuccal cancer, followed by a multivariate Cox regression that included all significant variables studied. With unmatched data, buccal cancer had significantly lesser OS and DSS values than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity (P < .001). After case matching, the differences between OS and DSS for buccal cancer versus nonbuccal oral cancer were no longer significant. Univariate Cox regression models with respect to OS and DSS showed a significant difference between buccal cancer and nonbuccal cancer. However, with multivariate analysis, buccal hazard ratios for OS and DSS were not significant. With the largest series of buccal carcinoma to date, our study concludes that the OS and DSS of buccal cancer are similar to those of cancers in other oral cavity sites once age at diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, and race are taken into consideration. The previously perceived poor prognosis of buccal carcinoma may be due to variations in tumor presentation, such as later stage and older patient age. 2b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Optimal lighting of RGB LEDs for oral cavity detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Chen, Yung-Tsan

    2012-04-23

    In this paper the optimal lighting for oral cavity detection is proposed. The illuminants consist of several LEDs with different intensity ratios and peak wavelengths, which can enhance the color difference between normal and abnormal regions in the oral cavity. An algorithm combined with multi-spectral imaging (MSI) and color reproduction technique is applied to find the best enhancement of this difference. The colored LEDs of the optimal lighting, the Color Rendering Index (CRI) of the illuminants, and comparison with traditional illuminants are discussed. The calculations show that color enhancement ability in the oral cavity is not entirely a function of the higher CRI of some illuminants, as the narrowband illuminants (LEDs) produce an image with greater contrast than the broadband spectra and higher CRI of traditional illuminants in the reddish oral environment. Accordingly, an illuminant with specific intensity ratio of red, green, and blue LEDs is proposed, which has optimal color enhancement for oral cavity detection. Compared with the fluorescent lighting commonly in the use now, the color difference between normal and inflamed tissues can be improved from 21.5732 to 30.5532, a 42% increase, thus making medical diagnosis more efficient, so helping patients receive early treatment. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  18. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  19. Oral alimentation following intubation for esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Haffejee, A A; Angorn, I B

    1977-01-01

    The nutritional status of 15 patients suffering from unresectable carcinoma of the midthoracic esophagus was evaluated before and after palliative pulsion intubation. All patients showed evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition, prior to intubation. Oral alimentation using a formulated hospital ward diet with an elemental dietary supplement reversed the nutritional deficit. A mean daily positive nitrogen balance of seven grams was achieved three weeks following intubation. No episode of tube blockage was observed and the elemental diet supplement was well tolerated. PMID:74985

  20. Oral alimentation following intubation for esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Haffejee, A A; Angorn, I B

    1977-12-01

    The nutritional status of 15 patients suffering from unresectable carcinoma of the midthoracic esophagus was evaluated before and after palliative pulsion intubation. All patients showed evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition, prior to intubation. Oral alimentation using a formulated hospital ward diet with an elemental dietary supplement reversed the nutritional deficit. A mean daily positive nitrogen balance of seven grams was achieved three weeks following intubation. No episode of tube blockage was observed and the elemental diet supplement was well tolerated.

  1. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery.

    PubMed

    Yee, John K C

    2016-01-14

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization.

  2. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-15

    Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Tongue Carcinoma

  4. Analysis of the distribution and expression of claudin-1 tight junction protein in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ouban, Abderrahman; Ahmed, Atif

    2015-07-01

    Claudins are the main sealing proteins of the intercellular tight junctions and play an important role in cancer cell progression and dissemination. The authors have previously shown that overexpression of claudin-1 is associated with angiolymphatic and perineural invasion, consistent with aggressive tumor behavior and with advanced stage disease in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Our goal in this study was to examine claudin-1 expression in a tissue microarray of OSCCs taken from multiple sites within the oral cavity. This study examined and compared the expression of claudin-1 by immunohistochemistry in 60 tissue samples (49 OSCCs and 10 cases of non-neoplastic tissue, single core per case) were analyzed for claudin-1 expression by immunohistochemistry. The tumors included SCCs from the tongue (n=28), the cheek (n=9), gingival (n=4), lip (n=3), and oral cavity (n=5). Nonmalignant normal oral mucosa from the tongue (unmatched cases, n=2). Cancer adjacent tissue samples were taken from the tongue (n=6), gingival (n=2), and palate (n=1). This study demonstrates the expression of claudin-1 protein across a sample of OSCCs originating from multiple locations in the oral cavity. The highest expression of claudin-1 was observed in well-differentiated OSCCs, whereas poorly differentiated OSCCs exhibited mostly negative staining for claudin-1. In addition, we hereby report differential pattern of expression among tumors of different sites within the oral cavity, and between benign and cancerous samples. Our understanding of the exact function and role of claudin-1 in tumorigenesis is expanding exponentially.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R. Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity.

  6. Melanoma of the oral cavity. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cebrián Carretero, J L; Chamorro Pons, M; Montesdeoca, N

    2001-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumour derived from malignant transformation of melanic cells of the basal layer of cutaneous and mucosal epithelia. Primary melanoma of the oral cavity is the most malignant tumour among head and neck tumours. Inside the oral cavity, 80% are located in the maxilla, preferentially in the palatal mucosa. Although its etiology is unknown, occasionally it forms over a preexisting melanosis of prolonged evolution. In the vast majority of cases it is asymptomatic during years and it is usually detected as a pigmented mass which is sometimes painful. Doctors who treat problems of the oral cavity must be aware of the necessity for early diagnosis of melanoma, performing biopsies of any pigmented lesion. Once it becomes clinically evident, its tendency is to grow toward adjacent structures and to form metastases in cervical lymphatic nodes, turning the tumour into a systemic disease. Prognosis of melanoma in the oral cavity is very poor. The only curative treatment is ablative surgery. Other therapeutic modalities such as: radiotherapy, chemotherapy or immunotherapy have supposed little contribution to improve survival.

  7. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-04

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage 0 Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Laryngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA

  9. Ewing sarcoma of the oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives A review is made of the clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic and survival characteristics of Ewing sarcoma (ES) of the oral cavity. Material and Methods A systematic literature search was carried out, with restrictions referred to time (1960-2014), language (English and Spanish) and type of study (case reports, letters, datasets, reviews). The following MeSH terms and boolean operators were used: Ewing AND Sarcoma AND [tongue, jaw, maxilla, cheek, condyle OR temporomandibular, floor AND mouth, gum OR gingiva, palate OR palatal, lip, uvula, head AND neck]. Results Seventy-one cases of ES of the oral cavity were documented from 53 articles. The main differences versus ES of other locations were a younger age at manifestation, a shorter time from symptoms onset to diagnosis, and swelling as the most frequent clinical manifestation versus swelling and pain in the rest of disease locations. The way in which ES manifests in the oral cavity is varied and comprises dental displacement (19.7%), dental mobility (7%), root reabsorption (5.6%), destruction of the dental follicle (4.2%), premature exfoliation (4.2%) and paresthesia of the chin (2.8%). Metastatic neck adenopathies appear in 11.3% of the cases. Significant differences in survival are observed between patients with a complete diagnosis of ES (hematoxylin-eosin staining, PAS positivity, CD99 positivity) and those with an incomplete diagnosis. Conclusions Ewing sarcoma of the oral cavity presents a series of specific features that distinguish it from ES of other locations. Key words:Primitive neuroectodermal tumor, PNET, Ewing sarcoma, Ewing tumor, sarcoma, oral cavity. PMID:28210452

  10. Versatility of nasolabial flaps in oral cavity reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Cebrián-Carretero, José L.; Morán-Soto, María J.; Burgueño-García, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the techniques involved and the results obtained witn nasolabial flaps in small and medium-sized defects of the oral cavity. The procedure is an easy resconstructive option with a high success rate and with very good aesthetic and functional outcomes. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 16 nasolabial flap reconstructions in 15 oncological patients with oral cavity defects undergoing single-stage surgical interventions. We evaluate the tumor type, its location, size, the resective and reconstructive techniques involved, as well as any complications. Results: Out of 15 patients, 9 were male and 6 female, with ages ranging from 60-85 years. The primary tumor was located in the mandibular or maxillary gingiva in 7 patients, the lateral margin of the tongue in 5, the floor of the mouth in 3 and the mandibular symphysis in a single patient. The tumors were of a small to medium size. All patients underwent intraoral resections. In most cases, a cervical dissection was performed. All flaps were completed as single-stage surgical interventions, with 14 unilateral and 2 bilateral procedures. Five patients had received radiotherapy treatment for previous tumors. During the follow up period, which ranged from 4 months to 8 years, only one patient required their flap to be thinned, there were two incidents of surgical wound dehiscence, two hematomas and one orocutaneous fistula, none of which affected the survival of the flap. Conclusions: The nasolabial flap proves highly versatile in oral cavity reconstructions, coupled with a minimal morbidity of the donor region and good aesthetic and functional results. Its high vascularity allows for cervical dissections to be carried out or even for radiotherapy to be administered prior to it. It is straightforward, safe, and carrying it out as a single-stage intervention makes it the ideal surgical option for small to medium intraoral defects in edentulous patients with other comorbidities. Key words

  11. [Study on the oral hygiene of patients with oral cavity cancer].

    PubMed

    Bratoĭcheva, M St; Kondeva, V K

    2008-01-01

    Many authors consider oral hygiene an important factor in the etiology and pathogenesis of oral cavity cancer. The aim of the present study was to establish the role of poor oral hygiene in the development of malignant lesions in the oral cavity. One hundred and three patients were interviewed. Questions, regarding oral hygiene were included in the interview. Results showed that 53,80% of urban residents brush their teeth twice daily whereas 65,52% of rural residents brush their teeth irregularly - p<0,001 (chi(2)=23,67). 46,88% of women clean their teeth twice daily. 46,94% of men do not maintain adequate oral hygiene - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 9,21). Regarding the brush, it was found out that 56,00% of females use a hard bristle toothbrush, the same refers to 28,04% of men - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 4,15). Hard bristle toothbrush was used by 48,88% of urban residents and 9,09% of rural residents - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 5,78). People up to 30 years of age use hard bristle toothbrush most often -39,13% - p<0,01 (chi(2)=12,26). The accumulated evidence provides further explanation why oral cavity cancer is more frequent in men, rural residents and in the elderly. Oral hygiene is a factor in the development of oral cavity cancer.

  12. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival.

  13. Serum metabolomics in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Gokul; Ramani, Pratibha; Patankar, Sangeeta

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a core discipline of system biology focusing on the study of low molecular weight compounds in biological system. Analysis of human metabolome, which is composed of diverse group of metabolites, can aid in diagnosis and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of the present study is to analyze and identify serum metabolites in oral leukoplakia and OSCC as a potential diagnostic biomarker and a predictor for malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia. Serum metabolomic profile of patients diagnosed with oral leukoplakia (n = 21) and OSCC (n = 22) was compared with normal controls (n = 18) using quadrupole time of flight-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. MassHunter profile software was used for metabolite identification, and statistical analysis to assess the variation of the metabolites was performed using Mass Profiler Professional software. Statistical significance between the three groups was expressed using ANOVA (P < 0.05), and intergroup comparison was done using Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Significant upregulation of estradiol-17-beta-3-sulfate, L-carnitine, 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 8-hydroxyadenine, 2-methylcitric acid, putrescine, and estrone-3-sulfate was seen in oral leukoplakia and OSCC than in normal controls. Furthermore, significant upregulation of 5,6-dihydrouridine, 4-hydroxypenbutolol glucuronide, 8-hydroxyadenine, and putrescine was evident in OSCC group than in oral leukoplakia. Upregulation of L-carnitine, lysine, 2-methylcitric acid, putrescine; 8-hydroxyadenine; 17-estradiol; 5,6-dihydrouridine; and MTA suggests their diagnostic potential in oral leukoplakia and OSCC. Further, a significant upregulation of putrescine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5,6-dihydrouridine in OSCC than in oral leukoplakia indicates their potential role in predicting the malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia.

  14. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. Methods We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case–control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression and were adjusted for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Results Personal history of oral candidiasis was related to a significantly increased risk of oral cavity cancer (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.1-12.1). History of head and neck cancers among the first-degree relatives was associated with an OR of 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.8). The risk increased with the number of first-degree relatives with head and neck cancer. Conclusion A family history of head and neck cancer is a marker of an increased risk of oral cavity cancer and should be taken into account to target prevention efforts and screening. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between oral cavity cancer and personal history of candidiasis. PMID:24286495

  15. [Acute conditions of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bindslev, Preben Hørsted; Schou, Søren

    2010-11-01

    Acute conditions are mainly caused by inflammatory and infectious reactions in the dental pulp, periodontal tissues, periapical bone and the tissues around partially impacted teeth. Pain may also be related to traumatic injuries to the teeth and jaws as well as sequelae after oral surgery. Emergency treatment involves incision of abscesses, root canal treatment, irrigation with antiseptics, immobilisation of teeth or fractured bones, and prescription of analgetics. Antibiotics are only indicated in cases in which there is a risk that an infection spreads to adjacent regions or a risk of fever and malaise.

  16. Rare mycoses of the oral cavity: a literature epidemiologic review.

    PubMed

    Iatta, Roberta; Napoli, Christian; Borghi, Elisa; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2009-11-01

    Stomatologic fungal infections display different etiologies, pathogenesis, and clinical presentations. The incidence of rare mycoses of oral cavity is very low. These infections can involve both immunocompromised and immmunocompetent patients with common predisposing factors, such as diabetes or suffering from diseases causing immune system impairment. Oral mycoses can cause acute, chronic, and mucocutaneous lesions. Candidiasis is the most common mouth mycosis. Although occasionally primary mouth pathogens, Cryptococcus spp. or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus spp. and zygomycetes) can cause oral mycoses, with the oral localization more commonly secondary to a more serious systemic infection. The diagnosis of oral mycoses is based on clinical examination; for yeasts, culture is necessary to identify the etiologic agents; for filamentous fungi, in particular for zygomycetes and dimorphic, a definitive diagnosis can be made by histologic examination and pertinent stains with or without isolation of the fungus from the same site.

  17. [Determination of human papillomavirus in oral leukoplakia,oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Jin, Jian-qiu; Deng, Da-jun; Liu, Hong-wei

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the possibility for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to be a predictable signal for the carcinogenesis of oral mucosa by comparing the prevalences of HPV in each stage of oral mucosal carcinogenesis and to compare the sensitivity differences of the two methods in detecting HPV infection in oral cavity. The hybrid capture (HC-II) was used to detect infection of HPV in 255 samples taken from 12 cases of healthy oral mucosa, 211 cases of patients with pathological diagnosis and 32 cases of patients with clinical diagnosis. The diagnosed cases included 8 cases of benign lesions of the oral mucosa, precancerous lesions [74 cases of oral leukoplakia (OLK) with hyperplasia and 42 cases of OLK with oral epithelial dysplasia (OED)], 91 cases of precancerous condition [oral lichen planus (OLP)] and 28 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). And in situ hybridization (ISH) was used to detect infection of HPV in 33 cases of OSCC and 76 cases of OLK, including 30 cases of hyperplasia, 15 cases of mild OED, 15 cases of moderate OED and 16 cases of severe OED. The prevalence of HPV in OLP samples was higher (12.12%, 8/66) than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116) (χ(2)=4.666, P=0.031) and OSCC(7.14%, 2/28, χ(2)=0.513, P=0.474). The prevalence of HPV in OSCC (7.14%, 2/28) was higher than that of OLK (2.59%, 3/116), and no significant difference was found. There was only one case of smoke spot and statistical analysis was not carried out. ISH was used to detect type 16/18 and type 31/33 HPV DNA in 109 cases of oral mucosal lesions in paraffin sections and only one case of OSCC was HPV positive. Thirty-seven cases were detected by HC-II and ISH methods at the same time. The same negative results by the two methods were found in 94.6% samples (35/37). In the other two samples, one was OSCC with early infiltration and the other was OLK with hyperplasia, The HC-II results were positive while the ISH results were negative. The patients with OLP and HPV testing results

  18. Pedunculated carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Wu; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chen, Jeng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an epithelial malignancy arising in or from a benign pleomorphic salivary adenoma. The parotid gland is the most common location of CXPAs. Minor salivary gland CXPAs of the nasal cavity are exceedingly rare, with only 6 documented in the literature. Methods and Result: We present a 7th case: an unusual pedunculated intranasal CXPA, which had a favorable outcome after a wide endoscopic excision and the longest follow-up period reported to date. The clinical features, immunohistochemical characteristics, treatment choices, and disease outcomes of the intranasal CXPAs reported in previous studies are also reviewed. Conclusion: This case demonstrates the importance of considering the possibility of CXPA in the differential diagnosis of minor salivary gland malignancies in the nasal cavity. PMID:27684860

  19. Oral hybrid verrucous carcinoma: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gokavarapu, Sandhya; Rao S, L M Chandrasekhara; Tantravahi, Uma Sankar; Gundimeda, Sandhya Devi; Rao, T Subramaneshwar; Murthy, Sudha

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid Verrucous Carcinoma is an uncommon tumour wherein Verrucous Carcinoma (VC) is coexisting with conventional Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) within same maternal field. The heterogeneous nature, infrequency of occurrence and the difficulties associated with diagnosis and management of this tumor is discussed through a retrospective study. Patients of primary hybrid VC treated from Jan 2010 to May 2013 at a tertiary institute were analyzed on multivariate cox regression model. During the above mentioned period; 37 patients of hybrid VC were reported; 18(48.6 %) were male and 19(51.3 %) were female. Age ranged between 33 years to 78 years. Median follow up period was 32 months. T stage status and Stage grouping was not statistically significant for mortality (p value: 0.338). In the multivariate cox-regression model, the presence of second primary oral cancer was significantly associated with mortality, adjusted HR; 23.10 (95 % CI: 1.73, 307.65) (p = 0.017). Tumour staging is often unreliable in predicting prognosis of hybrid VC, occurrence of second primary oral cancer and recurrence appears to be significant factors effecting prognosis.

  20. [Results of surgical treatment of oral cavity cancer T1-2N0M0].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A V; Sibgatullin, R R; Belova, E N; Boĭko, A A; Zolotykh, V G; Roman, L D

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the results of treatment of 20 patients (aged from 46 to 85 years old) with early oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma at the period from April 2009 to January 2011. The surgery included the resection of primary tumor and neck dissection in all the patients. The primary tumor was removed by mouth access in 10 patients and combined method was used in 10 cases. The selective neck dissection was carried out in 22 cases. The oral cavity wounds were closed primarily by local flaps in 10 patients, some small residual defects were left open in 3 cases. The reconstructions with remote skin-muscular infrahyoid flap were performed in 7 patients. The free revascularized radial skin-fascia flap was used in 3 cases. A follow-up period was from 24 to 44 months. The primary local regional control consisted of 85% in given group of patients. The rate of recurrence of the second primary metachronous tumor was 15%. Tumors were located in the oral cavity. Overall 3-year survival was 90% (18 out of 20 patients).

  1. Inorganic chemistry of defensive peroxidases in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ashby, M T

    2008-10-01

    The innate host response system is comprised of various mechanisms for orchestrating host response to microbial infection of the oral cavity. The heterogeneity of the oral cavity and the associated microenvironments that are produced give rise to different chemistries that affect the innate defense system. One focus of this review is on how these spatial differences influence the two major defensive peroxidases of the oral cavity, salivary peroxidase (SPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). With hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidant, the defensive peroxidases use inorganic ions to produce antimicrobials that are generally more effective than H(2)O(2) itself. The concentrations of the inorganic substrates are different in saliva vs. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Thus, in the supragingival regime, SPO and MPO work in unison for the exclusive production of hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-), a reactive inorganic species), which constantly bathes nascent plaques. In contrast, MPO is introduced to the GCF during inflammatory response, and in that environment it is capable of producing hypochlorite (OCl(-)), a chemically more powerful oxidant that is implicated in host tissue damage. A second focus of this review is on inter-person variation that may contribute to different peroxidase function. Many of these differences are attributed to dietary or smoking practices that alter the concentrations of relevant inorganic species in the oral cavity (e.g.: fluoride, F(-); cyanide, CN(-); cyanate, OCN(-); thiocyanate, SCN(-); and nitrate, NO(3)(-)). Because of the complexity of the host and microflora biology and the associated chemistry, it is difficult to establish the significance of the human peroxidase systems during the pathogenesis of oral diseases. The problem is particularly complex with respect to the gingival sulcus and periodontal pockets (where the very different defensive stratagems of GCF and saliva co-mingle). Despite this complexity, intriguing in vitro and in vivo

  2. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  3. Quality of Life of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dzebo, Senada; Mahmutovic, Jasmina; Erkocevic, Hasiba

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years the quality of life of patients is very important in monitoring the treatment and therapeutic procedure success. It has become a significant factor in assessing the therapeutic procedure accomplishment, and for the first time the patient alone can access the success of the respective therapy. Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common cancers of the head and neck, and is one of the ten most common causes of death in the world. In the majority of cases, cancer of the oral cavity is detected in an advanced stage when therapeutic options are reduced, and the prognosis is much worse. Cancer of the oral cavity is 10 times more common in men. Assessment of quality of life should be an indicator of the multidisciplinary treatment success and it should point to areas in which the affected person requires support. Aim of the study: To examine the quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at the Clinic of Maxillofacial Surgery of the Clinical Center University of Sarajevo (CCUS), through a survey on patients with verified oral cavity cancer, questionnaire related to socio-demographic characteristics of the patients and the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire (UW-QOL). The results were included in the database and statistically processed in the SPSS program, 19.0 version for Windows. Afterwards, the results were thoroughly analyzed and documented, presented in absolute numbers and statistical values using statistical indicators in simple and understandable tables and figures. Results: The study results showed that out of the total score of 100, the median value of quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer, for the physical health component in the definition of quality was M=69.75 ±29.12 and for social-emotional health M=65.11 ± 27.47. Conclusion: This could be considered as satisfactory quality of life, in the sphere above half of the rating scale

  4. Apoptotic Index and Proliferative Index in Premalignant and Malignant Squamous Cell Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Vidya; Juluri, Ravichandra; Goel, Seema; Madan, Jyotsna; Mitra, Subir K; Gopalakrishnan, Dharmarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell lesions are most commonly diagnosed lesions in India. Both premalignant and malignant lesions are frequently encountered. In this study, we evaluated the role and significance of apoptotic indices (AI) and proliferative indices (PI) in premalignant and malignant squamous cell lesions of the oral cavity. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 histologically proven cases of premalignant and malignant oral squamous cell lesions were analyzed. The biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and also with monoclonal antibody Ki-67. AI and PI were assessed using a light microscope. Results: AI was found to increase gradually from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest AI was seen in well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). PI also was found to increase significantly from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma. The highest PI was seen in poorly differentiated SCC. Conclusion: AI in conjunction with the PI offers an accurate idea as to the nature and course of the lesion and may help to plan timely surgical intervention that results in better clinical prognosis and outcome. PMID:25709366

  5. LGR5 expression in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Andrew J; Abdul Majeed, Ahmad A; Pitty, Luke P; Major, Aidan G; Farah, Camile S

    2015-04-01

    LGR5 is pivotal to oral cavity development and is implicated in epithelial malignancy whereby stimulation of LGR5 potentiates canonical Wnt signaling. This investigation tested our hypothesis of a correlation between LGR5 expression and the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Immunoreactive LGR5 protein expression was quantified in 342 tissue samples ranging in disease severity from normal through mild and moderate or severe OED to OSCC. LGR5 was restricted to the basal layers for normal tissues, projected to the stratum granulosum in severe dysplasia, intense in carcinoma nests of well-differentiated OSCC, but uniformly diffuse throughout poorly differentiated OSCC. Median LGR5 immunoreactivity index scores increased with disease severity: mild dysplasia = 1 < moderate or severe dysplasia = 2.5 < OSCC = 6. Inclusion of LGR5 in a panel of immunohistochemical biomarkers may improve identification of increased potential for malignancy in OED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and predictive role of p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor in surgically treated oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandarana, Shamir P; Lee, Julia S; Chanowski, Eric J P; Sacco, Assuntina G; Bradford, Carol R; Wolf, Gregory T; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Worden, Francis P; Giordano, Thomas J; Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Katrina G; Carey, Thomas E; Chepeha, Douglas B

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship of p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression with survival in surgically treated patients who had oropharyngeal or oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Tissue from 36 patients with oropharyngeal SCC and 49 patients with oral cavity SCC treated between 1997 and 2001 was imbedded and immunostained using a tissue microarray. The p16 was positive in 57% and 13% of patients with oropharyngeal SCC and oral cavity SCC, respectively. EGFR was positive in 60% and 63% of patients with oropharyngeal SCC and oral cavity SCC, respectively. In patients with oropharyngeal SCC, p16 expression was associated with improved disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and time to recurrence (TTR) (p < .01, < .01, and <.01, respectively). EGFR expression was associated with poorer DSS, OS, and TTR (p < .01, = .01, and < .01, respectively). For oropharyngeal SCC, when examining both p16 and EGFR expression as combined biomarkers, high p16 expression coupled with low EGFR expression was associated with improved DSS (p p16 = .01; p EGFR = .01). Patients with oral cavity SCC showed no association between biomarker and outcome. For patients with oropharyngeal SCC, high p16 and low EGFR were associated with improved outcome, suggesting a predictive role in surgically treated patients. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Opium usage as an etiologic factor of oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Razmpa, Ebrahim; Saedi, Babak; Motiee-langroudi, Maziar; Garajei, Ata; Hoseinpor, Sareh; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of opium in causing oral cancer. Eighty patients and 80 selected matched controls who were referred to the ear-nose-throat department of an academic hospital were included in this study between October 2008 and September 2010. In addition to demographic data, information regarding alcohol, tobacco, and opium use was documented in the subjects. Finally, the effect of each risk factor was assessed. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the 2 groups. Smoking (P = 0.042) and poor oral hygiene (P = 0.016) significantly correlated with cancer. Finally, opium addiction showed a significant relationship with oral cavity cancer with an odds ratio of 4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.6). Opium use is among the possible risk factors for oral cancer.

  8. S-100 Negative Granular Cell Tumor of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Lynn W; Velez, Ines

    2016-09-01

    Classic granular cell tumor is a mesenchymal neoplasm that commonly occurs on the skin, but is not infrequently found in the oral cavity, primarily on the dorsal tongue. Diagnosis is usually straightforward with hematoxylin and eosin stained slides. Immunohistochemical studies on classic granular cell tumor shows positive immunostaining for S-100 and vimentin, while CD68 is variably positive. We report a case of otherwise unremarkable oral granular cell tumor that was immunohistochemically negative for S-100, and positive for vimentin and CD68, and discuss the differential diagnosis. The results of the immunohistochemical studies in our case are compared with those of classic S-100 positive oral granular cell tumors, as well as cutaneous and oral S-100 negative granular cell tumors. Classic S-100 positive granular cell tumors and S-100 negative granular cell tumors of the oral cavity can only be distinguished by immunohistochemical studies; however, the necessity of this distinction is unclear, as both are benign lesions in which recurrence is unlikely.

  9. Oxidative stress in the oral cavity: sources and pathological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Avezov, Katia; Reznick, Abraham Z; Aizenbud, Dror

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), an imbalance in the oxidant-antioxidant equilibrium, is thought to be involved in the development of many seemingly unrelated diseases. Oral cavity tissues are a unique environment constantly exposed to internal and external compounds and material hazards as almost no other part of the human body. Some of the compounds are capable of generating OS. Here, the main groups of endogenous as well as exogenous OS sources are presented, followed by their oxidative effect on the salivary contents and function. The oxidative mechanisms in oral cells and their pathologic influence are also discussed.

  10. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Ornamental Fish.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Sweeney, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Ornamental fish represent the largest and most diverse group of exotic animals kept as pets. The specific oral anatomy of each family or selected species has evolved to suit the natural environment, feeding behaviors, food or prey type, and location of the food/prey in the water column. The anatomy can change over the life of the animal, from fry to adult. The oral cavity of fish is susceptible to many problems including infectious and parasitic diseases, trauma, and neoplasia. Diagnosis may involve wet mount preparations of exfoliative cytology from the lesion, histopathology, and bacterial or fungal culture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Side effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2015-02-02

    Although drugs are the most powerful therapeutic tools we have for improving the quality of life of the population, their use is not free of adverse effects. Today there are many polymedicated patients, and it is difficult to find the cause of their adverse effects that increase exponentially when more than 4 drugs are combined. There are a large number of drugs that can result in numerous adverse effects in the oral cavity. The most common are xerostomia, altered taste, gingival enlargement and mucositis caused by cancer treatment. We also review other disorders of the salivary glands, oral mucosal changes, pigmentations, halitosis, osteonecrosis, opportunistic infections and bleeding diathesis.

  12. Fat Free Pleomorphic Lipoma of Oral Cavity: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kannan; Mathew, Seema Alice; Sreena, Nellimad Sreedharan; Lavanya, Nagarajan

    2017-03-01

    Pleomorphic lipoma is a rare, benign, soft tissue neoplasm that characteristically occurs as a subcutaneous mass in the posterior neck or upper back and rarely in the tonsillar fossa and oral cavity. Histologically, pleomorphic lipoma contains varying amounts of mature fat, areas of spindle and pleomorphic cells, floret giant cells and thick rope - like collagen in a myxoid stroma. Pleomorphic lipoma with scanty fatty elements is called the fat free variant of pleomorphic lipoma. The combination of meagre amount of fat and presence of pleomorphic elements gives a pseudosarcomatous picture under the microscope leading to misdiagnosis and over treatment. Here, we report a case of fat free pleomorphic lipoma, first of its kind in the oral cavity and discuss the diagnostic features and differential diagnosis.

  13. [The oral cavity condition in patients with high blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Rosiak, Joanna; Kubić-Filiks, Beata; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of high blood pressure in adults is estimated at ca. 30-40% of the general population. Both hypertension disease and hypertensive drugs affect the condition of the patients' oral cavity. A review of the current literature shows that disorders most frequently found in the masticatory organ of patients with hypertension include: xerostomia, changes in salivary glands, gum hypertrophy, lichenoid lesions, taste disorders, and paraesthesias. The authors emphasize that patients with high blood pressure, along with the treatment of the underlying disease, should receive prophylactic and therapeutic dental care. This would enable reduction and/or elimination of unpleasant complaints, and also help prevent the emergence of secondary disorders in the patients' oral cavity as a result of hypertension pharmacotherapy.

  14. Site-dependant redox ratio in healthy oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Sivabalan; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD are autofluorescent and can be monitored non-destructively and without exogenous labels, using optical techniques. These endogenous fluorophores which are present in the cells and tissues gives rise to different fluorescence emission/excitation spectra between the normal and different diseased conditions. In the resent years, finding the optical redox ratio i.e., the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of FAD and NADH, gives the relative change in the oxidation-reduction state of the cells. Unlike other organs oral cavity has lined with variety of mucosal types. We investigated in vivo Optical redox ratio for four different anatomical locations viz., cheek mucosa, vermilion border of the lip, Hard palate, dorsal side of the tongue of healthy oral cavity. We measured this ratio for 20 healthy subjects and the redox ratio was significantly different between the different anatomical locations. The statistical significance was also investigated.

  15. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  16. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  17. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  18. GLUT-1 immunoexpression in oral epithelial dysplasia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Vidya C; Angadi, Punnya V

    2015-06-01

    Glucose transporters, such as GLUT-1, mediate the important mechanisms involved in cellular glucose influx, allowing cells to proliferate and survive. The significance of GLUT-1 expression in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been less explored, and no study has investigated it in relation to verrucous carcinoma (VC). We evaluated 30 cases each of OED, OSCC, and VC, graded further on the basis of their differentiation, immunohistochemically for GLUT-1 expression, along with 10 specimens of normal oral mucosa (NOM) as controls. In OSCC, GLUT-1 expression increased with the degree of dysplasia and increasing grade (P < 0.001). The expression in VC was predominantly membranous and intense, resembling well differentiated OSCC. This increase of GLUT-1 expression in OSCC along with the degree of dysplasia and the histologic grade reflects the expanding glycolytic response to hypoxia. This is the first study to have revealed prominent GLUT-1 expression in VC, highlighting its inherent metabolic capacity.

  19. Germ cell tumor metastatic to the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Luis; Oppenheimer, Randy; Jayaram, Lakshmi

    2012-04-01

    Neoplasms metastatic to the oral cavity are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all malignancies found there. When they do occur, they are usually found in the soft tissue or mandible. Metastatic malignancies involving the gingival, alveolar, or buccal mucosa are very rare. We present a case of what appeared to be a benign epulis in a 25-year-old man. Biopsy revealed that the lesion represented metastatic testicular cancer.

  20. Photodynamic action on some pathogenic microorganisms of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2001-10-01

    The work is devoted to an analysis of pre-clinical and clinical experiments on photodynamic action of HeNe laser radiation in aggregate with a cation thiazinium dye Methylene Blue (MB) on a mix of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic aerobic bacteria being activators of pyoinflammatory diseases of oral cavity. Concentration of photosensitizes at which there is no own bactericidal influence on dying microflora, and parameters of influence at which the efficiency of irradiated microflora defeat reaches 99 % are determined.

  1. Differential cell-specific cytotoxic responses of oral cavity cells to tobacco preparations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, Gaddamanugu L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of standardized (reference) tobacco preparations on human oral cavity cells, two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (101A, 101B) and normal human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) were treated with cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM), smokeless tobacco extracted with complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS), or whole-smoke conditioned media (WS-CM). EC-50 values, as determined by sulforhodamine B assays, varied among the cell types and agents. When normalized to nicotine content, cytotoxicity for WS-CM and TPM was higher compared to that observed with ST/CAS. Nicotine alone had no or only minimal cytotoxicity for all cell types in the applied range. Activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 was examined in all cell types at their respective EC-50 doses for the three agents. TPM, but not ST/CAS or WS-CM significantly activated caspase-3 in all three cell types. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for expression of the early apoptosis marker Annexin V and for nuclear staining by 7-aminoactinomycin (7-AAD) revealed different extents of apoptosis versus non-apoptotic cell death for the three agents. These data characterize differential responses of normal and malignant oral cells after exposure to TPM, ST/CAS, or WS-CM. They assist in understanding differential effects of combustible versus non-combustible tobacco products, and in identifying novel biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure and effect in the oral cavity.

  2. Simple device for the direct visualization of oral-cavity tissue fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Gilhuly, Terence; Whitehead, Peter D.; Zeng, Haishan; Poh, Catherine; Ng, Samson; Williams, Michelle; Zhang, Lewei; Rosin, Miriam; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2006-03-01

    Early identification of high-risk disease could greatly reduce both mortality and morbidity due to oral cancer. We describe a simple handheld device that facilitates the direct visualization of oral-cavity fluorescence for the detection of high-risk precancerous and early cancerous lesions. Blue excitation light (400 to 460 nm) is employed to excite green-red fluorescence from fluorophores in the oral tissues. Tissue fluorescence is viewed directly along an optical axis collinear with the axis of excitation to reduce inter- and intraoperator variability. This robust, field-of-view device enables the direct visualization of fluorescence in the context of surrounding normal tissue. Results from a pilot study of 44 patients are presented. Using histology as the gold standard, the device achieves a sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 100% when discriminating normal mucosa from severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ (CIS) or invasive carcinoma. We envisage this device as a suitable adjunct for oral cancer screening, biopsy guidance, and margin delineation.

  3. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity is very rare. A 76-year-old man presented with epistaxis and admitted to our hospital. His past histories were right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinomas at the age of 68 years and brain infarction at the age of 75 years. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a red polyp of the right nasal cavity. Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed a tumor measuring 2 x 3 x 2 cm. Angiography showed that the tumor is very hypervascular. Clinical diagnosis was angiogenic tumors including hemangioma, sinonasal hemangiopericytoma, and paraganglioma. A blood data showed anemia and low platerets, and bone marrow biopsy revealed myelodysplastic syndrome. A coiling embolization of the feeding artery was performed, and the tumor reduced markedly. The tumor was resected almost entirely. Pathologically, the tumor was 2 x 1.5 x 1.5 cm red tumor. The tumor cells had clear cytoplasm, and arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. Atypia is mild. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for pancytokeratin (AE1/3, CAM5.2), RCC ma, CD10, and Ki-67 (labeling=20%), but negative for CD34, factor-VIII-related antigen, CEA, EMA, melanosome (HMB45), S100 protein, p53, and HepPar-1. The pathological diagnosis was made without knowledge of kidney status. A pathological diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type (grade 1) was made. The patient is now free from tumor, and palliative chemoradiation is considered.

  4. Agrin and perlecan mediate tumorigenic processes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Granato, Daniela C; Carnielli, Carolina M; Cervigne, Nilva K; Oliveria, Carine E; Rivera, César; Martinez, César A R; Yokoo, Sami; Fonseca, Felipe P; Lopes, Marcio; Santos-Silva, Alan R; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of cancer in the oral cavity, representing more than 90% of all oral cancers. The characterization of altered molecules in oral cancer is essential to understand molecular mechanisms underlying tumor progression as well as to contribute to cancer biomarker and therapeutic target discovery. Proteoglycans are key molecular effectors of cell surface and pericellular microenvironments, performing multiple functions in cancer. Two of the major basement membrane proteoglycans, agrin and perlecan, were investigated in this study regarding their role in oral cancer. Using real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), we showed that agrin and perlecan are highly expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Interestingly, cell lines originated from distinct sites showed different expression of agrin and perlecan. Enzymatically targeting chondroitin sulfate modification by chondroitinase, oral squamous carcinoma cell line had a reduced ability to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins and increased sensibility to cisplatin. Additionally, knockdown of agrin and perlecan promoted a decrease on cell migration and adhesion, and on resistance of cells to cisplatin. Our study showed, for the first time, a negative regulation on oral cancer-associated events by either targeting chondroitin sulfate content or agrin and perlecan levels.

  5. Agrin and Perlecan Mediate Tumorigenic Processes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Granato, Daniela C.; Carnielli, Carolina M.; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Oliveria, Carine E.; Martinez, César A. R.; Yokoo, Sami; Fonseca, Felipe P.; Lopes, Marcio; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of cancer in the oral cavity, representing more than 90% of all oral cancers. The characterization of altered molecules in oral cancer is essential to understand molecular mechanisms underlying tumor progression as well as to contribute to cancer biomarker and therapeutic target discovery. Proteoglycans are key molecular effectors of cell surface and pericellular microenvironments, performing multiple functions in cancer. Two of the major basement membrane proteoglycans, agrin and perlecan, were investigated in this study regarding their role in oral cancer. Using real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), we showed that agrin and perlecan are highly expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Interestingly, cell lines originated from distinct sites showed different expression of agrin and perlecan. Enzymatically targeting chondroitin sulfate modification by chondroitinase, oral squamous carcinoma cell line had a reduced ability to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins and increased sensibility to cisplatin. Additionally, knockdown of agrin and perlecan promoted a decrease on cell migration and adhesion, and on resistance of cells to cisplatin. Our study showed, for the first time, a negative regulation on oral cancer-associated events by either targeting chondroitin sulfate content or agrin and perlecan levels. PMID:25506919

  6. [Antibiotic therapy of bacterial infections of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F; Castorina, A

    1989-09-30

    More than 300 commencial bacterial species may be found in the oral cavity. Other microorganisms, such as mycoplasms, mycetes, protozoa and viruses are present as well. The virulency of the saprofites and additional contamination by outside microorganisms are factors determining the development of infectious process in the oral tissues. Moreover, streptococci and anaerobes are the most frequent aetiology agents. The antibiotic therapy should comply with the general treatment criteria, on the one hand, and should be specific for these microorganism, on the other. The penicillines (ampicillin, bacampicillin and especially amoxycillin) process pharmacokinetic properties which make them a favorable choice for treatment. These drugs are effective in case of streptococcal infections, with cariogenic processes involvement and dissemination (endocarditis, glomerulonephritis). Other, frequently used drugs are spiramycin, erythromycin, josamycin and myocamycin that are selectively taken up by the oral tissues and present in large quantities in the saliva. The macrolides have a large spectrum of action on microorganisms normally found in the oral cavity. Lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) are active on anaerobes and are drugs of choice for treatment of staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Tetracycline therapy is restricted usually to parodontite cases caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. In conclusion, the choice of antibacterial therapy should be based on the bacterial aetiology, as well as on the intrinsic drug characteristics (pharmacokinetic, side effects, toxicity etc.).

  7. Mylohyoid advancement flap for closure of composite oral cavity defects.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Raja; Young, Lindsay; Ducic, Yadranko

    2011-11-01

    To describe a new surgical procedure in the reconstruction of composite oral cavity resections. Retrospective chart review for all patients who received mylohyoid pull through muscle flap for reconstruction of oral composite resection with marginal mandibulectomy by the senior author between 1999 and 2008. Data gathered from the chart review included demographics, pathologic diagnosis, tumor margins, use of reconstruction plate, exposure to radiotherapy, need for gastrostomy tube, flap viability, and flap complications. Twenty-nine patients received composite resection, marginal mandibulectomy, and reconstruction with the mylohyoid muscle flap between 1999 and 2008. Twenty-four of the 29 patients (82.7%) had a partial glossectomy as part of the resection. Flap success was 100%. Complications included partial skin graft loss (2 of 29) and partial flap dehiscence (2 of 29). Total complication rate was 13.8%. Twenty-five patients (86%) were exposed to external-beam radiotherapy. Two patients required supplemental alimentation with a gastrostomy tube. There were no cases of osteoradionecrosis. The mylohyoid flap is a valuable addition to the armamentarium of anterior oral cavity closures. The procedure is intuitive, and surgical time is miniscule. This procedure can often be used in cases previously requiring free flap closure. It allows a quick return to oral alimentation and has minimal donor site morbidity. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Comparative study of cell alterations in oral lichen planus and epidermoid carcinoma of the mouth mucosa.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fernando Augusto Cervantes Garcia de; Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Brandão, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck; Rosa, Luiz Eduardo Blumer

    2009-01-01

    Currently, much is discussed regarding the pre-malignant nature of mouth mucosa lichen planus. The present study aims at analyzing the alterations found in the epithelial cells present in the oral cavity lichen planus, comparing them to those found in epidermoid carcinoma. Histological cross-sections of oral lichen planus and epidermoid carcinoma, dyed by hematoxylineosin, were analyzed through light microscopy. The most frequently found alterations in oral lichen planus were: an increase in the nucleus/cytoplasm relation (93.33%), nucleus membrane thickness (86.67%) and bi-nucleus or multinucleous (86.67%). The Student t test (alpha=5%) revealed a statistically significant difference between the average number of cell alterations in oral lichen planus (5.87+/-1.57) and in epidermoid carcinoma (7.60+/-1.81). As to the types of alterations, the chi-squared test also revealed statistically significant differences among the lesions assessed in relation to the following cell alterations: nuclear excess chromatism, atypical mitoses, cellular pleomorphism and abnormal cell differentiation (p<0.05). Despite the fact that in some cases, some pathologists may make mistakes in the histopathological diagnosis of oral lichen planus, the results obtained in this study show that the alterations present in oral lichen planus differ considerably from those seen in epidermoid carcinoma, thus showing how distinct these two diseases are.

  9. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y.; Tito, Raul Y.; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars; Samaniego Castruita, José Alfredo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian; Olsen, Jesper V.; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M.; Collins, Matthew J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize: (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) the first evidence of ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, “red-complex” pathogens, and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity, and diet, thereby extending the direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  10. Colonization of the oral cavity by probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ravn, I; Dige, I; Meyer, R L; Nyvad, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if three probiotic bacteria present in the milk product Cultura Dofilus® naturell could be detected in saliva and on oral mucosal surfaces, and if they colonized dental surfaces in situ in 8 caries-inactive individuals after 8 daily exposures to the milk product for up to 3 days. Bacteria were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. While probiotic bacteria were present sporadically in the oral cavity on mucosal surfaces and in saliva after 3 days of frequent use of the probiotic milk, they were not detected on dental surfaces. Probiotic bacteria may thus contribute to general oral health, but their potential role in biofilm-induced dental diseases remains unclear.

  11. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y; Tito, Raul Y; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars H; Castruita, José Alfredo Samaniego; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M; Collins, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past.

  12. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  13. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan; Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta

    2014-01-01

    The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ) and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  14. Alcohol sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Talens Ferrando, A; Ferrer Mengual, S; González-Cruz Soler, A; Martínez Sanjuán, V; Poveda Roda, R; Sanchis Bielsa, J M; Bagán Sebastián, J V

    2013-01-01

    To present our experience in treating vascular malformations in the oral cavity solely by injecting ethanol into the lesions. We treated 26 patients (12 men and 14 women) with oral malformations. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings (n=26), magnetic resonance imaging studies (n=19), angiography findings (n=5), and direct puncture venography (n=2). To achieve sclerosis, we administered absolute ethanol through direct puncture. All interventions were performed under deep sedation. The vascular malformations treated ranged from 7mm to 60mm (median: 24.5mm) in maximum diameter and had been present in the oral cavity for 0.2 to 54 years (mean: 13.6 years). The median age of the patients was 44.5 years (range: 12-87 years). The reason for treatment of the malformation was: an increase in size (n=8), local bleeding (n=11), risk of bleeding during dental extraction (n=5), pain (n=1), and esthetic purposes (n=3). Lesions were located in the mucosa of the cheek (n=12), in the facial gingiva (n=5), in the labial mucosa (n=6), in the tongue (n=3), in the pterygomandibular region (n=1), and in the palate (n=1). The median dose of ethanol was 3.2mL. Twenty lesions disappeared after a single injection session, five after two sessions, two after three sessions, and one after five sessions. In 20 cases all signs of the lesions disappeared, in 6 a bluish macule persisted, and in 2 a mass effect persisted. The symptoms improved in all patients. Only transient complications of sclerotherapy were observed: local inflammation, perioral paresthesia in two patients, and necrosis of the mucosa of the cheek in one. Alcohol sclerotherapy is an efficacious procedure for treating vascular malformations in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  16. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients.

  17. [Prevalence of oral lichen planus and oral leukoplakia in 112 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Haya Fernández, M C; Bagán Sebastián, J V; Basterra Alegría, J; Lloria de Miguel, E

    2001-04-01

    To study the association existing between precancerous conditions, like oral lichen planus and oral leukoplakia into 112 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We applied a protocol to 112 patients with OSCC in the "Servicio de Estomatología del Hospital General Universitario de Valencia". We made two groups: 1. patients with precancerous lesions and oral carcinoma, 2. patients with OSCC and no precancerous lesions. The average age was 61.4 years, 85 of them being men and 27 women. The tongue and floor of the mouth were the most common locations. 33.6% of the tumours presented stage TNM I, most of them being histologically well differentiated and the 55.8% were ulcerated. We found differences between two groups of the patients regarding alcohol and tobacco habits, location, size and clinical stage and histological differentiation of the malignant lesions.

  18. [Frequency of oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral epithelial dysplasia in oral and oropharyngeal mucosa in Chile].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Carolina; Hernández, Marcela; Martínez, Benjamín; Adorno, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer in Chile corresponds approximately to 1.6% of all cancer cases. There are few studies about oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Chilean population. To determine the frequency of hyperkeratosis, mild, moderate and severe oral epithelial dysplasia, in situ carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral and oropharyngeal mucosa in a registry of the Oral Pathology Reference Institute of the Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Chile, in a ten years period. Review of clinical records and pathological plates of 389 patients, obtained between 1990 and 2009. Cases were selected according to their pathological diagnosis, including hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia, in situ carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma. Forty four percent of cases were squamous cell carcinoma, followed by hyperkeratosis in 37% and mild epithelial dysplasia in 11%. Squamous cell carcinoma was more common in men aged over 50 years. Most of the potentially malignant disorders presented clinically as leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma were clinically recognized as cancer. In this study, men aged over 50 years are the highest risk group for oral cancer. Early diagnosis is deficient since most of these lesions were diagnosed when squamous cell carcinoma became invasive. Leukoplakia diagnosis is mostly associated with hyperkeratosis and epithelial dysplasia, therefore biopsy of these lesions is mandatory to improve early diagnosis.

  19. Combusted but not smokeless tobacco products cause DNA damage in oral cavity cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Prasad, G L; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate genomic DNA damage in human oral cavity cells after exposure to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs). The oral carcinoma cell line 101A, gingival epithelial cells HGEC, and gingival fibroblasts HGF were exposed to TPM (total particulate matter from 3R4F cigarettes), ST/CAS (2S3 smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva), and NIC (nicotine). Treatments were for 24 h using TPM at its EC-50 doses, ST/CAS and NIC at doses with equi-nicotine units, and high doses for ST/CAS and NIC. Comet assays showed that TPM, but not ST/CAS or NIC, caused substantial DNA breaks in cells; only the high ST/CAS dose caused weak DNA damage. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence for γ-H2AX protein. These data revealed that the combusted TPP caused substantial DNA damage in all cell types, whereas the two non-combusted TPPs exerted no or only minimal DNA damage. They support epidemiologic evidence on the relative risk associated with consumption of non-combusted versus combusted tobacco products, and help to understand potential genotoxic effects of such products on oral cavity cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  1. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Guttenplan, Joseph B; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2012-06-15

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  2. High-Volume Surgeons Deliver Larger Surgical Margins in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Owen G; David, Michael C; Park, Daniel J; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-07-01

    In oral cavity cancer surgery there are many factors that contribute to the surgical margin; thus, the factors determining patient outcomes are still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to determine which variable or variables had the greatest influence on increasing the size of the surgical margin. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital of patients who underwent resective surgery for a primary oral cavity cancer from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The primary outcome variable was the surgical margin, defined as the closest distance between the surgical edge and invasive cancer. A heterogeneous set of predictor variables was identified as potentially affecting the primary outcome variable: demographic, 5 surgical, and 7 histologic variables. The data then underwent statistical analysis using univariable linear regression, and variables that were found to have a statistical association were retained in a non-interaction multivariable model. This study included 250 patients. The results showed that high-volume surgeons delivered larger surgical margins than low-volume surgeons. The single most important variable associated with larger surgical margins was who performed the resective operation. The following variables also were associated with smaller surgical margins: retromolar trigone location, non-squamous cell carcinomas, perineural invasion, and a lip-split mandibulectomy surgical approach. There was a strong association between high-volume surgeons and larger surgical margins, supporting the rationalization of oral cavity cancer management in high-volume centers and by high-volume surgeons. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser-induced autofluorescence of oral cavity hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E. G.; Uzunov, Tz. T.; Avramov, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    In current study oral cavity hard tissues autofluorescence was investigated to obtain more complete picture of their optical properties. As an excitation source nitrogen laser with parameters - 337,1 nm, 14 μJ, 10 Hz (ILGI-503, Russia) was used. In vitro spectra from enamel, dentine, cartilage, spongiosa and cortical part of the periodontal bones were registered using a fiber-optic microspectrometer (PC2000, "Ocean Optics" Inc., USA). Gingival fluorescence was also obtained for comparison of its spectral properties with that of hard oral tissues. Samples are characterized with significant differences of fluorescence properties one to another. It is clearly observed signal from different collagen types and collagen-cross links with maxima at 385, 430 and 480-490 nm. In dentine are observed only two maxima at 440 and 480 nm, related also to collagen structures. In samples of gingival and spongiosa were observed traces of hemoglobin - by its re-absorption at 545 and 575 nm, which distort the fluorescence spectra detected from these anatomic sites. Results, obtained in this study are foreseen to be used for development of algorithms for diagnosis and differentiation of teeth lesions and other problems of oral cavity hard tissues as periodontitis and gingivitis.

  4. Oral cavity rare lesions: 15 years case histories

    PubMed Central

    BARTULI, F.N.; LUCIANI, F.; CARDONI, G.; MUZZI, F.; CADDEO, F.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Oral cavity rare diseases include a various group of uncommon morbid conditions. For this reason they are often called “orphan diseases”, as they are not interesting for research and the description of their natural history is not easy. The aim of our study is to analyze the prevalence and the distribution of oral cavity rare diseases in order to increase their knowledge and allow a fast therapeutic approach. Methods and material. 3144 patients took part to our study, they were choosen according to specific criteria and included in a experimental program; they all were prepared for oral biopsy surgery at Fatebenefratelli Hospital - Tor Vergata University of Rome. Following the results of the histological diagnosis, patients have been grouped. Results. From 1996 to 2010, we observed 1635 men and 1509 women, average age was 53 years, higher for women (55y.) and lower for men (52y.). Conclusions. Nevertheless the low level of accordance and the difficulty in description of natural history of diseases reported in literature, we can conclude that, according to our study the onset of rare diseases shows a percentage of appearing statistically significant. PMID:23277869

  5. Multiple Ectopic Hepatocellular Carcinomas Arising in the Abdominal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery. PMID:23139654

  6. Multiple ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas arising in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery.

  7. Cytology of the oral cavity: a re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Navone, R

    2009-02-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology, while an economical and practical tool for diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant lesions, is not extensively used. The results of conventional (n = 89) and liquid-based (n = 411) oral diagnostic cytology cases are reported and compared to histological diagnosis. Cells were collected using either a Cytobrush device for conventional smears or a dermatological curette (AcuDispo) for liquid-based (Thin Prep) cytology. The "curette technique" allowed for the collection of "accidental" tissue fragments, utilized as microbiopsies. The sensitivity was 86.5% in conventional and 94.7% in liquid-based cytology; specificity was 94.3% and 98.9%, respectively; inadequate samples were present in 12.4% and 8.8% of cases, respectively. Although conventional cytology may be useful in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant lesions, liquid-based cytology gives better results, enhances both the sensitivity and specificity, and also provides material for further investigations, e.g. DNA ploidy studies, microhistology, etc.

  8. Clearance and metabolism of starch foods in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Linke, H A; Birkenfeld, L H

    1999-01-01

    The presence of carbohydrates and organic acids was monitored in the oral cavity over a 3-hour period following the ingestion of six foods containing cooked starch (popcorn, potato chips, corn flakes, bread stick, hard pretzel and wheat cracker) and compared to a food containing sugar (chocolate-covered candy bar). Oral fluid samples were collected at 30-min intervals from five different tooth sites from 7 volunteers using absorbent paper points. Samples were analyzed for carbohydrates and organic acids using high-performance liquid chromatography. Analytical data for each food were pooled and compared to the results of the sugar food. The amount of lactic acid produced 30 min after ingestion was highest with the potato chips and lowest with the corn flakes. Potato starch contributed more readily to oral lactic acid production than wheat or corn starch. A direct linear relationship existed between lactic acid production and the presence of oral glucose produced from starch, which occurred via the metabolites maltotriose and maltose. Oral clearance of foods containing cooked starch proceeded significantly slower than that of the sugar food, thus contributing to a prolonged period of lactic acid production.

  9. Potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anirudh

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancers in India, unlike in the West are the most common cancers encountered, be it a primary or a tertiary referral practice. This makes the study and management of these cancers an important issue especially for the otolaryngologist. It is well known that the most common variant of oral cancers is the squamous cell carcinoma. Also the etiology is well established; with tobacco use in both smoking and smokeless forms, alcohol, betel nut and recently the Human Papilloma virus infection being implicated. Certain conditions which definitely increase the probability of getting oral cancers are known and this study aims in revisiting these aspects of pre-malignancy. The progression from a pre-cancerous lesion/condition to frank cancer is well established across many studies and many specialties. Also timely recognizing these pre-cancerous conditions and administration of proper treatment will greatly help in reducing the morbidity and mortality from subsequent much advanced and dangerous oral cancer. Keeping these facts in mind this study was planned to study the established pre-cancerous lesions which are known to progress to oral cancers.

  10. Symptomatic hemangioma of oral cavity treated with CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Coutinho, Adriana A.; Nicola, Jorge H.; Gusmao, Reinaldo J.

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 laser has been used by our group as a secure and efficient tool for the treatment of symptomatic oral cavity hemangiomas which can be responsible for disturbance for swallowing, phonation and in hygienic, besides discomfort and bleeding to patients. During the last four years, twelve patients with symptomatic oral cavity hemangioma were treated at the Laser Unit of our University. The treatment consisted in the application of CO2 laser at medium to low intensity according to characteristics and location of the lesions. For hemangiomas located at sites of easy surgical access such as anterior 1/3 of the tongue, lips, bucal vestibule we use 10 to 37 J/mm2 over the surface of the lesion. When the hemangioma was located at difficult surgical access sites, such as, tonsils, posterior 1/3 of tongue, or at pharyngeal wall we used 3.0 to 4.0 J/mm2 encircling the whole hemangioma. This causes reduction in the size of the lesion throughout sclerosis of nutrition vessels. After this initial procedure we applied 0.8 to 1.0 J/mm2 over the whole extent of the lesion. For both procedures we observed no significant bleeding or inflammatory reaction. The patients referred minimal post-operative discomfort with good cicatricial evolution. The evident reduction in the vascularization and size could be confirmed by photographic documentation. The good results described above, with disappearance of symptoms lead to the conclusion that CO2 laser is an efficient and secure method of treatment for symptomatic hemangioma of the oral cavity.

  11. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  12. Role of radium implants in cancer of the oral cavity and oral pharynx. [Control and survival rates and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Fayos, J.V.

    1980-04-01

    Eighty-five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity tonsillar region or base of the tongue received a radium implant. Implants were done as a supplement to external irradiation except in three patients in whom it was the sole form of treatment. The median dose was 8500 rad given in about 8 weeks, 6000 to 6500 rad given by opposing lateral fields using /sup 60/Co radiation; 25% of the patients received doses higher than 8600 rad. The implant boosted the dose to the primary. Most of the patients who had radium implants had advanced disease. The overall control rate of the primary was 45.9%, the highest control achieved with smaller lesions. Surgery was performed in 26 patients for recurrence at the primary; five developed osteonecrosis of the jaw bone. The survival at 4 and 5 years was approximately equal for Stages I and II (80%); it was 40% for Stages III and IV.

  13. Cancer Salivary Biomarkers for Tumours Distant to the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rapado-González, Óscar; Majem, Blanca; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; López-López, Rafa; Suarez-Cunqueiro, María Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of saliva as a diagnostic approach for systemic diseases was proposed just two decades ago, but recently great interest in the field has emerged because of its revolutionary potential as a liquid biopsy and its usefulness as a non-invasive sampling method. Multiple molecules isolated in saliva have been proposed as cancer biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic studies. In this review, we focus on the current status of the salivary diagnostic biomarkers for different cancers distant to the oral cavity, noting their potential use in the clinic and their applicability in personalising cancer therapies. PMID:27626410

  14. [Anomalies of the oral cavity in Mexican neonates].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Romero, R M; Shor-Hass, F; Benitez-Tirado, C; Fernández-Carrocera, L

    1991-11-01

    The results of 1,200 physical oral cavity examinations in neonates born at the National Institute of Perinatology (INPer) are reported here, finding the frequency of occurrence of inclusion cysts, natal and neonatal teeth. We found that 46% (551 neonates) of those examined had inclusion cysts, among which the Bohn nodules were the most frequent (36 cases); a case of natal teeth was found as well as 30 cases of neonatal teeth. We emphasize the importance of these findings to both the pediatrician and the dentist since they constitute a frequent motive for visits during the perinatal period.

  15. Teratoid cyst of the oral cavity: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Palaskar, Sangeeta J; Garde, Janardan; Bartake, Anirudha; Narang, Bindiya

    2014-01-01

    The teratoid cyst is a rare variant of the dermoid cyst which seldom occurs in the oral cavity. If seen, they generally present as slow growing cysts of the floor of mouth, reported commonly in the 2nd and 3rd decade of life in males. Histopathologically, dermoid cyst is classified as epidermoid cyst, true dermoid cyst and teratoid cyst depending on the presence of adnexal structures and derivatives of all three germ layers. Herewith we report a rare case of teratoid cyst of the floor of the mouth, in a 2-year-old female child, which was present since birth. PMID:25949009

  16. Gene profiling analysis for patients with oral verrucous carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hong; Tian, Xin; Liu, Ou-Sheng; Fang, Xiao-Dan; Quan, Hong-Zhi; Xie, Shang; Gao, Shan; Tang, Zhan-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) is one malignant tumor which was carved out from the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the clinical and pathological features as well as the treatment strategies of OVC are different from OSCC. Here, global transcript abundance of tumor tissues from five patients with primary OVC and six patients with primary OSCC including their matched adjacently normal oral mucosa were profiled using the Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0. Ingenuity Systems IPA software was used to analyse the gene function and biological pathways. There were 109 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OVC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 66 were up-regulated and 43 were down-regulated; 1172 differentially expressed genes (more than 2-fold) between OSCC and the adjacently normal tissue, among them 608 were up-regulated and 564 were down-regulated. There were 39 common differentially expressed genes in OVC and OSCC compared with their matched normal oral mucosa, among them 22 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated, and 8 of them different between OVC and OSCC. In addition, the gene expression profile was further validated by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) analysis for four of those 39 selected genes. PMID:25126189

  17. What Are the Key Statistics about Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers? The American ... increase the risk for these second cancers. For statistics related to survival, see the section Survival Rates ...

  18. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Junu; Islam, Nadim; Cohen, Donald M; Marshal, David; Reavis, Michael R; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2008-05-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are long-term complications of immunosuppression after solid organ/bone marrow transplantation. In most cases, PTLD arises as a result of primary or reactivated Epstein-Barr virus infection in a host with impaired cellular immunity. PTLD is most often seen in the gastrointestinal tract, although it has also been reported in other organ systems, including the central nervous system and, rarely, in the head and neck. It is characterized histologically by abnormal lymphoid cell proliferation. Although many forms of PTLD do not meet all of the histologic criteria of lymphoma, they often behave clinically in a malignant fashion if left untreated. We present 3 rare cases of PTLD manifesting in the oral cavity as mucosal masses after solid organ transplantation. There are only 8 published reports of PTLD in the literature presenting as oral lesions. The clinical, pathologic, and therapeutic spectra of PTLD are discussed.

  19. Carcinogenesis of the Oral Cavity: Environmental Causes and Potential Prevention by Black Raspberry.

    PubMed

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Chen, Kun-Ming; Zhang, Shang-Min; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Amin, Shantu; Stoner, Gary; Guttenplan, Joseph B

    2017-01-17

    Worldwide, cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx comprise the sixth most common malignancies. Histologically, more than 90% of oral cancers are squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Epidemiologic data strongly support the role of exogenous factors such as tobacco, alcohol, and human papilloma virus infection as major causative agents. Avoidance of risk factors has only been partially successful, and survival rates have not improved despite advances in therapeutic approaches. Therefore, new or improved approaches to prevention and/or early detection are critical. Better understanding of the mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis can assist in the development of novel biomarkers for early detection and strategies for disease prevention. Toward this goal, several animal models for carcinogenesis in the oral cavity have been developed. Among these are xenograft, and transgenic animal models, and others employing the synthetic carcinogens such as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in hamster cheek pouch and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide in rats and mice. Additional animal models employing environmental carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene and N'-nitrosonornicotine have been reported. Each model has certain advantages and disadvantages. Models that (1) utilize environmental carcinogens, (2) reflect tumor heterogeneity, and (3) accurately represent the cellular and molecular changes involved in the initiation and progression of oral cancer in humans could provide a realistic platform. To achieve this goal, we introduced a novel nonsurgical mouse model to study oral carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), an environmental pollutant and tobacco smoke constituent, and its diol epoxide metabolite (±)-anti-11,12-dihydroxy-13,14-epoxy-11,12,13,14-tetrahydrodibenzo[a,l]pyrene [(±)-anti-DB[a,l]PDE]. On the basis of a detailed comparison of oral cancer induced by DB[a,l]P with that induced by the other above-mentioned oral carcinogens with respect to dose, duration, species and

  20. HIV shedding in the oral cavity: an assessment of HIV type, immunovirologic, demographic and oral factors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Hawes, Stephen E; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S; Gaye, Awa; N'Diaye, Charlotte F; Critchlow, Cathy W; Sow, Papa Salif; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To quantify the prevalence and burden of HIV type 2 (HIV-2) and HIV-1 RNA in the oral cavity of antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-infected Senegalese individuals and to identify correlates of oral HIV viral loads. Design A cross-sectional study of 163 HIV-1 and 27 HIV-2-infected antiretroviral therapy-naive Senegalese adults. Methods Participants received clinical and oral exams and provided blood and oral wash samples for viral load and plasma CD4 count ascertainment. Logistic and interval regression models were used to identify univariate and multivariable associations between presence and level of oral HIV RNA and various immunovirologic, local and demographic factors. Results Presence of detectable oral HIV RNA was less common in HIV-2-infected compared with HIV-1-infected study participants (33% vs 67%, OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.59). HIV type was no longer associated with oral shedding of HIV when plasma viral load was considered. Detection of oral HIV RNA was associated with increased plasma viral load in both HIV-1-infected and HIV-2-infected individuals (HIV-1, OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.61; HIV-2, OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.39). Oral HIV-1 detection was also associated with periodontal disease (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.16 to 7.87). Conclusions Oral shedding of HIV-2 RNA is less common than HIV-1 RNA, a likely consequence of lower overall viral burden. Both systemic and local factors may contribute to shedding of HIV in the oral cavity. PMID:22250179

  1. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  2. Oral cavity infection: an adverse effect after the treatment of oral cancer in aged individuals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Zhao, Jun; Jiang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The immune compromised patients after treatment of oral cancer may have a chance of infection by drug-resistant opportunistic microbes. We investigated the occurrence of opportunistic microorganisms in aged individuals receiving follow-up examinations after treatment of oral cancer in China. These patients were used as test group and the respective age grouped healthy individuals as control group. In this study, the oral cavity microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast were taken for the analysis. After the screening of representative microorganisms, their aptitude of pervasiveness against drugs was studied. Here, we used antimicrobial agents which are common in clinical practice. We also performed studies to investigate the presence of toxin genes in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that the prevalence of drug-resistant microbes was more pronounced in oral cancer patients after initial treatment above 70 years old. The oxacillin resistance of S. aureus isolate confirms that the prevalence of MRSA is increasing in accordance to age-factor and immune compromise in elderly patients. This study reveals the occurrence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in oral cavity after treatment for oral cancer in aged individuals. Special attention should be directed to MRSA during the treatment of oral cancer, and to realize the fact of immune compromise in elderly patients.

  3. [The origin of hydrogen peroxide in oral cavity and its role in oral microecology balance].

    PubMed

    Keke, Zhang; Xuedong, Zhou; Xin, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, an important antimicrobial agent in oral cavity, plays a significant role in the balance of oral microecology. At the early stage of biofilm formation, about 80% of the detected initial colonizers belong to the genus Streptococcus. These oral streptococci use different oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide. Recent studies showed that the produced hydrogen peroxide plays a critical role in modulating oral microecology. Hydrogen peroxide modulates biofilm development attributed to its growth inhibitory nature. Hydrogen peroxide production is closely associated with extracellular DNA(eDNA) release from microbe and the development of its competent cell which are critical for biofilm development and also serves as source for horizontal gene transfer. Microbe also can reduce the damage to themselves through several detoxification mechanisms. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide is also involved in the regulation of interactions between oral microorganisms and host. Taken together, hydrogen peroxide is an imperative ecological factor that contributes to the microbial equilibrium in the oral cavity. Here we will give a brief review of both the origin and the function in the oral microecology balance of hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Isolated perifacial lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma with clinically node-negative neck.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sangeet Kumar; Arora, Sowrabh Kumar; Kumar, Gopal; Sarin, Deepak

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of occult perifacial nodal disease in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is not well reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of isolated perifacial lymph node metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with a clinically node-negative neck. The study will shed light on current controversies and will provide valuable clinical and pathological information in the practice of routine comprehensive removal of these lymph node pads in selective neck dissection in the node-negative neck. Prospective analysis. This study was started in August 2011 when intraoperatively we routinely separated the lymph node levels from the main specimen for evaluation of the metastatic rate to different lymph node levels in 231 patients of oral squamous cell cancer with a clinically node-negative neck. The current study demonstrated that 19 (8.22%) out of 231 patients showed ipsilateral isolated perifacial lymph node involvement. The incidence of isolated perifacial nodes did not differ significantly between the oral tongue (7.14%) and buccal mucosa (7.75%). Incidence was statistically significant in cases with lower age group (<45 years), advanced T stage, and higher depth of tumor invasion. Isolated perifacial node metastasis is high in oral squamous cell carcinoma with a clinically node-negative neck. The incidence of isolated perifacial involvement is high in cases of buccal mucosal and tongue cancers. A meticulous dissection of the perifacial nodes seems prudent when treating the neck in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2252-2256, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Grimm, M; Biegner, T; Teriete, P; Hoefert, S; Krimmel, M; Munz, A; Reinert, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC.

  6. Crossed pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for recurrent oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Mayank; Sharma, Sanjay; Desai, Sanjay M.; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cavity cancers are fairly common and have propensity to recur locally. Since Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous (PMMC) flap is the most widely used first flap for reconstruction, it is exhausted at the earliest and recurrence poses a formidable challenge for reconstructive surgeon. Present study evaluated the feasibility of contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for reconstruction after resection of recurrent tumour. Methods: This was a study of the patients presenting with recurrent oral cavity cancer after exhausted ipsilateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (PMMC) in whom we used contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (Crossed PMMC Flap) for reconstruction between October 2013 to June 2016. Results: Five patients with recurrence underwent reconstruction with contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap. In all the flap was successfully used to reconstruct defects involving the entire buccal mucosa and in one patient the flap could be used to reconstruct full thickness resection defect(crossed bipedal PMMC Flap) with ease. Conclusion: Crossed Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap can be used safely and reliably for reconstruction of the buccal mucosal defect and in selected patients even for full thickness cheek defect as folded bipaddle Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap.

  7. [Early morphogenesis of ciliated cells in human oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Kurtova, A I; Chernikov, V P; Savel'ev, S V

    2013-01-01

    Ciliated cells were found in the epithelium of the oral cavity of human embryos and fetuses starting from the seventh week of prenatal development. At the early stages of prenatal development (until the 13th week), cells with cilia cover most of the dorsal surface of the tongue and the soft palate, whereas they are found only near the gland ducts in the circumvallate and foliate lingual papillae after 17 weeks of development. The ultrastructure of the axoneme of cilia corresponds to the structure of motile cilia and is represented by nine microtubule doublets that surround the central pair of microtubule singlets. An immunohistochemical study performed on weeks 10-12 of development identified nerve endings associated with the ciliated cells. Until the 14th week of development, the cytoplasm of ciliated cells is immunopositive for NSE. The spatial distribution of ciliated cells in the tongue epithelium until the 13th week of development is not related to the morphogenesis of lingual papillae, and their role in the human oral cavity during the first trimester of pregnancy is unclear and requires further study.

  8. Development of a New Outcome Prediction Model in Early-stage Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Based on Histopathologic Parameters With Multivariate Analysis: The Aditi-Nuzhat Lymph-node Prediction Score (ANLPS) System.

    PubMed

    Arora, Aditi; Husain, Nuzhat; Bansal, Ankur; Neyaz, Azfar; Jaiswal, Ritika; Jain, Kavitha; Chaturvedi, Arun; Anand, Nidhi; Malhotra, Kiranpreet; Shukla, Saumya

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the histopathologic parameters that predict lymph node metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to design a new assessment score on the basis of these parameters that could ultimately allow for changes in treatment decisions or aid clinicians in deciding whether there is a need for close follow-up or to perform early lymph node dissection. Histopathologic parameters of 336 cases of OSCC with stage cT1/T2 N0M0 disease were analyzed. The location of the tumor and the type of surgery used for the management of the tumor were recorded for all patients. The parameters, including T stage, grading of tumor, tumor budding, tumor thickness, depth of invasion, shape of tumor nest, lymphoid response at tumor-host interface and pattern of invasion, eosinophilic reaction, foreign-body giant cell reaction, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion, were examined. Ninety-two patients had metastasis in lymph nodes. On univariate and multivariate analysis, independent variables for predicting lymph node metastasis in descending order were depth of invasion (P=0.003), pattern of invasion (P=0.007), perineural invasion (P=0.014), grade (P=0.028), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.038), lymphoid response (P=0.037), and tumor budding (P=0.039). We designed a scoring system on the basis of these statistical results and tested it. Cases with scores ranging from 7 to 11, 12 to 16, and ≥17 points showed LN metastasis in 6.4%, 22.8%, and 77.1% of cases, respectively. The difference between these 3 groups in relation to nodal metastasis was very significant (P<0.0001). A patient at low risk for lymph node metastasis (score, 7 to 11) had a 5-year survival of 93%, moderate-risk patients (score, 12 to 16) had a 5-year survival of 67%, and high-risk patients (score, 17 to 21) had a 5-year survival of 39%. The risk of lymph node metastasis in OSCC is influenced by many histologic parameters that are not routinely analyzed in

  9. Histopathologic risk factors in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma variants: An update with special reference to HPV-related carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    : basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSCC), undifferentiated carcinoma (UCa), papillary squamous carcinoma (PSCC) and small cell carcinoma. Some studies have suggested favorable prognosis in some variants, analogous to that of the (NKSCC), while others showed poorer outcome. So far the number of studies on this subject is limited and the number of cases evaluated in each investigation is few. Because of that, it is prudent at this stage, not to alter management protocols as a result of identification of HPV in these variants and to await additional information Key words:Histopathologic risk-factors, oral cavity, oropharynx, squamous cell carcinoma variants, keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, HPV, basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, papillary squamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma. PMID:24880454

  10. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  11. Exophytic Verrucous Hyperplasia of the Oral Cavity – Application of Standardized Criteria for Diagnosis from a Consensus Report

    PubMed

    Rosnah, Binti Zain; Thomas, George Kallarakkal; Anand, Ramanathan; Jin, Kim; Wm, Tilakaratne; Takashi, Takata; Saman, Warnakulasuriya; Vinay, Kumar Hazarey; Alison, Rich; Haizal, Mohd Hussaini; Ajura, Jalil

    2016-01-09

    Verruco-papillary lesions (VPLs) of the oral cavity described in the literature involve a spectrum of conditions including squamous papilloma, verruca vulgaris, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma, proliferative verrucous leukoplakia and verrucous carcinoma. A majority of the VPLs are slow growing, benign in nature and have a viral aetiology. Virus associated benign mucosal outgrowths are not too difficult to diagnose either clinically or by microscopy. Apart from virus-associated lesions, VPLs harboring malignant potential or behaviour such as verrucous carcinoma, proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH), oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) and oral conventional squamous cell carcinoma with papillary features (CSCC) need to be further clarified for better understanding of their predictable biologic behavior and appropriate treatment. Current understanding of potentially malignant VPLs is perplexing and is primarily attributed to the use of confusing and unsatisfactory terminology. In particular, the condition referred to as oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) poses a major diagnostic challenge. OVH represents a histopathological entity whose clinical features are not well recognised and is usually clinically indistinguishable from a verrucous carcinoma and a PSCC or a CSCC. A consensus report published by an expert working group from South Asia as an outcome of the ‘First Asian Regional Meeting on the Terminology and Criteria for Verruco-papillary Lesions of the Oral Cavity’ held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, recognised the clinical description of these OVH as a new entity named ‘Exophytic Verrucous Hyperplasia’. Previously described clinical features of OVH such as the ‘blunt’ or ‘sharp’ variants; and the ‘mass’ or ‘plaque’ variants can now collectively fall under this newly described entity. This paper discusses in detail the application of the standardized criteria guidelines of ‘Exophytic Verrucous

  12. Nuclear fractal dimension as a prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goutzanis, L; Papadogeorgakis, N; Pavlopoulos, P M; Katti, K; Petsinis, V; Plochoras, I; Pantelidaki, C; Kavantzas, N; Patsouris, E; Alexandridis, C

    2008-04-01

    Strong theoretical reasons exist for using fractal geometry in measurements of natural objects, including most objects studied in pathology. Indeed, fractal dimension provides a more precise and theoretically more appropriate approximation of their structure properties and especially their shape complexity. The aim of our study was to evaluate the nuclear fractal dimension (FD) in tissue specimens from patients with oral cavity carcinomas in order to assess its potential value as prognostic factor. Relationships between FD and other factors including clinicopathologic characteristics were also investigated. Histological sections from 48 oral squamous cell carcinomas as well as from 17 non-malignant mucosa specimens were stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin for pathological examination and with Feulgen for nuclear complexity evaluation. The sections were evaluated by image analysis using fractal analysis software to quantify nuclear FD by the box-counting method. Carcinomas presented higher mean values of FD compared to normal mucosa. Well differentiated neoplasms had lower FD values than poorly differentiated ones. FD was significantly correlated with the nuclear size. Patients with FD lower than the median value of the sample had statistically significant higher survival rates. Within the sample of patients studied, FD was proved to be an independent prognostic factor of survival in oral cancer patients. In addition this study provides evidence that there are several statistically significant correlations between FD and other morphometric characteristics or clinicopathologic factors in oral squamous cell carcinomas.

  13. E6-Specific Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Oral Cavity Specimens from Iranian Patients

    PubMed

    Razavi Nikoo, Hadi; Ardebili, Abdollah; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Teimoori, Ali; Khanizadeh, Sayyad; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Ajorloo, Mehdi

    2017-05-02

    Detection and quantification of human Papillomavirus (HPV) genome in oral carcinoma play an important role in diagnosis, as well as implications for progression of disease. We evaluated tissues from 50 esopharyngeal cancers collected from different regions of Iran for HPV E6 using the two type-specific primers sets. E6 gene of HPV genotypes was amplified by specific primers. The sensitivity of PCR assay was analyzed and determined using HPV-DNA-containing plasmids. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the prevalence and HPV viral load in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Eighteen (36%) specimens were positive for HPV. Among the 18 positive specimens, 10 showed HPV-18 (55.55%), and 8 specimens were positive for HPV-11 (44.44%). Of the 18 infected specimens, 6 (33.32%) and 12 (66.65%) were identified as high-titer and low-titer viral load, respectively. The PCR-based assay, developed in the current study, could be used for HPV detection, quantification, and genotyping in epidemiological and clinical studies.

  14. Adverse side effects of statins in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Pascual Cruz, Montserrat; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo; García Vicente, José António; Mezquiriz Ferrero, Xavier; Borrell Thio, Eulalia; López López, José

    2008-02-01

    Increased plasma levels of cholesterol are high risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Statins are drugs that inhibit cholesterol synthesis at both pancreatic and extrahepathic levels, being the treatment of choice for hypercholesterolemia. To analyze the side effects of statins in the mouth cavity, and to analyze the symptoms after interruption of the treatment. Observational study, preliminary. Patients aged 50-70, diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia and undergoing treatment with statins, referred from their primary care physician to the dentist's office. Anamnesis over oral symptoms was performed in the first visit. Statin treatment was discontinued, followed by lab tests and control visits seven and fifteen days later. We monitored the improvement and/or remission of oral symptoms. Statin treatment was resumed, sending out a report of the patient evolution to the PCP. Symptoms were registered in sheet specially designed for the study. patient refusal, use of drugs for dry mouth treatment, Sjögren's syndrome. n=26 patients. Dry mouth patients: improvement in 17 out of 23 patients (88.5%). Itchiness: 6 out of 15 cases improved (57.7%). Bitterness: improvement in 13 out of 14 patients (53.8%). Cough: improvement in 11 out of 12 patients (46.1%). A high percentage of oral symptoms are associated to treatment with statins. There is a marked improvement after temporary interruption of the treatment. Little is known regarding the side effects of oral treatment with statins. This preliminary study includes a relatively small number of patients. The design of experimental treatments will be required to establish a true correlation between statin treatment and oral symptoms.

  15. Dietary patterns and risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    De Stefani, Eduardo; Boffetta, Paolo; Ronco, Alvaro L; Correa, Pelayo; Oreggia, Fernando; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo; Mendilaharsu, Maria; Leiva, Juan

    2005-01-01

    From 1995 to 2002, a case-control study on food groups and risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx was conducted in Montevideo, Uruguay. Two hundred thirty cases were frequency-matched to 460 controls on age, residence, and urban/rural status. The study was restricted to men. The relationship between foods and risk of oral and pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was examined through: 1) individual food group analysis, 2) factor analysis, and 3) determination of empirical scores. The results were similar. Factor analysis generated 2 patterns, which were labeled as "stew" and "vegetables and fruits." The stew pattern loaded positively on boiled meat, cooked vegetables, potato, and sweet potato. This pattern was directly associated with risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer [odds ratio (OR), 3.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.99-7.06; P value for trend=0.0002]. The vegetables and fruits factor loaded positively on raw vegetables, citrus fruits, other fruits, liver, fish, and desserts. This pattern was inversely associated with risk of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.64; P value for trend=0.0008). Joint effects of high intake of risk foods and low intake of protective foods were associated with a risk of 12.0 (95% CI, 4.1-34.6). Our study confirms the important role of dietary factors in oral and pharyngeal cancer risk and suggests that the analysis of dietary patterns is a powerful tool to investigate the links between nutrition and cancer.

  16. Telomerase activity in the occurrence and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriaki; Nozaki, Tadashige; Inoue, Harumi; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the risk factors for carcinogenesis. It was recently reported that telomerase plays an important role in inducing such chronic inflammation. Although high telomerase activity is detected in cancer tissues, the activator of telomerase is still unknown. In this study, we used an immunohistochemical method to examine the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the oral cavity. Furthermore, the effects of inflammatory cytokines on the telomerase activity and migration of oral cancer cell lines (Ca9-22, HSC-3, and HSC-4) were examined. Immunoreactivity for hTERT was observed in squamous intraepithelial neoplasia 3 and squamous cell carcinoma. Telomerase activity in Ca9-22 cells was increased by treatment with TNF-α and INF-γ, while its activity in HSC-4 cells was decreased by IL-1β. Although inflammatory cytokines did not affect the proliferative activity of any of the oral cancer cell lines, cytokines and hTERT siRNA promoted the migration of HSC-3 cells. These results suggest that the presence of long-term chronic inflammation may increase telomerase activity and therefore contribute to malignant transformation of the oral mucosal epithelium. Furthermore, inhibition of telomerase activity by inflammatory stimuli increases the invasion of certain types of oral squamous cell carcinomas.

  17. Impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the oral cavity of edentulous individuals.

    PubMed

    Rijkschroeff, Patrick; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2017-10-01

    Oral health is characterized by functional oral polymorphonuclear neutrophils (oPMNs). Edentulism might be associated with a loss of oPMNs because these cells enter the oral cavity primarily through the gingival crevices. The main aim of this study was to investigate the numbers of oPMNs in rinse samples obtained from edentulous (n = 21) and dentate (n = 20) subjects. A second study aim was to investigate possible differences between oPMNs and peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (cPMNs). Apoptosis/necrosis and cell-activation markers (CD11b, CD63 and CD66b) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined either without stimulation (constitutive) or in response to 10 μM phorbol myristate acetate or Fusobacterium nucleatum. The edentulous subjects presented with lower oPMN counts and higher percentages of apoptotic/necrotic oPMNs compared with dentate subjects. Furthermore, oPMNs from edentulous donors expressed low levels of all three activation markers and low constitutive ROS. In contrast, oPMNs from dentate subjects expressed high levels of all three activation markers and a higher level of constitutive ROS than cPMNs. When challenged, oPMNs from edentulous subjects showed no upregulation in ROS production, whereas oPMNs from dentate subjects retained their ability to respond to stimulation. The functional characteristics of cPMNs were comparable between edentulous and dentate subjects. This study demonstrates that despite having functional cPMNs, edentulous subjects have low oPMN numbers that are functionally impaired. © 2017 The Authors. Eur J Oral Sci published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Malignant epithelioid schwannoma of the oral cavity in a cat.

    PubMed

    Boonsriroj, Hassadin; Kimitsuki, Kazunori; Akagi, Tetsuya; Park, Chun-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A malignant epithelioid schwannoma of the oral cavity was diagnosed in an 8-year-old domestic short-hair cat. The mass was located in the gingiva of the upper left premolar to molar region and showed multinodular growth patterns. The mass comprised epithelioid cells arranged in densely packed sheets. Tumor cells had large, round to oval nuclei with prominent nucleoli and an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, most of the tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, but all lacked melanoma-associated antigen and muscle and neuroendocrine markers. Stains for type IV collagen showed linear immunoreactivity around single cells and groups of cells. Ultrastructurally, tumor cells were separated by a well-defined basement membrane, and interdigitating cell processes were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of feline malignant epithelioid schwannoma.

  19. Oral cavity eumycetoma: a rare and unusual condition.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Ahmed Mohamed; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2013-04-01

    In this short communication, we report on a 25-year-old male patient who presented with a longstanding painless swelling under the tongue. It was of a gradual onset and course, but 2 months before presentation it suddenly increased in size. Local examination revealed a tender firm pigmented mass in the midline of the mouth floor. The differential diagnosis included dermoid cyst, salivary glands tumours, mucocele or vascular anomaly. The investigations done were not conclusive. He underwent surgical exploration, and mycetoma was a surgical surprise. Although mycetoma is common problem in the tropics, such a presentation is a rarity. In tropical and subtropical regions, mycetoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral cavity masses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  1. Polymicrobial Candida biofilms: friends and foe in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lindsay E; Millhouse, Emma; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Malcolm, Jennifer; Nile, Christopher J; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    The role of polymicrobial biofilm infections in medicine is becoming more apparent. Increasing number of microbiome studies and deep sequencing has enabled us to develop a greater understanding of how positive and negative microbial interactions influence disease outcomes. An environment where this is particularly pertinent is within the oral cavity, a rich and diverse ecosystem inhabited by both bacteria and yeasts, which collectively occupy and coexist within various niches as biofilm communities. Studies within this environment have however tended to be subject to extensive independent investigation, in the context of either polymicrobial bacterial communities or yeast biofilms, but rarely both together. It is clear however that they are not mutually exclusive. Therefore, this review aims to explore the influence of candidal populations on the composition of these complex aggregates and biofilm communities, to investigate their mechanistic interactions to understand how these impact clinical outcomes, and determine whether we can translate how this knowledge can be used to improve patient management.

  2. Yellowish lesions of the oral cavity. Suggestion for a classification.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Iria; Varela, Pablo; Romero, Amparo; García, María José; Suárez, María Mercedes; Seoane, Juan

    2007-08-01

    The colour of a lesion is due to its nature and to its histological substratum. In order to ease diagnosis, oral cavity lesions have been classified according to their colour in: white, red, white and red, bluish and/or purple, brown, grey and/or black lesions. To the best of our knowledge, there is no such a classification for yellow lesions. So, a suggestion for a classification of yellowish lesions according to their semiology is made with the following headings: diffuse macular lesions, papular, hypertrophic, or pustular lesions, together with cysts and nodes. This interpretation of the lesions by its colour is the first step to diagnosis. It should be taken into account that, as happens with any other classification, the yellowish group of lesions includes items with different prognosis as well as possible markers of systemic disorders.

  3. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  4. The Oral Cavity and Age: A Site of Chronic Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus; Hlawaty, Hanna; Labat, Carlos; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Brink, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Background Aging may be accompanied by a low grade chronic up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. A variety of endogenous locally released mediators as well as inflammatory cells have been reported in the human oral cavity. The aim of this investigation was to determine the presence of different classes of inflammatory mediators in human saliva and correlate the levels with age. Methodology and Principal Findings Unstimulated whole buccal salivary samples were obtained in the morning from 94 healthy volunteers within 30 minutes after waking. None of the participants had taken aspirin in the week prior to the saliva collection. Lysozyme activity, eicosanoid levels (prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4) and MMP-9 activity were measured. The antimicrobial activity (lysozyme activity) was not correlated with age whereas PGE2 levels were markedly correlated with age (r = 0.29; P<0.05; n = 56). Saliva from healthy subjects (≤40 years) compared with data derived from older volunteers (>40 years) demonstrated a significant increase in the mean values for PGE2 and MMP-9 activity with age. In addition, significant correlations were observed between LTB4 and PGE2 (r = 0.28; P<0.05; n = 56) and between LTB4 levels and MMP-9 activity in smokers (r = 0.78; P<0.001; n = 15). Conclusions/Significance The presence of significant levels and activity of inflammatory mediators in saliva suggests that the oral cavity of healthy subjects may be in a constant low state of inflammation associated with age. PMID:18159234

  5. Analysis of parabens in dentifrices and the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Duk; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Song, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzed levels of parabens in commercial dentifrices and saliva. HPLC was performed using 35% acetonitrile and measuring absorbance at 254 nm. Thirteen toothpastes and five mouthwashes were analyzed. Of these, volunteers used three toothpastes and two mouthwashes, and levels of parabens were analyzed in saliva and water used for mouth rinsing. In toothpastes, the highest concentrations of methylparaben (MP), propylparaben (PP) and n-butylparaben (nBP) were 1.86, 1.42 and 1.87 mg/g, respectively. In mouthwashes, the highest concentrations of MP and PP were 0.97 and 0.11 mg/mL, respectively. After volunteers used 500 mg toothpaste T-1, which contained 895 µg MP, the first and tenth mouth rinse samples contained means of 64.63 and 1.89 µg MP, respectively. After rinsing the mouth three or five times, 37 µg or 18 µg MP was calculated to remain in the oral cavity, respectively. After using 20 mL mouthwash S-1, which contained 19 mg MP, 1.53 mg MP was calculated to remain in the oral cavity. Immediately after using this mouthwash, the mean salivary concentration of MP was 237 µg/mL. The daily intake of parabens from dentifrices was predicted to be insignificant compared with the intake from food; however, parabens can be ingested from dentifrices. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  7. Automatic Classification of Cancerous Tissue in Laserendomicroscopy Images of the Oral Cavity using Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Aubreville, Marc; Knipfer, Christian; Oetter, Nicolai; Jaremenko, Christian; Rodner, Erik; Denzler, Joachim; Bohr, Christopher; Neumann, Helmut; Stelzle, Florian; Maier, Andreas

    2017-09-20

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is a common type of cancer of the oral epithelium. Despite their high impact on mortality, sufficient screening methods for early diagnosis of OSCC often lack accuracy and thus OSCCs are mostly diagnosed at a late stage. Early detection and accurate outline estimation of OSCCs would lead to a better curative outcome and a reduction in recurrence rates after surgical treatment. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) records sub-surface micro-anatomical images for in vivo cell structure analysis. Recent CLE studies showed great prospects for a reliable, real-time ultrastructural imaging of OSCC in situ. We present and evaluate a novel automatic approach for OSCC diagnosis using deep learning technologies on CLE images. The method is compared against textural feature-based machine learning approaches that represent the current state of the art. For this work, CLE image sequences (7894 images) from patients diagnosed with OSCC were obtained from 4 specific locations in the oral cavity, including the OSCC lesion. The present approach is found to outperform the state of the art in CLE image recognition with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.96 and a mean accuracy of 88.3% (sensitivity 86.6%, specificity 90%).

  8. Clinical, Epidemiological And Histopathological Prognostic Factors In Oral Squamous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dragomir, L.P.; Simionescu, Cristiana; Dăguci, Luminiţa; Şearpe, Monica; Dragomir, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The study that was carried out was comprised of 117 cases of oral squamous carcinomas, selected in two years interval, between 2007-2008. The tumors were diagnosed especially at patients between the ages of 50 and 79 years, 96,6% being over 40 years old. It came out a clear predominance of the male sex in approximatively 90% of the cases. The main localisation was the lower lip and the tongue ( 67,5% ), in approximatively equal proportions ( 35% and 32,5% ). The histopathologically analisys releaved that 37,6% were well differentiated squamous carcinomas, 27,4% were moderately differentiated squamous carcinomas and 35% were poorly differentiated squamous carcinomas. Out of these 3,3% were microcarcinomas, 91,9% were non-metastatic invasive carcinomas and 4,8% were invasive carcinomas with metastatic adenopathy. PMID:24778830

  9. Removal of hyperplastic lesions of the oral cavity. A retrospective study of 128 cases.

    PubMed

    Tamarit-Borrás, Meritxell; Delgado-Molina, Esther; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2005-01-01

    Based on our accumulated experience, the present study evaluates and discusses the indications, advantages and inconveniences of oral cavity epulis resection using the carbon dioxide laser (CO2) versus the Erbium:YAG laser (Er:YAG), diode laser and surgical scalpel. A retrospective study has been made of 120 patients involving the removal of 128 epulis lesions with the CO2 laser, Er:YAG laser, diode laser and surgical scalpel. Postoperative controls were carried out after 7, 15 and 30 days to evaluate healing and wound evolution, and after 3, 6 and 12 months to assess possible relapse. Two groups were defined, based on the clinical and etiopathogenic characteristics of the excised lesions: gingival hyperplastic lesions (77 cases) and fibromatous hyperplasia (51 cases). The lower jaw was the most frequent location of gingival hyperplasia (51.9%). Fibrous hyperplasia was the most common histological diagnosis (49 cases; 63.6%). Percentage relapse following removal was 9.1%, of which 5 cases corresponded to fibrous hyperplasia. Only one malignancy was identified, corresponding to infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma. On the other hand, of the 51 treated cases of fibromatous hyperplasia, 58.8% were located in the upper jaw. These were histologically confirmed to be fibrous hyperplasia, with relapse in 19.6% of the cases. Although the different surgical techniques used for removal of epulis of the oral cavity are appropriate, we consider the CO2 laser to be the treatment of choice, since it offers a number of both intra- and postoperative advantages. On the other hand, all oral lesions require histological study to establish a firm diagnosis.

  10. Oral carcinoma associated with betel nut chewing in the Pacific: an impending crisis?

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Janette M; Syms, Mark J; Sniezek, Joseph C

    2005-03-01

    In Western populations, tobacco and alcohol use are the major etiologic factors associated with oral cavity cancers. In developing countries of Asia and the South Pacific, however, oral cancer is increasingly associated with the chewing of betel nut. As the population of Asia and the South Pacific immigrates, Head and Neck surgeons in North America are likely to see more patients with oral carcinoma induced by betel nut chewing. Tumor Registry records from 1977-2003 from a tertiary care, referral medical center were reviewed. All patient charts (27) demonstrating betel quid use of greater than 20 years and carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract were entered into the study. Five-year disease-free rates by stage were as follows: Stage 1: 100% (2/2); Stage 11: 50% (2/4); Stage III: 36% (4/9): Stage IV: 25% (3/12). Despite the prevalent misperception in the Pacific region that betel nut chewing is a harmless habit, betel nut-induced oral carcinomas are aggressive malignancies requiring aggressive treatment and long-term follow-up.

  11. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1993-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Thirty patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to twenty nine months. Four patients with T3 and T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eleven patients with T1 and T2 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Seven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and have remained disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity were treated. One obtained a complete response. Three patients with recurrent juvenile laryngotracheal papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but one recurred four months post-PDT. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however, limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations, and complications will be discussed.

  12. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, and tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has the potential to treat and cure early carcinomas of the head and neck while preserving normal tissue. Fifty-three patients with neoplasia of the head and neck have been treated with PDT with follow-up to 40 months. Eight patients with T2-T4 carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract had a partial response. Eighteen patients with CIS and T1 carcinomas of the larynx obtained a complete response and are disease free. Eleven patients with T1 carcinomas of the tongue, floor of mouth, and nasal cavity obtained a complete response. Three patients with mucosal melanomas of the nasopharynx obtained a complete response and remain disease free. Two patients with Kaposi's sarcoma or the oral cavity were treated, one obtained a complete response. Five patients with juvenile laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis obtained a complete response, but all recurred within six months of treatment. PDT is a promising therapy for treatment of early neoplasia of the head and neck. There are, however limitations to this treatment based on tumor size and site. Methodology, clinical response, limitations and complications are discussed.

  13. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers.

  14. Detection of Helicobacter spp. DNA in the oral cavity of dogs.

    PubMed

    Recordati, Camilla; Gualdi, Valentina; Tosi, Sabrina; Facchini, Roberto Vailati; Pengo, Graziano; Luini, Mario; Simpson, Kenneth W; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2007-01-31

    The mode of acquisition of gastric Helicobacter spp. infection in dogs has not been determined. It is suspected that oral-oral and faecal-oral transmission may be involved. The present study sought to determine if Helicobacter spp. DNA is present in the oral cavity of healthy and vomiting dogs. Thirty-eight pet dogs (27 vomiting and 11 clinically healthy) were studied. The presence of Helicobacter spp. was determined by single and nested PCR evaluation of DNA extracted from saliva, dental plaque and gastric biopsy samples. Helicobacter spp. DNA was detected by nested PCR in 36 (94.7%) gastric biopsies, 17 (44.7%) dental plaque and 19 (50%) saliva samples out of the 38 dogs examined. Overall 27 (71.1%) dogs screened by nested PCR were found to harbour Helicobacter spp. DNA in the oral cavity (dental plaque and/or saliva). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of Helicobacter spp. DNA in the oral cavity of vomiting and healthy dogs, and the time from vomiting to oral sampling did not have significant impact. This study confirms the high prevalence of gastric Helicobacter spp. infection in dogs, and reveals that Helicobacter spp. DNA is detectable in the oral cavity of over 70% of dogs. These findings support the possibility of oral-oral transmission between dogs and that the canine oral cavity may act as source of non-pylori Helicobacter spp. infection for humans.

  15. Treatment experience with 15 MeV fast neutrons in the oral cavity and oropharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Herskovic, A.; Cox, E.B.; Fender, F.; Schell, M.; Henshaw, W.; Rogers, C.; Ornitz, R.

    1984-05-15

    All 86 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with fast neutrons at the Mid-Atlantic Neutron Therapy facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (MANTA) from its inception in 1976 until closing in 1979, are reported. Patients generally had advanced disease or have failed or were failing conventional treatment prior to being treated at MANTA. The fixed horizontal beam parameters were suboptimal. Patients were treated by either neutrons alone or various combinations of neutrons and photons. In patients with T3 or T4 primary carcinomas treated with less than 2100 neutron rad, only 37% (3/11) had a complete response at the primary compared to 57% (24/42) treated to a higher dose. However, there was a significant evidence of radiation related complication. The latter was expected in a phase I/II trial of a new modality such as fast neutrons. Isocentric hospital based cyclotrons should offer some hope of improvement in the future.

  16. Knowledge and risk perception of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer among non-medical university students.

    PubMed

    Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Tutlam, Nhial T

    2016-01-28

    To assess non-medical university students' knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among non-medical students of a private Midwestern university in the United States in May 2012. Questionnaire assessed demographic information and contained 21 previously validated questions regarding knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Knowledge scale was categorized into low and high. Risk level was estimated based on smoking, drinking, and sexual habits. Bivariate associations between continuous and categorical variables were assessed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square tests, respectively. The response rate was 87% (100 out of 115 students approached). Eighty-one percent (81%) had low oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge; and only 2% perceived that their oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer risk was high. Risk perception was negatively correlated with age at sexual debut, r (64) = -0.26, p = 0.037; one-way ANOVA showed a marginally significant association between risk perception and number of sexual partners, F(4, 60) = 2.48, p = 0.05. There was no significant association between knowledge and perception of risk; however, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge was significantly associated with frequency of prevention of STDs (p < 0.05). Although 86% had heard about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer, only 18% had heard of oral mouth examination, and 7% of these reported ever having an oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer exam. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge and risk perception is low among this student population. Since oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer incidence is increasingly shifting towards younger adults, interventions must be tailored to this group in order to improve prevention and control.

  17. Detection of papillomaviral DNA sequences in a feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S; Howe, L; French, A; Squires, R A; Sugiarto, H

    2009-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) are common and often fatal feline neoplasms. Factors that predispose to neoplasm development in cats are poorly defined. Around 25% of human OSCCs are caused by papillomaviruses (PVs). To determine if PVs are associated with OSCCs in cats, three sets of consensus primers were used to evaluate 20 feline OSCCs and 20 non-neoplastic feline oral lesions for the presence of PV DNA. Papillomaviral sequences were detected within one OSCC, but no non-neoplastic lesion. Sequencing of the amplified DNA revealed a previously unreported PV that was most similar to human PV type 76. This is the first time PV DNA has been amplified from the oral cavity of a cat. However, while these results suggest that feline gingival epithelial cells can be infected by PVs, they do not support a causal association between viral infection and the development of feline OSCCs.

  18. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Homeida, L; Wiley, R T; Fatahzadeh, M

    2015-04-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia with significant visual and auditory impairment. Pathogenesis involves a mutation in the GJB2 gene, which encodes connexin-26, a protein in the epithelial gap junctions thought to be involved in the differentiation of ectodermally derived tissues. Affected patients are also at increased risk for the epithelial malignancies. To our knowledge, nearly 100 cases of KID syndrome, including 19 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) complications, have been reported worldwide. We report here a patient with KID syndrome who developed an ulcerative oral lesion causing him significant discomfort; he was subsequently diagnosed with oral SCC. We review the clinical presentation and symptomatology, including those affecting the oral cavity for this syndrome and highlight the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration and life-long screening aimed at prevention of the evolving complications.

  19. Prevalence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in oral cavity after treatment for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kaoru; Ohara, Masaru; Kojima, Taro; Nishimura, Rumi; Ogawa, Tetsuji; Hino, Takamune; Okada, Mitsugi; Toratani, Shigeaki; Kamata, Nobuyuki; Sugai, Motoyuki; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant opportunistic infections may cause health problems in immunocompromised hosts. Representative microorganisms in opportunistic infections of the oral cavity are Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We investigated the prevalence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in elderly adults receiving follow-up examinations after primary treatment of oral cancer. Oral microorganisms were collected from patients satisfactorily treated for oral cancer (defined as good outcomes to date) and a group of healthy adults (controls). After identification of microorganisms, the prevalence of drug-resistant microorganisms was studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing were also performed for methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in the prevalences of the three microorganisms between the groups. Surprisingly, 69.2% of S aureus isolates showed oxacillin resistance, suggesting that MRSA colonization is increasing among older Japanese. These MRSA isolates possessed SCCmec types II and IV but no representative toxin genes. Our results indicate that a basic infection control strategy, including standard precautions against MRSA, is important for elderly adults, particularly after treatment for oral cancer.

  20. Techniques for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Torras, Clàudia

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The diagnosis of early oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is of paramount clinical importance given the mortality rate of late stage disease. The aim of this study is to review the literature to assess the current situation and progress in this area. Material and Methods A search in Cochrane and PubMed (January 2006 to December 2013) has been used with the key words “squamous cell carcinoma”, “early diagnosis” “oral cavity”, “Potentially Malignant Disorders” y “premalignant lesions”. The inclusion criteria were the use of techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD, 7 years aged articles and publications written in English, French or Spanish. The exclusion criteria were case reports and studies in other languages. Results Out of the 89 studies obtained initially from the search 60 articles were selected to be included in the systematic review: 1 metaanalysis, 17 systematic reviews, 35 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 1 consensus and 1 semi-structured interviews. Conclusions The best diagnostic technique is that which we have sufficient experience and training. Definitely tissue biopsy and histopathological examination should remain the gold standard for oral cancer diagnose. In this systematic review it has not been found sufficient scientific evidence on the majority of proposed techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC, therefore more extensive and exhaustive studies are needed. Key words: Squamous cell carcinoma, early diagnosis, oral cavity, potentially malignant disorders, premalignant lesions. PMID:25662554

  1. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  2. Tea and coffee consumption and risk of oral cavity cancer: results of a large population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    PubMed

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Cyr, Diane; Schmaus, Annie; Carton, Matthieu; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Velten, Michel; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-06-01

    Results on the relationship between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer are contrasted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between coffee and tea drinking and the risk of oral cavity cancer in France, a high incidence area. We conducted a population based case-control study with face-to-face interviews and standardized questionnaires (the ICARE study, Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers). We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls. Odds-ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with tea and coffee consumption (quantity, duration, cumulative consumption) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. We observed inverse associations between oral cavity cancer and tea or coffee consumption (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI 0.21-0.70, for the highest quartile of tea consumption, and 0.60, 95% CI 0.34-1.05, for the highest quartile of coffee consumption). Exclusive tea or coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of oral cavity cancer and their joint effect was multiplicative. No differences in risk between men and women or between consumers of tobacco and alcohol and non-consumers were observed. The odds ratios related to the subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue) did not differ significantly from that observed for the other subsites of the oral cavity. Tea and coffee drinking may decrease the risk of oral cavity cancer through antioxidant components which play a role in the repair of cellular damages. These findings need further investigation in prospective studies and the underlying mechanisms in humans remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycoplasma salivarium as a dominant coloniser of Fanconi anaemia associated oral carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Birgit; Rumming, Madis; Sczyrba, Alexander; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Gombert, Michael; Rahn, Sebastian; Stoye, Jens; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium belongs to the class of the smallest self-replicating Tenericutes and is predominantly found in the oral cavity of humans. In general it is considered as a non-pathogenic commensal. However, some reports point to an association with human diseases. M. salivarium was found e.g. as causative agent of a submasseteric abscess, in necrotic dental pulp, in brain abscess and clogged biliary stent. Here we describe the detection of M. salivarium on the surface of a squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue of a patient with Fanconi anaemia (FA). FA is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome based on defective DNA-repair that increases the risk of carcinomas especially oral squamous cell carcinoma. Employing high coverage, massive parallel Roche/454-next-generation-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons we analysed the oral microbiome of this FA patient in comparison to that of an FA patient with a benign leukoplakia and five healthy individuals. The microbiota of the FA patient with leukoplakia correlated well with that of the healthy controls. A dominance of Streptococcus, Veillonella and Neisseria species was typically observed. In contrast, the microbiome of the cancer bearing FA patient was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the healthy sites, which changed to a predominance of 98% M. salivarium on the tumour surface. Quantification of the mycoplasma load in five healthy, two tumour- and two leukoplakia-FA patients by TaqMan-PCR confirmed the prevalence of M. salivarium at the tumour sites. These new findings suggest that this mycoplasma species with its reduced coding capacity found ideal breeding grounds at the tumour sites. Interestingly, the oral cavity of all FA patients and especially samples at the tumour sites were in addition positive for Candida albicans. It remains to be elucidated in further studies whether M. salivarium can be used as a predictive biomarker for tumour development in these patients.

  4. Mycoplasma salivarium as a Dominant Coloniser of Fanconi Anaemia Associated Oral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Birgit; Rumming, Madis; Sczyrba, Alexander; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Gombert, Michael; Rahn, Sebastian; Stoye, Jens; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium belongs to the class of the smallest self-replicating Tenericutes and is predominantly found in the oral cavity of humans. In general it is considered as a non-pathogenic commensal. However, some reports point to an association with human diseases. M. salivarium was found e.g. as causative agent of a submasseteric abscess, in necrotic dental pulp, in brain abscess and clogged biliary stent. Here we describe the detection of M. salivarium on the surface of a squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue of a patient with Fanconi anaemia (FA). FA is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome based on defective DNA-repair that increases the risk of carcinomas especially oral squamous cell carcinoma. Employing high coverage, massive parallel Roche/454-next-generation-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons we analysed the oral microbiome of this FA patient in comparison to that of an FA patient with a benign leukoplakia and five healthy individuals. The microbiota of the FA patient with leukoplakia correlated well with that of the healthy controls. A dominance of Streptococcus, Veillonella and Neisseria species was typically observed. In contrast, the microbiome of the cancer bearing FA patient was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the healthy sites, which changed to a predominance of 98% M. salivarium on the tumour surface. Quantification of the mycoplasma load in five healthy, two tumour- and two leukoplakia-FA patients by TaqMan-PCR confirmed the prevalence of M. salivarium at the tumour sites. These new findings suggest that this mycoplasma species with its reduced coding capacity found ideal breeding grounds at the tumour sites. Interestingly, the oral cavity of all FA patients and especially samples at the tumour sites were in addition positive for Candida albicans. It remains to be elucidated in further studies whether M. salivarium can be used as a predictive biomarker for tumour development in these patients. PMID:24642836

  5. Oral cavity awareness in nonnative speakers acquiring English.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Patricia

    2008-06-01

    This investigation assessed awareness of the oral cavity of nonnative speakers acquiring English. University students (60 men, 60 women) were placed into three equal-size groups. The Less Experienced group lived in the USA less than 6 mo. (M = 3.3 mo., SD = 2.4). The More Experienced group lived in the United States 3 or more years (M = 5.0 yr., SD = 1.9). Native English speakers were the control group. Participants were recruited from undergraduate general education classes and passed a speech screening in English including accurate production of the seven English syllables tested, namely, suh, luh, tuh, kuh, ruh, shuh, and thuh. Participants answered four multiple-choice questions about lingual contact for each of the syllables imitated. Total test mean scores were significantly higher for the More Experienced group. Native speakers performed the task best. Findings support the effects of amount of time speaking the language. Training methods employed to teach English and slight dialectal variations may account for the significant differences seen in the two groups of nonnative speakers. Further study is warranted.

  6. Posttraumatic growth: a novel concept in oral cavity cancer care?

    PubMed

    Rajandram, Rama Krsna; Jenewein, Josef; McGrath, Colman Patrick Joseph; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2010-11-01

    Recently the importance of posttraumatic growth (PTG), a phenomenon of positive psychological growth beyond baseline values, has been discovered in the field of oncology. An evidence based review of the literature regarding PTG was performed, both to support its understanding and to consider its application within the research field of oral cavity (OC) cancer. A Pubmed, Medline, PsycINFO search from the earliest date until April 2010 was carried out. Full articles meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were reviewed. The search yielded 852 papers, 91 'potentially relevant papers' and 29 'effective papers', the latter of which formed the basis of this review. PTG was assessed in twenty-eight studies with the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and in only one study with the Perceived Benefits Scale (PBS). PTG in cancer patients has been reported in five main domains (i) appreciation of life, (ii) relating to others, (iii) increased personal sense, (iv) sense of new possibilities and (v) positive spiritual change. Socio-demographic factors, stressor characteristics and coping strategies influence and predict the development PTG. In the past decade an increasing interest in the concept of PTG in the field of oncology has emerged. This evidence based review presents PTG to the research community in the field of OC cancer, appraises its modification capacity of the treatment outcome in other cancer research fields and hypothesizes its eventual benefit in the field of OC cancer research.

  7. Streptococcusdentiloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of elephants.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Saito, Masanori; Hirasawa, Masaaki; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism was isolated from oral cavity samples collected from healthy elephants. The isolated strain, NUM 2404T, was tentatively identified as a streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Although a comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis suggested the classification of this organism into the genus Streptococcus, it did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus. Strain NUM 2404T was related most closely to Streptococcus saliviloxodontae NUM 6306T with 95.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, but the phylogenetic tree reconstructed based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that NUM 2404T clustered with Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449T and Streptococcus troglodytae TKU 31T. Comparative sequence analysis based on two housekeeping genes, groEL, which encodes the 60 kDa heat-shock protein, and rpoB, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase, of NUM 2404T indicated that it was most closely related to those of Streptococcus orisratti A63T and Streptococcus sobrinus ATCC 33478T with 82.7 and 85.1 % sequence similarities, respectively. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic differences, it is proposed that the novel isolate be classified in the genus Streptococcus as representative of a novel species, Streptococcus dentiloxodontae sp. nov. The type strain is NUM 2404T (=JCM 19284T=DSM 27381T).

  8. Oral autopsy: A simple, faster procedure for total visualization of oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Charan Gowda, Boregowda Kadaiah; Mohan, C. V.; Hemavathi

    2016-01-01

    Identification of humans, especially in mass disaster is a challenging aspect for team members of the disaster victim identification (DVI) unit. Identification is necessary for humanitarian and emotional reasons and for many legal issues, particularly for family members. In the modern day, all possible methods have been applied for establishing the identification of deceased individuals. The DVI team comprises specialists from different disciplines. The forensic dentist plays a major role in the identification of victims in disaster. To establish a simple, faster and time saving procedure for Postmortem dental identification in mass disaster. In this article, we present a simpler and faster method, which helps in gaining access into the oral cavity that helps in the recording of postmortem oral findings where required. PMID:27555728

  9. Patterns of Care in Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Erqi L; Chin, Alexander L; Lee, Nancy Y; Tsai, C Jillian

    2017-07-15

    To characterize the patterns of care and potential barriers to access to care for elderly patients with oral cavity cancer in the adjuvant setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base and identified patients with resected oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, who survived for ≥3 months after surgery. We used logistic regression models to assess the association between age (<70, 70-79, and ≥80 years) and the receipt of adjuvant therapy within 3 months of surgery. We additionally assessed the association between patient and tumor characteristics and the receipt of adjuvant therapy among those aged ≥70 years. A total of 25,829 patients were included in the study. Compared with those aged <70 years, older patients were more likely to have no neck dissection or have fewer lymph nodes dissected and were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy than younger patients. Among our cohort, 11,361 patients (44%) had pathologic T3-T4 disease or N2-N3 disease, and 4185 patients (16%) had extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margins. In multivariate analyses controlling for comorbidity and demographic characteristics, older age was independently associated with lower odds of receiving adjuvant radiation therapy in the subgroup with T3 or T4 disease or N2 or N3 disease and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the positive extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margin subgroup. Among elderly patients, both greater patient distance from reporting facility and older age were associated with lower odds of receiving both adjuvant radiation therapy (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.81) and chemoradiation therapy (odds ratio 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.79). In a national hospital-based cohort of patients with oral cavity cancer, elderly patients were less likely to receive adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation therapy. Greater patient distance from reporting

  10. The association of smoking, alcoholic consumption, betel quid chewing and oral cavity cancer: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tin-Tin; Lin, Whe-Dar; Wang, Ching-Ping; Wang, Chen-Chi; Liu, Shih-An

    2008-11-01

    We aimed to analyze the relationship between smoking, alcoholic consumption and betel quid chewing with oral cavity cancer. All male patients age > or =18 years who visited our clinic received an oral mucosal inspection. Basic data including personal habits were also obtained. A multivariate logistic regression model was utilized to determine relevant risk factors for developing oral cavity cancer. A total of 8,356 patients were enrolled in this study. Abnormal findings were found in 382 patients (4.6%). Two hundred and ninety-seven patients received biopsy and 191 patients were proven to have oral cavity cancer. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed that those who smoked, consumed alcohol and chewed betel quid on a regular basis were most likely to contract oral cancer (odds ratio: 39.66, 95% confidence interval: 26.04-60.38). Therefore, habitual cigarette smokers, alcohol consumers, and betel quid chewers have a higher risk of contracting oral cavity cancer and should receive oral mucosal screening regularly so potential oral cavity cancer can be detected as early as possible, which may result in better and improved survival of oral cancer patients.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Elective Neck Dissection in Patients With Clinically Node-Negative Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Joseph R.; Fero, Katherine E.; Wilson, Bayard; Sacco, Assuntina G.; Mell, Loren K.; Coffey, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recently, a large randomized trial found a survival advantage among patients who received elective neck dissection in conjunction with primary surgery for clinically node-negative oral cavity cancer compared with those receiving primary surgery alone. However, elective neck dissection comes with greater upfront cost and patient morbidity. We present a cost-effectiveness analysis of elective neck dissection for the initial surgical management of early-stage oral cavity cancer. Methods We constructed a Markov model to simulate primary, adjuvant, and salvage therapy; disease recurrence; and survival in patients with T1/T2 clinically node-negative oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Transition probabilities were derived from clinical trial data; costs (in 2015 US dollars) and health utilities were estimated from the literature. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, expressed as dollar per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), were calculated with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios less than $100,000/QALY considered cost effective. We conducted one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to examine model uncertainty. Results Our base-case model found that over a lifetime the addition of elective neck dissection to primary surgery reduced overall costs by $6,000 and improved effectiveness by 0.42 QALYs compared with primary surgery alone. The decrease in overall cost despite the added neck dissection was a result of less use of salvage therapy. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was most sensitive to assumptions about disease recurrence, survival, and the health utility reduction from a neck dissection. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that treatment with elective neck dissection was cost effective 76% of the time at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. Conclusion Our study found that the addition of elective neck dissection reduces costs and improves health outcomes, making this a cost-effective treatment strategy for patients

  12. Role of hydrogen generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kanazuru, Tomoko; Sato, Eisuke F; Nagata, Kumiko; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Kasahara, Emiko; Jikumaru, Mika; Inoue, June; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Some gastrointestinal bacteria synthesize hydrogen (H(2)) by fermentation. Despite the presence of bactericidal factors in human saliva, a large number of bacteria also live in the oral cavity. It has never been shown that oral bacteria also produce H(2) or what role H(2) might play in the oral cavity. It was found that a significant amount of H(2) is synthesized in the oral cavity of healthy human subjects, and that its generation is enhanced by the presence of glucose but inhibited by either teeth brushing or sterilization with povidone iodine. These observations suggest the presence of H(2)-generating bacteria in the oral cavity. The screening of commensal bacteria in the oral cavity revealed that a variety of anaerobic bacteria generate H(2). Among them, Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) generated significantly large amounts of H(2) in the presence of glucose. Biochemical analysis revealed that various proteins in K. pneumoniae are carbonylated under standard culture conditions, and that oxidative stress induced by the presence of Fe(++) and H(2)O(2) increases the number of carbonylated proteins, particularly when their hydrogenase activity is inhibited by KCN. Inhibition of H(2) generation markedly suppresses the growth of K. pneumoniae. These observations suggest that H(2) generation and/or the reduction of oxidative stress is important for the survival and growth of K. pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

  13. The oral cavity microbiota: between health, oral disease and cancers of the aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Pierre; Metamoros, Sebastien; Montassier, Emmanuel; Le Vacon, Françoise; Potel, Gilles; Soueidan, Assem; Jordana, Fabienne; De La Cochétière, Marie-France

    2017-03-03

    Many studies show that the human microbiome plays a critical role in the chronic pathologies of obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. More recently, the interaction between cancer and the microbiome has been highlighted. Most studies have focused on the gut microbiota because it represents the most extensive bacterial community, and the body of evidence correlating it with gut syndromes is increasing. However, in the strict sense, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract begins in the oral cavity, and special attention should be paid to the specific flora of this cavity. This study reviewed the current knowledge about the various microbial ecosystems of the upper part of the GI tract and discussed their potential link to carcinogenesis. The overall composition of the microbial communities, as well as the presence or absence of 'key species' in relation to carcinogenesis, is addressed. Alterations in the oral microbiota can potentially be used to predict the risk of cancer. Molecular advances and the further monitoring of the microbiota will increase our understanding of the role of the microbiota in carcinogenesis and open new perspectives for future therapeutic and prophylactic modalities.

  14. Elective neck dissection in oral carcinoma: a critical review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, L P; Sanabria, A

    2007-06-01

    More than 50% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have lymph node metastases and histological confirmation of metastatic disease is the most important prognostic factor. Among patients with a clinically negative neck, the incidence of occult metastases varies with the site, size and thickness of the primary tumour. The high incidence rate of occult cervical metastases (> 20%) in tumours of the lower part of the oral cavity is the main argument in favour of elective treatment of the neck. The usual treatment of patients with clinically palpable metastatic lymph nodes has been radical neck dissection. This classical surgical procedure involves not only resection of level I to V lymph nodes of the neck but also the tail of the parotid, submandibular gland, sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein and spinal accessory nerve. It is a safe oncological surgical procedure that significantly reduces the risk of regional recurrences, however it produces significant post-operative morbidity, mainly shoulder dysfunction. Aiming to reduce morbidity, Ward and Roben described a modification of the procedure sparing the spinal accessory nerve to prevent post-operative shoulder morbidity. Several clinical and pathological studies have demonstrated that the pattern of metastatic lymph node metastases occurs in a predictable fashion in patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The use of selective supraomohyoid neck dissection as the elective treatment of the neck, in oral cancer patients, is now well established. However, its role in the treatment of clinically positive neck patients is controversial. Some Authors advocate this type of selective neck dissection in patients with limited neck disease at the upper levels of the neck, without jeopardizing neck control. The main factors supporting this approach are the usually good prognosis in patients with single levels I or II metastasis independent of the extent of neck dissection, and the low

  15. Oral verrucous carcinoma: a study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alper; Bulut, Emel; Gunhan, Omer; Ozden, Bora

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to identify a clinical and histopathological relationship between verrucous hyperplasia, verrucous keratosis, and verrucous carcinoma. We evaluated 12 patients who had developed oral verrucous carcinoma in the past 10 years in a follow-up study. In this study, the diagnostic criteria included clinical and histopathological features of the lesions. Each lesion was examined by a single oral pathologist. All the patients were diagnosed with verrucous carcinoma following excisional biopsy. One patient was diagnosed with verrucous hyperplasia and another with verrucous keratosis in their initial histological findings. Mandibular, posterior alveolar crest, and retromolar trigone were the most affected sites (41.6%), followed by the buccal mucosa (16.6%), the palate (16.6%), the floor of the mouth (16.6%), and the lip (8.3%). No patients had evidence of recurrence after treatment. Verrucous hyperplasia, verrucous keratosis, and verrucous carcinoma may not be distinguished clinically or may coexist, resulting in diagnostic difficulties. It should be kept in mind that verrucous hyperplasia may also develop from leukoplakic lesions, and it may transform into verrucous carcinoma or squamous-cell carcinoma, acting as a potential precancerous lesion.

  16. Oral Verrucous Carcinoma: A Study of 12 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Alper; Bulut, Emel; Gunhan, Omer; Ozden, Bora

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this clinical study was to identify a clinical and histopathological relationship between verrucous hyperplasia, verrucous keratosis, and verrucous carcinoma. Methods: We evaluated 12 patients who had developed oral verrucous carcinoma in the past 10 years in a follow-up study. In this study, the diagnostic criteria included clinical and histopathological features of the lesions. Each lesion was examined by a single oral pathologist. Results: All the patients were diagnosed with verrucous carcinoma following excisional biopsy. One patient was diagnosed with verrucous hyperplasia and another with verrucous keratosis in their initial histological findings. Mandibular, posterior alveolar crest, and retromolar trigone were the most affected sites (41.6%), followed by the buccal mucosa (16.6%), the palate (16.6%), the floor of the mouth (16.6%), and the lip (8.3%). No patients had evidence of recurrence after treatment. Conclusions: Verrucous hyperplasia, verrucous keratosis, and verrucous carcinoma may not be distinguished clinically or may coexist, resulting in diagnostic difficulties. It should be kept in mind that verrucous hyperplasia may also develop from leukoplakic lesions, and it may transform into verrucous carcinoma or squamous-cell carcinoma, acting as a potential precancerous lesion. PMID:20396454

  17. Analysis of risk factors for oral cavity and oropharynx cancer in the authors' own material.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska-Grygiel, Joanna; Owczarek, Kalina; Bielińska, Marzena; Wacławek, Magdalena; Olszewski, Jurek

    2017-04-30

    The aim of the study was to analyse the risk factors for oral cavity and oropharynx cancer in peopled examined under the Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week in 2016, Lodz. In Lodz, 21st September 2016, under the Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week, 106 people, including 67 women aged 29-77 and 39 men aged 23-84, underwent preventive examinations in the hospital department. Prior to the laryngological examination, the patients were asked to answer questions that referred to their education, medical case history, symptoms, smoking habits with the number of cigarettes per day, alcohol intake, the number of lifetime sexual partners, oral sex engagement, incidents of head and neck cancer in the family history. The major part of the examined patients were women and men with the secondary and high level of education, 47,76% and 35,82%, and 58,97% and 35,91% respectively. The patients were informed by mass media about the planned preventive medical examinations - 80,60% women and 79,49% men. The most common symptoms reported by women were: hoarse voice in 61,19% cases, dysphagia in 32,84% cases and burning sensation and/or pain in the oral cavity in 29,85% cases. The examined male patients mainly showed hoarse voice (46,15%), other symptoms (43,59%) and dysphagia (25,64%). 28,35% women and 28,20% men smoked cigarettes, while passive smokers were 22,38% and 25,64% respectively. Alcohol consumption was reported by 67,16% women and 82,05% men, rather occasionally. Having oral sex was noted in 25,37% women and 38,46% men, mostly with multiple sexual partners. Among the studied patients, 13,43% women and 5,12% men suffered from malignant cancer, including 2,98% women and 2,56% men who reported head and neck carcinoma in the medical interview. On the basis of the interview and ENT examination, 11,94% women and 17,94% men were qualified for the extended oncological diagnostics. Conclussion. The Fourth Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week shows the increased interest in preventive

  18. Oral verrucous carcinoma complicating a repetitive injury by the dental prosthesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rahali, Laila; Omor, Youssef; Mouden, Karima; Mahdi, Youssef; Elkacemi, Hanan; Elmajjaoui, Sanaa; Latib, Rachida; Kebdani, Tayeb; Boujida, Mohamed Najib; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2015-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is an unusual, well differentiated, and low-grade type of squamous cell carcinoma, characterized by benign histology and cytology but markedly invasive clinical behavior. They have a predilection for squamous mucosae, particularly those of the head and neck region. Many factors have been associated with its pathogenesis, including the presence of previous skin lesions; VC arising from a prosthesis injury is rare. Here we reported a case of VC of oral cavity a particularly very aggressive, arising from prosthesis injury. Regardless of the treatment modality, given new insights into the possible aggressivity of this tumor, radiotherapy associated to chemotherapy may be a more appropriate primary treatment compared with the significant local morbidity associated with surgery.

  19. Locoregional Flaps for Oral Cavity Reconstruction: A Review of Modern Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Urjeet A; Hartig, Gregory K; Hanasono, Matthew M; Lin, Derrick T; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2017-08-01

    Objective To review state-of-the-art modifications and advances in soft tissue local and regional flap reconstruction of the oral cavity and to determine the role these techniques play in current practice. Data Sources Review of the literature regarding oral cavity reconstruction. Review Methods The authors describe advances in locoregional reconstructive options and assimilate data from the literature that compare recent advances to the historic standards. Conclusions Modern advances in regional reconstruction of the oral cavity offer outstanding results and demonstrate potential advance over free tissue transfer. These modifications demonstrate the prominent role that regional reconstruction can play in oral cavity reconstruction. Implications for Practice With a more complete understanding of these options, the surgeon is better able to tailor the reconstruction to the needs of the patient to provide high-quality cost-effective care.

  20. Epidemiology of oral cavity cancer in taiwan with emphasis on the role of betel nut chewing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Jen, Yee-Min; Wang, Bill-B; Lee, Jih-Chin; Kang, Bor-Hwang

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the epidemiological characteristics and the possible contributing etiology of oral cavity cancer in Taiwan. Data on oral cavity cancer from the period between 1986 and 1997 were compiled from the Taiwan Cancer Registry Annual Report. The amount of average annual consumption per person of cigarettes, alcohol and betel nut were extracted from the Annual Report of Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau and the Agriculture Counsel of Taiwan. The incidence of oral cavity cancer increased annually. Both the total and male incidence have increased substantially since 1993. Regarding the peak incidence, most cases were seen in the sixth to eighth decades of life. Multiple regression models indicated that 86.2% variation in the incidence of oral cavity cancer was explained by the annual average betel nut consumption per person. These results imply that those who chew betel nut belong to a high-risk group and require special consideration and attention regarding health education and health promotion.

  1. Techniques for early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Torras, Clàudia; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of early oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is of paramount clinical importance given the mortality rate of late stage disease. The aim of this study is to review the literature to assess the current situation and progress in this area. A search in Cochrane and PubMed (January 2006 to December 2013) has been used with the key words "squamous cell carcinoma", "early diagnosis" "oral cavity", "Potentially Malignant Disorders" y "premalignant lesions". The inclusion criteria were the use of techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD, 7 years aged articles and publications written in English, French or Spanish. The exclusion criteria were case reports and studies in other languages. Out of the 89 studies obtained initially from the search 60 articles were selected to be included in the systematic review: 1 metaanalysis, 17 systematic reviews, 35 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 1 consensus and 1 semi-structured interviews. The best diagnostic technique is that which we have sufficient experience and training. Definitely tissue biopsy and histopathological examination should remain the gold standard for oral cancer diagnose. In this systematic review it has not been found sufficient scientific evidence on the majority of proposed techniques for early diagnosis of OSCC, therefore more extensive and exhaustive studies are needed.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of basement membrane proteins of verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Carrozzo, Marco; Pagano, Marco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Scully, Crispian; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is an extremely invasive tumour of stratified squamous epithelium that spreads throughout degradation of the basement membrane (BM) and extra-cellular matrix. Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare low-grade variant of oral SCC that penetrates into the subepithelial connective tissue. It also has a different clinical behaviour from classical oral SCC. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of laminin, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin in VC, severe epithelial dysplasia (SED) and SCC in order to analyse if the pattern of these molecules expression contributes to the differences in the biological behaviour of these diseases. The staining pattern of laminin was less intensive in SCC compared with SED and VC, and collagen IV expression was increased in VC compared with SED. Discontinuities of laminin, collagen IV and fibronectin were more evident in SED than in VC. This study indicates that VC has a biological behaviour different from SED or SCC, observable by immunohistochemistry in the BM zone.

  3. Prevotella aurantiaca sp. nov., isolated from the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Natsuko; Okamoto, Masaaki

    2010-03-01

    Two anaerobic, pigmented, non-spore-forming, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped strains isolated from the human oral cavity, OMA31(T) and OMA130, were characterized by determining their phenotypic and biochemical features, cellular fatty acid profiles and phylogenetic positions based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the new isolates belonged to a single species of the genus Prevotella. The two isolates showed 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with each other and were most closely related to Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611(T) with 96.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity; the next most closely related strains to the isolates were Prevotella pallens AHN 10371(T) (96.1 %) and Prevotella falsenii JCM 15124(T) (95.3 %). Phenotypic and biochemical characteristics of the isolates were the same as those of P. intermedia JCM 12248(T), P. falsenii JCM 15124(T) and Prevotella nigrescens JCM 12250(T). The isolates could be differentiated from P. pallens JCM 11140( T) by mannose fermentation and alpha-fucosidase activity. Conventional biochemical tests were unable to differentiate the new isolates from P. intermedia, P. falsenii and P. nigrescens. However, hsp60 gene sequence analysis suggested that strain OMA31(T) was not a representative of P. intermedia, P. pallens, P. falsenii or P. nigrescens. Based on these data, a novel species of the genus Prevotella, Prevotella aurantiaca sp. nov., is proposed, with OMA31(T) (=JCM 15754(T)=CCUG 57723(T)) as the type strain.

  4. Induction chemotherapy for oral cavity cancer patients: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; William, William N; Feher, Olavo; Carvalho, André Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of data from phase III randomized studies to support an ideal approach for locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients. In general, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are valid treatment options, and combined approach is usually indicated given poor clinical outcomes with single modality therapy. The aim of this study is to review the current status and future perspectives of induction chemotherapy for locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients.

  5. Pembrolizumab Combined With Cetuximab for Treatment of Recurrent/Metastatic Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    HNSCC; Lip SCC; Oral Cavity Cancer; Oropharynx Cancer; Larynx Cancer; Hypopharynx Cancer; Nasopharynx Cancer; Sinonasal Carcinoma; Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Head and Neck Cancer; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising from the Pleural Cavity After Pneumonectomy for Chronic Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yeong Jeong; Shin, Sumin; Shim, Young Mog

    2017-01-01

    Malignant tumors associated with chronic empyema have been reported in the literature, and a majority of these tumors are lymphomas. Epithelial tumors originating from the post-pneumonectomy space in patients with chronic empyema are extremely rare. Here, we present the cases of 2 patients with squamous cell carcinoma arising from the pleural cavity after pneumonectomy for chronic empyema. PMID:28382273

  7. Enhanced contact endoscopy for the assessment of the neoangiogenetic changes in precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Carta, Filippo; Sionis, Sara; Cocco, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Ferreli, Caterina; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract show significant neoangiogenesis appearing as subepithelial and epithelial microvascular irregularities that can be detected by Image-Enhanced Endoscopy such as Narrow Band Imaging and Storz Professional Image Enhancement System. In the present study, the most advanced endoscopic enhancement systems were coupled with Contact Endoscopy (Enhanced Contact Endoscopy). This original method improved the identification and the understanding of the neoangiogenetic changes of the chorion in 42 patients with leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and leuko-erythroplakia of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The physiologic and pathologic mucosa was described in five obvious vascular patterns observed at Enhanced Contact Endoscopy ranging from normal to squamous cell carcinoma, passing through inflammation, hyperplasia, and dysplasia. Each vascular pattern was then compared to histology, showing that the microvascular architectural changes seen with Enhanced Contact Endoscopy are almost constant. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in the differentiation between healthy mucosa and inflammation versus pathologic hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma were, respectively, 96.6, 93.3, 98.2, 87.5, and 95.9 %. Sensitivity and specificity were 100 % in differentiation between non-malignant lesions versus squamous cell carcinoma. Our preliminary experience shows that accuracy of Image-Enhanced Endoscopy in the diagnosis of precancerous lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx can be increased if associated to Contact Endoscopy.

  8. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-04-23

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  9. The expression of calretinin and cytokeratins in canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fulton, A; Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma (CAA) represent two epithelium-derived neoplasms that affect the oral cavity of dogs. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) and calretinin has been previously established in the canine tooth bud and odontogenic tumours. The aim of this study was to characterize the CK and calretinin expression profile of OSCC in comparison to CAA and canine tooth bud tissues. Samples from 15 OSCC and 15 CAA cases, as well as 6 tooth buds and 2 normal gingival tissues were examined. OSCC CK expression was consistent with the CK expression profile of CAA and canine tooth bud tissue. Calretinin was positively expressed in 10 of 15 OSCC cases, with 5 cases demonstrating high staining intensity. Only 2 of 15 CAA cases demonstrated mild-moderate staining intensity. The statistically significant difference in staining pattern and intensity of calretinin in OSCC and CAA can help distinguish between these two tumour types. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Clinicopathological analysis of 502 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with special interest to distant metastasis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Miho; Aoki, Takayuki; Nakamura, Naoya; Carreras, Joaquim; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Kumaki, Nobue; Inomoto, Chie; Ogura, Go; Kikuchi, Tomoki; Kikuti, Yara Y; Aoyama, Kenichi; Ota, Yoshihide

    2014-12-20

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity. Distant metastasis (DM) especially bone metastasis (BM) may reduce patients' quality of life and affects the clinical outcome. We performed clinicopathological analysis of 502 patients with OSCC undergoing radical surgery in order to evaluate the correlation values of clinicopathological features for OSCC with special interest in DM. DM was found in 54 cases and among them 44 and 25 cases had pulmonary metastasis (PM) and BM, respectively. Advanced T stage, positive N stage, lower histologic grade and higher score YK classification were the independent significant prognostic factors found in our series of 502 cases of OSCC. Positive lymph node was the most important prognostic factors in DM and BM; on the other hand, in PM, it was lower histological grade. All patients with BM except one had vertebral bone metastasis. These characteristics of DM, including BM and PM, of OSCC are useful for understanding the metastatic process of OSCC.

  11. Acrolein-an α,β-Unsaturated Aldehyde: A Review of Oral Cavity Exposure and Oral Pathology Effects.

    PubMed

    Aizenbud, Dror; Aizenbud, Itay; Reznick, Abraham Z; Avezov, Katia

    2016-07-28

    Acrolein is a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde widely present in the environment, particularly as a product of tobacco smoke. Our previous studies indicated the adverse consequences of even short-term acrolein exposure and proposed a molecular mechanism of its potential harmful effect on oral cavity keratinocytic cells. In this paper we chose to review the broad spectrum of acrolein sources such as pollution, food, and smoking. Consequently, in this paper we consider a high level of oral exposure to acrolein through these sources and discuss the noxious effects it has on the oral cavity including on salivary quality and contents, oral resistance to oxidative stress, and stress mechanism activation in a variety of oral cells.

  12. Acrolein—an α,β-Unsaturated Aldehyde: A Review of Oral Cavity Exposure and Oral Pathology Effects

    PubMed Central

    Aizenbud, Dror; Aizenbud, Itay; Reznick, Abraham Z.; Avezov, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde widely present in the environment, particularly as a product of tobacco smoke. Our previous studies indicated the adverse consequences of even short-term acrolein exposure and proposed a molecular mechanism of its potential harmful effect on oral cavity keratinocytic cells. In this paper we chose to review the broad spectrum of acrolein sources such as pollution, food, and smoking. Consequently, in this paper we consider a high level of oral exposure to acrolein through these sources and discuss the noxious effects it has on the oral cavity including on salivary quality and contents, oral resistance to oxidative stress, and stress mechanism activation in a variety of oral cells. PMID:27487309

  13. Computational fluid dynamics in the oral cavity of ram suspension-feeding fishes.

    PubMed

    Cheer, A Y; Ogami, Y; Sanderson, S L

    2001-06-21

    We have modeled steady, three-dimensional flow with a no-slip boundary condition in cylindrical and conical oral cavities possessing vertical or slanted branchial slits. These numerical simulations illustrate the transport of food particles toward the esophagus, as well as the velocity profiles of water exiting the oral cavity via the branchial slits. The maximum and average velocities are highest for flow exiting the most posterior branchial slit. The highest volume flow rates also occur in the most posterior slit for the cylindrical simulations, but occur in the most anterior slit for the conical simulations. Along the midline, there is a pronounced bilaterally symmetrical vortex in the posterodorsal region of the cylindrical and conical oral cavities and a second bilaterally symmetrical vortex in the posteroventral region of the cylinder. Particles entrained in the vortices will recirculate in the posterior oral cavity, increasing the probability of encounter with sticky, mucus-covered surfaces such as the oral roof, gill arches, or gill rakers. The posterodorsal vortex could serve to concentrate particles near the entrances of the epibranchial organs. The ventral vortex could be involved in sequestering dense inorganic particles that sink toward the floor of the oral cavity. All vortices are absent in the conical simulation with vertical branchial slits, indicating that the slanted branchial slits between the gill arches are responsible for the formation of the vortex in the conical oral cavity. Experiments using in vivo flow visualization techniques are needed to determine whether ram suspension feeders, pump suspension feeders, and non-suspension-feeding fishes possess vortices in the posterior oral cavity that contribute to particle transport, food particle encounter with sticky surfaces, and inorganic particle rejection. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Hyperthermia treatment of spontaneously occurring oral cavity tumors using a computer-controlled Nd:YAG laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Frazier, Donita L.; Klebanow, Edward R.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors in the oral cavity is difficult due to inability in accessing the lesion. A new hyperthermia technique employing near infrared Nd:YAG irradiation delivered through an optical fiber is introduced for heating oral and nasal tumors in animals. This system consisted of an Nd:YAG laser, a He-Ne laser, a computer controlled optical shutter, an interstitial thermometer, computer and a printer. The tumors were heated via surface illumination of the lesion. A thermocouple implanted in the base of the tumor provided temperature feedback for laser energy regulation. Three spontaneously occurring canine (two squamous cell carcinoma on the gum, one pigmented melanoma on the hard palate) and one feline tumor (squamous cell carcinoma on the nose) have been treated with the Nd:YAG laser-induced hyperthermia delivered following radiation therapy. The tumor temperature was maintained between 43.2-43.5 degree(s)C for one hour. Nd:YAG hyperthermia allowed efficient delivery of heat to veterinary oral and nasal lesions otherwise impossible to treat with conventional heating techniques.

  15. Histological subtypes of oral non-tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nemec, A; Murphy, B; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2012-01-01

    Several histological subtypes and grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are described in human literature and these subtypes have distinct morphological features and biological behaviour. This retrospective study (1990-2010) included 84 dogs diagnosed with SCC of the oral cavity and oropharynx, excluding the tonsils. Sixty-nine of the SCCs (82.1%) were further diagnosed as conventional SCC (CSCC) (33 [47.8%] well-differentiated, 31 [44.9%] moderately-differentiated and five [7.3%] poorly-differentiated), five (5.95%) each as papillary SCC and basaloid SCC, three (3.6%) as adenosquamous carcinoma and two (2.4%) as spindle cell carcinoma. Compared with the general hospital population, neutered female dogs, dogs aged 10 to <15 years, English springer spaniels and Shetland sheepdogs were overrepresented. The majority (78.1%) of SCCs were proliferative with or without associated ulceration, although no significant association was observed between the gross appearance and different SCC subtypes. 71.4% of SCCs were located in dentate jaws; however, well-differentiated CSCC more often affected the tongue and other non-dentate mucosal surfaces (P=0.0022). No significant association was found between any of the SCC subtypes and tumour-associated inflammation (TAI), perineural and lymphovascular invasion (PNI, LVI), or between gross appearance of the tumour and tumour location, PNI, LVI or TAI or PNI, LVI, TAI and tumour location.

  16. [Efficacy of oral cavity care in preventing stomatitis (mucositis) in cancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Koshino, Miki; Sakai, Chie; Ogura, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Akiko; Fukuzato, Fumiko; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro

    2009-03-01

    Stomatitis is a common side effect during cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that careful oral cavity care using patient guidance and cleanliness index prevents stomatitis in cancer chemotherapy. We introduced oral care patient guidance including teaching good brushing methods, O'Leary's Plaque Control Record(PCR)as a cleanliness index, and Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide(OAG)as an overall index after April 2006. We evaluated the incidence of stomatitis in 20 patients(10 patients between April 2004 to May 2006 and 10 patients after April 2006)with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy including 5-FU and CDDP. Patients receiving brushing training after 2006 were evaluated regarding cleanliness of their oral cavities using PCR index and OAG index. The rates of stomatitis were 60%(6/10)and 40%(4/10)before and after the introduction of oral care patient guidance. The average of PCR index decreased from 82% to 46% after teaching good brushing method to the patients. The average of OAG index after brushing training was 9.14 which was better score compared with previous reports. Introduction of oral care patient guidance decreased the incidence of stomatitis. Both PCR and OAG indexes were useful in evaluating the objective condition of the oral cavity and in sharing patients' information among a medical team. These indexes encouraged the patients to clean their oral cavities.

  17. Safety Assessment of the Oral Cavity Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Jeremy P.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Moore, Chris J.; Chilcott, Chris N.; Tagg, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a prominent member of the oral microbiota and has excellent potential for use as a probiotic targeting the oral cavity. In this report we document safety data relating to S. salivarius K12, including assessment of its antibiogram, metabolic profiles, and virulence determinants, and we examine the microbial composition of saliva following the dosing of subjects with K12. PMID:16598017

  18. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Miscellaneous Exotic Companion Mammals.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Angela M; Miwa, Yasutsugu

    2016-09-01

    Unusual mammalian species such as the hedgehog, sugar glider, and miniature pig are encountered with increasing frequency in exotic companion medicine. Disease of the oral cavity can occur in any species; although occasionally encountered in exotic mammalian species, it is rarely described in the literature. Anatomy and dentition vary significantly; diagnosis and treatment are often extrapolated from that known in other species. The best-documented disease of the oral cavity in this group of species is oral neoplasia in the hedgehog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Reptiles and Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    A wide variety of disorders may be seen affecting the reptile and amphibian oral cavity. Owners can easily miss problems until they are at an advanced stage because of the difficulty of examining the oral cavity at home. Because many problems are secondary to an inappropriate environment or diet and may be related to systemic disease, a full history and clinical examination is always required. Treatment of oral disorders also requires a holistic approach including correction of any predisposing factors in order for long-term successful resolution of the problem.

  20. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P < .001). Gingival and floor of mouth lesions occurred in older patients, possibly from chronic denture rubbing. Twenty-six patients had dental abnormalities recorded in close proximity to where their tumor developed. Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment

  1. Computer aided morphometric analysis of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Gupta, J; Miglani, R

    2016-01-01

    We compared the changes in the cells in the basal layer of normal mucosa, oral leukoplakia with dysplasia and different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using computer aided image analysis of tissue sections. We investigated three morphometric parameters: nuclear area (NA), cell area (CA) and their ratio (NA:CA). NA and NA:CA ratio showed a statistically significant increase from dysplasia to increasing grades of OSCC. Nuclear size was useful for differentiating normal tissue, potentially malignant leukoplakia and OSCC.

  2. Characterization of p53 gene mutations in a Brazilian population with oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Anna C M; Cherubini, Karen; Herter, Nilton; Furian, Roque; Santos, Diogenes S; Squier, Christopher; Domann, Frederick E

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are present in approximately 50% of all human cancers. We sought to determine the frequency and type of p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the oral cavity in a Brazilian population. To identify p53 mutations we used PCR-SSCP in tumor tissue microdissected from paraffin- embedded and from fresh-frozen sections followed by direct sequencing of SSCP bands with altered electrophoretic mobility. We identified p53 mutations in 40% of the human SCC analyzed. The mutations were of a broad spectrum, with a preponderance of G --> A and A --> G transitions with an apparent hotspot at the CpG dinucleotide at codon 290. Patient samples were stratified according to tobacco and alcohol consumption as well as by anatomic location of the tumor, and although trends did emerge, no statistically significant associations were obtained between the occurance of TP53 mutations and these lifestyle habits. We conclude that p53 mutations are common among oral cavity cancers in this population, and stress the significance of this study since it is the first analysis of p53 mutation in oral cancer in a southern Brazilian population.

  3. Oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Dharshiyani, Sandhya Chunilal; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Wanjari, Panjab Vitthalrao; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2012-01-01

    Myiasis is a general term for infection by fly larvae feeding on the host's necrotic or living tissue. Although infestation by fly larvae is much more prevalent in animals, it is a relatively frequent in occurrence. Oral myiasis is a rare pathology in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene. Larvae cause itching and irritation due to their crawling movements and can destroy vital tissues, inducing serious or even life-threatening haemorrhage. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots one by one; however, a systemic treatment with macrolide antibiotics, have been recently used for treatment. We present a case report of a 70-year-old man indigent, alcohol-dependent with an extensive necrotic wound in mandible and fetid odour. The prevention of human myiasis is by education, but unfortunately in the developing countries some people live in low social condition, predisposing the occurrence of the infestation. PMID:23266777

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W. )

    1990-11-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM.

  5. Sonic hedgehog in oral squamous cell carcinoma: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Sahana; Iyengar, Asha R; Mysorekar, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have revealed the involvement of hedgehog (Hh) signaling component in proliferation and invasive behavior of many carcinomas. Aim: This study aims to identify the expression of sonic Hh (SHH) protein of SHH pathway in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using SHH (H-160) (Santa Cruz, sc-9042) which could have therapeutic implication in future. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 cases comprising 50 normal oral mucosa, 50 cases of oral epithelial dysplasia, 50 well, 50 moderate and 50 poorly differentiated OSCCs were included in the study. Immunohistochemical evaluation of SHH protein expression was conducted using monoclonal antibody. Interpretation of the expression was done by immunoreactive score of Remmele and Stegner (IRS) scoring method. Statistical Analysis: Chi-Square test was used to analyze the results. Results: The study showed that SHH signaling molecules are highly expressed in OSCC, and their expression was mainly in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells. Conclusion: The SHH signaling component is associated with the pathological parameter in OSCC and oral epithelial dysplasia. PMID:27721600

  6. RENAL CELL CARCINOMA METASTASIS TO THE SINONASAL CAVITY: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Kovačić, Marijan; Krvavica, Ana; Rudić, Milan

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all adult malignant tumors. Common sites of metastases are lungs, bone, liver, brain and adrenal glands. Metastatic disease to the head and neck ranges from 15% to 30%. The 5-year survival rate after nephrectomy is 60%-75%, but with multiorgan metastases the 5-year survival rate is significantly lower, 0-7%. A case is presented of a female patient diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma metastases to the paranasal sinuses, diagnosed and treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Zadar General Hospital, Zadar, Croatia. The tumor was surgically removed. Unfortunately, the patient died one year after the procedure due to multiorgan failure. Although metastases of renal cell carcinoma to the head and neck are very rare, it should be first suspected when investigating a metastatic tumor in this region. Surgical excision offers the best hope for long term survival. In case of unresectable tumor, other treatment options should be considered such as radiotherapy, immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

  7. Efficacy of cobalt-60 radiation therapy for the treatment of nasal cavity nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma in the dog.

    PubMed

    Correa, Stephanie Shank; Mauldin, G Neal; Mauldin, Glenna E; Patnaik, Amiya K

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of cobalt-60 radiotherapy in the treatment of nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity in dogs and to compare this treatment group to historical controls. Six dogs with histopathologically confirmed nasal cavity nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma were treated with cobalt-60 radiotherapy to a total dose of either 63 Gy or 54 Gy. Overall survival times ranged from 30 days to 330 days, with a median survival time of 165 days. Nasal cavity nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma in the dog is an aggressive tumor that responds poorly to radiotherapy.

  8. Spontaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the oral region in domestic animals: a review and consideration of their relevance to human research.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G

    1996-06-01

    Spontaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the oral region in domestic animals have the potential of providing additional information about the pathology of oral cancer and may be useful in therapeutic research. Moreover, they exhibit definite advantages over chemically induced tumors in rodents. This article provides background information on spontaneous oral squamous cell carcinomas in dogs, cats, cattle, horses and sheep and then discusses the use in research of such tumors in dogs and cats. These two species are potentially the most useful because they are numerous, suffer quite commonly from squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx, and are usually allowed to live approximately normal life spans. Moreover, they are being treated routinely in veterinary hospitals.

  9. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina).

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Diane E; Fong, Derek L; Vogel, Keith W; Durning, W McIntyre; Torrence, Anne E; Rose, Timothy M; Staheli, Jeannette P; Baldessari, Audrey; Murnane, Robert D; Hukkannen, Renee R

    2014-06-01

    An adult, gravid, female pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) presented for facial swelling centered on the left mandible that was approximately 5 cm wide. Differential diagnoses included infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic origins. Definitive antemortem diagnosis was not possible, and the macaque's condition worsened despite supportive care. Necropsy findings included a mandibular mass that was locally invasive and expansile, encompassing approximately 80% of the left mandibular bone. The mass replaced portions of the soft palate, hard palate, sinuses, ear canal, and the caudal-rostral calvarium and masseter muscle. Histologically, the mass was a neoplasm that was poorly circumscribed, unencapsulated, and infiltrative invading regional bone and soft tissue. The mass consisted of polygonal squamous epithelial cells with intercellular bridging that breached the epithelial basement membrane and formed invasive nests, cords, and trabeculae. The mitotic rate averaged 3 per 400× field of view, with occasional bizarre mitotic figures. Epithelial cells often exhibited dyskeratosis, and the nests often contained compact lamellated keratin (keratin pearls). The neoplasm was positive via immunohistochemistry for pancytokeratin, variably positive for S100, and negative for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and desmin. The gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with an aggressive oral squamous cell carcinoma. The neoplasm was negative via PCR for papilloma virus. In general, neoplasia in macaques is rare. Although squamous cell carcinomas are one of the most common oral neoplasia in many species, to our knowledge this case represents the first reported oral squamous cell carcinoma in a pigtailed macaque.

  10. [The clinical aspects of HPV-positive cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx].

    PubMed

    Dvoryaninova, O Yu; Chainzonov, E L; Litvyakov, N V

    2016-01-01

    This review was designed to focus on the prevalence and the magnitude of infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) among healthy subjects and patients presenting with cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We compare the data on the relative frequency of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx in different populations, peculiarities of the clinical course of this pathology, and methods of its treatment. Much emphasis is placed on the specific clinical and morphological features of HPV-positive cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The general and relapse-free survival rates are considered with special reference to the outcome and prognosis of this disease. The currently accepted approaches to the treatment of HPV-positive cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx are discussed. It is concluded that HPV-positive cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx should be regarded as an autonomous pathological condition requiring specific approaches to its management, such as the application of adequate treatment schemes and algorithms.

  11. A review of risk factors for oral cavity cancer: the importance of a standardized case definition.

    PubMed

    Radoï, Loredana; Luce, Danièle

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to review the literature on risk factors of oral cavity cancer with a special attention to the definition of the cases, in order to highlight special features of these cancers and of their subsites. PubMed database was systematically searched to access relevant articles published between 1980 and 2010. Reference lists of selected papers were examined to identify further articles. One hundred and two studies met the inclusion criteria. Their results were difficult to compare because of the lack of uniformity in defining oral cavity. In addition, few studies examined risk factors other than alcohol and tobacco, and studies differentiating between subsites were rare. Despite these limitations, some characteristics of oral cavity cancers may be emphasized: smoked tobacco seems to be a stronger risk factor for oral cavity cancer than alcohol, and the floor of the mouth seems to be more sensitive to the harmful effects of alcohol and smoked tobacco. Studies limited strictly to oral cavity cancers and distinguishing between subsites are needed to better understand the aetiology of these cancers, and better define risk groups to target prevention efforts and screening.

  12. Assessing the patient at risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J B; Scully, C

    1997-01-01

    Patients and health care workers require continuing education to promote knowledge of the signs, symptoms, and risk factors for oral cancer. This paper reviews the literature assessing diagnostic tools that are currently available or being developed, in order to assist in the biopsy site selection and subsequent diagnosis of patients at risk for oral cancer. There is a general consensus that oral examination of patients at risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) should be conducted on a routine basis. However, there can be false-positive and false-negative findings. Toluidine blue has been shown to be useful as an adjunct to the clinical examination when used by experienced clinicians. Exfoliative cytology is not currently used as a routine measure for the evaluation of lesions of the oral mucosa, but further development and the application of biologic markers to cytologic specimens may increase its value. Fluorescent imaging of malignant lesions of the oral mucosa has been shown to be sensitive and specific in animal models but thus far has been reported in only one human trial. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques when used by general practitioners need to be assessed. Further, none of the above procedures has yet been shown to be a cost-effective public health measure in screening for oral cancer.

  13. Pharmacokinetics in the oral cavity: fluoride and other active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    Modern commercial toothpastes contain therapeutic ingredients to combat various oral conditions, for example, caries, gingivitis, calculus and tooth stain. The efficient delivery and retention of such ingredients in the mouth is essential for good performance. The aim of this chapter is to review the literature on the oral pharmacokinetics of, primarily, fluoride but also other active ingredients, mainly anti-plaque agents. Elevated levels of fluoride have been found in saliva, plaque and the oral soft tissues after use of fluoridated toothpaste, which persist at potentially active concentrations for hours. Both experiment and mathematical modelling suggest that the soft tissues are the main oral reservoir for fluoride. Qualitatively similar observations have been made for anti-plaque agents such as triclosan and metal cations, though their oral substantivity is generally greater. Scope for improved retention and subsequent efficacy exists. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Oral cavity and pharynx-throat cancer in the United States, 1973-2003.

    PubMed

    Rodu, Brad; Cole, Philip

    2007-11-01

    To study incidence rates (Is) of oral cavity and pharynx-throat cancer in adults age 20+ years from 1973 to 2003, and to estimate how many of these cancers occurred in the United States in 2003. We used data and software from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program to generate age-adjusted Is, reported as cases per 100,000 person-years. For oral cancer, the Is for young men were stable, and Is at ages 40+ years declined by one third after the mid 1980s. Is declined by one third in women ages 40 to 74, but increased in the youngest and oldest groups. In 2003 there were 10,432 cases of oral cavity cancer among persons age 20+ years in the United States, and there were 12,157 cases of pharynx-throat cancer. The Is of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx-throat are stable or declining for men and women in most age groups. Of the nearly 30,000 malignant neoplasms occurring in the SEER "oral cavity-pharynx" category in 2003, almost three quarters (21,455) were detectable during a routine oral examination.

  15. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%-100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%-25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  16. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%–100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%–25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  17. Introducing Cytology-Based Theranostics in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Patrikidou, Anna; Valeri, Rosalia Maria; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Destouni, Charikleia; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of brush cytology in the biomarker expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas within the concept of theranostics, and to correlate this biomarker profile with patient measurable outcomes. Markers representative of prognostic gene expression changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma was selected. These markers were also selected to involve pathways for which commercially available or investigational agents exist for clinical application. A set of 7 markers were analysed by immunocytochemistry on the archival primary tumour material of 99 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. We confirmed the feasibility of the technique for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Furthermore, our results affirm the prognostic significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family and the angiogenic pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma, confirming their interest for targeted therapy. Brush cytology appears feasible and applicable for the expression profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma within the concept of theranostics, according to sample availability.

  18. AgNORs in hyperplasia, papilloma and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L M; do Carmo, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ten inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias, ten papillomas, and nineteen oral squamous cell carcinomas were analyzed by the AgNOR technique to determine if different disturbances of oral epithelia presented different AgNOR counts. The papilloma group showed higher mean AgNOR counts (3.15 +/- 0.58) than the hyperplasia group (1.98 +/- 0.24) and smaller than the well-differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma group (6.56 +/- 1.25) and poorly differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma group (7.07 +/- 1.60). The differences among the groups of lesions were statistically significant (P < 0.05) except between the well differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma group and the poorly differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma group. Our findings suggest that the cellular proliferation ratio in papillomas is greater than hyperplasias and smaller than carcinomas.

  19. Influence of Oral Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 on Ear and Oral Cavity Health in Humans: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Katarina; Kriksic, Valentina; Kovacevic, Irena; Kovacevic, Dujo

    2017-06-01

    Traditionally, probiotics are linked to the good health of the intestine and most clinical studies focus on that field. Evidence of oral probiotic use for ear and oral cavity disease prevention with impact on human health is limited. This work reviews existing studies and literature on Streptococcus salivarius K12 as an oral probiotic and effects of S. salivarius K12 on human ear and oral cavity human health. The studies were accessed via database searches: MEDLINE, PubMed, and Elsevier. The search included/focused on/encompassed publications from 2003 to 2016 with keywords related to K12 Streptococcus salivarius, bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) K12, probiotic K12 salivarius, and K12 probiotic health effects. Only a small amount of studies was identified: the total of 68 studies was identified, 35 of which were relevant after screening, and 9 were included in the final analysis. Very little literature is available about the association/correlation between/connection/interrelation of S. salivarius K12 with/and human ear and oral cavity health. S. salivarius K12 may have a role in reducing the occurrence and/or severity of secretory otitis media (SOM) and also in prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children. Research highlights that S. salivarius K12 has shown promising results in treatment of halitosis, but data are still deficient. Further studies need to be initiated to improve understanding of the association of oral probiotic S. salivarius K12 with human ear and oral cavity health.

  20. Comparison of Selected Protein Levels in Tumour and Surgical Margin in a Group of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Gołąbek, Karolina; Cuber, Piotr; Krakowczyk, Łukasz; Owczarek, Aleksander Jerzy; Fronczek, Martyna; Choręża, Piotr; Hudziec, Edyta; Ostrowska, Zofia

    2017-08-01

    Oral cavity cancer belongs to head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma group. The purpose of the study was to assess the levels of certain proteins in a tumour and surgical margin in a group of patients with oral cavity cancer. The levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP1, SFRP2, RORA, TIMP3, p16, APC and RASSF1 proteins were measured by ELISA in tissue homogenates. The protein levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP2 and RASSF1 were significantly higher in tumour tissue than in the margin, contrary to TIMP3 which was lower in the tumour itself. DAPK1 level in the tumour was significantly higher in females than in males, the MGMT and p16 levels were lower in the tumours with lymph node metastasis (N1 + N2) than in N0 samples. The CDH1 expression was higher in a group with smoking habits, whereas TIMP3 was lower in this group. Changes in the levels of proteins in tumour and surgical margin may be either reflective of tumour occurrence and development, or they might be also responsible for the progress and reoccurrence of the disease. Levels of the studied proteins might be good prognostic factors; however, further studies are required.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  2. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  3. General Information about Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  5. Cellular systems for studying human oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vyomesh; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Siegele, Bradford; Marsh, Christina A; Leelahavanichkul, Kantima; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2011-01-01

    The human oral squamous epithelium plays an important role in maintaining a barrier function against mechanical, physical, and pathological injury. However, the self-renewing cells residing on the basement membrane of the epithelium can give rise to oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC), now the sixth most common cancer in the developed world, which is still associated with poor prognosis. This is due, in part, to the limited availability of well-defined culture systems for studying oral epithelial cell biology, which could advance our understanding of the molecular basis of OSCC. Here, we describe methods to successfully isolate large cultures of human oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts from small pieces of donor tissues for use in techniques such as three-dimensional cultures and animal grafts to validate genes suspected of playing a role in OSCC development and progression. Finally, the use of isolated oral epithelial cells in generating iPS cells is discussed which holds promise in the field of oral regenerative medicine.

  6. Non-smoking non-drinking elderly females: a clinically distinct subgroup of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Koo, K; Barrowman, R; McCullough, M; Iseli, T; Wiesenfeld, D

    2013-08-01

    There is growing interest in non-smoking non-drinking (NSND) patients presenting with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). There are, however, few published reports of OSCC in the elderly. We describe a subgroup of elderly NSND patients presenting with OSCC. Patients with SCC of the oral cavity were retrospectively assessed from the Head and Neck Oncology Tumour Stream database of the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Epidemiological and clinical data for 169 consecutive patients were reviewed and analysed. NSND patients were more likely to be females with a higher median age at presentation. They were more likely to have maxillary alveolus tumours and oral tongue tumours, with retromolar or mandibular tumours less likely. Second primary tumours for this subgroup were confined to the oral cavity. NSND elderly females experienced a worse disease-specific mortality. We have identified a distinct subgroup of elderly female patients presenting with OSCC not associated with the traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol, who have a worse prognosis. Altered management algorithms may prove beneficial for these patients, and further investigation and genetic analysis are required to delineate the aetiology of these carcinomas.

  7. [Quantitative evaluation of Streptococcus mutans and Candida species and salivary factors in the oral cavity of patient undergoing radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spolidorio, D M; Spolidorio, L C; Barbeiro, R H; Höfling, J F; Bernardo, W L; Pavan, S

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the microorganisms Streptococcus mutans and Candida sp in the oral cavity of patients with oropharynx carcinoma, before, during and after radiotherapy, and to correlate the results with salivary factors such as pH, buffer capacity (CT) and flow rate (FS). Saliva samples were collected, diluted and inoculated in SB-20 agar and in Sabouraud agar, for Streptococcus mutans and Candida sp, respectively. Previously to dilution, the concentrated saliva was analyzed, and the salivary factors were determined. After the growth of colonies, the number of microorganisms was determined in CFU/ml. The analysis of the results allowed to conclude that the salivary factors are related to the presence of microorganisms, and that the number of CFU/ml increased as salivary flow rate decreased. The effects of radiation compromised salivary homeostasis and favored the increase of infection by yeasts and bacteria.

  8. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Glucose Transporter Type 1 in Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; Feitosa, Sthefane Gomes; Lima, Ana Thayssa Tomaz; Luna, Ealber Carvalho Macedo; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Chaves, Filipe Nobre; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity and some of these have been documented in association or preceded by oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Aggressive cancers with fast growth have demonstrated overexpression of some glucose transporters (GLUTs). Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the glucose transporter, GLUT-1, in OEDs and OSCCs, seeking to better elucidate the biological behavior of neoplasias. Fifteen cases were selected this research of both lesions. Five areas were analyzed from each case by counting the percentage of positive cells at 400x magnification. Immunoreactivity of GLUT-1 was observed in 100% of the samples ranging from 54.2% to 86.2% for the OSCC and 73.9% to 97.4% for the OED. Statistical test revealed that there was greater overexpression of GLUT-1 in OED than the OSCC (p=0.01). It is believed the high expression of GLUT-1 may reflect the involvement of GLUT-1 in early stages of oral carcinogenesis.

  9. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  10. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Soft Tissues of the Oral Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Bernard, Rodney; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    The present study deals with the in vivo measurement of auto-fluorescence from different anatomical sites of oral cavities of healthy volunteers, using a homebuilt Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy setup. Excitation wave length of 325 nm from a He-Cd laser was used as the source. From the 7 anatomical sites (say buccal mucosa, tongue, palate etc) of each oral cavity of 113 subjects, 1266 fluorescence spectra were recorded. The spectra were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to see the correlation between different sites.

  11. Facial skin blood flow responses to irritant stimuli in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-03-01

    To investigate whether capsaicin and menthol stimuli elicit characteristic responses in facial skin blood flow (SkBF), we observed the facial SkBF response to low and high concentrations of capsaicin and menthol stimuli of 1-ml solution applied to the oral cavity for 20s in 17 healthy subjects. High concentration of capsaicin significantly increased the SkBF in all of the facial areas monitored. High concentration of menthol stimulus significantly decreased SkBF in the nose and increased that in the eyelid, and upper and lower lips. These results demonstrated that capsaicin and menthol stimuli in the oral cavity elicit characteristic responses in facial SkBF.

  12. [Templates for curietherapy of the oral cavity and their dosimetric use].

    PubMed

    Pizzi, G; Fongione, S; Mandoliti, G; Beorchia, A; Contento, G; Malisan, M R

    1989-12-01

    Flexible 192Ir wire implants are commonly used for the treatment of some types of cancer in the oral cavity. A modified technique of plastic tubes is here presented which aims at correctly positioning the active wires with thin plastic templates. Possible sources of error are examined and their consequences on the dose distribution around the implant are analyzed. In most cases control dosimetry matches the provisions satisfactorily. It may be thus concluded that the use of templates allows good and reproducible results to be obtained in the brachytherapy of the oral cavity.

  13. Improved transoral surgical tool design by CT measurements of the oral cavity and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Cox, Emily; Ghasemloonia, Ahmad; Nakoneshny, Steven C; Zareinia, Kourosh; Hudon, Mark; Lysack, John T; Sutherland, Garnette R; Dort, Joseph C

    2016-09-23

    The majority of head and neck cancers arise from the oral cavity and oropharynx. Many of these lesions will be amenable to surgical resection using transoral approaches including transoral robotic surgery (TORS). To develop and control TORS tools, precise dimensions of the oral cavity and pharynx are desirable. CT angiograms of 76 patients were analyzed. For the oral cavity, only the maximum length and width were measured, while for the pharynx, the width, length, and areas of the airway were all measured and the volume calculated. A prototype TORS tool was developed and tested based on the findings and dimensions. The design modification of the tool is in progress. The mean male oral cavity width and length were 93.3 ± 4.3 and 77.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively, and the mean male pharyngeal width, length, area, and volume were 26.5 ± 7.2 mm, 16.2 ± 8.8 mm, 325 ± 149 mm(2), and 28,440 ± 14,100 mm(3), respectively, while the mean female oral cavity width and length were 84.5 ± 12.9 and 71.0 ± 6.3 mm, respectively, and the mean female pharyngeal width, length, area, and volume were 24.8 ± 5.6 mm, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm, 258 ± 98 mm(2), and 17,660 ± 7700 mm(3), respectively. The developed TORS tool was tested inside the oral cavity of an intubation mannequin. These data will also be used to develop an electronic no-go cone-shape tunnel to improve the safety of the surgical field. Reporting the oral cavity and pharyngeal dimensions is important for design of TORS tools and creating control zones for the workspace of the tool inside the oral cavity.

  14. Touch imprint cytology: a rapid diagnostic tool for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geetha, L; Astekar, M; Ashok, K N; Sowmya, G V

    2015-07-01

    Techniques for intraoperative pathologic examination of oral squamous cell carcinoma are rare in the literature. We evaluated the advantages and limitations of touch imprint cytology for intraoperative diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We used 30 incisional biopsies of clinically diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma and compared touch imprint cytology to histopathological sections. Touch imprint cytology showed 24 specimens positive for malignancy, two suspicious for malignancy and four inadequate specimens. The accuracy of the test was 93.2%. Touch imprint cytology is an accurate, simple, rapid and cost-effective method that aids diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma during operation, but it does not replace incisional biopsy.

  15. Bacteroides species from the oral cavity and oral-associated diseases of cats.

    PubMed

    Love, D N; Johnson, J L; Moore, L V

    1989-03-01

    One hundred and sixty-seven strains of Bacteroides were isolated from 71 subcutaneous fight-wound abscesses of cats, 21 cases of feline pyothorax, normal gingival margins from 10 cats and 6 cases of feline gingivitis. Bacteroides species constituted (as a proportion of all anaerobic isolates examined) 44.5% from subcutaneous abscesses, 33.7% from pyothoraxes, 37.5% from normal gingiva and 27.7% from diseased gingiva. Bacteroides tectum comprised 43.7% or 73 of 167 strains, followed by the black- or brown-pigmented asaccharolytic feline species of B. gingivalis, B. salivosus and Group B, comprising 32.3% or 54 of 167 strains. B. heparinolyticus (some 10% or 17 of 167 strains) was the next most common species described. The remainder consisted of two strains of B. fragilis and 21 unspeciated strains. Bacteroides tectum was frequently isolated from subcutaneous abscesses (43.7%) and pyothoraxes (46.6%), and it constituted some 33% of anaerobic isolated from normal gingiva. Bacteroides heparinolyticus was more commonly encountered in purulent lesions (abscesses and pyothoraxes) than in the oral cavity.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tissues: a comprehensive review for oral healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Bsoul, Samer A; Huber, Michaell A; Terezhalmy, Geza T

    2005-11-15

    North Americans in 2004 were projected to die from oral and pharyngeal cancer at a rate of 1.2 per hour. Oral healthcare providers can be instrumental in reducing the incidence of oral and pharyngeal premalignant and malignant lesions by identifying patients with high-risk behavior, educating their patients about the consequences of their high-risk behavior, and by early detection of premalignant and malignant conditions. The fact only 34% of the cancers of the oral cavity and larynx are localized at the time of diagnosis and evidence that at least one third of the patients diagnosed with an oral or pharyngeal malignancy have undergone oral cancer screening within the past three years suggests the current protocol for the early detection of pre-malignant or malignant changes appears to be deficient. To facilitate early diagnosis, oral healthcare providers must take into consideration the capriciousness of oral cancer and must be familiar with the availability and application of diagnostic modalities beyond conventional visual inspection and palpation of oral soft tissues. This article provides a comprehensive review of the disease for healthcare professionals.

  17. Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detected in the Oral Cavity and Fingernails of Mid-Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tsung-chieh (Jane); Hughes, James P.; Feng, Qinghua; Hulbert, Ayaka; Hawes, Stephen E.; Xi, Long Fu; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Stern, Joshua E.; Koutsky, Laura A.; Winer, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral and fingernail human papillomavirus (HPV) detection may be associated with HPV-related carcinoma risk at these non-genital sites and foster transmission to the genitals. We describe the epidemiology of oral and fingernail HPV among mid-adult women. Methods Between 2011–2012, 409 women aged 30–50 years were followed for 6 months. Women completed health and behavior surveys and provided self-collected oral, fingernail, and vaginal specimens at enrollment and exit for type-specific HPV DNA testing. Concordance of type-specific HPV detection across anatomic sites was described with kappa statistics. Using generalized estimating equations or exact logistic regression, we measured the univariate associations of various risk factors with type-specific oral and fingernail HPV detection. Results Prevalence of detecting HPV in the oral cavity (2.4%) and fingernails (3.8%) was low compared to the vagina (33.1%). Concordance across anatomic sites was poor (kappa<.20 for all comparisons). However, concurrent vaginal infection with the same HPV type (OR=101.0;95%CI: 31.4–748.6) and vaginal HPV viral load (OR per one log10 viral load increase=2.2;95%CI:1.5–5.5) were each associated with fingernail HPV detection. Abnormal Pap history (OR=11.1;95%CI:2.8-infinity), lifetime number of male vaginal sex partners ≥10 (OR vs. 0–3 partners=5.0;95%CI:1.2-infinity), and lifetime number of open-mouth kissing partners ≥16 (OR vs. 0–15 partners=infinity;95%CI:2.6-infinity, by exact logistic regression) were each associated with oral HPV detection. Conclusions While our findings support HPV DNA deposition or autoinoculation between anatomic sites in mid-adult women, the rarity of HPV in the oral cavity and fingernails suggests that oral/fingernail HPV does not account for a significant fraction of HPV in genital sites. PMID:26562696

  18. Estimation of salivary sialic acid in oral premalignancy and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Vishakha; Pradeep, G. L.; Prakash, Nilima; Mahajan, Aarti M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Oral cancer is the most life-threatening disease of oral tissues. In societies where the incidence of oral cancer is high, clinically recognizable premalignant lesions are particularly common. Diagnosing oral cancers at an early stage is critical in improving the survival rate and reducing the morbidity associated with the disease. Alterations in the sialic acid levels in cancer patients have stimulated interest in this sugar residue as a possible tumor marker. Settings and Design: The purpose of this study was to estimate the salivary sialic acid levels in patients with oral premalignancy and squamous cell carcinoma and to correlate it with their grades to develop a cost-effective and noninvasive diagnostic parameter. Materials and Methods: Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from the groups under study and subjected to biochemical analysis for determination of sialic acid levels. Statistical Analysis Used: The salivary sialic acid levels were correlated with the clinical stage and histological grade by one-way ANOVA (SPSS software version 15). Results: Salivary sialic acid was elevated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) compared to oral premalignancy and control group. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the grades of squamous cell carcinoma, grades of dysplasia in premalignancy, and sialic acid level. Conclusion and Clinical Significance: Evaluation of salivary sialic acid levels in premalignant and malignant lesions can serve as a screening tool. The mortality and morbidity of OSCC can be reduced if the lesions are diagnosed in early precancerous states using such noninvasive diagnostic methods for screening and monitoring of the population. PMID:27994410

  19. The Oral Cavity State in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gašpar, Marija; Glavina, Ana; Grubišić, Kristina; Sabol, Ivan; Bušić, Mirela; Mravak, Marinka

    2015-01-01

    Aim Patients with a solid organ transplant can have many different complications in the mouth, as a result of immunosuppression and side effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and type of oral lesions in renal transplant patients, dental status, oral hygiene, oral lesions related to drugs which patients take and the time of transplantation as well as the frequency of patient’s visits to the dentist in the post-transplant period. Material and methods The study was performed in a period of two years and included 100 subjects with a renal transplant during their regular control visits to the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 100 randomly selected control subjects at the Department of Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Results Results showed a significantly higher incidence of oral lesions in patients with renal transplant (31%) compared to control subjects. The most frequent were erythematous (inflammatory changes), keratotic lesions and gingival hyperplasia. The average DMFT index was significantly lower in patients with renal transplant than in the control group. One third of patients had a subjective feeling of dry mouth. Oral hygiene was poor overall, and only a small number of subjects used the additional sustainers for oral hygiene. Most patients did not visit the dentist after the transplantation. Conclusion Renal transplant patients need a comprehensive and regular dental care during the pre- and post-transplant period and a doctor of dental medicine should be part of a multidisciplinary team of medical specialists. PMID:27688404

  20. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  1. Clinical relevance of copy number profiling in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; Braunius, Weibel W; Moelans, Cathy B; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; Koole, Ronald; Grolman, Wilko; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Current conventional treatment modalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are nonselective and have shown to cause serious side effects. Unraveling the molecular profiles of head and neck cancer may enable promising clinical applications that pave the road for personalized cancer treatment. We examined copy number status in 36 common oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a cohort of 191 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and 164 oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) using multiplex ligation probe amplification. Copy number status was correlated with human papillomavirus (HPV) status in OPSCC, with occult lymph node status in OSCC and with patient survival. The 11q13 region showed gain or amplifications in 59% of HPV-negative OPSCC, whereas this amplification was almost absent in HPV-positive OPSCC. Additionally, in clinically lymph node-negative OSCC (Stage I-II), gain of the 11q13 region was significantly correlated with occult lymph node metastases with a negative predictive value of 81%. Multivariate survival analysis revealed a significantly decreased disease-free survival in both HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCC with a gain of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1. Gain of CCND1 showed to be an independent predictor for worse survival in OSCC. These results show that copy number aberrations, mainly of the 11q13 region, may be important predictors and prognosticators which allow for stratifying patients for personalized treatment of HNSCC.

  2. Comparative analysis of cell proliferation ratio in oral lichen planus, epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Fernando-Augusto-Cervantes-Garcia; Paradella, Thaís-Cachuté; Carvalho, Yasmin-Rodarte; Rosa, Luiz-Eduardo-Blumer

    2009-11-01

    Although oral lichen planus has been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a potentially malignant disorder, such classification is still the target of much controversy. To evaluate the cell proliferation rate in oral lichen planus, comparing it to the rate observed in epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma, aiming at indications which might indicate the potential for malignant transformation. Twenty-four cases of each lesion were submitted to the streptoavidin-biotin and AgNOR technique to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of PCNA and the mean NORs/nucleus, respectively. Positivity for PCNA was observed in 58.33% of oral lichen planus cases, 83.33% of epithelial dysplasia cases and 91.67% of oral squamous cell carcinoma cases. Chi-squared test showed that the number of positive cases for PCNA was significantly lower in oral lichen planus than in oral squamous cell carcinoma (p<0.05). No significant statistical difference between oral lichen planus and epithelial dysplasia (p>0.05) and between the epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (p>0.05) was observed. The mean NORs/nucleus in oral lichen planus, epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma were 1.74+/-0.32, 2.42+/-0.62 e 2.41+/-0.61, respectively. Variance analysis (ANOVA) revealed significant statistical difference between oral lichen planus and the other studied lesions (p<0.05). Oral lichen planus cell proliferation rate was less than in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma which might explain the lower malignant transformation rate.

  3. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: manifestations in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Urízar, José Manuel; Echebarría-Goicouría, María Angeles; Eguía-del-Valle, Asier

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a pandemic disease characterised by impairment of the immune system; the main parameter is a progressive decline in the number of CD4 lymphocytes. This circumstance paves the way for opportunistic infections and the development of neoplastic processes that can lead the patient to a state known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ultimately, results in death. The incorporation of treatment based on a cocktail of different active drugs (highly active antiretroviral therapy) has made it possible to drastically change the panorama of the disease in developed nations; improving quality of life for the patient and delaying the progression of the disease. The oral manifestations of HIV infection have been and continue to be an important component of the disease from the very first descriptions and are indicative of progression. At some point in the course of the disease, nine out of every ten patients will present oral manifestations and, on occasion, these symptoms will be the first sign of the syndrome. It is essential that oral healthcare professionals recognize the hallmarks of the illness. In developed countries, the emergence of new therapies has made it possible to significantly reduce immune deficiency-related oral manifestations, both in terms of frequency, as well as severity. This review analyses the most important oral lesions associated with HIV infection and the current state of affairs in this regard.

  4. Corrosion in the oral cavity--potential local and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Bergman, M

    1986-03-01

    The main current-generating corrosion cells in the oral cavity are the bimetallic cell and the concentration cell, the latter mainly occurring due to differences in access to oxygen in the various parts of the metallic material. Corrosion resistance is not an intrinsic property of a metal or an alloy for it depends on an interaction with the environment. Thus, the contents of the oral cavity, have a decisive influence. This implies that corrosion tests in vitro are of limited value in predicting the clinical corrosion behaviour of a metallic material. Results from a series of clinical studies concerning a possible relationship between galvanic currents and certain oral and other symptoms in a group of patients who had been referred to the Faculty of Odontology, University of Umeå, are briefly presented. The possibility of local and systemic effects of intra-oral galvanic cells is discussed.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma with sarcomatous stroma in the nasal cavity of a dog.

    PubMed

    Bosward, K L; Kessell, A E; Lucy, R J

    2004-09-01

    This is a report of an unusual squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity of a dog. A 13-year-old Golden Retriever was presented with a unilateral nasal and ocular discharge. Although a nasal tumour was suspected, initial diagnostic investigations were unrewarding, and, with worsening clinical signs, the dog was euthanatized. Necropsy examination confirmed the presence of a nasal tumour that was composed histologically of both a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma component blending with a predominant spindle cell component. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-human keratin/cytokeratin (AE1/AE3, CAM 5.2 and broad spectrum cytokeratin), Vimentin, Desmin, smooth muscle actin and S-100 protein supported a diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma with (pseudo) sarcomatous stroma.

  6. Oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma in twelve dogs.

    PubMed

    Nemec, A; Murphy, B G; Jordan, R C; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-01-01

    Papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a distinct histological subtype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), described in both dogs and man. In dogs, PSCC has long been considered a malignant oral tumour of very young animals, but it has recently been reported to occur in adult dogs as well. The aim of this study was to describe the major clinicopathological characteristics of canine oral PSCC (COPSCC). Twelve dogs diagnosed with COPSCC were included in this retrospective study (1990-2012). The majority (75%) of the dogs were >6 years of age (median age 9 years). All tumours were derived from the gingiva of dentate jaws, with 66.7% affecting the rostral aspects of the jaws. The gross appearance of the lesions varied, with one having an intraosseous component only. The majority (91.7%) of the tumours were advanced lesions (T2 and T3), but no local or distant metastases were noted. Microscopically, two patterns were seen: (1) invasion of bone forming a cup-shaped indentation in the bone or a deeply cavitating cyst within the bone (cavitating pattern), (2) histologically malignant growth, but lack of apparent bone invasion (non-cavitating pattern). The microscopical appearance corresponded to imaging findings in a majority of cases, with cavitating forms presenting with a cyst-like pattern of bone loss or an expansile mass on imaging and non-cavitating forms showing an infiltrative pattern of bone destruction on imaging. These features suggest two distinct biological behaviours of COPSCC.

  7. Prognostic impact of metallothionein on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sérgio V; Barbosa, Hugo M; Candellori, Ignez M; Loyola, Adriano M; Aguiar, Maria Cássia F

    2002-08-01

    Metallothionein (MT), a low-molecular-weight protein with high cysteine content, seems to be related to neoplastic resistance to oncologic treatment and therefore has been studied as a prognostic factor for a variety of human malignant tumors. MT overexpression in neoplasms of ectodermal origin is usually associated with a poor prognosis. MT expression was evaluated in 60 samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma by immunohistochemistry to study its prognostic influence on oral cancer. Possible associations of MT immunoexpression were also investigated with respect to clinical stage (TNM), histological grading, and proliferation index (Ki-67) of the lesions. No significant statistical correlation was observed among these variables. The impact on overall survival was assessed by uni and multivariate statistical tests. Mean MT labeling index was 60%. High MT labeling indexes (over 76%) predicted shorter survival in univariate statistical analysis. In multivariate analysis, MT labeling index and clinical stage were independent prognostic factors. MT overexpression in oral squamous cell carcinoma seems to be related to a worse prognosis for patients.

  8. Fluorescence detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Hyperflav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rawicz, Andrew H.; Zhang, Lewei

    2000-05-01

    A novel hypericin-based drug HyperflavTM has been evaluated for light-induced fluorescence detection of oral cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma was induced with carcinogenic agent in right pouches of forty hamsters (20/20 males/females). Solution of HyperflavTM was sprinkled into stomach with a single dose 0.2 - 4 mg of pure hypericin per kg b.w. and 4 - 8 hours before fluorescence analysis. In two animal groups with cancer symptoms the autofluorescence and hypericin-induced fluorescence were taken under 442 nm excitation. The buccal mucosa and adjacent areas were measured fiberoptically in-vivo and in-vitro using orange/green ratio (610/540). The in-vivo fluorescence imaging of malignant areas was conducted to assist the biopsy guidance and to compare with white-light images. Histological and morphological analyses were performed from biopsies. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in its early stage demonstrated specific higher 610/540 ratio for 37 tested hamsters. Advanced state involved another higher fluorescence maximum around 640 nm that in our opinion caused by strong porphyrin-induced native fluorescence. Such deformation of fluorescence spectra may lead to inadequate perception of diseased tissue area. To avoid this problem the autofluorescence spectra & images were added. HyperflavTM application is promising for demarcation of early oral cancer when combined with autofluorescence measurements.

  9. Expression of E-cadherin in normal oral mucosa, in oral precancerous lesions and in oral carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Ugrappa; Jain, Ajay; Nagalaxmi, Velpula; Kumar, Ugrappa Vijay; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of E-cad in oral precancerous lesions and conditions and oral carcinomas in comparison with normal mucosa. Materials and Methods: Total of 50 samples were selected for the study and were categorized into five groups and 10 samples in each group as Group I-oral leukoplakia (OL), Group II-oral lichen planus (OLP), Group III-oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), Group IV-oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Group V-normal oral mucosa (NOM) as control group. All the samples were assessed for the expression of E-cad by immunohistochemical study. Results: Upon assessing the expression of E-cad in OL, OSMF, OLP and OSCC, as majority of the samples with OSCC (90%), OL (80%), OLP (70%) and OSMF (60%) showed mild to moderate expression of E-cad staining, which was suggestive of reduction in dysplastic cells on comparison to NOM cells. This difference in expression and variation of E-cad upon comparison with normal mucosa was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There is significant (P < 0.001) variation of expression of E-cad with the histopathological dysplasia of the oral precancerous lesions and conditions, and the tumor differentiation of the oral cancers. However, there was no correlation of the degree of loss of expression of E-cad with the degree of dysplasia or the tumor differentiation of oral cancers. We conclude with our study that, there is a variation in the expression of E-cad but its value as a prognostic marker is questionable. PMID:26430364

  10. [Oral cavity changes in the child with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Petrecca, S; Giammaria, G; Giammaria, A F

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-nine patients (of both sexes aged between 8 and 18 years old) were referred to our attention with a probable history of celiac disease; intestinal biopsy was positive for the said pathology. Biopsies were compared to a second group of 29 age- and sex-matched control subjects not suffering from gastrointestinal diseases and/or disorders of the phosphocalcium metabolism. The aim of the study was to highlight the possible presence, frequency and extent of oral alterations in confirmed celiac subjects in order to evaluate their greater or lesser incidence compared to controls. The results obtained confirm that celiac patients are more likely to manifest oral pathologies.

  11. Outcome Analysis of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer and Extracapsular Spread in Neck Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Extracapsular spread (ECS) in neck lymph nodes is a major adverse prognostic factor in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We conducted a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in this patient group and tried to identify a subset of patients with a worse prognosis suitable for more aggressive therapeutic interventions. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 255 OSCC patients with ECS in neck nodes and without evidence of distant metastasis. All participants were followed-up for at least 2 years or censored at last follow-up. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: Level IV/V lymph node metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm were independent predictors of 5-year survival and identified three prognostic groups. In the low-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth <12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 60%, 66%, and 50%, respectively. In the intermediate-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 39%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In the high-risk group (evidence of level IV/V metastases), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 14%, 12%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusions: Among OSCC patients with ECS, those with level IV/V metastases appear to have the worst prognosis followed by without level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm. An aggressive therapeutic approach may be suitable for intermediate- and high-risk patients.

  12. Impact of smoking status on clinical outcome in oral cavity cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kawakita, Daisuke; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Tajima, Kazuo; Murakami, Shingo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-02-01

    The association between smoking status and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the association between smoking status before treatment and clinical outcome in OSCC patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 222 OSCC patients who were treated at Aichi Cancer Center in Japan. Of these, 82 patients (36.9%) were non-smokers, 65 (29.3%) were light smokers (pack-years smoking (PY) <30), 54 (24.3%) were moderate smokers (30≤PY<60), and 21 (9.5%) were heavy smokers (60≤PY). The survival impact of pre-treatment smoking status was evaluated using multivariate proportional hazard models. Five-year overall survival for non-, light, moderate, and heavy smokers was 72.9% (95% confidence interval CI): (61.4-81.5), 85.5% (74.0-92.2), 59.9% (44.3-72.4) and 69.0% (42.8-85.0). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for moderate and heavy smokers in comparison with light smokers were 2.44 (1.07-5.57, P=0.034) and 2.66 (0.97-7.33, P=0.058) and the dose-response relationship among smokers was statistically significance (P(trend)=0.024). In addition, adjusted HR for non-smokers relative to light smokers was 2.27 (0.84-6.15, P=0.108). We observed a suggestive heterogeneity in the impact of smoking status by treatment method (P for heterogeneity=0.069). Effect of smoking was evident only among the chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy group. In this study, we found the significant positive dose-response relationship among smokers on clinical outcome in OSCC patients and that non-smokers were worse prognosis than light smokers. In addition, this effect might differ by treatment method.

  13. DNA ploidy and cell cycle protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas with and without lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Zargoun, Ibtisam M; Bingle, L; Speight, P M

    2017-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most frequently occurring malignant tumour in the oral cavity. OSCC arises because of multiple genetic alterations. Cell cycle aberrations and aneuploidy are reportedly among the main characteristics of cancer cells and are associated with aggressive growth and poor prognosis. The study sample included 47 non-metastasised and 39 metastasised primary OSCC, with matched positive cervical lymph nodes and 17 normal oral mucosa samples. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were prepared with a minimum of three cores from each case. TMA sections were cut and immunostained with MCM2, Ki-67, geminin and cyclin D1 antibodies. DNA image analysis was performed on the whole tissue section before TMAs were created. The results revealed that there were no differences in cell cycle protein expression in different areas of the tumours or between the metastatic and non-metastatic carcinomas. None of the cell cycle proteins showed significant differences between the lymph node metastasis and the primary OSCC, except for Ki-67. Geminin/Ki-67 ratio showed significant difference between metastatic and non-metastatic tumours. Aneuploidy was detected in all (100%) cases of OSCC. Similarly, all lymph node samples (39 cases) were aneuploid. The results suggest that although there was dysregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins, only Ki-67 and the MCM2/Ki-67 and geminin/Ki-67 ratios may have prognostic significance in oral cancer. DNA ploidy alone was not specific and may not be a good tool to evaluate prognosis or metastatic progression in oral cavity carcinomas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Who will win the race in childrens' oral cavities? Streptococcus mutans or beneficial lactic acid bacteria?

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ö E; Kırzıoğlu, Z; Dinçer, E; Kıvanç, M

    2013-09-01

    Adhesion to oral soft and hard tissue is crucial for bacterial colonisation in the mouth. The aim of this work was to select strains of oral lactic acid bacteria that could be used as probiotics for oral health. To this end, the adhesive properties of some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria including two Streptococcus mutans strains were isolated from the oral cavity of healthy children, while other strains were isolated from fermented meat products. The bacterial strains were applied to teeth surfaces covered with saliva or without saliva. A significant diversity in adhesion capacity to teeth surfaces among the lactic acid bacteria was observed. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from the oral cavity adhered the best to teeth surfaces covered with saliva, whereas lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented meat samples adhered the best to tooth surface without saliva. All strains of lactic acid bacteria were able to reduce the number of S. mutans cells, in particular on saliva-coated tooth surface. Therefore, they might have potential as probiotics for the oral cavity.

  15. The detection of microorganisms related to urethritis from the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Thi; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Kawai, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Takamasa; Uehara, Kazutaka; Murakami, Norihiko; Yoshioka, Masaru; Nakayama, Ken; Shiono, Yutaka; Muraoka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the presence of microorganisms related to urethritis in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis and the efficacies of antimicrobials for urethritis on microorganisms in the oral cavity. Ninety-two male patients with urethritis and 17 male controls participated to this study at 12 urology clinics in Japan between March 2014 and March 2015. The first voided urine (FVU) and oral wash fluid (OWF) specimens were collected from the participants. The microorganisms in both FVU and OWF specimens were detected by nucleic acid amplification tests at the first and follow-up visit. The efficacies of antimicrobials were evaluated after 1-4 weeks treatment completion. In a total of 92 male patients with urethritis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Trichomonas vaginalis and Gardnerella vaginalis were detected from OWF specimens of 12%, 3%, 9%, 0%, 12%, 3%, 3% and 15% patients, respectively. From control males, no microorganism was detected from OWF specimens. Among 46 patients who could be evaluated for antimicrobial efficacies at the follow-up visit, 5 in FVU specimens failed by azithromycin (AZM), and 10 failed in OWF specimens (7 by AZM, 2 by tetracycline, 1 by spectinomycin; p = 0.002). Especially, a high prevalence of G. vaginalis remained positive after treatment for urethritis in the oral cavity. Microorganisms related to urethritis were detected in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis. Antimicrobials that focused on urethritis, especially AZM regimen seem to be less effective for microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary tuberculosis of oral cavity: a rare entity revisited.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virad; Singh, Amit P; Meher, Ravi; Raj, Anoop

    2011-03-01

    Oral lesions of tuberculosis though uncommon, are seen both in the primary as well as the secondary stages of the disease. In secondary tuberculosis, the oral manifestations are accompanied by lesions in the lung, lymph nodes, or any other organ system of the body. This can be detected by the usual clinical history and systemic examination. Primary oral tuberculosis may thus present as a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. Amongst the oral lesions also, tongue is the usual site for tubercular infection, with the upper lip and soft palate being the least affected. The authors report two rare cases of children with isolated primary tuberculosis of the lip and uvula. Interestingly, the first case presenting just as a diffuse swelling of the upper lip, and the second as pain in throat with congestion and granulations on the uvula. We suggest a distinct Indian social habit which predisposes to primary lip and uvular tuberculosis, sites not common in the rest of the world. The habit of doing "datoon" i.e. brushing of the teeth with neem twigs in rural India, which at times causes trauma on the palate and thus predisposing to seedling of the wound with mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  17. Bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of 10 healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bik, Elisabeth M; Long, Clara Davis; Armitage, Gary C; Loomer, Peter; Emerson, Joanne; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Nelson, Karen E; Gill, Steven R; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M; Relman, David A

    2010-08-01

    The composition of the oral microbiota from 10 individuals with healthy oral tissues was determined using culture-independent techniques. From each individual, 26 specimens, each from different oral sites at a single point in time, were collected and pooled. An 11th pool was constructed using portions of the subgingival specimens from all 10 individuals. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified using broad-range bacterial primers, and clone libraries from the individual and subgingival pools were constructed. From a total of 11,368 high-quality, nonchimeric, near full-length sequences, 247 species-level phylotypes (using a 99% sequence identity threshold) and 9 bacterial phyla were identified. At least 15 bacterial genera were conserved among all 10 individuals, with significant interindividual differences at the species and strain level. Comparisons of these oral bacterial sequences with near full-length sequences found previously in the large intestines and feces of other healthy individuals suggest that the mouth and intestinal tract harbor distinct sets of bacteria. Co-occurrence analysis showed significant segregation of taxa when community membership was examined at the level of genus, but not at the level of species, suggesting that ecologically significant, competitive interactions are more apparent at a broader taxonomic level than species. This study is one of the more comprehensive, high-resolution analyses of bacterial diversity within the healthy human mouth to date, and highlights the value of tools from macroecology for enhancing our understanding of bacterial ecology in human health.

  18. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization of Head and Neck Tumours: Tumours of the Oral Cavity and Mobile Tongue.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susan

    2017-03-01

    There have been several additions and deletions in Chapter 4 on Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue in the 2017 fourth edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Head and Neck. This chapter excludes the oropharynx, which now is a stand-alone chapter acknowledging the uniqueness of the oropharynx from the oral cavity. New entries in Chapter 4 include rhabdomyoma, haemangioma, schwannoma, neurofibroma and myofibroblastic sarcoma in the section titled Soft tissue and neural tumours. Discussion of salivary gland entities have been reduced and includes mucoepidermoid carcinoma and pleomorphic adenoma as the other salivary gland types are discussed elsewhere. In the Haematolymphoid tumours section, like the salivary gland section, only tumors that commonly present in the oral cavity are discussed in Chapter 4. Excluded entities in the updated classification include papillary hyperplasia, median rhomboid glossitis, keratoacanthoma, focal oral mucinosis, and secondary tumors. This article will summarize the changes in the new classification since the 2005 edition focusing on selected entities that have had significant changes along with new entries.

  19. Verrucoid Variant of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Oral Submucous Fibrosis: A Clinicopathological Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Priya; Krithika, C.; Ananthalakshmi, R.; Jagdish, Praveena; Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma (VC) is an exophytic, low-grade, well-differentiated variant of squamous cell carcinoma. It is described as a lesion appearing in the sixth or seventh decade of life that has minimal aggressive potential and, in long-standing cases, has been shown to transform into squamous cell carcinoma. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant disorder, and about one-third of the affected population develop oral squamous cell carcinoma. The histopathological diagnosis of verrucous carcinoma is challenging, and the interpretation of early squamous cell carcinoma requires immense experience. Here we present a rare case of a 24-year-old male with OSMF transforming to verrucous carcinoma with invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Even though the case had a straightforward clinical diagnosis, the serial sectioning done for pathological diagnosis disclosed the squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. Evaluation of oxidative stress and nitric oxide levels in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Beevi, S Syed Sultan; Rasheed, A Muzib Hassanal; Geetha, A

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of oxidative stress and levels of nitric oxide in patients with oral cavity cancer by analyzing the levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products. This prospective study was conducted on 15 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity with clinical stage III/IV and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy subjects. The levels of lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants and nitric oxide products were determined by colorimetric methods. Lipid peroxidation products like lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide products like nitrite (NO(2)(-)), nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and total nitrite (TNO(2)(-)) were significantly elevated, whereas enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were significantly lowered in oral cavity cancer patients when compared to normal healthy subjects. Enhanced lipid peroxidation with concomitant decrease in antioxidants is indicative of oxidative stress that provides evidence of the relationship between lipid peroxidation and oral cavity cancer. Increased nitric oxide production represents a general mechanism in its pathogenesis.

  1. The use of thermovision camera to observe physiological and pathological conditions of oral cavity mucous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, M.; Dulski, R.; Żmuda, S.; Zaborowski, P.; Pogorzelski, C.

    2002-06-01

    This article presents initial results of investigations of the temperature distribution changes in oral cavity mucous membrane. The investigations aimed to prepare a model of temperature changes existing within mucosal membrane in physiological conditions and to compare those changes with those under pathological conditions. Our investigations were carried out using an infrared imaging system. A representative group of patients was tested.

  2. Videolaryngoscopes differ substantially in illumination of the oral cavity: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Barbe MA; van Zundert, André AJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Insufficient illumination of the oral cavity during endotracheal intubation may result in suboptimal conditions. Consequently, suboptimal illumination and laryngoscopy may lead to potential unwanted trauma to soft tissues of the pharyngeal mucosa. We investigated illumination of the oral cavity by different videolaryngoscopes (VLS) in a manikin model. Methods: We measured light intensity from the mouth opening of a Laerdal intubation trainer comparing different direct and indirect VLS at three occasions, resembling optimal to less-than-optimal intubation conditions; at the photographer's dark room, in an operating theatre and outdoors in bright sunlight. Results: Substantial differences in luminance were detected between VLS. The use of LED light significantly improved light production. All VLS produced substantial higher luminance values in a well-luminated environment compared to the dark photographer's room. The experiments outside-in bright sunlight-were interfered with by direct sunlight penetration through the synthetic material of the manikin, making correct measurement of luminance in the oropharynx invalid. Conclusion: Illumination of the oral cavity differs widely among direct and indirect VLS. The clinician should be aware of the possibility of suboptimal illumination of the oral cavity and the potential risk this poses for the patient. PMID:27212719

  3. Imaging of the oropharynx and oral cavity. Part I: Normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hermans, R; Lenz, M

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the anatomy of the oropharynx and oral cavity, as seen on CT and MR imaging studies. Emphasis is placed on the description and illustration of the structures which are of importance to detect tissue alterations and interprete them adequately. Common pitfalls in the image interpretation of this region are indicated.

  4. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Incisional Biopsy in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sara; Forman, Michael; Sadow, Peter M; August, Meredith

    2016-05-01

    To determine the accuracy of incisional biopsy examination to diagnose oral lesions. This retrospective cohort study was performed to determine the concordance rate between incisional biopsy examination and definitive resection diagnosis for different oral lesions. The study sample was derived from the population of patients who presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) from January 2005 through December 2012. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of an oral lesion from an incisional biopsy examination, subsequent diagnosis from the definitive resection of the same lesion, and complete clinical and pathologic patient records. The predictor variables were the origin and size of the lesion. The primary outcome variable was concordance between the provisional incisional biopsy diagnosis and definitive pathologic resection diagnosis. The secondary outcome variable was type of biopsy error for the discordant cases. Incisional biopsy errors were assessed and grouped into 5 categories: 1) sampling error; 2) insufficient tissue for diagnosis; 3) presence of inflammation making diagnosis difficult; 4) artifact; and 5) pathologist discordance. A total of 272 patients met the inclusion criteria. The study sample had a mean age of 47.4 years and 55.7% were women. Of these cases, 242 (88.9%) were concordant when comparing the biopsy and final resection pathology reports. At histologic evaluation, 60.0% of discordant findings were attributed to sampling error, 23.3% to pathologist discrepancy, 13.3% to insufficient tissue provided in the biopsy specimen, and 3.4% to inflammation obscuring diagnosis. Overall, concordant cases had a larger average biopsy volume (1.53 cm(3)) than discordant cases (0.42 cm(3)). The data collected indicate an 88.9% diagnostic concordance with final pathologic results for incisional oral biopsy diagnoses. Sixty percent of discordance was attributed to sampling error when sampled

  5. Bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of ten healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bik, Elisabeth M.; Long, Clara Davis; Armitage, Gary C.; Loomer, Peter; Emerson, Joanne; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; Gill, Steven R.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the oral microbiota from 10 individuals with healthy oral tissues was determined using culture-independent techniques. From each individual, 26 specimens, each from different oral sites at a single point in time, were collected and pooled. An eleventh pool was constructed using portions of the subgingival specimens from all 10 individuals. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified using broad-range bacterial primers, and clone libraries from the individual and subgingival pools were constructed. From a total of 11 368 high-quality, non-chimeric, near full-length sequences, 247 species-level phylotypes (using a 99% sequence identity threshold) and 9 bacteria phyla were identified. At least 15 bacterial genera were conserved among all 10 individuals, with significant interindividual differences at the species and strain level. Comparisons of these oral bacterial sequences to near full-length sequences found previously in the large intestines and feces of other healthy individuals suggest that the mouth and intestinal tract harbor distinct sets of bacteria. Co-occurrence analysis demonstrated significant segregation of taxa when community membership was examined at the level of genus, but not at the level of species, suggesting that ecologically-significant, competitive interactions are more apparent at a broader taxonomic level than species. This study is one of the more comprehensive, high-resolution analyses of bacterial diversity within the healthy human mouth to date, and highlights the value of tools from macroecology for enhancing our understanding of bacterial ecology in human health. PMID:20336157

  6. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  7. Photodynamic Therapy with 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide a (HPPH) for Cancer of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rigual, Nestor; Shafirstein, Gal; Cooper, Michele T.; Baumann, Heinz; Bellnier, David A.; Sunar, Ulas; Tracy, Erin C.; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Wilding, Gregory; Tan, Wei; Sullivan, Maureen; Merzianu, Mihai; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective was to evaluate safety of 3-(1’-hexyloxyethyl)pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) photodynamic therapy (HPPH-PDT) for dysplasia and early squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Secondary objectives were the assessment of treatment response and reporters for an effective PDT reaction. Experimental Design Patients with histologically proven oral dysplasia, carcinoma in situ (CiS ) or early stage HNSCC were enrolled in two sequentially conducted dose escalation studies with an expanded cohort at the highest dose level. These studies employed an HPPH dose of 4 mg/m2 and light doses from 50 to 140 J/cm2. Pathologic tumor responses were assessed at 3 months. Clinical follow up range was 5 to 40 months. PDT induced cross-linking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were assessed as potential indicators of PDT effective reaction. Results Forty patients received HPPH-PDT. Common adverse events were pain and treatment site edema. Biopsy proven complete response rates were 46% for dysplasia and CiS, and 82% for SCCs lesions at 140 J/cm2. The responses in the CiS/dysplasia cohort are not durable. The PDT induced STAT3 cross-links is significantly higher (P=0.0033) in SCC than in CiS/dysplasia for all light-doses. Conclusion HPPH-PDT is safe for the treatment of CiS/dysplasia and early stage cancer of the oral cavity. Early stage oral HNSCC appears to respond better to HPPH-PDT in comparison to premalignant lesions. The degree of STAT3 cross-linking is a significant reporter to evaluate HPPH-PDT mediated photoreaction. PMID:24088736

  8. [Nutritional status of patients with cancer of oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Pérez Camargo, Dana Aline; De Nicola Delfín, Luigina; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Copca Mendoza, Erika Thalia; Hernández Méndez, Margarita; Herrera Gómez, Ángel; Meneses García, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El cáncer de cavidad oral ocupa el doceavo lugar a nivel mundial. El tratamiento del cáncer de cavidad oral es habitualmente cirugía seguida de radioterapia, la cual puede estar indicada sola o con quimioterapia; este tipo de terapias tienen importantes efectos secundarios funcionales sobre el estado nutricio del paciente. Objetivo: El objetivo de este trabajo es conocer el impacto de los diferentes tratamientos sobre el estado nutricional de los pacientes con cáncer de cavidad oral atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología durante el período comprendido del 2009 al 2011. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, y retrospectivo. Se incluyeron 99 pacientes con cáncer de cavidad oral. Se registraron las siguientes variables; género, edad, tipo de tratamiento (cirugía, quimioterapia, radioterapia), complicaciones más importantes secundarias a tratamiento, pérdida de peso, índice de masa corporal (IMC) y albumina. Resultados y discusión: La prevalencia de cáncer de cavidad oral fue mayor en mujeres (58,6%); la edad promedio fue de 61,22 años. Las complicaciones secundarias al tratamiento fueron xerostomía (20%) seguida de odinofagia y mucositis (19%), la relación de pérdida de peso y sintomatología se observó en el (54%) de los pacientes, debido al tipo de alimentación previo, durante y después del tratamiento en los cuales tuvo mayor predominio el uso de papillas. Conclusión: Se observó una pérdida de peso debido a las complicaciones del tratamiento médico que afectaron el estado nutricio, por ello es importante tener un monitoreo continuo que apoye el éxito del tratamiento multidisciplinario.

  9. Prevalence of salivary epstein-barr virus in potentially malignant oral disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ocete-Monchon, María-Dolores; Leopoldo-Rodado, Manuel; Murillo-Cortes, Judith; Díaz-Fernández, Jose-M.; Medina-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gimeno-Cardona, Concepción; Bagan, Jose-V.

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the presence of salivary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral disorders. Material and Methods Three groups were studied: Group 1 (12 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC)), Group 2 (12 potentially malignant oral disorders (PMD)) and Group 3 (47 healthy controls). EBV DNA salivary analysis was performed by PCR. Results The highest percentage of positive salivary EBV DNA corresponded to the OSCC group (58.3%), followed by the PMD group (41.7%) and the controls (40.4%). The differences between groups were not statistically significant, however (p>0.05). Conclusions Salivary EBV DNA was more prevalent in OSCC than in PMD or the controls. Key words:EBV DNA, saliva, oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral leukoplakia. PMID:26827058

  10. Estimation of salivary lactate dehydrogenase in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: a biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shrikant; Metgud, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) is found in the cells of almost all body tissues. The profile of salivary total LDH enzymes is similar to that found in oral epithelium, indicating that the major source of salivary LDH is probably the oral epithelium-shedding cells. Consequently, LDH concentration in saliva, as an expression of cellular necrosis, could be a specific indicator for oral lesions that affect the integrity of the oral mucosa. Study comprised of three groups as follows: Group I: Comprised of 25 healthy individuals of comparable age. Group II: 25 otherwise healthy and consenting patients with oral leukoplakia (OL). Group III: 25 otherwise healthy and consenting oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Biochemical estimation of LDH was done with the help of Semiautomatic Analyzer. Inter comparison of salivary total LDH levels between all the three groups revealed that salivary LDH levels increase from healthy control group to Oral Leukoplakia group to further increase in OSCC group. On comparisons between the histopathological grades of OSCC group the level of LDH were found to increase from well differentiated to moderately differentiated to further increase in poorly differentiated patients. The present salivary analysis for LDH enzyme reveals an overall altered salivary LDH enzyme level in OL and OSCC cases.

  11. Minor Salivary Gland Changes in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Histopathological Study.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sunil Paramel; Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Ragunathan, Yoithapprabhunath Thukanayakanpalayam; Lakshmi, Suman Jhansi; Nallusamy, Jaisanghar; Joseph, Isaac

    2016-07-01

    The most common etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is tobacco and tobacco related products which cause nuclear damage to the keratinocytes. The chemical carcinogens not only affect the lining of oral epithelium but also affect the lining epithelium of the excretory ducts of the salivary glands. Thus, there is a possibility of epithelial dysplasia of the salivary duct epithelium which may lead to potential malignant transformation. The study was performed to see the changes in the minor salivary glands and excretory ducts in cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and OSCC. A total of 278 archival cases of mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, OSCC including verrucous carcinoma were histopathologically evaluated to observe changes in the excretory ducts and the minor salivary glands. In the study there were 56.5% males and 43.5% females. The age group that was most commonly affected in both the sexes was 50-60 yr old. Buccal mucosa was the most common site of involvement. Ductal changes observed in the excretory duct include simple hyperplasia, metaplastic changes such as mucous, oncocytic & squamous, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and malignant cells. Acinar changes observed were degeneration, squamous metaplasia, myoepithelial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Both the excretory ducts and ducts within the gland showed dysplasia. According to observations in our study it is suggested that histopathological interpretation for oral mucosal lesions especially oral epithelial dysplasias and OSCC should also include changes related to salivary gland tissue to provide a better treatment plan and prevent recurrence of the malignant tumours.

  12. Minor Salivary Gland Changes in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Ragunathan, Yoithapprabhunath Thukanayakanpalayam; Lakshmi, Suman Jhansi; Nallusamy, Jaisanghar; Joseph, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most common etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is tobacco and tobacco related products which cause nuclear damage to the keratinocytes. The chemical carcinogens not only affect the lining of oral epithelium but also affect the lining epithelium of the excretory ducts of the salivary glands. Thus, there is a possibility of epithelial dysplasia of the salivary duct epithelium which may lead to potential malignant transformation. Aim The study was performed to see the changes in the minor salivary glands and excretory ducts in cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and OSCC. Materials and Methods A total of 278 archival cases of mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, OSCC including verrucous carcinoma were histopathologically evaluated to observe changes in the excretory ducts and the minor salivary glands. Results In the study there were 56.5% males and 43.5% females. The age group that was most commonly affected in both the sexes was 50-60 yr old. Buccal mucosa was the most common site of involvement. Ductal changes observed in the excretory duct include simple hyperplasia, metaplastic changes such as mucous, oncocytic & squamous, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and malignant cells. Acinar changes observed were degeneration, squamous metaplasia, myoepithelial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Both the excretory ducts and ducts within the gland showed dysplasia. Conclusion According to observations in our study it is suggested that histopathological interpretation for oral mucosal lesions especially oral epithelial dysplasias and OSCC should also include changes related to salivary gland tissue to provide a better treatment plan and prevent recurrence of the malignant tumours. PMID:27630945

  13. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma presenting in the oral cavity of two HIV-negative Quechua patients.

    PubMed

    Mohanna, Salim; Bravo, Francisco; Ferrufino, Juan Carlos; Sanchez, Juvenal; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Traditionally, classic KS lesions have a general distribution, often involving the skin of the feet and legs, and to a lesser extent, that of the hands, arms, and trunk. Oral involvement is a rare manifestation. Initial oral involvement is an even rarer occurrence. We report two unusual cases of classic KS presenting in the oral cavity of two patients from indigenous origin; the first patient with primary oral KS lesion on the hard palate, with no other signs of the condition in any other region of the body; the second patient with generalized dermal KS lesions with lymph node and lower lip involvement. In conclusion, clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the typical clinical, gross, and histologic features of KS. Moreover, we would like to emphasize that oral KS may affect patients without AIDS or exposure to immunosuppression. The awareness of oral classic KS as a diagnostic possibility is important in the work-up of vascular lesions in the oral cavity of non-immunosuppressed individuals.

  14. Relationship between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carramolino-Cuéllar, Esther; Tomás, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda

    2014-05-01

    The components of the human body are closely interdependent; as a result, disease conditions in some organs or components can influence the development of disease in other body locations. The effect of oral health upon health in general has been investigated for decades by many epidemiological studies. In this context, there appears to be a clear relationship between deficient oral hygiene and different systemic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The precise relationship between them is the subject of ongoing research, and a variety of theories have been proposed, though most of them postulate the mediation of an inflammatory response. This association between the oral cavity and disease in general requires further study, and health professionals should be made aware of the importance of adopting measures destined to promote correct oral health. The present study conducts a Medline search with the purpose of offering an update on the relationship between oral diseases and cardiovascular diseases, together with an evaluation of the bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease. Most authors effectively describe a moderate association between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases, though they also report a lack of scientific evidence that oral alterations constitute an independent cause of cardiovascular diseases, or that their adequate treatment can contribute to prevent such diseases. In the case of metabolic syndrome, obesity and particularly diabetes mellitus may be associated to an increased susceptibility to periodontitis. However, it is not clear whether periodontal treatment is able to improve the systemic conditions of these patients.

  15. Role of human papillomavirus in oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shikha; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are epitheliotropic viruses with an affinity for keratinocytes and are principally found in the anogenital tract, urethra, skin, larynx, tracheobronchial and oral mucosa. On the basis of high, but variable frequency of HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), malignant potential of HPV infection has been hypothesized but not definitely confirmed. The aim of this review was to highlight the genomic structure and possible mechanism of infection and carcinogenesis by HPV in the oral mucosa and to review the frequency of HPV prevalence in OSCC and oral potentially malignant disorders. A computer database search was performed through the use of PubMed from 1994 to 2014. Search keywords used were: HPV and oral cancer, HPV and oral leukoplakia, HPV and oral lichen planus, HPV and OSCC, HPV and verrucous carcinoma, HPV and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, HPV and oral papilloma. PMID:26097339

  16. Chronic lingual ulceration caused by lipoma of the oral cavity. Case report.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo Pardo de Vera, Jose Luis; Cebrián Carretero, Jose Luis; Gómez García, Elena

    2004-01-01

    Although lipomas are among the most frequent tumors in the human body, their presentation in the oral cavity is not common. Oral cavity lipomas usually show a slow painless and assymptomatic growing. When these tumors reach big sizes, they can cause compressive symptons and deformities. In this paper we present the case of a patient in whom oral lipoma was the final finding in the differential diagnosis of a chronic mucosal ulcer. CT scan and MRI images and microscopical examination after fine-needle aspiration were the clue for the final diagnosis. The surgical excision of the tumor was the basis for the healing of the ulcer. We also review the most relevant and recent literature about clinic, diagnosis and treatment for these tumors.

  17. Silent blast in oral cavity: is the car battery innocuous?

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Umesh Kumar; Tripathi, Mukesh; Ramraj, P N; Singh, Ishwar

    2005-04-01

    Low voltage energy source is not free from danger. An exceptionally rare and peculiar mode of facial blast injury is reported. The blast took place silently in the mouth of a 15-year-old boy, due to short-circuiting of wires connected to a12-volt car battery while peeling off insulation with the intent of running a musical instrument. Airway compromise due to soft tissue injury produced further problem during tracheostomy. Emergent airway management is discussed. Post-healing sequel resulted in loss of voice and prevented normal oral feeding. The case report emphasizes need for education to public in handling low voltage energy source.

  18. [Propositions for the selection and the delineation of peritumoral microscopic disease volumes in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers (lymph nodes excluded)].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Henrot, P; Alfonsi, M; Bardet, E; Bensadoun, R J; Dolivet, G; Favrel, V; Gallocher, O; Giraud, P; Graff, P; Guerif, S; Lagarde, P; Lartigau, E; Marchesi, V; Pommier, P; Rives, M; Tortochaux, J; Toussaint, B; Verrelle, P; Bourhis, J; Calais, G

    2005-06-01

    This article reviews the concept of selectivity in peritumoral microscopic disease to be included in the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) for elective treatment for oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, using the local tumoral spread. The objective of the present article is to present a procedure for the delineation of the target volumes, required for an appropriate application of 3-DCRT and IMRT for head and neck cancers. These propositions are for the delineation of microscopic peritumoral target volumes when external beam irradiation is required. CTVs are illustrated on CT sections.

  19. Predictive factors of occult neck metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Renato Fortes; Ferraro, Homero Penha; Ribas, Marcelo Haddad; Lehn, Carlos Neutzling

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cervical lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The definition of parameters and classifications that could separate patients in groups of low, intermediate and high-risk is being attempted for several years. The objective of this study was to determine possible predictive factors related to the occurrence of occult cervical lymph node metastasis through the analysis of histopathological reports of surgical specimens obtained after oral squamous cell carcinoma resection and selective neck dissections of patients initially classified as N0. This was a primary, retrospective, observational, case-control study. Histopathological reports were reviewed to determine if some findings were related to the occurrence of occult lymph node metastasis. The events analyzed were oral cavity subsites, pT-stage, muscular infiltration, desmoplasia, vascular emboli, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and compromised margins. Occult cervical metastasis accounted for 19.10 percent of the cases. Desmoplasia, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and pT4a stage are predictive factors of occult neck metastasis (p-value=0.0488, 0.0326, 0.0395, 0.0488, respectively). The accurate definition of predictive factors of occult cervical metastasis may guide the selection of patients that should be referred to radiotherapy, avoiding the unnecessary exposure of low-risk patients to radiation and allowing a better regional control of the disease in those of moderate or high risk. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Mayank; Madaan Hans, Veenu

    2014-01-01

    Gingival epithelium provides first line of defence from the microorganisms present in dental plaque. It not only provides a mechanical barrier but also has an active immune function too. Gingival epithelial cells participate in innate immunity by producing a range of antimicrobial peptides to protect the host against oral pathogens. These epithelial antimicrobial peptides (EAPs) include the β-defensin family, cathelicidin (LL-37), calprotectin, and adrenomedullin. While some are constitutively expressed in gingival epithelial cells, others are induced upon exposure to microbial insults. It is likely that these EAPs have a role in determining the initiation and progression of oral diseases. EAPs are broad spectrum antimicrobials with a different but overlapping range of activity. Apart from antimicrobial activity, they participate in several other crucial roles in host tissues. Some of these, for instance, β-defensins, are chemotactic to immune cells. Others, such as calprotectin are important for wound healing and cell proliferation. Adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide, has its biological action in a wide range of tissues. Not only is it a potent vasodilator but also it has several endocrine effects. Knowing in detail the various bioactions of these EAPs may provide us with useful information regarding their utility as therapeutic agents. PMID:25435884

  1. [The study of HPV prevalence in normal oral mucosa and oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; Zhang, Zhi-yuan

    2007-10-01

    Mucosal infection with high-risk human papiloma virus(HPV) types 16 and 18 is the cause of cervical cancer and might be a subset of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), yet the prevalence and type distribution of HPV in oral SCC remained unclear. We systematically reviewed published studies of OSCC biopsies, which were employed to detect and genotype HPV through different methods. The aim of this investigation is to carry out a bibliographic review on the prevalence of HPV in OSCC and normal oral mucosa. Supported by Key Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.30630065), Key Lab Project of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.06DZ22026) and Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (Grant No. Y0203).

  2. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  3. TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression in normal oral epithelium oral dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Fernanda-Paula; Corrêa Pontes, Flávia-Sirotheau; Cury, Sérgio-Elias; Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Rebelo-Pontes, Hélder; Pinto-Júnior, Décio-dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of TWIST and p-Akt proteins in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), correlating their expressions with the histological features of the lesions. Study design: Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 10 normal oral epithelium, 30 OL and 20 OSCC formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Immunoperoxidase reactions for TWIST and p-Akt proteins were applied on the specimens and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Results: Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post tests revealed a significant difference in TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression among normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between TWIST and p-Akt expressions according to the Pearson’s correlation test. Conclusions: The results obtained in the current study suggest that TWIST and p-Akt may participate of the multi-step process of oral carcinogenesis since its early stages. Key words: Oral cancer, oral leukoplakia, dysplasia, immunohistochemistry. PMID:21743395

  4. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, A A; Poljak, M; Seme, K; Kocjan, B J; Gale, N; Luzar, B; Golouh, R

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the putative etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, a comparative study was carried out on 62 tissue specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and on 62 specimens of histologically normal oral mucosa obtained from the individuals who matched the subjects with OSCC in age, gender, localization of obtained tissue specimens, drinking and smoking habits. Internal control amplification showed that amplifiable DNA was recovered from 59/62 and 61/62 tissue samples of OSCC and normal oral mucosa, respectively. The amplification with two different HPV L1 and one HPV E6 consensus primer sets showed the presence of the HPV DNA genotypes 16, 33, 58 in 5/59 (8.4%) OSCC specimens and HPV genotypes 11, 16, 31, 68 in 4/61 (6.6%) tissue samples of normal oral mucosa tested. In the study in which a comparative examination of the presence of HPV DNA was for the first time performed on the tissue samples of the patients with OSCC and the age- and gender-matched control subjects there was no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA among both study groups. Our results suggest that occasional findings of HPV DNA in OSCC tissue specimens may be the result of an incidental HPV colonization of oral mucosa, rather than of viral infection, and that HPVs play a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of the majority of OSCC.

  5. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim