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Sample records for oral contrast agent

  1. Optimization of oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Schneemann, Herbert; Vogt, Florian M; Herborn, Christoph U; Ruhm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jorg F

    2003-07-01

    Effect on small-bowel distention of additives to water as contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was assessed. Oral contrast agents included water and water in combination with mannitol, a bulk fiber laxative, locust bean gum, and a combination of mannitol and locust bean gum. Filling of the small bowel was quantified on coronal images obtained with two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence; bowel diameters were measured. Ingestion of water with locust bean gum and mannitol provided the best distention of the small bowel. MR imaging of the small bowel with oral administration of water can be improved with addition of osmotic and nonosmotic substances that lead to decreased water resorption.

  2. Ex vivo Confocal Imaging with Contrast Agents for the Detection of Oral Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hallani, S. El; Poh, C. F.; Macaulay, C. E.; Follen, M.; Guillaud, M.; Lane, P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the potential use of real-time confocal microscpy in the non-invasive detection of occult oral potentially malignant lesions. Our objectives were to select the best fluorescence contrast agent for cellular morphology enhancement, to build an atlas of confocal microscopic images of normal human oral mucosa, and to determine the accuracy of confocal microscopy to recognise oral high-grade dysplasia lesions on live human tissue. Materials and Methods Five clinically used fluorescent contrast agents were tested in vitro on cultured human cells and validated ex vivo on human oral mucosa. Images acquired ex vivo from normal and diseased human oral biopsies with bench-top fluorescent confocal microscope were compared to conventional histology. Image analyzer software was used as an adjunct tool to objectively compare high-grade dysplasia versus low-grade dysplasia and normal epithelium. Results Acriflavine Hydrochloride provided the best cellular contrast by preferentially staining the nuclei of the epithelium. Using topical application of Acriflavine Hydrochloride followed by confocal microscopy, we could define morphological characteristics of each cellular layer of the normal human oral mucosa, building an atlas of histology-like images. Applying this technique to diseased oral tissue specimen, we were also able to accurately diagnose the presence of high-grade dysplasia through the increased cellularity and changes in nuclear morphological features. Objective measurement of cellular density by quantitative image analysis was a strong discriminant to differentiate between high-grade dysplasia and low-grade dysplasia lesions. Conclusions Pending clinical investigation, real-time confocal microscopy may become a useful adjunct to detect precancerous lesions that are at high risk of cancer progression, direct biopsy and delineate excision margins. PMID:23415144

  3. Oral manganese as an MRI contrast agent for the detection of nociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen E; Behera, Deepak; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Gold, Garry; Moseley, Michael; Yeomans, David; Biswal, Sandip

    2012-04-01

    The ability of divalent manganese to enter neurons via calcium channels makes manganese an excellent MRI contrast agent for the imaging of nociception, the afferent neuronal encoding of pain perception. There is growing evidence that nociceptive neurons possess increased expression and activity of calcium channels, which would allow for the selective accumulation of manganese at these sites. In this study, we show that oral manganese chloride leads to increased enhancement of peripheral nerves involved in nociception on T(1)-weighted MRI. Oral rather than intravenous administration was chosen for its potentially better safety profile, making it a better candidate for clinical translation with important applications, such as pain diagnosis, therapy and research. The spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain was used for the purposes of this study. SNI rats were given, sequentially, increasing amounts of manganese chloride (lowest, 2.29 mg/100 g weight; highest, 20.6 mg/100 g weight) with alanine and vitamin D(3) by oral gavage. Compared with controls, SNI rats demonstrated increased signal-to-background ratios on T(1)-weighted fast spin echo MRI, which was confirmed by and correlated strongly with spectrometry measurements of nerve manganese concentration. We also found the difference between SNI and control rats to be greater at 48 h than at 24 h after dosing, indicating increased manganese retention in addition to increased manganese uptake in nociceptive nerves. This study demonstrates that oral manganese is a viable method for the imaging of nerves associated with increased nociceptive activity.

  4. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  5. Confocal Microscopy and Molecular-Specific Optical Contrast Agents for the Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Alicia L.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Richards-Kortum, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    Using current clinical diagnostic techniques, it is difficult to visualize tumor morphology and architecture at the cellular level, which is necessary for diagnostic localization of pathologic lesions. Optical imaging techniques have the potential to address this clinical need by providing real-time, sub-cellular resolution images. This paper describes the use of dual mode confocal microscopy and optical molecular-specific contrast agents to image tissue architecture, cellular morphology, and sub-cellular molecular features of normal and neoplastic oral tissues. Fresh tissue slices were prepared from 33 biopsies of clinically normal and abnormal oral mucosa obtained from 14 patients. Reflectance confocal images were acquired after the application of 6% acetic acid, and fluorescence confocal images were acquired after the application of a fluorescence contrast agent targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The dual imaging modes provided images similar to light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining, but from thick fresh tissue slices. Reflectance images provided information on the architecture of the tissue and the cellular morphology. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio from the reflectance images was at least 7.5 times greater for the carcinoma than the corresponding normal samples, except for one case of highly keratinized carcinoma. Separation of carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia was achieved using this ratio (p<0.01). Fluorescence images of EGFR expression yielded a mean fluorescence labeling intensity (FLI) that was at least 2.7 times higher for severe dysplasia and carcinoma samples than for the corresponding normal sample, and could be used to distinguish carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia (p<0.01). Analyzed together, the N/C ratio and the mean FLI may improve the ability to distinguish carcinoma from normal squamous epithelium. PMID:17877424

  6. Physical and chemical stability of proflavine contrast agent solutions for early detection of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Myers, Alan L; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R; Kramer, Mark A; Gillenwater, Ann M; Culotta, Kirk S

    2016-02-01

    Proflavine hemisulfate solution is a fluorescence contrast agent to visualize cell nuclei using high-resolution optical imaging devices such as the high-resolution microendoscope. These devices provide real-time imaging to distinguish between normal versus neoplastic tissue. These images could be helpful for early screening of oral cancer and its precursors and to determine accurate margins of malignant tissue for ablative surgery. Extemporaneous preparation of proflavine solution for these diagnostic procedures requires preparation in batches and long-term storage to improve compounding efficiency in the pharmacy. However, there is a paucity of long-term stability data for proflavine contrast solutions. The physical and chemical stability of 0.01% (10 mg/100 ml) proflavine hemisulfate solutions prepared in sterile water was determined following storage at refrigeration (4-8℃) and room temperature (23℃). Concentrations of proflavine were measured at predetermined time points up to 12 months using a validated stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. Proflavine solutions stored under refrigeration were physically and chemically stable for at least 12 months with concentrations ranging from 95% to 105% compared to initial concentration. However, in solutions stored at room temperature increased turbidity and particulates were observed in some of the tested vials at 9 months and 12 months with peak particle count reaching 17-fold increase compared to baseline. Solutions stored at room temperature were chemically stable up to six months (94-105%). Proflavine solutions at concentration of 0.01% were chemically and physically stable for at least 12 months under refrigeration. The solution was chemically stable for six months when stored at room temperature. We recommend long-term storage of proflavine solutions under refrigeration prior to diagnostic procedure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    While the use of contrast agents in other imaging modalities (X ray, MRI, PET, …) has been routinely accepted for many years, the development and commercialization of contrast agents designed specifically for ultrasound imaging has occurred only very recently. As in the other imaging modalities, the injection of contrast agents during an ultrasound examination is intended to facilitate the detection and diagnosis of specific pathologies. Contrast agents efficiency is based on the backscattering of ultrasound by microbubbles. These microparticules are intravenously injected in the blood flow. After an introduction and generalities on ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) the microbubble physics in an acoustic field will be developed. Second, physics characteristics of contrast agents will be compared (bubbles with or without shell, gas nature, size distribution). Influence of acoustic pressure on the behaviour of the microparticules (linear, non linear and destruction) will be discussed. Finally, a review of specific imaging adapted to contrast agent properties as harmonic imaging, pulse inversion imaging will be presented.

  8. A new manganese-based oral contrast agent (CMC-001) for liver MRI: pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst; Rief, Matthias; Brismar, Torkel B; Wagner, Moritz; Albiin, Nils

    2012-09-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metals on earth and is found as a component of more than 100 different minerals. Besides being an essential trace element in relation to the metabolic processes in the body, manganese is also a paramagnetic metal that possesses similar characteristics to gadolinium with regards to T1-weighted (T1-w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese, in the form of manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate, is the active substance in a new targeted oral contrast agent, currently known as CMC-001, indicated for hepatobiliary MRI. Under physiological circumstances manganese is poorly absorbed from the intestine after oral intake, but by the use of specific absorption promoters, L-alanine and vitamin D(3), it is possible to obtain a sufficiently high concentration in the liver in order to achieve a significant signal enhancing effect. In the liver manganese is exposed to a very high first-pass effect, up to 98%, which prevents the metal from reaching the systemic circulation, thereby reducing the number of systemic side-effects. Manganese is one of the least toxic trace elements, and due to its favorable safety profile it may be an attractive alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents for patients undergoing an MRI evaluation for liver metastases in the future. In this review the basic pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects of this new targeted oral hepatobiliary specific contrast agent will be discussed.

  9. The efficacy of roselle (Hibicus sabdariffa Linn.) flower tea as oral negative contrast agent for MRCP study.

    PubMed

    Varavithya, Vithya; Phongkitkarun, Sith; Jatchavala, Janjira; Ngeonthom, Supap; Sumetchotimaytha, Wutthi; Leelasithorn, Vichit

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of roselle flower tea (RFT) administration as oral negative contrast agent for MRCP study. Roselle flower tea was prepared by packing 4,000 mg of dry ground roselle flower in a tea bag and soaked with 480 ml of hot distilled water RFT was tested in phantom, volunteer subjects and was studied in patients for MRCP study. Quanlitative analysis was made by evaluation of the conspicuity of biliary system after RFT administration. Quantitative comparison was performed by comparing the contrast-to-noise ratio between each part of the biliary system with stomach and duodenum. Roselle flower tea can effectively reduce signal intensity of the stomach and duodenum. There was statistically significant (p < 0.05) improvement in conspicuity of the common bile duct. There was slight improvement of conspicuity of common hepatic duct, ampulla and main pancreatic duct. Contrast-to-noise ratios were all statistically significantly improved. RFT contains 0.6 mg of iron and 1.28 mg of manganese content. Roselle flower tea is a very efficient oral negative contrast agent. It is natural, safe, inexpensive and palatable for oral administration.

  10. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  11. Low-volume hybrid bowel preparation combining saline laxatives with oral contrast agents versus standard polyethylene glycol lavage for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Edward M; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of low-volume hybrid computed tomography colonography bowel preparation, using both laxatives and oral contrast, with standard polyethylene glycol lavage. The study group consisted of 300 consecutive adults (mean age, 58.3 years) who underwent colonoscopy immediately after positive computed tomography colonography. Hybrid bowel preparation for study group was <1 L in total volume, consisting of osmotic cathartic (sodium phosphate or magnesium citrate) in conjunction with oral contrast (2% barium and diatrizoate). A control group of 300 adults (mean age, 58.3 years) underwent primary colonoscopy after standard 4-liter polyethylene glycol lavage without oral contrast. The prospective preparation quality rating by the endoscopist served as the reference standard. A rating of poor/marginal was considered inadequate and adequate/good/excellent was considered diagnostic. The frequency of inadequate bowel preparation was 4.3% (13/300) in the study group vs 12.3% (37/300) for the control group (P < .001). Specifically, preparation was poor or marginal in 10 and 3 cases in the hybrid cohort, respectively, and in 29 and 8 cases in the polyethylene glycol cohort, respectively. Preparation quality was scored as excellent in 32% (96/300) in the hybrid cohort and 23.3% (70/300) in the polyethylene glycol cohort (P < .05). At colonoscopy, low-volume laxative-oral contrast hybrid preparations are effective for bowel cleansing, perhaps even more so than polyethylene glycol lavage. Beyond improvements in quality, the low-volume preparation may improve patient compliance and would allow for immediate computed tomography colonography if colonoscopy is incomplete, without the need for additional oral contrast tagging.

  12. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  13. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) using new negative per-oral contrast agent based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for extrahepatic biliary duct visualization in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Polakova, Katerina; Mocikova, Ingrid; Purova, Dana; Tucek, Pavel; Novak, Pavel; Novotna, Katerina; Izak, Niko; Bielik, Radoslav; Zboril, Radek; Miroslav, Herman

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is often used for imaging of the biliary tree and is required by surgeons before liver transplantation. Advanced liver cirrhosis and ascites in patients however present diagnostic problems for MRCP. The aim of this study was to find out if the use of our negative per-oral contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) in MRCP is helpful for imaging of hepatobiliary tree in patients with liver cirrhosis. Forty patients with liver cirrhosis were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using standard MRCP protocol. Twenty patients (group A) underwent MRCP after administration of per-oral SPIO contrast agent 30 min before examination. In group B, twenty patients were examined without per-oral bowel preparation. Ascites was present in eleven patients from group A and in thirteen patients in group B. Four radiologists analyzed MR images for visibility and delineation of the biliary tree. χ(2) tests were used for comparison of the visibility of intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ducts in patients with and without ascites. Better extrahepatic biliary duct visualization and visibility of extraluminal pathologies in patients with ascites was proved after administration of SPIO contrast agent. No statistically significant difference between group A and B was found for visualization of extrahepatic biliary ducts in patients without ascites. Delineation of intrahepatic biliary ducts was independent on bowel preparation. Application of our negative per-oral SPIO contrast agent before MRCP improves the visualization of extrahepatic biliary ducts in patients with ascites which is helpful during the liver surgery, mainly in liver transplantation.

  14. Polymeric gastrointestinal MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tilcock, C; Unger, E C; Ahkong, Q F; Fritz, T; Koenig, S H; Brown, R D

    1991-01-01

    Combining either paramagnetic (gadolinium chelates) or superparamagnetic (ferrite) contrast agents with polymers such as polyethylene glycol or cellulose, or with simple sugars such as dextrose, results in mixtures that exhibit improved T1 and/or T2 relaxivity compared with that of the contrast agent alone. It is suggested that the addition of such inexpensive and nontoxic polymers or saccharides may improve the effectiveness and decrease the cost of enteric contrast agents.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  17. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  18. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  19. Clinical Comparison of Two Contrast Agents for Oral Cholecystography: Radiologic Efficacy and Drug Safety of Iopanoic Acid and Iopronic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Laurence; Putman, Charles E.; Burrell, Morton

    1979-01-01

    Oral doses of either iopronic acid (4.5 g Oravue, Squibb) or iopanoic acid (3 g Telepaque, Winthrop) were given to 98 patients requiring cholecystography. Radiographs were taken 13 to 16 hours after treatment showed good to excellent gallbladder opacification in 44 percent of patients after the first dose of iopronic acid and in an additional 29 percent after a second dose. Similar opacification occurred in 42 percent of patients after the first dose of iopanoic acid and in 34 percent after a second dose. Drug-related abnormalities in blood and urine tests occurred about equally in both groups and one patient in each group exhibited a clinically adverse reaction (diarrhea). Thus, the performance (radiographic efficacy and drug safety) of the new contrast agent, iopronic acid, was similar to a widely used drug, iopanoic acid. PMID:380184

  20. Mechanisms of contrast agent destruction.

    PubMed

    Chomas, J E; Dayton, P; Allen, J; Morgan, K; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Various applications of contrast-assisted ultrasound, including blood vessel detection, perfusion estimation, and drug delivery, require controlled destruction of contrast agent microbubbles. The lifetime of a bubble depends on properties of the bubble shell, the gas core, and the acoustic waveform impinging on the bubble. Three mechanisms of microbubble destruction are considered: fragmentation, acoustically driven diffusion, and static diffusion. Fragmentation is responsible for rapid destruction of contrast agents on a time scale of microseconds. The primary characteristics of fragmentation are a very large expansion and subsequent contraction, resulting in instability of the bubble. Optical studies using a novel pulsed-laser optical system show the expansion and contraction of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles with the ratio of maximum diameter to minimum diameter greater than 10. Fragmentation is dependent on the transmission pressure, occurring in over 55% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 2.4 MPa and in less than 10% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 0.8 MPa. The echo received from a bubble decorrelates significantly within two pulses when the bubble is fragmented, creating an opportunity for rapid detection of bubbles via a decorrelation-based analysis. Preliminary findings with a mouse tumor model verify the occurrence of fragmentation in vivo. A much slower mechanism of bubble destruction is diffusion, which is driven by both a concentration gradient between the concentration of gas in the bubble compared with the concentration of gas in the liquid, as well as convective effects of motion of the gas-liquid interface. The rate of diffusion increases during insonation, because of acoustically driven diffusion, producing changes in diameter on the time scale of the acoustic pulse length, thus, on the order of microseconds. Gas bubbles diffuse while they are not being insonified, termed

  1. Intraperitoneal contrast agents for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, J.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal contrast agents have been used to diagnose mass lesions, adhesions, and hernias using conventional radiographic techniques. The use of intraperitoneal contrast agents in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) has been limited and is the subject of this report.

  2. Oral contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Shearman, R P

    1986-02-17

    The history of the development of oral contraceptives (OCs) has been a progressive reduction in dosage to what is now probably the lowest does that is compatible with the desired therapeutic effect -- to inhibit ovluation. Yet, controversy and argument continue. A table lists the OCs that are available in Australia. Many of these preparations, although having different trade names, have an identical composition. Since the withdrawal of sequential OCs from the Australian market, there are only 2 generic types. These are the progestogen only (mini) OCs, which consist of either 30 mcg of levonorgestrel or 350 mcg of norethisterone given at the same time every day; and the combined OCs, which contain an estrogen and a progestogen. In the last 12 months, some of the older high-dose OCs have been withdrawn, and it seems likely that further withdrawals will follow. Only 2 estrogens are used in the formulation of the OC, but there is a greater variety of progestogens. Ethinyl estradiol is used in most preparations. A small minority of OCs contain mestranol, the 3-methyl ether of ethinyl estradiol. Currently, there are only 4 OC agents that are available in Australia that contain mestranol and 2 of these contain the high doses of 100 mcg. Fundamentally, there are 2 types of progestogens -- those that contain, or are metabolized to, norethisterone and those that contain norgestrel or its close relative, desogestrel. With the exception of the norgestrel group and desogestrel, all other progestins, including norethisterone itself, are effective in vivo after they have been metablized to norethisterone. Mestranol is effective in humans after demethylation to ethinyl estradiol. In the norgesterel group, since d-norgestrel is inert endocrinologically, 250 mcg of levonorgestrel and 500 mcg of dl-norgestrel are equivalent. Levonorgestrel and desogestrel are of approximately equal potency. With the combined OC agents, the overwhelming mechanism of action is by the inhibition of the

  3. "Basic MR Relaxation Mechanisms & Contrast Agent Design"

    PubMed Central

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Martins, André F.; Pinho, Marco; Rofsky, Neil; Sherry, A. Dean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we will detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We will offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand based contrast agents. We will discuss the mechanisms involved in magnetic resonance relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents will be accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in development for future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide. PMID:25975847

  4. Contrast agents in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuling; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a noninvasive method to assess angiogenesis, which is widely used in clinical applications including diagnosis, monitoring therapy response and prognosis estimation in cancer patients. Contrast agents play a crucial role in DCE-MRI and should be carefully selected in order to improve accuracy in DCE-MRI examination. Over the past decades, there was much progress in the development of optimal contrast agents in DCE-MRI. In this review, we describe the recent research advances in this field and discuss properties of contrast agents, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we discuss the research perspectives for improving this promising imaging method. PMID:28415647

  5. Model of Therapeutic Ultrasound Contrast Agent Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Targeted drug and gene delivery are rapidly emerging applications for ultrasound contrast agents since this could reduce potential deleterious side effects to healthy tissue and minimize the overall dose needed. Therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated microbubbles usually composed of a high molecular weight gas core and a highly viscous thick liquid shell. Development of new contrast agents requires a good understanding of the stability and breakup mechanisms of the liquid shell when subjected to ultrasonic acoustic waves. A novel numerical code, which enables one to investigate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents and the interaction between multiple agents and with nearby boundaries has been developed by coupling a Boundary Element Method solver and a finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver. We have applied the coupled code to examine shell breakup mechanisms for contrast agents near a solid wall. We found that the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location due to non-spherical deformations and that the contrast agent may break up due to local shell thinning and stretching as the non-spherical deformation is significant.

  6. Off-label use of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Reimer, P; Vosshenrich, R

    2008-06-01

    When contrast agents are approved, the label describes the approved indications and particular circumstances of use such as age, organ function or pregnancy. The use of contrast agents outside their labelled indications is increasing, namely with contrast agents used for MRI. The aim of this paper is to improve the knowledge about this topic. The basis for off-label use is the physician's prerogative, which finds its basis in the "Declaration of Helsinki". Off-label use is allowed under special conditions and might be even the medical state of the art. The necessity for off-label use will continue to increase for MR-contrast agents, as the regulatory requirements for approval of new indications continuously increase, and clinical trials for registration purposes are quite costly and time consuming. As a consequence, manufacturers will concentrate on clinical studies for the essential indications.

  7. Status of liposomes as MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Unger, E C; Shen, D K; Fritz, T A

    1993-01-01

    Recent work on the development of liposomal magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents has yielded structures with higher overall relaxivity than that of other nanoparticles of similar diameter. Liposomes incorporating membrane-bound complexes of manganase ("memsomes") produce greater hepatic enhancement per micromole of metal ion than either ferrite particles or paramagnetic chelates. Memsomes also hold promise for targeting of sites outside the liver. Work is in progress to take these agents into clinical trials.

  8. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, H. D.; Siddons, D. P.

    1990-05-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-rays and an iodine-containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic X-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron radiation source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the X-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation X-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contain contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth. The X-ray energy spectrum of the X-17 superconduction wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been used for these calculations. Both perfect Si crystals and Si crystals with a small mosaic spread are considered as monochromators. Contrast agents containing Gd or Yb seem to have about the optimal calculated signal to noise ratio. Gd-DTPA is already approved for use as a contrast agent for

  9. Acoustic response from adherent targeted contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shukui; Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    In ultrasonic molecular imaging, encapsulated micron-sized gas bubbles are tethered to a blood vessel wall by targeting ligands. A challenging problem is to detect the echoes from adherent microbubbles and distinguish them from echoes from non-adherent agents and tissue. Echoes from adherent contrast agents are observed to include a high amplitude at the fundamental frequency, and significantly different spectral shape compared with free agents (p < 0.0003). Mechanisms for the observed acoustical difference and potential techniques to utilize these differences for molecular imaging are proposed. PMID:17225437

  10. Superhydrophobic silica nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Lin, Chih-Yu; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Chia-Min; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-05-01

    Microbubbles have been widely studied as ultrasound contrast agents for diagnosis and as drug/gene carriers for therapy. However, their size and stability (lifetime of 5-12min) limited their applications. The development of stable nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents would therefore benefit both. Generating bubbles persistently in situ would be one of the promising solutions to the problem of short lifetime. We hypothesized that bubbles could be generated in situ by providing stable air nuclei since it has been found that the interfacial nanobubbles on a hydrophobic surface have a much longer lifetime (orders of days). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with large surface areas and different levels of hydrophobicity were prepared to test our hypothesis. It is clear that the superhydrophobic and porous nanoparticles exhibited a significant and strong contrast intensity compared with other nanoparticles. The bubbles generated from superhydrophobic nanoparticles sustained for at least 30min at a MI of 1.0, while lipid microbubble lasted for about 5min at the same settings. In summary MSNs have been transformed into reliable bubble precursors by making simple superhydrophobic modification, and made into a promising contrast agent with the potentials to serve as theranostic agents that are sensitive to ultrasound stimulation.

  11. Nano/microparticles and ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shu-Guang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Chen, Hang-Rong

    2013-12-28

    Microbubbles have been used for many years now in clinical practice as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging. Recently, their therapeutic applications have also attracted more attention. However, the short circulation time (minutes) and relatively large size (two to ten micrometers) of currently used commercial microbubbles do not allow effective extravasation into tumor tissue, preventing efficient tumor targeting. Fortunately, more multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages over the traditional microbubbles have been widely investigated and explored for biomedical applications. The way to synthesize an ideal ultrasound contrast agent based on nanoparticles in order to achieve an expected effect on contrast imaging is a key technique. Currently a number of nanomaterials, including liposomes, polymers, micelles, dendrimers, emulsions, quantum dots, solid nanoparticles etc., have already been applied to pre or clinical trials. Multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages, such as the tumor-targeted (passive or active), multi-mode contrast agents (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography or fluorescence), carrier or enhancer of drug delivery, and combined chemo or thermal therapy etc., are rapidly gaining popularity and have shown a promising application in the field of cancer treatment. In this mini review, the trends and the advances of multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles are briefly discussed.

  12. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Stride, E; Saffari, N

    2003-01-01

    The superior scattering properties of gas bubbles compared with blood cells have made microbubble ultrasound contrast agents important tools in ultrasound diagnosis. Over the past 2 years they have become the focus of a wide and rapidly expanding field of research, with their benefits being repeatedly demonstrated, both in ultrasound image enhancement, and more recently in drug and gene delivery applications. However, despite considerable investigation, their behaviour is by no means fully understood and, while no definite evidence of harmful effects has been obtained, there remain some concerns as to their safety. In this review the existing theoretical and experimental evidence is examined in order to clarify the extent to which contrast agents are currently understood and to identify areas for future research. In particular the disparity between the conditions considered in theoretical models and those encountered both in vitro, and more importantly in vivo is discussed, together with the controversy regarding the risk of harmful bio-effects.

  13. Hypoxia-sensitive NMR contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, H.M.; Chen, K.; Pals, M.; Sentjurc, M.; Morse, P.D. 2d.

    1986-02-01

    The rate of reduction of nitroxides is shown to be more rapid in hypoxic cells. The rate of reduction and the effect of hypoxia on the reduction rate vary for different nitroxides. These findings indicate that it may be feasible to develop in vivo NMR contrast agents that selectively will indicate areas of hypoxia and thereby aid in the detection of disease processes such as neoplasia, ischemia, and inflammation.

  14. Optical Imaging with Dynamic Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Isample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. In this article we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast, a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: i) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and ii) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  15. Optical imaging with dynamic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Wei, Alexander

    2011-01-24

    Biological imaging applications often employ molecular probes or nanoparticles for enhanced contrast. However, resolution and detection are still often limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the sample, which can produce high levels of background that obscure the signals of interest. Herein, we describe approaches to overcome this obstacle based on the concept of dynamic contrast: a strategy for elucidating signals by the suppression or removal of background noise. Dynamic contrast mechanisms can greatly reduce the loading requirement of contrast agents, and may be especially useful for single-probe imaging. Dynamic contrast modalities are also platform-independent, and can enhance the performance of sophisticated biomedical imaging systems or simple optical microscopes alike. Dynamic contrast is performed in two stages: 1) a signal modulation scheme to introduce time-dependent changes in amplitude or phase, and 2) a demodulation step for signal recovery. Optical signals can be coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, photoswitchable probes, or plasmon-resonant nanostructures for modulation by magnetomotive, photonic, or photothermal mechanisms, respectively. With respect to image demodulation, many of the strategies developed for signal processing in electronics and communication technologies can also be applied toward the editing of digital images. The image-processing step can be as simple as differential imaging, or may involve multiple reference points for deconvolution by using cross-correlation algorithms. Periodic signals are particularly amenable to image demodulation strategies based on Fourier transform; the contrast of the demodulated signal increases with acquisition time, and modulation frequencies in the kHz range are possible. Dynamic contrast is an emerging topic with considerable room for development, both with respect to molecular or nanoscale probes for signal modulation, and also to methods for more efficient image processing and editing

  16. Magnetoliposomes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J; Vande Velde, Greetje; Ketkar-Atre, Ashwini; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Among the wide variety in iron oxide nanoparticles which are routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, magnetoliposomes (MLs) take up a special place. In the present work, the two main types (large and small MLs) are defined and their specific features are commented. For both types of MLs, the flexibility of the lipid coating allows for efficient functionalization, enabling bimodal imaging (e.g., MRI and fluorescence) or the use of MLs as theranostics. These features are especially true for large MLs, where several magnetite cores are encapsulated within a single large liposome, which were found to be highly efficient theranostic agents. By carefully fine-tuning the number of magnetite cores and attaching Gd(3+) -complexes onto the liposomal surface, the large MLs can be efficiently optimized for dynamic MRI. A special type of MLs, biogenic MLs, can also be efficiently used in this regard, with potential applications in cancer treatment and imaging. Small MLs, where the lipid bilayer is immediately attached onto a solid magnetite core, give a very high r2 /r1 ratio. The flexibility of the lipid bilayer allows the incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid conjugates to increase blood circulation times and be used as bone marrow contrast agents. Cationic lipids can also be incorporated, leading to high cell uptake and associated strong contrast generation in MRI of implanted cells. Unique for these small MLs is the high resistance the particles exhibit against intracellular degradation compared with dextran- or citrate-coated particles. Additionally, intracellular clustering of the iron oxide cores enhances negative contrast generation and enables longer tracking of labeled cells in time. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Synthesis of Lipophilic Paramagnetic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Baker, William C.; Choi, Michael J.; Hill, Daniel C.; Thompson, Julie L.; Petillo, Peter A.

    1999-04-16

    The facile, high-yielding synthesis of a series of macrocycles 7a-k in 75-100% yield is reported. The transformation of these compounds to their carboxymethylated analogues 8a-k in 75-90% yield and subsequent gadolinium complexes 9a-k provides a series of homologous neutral paramagnetic contrast agents (PCAs) with tunable lipophilicity. Alkylated cationic intermediates 6a-k are prepared in yields of 72-94% from glyoxal adduct of cyclen (5) and slight excesses of alkyl iodides. The methodology is selective for monoalkylation and amenable to large-scale synthesis.

  19. Nanoparticle contrast agents for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Michelle Lynn

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides real-time, objective, in-vivo, optical cross-sectional representations of the retina and optic nerve. Recent innovations in image acquisition, including the incorporation of Fourier/spectral-domain detection, have improved imaging speed, sensitivity and resolution. Still, there remain specific structures within ocular OCT images, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are of clinical interest but consistently have low contrast. This makes it difficult to differentiate between surrounding layers and structures. The objectives of this project were: (1) To establish a reliable method for OCT imaging of the healthy and diseased mouse eye in order to provide a platform for testing the utility of OCT contrast agents for ocular imaging, (2) To develop antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles suitable for targeting specific structures and enhancing OCT image contrast in the mouse eye, and (3) To examine the localized contrast-enhancing ability and biocompatibility of gold nanoparticle contrast agents in-vivo. Our organizing hypotheses were that nanoparticles could improve contrast by modulating the intensity of backscattered light detected by OCT and that they could be directed to ocular structures of interest using antibodies specific to cellular markers. A reproducible method for imaging the mouse retina and quantifying retinal thickness was developed and this technique was then applied to a mouse model for retinal ganglion cell loss, optic nerve crush. Gold nanorods were designed specifically to augment the backscattering OCT signal at the same wavelengths of light used in current ophthalmic OCT imaging schemes (resonant wavelength lambda = 840 nm). Anti-CD90.1 (Thy1.1) antibodies were conjugated to the gold nanorods and a protocol for characterization of the success of antibody conjugation was developed. Upon injection, the gold nanorods were found to remain in the vitreous post-injection, with many consumed by an early

  20. Viral capsids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Liepold, Lars; Anderson, Stasia; Willits, Deborah; Oltrogge, Luke; Frank, Joseph A; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Viral capsids have the potential for combined cell/tissue targeting, drug delivery, and imaging. Described here is the development of a viral capsid as an efficient and potentially relevant MRI contrast agent. Two approaches are outlined to fuse high affinity Gd(3+) chelating moieties to the surface of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid. In the first approach, a metal binding peptide has been genetically engineered into the subunit of CCMV. In a second approach gadolinium-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (GdDOTA) was attached to CCMV by reactions with endogenous lysine residues on the surface of the viral capsid. T(1) and T(2) ionic relaxivity rates for the genetic fusion particle were R1 = 210 and R2 = 402 mM(-1)s(-1) (R2 at 56 MHz) and for CCMV functionalized with GdDOTA were R1 = 46 and R2 = 142 mM(-1)s(-1) at 61 MHz. The relaxivities per intact capsid for the genetic fusion were R1 = 36,120 and R2 = 69,144 mM(-1)s(-1) (R2 at 56 MHz) and for the GdDOTA CCMV construct were R1 = 2,806 and R2 = 8,662 mM(-1)s(-1) at 61 MHz. The combination of high relaxivity, stable Gd(3+) binding, and large Gd(3+) payloads indicates the potential of viral capsids as high-performance contrast agents. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  2. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  3. Method and apparatus to characterize ultrasonically reflective contrast agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for characterizing the time and frequency response of an ultrasonically reflective contrast agent is disclosed. An ultrasonically reflective contrast agent is injected, under constant pressure, into a fluid flowing through a pump flow circuit. The fluid and the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent are uniformly mixed in a mixing chamber, and the uniform mixture is passed through a contrast agent chamber. The contrast agent chamber is acoustically and axially interposed between an ultrasonic transducer chamber and an acoustic isolation chamber. A pulse of ultrasonic energy is transmitted into the contrast agent chamber from the ultrasonic transducer chamber. An echo waveform is received from the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent, and it is analyzed to determine the time and frequency response of the ultrasonically reflective contrast agent.

  4. Synthesis of laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Jingam; Park, Donghee; Shin, Unchul; Moon, Sanghyub; Kim, Chihyun; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Kiju; Jung, Bongkwang; Oh, Jaemin; Seo, Jongbum

    2013-10-21

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  5. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  6. Temperature dependent behavior of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Recent interest in ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) as tools for quantitative imaging and therapy has increased the need for accurate characterization. Laboratory investigations are frequently undertaken in a water bath at room temperature; however, implications for in vivo applications are not presented. Acoustic investigation of a bulk suspension of SonoVue (Bracco Research, Geneva, Switzerland) was made in a water bath at temperatures of 20-45 degrees C. UCA characteristics were significantly affected by temperature, particularly between 20 and 40 degrees C, leading to an increase in attenuation from 1.7-2.5 dB, respectively (p = 0.002) and a 2-dB increase in scattered signal over the same range (p = 0.05) at an insonation pressure of 100 kPa. Optical data supported the hypothesis that a temperature-mediated increase in diameter was the dominant cause, and revealed a decrease in bubble stability. In conclusion, measurements made at room temperature require careful interpretation with regard to behavior in vivo.

  7. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  8. Contrast agents for cardiac angiography: effects of a nonionic agent vs. a standard ionic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bettmann, M.A.; Bourdillon, P.D.; Barry, W.H.; Brush, K.A.; Levin, D.C.

    1984-12-01

    The effects on cardiac hemodynamics and of a standard contrast agent, sodium methylglucamine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) were compared with the effects of a new nonionic agent (iohexol) in a double-blind study in 51 patietns undergoing coronary angiography and left ventriculography. No significant alteration in measured blood parameters occurred with either contrast agent. Hemodynamic changes occurred with both, but were significantly greater with the standard renografin than with the low-osmolality, nonionic iohexol. After left ventriculography, heart rate increased and peripheral arterial pressure fell with both agents, but less with iohexol. It is concluded that iohexol causes less alteration in cardiac function than does the agent currently most widely used. Nonionic contrast material is likely to improve the safety of coronary angiography, particularly in those patients at greatest risk.

  9. Targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Caruthers, Shelton D; Winter, Patrick M; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2006-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine is emerging as physicians attempt to diagnose disease in asymptomatic individuals and treat pathology early in its natural history. A novel tool in an emerging armamentarium, molecular imaging will allow noninvasive characterization and segmentation of patients for delivering custom-tailored therapy. Nanoparticulate agents, such as superparamagnetic agents, liposomes, perfluorocarbon nanoparticle emulsions, and dendrimers, are being intensively researched as formulation platforms for various targeted clinical applications. As exemplified by perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, these new agents, in combination with the rapid innovations in imaging hardware and software, will allow the emergence of new medical diagnostic and therapeutic paradigms.

  10. Adherence to therapy with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Avorn, Jerry; Wang, Philip S; Winer, Eric P

    2002-05-01

    With the rise in availability and increasing use of oral anticancer agents, concerns about adherence to prescribed regimens will become an increasingly important issue in oncology. Few published studies have focused on adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy, in part because the vast majority of chemotherapy is delivered intravenously in physicians' offices or hospitals. In this article, we review current knowledge of adherence behavior with regard to oral medications in general, including factors associated with adherence and methods for measuring adherence. We also review published studies of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in adult and pediatric populations and adherence issues in cancer prevention. The available evidence reveals that patient adherence to oral chemotherapy recommendations is variable and not easily predicted. Adherence rates ranging from less than 20% to 100% have been reported, and certain populations, such as adolescents, pose particular challenges. Future efforts should focus on improving measurement and prediction of adherence and on developing interventions to improve adherence for both patients in clinical trials and patients being treated outside of the research setting. Assessment of adherence among individuals with cancer and implementation of interventions in situations of poor adherence should improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Collapse dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Daniel Alan

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are micron-sized gas bubbles encapsulated with thin shells on the order of nanometers thick. The damping effects of these viscoelastic coatings are widely known to significantly alter the bubble dynamics for linear and low-amplitude behavior; however, their effects on strongly nonlinear and destruction responses are much less studied. This dissertation examines the behaviors of single collapsing shelled microbubbles using experimental and theoretical methods. The study of their dynamics is particularly relevant for emerging experimental uses of UCAs which seek to leverage localized mechanical forces to create or avoid specialized biomedical effects. The central component in this work is the study of postexcitation rebound and collapse, observed acoustically to identify shell rupture and transient inertial cavitation of single UCA microbubbles. This time-domain analysis of the acoustic response provides a unique method for characterization of UCA destruction dynamics. The research contains a systematic documentation of single bubble postexcitation collapse through experimental measurement with the double passive cavitation detection (PCD) system at frequencies ranging from 0.9 to 7.1 MHz and peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes (PRPA) ranging from 230 kPa to 6.37 MPa. The double PCD setup is shown to improve the quality of collected data over previous setups by allowing symmetric responses from a localized confocal region to be identified. Postexcitation signal percentages are shown to generally follow trends consistent with other similar cavitation metrics such as inertial cavitation, with greater destruction observed at both increased PRPA and lower frequency over the tested ranges. Two different types of commercially available UCAs are characterized and found to have very different collapse thresholds; lipid-shelled Definity exhibits greater postexcitation at lower PRPAs than albumin-shelled Optison. Furthermore, by altering

  12. Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography: A Focus on Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Naha, Pratap C.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray based whole body imaging technique that is widely used in medicine. Clinically approved contrast agents for CT are iodinated small molecules or barium suspensions. Over the past seven years there has been a great increase in the development of nanoparticles as CT contrast agents. Nanoparticles have several advantages over small molecule CT contrast agents, such as long blood-pool residence times, and the potential for cell tracking and targeted imaging applications. Furthermore, there is a need for novel CT contrast agents, due to the growing population of renally impaired patients and patients hypersensitive to iodinated contrast. Micelles and lipoproteins, a micelle-related class of nanoparticle, have notably been adapted as CT contrast agents. In this review we discuss the principles of CT image formation and the generation of CT contrast. We discuss the progress in developing non-targeted, targeted and cell tracking nanoparticle CT contrast agents. We feature agents based on micelles and used in conjunction with spectral CT. The large contrast agent doses needed will necessitate careful toxicology studies prior to clinical translation. However, the field has seen tremendous advances in the past decade and we expect many more advances to come in the next decade. PMID:24470293

  13. [General adverse reactions to contrast agents. Classification and general concepts].

    PubMed

    Aguilar García, J J; Parada Blázquez, M J; Vargas Serrano, B; Rodríguez Romero, R

    2014-06-01

    General adverse reactions to intravenous contrast agents are uncommon, although relevant due to the growing number of radiologic tests that use iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents. Although most of these reactions are mild, some patients can experience significant reactions that radiologists should know how to prevent and treat.

  14. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for MR Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical imaging modality effective for anatomical and functional imaging of diseased soft tissues, including solid tumors. MRI contrast agents have been routinely used for detecting tumor at an early stage. Gadolinium based contrast agents are the most commonly used contrast agents in clinical MRI. There have been significant efforts to design and develop novel Gd(III) contrast agents with high relaxivity, low toxicity and specific tumor binding. The relaxivity of the Gd(III) contrast agents can be increased by proper chemical modification. The toxicity of Gd(III) contrast agents can be reduced by increasing the agents’ thermodynamic and kinetic stability, as well as optimizing their pharmacokinetic properties. The increasing knowledge in the field of cancer genomics and biology provides an opportunity for designing tumor-specific contrast agents. Various new Gd(III) chelates have been designed and evaluated in animal models for more effective cancer MRI. This review outlines the design and development, physicochemical properties, and in vivo properties of several classes of Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents for tumor imaging. PMID:23047730

  15. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  17. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  20. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) have attracted enormous attention due to their wide applications, including for magnetic separation, for magnetic hyperthermia, and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This review article introduces the methods of synthesizing MIONs, and their application as MRI contrast agents. Currently, many methods have been reported for the synthesis of MIONs. Herein, we only focus on the liquid-based synthesis methods including aqueous phase methods and organic phase methods. In addition, the MIONs larger than 10 nm can be used as negative contrast agents and the recently emerged extremely small MIONs (ES-MIONs) smaller than 5 nm are potential positive contrast agents. In this review, we focus on the ES-MIONs because ES-MIONs avoid the disadvantages of MION-based T2- and gadolinium chelate-based T1-weighted contrast agents.

  1. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  2. Basic MR relaxation mechanisms and contrast agent design.

    PubMed

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Martins, André F; Pinho, Marco C; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists, largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand-based contrast agents. We discuss the mechanisms involved in MR relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents is accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in the development of future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide.

  3. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  4. Enteric MRI contrast agents: comparative study of five potential agents in humans.

    PubMed

    Tart, R P; Li, K C; Storm, B L; Rolfes, R J; Ang, P G

    1991-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of 1 mM Geritol, 12% corn oil emulsion, Kaolin-pectin, single contrast oral barium sulfate, and effervescent granules as enteric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Five volunteers were recruited. Each volunteer ingested for examinations, separated by at least one week, either 500 ml of each of the liquid preparations or two packets of the CO2 granules (producing 400 ml of CO2 per packet). Abdominal MR images were then obtained using a 1.5 T Magnetom imager and SE 550/22, SE 2000/45/90 and FISP 40/18/40 degrees pulse sequences. The oil emulsions were best tolerated. Barium sulfate caused the greatest amount of nausea, followed by Geritol and Kaolin-pectin. With FISP 40/18/40 degrees, 60%-80% of the small bowel was well delineated using oil emulsion, Kaolin-pectin, or barium sulfate. We conclude that oil emulsion was by far the best enteric MR contrast agent in our study. Good delineation of the small bowel and pancreas can be achieved using oil emulsion and gradient echo pulse sequences. The lack of side-effects and the excellent taste make it highly acceptable to human subjects.

  5. Contrast agents and renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Romano, Giulia; Briguori, Carlo; Quintavalle, Cristina; Zanca, Ciro; Rivera, Natalia V; Colombo, Antonio; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2008-10-01

    Contrast media (CM) induce a direct toxic effect on renal tubular cells. This toxic effect may have a role in the pathophysiology of contrast nephropathy. We evaluated (i) the cytotoxicity of CM [both low-osmolality (LOCM) and iso-osmolality (IOCM)], of iodine alone, and of an hyperosmolar solution (mannitol 8%) on human embryonic kidney (HEK 293), porcine proximal renal tubular (LLC-PK1), and canine Madin-Darby distal tubular renal (MDCK) cells; and (ii) the effectiveness of various antioxidant compounds [n-acetylcysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid and sodium bicarbonate] in preventing CM cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of CM was assessed at different time points, with different methods: cell viability, DNA laddering, flow cytometry, and caspase activation. Both LOCM and IOCM produced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in cell death as assessed by the different methods. On the contrary, iodine alone and hyperosmolar solution did not induce any significant cytotoxic effect. There was not any significant difference in the cytotoxic effect between LOCM and IOCM. Furthermore, both LOCM and IOCM caused a marked increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities and poly(ADP-ribose) fragmentation, while no effect on caspase-8/-10 was observed, thus indicating that the CM activated apoptosis mainly through the intrinsic pathway. Both CM induced an increase in protein expression levels of pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl2 family (Bim and Bad). NAC and ascorbic acid but not sodium bicarbonate had a dose-dependent protective effect on renal cells after 3 h incubation with high dose (200 mg iodine/mL) of both LOCM and IOCM. Both LOCM and IOCM induce a dose-dependent renal cell apoptosis. NAC and ascorbic acid but not sodium bicarbonate prevent this contrast-induced apoptosis.

  6. Current topics in ultrasound contrast agent application and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Kruse, Dustin E.; May, Donovan J.

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are bubbles, 1-10 microns in radius, encapsulated by a lipid, protein, polymer or fluid shell. The agents have been used to distinguish the acoustic scattering signatures of blood from those of the surrounding tissue. This is possible due to the nonlinear response of the agent, which is similar to that of a free gas bubble. Upon sufficient forcing the agents will oscillate nonlinearly about their equilibrium radius, and for specific conditions, produce nonlinear resonance responses which are integer multiples of the primary resonance. Ultrasound tissue perfusion studies have been developed which are based on the destruction of contract agents coupled to the measurement of blood flow. Nevertheless, many outstanding issues remain in contrast agent design especially with respect to emerging applications. Even with the use of higher order harmonics there is a lack of an acoustic signature or destruction mechanism at frequencies above approximately 5.0 MHz with conventional agents. The design and use of a high frequency contrast agent is addressed by exploiting the multiple scattering response of agents modled as spherical elastic shells. Also considered is the nonlinear response of elastic-shelled agents. The considerations of shells modeled as linear and nonlinear elastic materials are discussed. The use of contrast agents for targeted drug delivery has recently received much attention. More specifically, the ImaRx Corporation (Tucson, Arizona) has developed thick fluid shelled agents, which release suspended taxol-based drugs from their shells upon destruction. Shape instabilities and surface waves correspond with the fragmentation and destruction of the agents. Finally, the interaction of multiple contrast agents has received little attention with respect to these emerging applications.

  7. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  8. Hyperpolarized noble gases as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases ((3)He and (129)Xe) can provide NMR signal enhancements of 10,000 to 100,000 times that of thermally polarized gases and have shown great potential for applications in lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by greatly enhancing the sensitivity and contrast. These gases obtain a highly polarized state by employing a spin exchange optical pumping technique. In this chapter, the underlying physics of spin exchange optical pumping for production of hyperpolarized noble gases is explained and the basic components and procedures for building a polarizer are described. The storage and delivery strategies of hyperpolarized gases for in vivo imaging are discussed. Many of the problems that are likely to be encountered in practical experiments and the corresponding detailed approaches to overcome them are also discussed.

  9. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  10. Manganese-based MRI contrast agents: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic metals are used as contrast materials for magnetic resonance (MR) based techniques. Lanthanide metal gadolinium (Gd) has been the most widely explored, predominant paramagnetic contrast agent until the discovery and association of the metal with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a rare but serious side effects in patients with renal or kidney problems. Manganese was one of the earliest reported examples of paramagnetic contrast material for MRI because of its efficient positive contrast enhancement. In this review, manganese based contrast agent approaches are discussed with a particular emphasis on their synthetic approaches. Both small molecules based typical blood pool contrast agents and more recently developed novel nanometer sized materials are reviewed focusing on a number of successful molecular imaging examples. PMID:22043109

  11. [Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: development and problems].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-kai

    2002-09-01

    In spite of the inherent versatility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers and clinicians from both home and aboard have made great achievements in developing safe and effective contrast agents. Many new agents are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. It is of clinical importance that the agents should expand the diagnostic utility of MRI, improve the detection of tiny lesions and help evaluate specific tissue or organ functions. This article aims to examine current status of contrast agents for MRI and the problems waiting for solutions.

  12. A review of responsive MRI contrast agents: 2005–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Bernstein, Adam S.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on MRI contrast agents that are responsive to a change in a physiological biomarker. The response mechanisms are dependent on six physicochemical characteristics, including the accessibility of water to the agent, tumbling time, proton exchange rate, electron spin state, MR frequency, or superparamagnetism of the agent. These characteristics can be affected by changes in concentrations or activities of enzymes, proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites, or metal ions, or changes in redox state, pH, temperature, or light. A total of 117 examples are presented, including examples that employ nuclei other than 1H, which attests to the creativity of multidisciplinary research efforts to develop responsive MRI contrast agents. PMID:25355685

  13. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence.

  14. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; SUGIYAMA, TADASHI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21–85 years) and 73 years (range, 30–90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3–3,585 days) and 219 days (24–3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4–5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence. PMID:25295117

  15. Neutral vs positive oral contrast in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT: sensitivity, specificity, reader confidence and interpretation time

    PubMed Central

    Naeger, D M; Chang, S D; Kolli, P; Shah, V; Huang, W; Thoeni, R F

    2011-01-01

    Objective The study compared the sensitivity, specificity, confidence and interpretation time of readers of differing experience in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT using neutral vs positive oral contrast agents. Methods Contrast-enhanced CT for right lower quadrant or right flank pain was performed in 200 patients with neutral and 200 with positive oral contrast including 199 with proven acute appendicitis and 201 with other diagnoses. Test set disease prevalence was 50%. Two experienced gastrointestinal radiologists, one fellow and two first-year residents blindly assessed all studies for appendicitis (2000 readings) and assigned confidence scores (1=poor to 4=excellent). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Total interpretation time was recorded. Each reader's interpretation with the two agents was compared using standard statistical methods. Results Average reader sensitivity was found to be 96% (range 91–99%) with positive and 95% (89–98%) with neutral oral contrast; specificity was 96% (92–98%) and 94% (90–97%). For each reader, no statistically significant difference was found between the two agents (sensitivities p-values >0.6; specificities p-values>0.08), in the area under the ROC curve (range 0.95–0.99) or in average interpretation times. In cases without appendicitis, positive oral contrast demonstrated improved appendix identification (average 90% vs 78%) and higher confidence scores for three readers. Average interpretation times showed no statistically significant differences between the agents. Conclusion Neutral vs positive oral contrast does not affect the accuracy of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosing acute appendicitis. Although positive oral contrast might help to identify normal appendices, we continue to use neutral oral contrast given its other potential benefits. PMID:20959365

  16. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  17. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds.

  18. A multimeric MR-optical contrast agent for multimodal imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Victoria S. R.; Carney, Christiane E.; Macrenaris, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a multimodal and multimeric contrast agent. The agent consists of three macrocyclic Gd(III) chelates conjugated to a fluorophore and possesses high relaxivity, water solubility, and is nontoxic. The modular synthesis is amenable for the incorporation of a variety of fluorophores to generate molecular constructs for a number of applications. PMID:25137290

  19. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories. PMID:27547627

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kuźnik, Nikodem; Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories.

  1. Contrast agent enhanced pQCT of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallioniemi, A. S.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Nieminen, M. T.; Lammi, M. J.; Töyräs, J.

    2007-02-01

    The delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) technique is the only non-invasive means to estimate proteoglycan (PG) content in articular cartilage. In dGEMRIC, the anionic paramagnetic contrast agent gadopentetate distributes in inverse relation to negatively charged PGs, leading to a linear relation between T1,Gd and spatial PG content in tissue. In the present study, for the first time, contrast agent enhanced peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was applied, analogously to dGEMRIC, for the quantitative detection of spatial PG content in cartilage. The suitability of two anionic radiographic contrast agents, gadopentetate and ioxaglate, to detect enzymatically induced PG depletion in articular cartilage was investigated. First, the interrelationships of x-ray absorption, as measured with pQCT, and the contrast agent solution concentration were investigated. Optimal contrast agent concentrations for the following experiments were selected. Second, diffusion rates for both contrast agents were investigated in intact (n = 3) and trypsin-degraded (n = 3) bovine patellar cartilage. The contrast agent concentration of the cartilaginous layer was measured prior to and 2-27 h after immersion. Optimal immersion time for the further experiments was selected. Third, the suitability of gadopentetate and ioxaglate enhanced pQCT to detect the enzymatically induced specific PG depletion was investigated by determining the contrast agent concentrations and uronic acid and water contents in digested and intact osteochondral samples (n = 16). After trypsin-induced PG loss (-70%, p < 0.05) the penetration of gadopentetate and ioxaglate increased (p < 0.05) by 34% and 48%, respectively. Gadopentetate and ioxaglate concentrations both showed strong correlation (r = -0.95, r = -0.94, p < 0.01, respectively) with the uronic acid content. To conclude, contrast agent enhanced pQCT provides a technique to quantify PG content in normal and experimentally

  2. Cell Labeling via Membrane-Anchored Lipophilic MR Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell tracking in vivo with MR imaging requires the development of contrast agents with increased sensitivity that effectively label and are retained by cells. Most clinically approved Gd(III)-based contrast agents require high incubation concentrations and prolonged incubation times for cellular internalization. Strategies to increase contrast agent permeability have included conjugating Gd(III) complexes to cell penetrating peptides, nanoparticles, and small molecules which have greatly improved cell labeling but have not resulted in improved cellular retention. To overcome these challenges, we have synthesized a series of lipophilic Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents that label cell membranes in vitro. Two of the agents were synthesized with a multiplexing strategy to contain three Gd(III) chelates (1 and 2) while the third contains a single Gd(III) chelate (3). These new agents exhibit significantly enhanced labeling and retention in HeLa and MDA-MB-231-mcherry cells compared to agents that are internalized by cells (4 and Prohance). PMID:24787689

  3. Interfacial rheology of encapsulated microbubble contrast agents for medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2002-11-01

    Intravenous encapsulated microbubble contrast agents (1-10 mu) have become an established clinical tool for enhancing ultrasound sensitivity. Bubbles enhance contrast due to their high scattering cross-sections relative to those of rigid particles. The high values result from the large difference in density and compressibility. Furthermore, they act as damped mass-spring systems with enhanced resonant signal near their natural frequency. Most contrast agents are made with an encapsulating shell that prevents their premature dissolution. Free bubbles can last only a fraction of a second, whereas persistence requirements for a bubble to successfully reach from peripheral veins, where they are injected, to end-organs via heart is 12-27 seconds. Different contrast agents differ in the materials, structure and properties of their shells. We will present a model of the surface rheology of the shell. It will be compared with the currently available models of the shell. Preliminary results of the encapsulated bubble dynamics will be provided.

  4. Methods for blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2003-10-01

    Blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents are being investigated for myocardial perfusion and more recently in other organ systems. The methods are based largely on the relative increase in echogenicity due to the concentration of bubbles present in the ultrasound beam. In the simplest form, regional differences in blood volume can be inferred but the possibility exists to extract perfusion from the transit of contrast agent through tissue. Perfusion measurements rely on determining the flux of blood through a tissue volume and as such require knowledge of the fractional blood volume (FBV), i.e., ml blood/g tissue and the rate of exchange, commonly measured as the mean transit time (MTT). This presentation will discuss methods of determining each of these values and their combination to estimate tissue perfusion. Underlying principles of indicator-dilution theory will be provided in the context of ultrasound contrast agents. Current methods for determining MTT will include imaging of the intravenous bolus, in-plane contrast disruption with interval and real-time contrast recovery imaging, and control of contrast agent flow using arterial disruption (contrast interruption). The advantages and limitations of the methods will be examined along with current applications. [Work supported in part by NIH.

  5. Contrast agent influences MRI phase-contrast flow measurements in small vessels.

    PubMed

    Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Vikhoff-Baaz, Barbro; Starck, Göran; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is often combined with phase contrast (PC) flow measurement to answer a particular clinical question. The contrast agent that is administered during contrast-enhanced MR angiography may still be present in the blood during the consecutive PC flow measurement. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of contrast agent on PC flow measurements in small vessels. For that purpose, both in vivo measurements and computer simulations were performed. The dependence of the PC flow quantification on the signal amplitude difference between blood and stationary background tissue for various vessel sizes was characterized. Results show that the partial-volume effect strongly affects the accuracy of the PC flow quantification when the imaged vessel is small compared to the spatial resolution. A higher blood-to-background-contrast level during imaging significantly increases the partial-volume effect and thereby reduces the accuracy of the flow quantification. On the other hand, a higher blood-to-background-contrast level facilitated the segmentation of the vessel for flow rate determination. PC flow measurements should therefore be performed after contrast agent administration in large vessels, but before contrast agent administration in small vessels.

  6. Magnetic and Plasmonic Contrast Agents in Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Amy L; Blackmon, Richard L; Sierchio, Justin M

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has gained widespread application for many biomedical applications, yet the traditional array of contrast agents used in incoherent imaging modalities do not provide contrast in OCT. Owing to the high biocompatibility of iron oxides and noble metals, magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticles, respectively, have been developed as OCT contrast agents to enable a range of biological and pre-clinical studies. Here we provide a review of these developments within the past decade, including an overview of the physical contrast mechanisms and classes of OCT system hardware addons needed for magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticle contrast. A comparison of the wide variety of nanoparticle systems is also presented, where the figures of merit depend strongly upon the choice of biological application.

  7. Magnetic and Plasmonic Contrast Agents in Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Sierchio, Justin M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has gained widespread application for many biomedical applications, yet the traditional array of contrast agents used in incoherent imaging modalities do not provide contrast in OCT. Owing to the high biocompatibility of iron oxides and noble metals, magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticles, respectively, have been developed as OCT contrast agents to enable a range of biological and pre-clinical studies. Here we provide a review of these developments within the past decade, including an overview of the physical contrast mechanisms and classes of OCT system hardware addons needed for magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticle contrast. A comparison of the wide variety of nanoparticle systems is also presented, where the figures of merit depend strongly upon the choice of biological application. PMID:27429543

  8. Structure – relaxivity relationships among targeted MR contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoda

    2012-01-01

    Paramagnetic gadolinium(III) complexes are widely used to increase contrast in magnetic resonance (MR) images. Contrast enhancement depends on the concentration of the gadolinium complex and on its relaxivity, an inherent property of the complex. Increased relaxivity results in greater image contrast or the ability to detect the contrast agent at a lower concentration. Increasing relaxivity enables imaging of abundant molecular targets. Relaxivity depends on the structure of the complex, kinetics of inner-sphere and second sphere water exchange, and on the rotational dynamics of the molecule. The latter, and in some cases the former, properties of the complex change when it is bound to its target. All of these properties can be rationally tuned to enhance relaxivitry. In this Microreview we summarize our efforts in understanding and optimizing the relaxivity of contrast agents targeted to serum albumin and to fibrin. PMID:22745568

  9. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  10. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed. PMID:25530615

  11. Contrast agent stability: a continuous B-mode imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-10-01

    The stability of contrast agents in suspensions with various dissolved gas levels has not been reported in the literature. An in vitro investigation has been carried out that studied the combined effect of varying the acoustic pressure along with degassing the suspension environment. In this study, the contrast agents were introduced into suspensions with different oxygen concentration levels, and their relative performance was assessed in terms of decay rate of their backscatter echoes. The partial pressures of oxygen in those solutions ranged between 1.5 and 26 kPa. Two IV and one arterial contrast agents were used: Definity, Quantison, and Myomap. It was found that Quantison and Myomap released free bubbles at high acoustic pressure that also dissolved faster in degassed suspensions. The backscatter decay for Definity did not depend on the air content of the suspensions. The destruction of bubbles was dependent on acoustic pressure. Different backscatter performance was observed by different populations of bubbles of the last two agents. The physical quantity of "overall backscatter" (OB) was defined as the integral of the decay rate over time of the backscatter of the contrast suspensions, and improved significantly the understanding of the behaviour of the agents. A quantitative analysis of the backscatter properties of contrast agents using a continuous imaging approach was difficult to achieve. This is due to the fact that the backscatter in the field of view is representative of a bubble population affected by the ultrasound (US) field, but this bubble population is not representative of the contrast suspension in the whole tank. Single frame insonation is suggested to avoid the effects of decay due to the ultrasonic field, and to measure a tank-representative backscatter. The definition of OB was useful, however, in understanding the behaviour of the agents.

  12. Functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Vidili, Gianpaolo; Venturelli, Enrica; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Pilo, Giovannantonio; Nicolussi, Paola; Ligios, Ciriaco; Bedognetti, Davide; Sgarrella, Francesco; Manetti, Roberto; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a fundamental diagnostic imaging tool in everyday clinical practice. Here, we are unique in describing the use of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as hyperechogenic material, suggesting their potential application as ultrasound contrast agents. Initially, we carried out a thorough investigation to assess the echogenic property of the nanotubes in vitro. We demonstrated their long-lasting ultrasound contrast properties. We also showed that ultrasound signal of functionalized MWCNTs is higher than graphene oxide, pristine MWCNTs, and functionalized single-walled CNTs. Qualitatively, the ultrasound signal of CNTs was equal to that of sulfur hexafluoride (SonoVue), a commercially available contrast agent. Then, we found that MWCNTs were highly echogenic in liver and heart through ex vivo experiments using pig as an animal model. In contrast to the majority of ultrasound contrast agents, we observed in a phantom bladder that the tubes can be visualized within a wide variety of frequencies (i.e., 5.5–10 MHz) and 12.5 MHz using tissue harmonic imaging modality. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo in the pig bladder that MWCNTs can be observed at low frequencies, which are appropriate for abdominal organs. Importantly, we did not report any toxicity of CNTs after 7 d from the injection by animal autopsy, organ histology and immunostaining, blood count, and chemical profile. Our results reveal the enormous potential of CNTs as ultrasound contrast agents, giving support for their future applications as theranostic nanoparticles, combining diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. PMID:23012426

  13. Comparison of colonic transit between polyethylene glycol and water as oral contrast vehicles in the CT evaluation of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Taylor, Andrew J; Winter, Thomas C

    2006-11-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the efficacy of a new positive oral contrast agent's ability to reach the colon during CT evaluation of acute appendicitis. Eighty adult emergency department patients who underwent abdominal CT to evaluate for appendicitis were studied. Forty patients received the department's standard dose of 1,600 mL of a water-iodinated contrast mixture (ratio of 2 mL of iodinated contrast material to 100 mL of water) with a standard delay time of 2-2.5 hours from the beginning of contrast medium ingestion. Forty patients were given a new oral contrast mixture of 1,000 mL of polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixed with 30 mL of iodinated contrast agent, and the examination was conducted only 1 hour from inception of contrast administration. Examinations were reviewed for the presence of contrast medium in the cecum and the presence of appendicitis or other abdominal abnormality. Thirty-eight of 40 patients in the PEG group had contrast medium in the colon at 1 hour after contrast administration, 20 of whom had surgically confirmed cases of appendicitis. In five other patients in that group, another cause to explain the patient's complaints was identified on imaging. Only 18 of the 40 patients who received the standard oral preparation had contrast material present in the cecum. Eleven patients in that group had confirmed appendicitis, and four others had another abnormal finding detected at CT. There was a significant difference in the success of contrast medium transit to the colon with these two agents (p < 0.0001). The use of an oral contrast agent composed of PEG and iodinated contrast material provided a marked improvement in oral agent transit to the colon even in patients with intraabdominal inflammation.

  14. A comparison of the palatability of flavored oral contrasts.

    PubMed

    Arya, Rajiv; Hansen, Allison; Taira, Breena R; Packy, Theodore; Singer, Adam J

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the taste of computed tomography (CT) oral contrast diluted with various flavored drinks. We performed a prospective, blinded, controlled trial in healthy adult volunteers. Subjects were assigned to ingest four 250-mL aliquots of oral contrast media diluted in water, Crystal Light Lemonade (Kraft Food, Northfield, Ill), Tropical Punch Kool-Aid (Kraft Food), and Tropicana orange juice (Pepsi Bottling Company, Sommers, NY) in random order; and the taste of the solution was measured with a 100-mm visual analogue scale and 5-point Likert scale from very worst to best. Between-group comparison of the taste scores was performed with repeated-measures analysis of variance and pairwise t tests. The study had 80% power to detect an effect size 0.75 SDs. There were 23 subjects; mean (SD) age was 33 (7.7) and 30% were female. The mean (SD) taste scores were water 12 (5), lemonade 37 (21), Kool-Aid 44 (20), and orange juice 40 (20) (P < .05). The proportion of subjects completely ingesting the contrast in water (65%) was significantly less than that with other 3 study solutions (100% each, P < .001). Dilution of oral contrast media with lemonade, fruit punch, or orange juice is tastier than with water. The choice of the specific juice used to dilute the oral contrast should be individualized based on patient preferences and availability.

  15. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: an investigation into the underlying sources of contrast.

    PubMed

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type. It is concluded that

  16. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  17. Graphene-based contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Cai, Xin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-12-01

    In this work, graphene nanoribbons and nanoplatelets were investigated as contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography (PAT and TAT). We show that oxidized single-and multi-walled graphene oxide nanoribbons (O-SWGNRs, O-MWGNRs) exhibit approximately 5-10 fold signal enhancement for PAT in comparison to blood at the wavelength of 755 nm, and approximately 10-28% signal enhancement for TAT in comparison to deionized (DI) water at 3 GHz. Oxidized graphite microparticles (O-GMPs) and exfoliated graphene oxide nanoplatelets (O-GNPs) show no significant signal enhancement for PAT, and approximately 12-29% signal enhancement for TAT. These results indicate that O-GNRs show promise as multi-modal PAT and TAT contrast agents, and that O-GNPs are suitable contrast agents for TAT.

  18. Graphene-based contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography☆

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Cai, Xin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Lihong V.; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    In this work, graphene nanoribbons and nanoplatelets were investigated as contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography (PAT and TAT). We show that oxidized single- and multi-walled graphene oxide nanoribbons (O-SWGNRs, O-MWGNRs) exhibit approximately 5–10 fold signal enhancement for PAT in comparison to blood at the wavelength of 755 nm, and approximately 10–28% signal enhancement for TAT in comparison to deionized (DI) water at 3 GHz. Oxidized graphite microparticles (O-GMPs) and exfoliated graphene oxide nanoplatelets (O-GNPs) show no significant signal enhancement for PAT, and approximately 12–29% signal enhancement for TAT. These results indicate that O-GNRs show promise as multi-modal PAT and TAT contrast agents, and that O-GNPs are suitable contrast agents for TAT. PMID:24490141

  19. Blood pool contrast agents for venous magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Irai S.; Li, Weier; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the venous system plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of clinically significant disorders. There have been great advances in venous imaging techniques, culminating in the use of magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Although MRV has distinct advantages in anatomic and quantitative cross sectional imaging without ionizing radiation, there are well-known challenges in acquisition timing and contrast administration in patients with renal impairment. The latest advancement involves the addition of new contrast media agents, which have emerged as valuable alternatives in these difficult scenarios. In this review, we will focus on a group of specific contrast agents called blood pool agents and discuss their salient features and clinical applications. PMID:28123972

  20. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  1. First experience with a new echographic contrast agent.

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, G; Rosa, N; Vallone, G F; Smaltino, F

    1994-01-01

    The intravenous injection of an ultrasound contrast agent can enhance signals from blood flow. Broad toxicological and pharmaceutical studies in animals confirmed the safety and efficacy of an ultrasound contrast agent made of microparticles of galactose with stabilised microbubbles in watery suspension (SH U 508 A). In this paper 10 patients with different malignant orbital and ocular tumours have been evaluated with an echo colour Doppler machine before and after the injection of SH U 508 A. An enhancement of the Doppler signals in the lesions in different degrees has been detected. This echographic contrast agent seems to be very important not only in the evaluation of vascular lesions, but also in evaluating the effectiveness of radiotherapy in malignant tumours and could spread the echographic indications in several other ophthalmic fields. Images PMID:7848976

  2. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T; Kaul, Michael G; Hansen, Eric C; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T; Montana, Daniel M; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-02-28

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography.

  3. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T.; Kaul, Michael G.; Hansen, Eric C.; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M.; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T.; Montana, Daniel M.; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography. PMID:28193901

  4. Geometrical confinement of gadolinium-based contrast agents in nanoporous particles enhances T1 contrast

    PubMed Central

    Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Godin, Biana; Sethi, Richa; Moriggi, Loick; Liu, Xuewu; Serda, Rita E.; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Muthupillai, Raja; Bolskar, Robert D.; Helm, Lothar; Ferrari, Mauro; Wilson, Lon J.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are currently designed by modifying their structural and physiochemical properties in order to improve relaxivity and to enhance image contrast. Here we show a general method for increasing relaxivity by confining contrast agents inside the nanoporous structure of silicon particles. Magnevist, gadofullerenes and gadonanotubes were loaded inside the pores of quasi-hemispherical and discoidal particles. For all combinations of nanoconstructs, a boost in longitudinal proton relaxivity r1 was observed: for Magnevist, r1~14 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~8.15×10+7 mM-1s-1/construct); for gadofullerenes, r1~200 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~7×10+9 mM-1s-1/construct); for gadonanotubes, r1~150 mM-1s-1/Gd3+ion (~2×10+9 mM-1s-1/construct). These relaxivity values are about 4 to 50 times larger than that of clinically-available gadolinium-based agents (~4 mM-1s-1 /Gd3+ion). The enhancement in contrast is attributed to the geometrical confinement of the agents, which influences the paramagnetic behavior of the Gd3+ions. Thus, nanoscale confinement offers a new and general strategy for enhancing the contrast of gadolinium-based contrast agents. PMID:20972435

  5. Stability analysis of ultrasound thick-shell contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges L.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    The stability of thick shell encapsulated bubbles is studied analytically. 3-D small perturbations are introduced to the spherical oscillations of a contrast agent bubble in response to a sinusoidal acoustic field with different amplitudes of excitation. The equations of the perturbation amplitudes are derived using asymptotic expansions and linear stability analysis is then applied to the resulting differential equations. The stability of the encapsulated microbubbles to nonspherical small perturbations is examined by solving an eigenvalue problem. The approach then identifies the fastest growing perturbations which could lead to the breakup of the encapsulated microbubble or contrast agent. PMID:22280568

  6. Gd-HOPO Based High Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Ankona; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-11-06

    Tris-bidentate HOPO-based ligands developed in our laboratory were designed to complement the coordination preferences of Gd{sup 3+}, especially its oxophilicity. The HOPO ligands provide a hexadentate coordination environment for Gd{sup 3+} in which all he donor atoms are oxygen. Because Gd{sup 3+} favors eight or nine coordination, this design provides two to three open sites for inner-sphere water molecules. These water molecules rapidly exchange with bulk solution, hence affecting the relaxation rates of bulk water olecules. The parameters affecting the efficiency of these contrast agents have been tuned to improve contrast while still maintaining a high thermodynamic stability for Gd{sup 3+} binding. The Gd- HOPO-based contrast agents surpass current commercially available agents ecause of a higher number of inner-sphere water molecules, rapid exchange of inner-sphere water molecules via an associative mechanism, and a long electronic relaxation time. The contrast enhancement provided by these agents is at least twice that of commercial contrast gents, which are based on polyaminocarboxylate ligands.

  7. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  8. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  9. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): Evolution and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W. C.; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H.; Menkens, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov) to students, researchers and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as a CSV file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, preclinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at: micad@nlm.nih.gov PMID:21989943

  10. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): evolution and progress.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W C; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H; Menkens, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov ) to students, researchers, and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1,000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4,250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as a comma separated values file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, pre-clinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities, and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments, or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at micad@nlm.nih.gov.

  11. DNA surface modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Matthieu F; Baligand, Celine; Li, Yichen; Knowles, Elisabeth S; Meisel, Mark W; Walter, Glenn A; Talham, Daniel R

    2012-05-16

    Oligonucleotide modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles have been prepared and their magnetic resonance relaxivity properties measured. Nanoparticles of GdPO4·H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant, resulting in 50 to 100 nm particles that are highly dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces, the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd(3+) sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14.1 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex, and Omniscan (FDA approved contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4·H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1, r2) comparable to those of commercially available contrast agents. In addition, the data suggest that biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  12. Surface Modified Gadolinium Phosphate Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Matthieu F.; Baligand, Celine; Knowles, Elisabeth S.; Meisel, Mark W.; Walter, Glenn A.; Talham, Daniel R.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles of GdPO4H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant resulting in 50 nm to 100 nm particles that are dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces,ootnotetext J. Monot et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (2008) 6243. the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd^3+ sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex and Omniscan (FDA cleared contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1,r2) comparable to commercially available contrast agents.ootnotetext H. Hifumi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 (2006) 15090. In addition, biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  13. Contrast agents for preclinical targeted X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Anton, Nicolas; Zuber, Guy; Vandamme, Thierry

    2014-09-30

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an X-ray based instrument that it is specifically designed for biomedical research at a preclinical stage for live imaging of small animals. This imaging modality is cost-effective, fast, and produces remarkable high-resolution images of X-ray opaque skeleton. Administration of biocompatible X-ray opaque contrast agent allows delineation of the blood vessels, and internal organs and even detection of tumor metastases as small as 300 μm. However, the main limitation of micro-CT lies in the poor efficacy or toxicity of the contrast agents. Moreover, contrast agents for micro-CT have to be stealth nanoparticulate systems, i.e. preventing their rapid renal clearance. The chemical composition and physicochemical properties will condition their uptake and elimination pathways, and therefore all the biological fluids, organs, and tissues trough this elimination route of the nanoparticles will be contrasted. Furthermore, several technologies playing on the nanoparticle properties, aim to influence these biological pathways in order to induce their accumulation onto given targeted sites, organs of tumors. In function of the methodologies carried out, taking benefit or not of the action of immune system, of the natural response of the organism like hepatocyte uptake or enhanced permeation and retention effect, or even accumulation due to ligand/receptor interactions, the technologies are called passive or active targeted imaging. The present review presents the most recent advances in the development of specific contrast agents for targeted X-ray imaging micro-CT, discussing the recent advance of in vivo targeting of nanoparticulate contrast agents, and the influence of the formulations, nature of the nanocarrier, nature and concentration of the X-ray contrasting materials, effect of the surface properties, functionalization and bioconjugation. The pharmacokinetic and versatility of nanometric systems appear particularly advantageous

  14. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. PMID:25580914

  16. A biomarker-responsive T2ex MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Randtke, Edward A; Pagel, Mark D

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated a fundamentally new type of responsive MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging that alters T2 exchange (T2ex ) properties after interacting with a molecular biomarker. The contrast agent Tm-DO3A-oAA was treated with nitric oxide (NO) and O2 . The R1 and R2 relaxation rates of the reactant and product were measured with respect to concentration, temperature, and pH. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) spectra of the reactant and product were acquired using a 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and analyzed to estimate the chemical exchange rates and r2ex relaxivities. The reaction of Tm-DO3A-oAA with NO and O2 caused a 6.4-fold increase in the r2 relaxivity of the agent, whereas r1 relaxivity remained unchanged, which demonstrated that Tm-DO3A-oAA is a responsive T2ex agent. The effects of pH and temperature on the r2 relaxivities of the reactant and product supported the conclusion that the product's benzimidazole ligand caused the agent to have a fast chemical exchange rate relative to the slow exchange rate of the reactant's ortho-aminoanilide ligand. T2ex MRI contrast agents are a new type of responsive agent that have good detection sensitivity and specificity for detecting a biomarker, which can serve as a new tool for molecular imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1665-1670, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  18. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    McCarney, Evan R; Armstrong, Brandon D; Lingwood, Mark D; Han, Songi

    2007-02-06

    Pure water in a highly (1)H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a (1)H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the (1)H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A (1)H signal enhancement of water by a factor of -10 and -100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T(1) relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate.

  19. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  20. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed.

  1. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  2. Biodegradable polydisulfide dendrimer nanoclusters as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Nwe, Kido; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Brechbiel, Martin W; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-11-27

    Gadolinium-conjugated dendrimer nanoclusters (DNCs) are a promising platform for the early detection of disease; however, their clinical utility is potentially limited due to safety concerns related to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). In this paper, biodegradable DNCs were prepared with polydisulfide linkages between the individual dendrimers to facilitate excretion. Further, DNCs were labeled with premetalated Gd chelates to eliminate the risk of free Gd becoming entrapped in dendrimer cavities. The biodegradable polydisulfide DNCs possessed a circulation half-life of >1.6 h in mice and produced significant contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta and kidneys for as long as 4 h. The DNCs were reduced in circulation as a result of thiol-disulfide exchange, and the degradation products were rapidly excreted via renal filtration. These agents demonstrated effective and prolonged in vivo contrast enhancement and yet minimized Gd tissue retention. Biodegradable polydisulfide DNCs represent a promising biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into target-specific MRI contrast agents.

  3. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  5. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  6. Use of pineapple juice with gadopentetate dimeglumine as a negative oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Juliana Avila; Furtado, Alvaro Porto Alegre; Marroni, Claudio Augusto

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of pineapple juice with gadopentetate dimeglumine as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Images were obtained before and after the intake of a negative oral contrast agent. Images obtained from six different areas of the biliary tree were analyzed by three different radiologists, who were blind to the exams; scores regarding image quality were given to each area. The statistical analysis showed a significant difference between images before and after the use of the contrast agent (P < 0.001) for the three radiologists (R1-R3). Mean scores given by radiologists before the intake of the contrast agent were 2.49 ± 0.42 (R1), 2.62 ± 0.32 (R2), and 2.22 ± 0.46 (R3). After the intake, mean scores were 3.38 ± 0.62 (R1), 3.48 ± 0.55 (R2), and 2.89 ± 0.69 (R3). The ducts that showed the highest scores were the common bile duct and duct of Wirsung, the distal portion of the common bile duct and the cystic duct. We suggest herein that the contrast agent pineapple juice with gadopentate dimeglumine constitutes an efficient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP, for it efficiently eliminates the signal of the digestive tube in MRCP images.

  7. Assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W

    2011-05-01

    The increase in oral anticancer medications with complex regimens creates a need to assure that patients are taking therapeutic dosages as prescribed. This article reviews the assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. Research and journal articles from CINAHL and PubMed. Assessing and measuring adherence to oral antineoplastics should include three dimensions: the percentage of medications taken, the duration, and the timing of taking the medication. Clinicians need to conduct ongoing assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. This includes eliciting patient report of adherence, pill counts, drug diaries, and pharmacy or medical record audits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Silver Nanoplate Contrast Agents for In Vivo Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Souza, Michael; Truby, Ryan; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Green, Christopher; Vreeland, Erika; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoplates are introduced as a new photoacoustic contrast agent that can be easily functionalized for molecular photoacoustic imaging in vivo. Methods are described for synthesis, functionalization, and stabilization of silver nanoplates using biocompatible (“green”) reagents. Directional antibody conjugation to the nanoplate surface is presented along with proof of molecular sensitivity in vitro with pancreatic cancer cells. Cell viability tests show the antibody-conjugated silver nanoplates to be nontoxic at concentrations up to 1 mg/ml. Furthermore, the silver nanoplates' potential for in vivo application as a molecularly sensitive photoacoustic contrast agent is demonstrated using an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Results of these studies suggest that the synthesized silver nanoplates are well suited for a host of biomedical imaging and sensing applications. PMID:22188516

  9. Hyperpolarized lithium-6 as a sensor of nanomolar contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B.; Uffmann, Kai; Comment, Arnaud; Kurdzesau, Fiodar; Perazzolo, Chiara; Cudalbu, Cristina; Jannin, Sami; Konter, Jacobus A.; Hautle, Patrick; van den Brandt, Ben; Navon, Gil; van der Klink, Jacques J.; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Lithium is widely used in psychotherapy. The 6Li isotope has a long intrinsic longitudinal relaxation time T1 on the order of minutes, making it an ideal candidate for hyperpolarization experiments. In the present study, we demonstrated that lithium-6 can be readily hyperpolarized within 30 min, while retaining a long polarization decay time on the order of a minute. We used the intrinsically long relaxation time for the detection of 500 nM contrast agent in vitro. Hyperpolarized lithium-6 was administered to the rat and its signal retained a decay time on the order of 70 s in vivo. Localization experiments imply that the lithium signal originated from within the brain and that it was detectable up to 5 min after administration. We conclude that the detection of sub-micromolar contrast agents using hyperpolarized NMR nuclei such as 6Li may provide a novel avenue for molecular imaging. PMID:19353663

  10. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  11. A theoretical investigation of chirp insonification of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Euan; Mulholland, Anthony J; Gachagan, Anthony; Nordon, Alison

    2011-08-01

    A theoretical investigation of second harmonic imaging of an Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCA) under chirp insonification is considered. By solving the UCA's dynamical equation analytically, the effect that the chirp signal parameters and the UCA shell parameters have on the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency are examined. This allows optimal parameter values to be identified which maximise the UCA's second harmonic response. A relationship is found for the chirp parameters which ensures that a signal can be designed to resonate a UCA for a given set of shell parameters. It is also shown that the shell thickness, shell viscosity and shell elasticity parameter should be as small as realistically possible in order to maximise the second harmonic amplitude. Keller-Herring, Second Harmonic, Chirp, Ultrasound Contrast Agent.

  12. Nanoshells as an optical coherence tomography contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Halas, Naomi J.; West, Jennifer L.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2004-07-01

    Nanoshells are a layered dielectric core/metal shell composite nanostructure with an optical resonance geometrically tunable through the visible and near infrared. Due to their small size, ability to generate a strong backscattering signal, and potential for surface modification, they may be an ideal in vivo optical coherence tomography contrast agent. We performed a pilot study to assess their capabilities. Images of a cuvette filled with dilute nanoshells, 2 μm polystyrene microspheres, or a combination were obtained. When compared to microspheres, images of the nanoshells where much brighter and attenuation of the bottom cuvette interface less. Injection of micropheres into the tail vein of mice and hamsters caused a noticeable brightening of OCT images of the dorsal skin. These pilot studies indicate that nanoshells may be an excellent OCT contrast agent; work is continuing to determine optimum nanoshell parameters and applications.

  13. Carbon nanoparticles as a multimodal thermoacoustic and photoacoustic contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Lina; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Nie, Liming; Zhang, Ruiying; Lanza, Gregory M.; Shen, Baozhong; Pan, Dipanjan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated the potential of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) as exogenous contrast agents for both thermoacoustic (TA) tomography (TAT) and photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT). In comparison to deionized water, the CNPs provided a four times stronger signal in TAT at 3 GHz. In comparison to blood, The CNPs provided a much stronger signal in PAT over a broad wavelength range of 450-850 nm. Specifically, the maximum signal enhancement in PAT was 9.4 times stronger in the near-infrared window of 635-670 nm. In vivo blood-vessel PA imaging was performed non-invasively on a mouse femoral area. The images, captured after the tail vein injection of CNPs, show a gradual enhancement of the optical absorption in the vessels by up to 230%. The results indicate that CNPs can be potentially used as contrast agents for TAT and PAT to monitor the intravascular or extravascular pathways in clinical applications.

  14. The in vivo relaxivity of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuter, Borys

    1999-11-01

    Post-contrast clinical 1H Magnetic Resonance Images have to date been interpreted with little regard for possible variations in the in-vivo properties of injected magnetic pharmaceuticals (contrast agents), particularly in their relaxivity or ability to alter tissue relaxation rates, T2-1 and T 2-1, per unit concentration. The relaxivities of contrast agents have only rarely been measured in-vivo, measurements usually being performed on excised tissues and at magnetic field strengths lower than used in clinical practice. Some researchers have simply assumed that relaxivities determined in homogeneous tissue phantoms were applicable in-vivo. In this thesis, the relaxivities of two contrast agents, Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, were measured in simple tissue phantoms and in the kidney and liver of intact, but sacrificed, Wistar rats using a clinical MR scanner with a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. T1 and T2 were determined from sets of images acquired using a standard clinical spin-echo pulse sequence. The contrast agent concentration in tissue was assessed by radioassay of 153Gd-DTPA or 153Gd-EOB-DTPA, mixed with the normal compound prior to injection. Relaxivity was taken as the slope of a linear regression fit of relaxation rate against Gd concentration. The relaxivities of Gd-EOB-DTPA were similarly determined in normal and biliary- obstructed guinea pigs. Relaxivities in tissue differed significantly from values obtained in simple phantoms. Kidney T1 relaxivity was reduced for both compounds in normal animals. Three days or more of biliary obstruction produced further reductions in kidney T1 relaxivity of Gd-EOB-DTPA, providing strong evidence that disease affects contrast agent relaxivity. Kidney T2 relaxivity was much greater than T1 relaxivity and was also depressed by biliary obstruction. Liver T1 and T 2 relaxivites were increased above phantom values, but were not affected by the biliary obstruction. Water compartmentalisation, macromolecular binding, proton

  15. Beat frequency ultrasonic microsphere contrast agent detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A system for and method of detecting and measuring concentrations of an ultrasonically-reflective microsphere contrast agent involving detecting non-linear sum and difference beat frequencies produced by the microspheres when two impinging signals with non-identical frequencies are combined by mixing. These beat frequencies can be used for a variety of applications such as detecting the presence of and measuring the flow rates of biological fluids and industrial liquids, including determining the concentration level of microspheres in the myocardium.

  16. Theoretical analysis of chirp excitation of contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Euan; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Nordon, Alison; Gachagan, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Analytic expressions are found for the amplitude of the first and second harmonics of the Ultrasound Contrast Agent's (UCA's) dynamics when excited by a chirp. The dependency of the second harmonic amplitude on the system parameters, the UCA shell parameters, and the insonifying signal parameters is then investigated. It is shown that optimal parameter values exist which give rise to a clear increase in the second harmonic component of the UCA's motion.

  17. Beat frequency ultrasonic microsphere contrast agent detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system for and method of detecting and measuring concentrations of an ultrasonically-reflective microsphere contrast agent involving detecting non-linear sum and difference beat frequencies produced by the microspheres when two impinging signals with non-identical frequencies are combined by mixing. These beat frequencies can be used for a variety of applications such as detecting the presence of and measuring the flow rates of biological fluids and industrial liquids, including determining the concentration level of microspheres in the myocardium.

  18. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  19. Site-specific tumor-targeted fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Wilhelm, R. Randy; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Erion, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as photo therapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carries such as antibodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in prolonged blood circulation times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmocokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near IR light absorbing dye to bioactive peptides that specifically target over expressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit form this approach.

  20. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  1. Mechanistic investigation of beta-galactosidase-activated MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk-Pearson, Lauren M; Femia, Frank J; Smith, Jeffrey; Parigi, Giacomo; Duimstra, Joseph A; Eckermann, Amanda L; Luchinat, Claudio; Meade, Thomas J

    2008-01-07

    We report a mechanistic investigation of an isomeric series of beta-galactosidase-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents. Our strategy focuses on the synthesis of macrocyclic caged-complexes that coordinatively saturate a chelated lanthanide. Enzyme cleavage of the complex results in an open coordination site available for water that creates a detectable MR contrast agent. The complexes consist of a DO3A Gd(III) chelator modified with a galactopyranose at the N-10 position of the macrocycle. We observed significant differences in relaxometric properties and coordination geometry that can be correlated to subtle variations of the linker between the macrocycle and the galactopyranose. After synthesis and purification of the R, S, and racemic mixtures of complexes 1 and 3 and measurement of the hydration number, water residence lifetime, and longitudinal relaxation rates, we propose mechanisms for water exclusion from the lanthanide in the precleavage state. While the stereochemistry of the linker does not influence the agents' properties, the mechanism of water exclusion for each isomer is significantly influenced by the position of modification. Data for one series with a methyl group substituted on the sugar-macrocycle linker at the alpha-position suggests a steric mechanism where the galactopyranose sugar blocks water from the Gd(III) center. In contrast, our observations for a second series with methyl substitution at the beta position of the sugar-macrocycle linker are consistent with a mechanism in which a bidentate anion occupies two available coordination sites of Gd(III) in the precleavage state.

  2. Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Megan L.; Farrar, Christian T.; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. To aid MR sensitivity to cell density and myelination, we have begun the development of target-specific paramagnetic contrast agents. This work details the first application of luxol fast blue (LFB), an optical stain for myelin, as a white matter-selective MR contrast agent for human ex vivo brain tissue. Formalin-fixed human visual cortex was imaged with an isotropic resolution between 80 and 150 μm at 4.7 and 14 T before and after en bloc staining with LFB. Longitudinal (R1) and transverse (R2) relaxation rates in LFB-stained tissue increased proportionally with myelination at both field strengths. Changes in R1 resulted in larger contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), per unit time, on T1-weighted images between more myelinated cortical layers (IV–VI) and adjacent, superficial layers (I–III) at both field strengths. Specifically, CNR for LFB-treated samples increased by 229±13% at 4.7 T and 269±25% at 14 T when compared to controls. Also, additional cortical layers (IVca, IVd, and Va) were resolvable in 14T-MR images of LFB-treated samples but not in control samples. After imaging, samples were sliced in 40-micron sections, mounted, and photographed. Both the macroscopic and microscopic distributions of LFB were found to mimic those of traditional histological preparations. Our results suggest target-specific contrast agents will enable more detailed MR images with applications in imaging pathological ex vivo samples and constructing better MR atlases from ex vivo brains. PMID:19385012

  3. Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Megan L; Farrar, Christian T; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce R

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. To aid MR sensitivity to cell density and myelination, we have begun the development of target-specific paramagnetic contrast agents. This work details the first application of luxol fast blue (LFB), an optical stain for myelin, as a white matter-selective MR contrast agent for human ex vivo brain tissue. Formalin-fixed human visual cortex was imaged with an isotropic resolution between 80 and 150 microm at 4.7 and 14 T before and after en bloc staining with LFB. Longitudinal (R1) and transverse (R2) relaxation rates in LFB-stained tissue increased proportionally with myelination at both field strengths. Changes in R1 resulted in larger contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), per unit time, on T1-weighted images between more myelinated cortical layers (IV-VI) and adjacent, superficial layers (I-III) at both field strengths. Specifically, CNR for LFB-treated samples increased by 229 +/- 13% at 4.7 T and 269 +/- 25% at 14 T when compared to controls. Also, additional cortical layers (IVca, IVd, and Va) were resolvable in 14 T-MR images of LFB-treated samples but not in control samples. After imaging, samples were sliced in 40-micron sections, mounted, and photographed. Both the macroscopic and microscopic distributions of LFB were found to mimic those of traditional histological preparations. Our results suggest target-specific contrast agents will enable more detailed MR images with applications in imaging pathological ex vivo samples and constructing better MR atlases from ex vivo brains.

  4. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  5. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  6. MR-angiography: the role of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Goyen, M; Ruehm, S G; Debatin, J F

    2000-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography (MRA) permits comprehensive assessment of the supraaortic arteries as well as the arterial system in the chest, abdomen and lower extremities. 3D MRA combines intravenous injection of a non-nephrotoxic, paramagnetic, extracellular contrast agent that increases the signal intensity of blood by shortening its T1 value with the acquisition of a fast 3D data set. High contrast between the vascular lumen and surrounding tissues, inherent three-dimensionality and the ability to collect image data in the chest and abdomen under apnea conditions all contribute to excellent image quality. This review provides clinical applications of 3D MRA in the chest, abdomen and lower extremities based upon the available literature and several clinical examples.

  7. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-09-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  8. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:27807499

  9. Oral Adverse Reactions Caused by Over-the-Counter Oral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Andabak Rogulj, Ana; Vidovic Juras, Danica; Gabric, Dragana; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter products rarely cause unwanted reactions in the oral cavity. Oral reactions to these agents are not specific and might present with various clinical oral findings. Detailed medical history is a key to the proper diagnosis of these lesions and fortunately other diagnostic procedures are rarely needed. Lesions are usually managed with elimination of the offending agent and with topical steroids. In more severe cases systemic steroids should be applied. PMID:25883811

  10. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  11. Whole body postmortem angiography with a high viscosity contrast agent solution using poly ethylene glycol as contrast agent dissolver.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Christian; Persson, Anders; Thali, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    Postmortem minimal invasive angiography has already been implemented to support virtual autopsy examinations. An experimental approach in a porcine model to overcome an initially described artificial tissue edema artifact by using a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) containing contrast agent solution showed promising results. The present publication describes the first application of PEG in a whole corpse angiographic CT examination. A minimal invasive postmortem CT angiography was performed in a human corpse utilizing the high viscosity contrast agent solution containing 65% of PEG. Injection was carried out via the femoral artery into the aortic root in simulated cardiac output conditions. Subsequent CT scanning delivered the 3D volume data of the whole corpse. Visualization of the human arterial anatomy was excellent and the contrast agent distribution was generally limited to the arterial system as intended. As exceptions an enhancement of the brain, the left ventricular myocardium and the renal cortex became obvious. This most likely represented the stage of centralization of the blood circulation at the time of death with dilatation of the precapillary arterioles within these tissues. Especially for the brain this resulted in a distinctively improved visualization of the intracerebral structures by CT. However, the general tissue edema artifact of postmortem minimal invasive angiography examinations could be distinctively reduced.

  12. Spectral triangulation molecular contrast optical coherence tomography with indocyanine green as the contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changhuei; McGuckin, Laura E. L.; Simon, John D.; Choma, Michael A.; Applegate, Brian E.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    We report a new molecular contrast optical coherence tomography (MCOCT) implementation that profiles the contrast agent distribution in a sample by measuring the agent’s spectral differential absorption. The method, spectra triangulation MCOCT, can effectively suppress contributions from spectrally dependent scatterings from the sample without a priori knowledge of the scattering properties. We demonstrate molecular imaging with this new MCOCT modality by mapping the distribution of indocyanine green, a FDA-approved infrared red dye, within a stage 54 Xenopus laevis. PMID:15455765

  13. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  14. Safety of oral sulfates in rats and dogs contrasted with phosphate-induced nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Pelham, Russell W; Russell, Robert G; Padgett, Eric L; Reno, Frederick E; Cleveland, Mark vB

    2009-01-01

    An oral sulfate salt solution (OSS), under development as a bowel cleansing agent for colonoscopy in humans, is studied in rats and dogs. In rats, amaximumpractical oral OSS dose (5 g/kg/d) is compared with an oral sodium phosphate (OSP) solution, both at about 7 times the clinical dose. OSS induces the intended effects of loose stools and diarrhea. In rats, higher urine sodium and potassium accompany higher clearance rates, considered adaptive to the osmotic load of OSS. OSS for 28 days is well tolerated in rats and dogs. In contrast, OSP causes increased mortality, reduced body weight and food consumption, severe kidney tubular degeneration, and calcium phosphate deposition in rats. These are accompanied by mineralization in the stomach and aorta, along with cardiac and hepatic degeneration and necrosis. The greater safety margin of OSS over OSP at similarmultiples of the clinical dose indicates its suitability for human use.

  15. Interactive neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging using fruit juice as an oral contrast media

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the use of fruit juice with an interactive inversion recovery (IR) MR pulse sequence to visualise the gastrointestinal tract. Methods We investigated the relaxation properties of 12 different natural fruit juices in vitro, to identify which could be used as oral contrast. We then describe our initial experience using an interactive MR pulse sequence to allow optimal visualisation after administering pineapple juice orally, and suppressing pre-existing bowel fluid contents, with variable TI in three adult and one child volunteer. Results Pineapple juice (PJ) had both the shortest T1 (243 ms) and shortest T2 (48 ms) of the fruit juices tested. Optimal signal differentiation between pre-existing bowel contents and oral PJ administration was obtained with TIs of between 900 and 1100 ms. Conclusion The use of an inversion recovery preparation allowed long T1 pre-existing bowel contents to be suppressed whilst the short T1 of fruit juice acts as a positive contrast medium. Pineapple juice could be used as oral contrast agent for neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25245815

  16. Impact of myocardial contrast echocardiography on vascular permeability: comparison of three different contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Armstrong, William F; Miller, Douglas L

    2004-01-01

    Microvascular permeabilization, petechial hemorrhage and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) have been demonstrated in an in vivo rat model of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). The purpose of this study was to compare these effects for three US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ultrasound (US) contrast agents (US CA): Optison, Definity and Imagent. Evans blue dye, an indicator of microvascular permeability, and a contrast agent were injected IV in anesthetized rats suspended in a water bath to mimic scanning depths seen in clinical echocardiology. Diagnostic US B-mode scans with 1:4 end-systolic triggering were performed at 1.7 MHz using a cardiac phased-array scanhead to provide a short axis view of the left ventricle. To elicit readily measurable effects for comparisons, relatively high doses of the agent were used (50 to 500 microL kg(-1) for Optison, 25 to 200 microL kg(-1) for Imagent, 10 to 100 microL kg(-1) for Definity). Microvascular leakage was characterized by the area of Evans blue dye coloration on the hearts and by extraction of the dye from tissue samples. The number of petechia were counted on the epicardial surface of excised hearts. PVCs were counted from ECG traces recorded with the MCE images. Neither evidence of capillary leakage nor PVCs were seen in sham animals. Based on volume dose, Definity MCE produced more microvascular leakage, but there was no apparent difference between the three agents' microvascular damage potential, which increased linearly with dose at low doses, when expressed in terms of the number of stabilized microbubbles. Definity MCE resulted in fewer PVCs than the other agents. The effects increased strongly with peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, with apparent thresholds for petechiae at 0.4 MPa and for PVCs at about 1.0 MPa. These results should be of value for minimizing adverse potential in diagnosis and optimizing efficacy in therapeutic applications.

  17. What We Can Really Do with Bioresponsive MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Angelovski, Goran

    2016-06-13

    Bioresponsive MRI contrast agents hold great promise for monitoring major physiological and pathological processes in a non-invasive manner. They are capable of altering the acquired MRI signal as a consequence of changes in their microenvironment, thus allowing real-time functional reporting in living organisms. Importantly, chemistry offers diverse solutions for the design of agents which respond to a great number of specific targets. However, the path to the successful utilization of these biomarkers in the desired functional MRI studies involves careful consideration of multiple scientific, technical, and practical issues across various research disciplines. This Minireview highlights the critical steps for planning and executing such multidisciplinary projects with an aim to substantially improve our knowledge of essential biological processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-07

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  19. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F.; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist® in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL-1), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly ‘energy dependent’ for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  20. Acoustic bubble sorting for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; Versluis, Michel

    2014-05-21

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii ranging from 1 to 10 μm. Medical transducers typically operate at a single frequency, therefore only a small selection of bubbles will resonate to the driving ultrasound pulse. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution. Here, we present a simple lab-on-a-chip method to sort the population of microbubbles on-chip using a traveling ultrasound wave. First, we explore the physical parameter space of acoustic bubble sorting using well-defined bubble sizes formed in a flow-focusing device, then we demonstrate successful acoustic sorting of a commercial UCA. This novel sorting strategy may lead to an overall improvement of the sensitivity of contrast ultrasound by more than 10 dB.

  1. Therapeutic strategies with oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 against oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Ferdous, Tarannum; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer has been recognized as a tumor with low sensitivity to anticancer agents. However, introduction of S-1, an oral cancer agent is improving treatment outcome for patients with oral cancer. In addition, S-1, as a main drug for oral cancer treatment in Japan can be easily available for outpatients. In fact, S-1 exerts high therapeutic effects with acceptable side effects. Moreover, combined chemotherapy with S-1 shows higher efficacy than S-1 alone, and combined chemo-radiotherapy with S-1 exerts remarkable therapeutic effects. Furthermore, we should consider the combined therapy of S-1 and molecular targeting agents right now as these combinations were reportedly useful for oral cancer treatment. Here, we describe our findings related to S-1 that were obtained experimentally and clinically, and favorable therapeutic strategies with S-1 against oral cancer with bibliographic considerations.

  2. Recent advances in oral anticancer agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Raj Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To provide therapeutic alternatives to intravenous colon chemotherapy major recent research is focusing on the development of oral chemotherapeutic agents with the intention to improve the quality of life of patients. Initially 5-fluorouracil was most commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but currently oxaliplatin and irinotecan are also available. The majority of these new drugs are pyrimidines and their analogs. The rationale for using oral anticancer agents is discussed and new drugs, such as farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor S-1, rubitecan, ZD9331, MMI-166, eflornithine, sulindac, and oral camptothecin analogs, among others, are presented with the results of their preclinical and clinical developments. This article focuses on the advancement of clinical development and also discusses the relative merits and demerits of these agents. The accelerated approval of these agents by regulatory authorities is supported by survival benefit, response rate and time to progression.

  3. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Benes, J.; Sopko, V.; Gelbic, I.

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  4. Assessment of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Qian; Huang, Ping; Hyman, Shay; Intes, Xavier; Lee, William; Chance, Britton

    2003-12-01

    Angiogenesis is an important factor for further tumor growth and thus could be an attractive therapeutic target. Optical imaging can provide a non-invasive way to measure the permeability of tumor blood vessels and assess the tumor vasculature. We have developed a dual-channel near-infrared fluorescence system for simultaneous measurement of the pharmacokinetics of tumorous and normal tissues with exogenous contrast agents. This frequency-domain system consists of the light source (780 nm laser diode), fiber optics, interference filter (830 nm) and the detector (PMT). The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG), and the normal dosage is 100 μl at a concentration of 5 μM. In vivo animal study is performed on the K1735 melanoma-bearing mouse. The fluorescence signals both tumorous and normal tissues after the bolus injection of ICG through the tail vein are continuously recorded as a function of time. The data is fitted by a double-exponential model to reveal the wash-in and wash-out parameters of different tissues. We observed an elongated wash-out from the tumor compared with normal tissue (leg). The effect of radiation therapy on the tumor vasculature is also discussed.

  5. Photoacoustic microscopy using Evans Blue dye as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Complete and continuous imaging of microvascular networks is crucial for a wide variety of biomedical applications. Photoacoustic tomography can provide high resolution microvascular imaging using hemoglobin within red blood cells (RBC) as an endogenous contrast agent. However, intermittent RBC flow in capillaries results in discontinuous and fragmentary capillary images. To overcome this problem, we used Evans Blue (EB) dye as a contrast agent for in vivo photoacoustic imaging. EB has strong optical absorption at 610 nm and distributes uniformly in the blood stream by chemically binding to albumin. By intravenous injection of EB (6%, 200 μL), complete and continuous microvascular networks-especially capillaries-of the ears of nude mice were imaged. The diffusion of EB (3%, 100 μL) leaving the blood stream was monitored for 2 hours. At lower administration dose of EB (3%, 50 μL), the clearance of the EB-albumin complex was imaged for 10 days and quantitatively investigated using a two-compartment model.

  6. Development of Multifunctional Luminomagnetic Nanoparticles as Bioimaging Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimun, Lawrence C.; Rightsell, Chris; Kumar, G. A.; Pedraza, Francisco; Montelongo, Sergio A.; Guda, Teja; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Trivalent rare earth doped nanocrystalline materials with multiple functionalities have drawn special attention in biomedical industry. Current research is focused on the use of various materials with dual functionality for potential multifunctional applications. In this project, we are developing near infrared(NIR) based nanocrystals (NCs) as contrast agents with multimodal features comprising of strong NIR fluorescence, X-ray fluorescence and magnetic properties by utilizing the superparamagnetic features of Gd3+, the high X-ray excitation cross section of Lu3+, and the NIR fluorescence of Nd3+. Halides, such as MGdLuF4 (M=K,Na), were doped with NIR active rare earth ions, Nd3+, where synthesis conditions have been optimized to obtain the brightest phosphor with a size of sub-50 nm. Characterization of the NCs were performed to explore the excitation and emission properties, crystal structure, morphology, magnetization properties, and X-ray fluorescence properties. The potential use of these NCs can be utilized as contrast agents for medical imaging application such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance (MRI) and X-ray imaging. This research was, in part, funded by NIGMS MBRS-RISE GM060655 and from the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  7. HIFU Hemostasis of Liver Injuries Enhanced by Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Vaezy, Shahram; Brayman, Andrew A.; Matula, Thomas J.; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2005-03-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) hemostasis can be achieved faster in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). Incisions (3 cm long and 0.5 cm deep) were made in surgically exposed rabbit liver. Optison at a concentration of 0.18 ml/kg was injected into the mesenteric vein, immediately before the incision was made. The HIFU applicator (frequency of 5.5 MHz, and intensity of 3,700 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision (at an approximate rate of 1 mm/s) until hemostasis was achieved. The times to complete hemostasis were measured and normalized with the initial blood loss. The hemostasis times were 59±23 s in the presence of Optison and 70±23 s without Optison. The presence of Optison produced a 37% reduction in the normalized hemostasis times (p<0.05). Optison also provided faster (by 34%) formation of the coagulum seal over the lesion. Gross observations showed that the lesion size did not change due to the presence of Optison. Histological analysis showed that lesions consisted of an area of coagulation necrosis in vicinity of the incision, occasionally surrounded by a congestion zone filled with blood. Our results suggest the potential utility of microbubble contrast agents for increasing efficiency of HIFU hemostasis of internal organ injuries.

  8. Repositioning Clofazimine as a Macrophage-Targeting Photoacoustic Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Keswani, Rahul K.; Tian, Chao; Peryea, Tyler; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding; Rosania, Gus R.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) is a deep-tissue imaging modality, with potential clinical applications in the diagnosis of arthritis, cancer and other disease conditions. Here, we identified Clofazimine (CFZ), a red-pigmented dye and anti-inflammatory FDA-approved drug, as a macrophage-targeting photoacoustic (PA) imaging agent. Spectroscopic experiments revealed that CFZ and its various protonated forms yielded optimal PAT signals at wavelengths −450 to 540 nm. CFZ’s macrophage-targeting chemical and structural forms were detected with PA microscopy at a high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR > 22 dB) as well as with macroscopic imaging using synthetic gelatin phantoms. In vivo, natural and synthetic CFZ formulations also demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, the injection of CFZ was monitored via a real-time ultrasound-photoacoustic (US-PA) dual imaging system in a live animal and clinically relevant human hand model. These results demonstrate an anti-inflammatory drug repurposing strategy, while identifying a new PA contrast agent with potential applications in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:27000434

  9. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  10. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles as potential contrast agents in MRI.

    PubMed

    Van Roosbroeck, Ruben; Van Roy, Willem; Stakenborg, Tim; Trekker, Jesse; D'Hollander, Antoine; Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-03-25

    We present the top-down synthesis of a novel type of MRI T2 contrast agent with great control over size and shape using a colloidal lithography technique. The resulting synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles (SAF-NPs) yield improved relaxivities compared to superparamagnetic iron oxide alternatives (SPIONs). For T2 weighted imaging, the outer sphere relaxation theory has shown that the sensitivity of a T2 contrast agent is dependent on the particle size with an optimal size that exceeds the superparamagnetic limit of SPIONs. With the use of the interlayer exchange coupling effect, the SAF-NPs presented here do not suffer from this limit. Adjusting the outer sphere relaxation theory for spherical particles to SAF-NPs, we show both theoretically and experimentally that the SAF-NP size can be optimized to reach the r2 maximum. With measured r2 values up to 355 s(-1) mM(-1), our SAF-NPs show better performance than commercial alternatives and are competitive with the state-of-the-art. This performance is confirmed in an in vitro MRI study on SKOV3 cells.

  11. Oral contrast media for body CT: Comparison of diatrizoate sodium and iohexol for patient acceptance and bowel opacification.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Michelle M; Lockhart, Mark E; Fineberg, Naomi S; Berland, Lincoln L

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether a difference in patient preference exists between iohexol (Omnipaque) and diatrizoate sodium (Gastroview) as oral contrast medium for abdominal-pelvic CT. A secondary objective was to evaluate whether there are significant differences in bowel opacification and adverse effect profile for the two agents. From August 2007 through March 2009, 300 patients were enrolled in this prospective study after informed consent was obtained. Eligible patients were identified from those scheduled for outpatient abdominal-pelvic CT. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive one of two oral contrast agents in a double-blinded fashion. Subjects graded the taste using a 5-point scale, and data regarding demographics, total volume, and adverse effects were collected. A direct comparison of 30 mL of each of the two diluted agents in randomized order was then performed. CT images were graded for bowel opacification by two blinded abdominal radiologists. Of 287 subjects who expressed a preference, 233 patients (81%) preferred dilute iohexol compared with 54 patients (19%) who preferred dilute diatrizoate sodium (p < 0.001). Ten patients had no preference, and three patients did not complete the taste comparison study. No difference in bowel opacification was identified between the oral contrast agents (p = 0.27), nor was there a significant difference in adverse effects (p = 0.352). Patents preferred dilute iohexol over dilute diatrizoate sodium for oral contrast for abdominal-pelvic CT. There was no significant difference in bowel opacification or adverse effect profile.

  12. Pinched flow fractionation of microbubbles for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Kok, Maarten; Segers, Tim

    2014-11-01

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains a wide size distribution of encapsulated microbubbles (typically 1-10 μm in diameter) that resonate to the driving ultrasound field by the intrinsic relationship between bubble size and ultrasound frequency. Medical transducers, however, operate in a narrow frequency range, which severely limits the number of bubbles that contribute to the echo signal. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution of the bubble suspension. Here, we present a novel, low-cost, lab-on-a-chip method for the sorting of contrast microbubbles by size, based on a microfluidic separation technique known as pinched flow fractionation (PFF). We show by experimental and numerical investigation that the inclusion of particle rotation is essential for an accurate physical description of the sorting behavior of the larger bubbles. Successful sorting of a bubble suspension with a narrow size distribution (3.0 +/- 0.6 μm) has been achieved with a PFF microdevice. This sorting technique can be easily parallelized, and may lead to a significant improvement in the sensitivity of contrast-enhanced medical ultrasound. This work is supported by NanoNextNL, a micro and nanotechnology consortium of the Government of the Netherlands and 130 partners.

  13. Optical and acoustical dynamics of microbubble contrast agents inside neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, P A; Chomas, J E; Lum, A F; Allen, J S; Lindner, J R; Simon, S I; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Acoustically active microbubbles are used for contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of organ perfusion. In regions of inflammation, contrast agents are captured and phagocytosed by activated neutrophils adherent to the venular wall. Using direct optical observation with a high-speed camera and acoustical interrogation of individual bubbles and cells, we assessed the physical and acoustical responses of both phagocytosed and free microbubbles. Optical analysis of bubble radial oscillations during insonation demonstrated that phagocytosed microbubbles experience viscous damping within the cytoplasm and yet remain acoustically active and capable of large volumetric oscillations during an acoustic pulse. Fitting a modified version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation that describes mechanical properties of thin shells to optical radius-time data of oscillating bubbles provided estimates of the apparent viscosity of the intracellular medium. Phagocytosed microbubbles experienced a viscous damping approximately sevenfold greater than free microbubbles. Acoustical comparison between free and phagocytosed microbubbles indicated that phagocytosed microbubbles produce an echo with a higher mean frequency than free microbubbles in response to a rarefaction-first single-cycle pulse. Moreover, this frequency increase is predicted using the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. We conclude that contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect distinct acoustic signals from microbubbles inside of neutrophils and may provide a unique tool to identify activated neutrophils at sites of inflammation. PMID:11222315

  14. Cellulose nanoparticles: photoacoustic contrast agents that biodegrade to simple sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticle contrast agents offer strong signal intensity and long-term stability, but are limited by poor biodistribution and clearance profiles. Conversely, small molecules offer renal clearance, but relatively low photoacoustic signal. Here we describe a cellulose-based nanoparticle with photoacoustic signal superior to gold nanorods, but that undergoes enzymatic cleavage into constituent glucose molecules for renal clearance. Cellulose nanoparticles (CNPs) were synthesized through acidic cleavage of cellulose linters and purified with centrifugation. TEM indicated that the nanoparticles were 132 +/- 46 nm; the polydispersity index was 0.138. Ex vivo characterization showed a photoacoustic limit of detection of 0.02 mg/mL CNPs, and the photoacoustic signal of CNPs was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than gold nanorods (also at 700 nm resonance) on a particle-to-particle basis. Cell toxicity assays suggested that overnight doses below 0.31 mg/mL CNPs produced no significant (p>0.05) impact on cell metabolism. Intravenous doses up to 0.24 mg were tolerated well in nude mice. Subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor xenografts of the OV2008 ovarian cancer cell line were then created in nude mice. Data was collected with a Nexus128 scanner from Endra LifeSciences. Spectral data used a LAZR system from Visualsonics both at 700 nm excitation. We injected CNPs (0.024 mg, 0.048 mg, and 0.80 mg) via tail vein and showed that the tumor photoacoustic signal reached maximum increase between 10 and 20 minutes. All injected concentrations were statistically (p<0.05) elevated relative to the control group with n=3 mice in each group, and dose and signal had a linear relationship at R2>0.96 suggesting quantitative signal. CNP biodegradation was demonstrated ex vivo with a glucose assay. CNPs in the presence of cellulase were reduced to free glucose in under than four hours. The glucose concentration before addition of cellulase was not detectable, but increased to

  15. A new orally active male antifertility agent.

    PubMed

    Coppola, J A; Saldarini, R J

    1974-05-01

    CL 88,236 (1-1-amino-3-chloro-2-propanol HC1) was tested orally for antifertility in male rats, mice and hamsters. It was given orally in propylene glycol either daily for 14 days with mating on Days 7-14, (or for 7 days with mating on Days 2, 4, and 6, or for 7 days every other week for 3 weeks in withdrawal tests. In male rats, 5 mg per kg for 14 days reduced number of pregnant females 50%, and at 10-80 mg per kg males were completely sterile. Libido, coitus, and ejaculation were normal, but fragmented sperm, spermatogenic arrest, and granuloma-like epididymal lesions appeared at 40 and 80 mg per kg. Serial matings showed that sterility developed within 6 days and lasted for 1 week after withdrawal. Sterility was maintained by treating rats with CL 88,236 on alternating weeks. Male mice and hamsters were sterilized by 300 mg per kg per day for 14 days, without toxicity. Sterility was apparently mediated by affecting epididymal and vas sperm stores.

  16. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  17. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis, I: Oral agents.

    PubMed

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2004-07-01

    Given the prevalence of herpes labialis, effective therapy has the potential to affect the lives of many and presents a challenge for clinicians. Over the last several years, most of the focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. Recently, however, several studies have been published examining the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Several therapeutic agents, both prescription and over-the-counter, are available for controlling and managing the disease. In this series of articles, we review oral and topical therapeutic agents that are available in the treatment of herpes labialis and its associated symptoms. This article will review oral treatment options.

  18. Harmonic chirp imaging method for ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, Jerome M G; Chin, Chien Ting; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2005-02-01

    Coded excitation is currently used in medical ultrasound to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and penetration depth. We propose a chirp excitation method for contrast agents using the second harmonic component of the response. This method is based on a compression filter that selectively compresses and extracts the second harmonic component from the received echo signal. Simulations have shown a clear increase in response for chirp excitation over pulse excitation with the same peak amplitude. This was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) optical observations of bubble response with a fast framing camera. To evaluate the harmonic compression method, we applied it to simulated bubble echoes, to measured propagation harmonics, and to B-mode scans of a flow phantom and compared it to regular pulse excitation imaging. An increase of approximately 10 dB in SNR was found for chirp excitation. The compression method was found to perform well in terms of resolution. Axial resolution was in all cases within 10% of the axial resolution from pulse excitation. Range side-lobe levels were 30 dB below the main lobe for the simulated bubble echoes and measured propagation harmonics. However, side-lobes were visible in the B-mode contrast images.

  19. High-frequency dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E; Dayton, Paul A; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2005-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 microm, a maximum diameter less than 8 microm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques.

  20. Mechanically Tunable Hollow Silica Ultrathin Nanoshells for Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Liberman, A; Wang, J; Lu, N; Viveros, R D; Allen, C A; Mattrey, R F; Blair, S L; Trogler, W C; Kim, M J; Kummel, A C

    2015-07-08

    Perfluoropentane (PFP) gas filled biodegradable iron-doped silica nanoshells have been demonstrated as long-lived ultrasound contrast agents. Nanoshells are synthesized by a sol-gel process with tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and iron ethoxide. Substituting a fraction of the TMOS with R-substituted trialkoxysilanes produces ultrathin nanoshells with varying shell thicknesses and morphologies composed of fused nanoflakes. The ultrathin nanoshells had continuous ultrasound Doppler imaging lifetimes exceeding 3 hours, were twice as bright using contrast specific imaging, and had decreased pressure thresholds compared to control nanoshells synthesized with just TMOS. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the R-group substituted trialkoxysilanes could reduce the mechanically critical nanoshell layer to 1.4 nm. These ultrathin nanoshells have the mechanical behavior of weakly linked nanoflakes but the chemical stability of silica. The synthesis can be adapted for general fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures composed of nanoflakes, which have thicknesses from 1.4-3.8 nm and diameters from 2-23 nm.

  1. Mechanically Tunable Hollow Silica Ultrathin Nanoshells for Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, A.; Wang, J.; Lu, N.; Viveros, R.D.; Allen, C. A.; Mattrey, R.F.; Blair, S.L.; Trogler, W.C.; Kim, M. J.; Kummel, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP) gas filled biodegradable iron-doped silica nanoshells have been demonstrated as long-lived ultrasound contrast agents. Nanoshells are synthesized by a sol-gel process with tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and iron ethoxide. Substituting a fraction of the TMOS with R-substituted trialkoxysilanes produces ultrathin nanoshells with varying shell thicknesses and morphologies composed of fused nanoflakes. The ultrathin nanoshells had continuous ultrasound Doppler imaging lifetimes exceeding 3 hours, were twice as bright using contrast specific imaging, and had decreased pressure thresholds compared to control nanoshells synthesized with just TMOS. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the R-group substituted trialkoxysilanes could reduce the mechanically critical nanoshell layer to 1.4 nm. These ultrathin nanoshells have the mechanical behavior of weakly linked nanoflakes but the chemical stability of silica. The synthesis can be adapted for general fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures composed of nanoflakes, which have thicknesses from 1.4–3.8 nm and diameters from 2–23 nm. PMID:26955300

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  3. High-Frequency Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 μm, a maximum diameter less than 8 μm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques. PMID:16422410

  4. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  5. Targeted Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    TITLE: Targeted Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Computed Tomography PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roshan...2009 – Feb 14, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeted Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Digital Breast 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Tomosynthesis and...of all breast cancers [2, 3]. The combination of such contrast agents with temporal subtraction breast tomosynthesis (DBT) or digital mammography

  6. [Current status of oral immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents].

    PubMed

    Meller, S; Baran, A M; Braun, S A; Klossowski, N; Homey, B

    2014-02-01

    Various dermatological disorders require treatments with immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agents. Nevertheless, several studies demonstrate low prescription rates for systemic treatments. This low usage may be a result of physicians' low levels of confidence in administering systemic treatments. However, immunosuppressive treatments represent safe options when potential side effects as well as pharmacological interactions are considered. This review overviews the most important oral immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agents and summarizes their mode of actions, indications, and adverse effects. Biologics that require intravenous or subcutaneous application are not included, but novel and new agents likely to be released soon are considered.

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging kinetic parameters and molecular weight of dendritic contrast agents in tumor angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    de Lussanet, Quido G; Langereis, Sander; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; van Genderen, Marcel H P; Griffioen, Arjan W; van Engelshoven, Jos M A; Backes, Walter H

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the relationship between dynamic contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived kinetic parameters and contrast agents of equal chemical composition and configuration but with different molecular weights in a tumor angiogenesis model. This study was approved by the ethical review committee. Maintenance and care of animals was in compliance with guidelines set by the institutional animal care committee. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed with dendritic contrast agents in 16 mice with tumor xenografts; mice were placed in groups of four for each molecular weight of the contrast agent. The magnitude and spatial distribution of kinetic parameters (transfer coefficient [K(PS)] and plasma fraction [f(PV)]) were compared with molecular weight of the contrast agent by determining the Spearman correlation coefficient (r) and the quantitative relationship between the endothelial K(PS) and molecular weight. Inverse relationships between molecular weight of contrast agent and K(PS) and f(PV) of tumor rim (r = -0.8, P < .001 and r = -0.5, P = .04, respectively) and core (r = -0.7, P = .004 and r = -0.6, P = .01, respectively) were observed. The quantitative relationship between K(PS) and molecular weight (MW) was K(PS) = 0.4/MW(0.44). A decreasing stepwise pattern in f(PV) was noted between contrast agents with low (0.7- and 3.0-kDa) molecular weight and those with high (12- and 51-kDa) molecular weight. Macromolecular permeability is best measured with high-molecular-weight contrast agents; endothelial K(PS) values measured with low-molecular-weight contrast agents incorporate tissue perfusion and permeability and demonstrate heterogeneous microcirculatory flow. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  8. Are gadolinium contrast agents suitable for gadolinium neutron capture therapy?

    PubMed

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Rajesh, Deepika; Casalbore, Patrizia; Daniels, Matthew J; Erhardt, Robert J; Frazer, Bradley H; Wiese, Lisa M; Richter, Katherine L; Sonderegger, Brandon R; Gilbert, Benjamin; Schaub, Sebastien; Cannara, Rachel J; Crawford, John F; Gilles, Mary K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Fowler, John F; Larocca, Luigi M; Howard, Steven P; Mercanti, Delio; Mehta, Minesh P; Pallini, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is a potential treatment for malignant tumors based on two steps: (1) injection of a tumor-specific (157)Gd compound; (2) tumor irradiation with thermal neutrons. The GdNC reaction can induce cell death provided that Gd is proximate to DNA. Here, we studied the nuclear uptake of Gd by glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cells after treatment with two Gd compounds commonly used for magnetic resonance imaging, to evaluate their potential as GdNCT agents. Using synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy, we analyzed the Gd distribution at the subcellular level in: (1) human cultured GBM cells exposed to Gd-DTPA or Gd-DOTA for 0-72 hours; (2) intracerebrally implanted C6 glioma tumors in rats injected with one or two doses of Gd-DOTA, and (3) tumor samples from GBM patients injected with Gd-DTPA. In cell cultures, Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA were found in 84% and 56% of the cell nuclei, respectively. In rat tumors, Gd penetrated the nuclei of 47% and 85% of the tumor cells, after single and double injection of Gd-DOTA, respectively. In contrast, in human GBM tumors 6.1% of the cell nuclei contained Gd-DTPA. Efficacy of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA as GdNCT agents is predicted to be low, due to the insufficient number of tumor cell nuclei incorporating Gd. Although multiple administration schedules in vivo might induce Gd penetration into more tumor cell nuclei, a search for new Gd compounds with higher nuclear affinity is warranted before planning GdNCT in animal models or clinical trials.

  9. Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsner, Robert James

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous

  10. Contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography: in vitro evaluation of a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent for in vivo optimization.

    PubMed

    Back, Susan J; Edgar, J Christopher; Canning, Douglas A; Darge, Kassa

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is primarily performed outside the United States where a track record for safety in intravenous and intravesical applications has been established. Contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography (ceVUS) has also been shown to have a much higher rate of vesicoureteral reflux detection compared to voiding cystourethrography. US contrast agents available in the United States differ from those abroad. Optison® (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ) is such an US contrast agent. While Optison® has similar characteristics to other second-generation agents, it has never been used for ceVUS. In vitro optimization of dose and imaging parameters as well as assessment of contrast visualization when delivered in conditions similar to ceVUS are necessary starting points prior to in vivo applications. To optimize the intravesical use of Optison® in vitro for ceVUS before its use in pediatric studies. The experimental design simulated intravesical use. Using 9- and 12-MHz linear transducers, we scanned 20-mL syringes varying mechanical index, US contrast agent concentration (0.25%, 0.5%, 1.0%), solvent (saline, urine, radiographic contrast agent) and time out of refrigeration. We evaluated mechanical index settings and contrast duration, optimized the contrast dose, measured the effect of urine and radiographic contrast agent, and the impact of length of time of contrast outside of the refrigerator on US contrast appearance. We scanned 50-ml saline bags to assess the appearance and duration of US contrast with different delivery systems (injection vs. infusion). Consistent contrast visualization was achieved at a mechanical index of 0.06-0.17 and 0.11-0.48 for the L9 and L12 MHz transducers (P < 0.01), respectively. Thus, it was necessary to increase the mechanical index for better contrast visualization of the microbubbles with a higher transducer frequency. The lowest mechanical index for earliest visible microbubble destruction was 0

  11. Mn Porphyrins as Novel Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N.; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J.; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J.; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP5+) and Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP5+). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. Materials and Methods MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP5+ (n=6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP5+ (n=6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Results Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP5+or MnTnHex-2-PyP5+, with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP5+ administration. Conclusion After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP5+, contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate

  12. Mn porphyrins as novel molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Lascola, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP(5+)) and Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+)). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP(5+)or MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+), with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP(5+) administration. After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP(5+), contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate malignancy using MRI.

  13. Ultrasound Induced Fluorescence of Nanoscale Liposome Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qimei; Morgan, Stephen P.; O’Shea, Paul; Mather, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    A new imaging contrast agent is reported that provides an increased fluorescent signal upon application of ultrasound (US). Liposomes containing lipids labelled with pyrene were optically excited and the excimer fluorescence emission intensity was detected in the absence and presence of an ultrasound field using an acousto-fluorescence setup. The acousto-fluorescence dynamics of liposomes containing lipids with pyrene labelled on the fatty acid tail group (PyPC) and the head group (PyPE) were compared. An increase in excimer emission intensity following exposure to US was observed for both cases studied. The increased intensity and time constants were found to be different for the PyPC and PyPE systems, and dependent on the applied US pressure and exposure time. The greatest change in fluorescence intensity (130%) and smallest rise time constant (0.33 s) are achieved through the use of PyPC labelled liposomes. The mechanism underlying the observed increase of the excimer emission intensity in PyPC labelled liposomes is proposed to arise from the “wagging” of acyl chains which involves fast response and requires lower US pressure. This is accompanied by increased lipid lateral diffusivity at higher ultrasound pressures, a mechanism that is also active in the PyPE labelled liposomes. PMID:27467748

  14. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form ICAV = Pr/f (where Pr is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  15. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2013-01-07

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form I(CAV) = P(r)/f (where P(r) is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  16. Therapy after single oral agent failure: adding a second oral agent or an insulin mixture?

    PubMed

    Malone, James K; Beattie, Scott D; Campaigne, Barbara N; Johnson, Patricia A; Howard, Andrew S; Milicevic, Zvonko

    2003-12-01

    to compare the glycemic response to an insulin lispro mixture (25% insulin lispro and 75% NPL) twice daily plus metformin (Mix25+M) with glibenclamide plus metformin (G+M), in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with a single oral agent. 597 patients treated in a randomized, open-label, 16-week parallel study. Variables evaluated: hemoglobin A1C (A1C), patient symptoms, hypoglycemia rate (episodes/patient/30 days), and incidence (% patients experiencing > or =1 episode). For a subset of patients (N=120), fasting, 1-h, and 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (FPG, 1-h ppPG, 2-h ppPG) in response to a standardized test meal (STM) and self-monitored blood glucose (BG) profiles were measured. improved A1C at endpoint for both groups, and A1C changes from baseline to endpoint were not significantly different between treatments (Mix25+M, -1.87+/-1.35% vs. G+M, -1.98+/-1.28%; p=0.288). Among patients completing STM; endpoint 2-h ppPG was significantly lower with Mix25+M (9.05+/-3.32 mmol/l vs. 12.31+/-3.65 mmol/l; p<0.001), as was 2-h ppPG excursion (2-h ppPGex)(0.38+/-3.23 mmol/l vs. 2.88+/-1.98 mmol/l; p<0.001). Percentage of patients achieving postprandial BG targets (<10 mmol/l) at endpoint was significantly greater with Mix25+M (80% vs. 48%; p<0.001). Although, overall hypoglycemia rates were similar, percentage of patients experiencing and rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia was less with Mix25+M (1% vs. 5%; p<0.01, and 0.01 vs. 0.08 episodes/pt/30 d; p=0.007). Patients reported less polyuria with Mix25+M (p<0.001). in patients with type 2 diabetes failing on metformin or a sulfonylurea, Mix25+M provided similar overall glycemic control, lower ppPG, reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia, and fewer hyperglycemic symptoms compared to G+M.

  17. Section 6—Mechanical Bioeffects in the Presence of Gas-Carrier Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of mechanical ultrasound-induced bioeffects in the presence of gas carrier contrast agents (GCAs). Here, the term “contrast agent” refers to those agents that provide ultrasound contrast by being composed of microbubbles, encapsulated or not, containing one or more gases. Provided in this section are summaries on how contrast agents work, some of their current uses, and the potential for bio-effects associated with their presence in an ultrasonic field. PMID:10680618

  18. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound mapping of sentinel lymph nodes in oral tongue cancer-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, Shalva R; Xiong, Ping; Lv, Mingming; Li, Jun; Hu, Jingzhou; Ilkaev, Konstantin D; Yang, Xin; Sun, Jian

    2017-03-01

    To assess the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with peritumoral injection of microbubble contrast agent for detecting the sentinel lymph nodes for oral tongue carcinoma. The study was carried out on 12 patients with T1-2cN0 oral tongue cancer. A radical resection of the primary disease was planned; a modified radical supraomohyoid neck dissection was reserved for patients with larger lesions (T2, n = 8). The treatment plan and execution were not influenced by sentinel node mapping outcome. The Sonovue(™) contrast agent (Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy) was utilized. After detection, the position and radiologic features of the sentinel nodes were recorded. The identification rate of the sentinel nodes was 91.7%; one patient failed to demonstrate any enhanced areas. A total of 15 sentinel nodes were found in the rest of the 11 cases, with a mean of 1.4 nodes for each patient. The sentinel nodes were localized in: Level IA-1 (6.7%) node; Level IB-11 (73.3%) nodes; Level IIA-3 (20.0%) nodes. No contrast-related adverse effects were observed. For oral tongue tumours, CEUS is a feasible and potentially widely available approach of sentinel node mapping. Further clinical research is required to establish the position of CEUS detection of the sentinel nodes in oral cavity cancers.

  19. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2006-10-21

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 microm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 microm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 microm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  20. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-10-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 µm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 µm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 µm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  1. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2010-01-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble’s oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than UCA size. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA’s oscillation and the microvessel’s acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 micron vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1MPa and a center frequency of 1MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with the range of diameters considered in this work, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless the vessel diameter, however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a center frequency of 1MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 μm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease, however the

  2. The angiogenic response is dependent on ultrasound contrast agent concentration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Ultrasound (US) and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) provide a way to noninvasively induce targeted angiogenesis. However, there exists a lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms of this process that has impeded progress. This study sought to characterize the angiogenic response, by both exploring the role of UCA concentration ([UCA]) in bioeffect induction at 0 days post exposure (DPE) and assessing the bioeffect as a possible potentiator of angiogenesis at 5 DPE. Methods A 1-MHz ultrasonic transducer was used to expose the gracilis muscles of Sprague Dawley rats for 5 min with a 10-μs pulse duration, 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, and 0.7-MPa peak rarefactional acoustic pressure (pr). Four [UCA]s were tested: 0x (saline), 1×, 5×, and 10×, where 1× is 5% Definity by volume of solution. Evans blue dye (EBD) was used to quantify changes in acute vascular permeability (0 DPE), and VEGF expression was quantified at 5 DPE to support that angiogenesis had occurred. CD31 staining was used to assess capillary density at both time points. Results [UCA] was a significant parameter for determining EBD leakage (permeability) and VEGF expression (p < 0.001 for both). However, [UCA] was not a significant parameter for capillary density at 0 or 5 DPE. Multiple comparisons between 0 and 5 DPE showed that only 10× [UCA] at 5 DPE was significantly different than 0 DPE, suggesting a [UCA] dependence of the angiogenic response. Conclusions This study suggests that [UCA] was a significant parameter in the induction of an angiogenic response with US and UCAs. It also suggests that rather than damage from US and UCAs, as previously speculated, a nondestructive mechanical interaction between the UCAs and vascular endothelium induces bioeffects to potentiate the angiogenic response. PMID:22587914

  3. Targeted Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Agent for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis and Computed Tomography PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roshan Karunamuni...February 2009 – 14 February 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeted Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis ...agent injected into a living animal. Technical characterization of a contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis system A second generation

  4. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  5. Antibacterial effect of a new haemostatic agent on oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Çinar, Çağdaş; Akca, Gülçin; Işik, Berrin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the antibacterial effect of a newly developed haemostatic agent Ankaferd Blood Stopper® (ABS) and Ferric Sulphate (FS) on various oral microorganisms. Study design: Bacterial strains were freshly incubated in their specific broth media. For each of the strains, 3 wells per each agent, with a 5 mm diameter were made under aseptic conditions in the specific agar media. Then they were filled with a test agents or 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) (control group). After 24h and 48h incubation periods, inhibition zones were measured. Results: ABS showed antibacterial effect on all test microorganisms except Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus salivarius. Ferric sulphate and CHX have antibacterial effect on all microorganisms. When the test agents compared, the inhibition zones of the ABS were found smaller than the ferric sulphate and CHX. Conclusions: Although ferric sulphate and ABS have antibacterial effect, ferric sulphate had better antibacterial activity than ABS on oral microorganisms under in vitro condition. FS and ABS not only exhibit the haemostatic activity but also antimicrobial activity. Key words:Ankaferd blood stopper, ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, haemostasia, bleeding, bactericide. PMID:24558546

  6. Antibacterials as anti-inflammatory agents: dual action agents for oral health.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Prem K; Gaffar, Abdul

    2008-03-01

    Inflammatory processes with a range of specialized cells and biochemical mediators form a complex network of inter-related signal transducing pathways that relay information to preserve normal functions. Advances in molecular analyses of the information relay pathways for their constituents and principal ligands along with mechanisms utilized by the host for microbial recognition have stimulated interest in therapeutic agents with dual functionalities i.e. antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. This review examines clinically tested agents for oral health applications with both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects to include antibiotics, antimicrobials and phenolics. Bis-phenols such as triclosan, representing a unique dual functional therapeutic for routine oral hygiene, with its demonstrated clinical effects on inhibiting the dental plaque biofilm, reducing inflammation (gingivitis) and subsequent periodontitis is described. Cyclines, comprising another class of approved anti-inflammatory agents used at the patient level for oral health is discussed. Dual active agents in current clinical practice for systemic conditions are highlighted to summarize the clinical validity of dual function agents as an emerging therapeutic strategy. Clinical studies demonstrate therapeutic benefits of agents with dual functionality with their effects on microorganisms and the concomitant host inflammatory response. Advances in microbial pathogenesis and resultant inflammation will facilitate progress in this emerging area poised to be a significant milestone for dental therapeutics.

  7. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  8. Effects of oral contrast on dose in abdominopelvic computed tomography with pure iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kevin P; Healy, Liam J; Crush, Lee; Twomey, Maria; Moloney, Fiachra; Sexton, Sylvia; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the effect of neutral (NC) and positive (PC) oral contrast use on patient dose in low-dose abdominal computed tomography (CT). METHODS Low-dose clinically indicated CTs were performed on 79 Crohn’s patients (35 = PC, 1 L 2% gastrografin; 44 = NC, 1.5 L polyethylene glycol). Scanner settings for both acquisitions were identical apart from 25 s difference in intravenous contrast timing. Body mass index (BMI), scan-ranges, dose-length product and size-specific dose estimated were recorded. Data was reconstructed with pure model-based iterative reconstruction. Image quality was objectively and subjectively analysed. Data analysis was performed with Statistical Package for Social Scientists. RESULTS Higher doses were seen in neutral contrast CTs (107.60 ± 78.7 mGy.cm, 2.47 ± 1.21 mGy vs 85.65 ± 58.2 mGy.cm, 2.18 ± 0.96 mGy). The difference was significant in 2 of 4 BMI groups and in those that had both NC and PC investigations. Image-quality assessment yielded 6952 datapoints. NC image quality was significantly superior (P < 0.001) (objective noise, objective signal to noise ratio, subjective spatial resolution, subjective contrast resolution, diagnostic acceptability) at all levels. NC bowel distension was significantly (P < 0.001) superior. CONCLUSION The use of polyethylene glycol as a neutral OC agent leads to higher radiation doses than standard positive contrast studies, in low dose abdominal CT imaging. This is possibly related to the osmotic effect of the agent resulting in larger intraluminal fluid volumes and resultant increased overall beam attenuation. PMID:27721943

  9. Optimization of the protocols for the use of contrast agents in PET/CT studies.

    PubMed

    Pelegrí Martínez, L; Kohan, A A; Vercher Conejero, J L

    The introduction of PET/CT scanners in clinical practice in 1998 has improved care for oncologic patients throughout the clinical pathway, from the initial diagnosis of disease through the evaluation of the response to treatment to screening for possible recurrence. The CT component of a PET/CT study is used to correct the attenuation of PET studies; CT also provides anatomic information about the distribution of the radiotracer. CT is especially useful in situations where PET alone can lead to false positives and false negatives, and CT thereby improves the diagnostic performance of PET. The use of intravenous or oral contrast agents and optimal CT protocols have improved the detection and characterization of lesions. However, there are circumstances in which the systematic use of contrast agents is not justified. The standard acquisition in PET/CT scanners is the whole body protocol, but this can lead to artifacts due to the position of patients and respiratory movements between the CT and PET acquisitions. This article discusses these aspects from a constructive perspective with the aim of maximizing the diagnostic potential of PET/CT and providing better care for patients.

  10. Adherence enhancing interventions for oral anticancer agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tim; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-02-01

    The use of oral anticancer agents has increased in the last decades. Adherence is a crucial factor for the success of oral anticancer agent therapy. However, many patients are non-adherent. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of adherence interventions in patients taking oral anticancer agents. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline and Embase. Titles and abstracts and in case of potential relevance, full-texts were assessed for eligibility according to the predefined inclusion criteria. The study quality was evaluated. Both process steps were carried out independently by two reviewers. Relevant data on study design, patients, interventions and results were extracted in standardized tables by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Six controlled studies were included. Only one study was randomized. The study quality was moderate to low. One study showed statistically significant results in favor of the adherence intervention, two studies showed a tendency in favor of the intervention, one study showed an inconsistent result depending on the adherence definition and one study showed almost identical adherence rates in both groups. One study showed a tendency in favor of the control group. Although most of the interventions are not very effective, it appears that certain adherence enhancing interventions could have a promising effect. One crucial point is the consideration of the baseline adherence when choosing patients to avoid ceiling effects. The evidence is limited due to lack of sufficient studies and partly inconsistent results. Further high quality studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  12. Photon-counting CT for simultaneous imaging of multiple contrast agents in the abdomen: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Symons, Rolf; Krauss, Bernhard; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Cork, Tyler E; Lakshmanan, Manu N; Bluemke, David A; Pourmorteza, Amir

    2017-04-26

    To demonstrate the feasibility of spectral imaging using photon-counting detector (PCD) x-ray computed tomography (CT) for simultaneous material decomposition of three contrast agents in vivo in a large animal model. This Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved study used a canine model. Bismuth subsalicylate was administered orally 24-72 h before imaging. PCD CT was performed during intravenous administration of 40-60 ml gadoterate meglumine; 3.5 min later, iopamidol 370 was injected intravenously. Renal PCD CT images were acquired every 2 s for 5-6 min to capture the wash-in and wash-out kinetics of the contrast agents. Least mean squares linear material decomposition was used to calculate the concentrations of contrast agents in the aorta, renal cortex, renal medulla and renal pelvis. Using reference vials with known concentrations of materials, we computed molar concentrations of the various contrast agents during each phase of CT scanning. Material concentration maps allowed simultaneous quantification of both arterial and delayed renal enhancement in a single CT acquisition. The accuracy of the material decomposition algorithm in a test phantom was -0.4 ± 2.2 mM, 0.3 ± 2.2 mM for iodine and gadolinium solutions, respectively. Peak contrast concentration of gadolinium and iodine in the aorta, renal cortex, and renal medulla were observed 16, 24, and 60 s after the start each injection, respectively. Photon-counting spectral CT allowed simultaneous material decomposition of multiple contrast agents in vivo. Besides defining contrast agent concentrations, tissue enhancement at multiple phases was observed in a single CT acquisition, potentially obviating the need for multiphase CT scans and thus reducing radiation dose. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  14. Expanding the potential of MRI contrast agents through multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Ioana; Gunkel-Grabole, Gesine; Belluati, Andrea; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    MRI is a sought-after, noninvasive tool in medical diagnostics, yet the direct application of contrast agents to tissue suffers from several drawbacks. Hosting the contrast agents in polymeric nanocarriers can solve many of these issues while creating additional benefit through exploitation of the intrinsic characteristics of the polymeric carriers. In this report, the versatility is highlighted with recent examples of dendritic and hyperbranched polymers, polymer nanoparticles and micelles, and polymersomes as multifunctional bioresponsive nanocarriers for MRI contrast agents.

  15. Clofibrate and diabetes control in patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Daubresse, J C; Daigneux, D; Bruwier, M; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P J

    1979-01-01

    1. Twenty-two maturity-onset type diabetics treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents entered a single-blind crossover study using placebo (periods A and C, 2 months each) and clofibrate (2 g/day; period B; 2 months). 2. In thirteen patients, under reasonably good control, clofibrate did not reduce fasting or post-prandial blood glucose, nor 24 h glycosuria; no improvement was noted in the M-value, an index of diabetes control. 3. In contrast, in nine patients, with poor diabetes control, clofibrate reduced 24 h glycosuria and significantly improved the M-value. 4. In all patients, clofibrate therapy was associated with a significant 19-23% reduction in plasma fibrinogen. 5. It is suggested that addition of clofibrate may be useful in maturity-onset diabetics not adequately controlled by diet combined with oral hypoglycaemic agents. PMID:380614

  16. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a “double-agent” approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as “secret agents” in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging. PMID:27747191

  17. Water-Soluble Lipophilic MR Contrast Agents for Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Christiane E.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cell tracking with MR imaging necessitates the development of contrast agents that both label and are retained by cells. One promising strategy for long-term cell labeling is the development of lipophilic Gd(III)-based contrast agents that anchor into the cell membrane. We have previously reported the efficacy of monomeric and multimeric lipophilic agents and showed that the monomeric agents have improved labeling and contrast enhancement of cell populations. Here, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro testing of a series of monomeric lipophilic contrast agents with varied alkyl chain compositions. We show that these agents disperse in water, localize to the cell membrane, and label HeLa and MCF7 cells effectively. Additionally, these agents have up to 10-fold improved retention in cells compared to clinically available ProHance®. PMID:26215869

  18. Cyanine dyes as optical contrast agents for ophthalmological surgery.

    PubMed

    Langhals, Heinz; Varja, Ana; Laubichler, Peter; Kernt, Marcus; Eibl, Kirsten; Haritoglou, Christos

    2011-06-09

    Cyanine dyes were prepared as optical contrast media for supporting the surgery of the lamina limitans interna (LLI) of the retina and other structures of the human eye. Their absorption spectra were adapted both to the spectral sensitivity of the human eye and to standard illumination. The contrast could be further amplified by the application of the strong fluorescence of the dyes used. The binding of the dyes to various surfaces was studied. No toxic effects could be detected for the applied dyes.

  19. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine.

  20. Blood-pool contrast agent for pre-clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruje, Charmainne; Tse, Justin J.; Holdsworth, David W.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.; Drangova, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of blood-pool contrast agents for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Although long-circulating nanoparticle-based agents exist for micro-CT, they are predominantly based on iodine, which has a low atomic number. Micro-CT contrast increases when using elements with higher atomic numbers (i.e. lanthanides), particularly at higher energies. The purpose of our work was to develop and evaluate a lanthanide-based blood-pool contrast agent that is suitable for in vivo micro-CT. We synthesized a contrast agent in the form of polymer-encapsulated Gd nanoparticles and evaluated its stability in vitro. The synthesized nanoparticles were shown to have an average diameter of 127 +/- 6 nm, with good size dispersity. Particle size distribution - evaluated by dynamic light scattering over the period of two days - demonstrated no change in size of the contrast agent in water and saline. Additionally, our contrast agent was stable in a mouse serum mimic for up to 30 minutes. CT images of the synthesized contrast agent (containing 27 mg/mL of Gd) demonstrated an attenuation of over 1000 Hounsfield Units. This approach to synthesizing a Gd-based blood-pool contrast agent promises to enhance the capabilities of micro-CT imaging.

  1. Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agents in Mammography: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    The successful translation of molecular imaging to mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis would allow clinical molecular imaging of the breast...nanoparticle (NP) imaging agents, used in conjunction with digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis , should provide improved lesion conspicuity. Au-NP...used in conjunction with digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis , should result in significantly improved lesion conspicuity. Molecular

  2. Synthetic Ni3S2/Ni hybrid architectures as potential contrast agents in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Chen, K.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents mainly include superparamagnetic (SPM) iron oxide nanoparticle as T 2 contrast agent for liver and paramagnetic Gd (III)-chelate as T 1 contrast agent for all organs. In this work, weak ferromagnetic kale-like and SPM cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni hybrid architectures were synthesized and evaluated as potential T 1 MRI contrast agents. Their relatively small r 2/r 1 ratios of 2.59 and 2.38, and high r 1 values of 11.27 and 4.89 mmol-1 L s-1 (for the kale-like and cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni, respectively) will shed some light on the development of new-type MRI contrast agents.

  3. Application of nonlinear sliding mode control to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Lauderbaugh, Leal K; Calvisi, Michael L

    2013-07-01

    A sliding mode control system is developed and applied to a spherical model of a contrast agent microbubble that simulates its radial response to ultrasound. The model uses a compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation combined with a thin-shell model. A nonlinear control law for the second-order model is derived and used to design and simulate the controller. The effect of the controller on the contrast agent response is investigated for various control scenarios. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a nonlinear control system to modulate the dynamic response of ultrasound contrast agents, but highlights the need for improved feedback mechanisms and control input methods. Possible applications of the nonlinear control system to contrast agents illustrated in this work include radius stabilization in the presence of an acoustic wave, radial growth and subsequent collapse, and generation of periodic radial oscillations while a contrast agent is within an acoustic forcing regime known to cause a chaotic response.

  4. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based “nanobubble” contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:25321797

  5. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size.

  6. Novel oral anticoagulants and reversal agents: Considerations for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Sarich, Troy C; Seltzer, Jonathan H; Berkowitz, Scott D; Costin', James; Curnutte, John T; Gibson, C Michael; Hoffman, Maureane; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Levy, Jerrold H; Mintz, Paul D; Reilly, Paul A; Sager, Philip T; Singer, Daniel E; Stockbridge, Norman; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Kowey, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    This white paper provides a summary of presentations and discussions that were held at an Anticoagulant-Induced Bleeding and Reversal Agents Think Tank co-sponsored by the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at the FDA's White Oak Headquarters on April 22, 2014. Attention focused on a development pathway for reversal agents for the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This is important because anticoagulation is still widely underused for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Undertreatment persists, although NOACs, in general, overcome some of the difficulties associated with anticoagulation provided by vitamin K antagonists. One reason for the lack of a wider uptake is the absence of NOAC reversal agents. As there are neither widely accepted academic and industry standards nor a definitive regulatory policy on the development of such reversal agents, this meeting provided a forum for leaders in the fields of cardiovascular clinical trials and cardiovascular safety to discuss the issues and develop recommendations. Attendees included representatives from pharmaceutical companies; regulatory agencies; end point adjudication specialist groups; contract research organizations; and active, academically based physicians. There was wide and solid consensus that NOACs overall offer improvements in convenience, efficacy, and safety compared with warfarin, even without reversal agents. Still, it was broadly accepted that it would be helpful to have reversal agents available for clinicians to use. Because it is not feasible to do definitive outcomes studies demonstrating a reversal agent's clinical benefits, it was felt that these agents could be approved for use in life-threatening bleeding situations if the molecules were well characterized preclinically, their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles were well understood, and showed no harmful adverse events in early human testing. There was also consensus

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Contrast Agents in Mammography: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    breast tomosynthesis would allow clinical molecular imaging of the breast. This is a potentially more sensitive approach to early breast cancer...breast tomosynthesis , should provide improved lesion conspicuity. We are studying the feasibility of mammographic molecular imaging through in vitro...mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis to test for adequate contrast enhancement, both conventionally and using dual-energy subtraction methods

  8. Development of contrast enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lex, L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful new diagnostic tool in medicine. In MRI there is a great need to improve the specific identification of different tissues i.e. to enhance the contrast between them. This review tries to cover most of the approaches known for solving this problem.

  9. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  10. Development and characterization of a nano-scale contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Brian E; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2004-04-01

    Agents injected parenterally must be less than approximately 8 microm diameter in order to traverse the capillaries in the pulmonary bed, but these agents remain in the vasculature until they are eliminated from the body by a variety of mechanisms. Targeting of cells outside the capillaries requires agent diameters of less than approximately 700 nm to enable escape through the larger-than-usual pores that have been noted in the leaky vasculature of a tumor. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of creating a surfactant-stabilized nano-bubble with favorable acoustic properties, and identify the key parameters that influence size, yield and stability. Size distribution was characterized using laser light scattering. In vitro acoustic enhancement was assessed by generation of dose and time response curves. We previously developed a successful protocol to generate gas-filled microbubbles (containing perfluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride or air) with mean diameter of 1.5 microm, using sonication of carefully selected surfactant mixtures. This presentation describes generation of nano-bubbles with mean diameters ranging from 700 to 450 nm, depending on process variables. In all cases a centrifugation step was employed to separate the nano-sized particles. The in vitro dose response curves gave a maximum of 23-27 dB enhancement compared to buffer in the absence of agent, with the maximum enhancement and presence of shadowing at higher doses being dependent on the fabrication protocol. The effect of sonication time for solutions containing a mixture of the surfactants (Span 60 and Tween 80) was also tested, but was determined not to be an influencing factor. Future studies will involve development of a mathematical model characterizing the mean size as a function of centrifugal force, spin time and initial size distribution. Future work will also include imaging of tumor-bearing mice and measuring imaging potential in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits

  11. Quantification of microbubble destruction of three fluorocarbon-filled ultrasonic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Moran, C M; Anderson, T; Pye, S D; Sboros, V; McDicken, W N

    2000-05-01

    The assessment of myocardial blood velocity using ultrasonic contrast agents is based on the premise that the vast majority of contrast microbubbles within a myocardial region can be destroyed by an acoustic pulse of sufficient magnitude. Determination of the period of time after destruction that a region of myocardium needs to reperfuse may be used to assess myocardial blood velocity. In this study, we investigated the acoustic pressure sensitivity of three solutions of intravenous fluorocarbon-filled contrast agents and the magnitude of acoustic pulse required to destroy the contrast agent microbubbles. A novel tissue-mimicking phantom was designed and manufactured to investigate the relationships between mean integrated backscatter, incident acoustic pressure and number of frames of insonation for three fluorocarbon-filled contrast agents (Definity(R), Optison(R), and Sonazoid(R), formerly NC100100). Using a routine clinical ultrasound (US) scanner (Acuson XP-10), modified to allow access to the unprocessed US data, the contrast agents were scanned at the four acoustic output powers. All three agents initially demonstrated a linear relationship between mean integrated backscatter and number of frames of insonation. For all three agents, mean integrated backscatter decreased more rapidly at higher acoustic pressures, suggesting a more rapid destruction of the microbubbles. In spite of the fact that there was no movement of microbubbles into or out of the beam, only the results from Definity(R) suggested that a complete destruction of the contrast agent microbubbles had occurred within the total duration of insonation in this study.

  12. Design and characterization of a new irreversible responsive PARACEST MRI contrast agent that detects nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanshu; Li, Yuguo; Pagel, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Irreversible responsive PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents constitute a new type of agent for molecular imaging. To investigate the utility of this approach, a novel PARACEST MRI contrast agent, Yb(III)-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)-orthoaminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA), was developed that detects nitric oxide (NO). The agent exhibited two CEST effects at -11 ppm and +8 ppm, which were assigned to chemical exchange from amide and amine functional groups, respectively. The effects of pH, temperature, and concentration were investigated to characterize the complex and to optimize PARACEST detection. This responsive PARACEST MRI contrast agent incurred an irreversible covalent change in the presence of NO and O(2), which caused an irreversible disappearance of both PARACEST effects from MR images. The NO-dependent response of a relaxivity-based MRI contrast agent, Gd-DO3A-oAA, was investigated for comparison. This report highlights the advantages of irreversible MRI contrast agents, demonstrates that large changes in PARACEST can be used to create a highly responsive agent, and indicates challenges that must be overcome to apply this type of contrast agent to in vivo biomedical applications in molecular imaging. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Oral Transmission of L-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent among Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    To determine oral transmissibility of the L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion, we orally inoculated 16 calves with brain homogenates of the agent. Only 1 animal, given a high dose, showed signs and died at 88 months. These results suggest low risk for oral transmission of the L-BSE agent among cattle. PMID:28098532

  14. Oral Transmission of L-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent among Cattle.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    To determine oral transmissibility of the L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion, we orally inoculated 16 calves with brain homogenates of the agent. Only 1 animal, given a high dose, showed signs and died at 88 months. These results suggest low risk for oral transmission of the L-BSE agent among cattle.

  15. Safe ex vivo coronary angiography with isosmotic contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Schmit, D B; Kern, J A; Mauney, M C; Kron, I L; Tribble, C G

    1996-08-01

    Plain-film coronary angiography of the cardiac explant on the operating table should be considered when conventional cardiac catheterization is desired but unavailable. We compared the effects of three contrast solutions on cold-preserved, isolated guinea pig hearts. Hearts were excised, perfused for 30 minutes, and arrested with Plegisol solution at 7 degree C. Twenty minutes after arrest, experimental hearts were perfused with one of three solutions: hyperosmolar Hexabrix solution (n = 6), hyperosmolar Renografin-76 solution (n = 6), or diluted, isosmotic Omnipaque solution (n = 8). The hearts were flushed with cold Plegisol solution 5 minutes later. Control hearts received no contrast during arrest (n = 9). The hearts were reperfused after 1 hour of arrest, and coronary blood flow (in millimeters per minute), left ventricular developed pressure (in millimeters of mercury), and rate of developed pressure (in millimeters of mercury per second) were measured. Endothelium-dependent smooth muscle relaxation to bradykinin administration and endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside administration were also assessed. No significant difference in myocardial or endothelial function was noted between control hearts and hearts perfused with Omnipaque solution. Hearts perfused with Renografin solution or Hexabrix solution, however, were found to have significantly impaired endothelial and myocardial function. We conclude that an isosmotic contrast solution should be used for ex vivo coronary angiography in cold-preserved hearts to avoid impairment of endothelial and myocardial function.

  16. Opportunities for new CT contrast agents to maximize the diagnostic potential of emerging spectral CT technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Benjamin M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Edic, Peter M; Lambert, Jack W; Colborn, Robert E; Marino, Michael E; Evans, Paul M; Roberts, Jeannette C; Wang, Zhen J; Wong, Margaret J; Bonitatibus, Peter J

    2016-09-09

    The introduction of spectral CT imaging in the form of fast clinical dual-energy CT enabled contrast material to be differentiated from other radiodense materials, improved lesion detection in contrast-enhanced scans, and changed the way that existing iodine and barium contrast materials are used in clinical practice. More profoundly, spectral CT can differentiate between individual contrast materials that have different reporter elements such that high-resolution CT imaging of multiple contrast agents can be obtained in a single pass of the CT scanner. These spectral CT capabilities would be even more impactful with the development of contrast materials designed to complement the existing clinical iodine- and barium-based agents. New biocompatible high-atomic number contrast materials with different biodistribution and X-ray attenuation properties than existing agents will expand the diagnostic power of spectral CT imaging without penalties in radiation dose or scan time.

  17. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  18. Dual-energy CT angiography of abdomen with routine concentration contrast agent in comparison with conventional single-energy CT with high concentration contrast agent.

    PubMed

    He, Jingzhen; Wang, Qing; Ma, Xiangxing; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2015-02-01

    To compare the quantitative and subjective image quality in abdominal angiography between dual-energy CT (DECT) at the routine concentration of iodinated contrast agent (300mg/mL) and conventional 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT) at the high concentration of contrast agent (370mg/mL). Abdominal computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed in 104 patients, including 56 with conventional 120-kVp SECT at the high concentration of contrast agent and 48 with DECT at the routine concentration of contrast agent. The monochromatic images at the optimal kiloelectron-voltage (keV) of DECT that demonstrated the best contrast-to-noise ratio were reconstructed. The signal intensity and noise in abdominal arteries were comparatively analyzed between DECT and SECT. The image quality and visibility of the branch orders of superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries were further assessed. The radiation doses were recorded. Compared with SECT, DECT demonstrated higher signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio (all P<0.01) with moderately increased noise (40%, P<0.01) in all abdominal arteries. The image quality of DECT was superior to that of SECT (P<0.01) as evaluated with a subjective five-point scale system. Visualization of the branches of superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries was also better by DECT (P<0.01) than SECT. The radiation dose of DECT was slight higher than that of SECT (P<0.0001). DECT with image reconstruction at the optimal keV provides a high-quality angiographic technique, which allows use of a lower concentration of contrast agent compared with conventional 120-kVp SECT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [A review of the effect of tooth bleaching agents on oral microbes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Huo, Sibei; Liu, Shiyu; Li, Mingyun

    2016-02-01

    Tooth bleaching agents contain powerful oxidizing agents, which serve as the main part of bleaching agents because of its release of effective bleaching component. It has been a hot topic whether tooth bleaching agents exert negative influence on oral health. In order to provide train of thoughts and reference for further clinical researches and treatments, this review paper focuses on bleaching agents' effects on the growth of oral microbes and the formation of biofilms.

  20. Intravenous ultrasound contrast agents versus other imaging methods in pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases - a comparison.

    PubMed

    Piskunowicz, Maciej; Kosiak, Wojciech; Batko, Tomasz; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Szarmach, Arkadiusz

    2013-12-01

    The lack of registration of ultrasound contrast agents for use in patients below the age of 18 is a significant limitation of their usage. Despite this, examinations with the use of contrast agents are conducted in numerous centers, mainly as part of the diagnostic process of vesicoureteral reflux. Examinations after an intravenous administration of contrast agents are conducted rarely. The reason for this is not only the lack of registration, but also the lack of studies on their safety profile in paediatric patients or no guidelines concerning the dosage. It seems that imaging with the use of such agents could help solve certain clinical problems when other diagnostic methods fail. The paper presents selected cases of pediatric patients treated in oncological departments, in whom the examination with the use of ultrasound contrast agents had a considerable influence on the diagnostic and therapeutic process.

  1. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Silvast, Tuomo S; Kokkonen, Harri T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Quinn, Thomas M; Nieminen, Miika T; Töyräs, Juha

    2009-11-21

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Ø = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist((R)), gadodiamide: Omniscan, ioxaglate: Hexabrix or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  2. Nanodiamond-Manganese dual mode MRI contrast agents for enhanced liver tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weixin; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Yvonne, Tay Wei Zheng; Lee, Kuan J; Guenther, Ilonka; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is critical for the diagnosis and monitoring of a number of diseases, including cancer. Certain clinical applications, including the detection of liver tumors, rely on both T1 and T2-weighted images even though contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging is not always reliable. Thus, there is a need for improved dual mode contrast agents with enhanced sensitivity. We report the development of a nanodiamond-manganese dual mode contrast agent that enhanced both T1 and T2-weighted MR imaging. Conjugation of manganese to nanodiamonds resulted in improved longitudinal and transverse relaxivity efficacy over unmodified MnCl2 as well as clinical contrast agents. Following intravenous administration, nanodiamond-manganese complexes outperformed current clinical contrast agents in an orthotopic liver cancer mouse model while also reducing blood serum concentration of toxic free Mn(2+) ions. Thus, nanodiamond-manganese complexes may serve as more effective dual mode MRI contrast agent, particularly in cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvast, Tuomo S.; Kokkonen, Harri T.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Quinn, Thomas M.; Nieminen, Miika T.; Töyräs, Juha

    2009-11-01

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Ø = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist®, gadodiamide: Omniscan™, ioxaglate: Hexabrix™ or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  4. Phthalocyanine photosensitizers as contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Bte Ebrahim; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for contrast agents for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of tumors. Herein, Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) was employed to evaluate phthalocyanines commonly used in photodynamic therapy as photoacoustic contrast agents. We studied the photoacoustic activity of three water-soluble phthalocyanine photosensitizers: phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (PcS4), Zn(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (ZnPcS4) and Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid (AlPcS4) in phantom and in tumor-bearing mice to investigate the biodistribution and fate of the phthalocyanines in the biological tissues. PcS4 was observed to grant good contrast between the different reticuloendothelial organs and accumulate in the tumor within an hour of post-administration. ZnPcS4 and AlPcS4 offered little contrast in photoacoustic signals between the organs. PcS4 is a promising photoacoustic contrast agent and can be exploited as a photodiagnostic agent.

  5. A functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid as a receptor directed MR contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, L.; Groman, E.V.; Menz, E.; Lewis, J.M.; Bengele, H. )

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized a surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid whose clearance from the vascular compartment was inhibited by asialofetuin but not fetuin. Unlike other particulate or colloidal magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents, the agent of the current communication is not withdrawn from the vascular compartment by cells of the macrophage-monocyte phagocytic system, as indicated by its selective increase in hepatic relaxation rates. Because of this we refer to this colloid as a hepatic selective (HS) MR contrast agent. At 20 mumol Fe/kg the HS MR agent darkened MR images of liver. The HS MR agent exhibited no acute toxicity when injected into rats at 1800 mumol Fe/kg. Based on these observations, surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloids may be the basis of MR contrast agents internalized by receptor mediated endocytosis generally, and by the asialoglycoprotein receptor in particular.

  6. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  7. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  8. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  9. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  10. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  11. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce T; Robinson, Joshua D; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam.

  12. Contrasting actions of pressor agents in severe autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Norman, R.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic hypotension is the most disabling symptom of autonomic failure. The choice of a pressor agent is largely empiric, and it would be of great value to define predictors of a response. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 35 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure, we determined the effect on seated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of placebo, phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg and 25 mg), yohimbine (5.4 mg), indomethacin (50 mg), ibuprofen (600 mg), caffeine (250 mg), and methylphenidate (5 mg). In a subgroup of patients, we compared the pressor effect of midodrine (5 mg) with the effect of phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg). RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the pressor responses between patients with multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure. When compared with placebo, the pressor response was significant for phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin. In a subgroup of patients, we confirmed that this pressor effect of phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin corresponded to a significant increase in standing SBP. The pressor responses to ibuprofen, caffeine, and methylphenidate were not significantly different from placebo. Phenylpropanolamine and midodrine elicited similar pressor responses. There were no significant associations between drug response and autonomic function testing, postprandial hypotension, or plasma catecholamine levels. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that significant increases in systolic blood pressure can be obtained in patients with orthostatic hypotension due to primary autonomic failure with phenylpropanolamine in low doses or yohimbine or indomethacin in moderate doses. The response to a pressor agent cannot be predicted by autonomic function testing or plasma catecholamines. Therefore, empiric testing with a sequence of medications, based on the risk of side effects in the individual patient and the probability of a response, is a useful approach.

  13. Contrasting actions of pressor agents in severe autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Norman, R.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic hypotension is the most disabling symptom of autonomic failure. The choice of a pressor agent is largely empiric, and it would be of great value to define predictors of a response. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 35 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure, we determined the effect on seated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of placebo, phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg and 25 mg), yohimbine (5.4 mg), indomethacin (50 mg), ibuprofen (600 mg), caffeine (250 mg), and methylphenidate (5 mg). In a subgroup of patients, we compared the pressor effect of midodrine (5 mg) with the effect of phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg). RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the pressor responses between patients with multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure. When compared with placebo, the pressor response was significant for phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin. In a subgroup of patients, we confirmed that this pressor effect of phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin corresponded to a significant increase in standing SBP. The pressor responses to ibuprofen, caffeine, and methylphenidate were not significantly different from placebo. Phenylpropanolamine and midodrine elicited similar pressor responses. There were no significant associations between drug response and autonomic function testing, postprandial hypotension, or plasma catecholamine levels. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that significant increases in systolic blood pressure can be obtained in patients with orthostatic hypotension due to primary autonomic failure with phenylpropanolamine in low doses or yohimbine or indomethacin in moderate doses. The response to a pressor agent cannot be predicted by autonomic function testing or plasma catecholamines. Therefore, empiric testing with a sequence of medications, based on the risk of side effects in the individual patient and the probability of a response, is a useful approach.

  14. Nanoparticulate X-ray computed tomography contrast agents: from design validation to in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Ai, Kelong; Lu, Lehui

    2012-10-16

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is one of the most powerful noninvasive diagnostic imaging techniques in modern medicine. Nevertheless, the iodinated molecules used as CT contrast agents in the clinic have relatively short circulation times in vivo, which significantly restrict the applications of this technique in target-specific imaging and angiography. In addition, the use of these agents can present adverse. For example, an adult patient typically receives approximately 70 mL of iodinated agent (350 mg I/mL) because of iodine's low contrast efficacy. Rapid renal clearance of such a large dose of these agents may lead to serious adverse effects. Furthermore, some patients are hypersensitive to iodine. Therefore, biomedical researchers have invested tremendous efforts to address these issues. Over the past decade, advances in nanoscience have created new paradigms for imaging. The unique properties of nanomaterials, such as their prolonged circulating half-life, passive accumulation at the tumor sites, facile surface modification, and integration of multiple diverse functions into a single particle, make them advantageous for in vivo applications. However, research on the utilization of nanomaterials for CT imaging has lagged far behind their applications for other imaging techniques such as MRI and fluorescence imaging because of the challenges in the preparation of cost-effective nanoparticulate CT contrast agents with excellent biocompatibility, high contrast efficacy, long in vivo circulation time, and long-term colloidal stability in physiological environments. This Account reviews our recent work on the design and in vivo applications of nanoparticulate CT contrast agents. By optimizing the contrast elements in the nanoparticles according to the fundamental principles of X-ray imaging and by employing the surface engineering approaches that we and others have developed, we have synthesized several nanoparticulate CT contrast agents with excellent imaging

  15. Liver-specific agents for contrast-enhanced MRI: role in oncological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thian, Yee Liang; Riddell, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver-specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents are increasingly used in evaluation of the liver. They are effective in detection and morphological characterization of lesions, and can be useful for evaluation of biliary tree anatomy and liver function. The typical appearances and imaging pitfalls of various tumours at MR imaging performed with these agents can be understood by the interplay of pharmacokinetics of these contrast agents and transporter expression of the tumour. This review focuses on the applications of these agents in oncological imaging. PMID:24434892

  16. [Preparation and in vitro study of a high molecular weight contrast agent targeting hepatoma cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zeng, Yan; Guo, Da-Jing; Fang, Zheng; Zhao, Jian-Nong; Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2013-01-01

    To prepare a specific high molecular weight polymer contrast agent capable of specifically targeting hepatocarcinoma cells (HCC) and to investigate its affinity in vitro using HepG2 cells. The high molecular weight polymer polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAG)-COOH was prepared by the double emulsion technique. PLAG-COOH microbubbles were combined with glypican-3 (GPC3) antibody to generate HCC targeting high molecular polymer ultrasound contrast agents by the carbodiimide method. The affinity for HCC cells was confirmed by measuring attachment to cultured HepG2 cells by flow cytometry and comparing the results with the properties observed for non-targeted high molecular weight polymer ultrasound contrast agents. The average diameter of the targeted high molecular weight polymer ultrasound contrast agents was (800+/-10) nm. In vitro targeting of HepG2 cells showed that many of the targeted high molecular weight polymer ultrasound contrast agents attached tightly to the cell surface and that the GPC3-PLGA has a particularly strong targeting ability. A HCC-specific high molecular contrast agent, GPC3-PLGA, was synthesized and evidenced a strong targeting ability towards HepG2 cells in vitro. This new agent may be exploited to improve diagnosis of liver cancer at the molecular level.

  17. Characteristics of a new MRI contrast agent prepared from polypropyleneimine dendrimers, generation 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Steven J; Brechbiel, Martin; Wiener, Erik C

    2003-10-01

    Dendrimer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents offer many advantages including high levels of amplification. The objective of this research was to test the adequacy and viability of a new family of dendrimers for use as MRI contrast agents in vitro and in vivo. Dendrimers based on 1,4-diaminobutane core polypropyleneimine (PPI) generation 2 and ammonia core polyamidoamine dendrimers had the free surface amines conjugated to a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid derivative followed by complex formation with gadolinium. Relaxivity measurements were made on an IBM Field Cycling Relaxometer. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies were examined with the radiotracer 153Gd in rats and a counting window of 95 to 105 keV. MRI images were conducted at 4.7 T. The relaxivity of the PPI agent exceeded that of the corresponding generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) agent. Uptake occurred in the liver, spleen, and kidney. Pharmacokinetic studies showed a biexponential decay with excretion half-lives of 3 hours and 33.6 days respectively. The agent increased the contrast enhancement, 1 hour after injection, of T1-weighted images by 52%. This PPI agent resulted in significant contrast signal enhancement. This family of agent may also provide a valuable contrast agent backbone.

  18. Utilization of nanoparticles as X-ray contrast agents for diagnostic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    De La Vega, José Carlos; Häfeli, Urs O

    2015-01-01

    Among all the diagnostic imaging modalities, X-ray imaging techniques are the most commonly used owing to their high resolution and low cost. The improvement of these techniques relies heavily on the development of novel X-ray contrast agents, which are molecules that enhance the visibility of internal structures within the body in X-ray imaging. To date, clinically used X-ray contrast agents consist mainly of small iodinated molecules that might cause severe adverse effects (e.g. allergies, cardiovascular diseases and nephrotoxicity) in some patients owing to the large and repeated doses that are required to achieve good contrast. For this reason, there is an increasing interest in the development of alternative X-ray contrast agents utilizing elements with high atomic numbers (e.g. gold, bismuth, ytterbium and tantalum), which are well known for exhibiting high absorption of X-rays. Nanoparticles (NPs) made from these elements have been reported to have better imaging properties, longer blood circulation times and lower toxicity than conventional iodinated X-ray contrast agents. Additionally, the combination of two or more of these elements into a single carrier allows for the development of multimodal and hybrid contrast agents. Herein, the limitations of iodinated X-ray contrast agents are discussed and the parameters that influence the efficacy of X-ray contrast agents are summarized. Several examples of the design and production of both iodinated and iodine-free NP-based X-ray contrast agents are then provided, emphasizing the studies performed to evaluate their X-ray attenuation capabilities and their toxicity in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Development of contrast agents targeted to macrophage scavenger receptors for MRI of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Björn; Youens, Susan; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death in the U.S. Because there is a potential to prevent coronary and arterial diseases through early diagnosis, there is a need for methods to image arteries in the sub-clinical stage as well as clinical stage using various non-invasive techniques, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). We describe a development of a novel MRI contrast agent targeted to plaques that will allow imaging of lesion formation. The contrast agent is directed to macrophages, one of the earliest components of developing plaques. Macrophages are labeled through the macrophage scavenger receptor A, a macrophage specific cell surface protein, using an MRI contrast agent derived from scavenger receptor ligands. We have synthesized and characterized these contrast agents with a range of relaxivities. In vitro studies show that the targeted contrast agent accumulates in macrophages and solution studies indicate that micromolar concentrations are sufficient to produce contrast in an MR image. Cell toxicity and initial biodistribution studies indicate low toxicity, no detectable retention in normal blood vessels, and rapid clearance from blood. The promising performance of this contrast agent targeted towards vascular inflammation opens doors to tracking of other inflammatory diseases such as tumor immunotherapy and transplant acceptance using MRI. PMID:16536488

  20. In vivo ultrasound visualization of non-occlusive blood clots with thrombin-sensitive contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Matthew A; Barback, Christopher V; Fitch, Kirsten R; Farwell, Alexander R; Esener, Sadik C; Mattrey, Robert F; Cha, Jennifer N; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    The use of microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agents is one of the primary methods to diagnose deep venous thrombosis. However, current microbubble imaging strategies require either a clot sufficiently large to produce a circulation filling defect or a clot with sufficient vascularization to allow for targeted accumulation of contrast agents. Previously, we reported the design of a microbubble formulation that modulated its ability to generate ultrasound contrast from interaction with thrombin through incorporation of aptamer-containing DNA crosslinks in the encapsulating shell, enabling the measurement of a local chemical environment by changes in acoustic activity. However, this contrast agent lacked sufficient stability and lifetime in blood to be used as a diagnostic tool. Here we describe a PEG-stabilized, thrombin-activated microbubble (PSTA-MB) with sufficient stability to be used in vivo in circulation with no change in biomarker sensitivity. In the presence of actively clotting blood, PSTA-MBs showed a 5-fold increase in acoustic activity. Specificity for the presence of thrombin and stability under constant shear flow were demonstrated in a home-built in vitro model. Finally, PSTA-MBs were able to detect the presence of an active clot within the vena cava of a rabbit sufficiently small as to not be visible by current non-specific contrast agents. By activating in non-occlusive environments, these contrast agents will be able to detect clots not diagnosable by current contrast agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, ), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  2. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  3. [Experimental studies of ferrite as a MRI contrast agent].

    PubMed

    Aoki, F

    1992-02-01

    Using a 0.2 T permanent MR imaging system, the gradual changes of signal intensity after intravenous injection of Ferrite suspension were studied in liver of normal rabbits and those with intrahepatic VX2 tumor. After injection of Ferrite suspension, decreased signal intensities of liver were observed on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The decrease on T2 weighted images was more remarkable than that on the T1 weighted image. The image with 8 mg/kg (50 mumol/kg) dose of Ferrite suspension showed significant changes of signal intensity, while, the image with 24 mg/kg (150 mumol/kg) dose was hardly evaluated because of inducing intense artifacts. The decrease of signal intensity in liver was observed immediately after the injection and was lowest after 1 hour. After 48 hours, the signal intensity began to increase. However, a slight loss of signal intensity was visualized even after 4 weeks. A clear MRI of the intrahepatic tumor following injection of Ferrite suspension was acquired especially on T2 weighted image in comparison with MRI after Gd-DTPA administration. In addition, MRI using Ferrite suspension could detect the small intrahepatic tumors which had been unable to be visualized by plain CT or enhanced CT. It is of benefit, furthermore, that Ferrite suspension could be an useful tracer for observing the intrahepatic tumor growth by a first single injection. Histologically, Ferrite particles were accumulated in reticuloendothelial system of liver whereas no accumulated in intrahepatic tumor was verified. The particles produced changes in local magnetic field resulting that signal intensity of liver showed decrease on the image. Subsequently, relatively negative contrast enhancement of liver was displayed. As a result of the present investigation, the MR imaging following injection of Ferrite suspension was found to be useful for detection of intrahepatic tumors, particularly of metastatic tumors which were isointense or hypovascular to the surrounding tissue

  4. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T 1, spin-lattice relaxation and T 2, spin-spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T 1 and T 2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T 1 and 1/T 2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T 2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T 1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents.

  5. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  6. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  7. Acoustic responses of monodisperse lipid-encapsulated microbubble contrast agents produced by flow focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mehmet; Feingold, Steven; Hettiarachchi, Kanaka; Lee, Abraham P; Dayton, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-encapsulated microbubbles are used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging. Currently available commercially made contrast agents have a polydisperse size distribution. It has been hypothesised that improved imaging sensitivity could be achieved with a uniform microbubble radius. We have recently developed microfluidics technology to produce contrast agents with a nearly monodisperse distribution. In this manuscript, we analyze echo responses from individual microbubbles from monodisperse populations in order to establish the relationship between scattered echo, microbubble radius, and excitation frequency. Simulations of bubble response from a modified Rayleigh-Plesset type model corroborate experimental data. Results indicate that microbubble echo response can be greatly increased by optimal combinations of microbubble radius and acoustic excitation frequency. These results may have a significant impact in the formulation of contrast agents to improve ultrasonic sensitivity. PMID:21475641

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF THE DYNAMICS OF THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. PMID:20950929

  9. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  10. Mn12 single-molecule magnet aggregates as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinglin; Li, Wen; Zhou, Shengyan; Kong, Daliang; Yang, Haishan; Wu, Lixin

    2011-03-28

    Mn(12) single-molecule magnets have been dispersed in water through an emulsion-assisted self-assembly method with an improved stability in water, in order to investigate the use of Mn(12) as MRI contrast agents.

  11. Magnetic resonance contrast media sensing in vivo molecular imaging agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Norouzian, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Inanlou, Davoud Nouri; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic imaging is commonly performed by nuclear medicine facilities such as PET or SPECT, etc. The production and biomedical applications of bio-molecular sensing in vivo MRI metabolic contrast agents has recently become of great universal research interest, which follows its great success as a potential cost effective, less radioactive, nuclear medicine alternative. Temperature, redox potential, enzyme activity, free radial/metal ion responsive and/or pH sensitive molecular metabolic MR contrast agents are among the famous instances exemplified, which basically promote MR image contrast enhancement ability to distinguish molecular metabolic/gene expression features. Overall, these MRI contrast agents provide a framework to achieve a greater degree of accuracy from MRI as a low cost, more available facility, non radioactive radiation producing and highly sensitive biomedical tool to propound as a new suggesting opponent for PET nuclear medicine imaging. In the present review, the design, development, examination and future of the above agents will be discussed in detail.

  12. Safety of an oral chondroprotective agent in horses.

    PubMed

    Kirker-Head, C A; Kirker-Head, R P

    2001-01-01

    Six healthy, adult female horses were administered five times the minimum maintenance dose of an oral low-molecular-weight chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine HCl, and manganese ascorbate chondroprotective agent (Cosequin; Nutramax Laboratories, Inc., Edgewood, MD) daily for 35 days. Hematology, serum biochemistry, and synovial fluid parameters were assessed twice prior to administering the product and again at the end of the treatment period. Physical examinations performed daily throughout the study showed no abnormal clinical changes attributable to the product. All hematologic parameters measured were within normal reference ranges; however, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and white blood cell counts were significantly (P < .05) increased after treatment, as compared with values on Day 0. Mean serum urea nitrogen was mildly elevated above the reference range before and after treatments, and mean serum creatinine was significantly (P < .05) decreased after treatment. Several other biochemical parameters (calcium, phosphorus, potassium, total and indirect bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactic dehydrogenase, and sodium:potassium ratio) were significantly (P < .05) altered following administration of the chondroprotectant, but all remained within normal reference ranges. Mean creatine kinase levels were significantly higher after treatment than on Day 0 (429 U/L versus 310 U/L), but this represented only a mild elevation relative to the reference range (10 to 350 U/L). Synovial fluid total protein and specific gravity were unaffected. The minor shifts encountered in hematology and serum biochemistry parameters are not considered to have clinical significance. The results of this study suggest that the oral chondroprotective agent tested is safe for administration to horses at recommended dose rates.

  13. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  14. Impact of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the assessment of Crohn's disease activity: Is contrast agent injection necessary?

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Sozzi, Michele; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Pontello, Michele; Angileri, Roberta; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) performed without intravenous contrast injection is diagnostically noninferior to conventional contrast-enhanced MRE (CE-MRE) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). This was an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective study. Ninety-six patients (52 male and 44 female; 47.18 years ± 13.6) with a diagnosis of CD underwent MRE at 1.5T including T2 -weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo, T2 -weighted spectral fat presaturation with inversion recovery (SPAIR), T1 -weighted balanced fast-field-echo MR sequences, and CE-MRE consisting in T1 -weighted breath-hold THRIVE 3D MRI sequences after administration of gadobenate dimeglumine (0.2 mL/kg of body weight). Unenhanced MRE, CE-MRE, and unenhanced MRE plus CE-MRE were reviewed in separate sessions with blinding by two readers in consensus, and subsequently by two other readers independently considering a subgroup of 20 patients. Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS) and/or histologic analysis of the surgical specimen were considered as reference standards for the assessment of inflammatory activity. Patients revealed prevalently active (n = 55 patients) or quiescent CD (n = 41 patients). The agreement between unenhanced MRE vs. CE-MRE in interpreting active bowel inflammation was 96% (123/128 bowel segments; one-sided 95% confidence interval [CI], >94.4%). Unenhanced MRE vs. CE-MRE vs. unenhanced MRE plus CE-MRE revealed a diagnostic accuracy of 93% [90/96] vs. 92% [88/96] vs. 97% [93/96] (P > 0.05) in the diagnosis of active CD. Interreader agreement was very good for all variables (κ value = 0.8-0.9) except for the measurement of the length of disease (κ value = 0.45). Unenhanced MRE was noninferior to CE-MRE in diagnosing active inflammation in patients with CD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diffusion of MRI and CT Contrast Agents in Articular Cartilage under Static Compression

    PubMed Central

    Shafieyan, Yousef; Khosravi, Niloufar; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair and focal damage can eventually lead to complete degradation of the tissue. Early diagnosis of degenerative changes in cartilage is therefore essential. Contrast agent-based computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide promising tools for this purpose. However, the common assumption in clinical applications that contrast agents reach steady-state distributions within the tissue has been of questionable validity. Characterization of nonequilibrium diffusion of contrast agents rather than their equilibrium distributions may therefore be more effective for image-based cartilage assessment. Transport of contrast agent through the extracellular matrix of cartilage can be affected by tissue compression due to matrix structural and compositional changes including reduced pore size and fluid content. We therefore investigate the effects of static compression on diffusion of three common contrast agents: sodium iodide, sodium diatrizoate, and gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacid (Gd-DTPA). Results showed that static compression was associated with significant decreases in diffusivities for sodium iodide and Gd-DTPA, with similar (but not significant) trends for sodium diatrizoate. Molecular mass of contrast agents affected diffusivities as the smallest one tested, sodium iodide, showed higher diffusivity than sodium diatrizoate and Gd-DTPA. Compression-associated cartilage matrix alterations such as glycosaminoglycan and fluid contents were found to correspond with variations in contrast agent diffusivities. Although decreased diffusivity was significantly correlated with increasing glycosaminoglycan content for sodium iodide and Gd-DTPA only, diffusivity significantly increased for all contrast agents by increasing fluid fraction. Because compounds based on iodine and gadolinium are commonly used for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, present findings can be valuable for more accurate image

  16. Diffusion of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage under static compression.

    PubMed

    Shafieyan, Yousef; Khosravi, Niloufar; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2014-07-15

    Cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair and focal damage can eventually lead to complete degradation of the tissue. Early diagnosis of degenerative changes in cartilage is therefore essential. Contrast agent-based computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide promising tools for this purpose. However, the common assumption in clinical applications that contrast agents reach steady-state distributions within the tissue has been of questionable validity. Characterization of nonequilibrium diffusion of contrast agents rather than their equilibrium distributions may therefore be more effective for image-based cartilage assessment. Transport of contrast agent through the extracellular matrix of cartilage can be affected by tissue compression due to matrix structural and compositional changes including reduced pore size and fluid content. We therefore investigate the effects of static compression on diffusion of three common contrast agents: sodium iodide, sodium diatrizoate, and gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacid (Gd-DTPA). Results showed that static compression was associated with significant decreases in diffusivities for sodium iodide and Gd-DTPA, with similar (but not significant) trends for sodium diatrizoate. Molecular mass of contrast agents affected diffusivities as the smallest one tested, sodium iodide, showed higher diffusivity than sodium diatrizoate and Gd-DTPA. Compression-associated cartilage matrix alterations such as glycosaminoglycan and fluid contents were found to correspond with variations in contrast agent diffusivities. Although decreased diffusivity was significantly correlated with increasing glycosaminoglycan content for sodium iodide and Gd-DTPA only, diffusivity significantly increased for all contrast agents by increasing fluid fraction. Because compounds based on iodine and gadolinium are commonly used for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, present findings can be valuable for more accurate image

  17. Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography of articular cartilage: association with tissue composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Silvast, T S; Jurvelin, J S; Aula, A S; Lammi, M J; Töyräs, J

    2009-01-01

    Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R| > 0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a clinical pQCT scanner. Possibly, the in vivo use of clinical p

  18. Dynamic imaging of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes using a bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Mounzer, Rawad; Shkarin, Pavel; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, Todd; Ruddle, Nancy H; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of lymphedema and lymph node metastasis in humans has relied primarily on invasive or radioactive modalities. While noninvasive technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the potential for true three-dimensional imaging of lymphatic structures, invasive modalities, such as optical fluorescence microscopy, provide higher resolution and clearer delineation of both lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels. Thus, contrast agents that image lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by both fluorescence and MRI may further enhance our understanding of the structure and function of the lymphatic system. Recent applications of bimodal (fluorescence and MR) contrast agents in mice have not achieved clear visualization of lymphatic vessels and nodes. Here the authors describe the development of a nanoparticulate contrast agent that is taken up by lymphatic vessels to draining lymph nodes and detected by both modalities. A unique nanoparticulate contrast agent composed of a polyamidoamine dendrimer core conjugated to paramagnetic contrast agents and fluorescent probes was synthesized. Anesthetized mice were injected with the nanoparticulates in the hind footpads and imaged by MR and fluorescence microscopy. High resolution MR and fluorescence images were obtained and compared to traditional techniques for lymphatic visualization using Evans blue dye. Lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels were clearly observed by both MRI and fluorescence microscopy using the bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent. Characteristic tail-lymphatics were also visualized by both modalities. Contrast imaging yielded a higher resolution than the traditional method employing Evans blue dye. MR data correlated with fluorescence and Evans blue dye imaging. A bimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent facilitates the visualization of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by both fluorescence microscopy and MRI with strong correlation between the two modalities. This agent may translate to applications

  19. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  20. Risk factors for adverse reactions from contrast agents for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daiki; Takahashi, Osamu; Ueda, Takuya; Deshpande, Gautam A; Arioka, Hiroko; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2013-01-30

    Symptoms of an adverse reaction to contrast agents for computed tomography are diverse ranging, and sometimes serious. The goal of this study is to create a scoring rule to predict adverse reactions to contrast agents used in computed tomography. This was a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients undergoing contrast enhanced CT scan for 7 years. The subjects were randomly divided into either a derivation or validation group. Baseline data and clinically relevant factors were collected from the electronic chart. Primary outcome was any acute adverse reactions to contrast media, observed for during 24 hours after administration. All potential candidate predictors were included in a forward stepwise logistic regression model. Prediction scores were assigned based on β coefficient. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn, and the area under the curve (AUC) and incidence of acute adverse reactions at each point were obtained. The same process was performed in the validation group. 36,472 patients underwent enhanced CT imaging: 20,000 patients in the derivation group and 16,472 in the validation group. A total of 409 (2.0%, 95% CI:1.9-2.3) and 347 (2.1%, 95% CI:1.9-2.3) acute adverse reactions were seen in the derivation and validation groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed that prior adverse reaction to contrast agents, urticaria, an allergic history to drugs other than contrast agents, contrast agent concentration >70%, age <50 years, and total contrast agent dose >65 g were significant predictors of an acute adverse reaction. AUC was 0.70 (95% CI:0.67-0.73) and 0.67 (95% CI:0.64-0.70) in the derivation and validation groups. We suggest a prediction model consisting of six predictors for acute adverse reactions to contrast agents used in CT.

  1. Submicron polycaprolactone particles as a carrier for imaging contrast agent for in vitro applications.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Robin, Sophie; Humbert, Philippe; Viennet, Céline; Agusti, Geraldine; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent materials have recently attracted considerable attention due to their unique properties and high performance as imaging agent in biomedical fields. Different imaging agents have been encapsulated in order to restrict its delivery to a specific area. In this study, a fluorescent contrast agent was encapsulated for in vitro application by polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer. The encapsulation was performed using modified double emulsion solvent evaporation technique with sonication. Fluorescent nanoparticles (20 nm) were incorporated in the inner aqueous phase of double emulsion. A number of samples were fabricated using different concentrations of fluorescent contrast agent. The contrast agent-containing submicron particle was characterized by a zetasizer for average particle size, SEM and TEM for morphology observations and fluorescence spectrophotometer for encapsulation efficiency. Moreover, contrast agent distribution in the PCL matrix was determined by confocal microscopy. The incorporation of contrast agent in different concentrations did not affect the physicochemical properties of PCL particles and the average size of encapsulated particles was found to be in the submicron range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioprotection and contrast agent use in pediatrics: what, how, and when.

    PubMed

    Lancharro Zapata, Á M; Rodríguez, C Marín

    2016-05-01

    It is essential to minimize exposure to ionizing radiation in children for various reasons. The risk of developing a tumor from exposure to a given dose of radiation is greater in childhood. Various strategies can be used to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation. It is fundamental to avoid unnecessary tests and tests that are not indicated, to choose an alternative test that does not use ionizing radiation, and/or to take a series of measures that minimize the dose of radiation that the patient receives, such as avoiding having to repeat tests, using the appropriate projections, using shields, adjusting the protocol (mAs, Kv, or pitch) to the patient's body volume, etc… When contrast agents are necessary, intracavitary ultrasound agents can be used, although the use of ultrasound agents is also being extended to include intravenous administration. In fluoroscopy, contrast agents with low osmolarity must be used, as in CT where we must adjust the dose and speed of injection to the patient's weight and to the caliber of the peripheral line, respectively. In MRI, only three types of contrast agents have been approved for pediatric use. It is sometimes necessary to use double doses or organ-specific contrast agents in certain clinical situations; the safety of contrast agents for these indications has not been proven, so they must be used off label.

  3. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P < 0.05 for iodine and Gd-DTPA; and 76% increase after 10 min for diatrizoate, P < 0.05). Effective partition coefficients were unaffected in mechanically injured cartilage. Mechanical injury reduced PG content and collagen integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  4. MR cholangiography in potential liver donors: quantitative and qualitative improvement with administration of an oral effervescent agent.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heon-Ju; Kim, Kyoung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Jung, Jin-Hee; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Se-Young; Lee, Jeongjin; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-03-23

    To determine whether an oral effervescent agent improves magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) images, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in potential live liver donors. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. Seventy potential liver donors underwent 2D MRC before and after administration of an oral effervescent agent. One radiologist measured relative contrast ratio (rC) and relative signal intensity (rS) for right and left intrahepatic ducts (RHD and LHD), and common hepatic duct (CHD). After assessment of overall image quality, two other radiologists independently scored visualization of five ductal segments (RHD, LHD, CHD, cystic, and common bile duct) and assessed the preferred image set. In consensus, they assessed the biliary anatomy. The data were analyzed using a paired t-test, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, and chi-square test. Both rC and rS of RHD and CHD were significantly higher on MRC images after administration of an oral effervescent agent than before (P < 0.03). The overall image quality grades and biliary visualization scores for all five duct segments were significantly higher on MRC images after administration of an oral effervescent agent than before (P < 0.0001). Between these images, both readers more often preferred MRC images with an effervescent agent rather than those without this agent (reader 1: 56/70, 80.0%; reader 2: 55/70, 78.6%; P = 0.0003). The readers correctly assessed second-order biliary tract anatomy in two more subjects on MRC after administration of an effervescent agent than before. Oral administration of an effervescent agent improves MRC images, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in live liver donors. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Microbubbles as x-ray scattering contrast agents using analyzer-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Arfelli, F; Rigon, L; Menk, R H

    2010-03-21

    Conventional contrast agents utilized in diagnostic radiology are based on x-ray absorption properties; alternative physical principles capable of providing a contrast enhancement in radiographs have never been applied. This study exploits the possibility of using a novel type of contrast media based on x-ray scattering. The contrast agents consist of microbubble echo-enhancing agents, usually applied in ultrasound examinations, which are invisible with conventional x-ray absorption techniques. The experiment was carried out at the medical beamline of the synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste, Italy. A flat silicon analyzer crystal typically used for diffraction-enhanced imaging was utilized as a tool for detecting the scattering properties of the contrast agents. In analyzer-based imaging, it is possible to detect the scattering properties of the sample by shifting the analyzer crystal to selected positions of its reflectivity curve. In particular, when the sample consists of a large number of micro-particles an overall effect can be observed. Phantoms containing contrast agents based on microbubbles were imaged at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. High visibility of the details was demonstrated, and a strong contrast enhancement was measured compared to normal x-ray absorption techniques.

  6. Potential of high-Z contrast agents in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Tristan; Hupfer, Martin; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Currently, only iodine- and barium-based contrast media (CM) are used in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT). High-Z metals would produce a higher contrast at equal mass density for the x-ray spectra used in clinical CT. Using such materials might allow for significant dose reductions in CE-CT. The purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for dose reduction when using CM based on heavy metals. Methods: The contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) was determined as a function of scan protocol by means of measurements and simulations on a clinical CT scanner. For simulations, water cylinders with diameters 160, 320, 480, and 640 mm were used to cover a broad range of patient sizes. Measurements were conducted with 160 and 320 mm water-equivalent plastic cylinders. A central bore of 13 mm diameter was present in all phantoms. The tube voltage was varied from 80 to 140 kV for measurements and from 60 to 180 kV for simulations. Additional tin filtration of thicknesses 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm was applied in the simulation to evaluate a range of spectral hardness. The bore was filled with a mixture of water and 10 mg/ml of pure iodine, holmium, gadolinium, ytterbium, osmium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth for the simulations and with aqueous solutions of ytterbium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth salts as well as Iopromid containing 10 mg/ml of the pure materials for the measurements. CNRDs were compared to iodine at phantom size-dependent reference voltages for all high-Z materials and the resulting dose reduction was calculated for equal contrast-to-noise ratio. Results: Dose reduction potentials strongly depended on phantom size, spectral hardness, and tube voltage. Depending on the added filtration, a dose reduction of 19%-60% could be reached at 80 kV with gadolinium for the 160 mm phantom, 52%-69% at 100 kV with holmium for the 320 mm phantom, 62%-78% with 120 kV for hafnium and the 480 mm phantom and 74%-86% with 140 kV for gold

  7. Formulation of radiographically detectable gastrointestinal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging: effects of a barium sulfate additive on MR contrast agent effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D L; Muller, H H; Young, S W

    1992-01-01

    Complete and homogeneous distribution of gastrointestinal (GI) contrast media are important factors for their effective use in computed tomography as well as in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A radiographic method (using fluoroscopy or spot films) could be effective for monitoring intestinal filling with GI contrast agents for MR imaging (GICMR), but it would require the addition of a radiopaque agent to most GICMR. This study was conducted to determine the minimum amount of barium additive necessary to be radiographically visible and to evaluate whether this additive influences the signal characteristics of the GICMR. A variety of barium sulfate preparations (3-12% wt/vol) were tested in dogs to determine the minimum quantity needed to make the administered agent visible during fluoroscopy and on abdominal radiographs. Solutions of 10 different potential GI contrast agents (Gd-DTPA, ferric ammonium citrate, Mn-DPDP, chromium-EDTA, gadolinium-oxalate, ferrite particles, water, mineral oil, lipid emulsion, and methylcellulose) were prepared without ("nondoped") and with ("doped") the barium sulfate additive. MR images of the solutions in tubes were obtained at 0.38 T using 10 different spin-echo pulse sequences. Region of interest (ROI) measurements of contrast agent signal intensity (SI) were made. In addition, for the paramagnetic contrast media, the longitudinal and transverse relaxivity (R1 and R2) were measured. A 6% wt/vol suspension of barium was the smallest concentration yielding adequate radiopacity in the GI tract. Except for gadolinium-oxalate, there was no statistically significant difference in SI for doped and non-doped solutions with most pulse sequences used. In addition, the doped and nondoped solutions yielded R1 and R2 values which were comparable. We conclude that barium sulfate 6% wt/vol added to MR contrast agents produces a suspension with sufficient radiodensity to be viewed radiographically, and it does not cause significant alteration in

  8. Sudden death after intravenous administration of a perflutren contrast agent: a case of pseudocomplication?

    PubMed

    Mahjoub, Haïfa; Roméo, Philippe; Leung, Tack-Ki; Burelle, Denis; Cartier, Raymond; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2009-06-01

    Perflutren cardiac ultrasound agents improve diagnostic accuracy in patients whose imaging is technically difficult. This report describes a case of sudden death approximately 5 minutes after the intravenous administration of 0.5 mL of perflutren contrast agent (Definity) during transthoracic echocardiography with suboptimal baseline images performed 10 days after coronary artery bypass graft surgery because of hypotension and tachycardia in a 73-year-old patient with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Autopsy did not reveal a clear direct relationship between perflutren and death. This is the first reported case of death related temporally to an echocardiographic contrast agent occurring in Canada and could represent a case of pseudocomplication.

  9. Topical contrast agents to improve soft-tissue contrast in the upper airway using cone beam CT: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alsufyani, N A; Noga, M L; Finlay, W H; Major, P W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the topical use of radiographic contrast agents to enhance soft-tissue contrast on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. Different barium sulphate concentrations were first tested using an airway phantom. Different methods of barium sulphate application (nasal drops, syringe, spray and sinus wash) were then tested on four volunteers, and nebulized iodine was tested in one volunteer. CBCT images were performed and then assessed subjectively by two examiners for contrast agent uniformity and lack of streak artefact. 25.0% barium sulphate presented adequate viscosity and radiodensity. Barium sulphate administered via nasal drops and sprays showed non-uniform collection at the nostrils, along the inferior and/or middle nasal meatuses and posterior nasal choana. The syringe and sinus wash showed similar results with larger volumes collecting in the naso-oropharynx. Nebulized iodine failed to distribute into the nasal cavity and scarcely collected at the nostrils. All methods of nasal application failed to adequately reach or uniformly coat the nasal cavity beyond the inferior nasal meatuses. The key factors to consider for optimum topical radiographic contrast in the nasal airway are particle size, flow velocity and radio-opacity.

  10. Effect of handling and storage conditions and stabilizing agent on the recovery of viral RNA from oral fluid of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Muehlhauser, V

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in using oral fluid to determine herd health and documenting the circulation of viruses in commercial swine populations but little is known about the stability of viruses in oral fluid. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic virus which is widespread in swine herds. Information on optimal handling methods such as heat treatments, freezing and RNA stabilization agents is needed to prevent or minimize degradation of viral RNA by degradative enzymes. The objectives of the study were to determine optimum handling conditions of the oral fluid before RNA extraction and to compare the performance of the RNeasy Protect Saliva Mini kit, which contains a stabilizing agent, with that of the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit, which does not contain a stabilizing agent. Preliminary studies with oral fluid inoculated with HEV indicated that a heat treatment of 60°C for 15min was detrimental to HEV RNA. HEV was recovered from 25/25 and 24/25 samples of oral fluid when samples were incubated for ≤24h at 4°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, without a stabilizing agent and extracted with the QiaAMP kit. In contrast, HEV RNA was detected in 16/25 and 11/25 samples when samples were incubated with a stabilizing agent for 24h at 37°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, and extracted with the RNeasy Protect Saliva kit. Moreover, the mean number of genome copies/ml of HEV recovered from oral fluid stored at -20°C without the stabilizing agent was 2.9 log units higher than oral fluid stored at -20°C in the presence of the stabilizing agent. The recovery of RNA from HEV, F-RNA coliphage MS2 and murine norovirus (MNV), which are surrogates for norovirus, was significantly greater when oral fluid was incubated for 24h at 4°C than when oral fluid was stabilized with RNAprotect Saliva Reagent for 24h at 37°C, where the relative differences between the two processes were 1.4, 1.8, and 2.7 log genome copies/ml for MS2, MNV, and HEV, respectively. The findings

  11. Section 6--mechanical bioeffects in the presence of gas-carrier ultrasound contrast agents. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    This review addresses the issue of mechanical ultrasound-induced bioeffects in the presence of gas carrier contrast agents (GCAs). Here, the term "contrast agent" refers to those agents that provide ultrasound contrast by being composed of microbubbles, encapsulated or not, containing one or more gases. Provided in this section are summaries on how contrast agents work, some of their current uses, and the potential for bioeffects associated with their presence in an ultrasonic field.

  12. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anil N.; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance® (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (Ktrans), efflux rate constant (Kep). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested. PMID:27298076

  13. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anil N; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-06-14

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance(®) (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (K(trans)), efflux rate constant (K(ep)). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested.

  14. HER2 Targeted Molecular MR Imaging Using a De Novo Designed Protein Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jingjuan; Li, Shunyi; Wei, Lixia; Jiang, Jie; Long, Robert; Mao, Hui; Wei, Ling; Wang, Liya; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively assess disease biomarkers has been hampered by the lack of desired contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability, and optimized pharmacokinetics. We have developed a novel MR imaging probe targeting to HER2, a biomarker for various cancer types and a drug target for anti-cancer therapies. This multimodal HER20targeted MR imaging probe integrates a de novo designed protein contrast agent with a high affinity HER2 affibody and a near IR fluorescent dye. Our probe can differentially monitor tumors with different expression levels of HER2 in both human cell lines and xenograft mice models. In addition to its 100-fold higher dose efficiency compared to clinically approved non-targeting contrast agent DTPA, our developed agent also exhibits advantages in crossing the endothelial boundary, tissue distribution, and tumor tissue retention over reported contrast agents as demonstrated by even distribution of the imaging probe across the entire tumor mass. This contrast agent will provide a powerful tool for quantitative assessment of molecular markers, and improved resolution for diagnosis, prognosis and drug discovery. PMID:21455310

  15. Silica-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as biocompatible contrast agent in biomedical photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Alwi, Rudolf; Telenkov, Sergey; Mandelis, Andreas; Leshuk, Timothy; Gu, Frank; Oladepo, Sulayman; Michaelian, Kirk

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the use of silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as contrast agents in biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Using frequency-domain photoacoustic correlation (the photoacoustic radar), we investigated the effects of nanoparticle size, concentration and biological media (e.g. serum, sheep blood) on the photoacoustic response in turbid media. Maximum detection depth and the minimum measurable SPION concentration were determined experimentally. The nanoparticle-induced optical contrast ex vivo in dense muscular tissues (avian pectus and murine quadricept) was evaluated and the strong potential of silica-coated SPION as a possible photoacoustic contrast agents was demonstrated.

  16. Poly(iohexol) nanoparticles as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yap, Felix Y; Yin, Lichen; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Qin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Fan, Timothy M; Gaba, Ron C; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-09-18

    Biocompatible poly(iohexol) nanoparticles, prepared through cross-linking of iohexol and hexamethylene diisocyanate followed by coprecipitation of the resulting cross-linked polymer with mPEG-polylactide, were utilized as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Compared to conventional small-molecule contrast agents, poly(iohexol) nanoparticles exhibited substantially protracted retention within the tumor bed and a 36-fold increase in CT contrast 4 h post injection, which makes it possible to acquire CT images with improved diagnosis accuracy over a broad time frame without multiple administrations.

  17. Superparamagnetic bifunctional bisphosphonates nanoparticles: a potential MRI contrast agent for osteoporosis therapy and diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Lalatonne, Y; Monteil, M; Jouni, H; Serfaty, J M; Sainte-Catherine, O; Lièvre, N; Kusmia, S; Weinmann, P; Lecouvey, M; Motte, L

    2010-06-15

    A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates) into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe(2)O(3) nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs) molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2(∗) contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) show that γFe(2)O(3)@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system.

  18. Superparamagnetic Bifunctional Bisphosphonates Nanoparticles: A Potential MRI Contrast Agent for Osteoporosis Therapy and Diagnostic

    PubMed Central

    Lalatonne, Y.; Monteil, M.; Jouni, H.; Serfaty, J. M.; Sainte-Catherine, O.; Lièvre, N.; Kusmia, S.; Weinmann, P.; Lecouvey, M.; Motte, L.

    2010-01-01

    A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates) into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe2O3 nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs) molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2∗ contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) show that γFe2O3@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system. PMID:20981332

  19. Polydisulfide Manganese(II) Complexes as Non-Gadolinium Biodegradable Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhen; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wu, Xueming; Tan, Mingqian; Yin, Shouyu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop safe and effective manganese(II) based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. Materials and Methods In this study, we synthesized and characterized two polydisulfide manganese(II) complexes, Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers and Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers, as new biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. The contrast enhancement of the two manganese based contrast agents were evaluated in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma xenografts, in comparison with MnCl2. Results The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 4.74 and 10.38 mM−1s−1 per manganese at 3T for Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers (Mn=30.50 kDa) and 6.41 and 9.72 mM−1s−1 for Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers (Mn= 61.80 kDa). Both polydisulfide Mn(II) complexes showed significant liver, myocardium and tumor enhancement. Conclusion The manganese based polydisulfide contrast agents have a potential to be developed as alternative non-gadolinium contrast agents for MR cancer and myocardium imaging. PMID:22031457

  20. Structural and functional photoacoustic molecular tomography aided by emerging contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can offer structural, functional and molecular contrasts at scalable observation level. By ultrasonically overcoming the strong optical scattering, this imaging technology can reach centimeters penetration depth while retaining high spatial resolution in biological tissue. Recent extensive research has been focused on developing new contrast agents to improve the imaging sensitivity, specificity and efficiency. These emerging materials have substantially accelerated PAT applications in signal sensing, functional imaging, biomarker labeling and therapy monitoring etc. Here, the potentials of different optical probes as PAT contrast agents were elucidated. We first describe the instrumental embodiments and the measured functional parameters, then focus on emerging contrast agent-based PAT applications, and finally discuss the challenges and prospects. PMID:24967718

  1. Blood pool agent contrast-enhanced MRA: level-set-based artery-vein separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bemmel, Cornelis M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Verdonck, Bert; Viergever, Max A.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2002-05-01

    Blood pool agents (BPAs) for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) allow prolonged imaging times for higher contrast and resolution by imaging during the steady-state when the contrast agent is distributed through the complete vascular system. However, simultaneous venous and arterial enhancement hampers interpretation. It is shown that arterial and venous segmentation in this equilibrium phase can be achieved if the central arterial axis (CAA) and central venous axis (CVA) are known. Since the CAA can not straightforwardly be obtained from the steady-state data, images acquired during the first-pass of the contrast agent can be utilized to determine the CAA with minimal user initialization. Utilizing the CAA to provide a rough arterial segmentation, the CVA can subsequently be determined from the steady-state dataset. The final segmentations of the arteries and veins are achieved by simultaneously evolving two level-sets in the steady-state dataset starting from the CAA and CVA.

  2. Hepatic contrast agents for computed tomography: high atomic number particulate material.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S E; Adams, D F; Davis, M A; Hessel, S J; Havron, A; Judy, P F; Paskins-Hurlburt, A J; Hollenberg, N K

    1981-06-01

    We used a stepwise approach to identify, design, synthesize, and test new high atomic number particulate contrast agents that would be especially well suited for use with computed tomography (CT). Our goal was to produce extremely radiopaque compounds with highly selective biodistribution to the normal liver. In this way, dose requirements could be lessened and toxicity minimized. Suspensions of cerium, gadolinium, and dysprosium oxide particles and silver iodide colloid were tested and compared with standard agents. All four experimental agents were selectively concentrated in the reticuloendothelial systems of rats and rabbits. These compounds produced greater and longer opacification of normal livers and larger liver-to-tumor differences in rabbits with hepatic tumors than did equivalent amounts of standard, iodinated agents. Lesions as small as 5 mm were visible with CT. These experimental materials have favorable characteristics as hepatic contrast agents, but their toxicity and long term retention may limit clinical use.

  3. Hepatic contrast agents for computed tomography: high atomic number particulate material

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S.E.; Adams, D.F.; Davis, M.A.; Hessel, S.J.; Havron, A.; Judy, P.F.; Paskins-Hurlburt, A.J.; Hollenberg, N.K.

    1981-06-01

    We used a stepwise approach to identify, design, synthesize, and test new high atomic number particulate contrast agents that would be especially well suited for use with computed tomography (CT). Our goal was to produce extremely radiopaque compounds with highly selective biodistribution to the normal liver. In this way, dose requirements could be lessened and toxicity minimized. Suspensions of cerium, gadolinium, and dysprosium oxide particles and silver iodide colloid were tested and compared with standard agents. All four experimental agents were selectively concentrated in the reticuloendothelial systems of rats and rabbits. These compounds produced greater and longer opacification of normal livers and larger liver-to-tumor differences in rabbits with hepatic tumors than did equivalent amounts of standard, iodinated agents. Lesions as small as 5 mm were visible with CT. These experimental materials have favorable characteristics as hepatic contrast agents, but their toxicity and long term retention may limit clinical use.

  4. Intraosseous injection of iodinated computed tomography contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Thomas E; Paxton, James H; Myers, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Intraosseous venous access can be life-saving in trauma patients when traditional methods for obtaining venous access are difficult or impossible. Because many blunt trauma patients require expeditious evaluation by computed tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast, it is important to evaluate whether intraosseous catheters can be used for administering CT contrast agents in lieu of waiting until secure peripheral intravenous or central venous catheter access can be established. Previous case reports have demonstrated that tibial intraosseous catheters can be used to safely administer CT contrast in the pediatric patient population. Here we report a case in which intraosseous access was the only means of administering intravenous contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient. An intraosseous catheter was placed in the standard manner in the right proximal humerus. Intravenous contrast agent was administered through the intraosseous catheter, using the standard blunt trauma protocol at our institution. CT scans were evaluated by a staff radiologist and assessed for the adequacy of diagnosis for blunt traumatic injuries. CT scans of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were considered to be adequate for diagnostic purposes and subjectively equivalent to those of studies using traditional central venous access. The intraosseous catheter was discontinued the following day. No complications of intraosseous placement or of contrast administration were identified. Intraosseous catheterization appears to be a feasible and effective alternative to traditional methods of venous access in the administration of iodinated contrast agents for CT evaluation in adult blunt trauma patients. Further study is warranted.

  5. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  6. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  7. Pre-existing oral contrast from lanthanum carbonate: a confounding factor in CT mesenteric angiography.

    PubMed

    Bull, M D; Shrimanker, R; Thomas, M R M; Mulgrew, C J

    2012-04-01

    A 69-year-old male was referred from the renal unit to radiology for investigation of bleeding per rectum. A CT mesenteric angiogram was performed. However, it was noted on the pre-contrast images that the large bowel contained positive oral contrast media. The procedure was abandoned as it would have been difficult to see extravasation of intravenous contrast from a bleeding point in the large bowel. The initial belief was that either the patient had been given oral contrast by ward staff on the assumption that it would be needed, or had had a recent radiological study requiring contrast, which was still present. Neither was the case; it emerged that the patient was taking Fosrenol (Shire Pharmaceuticals, Wayne, PA), a lanthanum carbonate medication used in the treatment of hyperphosphataemia. Lanthanum is densely radio-opaque and appears as positive bowel contrast on CT and plain radiography studies. When considering radiological studies specifically requiring the absence of oral contrast, it is important to be aware of the patient's drug history to avoid non-diagnostic scans with the associated radiation exposure.

  8. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  9. Main applications of hybrid PET-MRI contrast agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Kiani, A; Esquevin, A; Lepareur, N; Bourguet, P; Le Jeune, F; Gauvrit, Jy

    2016-01-01

    In medical imaging, the continuous quest to improve diagnostic performance and optimize treatment strategies has led to the use of combined imaging modalities. Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) is a hybrid imaging existing already for many years. The high spatial and contrast resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the high sensitivity and molecular information from PET imaging are leading to the development of this new hybrid imaging along with hybrid contrast agents. To create a hybrid contrast agent for PET-MRI device, a PET radiotracer needs to be combined with an MRI contrast agent. The most common approach is to add a radioactive isotope to the surface of a small superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particle. The resulting agents offer a wide range of applications, such as pH variation monitoring, non-invasive angiography and early imaging diagnosis of atherosclerosis. Oncology is the most promising field with the detection of sentinel lymph nodes and the targeting of tumor neoangiogenesis. Oncology and cardiovascular imaging are thus major areas of development for hybrid PET-MRI imaging systems and hybrid contrast agents. The aim is to combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, morphological and functional information. Future prospects include the use of specific antibodies and hybrid multimodal PET-MRI-ultrasound-fluorescence imaging with the potential to provide overall pre-, intra- and postoperative patient care.

  10. Connexin 43-targeted T1 contrast agent for MRI diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Abakumova, Tatiana; Abakumov, Maxim; Shein, Sergey; Chelushkin, Pavel; Bychkov, Dmitry; Mukhin, Vladimir; Yusubalieva, Gaukhar; Grinenko, Nadezhda; Kabanov, Alexander; Nukolova, Natalia; Chekhonin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive form of brain tumor. Early and accurate diagnosis of glioma and its borders is an important step for its successful treatment. One of the promising targets for selective visualization of glioma and its margins is connexin 43 (Cx43), which is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes and migrating glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a Gd-based contrast agent conjugated with specific antibodies to Cx43 for efficient visualization of glioma C6 in vivo. We have prepared stable nontoxic conjugates of monoclonal antibody to Cx43 and polylysine-DTPA ligands complexed with Gd(III), which are characterized by higher T1 relaxivity (6.5 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7 T) than the commercial agent Magnevist® (3.4 mM(-1) s(-1)). Cellular uptake of Cx43-specific T1 contrast agent in glioma C6 cells was more than four times higher than the nonspecific IgG-contrast agent, as detected by flow cytometry and confocal analysis. MRI experiments showed that the obtained agents could markedly enhance visualization of glioma C6 in vivo after their intravenous administration. Significant accumulation of Cx43-targeted contrast agents in glioma and the peritumoral zone led not only to enhanced contrast but also to improved detection of the tumor periphery. Fluorescence imaging confirmed notable accumulation of Cx43-specific conjugates in the peritumoral zone compared with nonspecific IgG conjugates at 24 h after intravenous injection. All these features of Cx43-targeted contrast agents might be useful for more precise diagnosis of glioma and its borders by MRI.

  11. The Subharmonic Behavior and Thresholds of High Frequency Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated micro-bubbles used for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical ultrasound. The agents oscillate nonlinearly about their equilibrium radii upon sufficient acoustic forcing and produce unique acoustic signatures that allow them to be distinguished from scattering from the surrounding tissue. The subharmonic response occurs below the fundamental and is associated with an acoustic pressure threshold. Subharmonic imaging using ultrasound contrast agents has been established for clinical applications at standard diagnostic frequencies typically below 20 MHz. However, for emerging applications of high frequency applications (above 20 MHz) subharmonic imaging is an area of on-going research. The effects of attenuation from tissue are more significant and the characterization of agents is not as well understood. Due to specificity and control production, polymer agents are useful for high frequency applications. In this study, we highlight novel measurement techniques to measure and characterize the mechanical properties of the shell of polymer contrast agents. The definition of the subharmonic threshold is investigated with respect to mono-frequency and chirp forcing waveforms which have been used to achieve optimal subharmonic content in the backscattered signal. Time frequency analysis using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert-Huang transform facilitates a more sensitive and robust methodology for characterization of subharmonic content with respect to non-stationary forcing. A new definition of the subharmonic threshold is proposed with respect to the energy content of the associated adaptive basis decomposition. Additional studies with respect to targeted agent behavior and cardiovascular disease are discussed. NIH, ONR.

  12. The delayed onset of subharmonic and ultraharmonic emissions from a phospholipid-shelled microbubble contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Awuor, Ivy; Thomas, Keri; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the nonlinear response of microbubble contrast agents is important for their efficacious use in imaging and therapy. In this paper, we report that the subharmonic and ultraharmonic response of lipid-shelled microbubble contrast agents exhibits a strong temporal dependence. We characterized nonlinear emissions from Targestar-P® microbubbles (Targeson Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) periodically for 60 minutes, at 10 MHz excitation frequency. The results revealed a considerable increase in the subharmonic and ultraharmonic response (nearly 12–15 and 5–8 dB) after 5–10 minutes of agent preparation. However, the fundamental and the harmonic response remained almost unchanged in this period. During the next 50 minutes, the subharmonic, fundamental, ultraharmonic, and harmonic responses decreased steadily by 2–5 dB. The temporal changes in the nonlinear behavior of the agent appeared to be primarily mediated by gas-exchange through the microbubble shell; temperature and prior acoustic excitation based mechanisms were ruled out. Further, there was no measurable change in the agent size distribution by static diffusion. We envisage that these findings will help obtain reproducible measurements from agent characterization, nonlinear imaging, and fluid-pressure sensing. These findings also suggest the possibility for improving nonlinear imaging by careful design of ultrasound contrast agents. PMID:24582298

  13. Optimal Contrast Agent Staining of Ligaments and Tendons for X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Richard; Lowe, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography has become an important tool for studying the microstructures of biological soft tissues, such as ligaments and tendons. Due to the low X-ray attenuation of such tissues, chemical contrast agents are often necessary to enhance contrast during scanning. In this article, the effects of using three different contrast agents—iodine potassium iodide solution, phosphotungstic acid and phosphomolybdic acid—are evaluated and compared. Porcine anterior cruciate ligaments, patellar tendons, medial collateral ligaments and lateral collateral ligaments were used as the basis of the study. Three samples of each of the four ligament/tendon types were each assigned a different contrast agent (giving a total of twelve samples), and the progression of that agent through the tissue was monitored by performing a scan every day for a total period of five days (giving a total of sixty scans). Since the samples were unstained on day one, they had been stained for a total of four days by the time of the final scans. The relative contrast enhancement and tissue deformation were measured. It was observed that the iodine potassium iodide solution penetrated the samples fastest and caused the least sample shrinkage on average (although significant deformation was observed by the time of the final scans), whereas the phosphomolybdic acid caused the greatest sample shrinkage. Equations describing the observed behaviour of the contrast agents, which can be used to predict optimal staining times for ligament and tendon X-ray computed tomography, are presented. PMID:27078030

  14. Oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan as enhanced T1 contrast agent for in vivo targeted tumor MRI.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoyan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Kunchi; Cao, Yi; Dong, Jingjin; Jiang, Bin; Lu, Bo; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    To synthesize and characterize an effective macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan with targeting capability. In this study we synthesized and characterized oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan copolymers, followed by conjugating with Gd-DTPA and folic acid. The toxicity was evaluated by WST assay, and in vitro MRI studies were performed in comparison with Gd-DTPA. Finally, the contrast enhancement of the new macromolecular MRI contrast agent was then evaluated in the mice bearing KB xenografts. Compared to Gd-DTPA (4.3 mM(-1) s(-1) ), this macromolecular contrast agent (mCA) exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity (14.4 mM(-1) s(-1) ), up to 3.3 times higher. Meanwhile, the WST assay illustrated that the viability of KB cells remained at 90% even when the Gd concentration was 1 mM. During the in vivo study, the image contrast produced by FA-mCA was higher than one produced by mCA, up to 2.5 times higher. Our results showed this macromolecular contrast agent has potential for developing sensitive and biocompatible MRI probe with targeting capability. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:23-29. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  16. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR). The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. Methods All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. Results The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15–87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Conclusion Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma. PMID:25287952

  17. Breakthrough reactions of iodinated and gadolinium contrast media after oral steroid premedication protocol.

    PubMed

    Jingu, Akiko; Fukuda, Junya; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-10-06

    Adverse reactions to iodinated and gadolinium contrast media are an important clinical issue. Although some guidelines have proposed oral steroid premedication protocols to prevent adverse reactions, some patients may have reactions to contrast media in spite of premedication (breakthrough reaction; BTR).The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency, type and severity of BTR when following an oral steroid premedication protocol. All iodinated and gadolinium contrast-enhanced radiologic examinations between August 2011 and February 2013 for which the premedication protocol was applied in our institution were assessed for BTRs. The protocol was applied to a total of 252 examinations (153 patients, ages 15-87 years; 63 males, 90 females). Of these, 152 were for prior acute adverse reactions to contrast media, 85 were for a history of bronchial asthma, and 15 were for other reasons. There were 198 contrast enhanced CTs and 54 contrast enhanced MRIs. There were nine BTR (4.5%) for iodinated contrast media, and only one BTR (1.9%) for gadolinium contrast media: eight were mild and one was moderate. No patient who had a mild index reaction (IR) had a severe BTR. Incidence of BTRs when following the premedication protocol was low. This study by no means proves the efficacy of premedication, but provides some support for following a premedication protocol to improve safety of contrast-enhanced examinations when prior adverse reactions are mild, or when there is a history of asthma.

  18. Towards a nanoscale mammographic contrast agent: development of a modular pre-clinical dual optical/x-ray agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Niroui, Farnaz; Levitin, Ronald B.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Rowlands, J. A.; Matsuura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) can provide improved breast cancer detection and characterization compared to conventional mammography by imaging the effects of tumour angiogenesis. Current small-molecule contrast agents used for CEDM are limited by a short plasma half-life and rapid extravasation into tissue interstitial space. To address these limitations, nanoscale agents that can remain intravascular except at sites of tumour angiogenesis can be used. For CEDM, this agent must be both biocompatible and strongly attenuate mammographic energy x-rays. Nanoscale perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) droplets have good x-ray attenuation and have been used in patients for other applications. However, the macroscopic scale of x-ray imaging (50-100 µm) is inadequate for direct verification that PFOB droplets localize at sites of breast tumour angiogenesis. For efficient pre-clinical optimization for CEDM, we integrated an optical marker into PFOB droplets for microscopic assessment (≪50 µm). To develop PFOB droplets as a new nanoscale mammographic contrast agent, PFOB droplets were labelled with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The droplets had mean diameters of 160 nm, fluoresced at 635 nm and attenuated x-ray spectra at 30.5 keV mean energy with a relative attenuation of 5.6 ± 0.3 Hounsfield units (HU) mg-1 mL-1 QD-PFOB. With the agent loaded into tissue phantoms, good correlation between x-ray attenuation and optical fluorescence was found (R2 = 0.96), confirming co-localization of the QDs with PFOB for quantitative assessment using x-ray or optical methods. Furthermore, the QDs can be removed from the PFOB agent without affecting its x-ray attenuation or structural properties for expedited translation of optimized PFOB droplet formulations into patients.

  19. Microbubble contrast agents: targeted ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-assisted drug-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2006-03-01

    The use of microbubble contrast agents for general tissue delineation and perfusion enjoys steady interest in ultrasound imaging. Microbubbles as contrast materials require a small dosage and show excellent detection sensitivity. Targeting ligands on the surface of microbubbles permit the selective accumulation of these particles in the areas of interest, which show an up-regulated level of receptor molecules on vascular endothelium. Selective contrast imaging of inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion injury, angiogenesis, and thrombosis has been achieved in animal models. Ultrasound-assisted drug delivery and activation, performed by combining microbubble agent containing drug substances or coadministered with pharmaceutical agents (including plasmid DNA for transfection), has been achieved in multiple model systems in vitro and in vivo. Ultrasound and microbubbles-based targeted acceleration of the thrombolytic enzyme action already have reached clinical trials. Overall, microbubble targeting and ultrasound-assisted microbubble-based drug-delivery systems will offer a step toward the application of targeted personalized diagnostics and therapy.

  20. Molecular MR Contrast Agents for the Detection of Cancer: Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Alexei; Mazzanti, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful diagnostic tool capable of providing detailed information about the structure and composition of tumors, with unsurpassed spatial resolution. The use of exogenously administered contrast agents allows compartment-specific enhancement of tumors, enabling imaging of functional blood and interstitial volumes. Current efforts are directed at enhancing the capabilities of MRI in oncology to add contrast agents with molecular specificities to the growing armamentarium of diagnostic probes capable of changing local proton relaxation times as a consequence of specific contrast agent binding to cell surface receptors or extracellular matrix components. We review herein the most notable examples, illustrating major trends in the development of specific probes for high-resolution imaging in molecular oncology. PMID:21362515

  1. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high “relaxivity per particle” and “relaxivity density”, and biodegradability. PMID:23432004

  2. Nano-sized Contrast Agents to Non-Invasively Detect Renal Inflammation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular imaging methods have been developed that employ nano-sized contrast agents to detect markers of inflammation within tissues. Renal inflammation contributes to disease progression in a wide range of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and a biopsy is currently the only method of definitively diagnosing active renal inflammation. However, the development of new molecular imaging methods that employ contrast agents capable of detecting particular immune cells or protein biomarkers will allow clinicians to evaluate inflammation throughout the kidneys, and to assess a patient's response to immunomodulatory drugs. These imaging tools will improve our ability to validate new therapies and to optimize the treatment of individual patients with existing therapies. This review describes the clinical need for new methods of monitoring renal inflammation, and recent advances in the development of nano-sized contrast agents for detection of inflammatory markers of renal disease. PMID:24206601

  3. Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Amy L; Hansen, Matthew N; Zweifel, Daniel A; Wei, Alexander; Boppart, Stephen A

    2006-07-24

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods are demonstrated as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography (OCT). We define the backscattering albedo, a', as the ratio of the backscattering to extinction coefficient. Contrast agents which modify a' within the host tissue phantoms are detected with greater sensitivity by the differential OCT measurement of both a' and extinction. Optimum sensitivity is achieved by maximizing the difference between contrast agents and tissue, |a'(ca) - a'(tiss)|. Low backscattering albedo gold nanorods (14x 44 nm; lambda(max) = 780 nm) within a high backscattering albedo tissue phantom with an uncertainty in concentration of 20% (randomized 2+/-0.4% intralipid) were readily detected at 82 ppm (by weight) in a regime where extinction alone could not discriminate nanorods. The estimated threshold of detection was 30 ppm.

  4. Quantitative guidelines for the prediction of ultrasound contrast agent destruction during injection.

    PubMed

    Threlfall, Greg; Wu, Hong Juan; Li, Katherine; Aldham, Ben; Scoble, Judith; Sutalo, Ilija D; Raicevic, Anna; Pontes-Braz, Luisa; Lee, Brian; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Ooi, Andrew; Coia, Greg; Manasseh, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Experiments and theory were undertaken on the destruction of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles on needle injection, with the aim of predicting agent loss during in vivo studies. Agents were expelled through a variety of syringe and needle combinations, subjecting the microbubbles to a range of pressure drops. Imaging of the bubbles identified cases where bubbles were destroyed and the extent of destruction. Fluid-dynamic calculations determined the pressure drop for each syringe and needle combination. It was found that agent destruction occurred at a critical pressure drop that depended only on the type of microbubble. Protein-shelled microbubbles (sonicated bovine serum albumin) were virtually all destroyed above their critical pressure drop of 109 ± 7 kPa Two types of lipid-shelled microbubbles were found to have a pressure drop threshold above which more than 50% of the microbubbles were destroyed. The commercial lipid-shelled agent Definity was found to have a critical pressure drop for destruction of 230 ± 10 kPa; for a previously published lipid-shelled agent, this value was 150 ± 40 kPa. It is recommended that attention to the predictions of a simple formula could preclude unnecessary destruction of microbubble contrast agent during in vivo injections. This approach may also preclude undesirable release of drug or gene payloads in targeted microbubble therapies. Example values of appropriate injection rates for various agents and conditions are given. 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved

  5. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Spectral Imaging Technology-Based Evaluation of Radiation Treatment Planning to Remove Contrast Agent Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Yi-Qun, Xu; Wei, Liu; Xin-Ye, Ni

    2016-10-01

    This study employs dual-source computed tomography single-spectrum imaging to evaluate the effects of contrast agent artifact removal and the computational accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning improvement. The phantom, including the contrast agent, was used in all experiments. The amounts of iodine in the contrast agent were 30, 15, 7.5, and 0.75 g/100 mL. Two images with different energy values were scanned and captured using dual-source computed tomography (80 and 140 kV). To obtain a fused image, 2 groups of images were processed using single-energy spectrum imaging technology. The Pinnacle planning system was used to measure the computed tomography values of the contrast agent and the surrounding phantom tissue. The difference between radiotherapy treatment planning based on 80 kV, 140 kV, and energy spectrum image was analyzed. For the image with high iodine concentration, the quality of the energy spectrum-fused image was the highest, followed by that of the 140-kV image. That of the 80-kV image was the worst. The difference in the radiotherapy treatment results among the 3 models was significant. When the concentration of iodine was 30 g/100 mL and the distance from the contrast agent at the dose measurement point was 1 cm, the deviation values (P) were 5.95% and 2.20% when image treatment planning was based on 80 and 140 kV, respectively. When the concentration of iodine was 15 g/100 mL, deviation values (P) were -2.64% and -1.69%. Dual-source computed tomography single-energy spectral imaging technology can remove contrast agent artifacts to improve the calculated dose accuracy in radiotherapy treatment planning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M.; Mani, Venkatesh

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities. PMID:23539505

  8. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi

    2013-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities.

  9. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  10. A theranostic dental pulp capping agent with improved MRI and CT contrast and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, S; Güvener, N; Dou, W; Alghamdi, H S; Camargo, W A; Cremers, J G O; Borm, P J A; Heerschap, A; Oosterwijk, E; Jansen, J A; Walboomers, X F

    2017-08-24

    Different materials have been used for vital dental pulp treatment. Preferably a pulp capping agent should show appropriate biological performance, excellent handling properties, and a good imaging contrast. These features can be delivered into a single material through the combination of therapeutic and diagnostic agents (i.e. theranostic). Calcium phosphate based composites (CPCs) are potentially ideal candidate for pulp treatment, although poor imaging contrast and poor dentino-inductive properties are limiting their clinical use. In this study, a theranostic dental pulp capping agent was developed. First, imaging properties of the CPC were improved by using a core-shell structured dual contrast agent (csDCA) consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and colloidal gold, as MRI and CT contrast agent respectively. Second, biological properties were implemented by using a dentinogenic factor (i.e. bone morphogenetic protein 2, BMP-2). The obtained CPC/csDCA/BMP-2 composite was tested in vivo, as direct pulp capping agent, in a male Habsi goat incisor model. Our outcomes showed no relevant alteration of the handling and mechanical properties (e.g. setting time, injectability, and compressive strength) by the incorporation of csDCA particles. In vivo results proved MRI contrast enhancement up to 7weeks. Incisors treated with BMP-2 showed improved tertiary dentin deposition as well as faster cement degradation as measured by µCT assessment. In conclusion, the presented theranostic agent matches the imaging and regenerative requirements for pulp capping applications. In this study, we combined diagnostic and therapeutic agents in order to developed a theranostic pulp capping agent with enhanced MRI and CT contrast and improved dentin regeneration ability. In our study we cover all the steps from material preparation, mechanical and in vitro characterization, to in vivo study in a goat dental model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a

  11. Intradermal administration of fluorescent contrast agents for delivery to axillary lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, John C.; Meric-Berstam, Funda; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Wagner, Jamie L.; Babiera, Gildy V.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-05-01

    In this proof-of-concept study we seek to demonstrate the delivery of fluorescent contrast agent to the tumor-draining lymph node basin following intraparenchymal breast injections and intradermal arm injection of micrograms of indocyanine green in 20 breast cancer patients undergoing complete axillary lymph node dissection. Individual lymph nodes were assessed ex vivo for presence of fluorescent signal. In all, 88% of tumor-negative lymph nodes and 81% of tumor-positive lymph nodes were fluorescent. These results indicate that future studies utilizing targeted fluorescent contrast agents may demonstrate improved surgical and therapeutic intervention.

  12. Preclinical evaluation of biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi

    Macromolecular contrast agents have been shown to be superior to small molecular weight contrast agents for MRI in blood pool imaging, tumor diagnosis and grading. However, none has been approved by the FDA because they circulate in the bloodstream much longer than small molecular weight contrast agents and result in high tissue accumulation of toxic Gd(III) ions. Biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents (BMCA) were invented to alleviate the toxic accumulation. They have a cleavable disulfide bond based backbone that can be degraded in vivo and excreted out of the body via renal filtration. Furthermore, the side chain of the backbone can be modified to achieve various degradation rates. Three BMCA, (Gd-DTPA)-cystamine copolymers (GDCC), Gd-DTPA cystine copolymers (GDCP), and Gd-DTPA cystine diethyl ester copolymers (GDCEP), were evaluated as blood pool contrast agents in a rat model. They have excellent blood pool enhancement, preferred pharmacokinetics, and only minimal long-term tissue retention of toxic Gd(III) ions. GDCC and GDCP, the lead agents with desired degradation rates, with molecular weights of 20 KDa and 70 KDa, were chosen for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to differentiate human prostate tumor models of different malignancy and growth rates. GDCC and GDCP could differentiate these tumor models, providing more accurate estimations of plasma volume, flow leakage rate, and permeability surface area product than a small molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA-BMA when compared to the prototype macromolecular contrast agent albumin-Gd-DTPA. GDCC was favored for its neutral charge side chain and reasonable uptake rate by the tumors. GDCC with a molecular weight of 40 KDa (GDCC-40, above the renal filtration cutoff size) was used to assess the efficacy of two photothermal therapies (interstitial and indocyanine green enhanced). GDCC-40 provided excellent tumor enhancement shortly after its injection. Acute tumor response (4 hr) after therapies

  13. [Case of the month. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to an iodinated contrast radiodiagnostic agent].

    PubMed

    Paquet, P; Vandenbossche, G; Nikkels, A F; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2009-12-01

    Iodinated contrast agents are frequently involved in delayed polymorphic adverse skin reactions. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis following administration of iodinated contrast agents is a rare but severe form of such reactions. The disease is characterized by the sudden occurrence of an erosive and pustular erythroderma with fever, leukocytosis and sometimes peripheral adenopathies and liver involvement. This condition is considered as an immunologic reaction, primarily involving T lymphocytes. The overall mortality reaches about 1%. Elucidating the differential diagnosis with other acute paroxysmal drug eruptions (toxic epidermal necrolysis, Steven-Johnson syndrome and drug hypersensitivity syndrome) is of paramount importance for establishing the adequate treatment of PEAG.

  14. An evaluation of the use of oral contrast media in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Erica Lauren; Grima, Karen Borg; Cortis, Kelvin; Soler, Sandro Galea; Zarb, Francis

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of different oral contrast media (OCM) for abdominopelvic CT examinations performed for follow-up general oncological indications. The objectives were to establish anatomical image quality criteria for abdominopelvic CT; use these criteria to evaluate and compare image quality using positive OCM, neutral OCM and no OCM; and evaluate possible benefits for the medical imaging department. Forty-six adult patients attending a follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications and who had a previous abdominopelvic CT with positive OCM (n = 46) were recruited and prospectively placed into either the water (n = 25) or no OCM (n = 21) group. Three radiologists performed absolute visual grading analysis (VGA) to assess image quality by grading the fulfilment of 24 anatomical image quality criteria. Visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the data showed comparable image quality with regards to reproduction of abdominal structures, bowel discrimination, presence of artefacts, and visualization of the amount of intra-abdominal fat for the three OCM protocols. All three OCM protocols provided similar image quality for follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications. • Positive oral contrast media are routinely used for abdominopelvic multidetector computed tomography • Experimental study comparing image quality using three different oral contrast materials • Three different oral contrast materials result in comparable CT image quality • Benefits for patients and medical imaging department.

  15. Safe handling and administration considerations of oral anticancer agents in the clinical and home setting.

    PubMed

    Lester, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The use of hormonal, chemotherapeutic, and targeted biologic oral agents has exponentially increased since the early 2000s. Oral therapies have the advantage of persistent exposure of the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and the tumor environment. The use of oral anticancer agents provides therapeutic drug treatment for patients with cancer in the comfort of their home or alternative settings, such as retirement homes and assisted living or extended-care facilities. Practices to ensure safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of oral agents are necessary to prevent additional exposure of hazardous substances to the environment, professionals, patients, family members, and caretakers. Providers should consider potential barriers to adherence and compliance, and develop strategies to ensure optimal therapeutic benefit prior to initiation of oral agents.

  16. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Improved sensitivity of computed tomography towards iodine and gold nanoparticle contrast agents via iterative reconstruction methods

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Ally Leigh; Dhanantwari, Amar; Jurcova, Martina; Cheheltani, Rabee; Naha, Pratap Chandra; Ivanc, Thomas; Shefer, Efrat; Cormode, David Peter

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography is a widely used medical imaging technique that has high spatial and temporal resolution. Its weakness is its low sensitivity towards contrast media. Iterative reconstruction techniques (ITER) have recently become available, which provide reduced image noise compared with traditional filtered back-projection methods (FBP), which may allow the sensitivity of CT to be improved, however this effect has not been studied in detail. We scanned phantoms containing either an iodine contrast agent or gold nanoparticles. We used a range of tube voltages and currents. We performed reconstruction with FBP, ITER and a novel, iterative, modal-based reconstruction (IMR) algorithm. We found that noise decreased in an algorithm dependent manner (FBP > ITER > IMR) for every scan and that no differences were observed in attenuation rates of the agents. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of iodine was highest at 80 kV, whilst the CNR for gold was highest at 140 kV. The CNR of IMR images was almost tenfold higher than that of FBP images. Similar trends were found in dual energy images formed using these algorithms. In conclusion, IMR-based reconstruction techniques will allow contrast agents to be detected with greater sensitivity, and may allow lower contrast agent doses to be used. PMID:27185492

  18. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hógáin, Dara Ó.; Davies, Gareth R.; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T1 dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T1 dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T1 contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R1 values using a set of images at each field. The R1 maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR1 in which pixel values depend on the change in R1 of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR1 image compared with a standard T1-weighted image.

  19. The use of contrast agents with fast field-cycling magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hógáin, Dara O; Davies, Gareth R; Baroni, Simona; Aime, Silvio; Lurie, David J

    2011-01-07

    Fast field-cycling (FFC) MRI allows switching of the magnetic field during an imaging scan. FFC-MRI takes advantage of the T(1) dispersion properties of contrast agents to improve contrast, thus enabling more sensitive detection of the agent. A new contrast agent designed specifically for use with FFC was imaged using both a homebuilt FFC-MRI system and a 3 T Philips clinical MRI scanner. T(1) dispersion curves were obtained using a commercial relaxometer which showed large changes in relaxation rate between fields. A model of magnetization behaviour was used to predict optimum evolution times for the maximum T(1) contrast between samples at each field. Images were processed and analysed to create maps of R(1) values using a set of images at each field. The R(1) maps produced at two different fields were then subtracted from each other in order to create a map of ΔR(1) in which pixel values depend on the change in R(1) of the sample between the two fields. The dispersion properties of the agent resulted in higher contrast in a ΔR(1) image compared with a standard T(1)-weighted image.

  20. Gold nanoparticles as contrast agents in x-ray imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Ross, Ryan D; Tilley, Jennifer Mr; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography enables 3D anatomic imaging at a high spatial resolution, but requires delivery of an x-ray contrast agent to distinguish tissues with similar or low x-ray attenuation. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained recent attention as an x-ray contrast agent due to exhibiting a high x-ray attenuation, nontoxicity and facile synthesis and surface functionalization for colloidal stability and targeted delivery. Potential diagnostic applications include blood pool imaging, passive targeting and active targeting, where actively targeted AuNPs could enable molecular imaging by computed tomography. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge for AuNP x-ray contrast agents within a paradigm of key structure-property-function relationships in order to provide guidance for the design of AuNP contrast agents to meet the necessary functional requirements in a particular application. Functional requirements include delivery to the site of interest (e.g., blood, tumors or microcalcifications), nontoxicity during delivery and clearance, targeting or localization at the site of interest and contrast enhancement for the site of interest compared with surrounding tissues. Design is achieved by strategically controlling structural characteristics (composition, mass concentration, size, shape and surface functionalization) for optimized properties and functional performance. Examples from the literature are used to highlight current design trade-offs that exist between the different functional requirements.

  1. Improved sensitivity of computed tomography towards iodine and gold nanoparticle contrast agents via iterative reconstruction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Ally Leigh; Dhanantwari, Amar; Jurcova, Martina; Cheheltani, Rabee; Naha, Pratap Chandra; Ivanc, Thomas; Shefer, Efrat; Cormode, David Peter

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography is a widely used medical imaging technique that has high spatial and temporal resolution. Its weakness is its low sensitivity towards contrast media. Iterative reconstruction techniques (ITER) have recently become available, which provide reduced image noise compared with traditional filtered back-projection methods (FBP), which may allow the sensitivity of CT to be improved, however this effect has not been studied in detail. We scanned phantoms containing either an iodine contrast agent or gold nanoparticles. We used a range of tube voltages and currents. We performed reconstruction with FBP, ITER and a novel, iterative, modal-based reconstruction (IMR) algorithm. We found that noise decreased in an algorithm dependent manner (FBP > ITER > IMR) for every scan and that no differences were observed in attenuation rates of the agents. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of iodine was highest at 80 kV, whilst the CNR for gold was highest at 140 kV. The CNR of IMR images was almost tenfold higher than that of FBP images. Similar trends were found in dual energy images formed using these algorithms. In conclusion, IMR-based reconstruction techniques will allow contrast agents to be detected with greater sensitivity, and may allow lower contrast agent doses to be used.

  2. Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles As Molecular-Specific Contrast Agents for Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Targeted metallic nanoparticles have shown potential as a platform for development of molecular-specific contrast agents. Aptamers have recently been demonstrated as ideal candidates for molecular targeting applications. In this study, we investigated the development of aptamer-based gold nanoparticles as contrast agents, using aptamers as targeting agents and gold nanoparticles as imaging agents. We devised a novel conjugation approach using an extended aptamer design where the extension is complementary to an oligonucleotide sequence attached to the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The chemical and optical properties of the aptamer−gold conjugates were characterized using size measurements and oligonucleotide quantitation assays. We demonstrate this conjugation approach to create a contrast agent designed for detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), obtaining reflectance images of PSMA(+) and PSMA(−) cell lines treated with the anti-PSMA aptamer−gold conjugates. This design strategy can easily be modified to incorporate multifunctional agents as part of a multimodal platform for reflectance imaging applications. PMID:18512972

  3. A self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent that detects esterase enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuguo; Sheth, Vipul R.; Liu, Guanshu; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The CEST effect of many PARACEST MRI contrast agents changes in response to a molecular biomarker. However, other molecular biomarkers or environmental factors can influence CEST, so that a change in CEST is not conclusive proof for detecting the biomarker. To overcome this problem, a second control CEST effect may be included in the same PARACEST agent, which is responsive to all factors that alter the first CEST effect except for the biomarker to be measured. To investigate this approach, a PARACEST MRI contrast agent was developed with one CEST effect that is responsive to esterase enzyme activity and a second control CEST effect. The ratio of the two CEST effects was independent of concentration and T1 relaxation, so that this agent was self-calibrating with respect to these factors. This ratiometric method was dependent on temperature and was influenced by MR coalescence as the chemical exchange rates approached the chemical shifts of the exchangable protons as temperature was increased. The two CEST effects also showed evidence of having different pH dependencies, so that this agent was not self-calibrating with respect to pH. Therefore, a self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent can more accurately detect a molecular biomarker such as esterase enzyme activity, as long as temperature and pH are within an acceptable physiological range and remain constant. PMID:21861282

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal — thermoacoustic and photoacoustic — contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison with de-ionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than two-fold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison with blood, they exhibited more than six-fold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies. PMID:19566311

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal-thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison to deionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than twofold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison to blood, they exhibited more than sixfold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies.

  6. Screening and Monitoring Response to Treatment Using Subsecond Molecular Imaging and Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Magnetization transfer MRI in multiple sclerosis . J Neuroimaging. 2007;17 Suppl 1:S22–S26. 82. Filippi M, Rocca MA. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance... multiple sclerosis . Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2009;19(1):27–36. 84. Lundbom N. Determination of magnetization transfer contrast in tissue: an MR... multiple RF coils intended for optimal direct and indirect detection of hyperpolarized contrast agents in vivo. 4.b. Y1Q3-Y1Q4. Low field MRI: pre

  7. Prostate Cancer Evaluation: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Enzyme-Activated Proton MRI Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    tissues have determined the widespread success of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in clinical diagnosis.[40] The contrast in an MR image is the... MR images of M9 and M10 with lacZ transfected prostate tumor cells, yielding obvious MRI contrast changes between in WT and lacZ transfected PC3...agent for MR angiography , Radiology, 207, 529-538. 44. Rudin M, Mueggler T, Allegrini PR, Baumann D, Rausch M, 2003, Characterization of CNS disorders

  8. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro, Francisco José; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Rosa Abadía, Ana; Soledad Romero, María; López, Antonio; Jesús Muñoz, María

    2007-04-01

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem ®), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers.

  9. Comparison of voiding cystourethrography and urosonography with second-generation contrast agents in simultaneous prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Świętoń, Dominik; Rybczyńska, Dorota; Czarniak, Piotr; Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Kaszubowski, Mariusz; Szurowska, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background The invasiveness and exposure to radiation in voiding cystourethrography led to the introduction of alternative methods of diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, including contrast enhanced voiding urosonography. While there is a limited number of studies comparing these methods using new generation ultrasound contrast agents, none of them compared both methods simultaneously. This study is aimed at assessing agreement between contrast enhanced voiding urosonography with second-generation ultrasound contrast agents and voiding cystourethrography. Methods From April 2013 to May 2014, 83 children (37 female and 46 male), mean age 3.5 years, age range from 1 month to 17.5 years, underwent prospective simultaneous assessment by contrast enhanced voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography, with a total of 166 uretero-renal units evaluated. Results The sensitivity of voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography were comparable, amounting to 88%, however, neither reached 100% for the entire studied population. The negative predictive value of voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography was 97%, and there was no difference between both methods. Conclusion Voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography are comparable methods in diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, and can be performed alternatively. However, some limitations of contrast enhanced voiding urosonography must be remembered. PMID:28138405

  10. Evaluation of three effervescent agents for double-contrast upper gastrointestinal radiography.

    PubMed

    Koehler, R E; Weyman, P J; Stanley, R J; Lee, J K; Balfe, D M

    1981-01-01

    The agent used to introduce gas into the stomach is an important factor in determining the quality of double-contrast upper gastrointestinal radiography. The efficacy of 3 effervescent agents formulated for use in double-contract upper gastrointestinal radiography was evaluated in 300 patients. Patients found 2 granular preparations (E-Z-Gas granules and Baros) easier to swallow than a powdered agent (E-Z-Gas powder). Bubble formation and flocculation of barium in the stomach were less of a problem with Baros. Differences in mucosal coating and visualization of area gastricae were not statistically significant.

  11. Characterization of a Novel Hafnium-Based X-ray Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thomas; Bauser, Marcus; Berger, Markus; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Jost, Gregor; Neis, Christian; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Riefke, Björn; Suelzle, Detlev; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of BAY-576, a new x-ray contrast agent which is not based on iodine, but rather on the heavy metal hafnium. Compared with iodine, hafnium provides better x-ray absorption in the energy range of computed tomography (CT) and allows images of comparable quality to be acquired at a significantly reduced radiation dose. A range of standard methods were used to explore the physicochemistry of BAY-576 as well as its tolerability in in vitro assays, its pharmacokinetics and toxicology in rats, and its performance in CT imaging in rabbits. BAY-576 is an extraordinarily stable chelate with a metal content of 42% (wt/wt) and with excellent water solubility. Formulations of 300 mg Hf/mL exhibited viscosity (3.3-3.6 mPa) and osmolality (860-985 mOsm/kg) in the range of nonionic x-ray agents. No relevant effects on erythrocytes, the coagulation, or complement system or on a panel of 87 potential biological targets were observed. The compound did not bind to plasma proteins of a number of species investigated. After intravenous injection in rats, it was excreted fast and mainly via the kidneys. Its pharmacokinetics was comparable to known extracellular contrast agents. A dose of 6000 mg Hf/kg, approximately 10 to 20 times the expected diagnostic dose, was well tolerated by rats with only moderate adverse effects. Computed tomography imaging in rabbits bearing a tumor in the liver demonstrated excellent image quality when compared with iopromide at the same contrast agent dose in angiography during the arterial phase. At 70% of the radiation dose, BAY-576 provided a contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumor, which was equivalent to iopromide at 100% radiation dose. The profile of BAY-576 indicates its potential as the first compound in a new class of noniodine x-ray contrast agents, which can contribute to the reduction of the radiation burden in contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

  12. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  13. [Relationship between oral food intake and nausea caused by intravenous injection of iodinated contrast material].

    PubMed

    Oowaki, K; Saigusa, H; Ojiri, H; Ariizumi, M; Yamagisi, J; Fukuda, K; Tada, S

    1994-05-25

    From December, 1990 to July, 1992 we investigated the relationship between the time after oral food intake and nausea and vomiting caused by the intravenous injection of iodinated contrast media in 2,414 patients who underwent contrast enhanced CT. The contrast media used were as follows: amidotrizoic acid (high-osmolality contrast medium, HOCM, iodine 292 mg/ml) in 1173 patients, iopamidol (low-osmolality contrast medium, LOCM, iodine 300m g/ml) in 641 patients, and iohexol (LOCM, iodine 300 mg/ml) in 600 patients. All the patients had an intravenous injection of 100ml in volume. The overall incidence of nausea and vomiting was 3.8% (96/2412 patients). The incidence was 6. 7% (79/1173 patients) in the HOCM group and 1.4% (17/1241 patients) in the LOCM group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting increased with the interval between the oral intake of food and the intravenous injection of contrast medium. It is concluded that fasting before contrast-enhanced CT enhances the adverse effect of nausea and vomiting.

  14. Heterogeneous delayed enhancement of the liver after ultrasound contrast agent injection--a normal variant.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Albrecht, Thomas; Blomley, Martin J; Heckemann, Rolf A; Cosgrove, David O; Wolf, Karl-Jürgen

    2002-08-01

    We report a characteristic heterogeneous delayed liver enhancement pattern that we have encountered in a total of 6 of approximately 1500 subjects who underwent contrast-enhanced liver ultrasonography. The heterogeneous enhancement occurred several min after contrast injection and persisted for up to 1 h. It was seen in diseased as well as healthy livers and appears to represent a "normal variant" of liver enhancement. It was observed with two different contrast agents. The cause of the described effect is unknown; it may be related to the formation of large bubbles and vascular entrapment of these bubbles in the liver.

  15. Development of silica-encapsulated silver nanoparticles as contrast agents intended for dual-energy mammography.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Roshan; Naha, Pratap C; Lau, Kristen C; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Popov, Anatoliy V; Delikatny, Edward J; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P; Maidment, Andrew D A

    2016-09-01

    Dual-energy (DE) mammography has recently entered the clinic. Previous theoretical and phantom studies demonstrated that silver provides greater contrast than iodine for this technique. Our objective was to characterize and evaluate in vivo a prototype silver contrast agent ultimately intended for DE mammography. The prototype silver contrast agent was synthesized using a three-step process: synthesis of a silver core, silica encapsulation and PEG coating. The nanoparticles were then injected into mice to determine their accumulation in various organs, blood half-life and dual-energy contrast. All animal procedures were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. The final diameter of the nanoparticles was measured to be 102 (±9) nm. The particles were removed from the vascular circulation with a half-life of 15 min, and accumulated in macrophage-rich organs such as the liver, spleen and lymph nodes. Dual-energy subtraction techniques increased the signal difference-to-noise ratio of the particles by as much as a factor of 15.2 compared to the single-energy images. These nanoparticles produced no adverse effects in mice. Silver nanoparticles are an effective contrast agent for dual-energy x-ray imaging. With further design improvements, silver nanoparticles may prove valuable in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. • Silver has potential as a contrast agent for DE mammography. • Silica-coated silver nanoparticles are biocompatible and suited for in vivo use. • Silver nanoparticles produce strong contrast in vivo using DE mammography imaging systems.

  16. Specific binding of molecularly targeted agents to pancreas tumors and impact on observed optical contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Pardesi, Omar; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    In optical imaging it is thought that optimum tumor contrast can be achieved with the use of small-labeled molecular tracers that have high affinity to their targets and fast clearance rates from the blood stream and healthy tissues. An example of this is fluorescently tagged EGF to monitor the molecular activity of tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. Extensive fluorescence contrast analysis for fluorescence molecular tomography has been performed on the AsPC-1 pancreas tumor, grown orthotopically in mice; yet, the binding dynamics of the EGF-fluorescent agent in vivo is not completely known. The bulk pancreatic tumor displays 3:1 contrast relative to the normal pancreas at long times after injection; however, even higher levels of fluorescence in the liver, kidney and intestine suggest that molecular specificity for the tumor may be low. Mice were administered a fluorescently labeled EGF agent and were sacrificed at various time points post-injection. To analyze the amount of specific binding at each time point frozen tissue samples were fluorescently imaged, washed with saline to remove the interstitially distributed contrast agent, and then imaged again. This technique demonstrated that approximately ~10% of the molecular target was firmly bound to the cell, while 90% was mobile or unbound. This low binding ratio suggests that the contrast observed is from inherent properties of the tumor (i.e. enhanced permeability and retention effect) and not from specific bound contrast as previously anticipated. The use of EGF contrast agents in MRI-guided fluorescence tomography and the impact of low binding specificity are discussed.

  17. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity.

  18. Dual-energy coronary angiography in pigs using a Gd contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Stefan; Elleaume, Helene; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Brochard, Thierry; Renier, Michel; Bertrand, Bernard; Esteve, Francois; Le Bas, Jean-Francois; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William C.

    2000-04-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Medical Research Beamline is now fully operational. One of the primary programs is the development of dual-energy transvenous coronary angiography for in vivo human research protocols. Previous work at this and other synchrotrons has been entirely devoted to the use of the dual-energy digital subtraction technique at the iodine k-absorption edge at 33.17 keV. The images are recorded in a line scan mode following venous injection of the contrast agent. Considerations of the patient dose, the dilution of the contrast agent in the pulmonary system and the arteries overlying the filled ventricles have limited the image quality. The ESRF facility was designed to allow dual- energy imaging at higher energies, for example at the gadolinium k-absorption edge at 50.24 keV. The advantages have been theoretically known for many years, with the higher energy promising higher image quality with less radiation dose. During the commissioning phase of the ESRF angiography program, the opportunity presented itself to image adult pigs in vivo with Gd contrast agent. This paper presents some initial results of the image quality in the Gd studies in comparison with iodine contrast agent studies, also carried out in adult pigs at the ESRF.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of the dynamics of therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-12-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  1. Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun

    2011-07-01

    Reported herein is the synthesis of a dextran coating on nickel ferrite (Ni-Fe2O4) nanoparticles via chemical coprecipitation. The aqueous solution of the synthesized nanoparticles showed good colloidal stability, and no precipitate was observed 20 months after the synthesis. The coated nanoparticles were found to be cylindrical in shape in the TEM images, and showed a uniform size distribution with an average length and diameter of 17 and 4 nm, respectively. The coated particles were evaluated as potential T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI. The T1 and T2 relaxations of the hydrogen protons in the water molecules in an aqueous solution of dextran-coated Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles were studied. It was found that the T1 relaxivity for the aqueous solution of dextran-coated nanoparticles was slightly greater than that of a commercial Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent. The T2 relaxivity, however, was almost twice that of the commercial Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent. Animal experimentation also demonstrated that the dextran-coated Ni-Fe2O4 nanoparticles are suitable for use as either T1 or T2 contrast agents in MRI.

  2. Melanin-Based Contrast Agents for Biomedical Optoacoustic Imaging and Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Optoacoustic imaging emerged in early 1990s as a new biomedical imaging technology that generates images by illuminating tissues with short laser pulses and detecting resulting ultrasound waves. This technique takes advantage of the spectroscopic approach to molecular imaging, and delivers high-resolution images in the depth of tissue. Resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is scalable, so that biomedical systems from cellular organelles to large organs can be visualized and, more importantly, characterized based on their optical absorption coefficient, which is proportional to the concentration of absorbing chromophores. Optoacoustic imaging was shown to be useful in both preclinical research using small animal models and in clinical applications. Applications in the field of molecular imaging offer abundant opportunities for the development of highly specific and effective contrast agents for quantitative optoacoustic imaging. Recent efforts are being made in the direction of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents (such as nanoparticles made of melanin) that are potentially applicable in clinical optoacoustic imaging. In order to increase the efficiency and specificity of contrast agents and probes, they need to be made smart and capable of controlled accumulation in the target cells. This review was written in recognition of the potential breakthroughs in medical optoacoustic imaging that can be enabled by efficient and nontoxic melanin-based optoacoustic contrast agents. PMID:28783106

  3. PSMA-targeted contrast agents for intraoperative imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Lee, Jeong Heon; Kang, Homan; Park, G Kate; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2017-02-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) can serve as a molecular cell surface target for the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging enables highly sensitive, rapid, and non-radioactive imaging of PSMA, though specific targeting still remains a challenge because no optimized contrast agents exist.

  4. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Jeffrey R; West, Jennifer L; Badea, Cristian T

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research.

  5. Can focused US with a diagnostic US contrast agent favorably affect renal function?

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2009-12-01

    Focused ultrasonography (US) with simultaneous administration of a US microbubble contrast agent was used to transiently increase the glomerular filtration rate while altering the sieving properties of glomeruli in normal rabbits. In its current form, this process has very limited application potential to states of abnormal renal function.

  6. In vivo small animal micro-CT using nanoparticle contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; West, Jennifer L.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most valuable modalities for in vivo imaging because it is fast, high-resolution, cost-effective, and non-invasive. Moreover, CT is heavily used not only in the clinic (for both diagnostics and treatment planning) but also in preclinical research as micro-CT. Although CT is inherently effective for lung and bone imaging, soft tissue imaging requires the use of contrast agents. For small animal micro-CT, nanoparticle contrast agents are used in order to avoid rapid renal clearance. A variety of nanoparticles have been used for micro-CT imaging, but the majority of research has focused on the use of iodine-containing nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles. Both nanoparticle types can act as highly effective blood pool contrast agents or can be targeted using a wide variety of targeting mechanisms. CT imaging can be further enhanced by adding spectral capabilities to separate multiple co-injected nanoparticles in vivo. Spectral CT, using both energy-integrating and energy-resolving detectors, has been used with multiple contrast agents to enable functional and molecular imaging. This review focuses on new developments for in vivo small animal micro-CT using novel nanoparticle probes applied in preclinical research. PMID:26581654

  7. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  8. Modeling contrast agent flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of CFD with medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Vali, Alireza; Sigovan, Monica; Lawton, Michael; Saloner, David; Boussel, Loic

    2016-11-01

    PURPOSE: The flow in cerebral aneurysms is routinely assessed with X-ray angiography, an imaging technique based on a contrast agent injection. In addition to requiring a patient's catheterization and radiation exposure, the X-ray angiography may inaccurately estimate the flow residence time, as the injection alters the native blood flow patterns. Numerical modeling of the contrast transport based on MRI imaging, provides a non-invasive alternative for the flow diagnostics. METHODS: The flow in 3 cerebral aneurysms was measured in vivo with 4D PC-MRI, which provides time-resolved, 3D velocity field. The measured velocities were used to simulate a contrast agent transport by solving the advection-diffusion equation. In addition, the flow in the same patient-specific geometries was simulated with CFD and the velocities obtained from the Navier-Stokes solution were used to model the transport of a virtual contrast. RESULTS: Contrast filling and washout patterns obtained in simulations based on MRI-measured velocities were in agreement with those obtained using the Navier-Stokes solution. Some discrepancies were observed in comparison to the X-ray angiography data, as numerical modeling of the contrast transport is based on the native blood flow unaffected by the contrast injection. NIH HL115267.

  9. Flow-enhanced off-resonance saturation for remote detection of iron-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Philipp; Helluy, Xavier; Kampf, Thomas; Lang, Esra; Jakob, Peter M

    2010-06-01

    A switchable contrast mechanism, flow enhanced off-resonance saturation, is presented. This technique combines the effects of flow and off-resonance saturation for remote detection of iron oxide contrast agents incorporated into a vessel wall. Initial results from phantom experiments are presented and show the feasibility of this method. A specific saturation contrast could be observed. This contrast mechanism is highly dependent on field homogeneity and spectral selectivity of the off-resonance saturation pulses. The contrast scales directly with the pulse offset of the used saturation pulses, the flow velocity in the vessel, and the duration of the off-resonance saturation module prior to the imaging sequence. This technique has the potential to detect iron-loaded atherosclerotic plaques in future in vivo applications. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  11. Preparation of near-infrared-labeled targeted contrast agents for clinical translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, D. Michael

    2011-03-01

    Targeted fluorophore-labeled contrast agents are moving toward translation to human surgical use. To prepare for future clinical use, we examined the performance of potential ligands targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor, α5β3 integrins, and GLUT transporters for their suitability as directed contrast agents. Each agent was labeled with IRDye 800CW, and near-infrared dye with excitation/emission wavelengths of 789/805 nm, which we determined had favorable toxicity characteristics. The probe molecules examined consisted of Affibodies, nanobodies, peptides, and the sugar 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Each probe was tested for specific and non-specific binding in cell based assays. All probe types showed good performance in mouse models for detecting either spontaneous tumors or tumor xenografts in vivo. Each of the probes tested show promise for future human clinical studies.

  12. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  13. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  14. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    PubMed Central

    D’Hollander, Antoine; Mathieu, Evelien; Jans, Hilde; Vande Velde, Greetje; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lagae, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3). Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. PMID:27536107

  15. Development of silica-encapsulated silver nanoparticle as contrast agents intended for dual-energy mammography

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Roshan; Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Popov, Anatoliy V.; Cormode, David P.; Delikatny, Edward J.; Tsourkas, Andrew; Maidment, Andrew D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dual-energy (DE) mammography has recently entered the clinic. Previous theoretical and phantom studies demonstrated that silver provides greater contrast than iodine for this technique. Our objective was to characterize and evaluate in vivo a prototype silver contrast agent ultimately intended for DE mammography. Methods The prototype silver contrast agent was synthesized using a three-step process: synthesis of a silver core, silica encapsulation, and PEG coating. The nanoparticles were then injected into mice to determine their accumulation in various organs, blood half-life, and dual-energy contrast. All animal procedures were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Results The final diameter of the nanoparticles was measured to be 102 (± 9) nm. The particles were removed from the vascular circulation with a half-life of 15 minutes, and accumulated in macrophage-rich organs such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Dual-energy subtraction techniques increased the signal difference-to-noise ratio of the particles by as much as a factor of 15.2 compared to the single-energy images. These nanoparticles produced no adverse effects in mice. Conclusion Silver nanoparticles are an effective contrast agent for dual-energy x-ray imaging. With further design improvements, silver nanoparticles may prove valuable in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. PMID:26910906

  16. Near-infrared dye-loaded magnetic nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agent for enhanced tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chuang; Deng, Zi-Jian; Peng, Dong; Jin, Yu-Shen; Ma, Yan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Yu-Kun; Xi, Jian-Zhong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhi-Fei; Li, Chang-Hui; Liang, Xiao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) has attracted extensive interest because of its optical absorption contrast and ultrasonic detection. This study aims to develop a biocompatible and biodegradable PA contrast agent particularly promising for clinical applications in human body. Methods: In this study, we presented a PA contrast agent: 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)] (DSPE-PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with indocyanine green (ICG). We used ICG and SPIO NPs because both drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Given the strong absorption of near-infrared laser pulses, SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs with a uniform diameter of ~28 nm could significantly enhance PA signals. Results: We demonstrated the contrast enhancement of these NPs in phantom and animal experiments, in which the in vivo circulation time of SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs was considerably longer than that of free ICG. These novel NPs also displayed a high efficiency of tumor targeting. Conclusions: SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs are promising PAT contrast agents for clinical applications. PMID:27807502

  17. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described.

  18. Contrast-enhanced US-guided Interventions: Improving Success Rate and Avoiding Complications Using US Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dean Y; Yusuf, Gibran T; Daneshi, Mohammad; Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Ramnarine, Raymond; Sellars, Maria E K; Sidhu, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an established modality for intervention. The introduction of microbubble US contrast agents (UCAs) has the potential to further improve US imaging for intervention. According to licensing, UCAs are currently approved for clinical use in restricted situations, but many additional indications have become accepted as having clinical value. The use of UCAs has been shown to be safe, and there is no risk of renal toxic effects, unlike with iodinated or gadolinium contrast medium. Broadly speaking, UCAs can be injected into the bloodstream (intravascular use) or instilled into almost any accessible body cavity (endocavitary use), either in isolation or synchronously. In microvascular applications, contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) enhances delineation of necrotic areas and the vascularized target to improve real-time targeting. The ability of CEUS to allow true assessment of vascularity has also been used in follow-up of devascularizing intervention. In macrovascular applications, real-time angiographic images can be obtained with CEUS without nephrotoxic effects or radiation. In endocavitary applications, CEUS can achieve imaging similar to that of iodinated contrast medium-based fluoroscopy; follow-up to intervention (eg, tubography and nephrostography) can be performed at the bedside, which may be advantageous. The use of UCAs is a natural progression in US-guided intervention. The aim of this article is to describe the indications, contraindications, and techniques of using UCAs as an adjunctive tool for US-guided interventional procedures to facilitate effective treatment, improve complication management, and increase the overall success of interventional procedures. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  19. The influence of agent delivery mode on cardiomyocyte injury induced by myocardial contrast echocardiography in rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Armstrong, William F

    2005-09-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) can induce bioeffects in rat hearts by local activation of the contrast agent gas bodies. This study was designed to examine the influence of agent delivery mode on the magnitude of cardiomyocyte injury. A total of 69 hairless rats were anesthetized and mounted vertically in a water bath. Evans blue dye was injected as vital stain for cardiomyocyte injury. Definity contrast agent was diluted in saline and injected via tail vein at 20 or 80 microL/kg in bolus or infusion mode. In 12 rats, 0.57 mg/kg dipyridamole was given to simulate a stress test. MCE in a short axis view with 1:4 or 1:16 ECG triggering was performed at 1.5 MHz for 5 or 20 min. The peak rarefactional pressure amplitude was set to 1.1 or 2.0 MPa. Premature beats were counted from the ECG record. Evans blue fluorescent cells were counted on frozen sections from the center of the scan plane of heart samples obtained 24 h postMCE. Infusion of the contrast agent led to more cardiomyocyte injury than did bolus injection. Dipyridamole stress also increased the effect. Varying the infusion rate or trigger interval was less important than the overall dosage during scanning. Exposure at 1.1 MPa and 80 microL/kg yielded significant cell killing relative to shams. Premature beats generally followed the same trends as cell injury, except that lower infusion rates tended to increase this effect. Contrast agent delivery mode, as well as dose and peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, has a significant influence on the bioeffects potential of MCE.

  20. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  1. Synthesis of nanoparticle CT contrast agents: in vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung June; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Park, Ji Ae; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble and biocompatible D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 and BaCO3 nanoparticles were synthesized for the first time to be used as x-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Their average particle diameters were 3.2 ± 0.1 and 2.8 ± 0.1 nm for D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 and BaCO3 nanoparticles, respectively. All the nanoparticles exhibited a strong x-ray attenuation. In vivo CT images were obtained after intravenous injection of an aqueous sample suspension of D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 nanoparticles, and positive contrast enhancements in the kidney were clearly shown. These findings indicate that the nanoparticles reported in this study may be promising CT contrast agents. PMID:27877838

  2. Fe-based nanoparticulate metallic alloys as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bomatí-Miguel, Oscar; Morales, María P; Tartaj, Pedro; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Bonville, Pierre; Santos, Martín; Zhao, Xinqing; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2005-10-01

    Pharmaceutical grade magnetic colloidal dispersions have been prepared from iron alloys synthesized by laser pyrolysis. The colloids were obtained by simultaneous dispersion and coating of the particles with dextran in a strong alkaline solution. Both powders and dispersions have been analyzed in terms of microstructural characteristics, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The powders consist of uniform spherical nanoparticles (12 nm of diameter) showing a metallic core encapsulated into an iron-oxide shell. On the other hand, the colloidal dispersions consist of magnetic particles-aggregates with hydrodynamic sizes of approximately 75 nm. Magnetic resonance images of rats were taken after the intravenously administration of the Fe colloidal dispersions, and compared with those obtained using a commercial iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. The results showed a contrast improvement of 60% in the liver with respect to the commercial sample, which suggests that this product could be a suitable contrast agent for NMR imaging of liver and spleen.

  3. Synthesis of nanoparticle CT contrast agents: in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung June; Xu, Wenlong; Wasi Ahmad, Md; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Park, Ji Ae; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-10-01

    Water-soluble and biocompatible D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 and BaCO3 nanoparticles were synthesized for the first time to be used as x-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Their average particle diameters were 3.2 ± 0.1 and 2.8 ± 0.1 nm for D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 and BaCO3 nanoparticles, respectively. All the nanoparticles exhibited a strong x-ray attenuation. In vivo CT images were obtained after intravenous injection of an aqueous sample suspension of D-glucuronic acid coated Na2WO4 nanoparticles, and positive contrast enhancements in the kidney were clearly shown. These findings indicate that the nanoparticles reported in this study may be promising CT contrast agents.

  4. Golden carbon nanotubes as multimodal photoacoustic and photothermal high-contrast molecular agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Moon, Hyung-Mo; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise as contrast agents for photoacoustic and photothermal imaging of tumours and infections because they offer high resolution and allow deep tissue imaging. However, in vivo applications have been limited by the relatively low absorption displayed by nanotubes at near-infrared wavelengths and concerns over toxicity. Here, we show that gold-plated carbon nanotubes—termed golden carbon nanotubes—can be used as photoacoustic and photothermal contrast agents with enhanced near-infrared contrast (~102-fold) for targeting lymphatic vessels in mice using extremely low laser fluence levels of a few mJ cm−2. Antibody-conjugated golden carbon nanotubes were used to map the lymphatic endothelial receptor, and preliminary in vitro viability tests show golden carbon nanotubes have minimal toxicity. This new nanomaterial could be an effective alternative to existing nanoparticles and fluorescent labels for non-invasive targeted imaging of molecular structures in vivo. PMID:19809462

  5. T(2) relaxation time of hyaline cartilage in presence of different gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Edzard; Settles, Marcus; Diederichs, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    The transverse relaxation time, T(2), of native cartilage is used to quantify cartilage degradation. T(2) is frequently measured after contrast administration, assuming that the impact of gadolinium-based contrast agents on cartilage T(2) is negligible. To verify this assumption the depth-dependent variation of T(2) in the presence of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoteridol was investigated. Furthermore, the r(2)/r(1) relaxivity ratios were quantified in different cartilage layers to demonstrate differences between T(2) and T(1) relaxation effects. Transverse high-spatial-resolution T(1)- and T(2)-maps were simultaneously acquired on a 1.5 T MR scanner before and after contrast administration in nine bovine patellae using a turbo-mixed sequence. The r(2)/r(1) ratios were calculated for each contrast agent in cartilage. Profiles of T(1), T(2) and r(2)/r(1) across cartilage thickness were generated in the absence and presence of contrast agent. The mean values in different cartilage layers were compared for global variance using the Kruskal-Wallis test and pairwise using the Mann-Whitney U-test. T(2) of unenhanced cartilage was 98 +/- 5 ms at 1 mm and 65 +/- 4 ms at 3 mm depth. Eleven hours after contrast administration significant differences (p < 0.001) were measurable for all three contrast agents. T(2) values were 58 +/- 2 and 62 +/- 3 ms for gadopentetate dimeglumine, 46 +/- 2 and 57 +/- 2 ms for gadobenate dimeglumine, and 38 +/- 2 and 42 +/- 2 ms for gadoteridol at 1 and 3 mm depths, respectively. The r(2)/r(1) relaxivity ratios across cartilage thickness were close to 1.0 (range 0.9-1.3). At 1.5 T, T(2) decreased significantly in the presence of contrast agents, more pronounced in superficial than in deep cartilage. The change in T(2) relaxation rate was similar to the change in T(1). Cartilage T(2) measurements after contrast administration will lead to systematic errors in the quantification of cartilage degradation. 2010 John

  6. MCNP simulation of absorbed energy and dose by iodinated contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Yao, Hai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the absorbed dose and energy by iodinated contrast medium in diagnostic radiology. A simulation geometry in which an inner sphere (d = 0.2cm, 1cm, 5cm) filled with iodinated contrast medium (or water) is located at the center of a 20cm diameter water sphere was used in simulations performed with MCNP5 codes. Monoenergetic x-rays with energies ranging from 40 to 80keV from a cone beam source were utilized and contrast medium concentration ranged from 100 to 1mg/ml. Absorbed dose ratio (RD) to inner sphere and total absorbed energies ratio (RE) to the whole phantom with and without iodinated contrast medium were investigated. The maximum RD was ~13 for the 0.2cm diameter sphere with 100mg/ml contrast medium. The maximum RE was ~1.05 for the 5cm diameter contrast sphere at 80keV with 100mg/ml contrast medium. Under the same incident photon energy, increasing the inner sphere size from 0.2cm to 5cm caused a ~63% increase in the RD on average. Decreasing the contrast medium concentration from 100 to 10 mg/ml caused a decrease of RD of ~ 76%. A conclusion was reached that although local absorbed dose increase caused by iodinated contrast agent could be high; the increase in total absorbed energy is negligible.

  7. Real time myocardial contrast echocardiography during supine bicycle stress and continuous infusion of contrast agent. Cutoff values for myocardial contrast replenishment discriminating abnormal myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Kuntz-Hehner, Stefanie; Schmidt, Harald; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Tiemann, Klaus; Ghanem, Alexander; Troatz, Clemens; Lüderitz, Berndt; Omran, Heyder

    2007-07-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is a new imaging modality for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of our study was to evaluate feasibility of qualitative myocardial contrast replenishment (RP) assessment during supine bicycle stress MCE and find out cutoff values for such analysis, which could allow accurate detection of CAD. Forty-four consecutive patients, scheduled for coronary angiography (CA) underwent supine bicycle stress two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE). During the same session, MCE was performed at peak stress and post stress. Ultrasound contrast agent (SonoVue) was administered in continuous mode using an infusion pump (BR-INF 100, Bracco Research). Seventeen-segment model of left ventricle was used in analysis. MCE was assessed off-line in terms of myocardial contrast opacification and RP. RP was evaluated on the basis of the number of cardiac cycles required to refill the segment with contrast after its prior destruction with high-power frames. Determination of cutoff values for RP assessment was performed by means of reference intervals and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Quantitative CA was carried out using CAAS system. MCE could be assessed in 42 patients. CA revealed CAD in 25 patients. Calculated cutoff values for RP-analysis (peak-stress RP >3 cardiac cycles and difference between peak stress and post stress RP >0 cardiac cycles) provided sensitive (88%) and accurate (88%) detection of CAD. Sensitivity and accuracy of 2DE were 76% and 79%, respectively. Qualitative RP-analysis based on the number of cardiac cycles required to refill myocardium with contrast is feasible during supine bicycle stress MCE and enables accurate detection of CAD.

  8. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  9. Relative diffusion of paramagnetic metal complexes of MRI contrast agents in an isotropic hydrogel medium.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Bimali Sanjeevani; Osuga, Toshiaki

    2017-03-01

    The observation of molecular diffusion by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is significant in the evaluation of the metabolic activity of living tissues. Series of MRI examinations were conducted on a diffusion model to study the behaviour of the diffusion process of different-molecular-weight (MW) paramagnetic MRI contrast agents in an isotropic agar hydrogel medium. The model consisted of a solidified 1 % agar gel with an initial concentration of 0.5 mmol/L contrast solution layered on top of the gel. The diffusion process was monitored at pre-determined time intervals of immediately, 1, 6, 9, 23, and 48 h after introduction of the contrast agents onto the agar gel with a T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) pulse sequence. Three types of paramagnetic contrast agents, Gd-DTPA with a MW of 547.57 g/mol, Prohance with a MW of 558.69 g/mol and MnCl2 with a MW of 125.84 g/mol, resulted in an approximate average diffusional displacement ratio of 1:1:2 per hour, respectively, within 48 h of the experiment. Therefore, the results of this study supported the hypothesis that the rate of the diffusion process of MRI contrast agents in the agar hydrogel medium is inversely related to their MWs. However, more repetitions are necessary under various types of experimental conditions and also with various types of contrast media of different MWs for further confirmation and validation of these results.

  10. A novel blood-pooling MR contrast agent: Carboxymethyl-diethylaminoethyl dextran magnetite.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsuchiya, Keiko; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Ohta, Shinichi; Otani, Hideji; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Gadofosveset trisodium is available as a prolonged pooling vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. As gadolinium (Gd)-based agents may increase the risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency, the present study synthesized carboxymethyl-diethylaminoethyl dextran magnetite (CMEADM) particles as a blood-pooling, non-Gd‑based contrast agent. CMEADM particles carry a negative or positive charge due to the binding of amino and carboxyl groups to the hydroxyl group of dextran. The present study evaluated whether the degree of charge alters the blood‑pooling time. The evaluation was performed by injecting four groups of three Japanese white rabbits each with CMEADM‑, CMEADM2‑, CMEADM+ (surface charges: ‑10.4, ‑41.0 and +9.6 mV, respectively) or with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO; ‑11.5 mV). The relative signal intensity (SIrel) of each was calculated using the following formula: SIrel = (SI post‑contrast ‑ SI pre‑contrast / SI pre‑contrast) x 100. Following injection with the CMEADMs, but not with USPIO, the in vivo pooling time was prolonged to >300 min. No significant differences were attributable to the electric charge among the CMEADM‑, CMEADM2‑ or and CMEADM+ particles when analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD test. Taken together, all three differently‑charged CMEADM2 particles exhibited prolonged vascular enhancing effects, compared with the USPIO. The degree of charge of the contrast agents used in the present study did not result in alteration of the prolonged blood pooling time.

  11. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velroyen, A.; Bech, M.; Malecki, A.; Tapfer, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Ingrisch, M.; Cyran, C. C.; Auweter, S. D.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-02-01

    In clinically established—absorption-based—biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  12. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Velroyen, A; Bech, M; Malecki, A; Tapfer, A; Yaroshenko, A; Ingrisch, M; Cyran, C C; Auweter, S D; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-02-21

    In clinically established-absorption-based-biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  13. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Nojima, Masanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice. PMID:26060990

  14. Multimeric Near IR–MR Contrast Agent for Multimodal In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiple imaging modalities are often required for in vivo imaging applications that require both high probe sensitivity and excellent spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, MR and optical imaging are an attractive combination that can be used to determine both molecular and anatomical information. Herein, we describe the synthesis and in vivo testing of two multimeric NIR–MR contrast agents that contain three Gd(III) chelates and an IR-783 dye moiety. One agent contains a PEG linker and the other a short alkyl linker. These agents label cells with extraordinary efficacy and can be detected in vivo using both imaging modalities. Biodistribution of the PEGylated agent shows observable fluorescence in xenograft MCF7 tumors and renal clearance by MR imaging. PMID:26083313

  15. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T2 contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM-1 S-1, which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM-1 S-1). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM-1 S-1, which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM-1 S-1). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figures and experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04691e

  16. The use of innovative gadolinium-based contrast agent for MR-diagnosis of cancer in the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Zelchan, R.; Grigorev, E.; Frolova, I.; Nam, I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study of the functional suitability and specific activity of the contrast agent gadolinium-based for magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the investigated contrast agent intensively accumulates in organs and anatomical structures of the experimental animals. In the model of tumor lesions in animals, study have shown that investigational contrast agent accumulates in the tumor tissue and retained there in for a long enough time.

  17. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast-cancer targeting ultrasound contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Milgroom, Andrew; Intrator, Miranda; Madhavan, Krishna; Mazzaro, Luciano; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Bolin; Park, Daewon

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is used widely in the context of breast cancer. While it is advantageous for a number of reasons, it has low specificity and requires the use of a contrast agent. Its use as a standalone diagnostic and real-time imaging modality could be achieved by development of a tumor-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA); functionalizing the UCA with a tumor-targeting agent would also allow the targeted administration of anti-cancer drugs at the tumor site. In this article, clinical US techniques are used to show that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), functionalized with the monoclonal antibody Herceptin®, can be used as an effective UCA by increasing US image contrast. Furthermore, in vitro assays show the successful localization and binding of the MSN-Herceptin conjugate to HER2+ cancer cells, resulting in tumor-specific cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate the potential of MSNs as a stable, biocompatible, and effective therapeutic and diagnostic (“theranostic”) agent for US-based breast cancer imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24269054

  18. Highly stabilized gadolinium chelates functionalized on metal nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Talha S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method for imaging and diagnosing tissue damage, organ function and the vascular system. Magnevist(TM) a complex of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Gd3+ is a clinically approved contrast agent for MRI. A derivative of DTPA was formed by the addition of two cysteine groups (DTPA-L-Cys) through amide linkage. The Gd complex of this ligand bonds with the silver surfaces through the cysteine thiols. GdDTPA-L-Cys was bound to ˜10nm diameter Ag nanoparticles for use as a multifunctional MRI contrast agent. The ligand and complex were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The silver construct was characterized by TEM, TGA and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The per metal complex r1 relaxivity of GdDTPA-L-Cys{Ag} greater than that of Magnavist(TM) with the same molarity for both compounds. The synthesis of a DTPA derivative is described that allows it to bind to silver or gold nanoparticles through a single thiol linkage (DTPASH). The resulting Gd complex, GdDTPASH, was bound to Ag nanoparticles to create a single monolayer on the surface. The construct was further stabilized in buffered solution with the addition of a thiolated PEG chain. The highly stabilized nanoparticle construct delivers a high payload of Gd compelex and is an effective T1 brightening agent. The production of this type of construct opens the way for engineered multimodal MRI contrast agents.

  19. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-11-11

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) particle for the purpose of concentrating the agent at an imaging site. PLGA particles with two separate average sizes of 1.83 microm and 920 nm, and PLA-PEG particles with a mean diameter of 952 nm were created. Loading of up to 30 wt % Gd-DTPA was achieved, and in vitro release occurred over 5 h. PLGA particles had highly negative zeta potentials, whereas the particles incorporating PEG had zeta potentials closer to neutral. Cytotoxicity of the particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was shown to be minimal. The ability of the polymeric contrast agent formulation to create contrast was similar to that of Gd-DTPA alone. These results demonstrate the possible utility of the contrast agent-loaded polymeric particles for plaque detection with MRI.

  20. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  1. NOTE: The effects of paramagnetic contrast agents on metabolite protons in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Philip S.; Leach, Martin O.; Rowland, Ian J.

    2002-03-01

    The longitudinal (R1) and transverse (R2) relaxivities of the clinically used contrast agents Gd(DTPA)2-, Gd(DOTA)- and Gd(DTPA-BMA) have been determined in mixed aqueous metabolite solutions for choline, creatine and N-acetylaspartate. Measurements were performed at 1.5 T using a STEAM sequence on 25 mM metabolite solutions at pH = 7.4 and 22 °C. The data showed that for all the contrast agents and metabolites, R1 ~ R2. The largest range of relaxivity values was found for Gd(DTPA)2-, where R2 = 6.8 +/- 0.3 mM-1 s-1 for choline and 1.5 +/- 0.4 mM-1 s-1 for N-acetylaspartate. Variation in relaxivity values was attributed primarily to differences between the charges of the paramagnetic agent and metabolite. The maximum potential influence of the contrast agents on in vivo metabolite signals was calculated using the measured relaxivities.

  2. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  3. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  4. Environmentally sensitive paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Torres, Jesus; Calle, Daniel; Lizarbe, Blanca; Negri, Viviana; Ubide, Carmen; Fayos, Rosa; Larrubia, Pilar López; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdan, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Even though alterations in the microenvironmental properties of tissues underlie the development of the most prevalent and morbid pathologies, they are not directly observable in vivo by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. This circumstance has lead to the development of a wide variety of exogenous paramagnetic and diamagnetic MRI and MRS probes able to inform non invasively on microenvironmental variables such as pH, pO(2), ion concentration o even temperature. This review covers the fundamentals of environmental contrast and the current arsenal of endogenous and exogenous MRI and MRS contrast enhancing agents available to visualize it. We begin describing the physicochemical background necessary to understand paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast enhancement with a special reference to novel magnetization transfer and (13)C hyperpolarization strategies. We describe then the main macrocyclic structures used to support the environmentally sensitive paramagnetic sensors, including CEST and PARACEST pH sensitive probes, temperature probes and enzyme activity or gene expression activatable probes. Finally we address the most commonly used diamagnetic contrast agents including imidazolic derivatives to reveal extracellular pH and tissue pO(2) values by MRS. The potential applications of these agents in multimodal and molecular imaging approaches are discussed.

  5. Gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Iwakuma, N.; Sharma, P.; Moudgil, B. M.; Wu, C.; McNeill, J.; Jiang, H.; Grobmyer, S. R.

    2009-09-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a rapidly emerging non-invasive imaging technology that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution. The ability to quantitatively and non-invasively image nanoparticles has important implications for the development of nanoparticles as in vivo cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study, the ability of systemically administered poly(ethylene glycol)-coated (PEGylated) gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with PAT has been evaluated. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticles (20 and 50 nm) have high photoacoustic contrast as compared to mouse tissue ex vivo. Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in mice in vivo following subcutaneous administration using PAT. Following intravenous administration of PEGylated gold nanoparticles to tumor-bearing mice, accumulation of gold nanoparticles in tumors can be effectively imaged with PAT. With gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent, PAT has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as breast cancer, melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.

  6. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  7. A naturally occurring contrast agent for OCT imaging of smokers' lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Whiteman, Suzanne C.; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; El Haj, Alicia J.; Spiteri, Monica A.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers great potential for clinical applications in terms of its cost, safety and real-time imaging capability. Improvement of its resolution for revealing sub-layers or sub-cellular components within a tissue will further widen its application. In this study we report that carbon pigment, which is frequently present in the lungs of smokers, could be used as a contrast agent to improve the OCT imaging of lung tissue. Carbon produced an intense bright OCT image at a relatively deep location. The parallel histopathological section analysis confirmed the presence of carbon pigment in such tissues. The underlying mechanism of the OCT image formation has been discussed based on a model system in which carbon particles were dispersed in agar gel. Calculations and in-depth intensity profiles of OCT revealed that higher refractive index particles with a size close to or smaller than the wavelength would greatly increase backscattering and generate a sharp contrast, while a particle size several times larger than the wavelength would absorb or obstruct the light path. The naturally occurring contrast agent could provide a diagnostic biomarker of lung tissue in smokers. Furthermore, carbon under such circumstances, can be used as an effective exogenous contrast agent, with which specific components or tissues exhibiting early tumour formation can be optically labelled to delineate the location and boundary, providing potential for early cancer detection and its treatment.

  8. Dynamical analysis of the nonlinear response of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Calvisi, Michael L; Lauderbaugh, Leal K

    2013-05-01

    The nonlinear response of spherical ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles is investigated to understand the effects of common shells on the dynamics. A compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation is combined with a thin-shell model developed by Lars Hoff to simulate the radial response of contrast agents subject to ultrasound. The responses of Albunex, Sonazoid, and polymer shells are analyzed through the application of techniques from dynamical systems theory such as Poincaré sections, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams to illustrate the qualitative dynamics and transition to chaos that occurs under certain changes in system parameters. Corresponding calculations of Lyapunov exponents provide quantitative data on the system dynamics. The results indicate that Albunex and polymer shells sufficiently stabilize the response to prevent transition to the chaotic regime throughout typical clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency. By contrast, Sonazoid shells delay the onset of chaos relative to an unshelled bubble but do not prevent it. A contour plot identifying regions of periodic and chaotic behavior over clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency is provided for Sonazoid. This work characterizes the nonlinear response of various ultrasound contrast agents, and shows that shell properties have a profound influence on the dynamics.

  9. Contrast media and glomerular filtration: dose dependence of clearance for three agents

    SciTech Connect

    Baeck, S.E.K.; Krutzen, E.; Nilsson-Ehle, P.

    1988-09-01

    Determination of plasma clearance of contrast agents has been advocated as a means to assess glomerular filtration rate. To evaluate the feasibility of different agents for this purpose, we have compared, in healthy volunteers, the dose dependence of plasma clearance for three contrast media (iohexol, a nonionic agent, and iothalamate and metrizoate, which are ionic substances), with special emphasis on the lower dose range (2-20 mL corresponding to 0.9-12.9 g, depending on dose and agent). Iohexol and iothalamate were cleared at constant rates, irrespective of given dose, whereas metrizoate clearance increased significantly at lower doses. In general, the clearances or iothalamate and metrizoate were, respectively, moderately and markedly higher than that of iohexol. The clearance of different doses of metrizoate (2 mL versus a radiographic dose of 40 mL or more) was also compared with the clearance of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in two groups of patients with reduced renal function. When compared with (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in patients with renal dysfunction, metrizoate was cleared significantly faster after a 2-mL dose, whereas clearances were identical when the metrizoate dose was 40 mL or more. These findings indicate that tubular secretion plays an active role in the elimination of metrizoate. The pharmacokinetic properties of iohexol, in combination with its low toxicity, make it a suitable agent for determination of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice.

  10. Virus-based nanomaterials as PET and MR contrast agents: from technology development to translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses have recently emerged as ideal protein scaffolds for a new class of contrast agents that can be used in medical imaging procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas synthetic nanoparticles are difficult to produce as homogeneous formulations due to the inherently stochastic nature of the synthesis process, virus-based nanoparticles are genetically encoded and are therefore produced as homogeneous and monodisperse preparations with a high degree of quality control. Because the virus capsids have a defined chemical structure that has evolved to carry cargoes of nucleic acids, they can be modified to carry precisely defined cargoes of contrast agents and can be decorated with spatially defined contrast reagents on the internal or external surfaces. Viral nanoparticles can also be genetically programed or conjugated with targeting ligands to deliver contrast agents to specific cells, and the natural biocompatibility of viruses means they are cleared rapidly from the body. Nanoparticles based on bacteriophages and plant viruses are safe for use in humans and can be produced inexpensively in large quantities as self-assembling recombinant proteins. Based on these considerations, a new generation of contrast agents has been developed using bacteriophages and plant viruses as scaffolds to carry positron-emitting radioisotopes such as [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose for PET imaging and iron oxide or Gd3+ for MRI. Although challenges such as immunogenicity, loading efficiency and regulatory compliance remain to be address, virus-based nanoparticles represent a promising new enabling technology for a new generation of highly biocompatible and biodegradable targeted imaging reagents. PMID:25683790

  11. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  12. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  13. Safety of intravenous application of second-generation ultrasound contrast agent in children: prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Piskunowicz, Maciej; Kosiak, Wojciech; Batko, Tomasz; Piankowski, Arkadiusz; Połczyńska, Katarzyna; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta

    2015-04-01

    The goal of the work described here was to assess the safety profile of intravenous second-generation ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) containing sulfur hexafluoride in pediatric contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Between 2010 and 2013, a total of 167 examinations were performed in 137 children referred by the Oncology Department. Approval by an Independent Ethical Review Board on Scientific Research for the intravenous use of an UCA containing sulfur hexafluoride in children with oncologic diseases was obtained. Consent for UCA administration was acquired from the parents or legal guardians. Severe anaphylactic reaction was observed in 0.6% (n = 1). No other adverse events during or after intravenous administration of contrast were observed in the examined group (no changes in heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, oxygen saturation or respiratory rate). There were no reports of subjective flushing, nausea, transient headaches or altered taste. Although second-generation ultrasound contrast agents are considered potentially safe, all investigators should be prepared for the development of adverse reactions and have provisions in place for all pediatric intravenous contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations. More multicenter studies are essential to determination of an accurate UCA safety profile. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  15. Gadolinium-based contrast agents: did we miss something in the last 25 years?

    PubMed

    Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Errante, Yuri; Grasso, Rosario Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In the last 24 months, several clinical and experimental studies, suggested first and demonstrated later, a progressive concentration of Gadolinium in the brain of normal renal function patients, following repeated injections of some of the commercially approved Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents. Although, till now, Gadolinium brain deposits have not been associated to any kind of neurological signs or symptoms, they oblige the radiology community to modify the actual approach in using Gadolinium contrast media in daily practice, to reduce unknown possible risks for patients.

  16. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Williams, D. R.; Schallek, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  17. Gd-doped BNNTs as T2-weighted MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Boni, Adriano; Calucci, Lucia; Forte, Claudia; Gozzi, Alessandro; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-08-01

    This work describes, for the first time, doping of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with gadolinium (Gd@BNNTs), a stable functionalization that permits non-invasive BNNT tracking via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report the structure, Gd loading, and relaxometric properties in water suspension at 7 T of Gd@BNNTs, and show the behaviour of these nanostructures as promising T2-weighted contrast agents. Finally, we demonstrate their complete biocompatibility in vitro on human neuroblastoma cells, together with their ability to effectively label and affect contrast in MRI images at 7 T.

  18. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Torres, A; Williams, D R; Schallek, J B

    2015-06-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina.

  19. Efficient, non-iterative estimator for imaging contrast agents with spectral x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2015-12-22

    This paper describes an estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements. Previous implementations were limited to a two function basis set but the new implementation is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required with high atomic number contrast materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters can be computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator.

  20. Modifying the size distribution of microbubble contrast agents for high-frequency subharmonic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Rychak, Joshua J.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Subharmonic imaging is of interest for high frequency (>10 MHz) nonlinear imaging, because it can specifically detect the response of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). However, conventional UCA produce a weak subharmonic response at high frequencies, which limits the sensitivity of subharmonic imaging. We hypothesized that modifying the size distribution of the agent can enhance its high-frequency subharmonic response. The overall goal of this study was to investigate size-manipulated populations of the agent to determine the range of sizes that produce the strongest subharmonic response at high frequencies (in this case, 20 MHz). A secondary goal was to assess whether the number or the volume-weighted size distribution better represents the efficacy of the agent for high-frequency subharmonic imaging. Methods: The authors created six distinct agent size distributions from the native distribution of a commercially available UCA (Targestar-P®). The median (number-weighted) diameter of the native agent was 1.63 μm, while the median diameters of the size-manipulated populations ranged from 1.35 to 2.99 μm. The authors conducted acoustic measurements with native and size-manipulated agent populations to assess their subharmonic response to 20 MHz excitation (pulse duration 1.5 μs, pressure amplitudes 100–398 kPa). Results: The results showed a considerable difference between the subharmonic response of the agent populations that were investigated. The subharmonic response peaked for the agent population with a median diameter of 2.15 μm, which demonstrated a subharmonic signal that was 8 dB higher than the native agent. Comparing the subharmonic response of different UCA populations indicated that microbubbles with diameters between 1.3 and 3 μm are the dominant contributors to the subharmonic response at 20 MHz. Additionally, a better correlation was observed between the subharmonic response of the agent and the number-weighted size-distribution (R2

  1. Allergic-like breakthrough reactions to gadolinium contrast agents after corticosteroid and antihistamine premedication.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Ellis, James H; Cohan, Richard H; Strouse, Peter J; Jan, Sophia C

    2008-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the number and severity of allergic-like breakthrough reactions to i.v. gadolinium-containing contrast agents in children and adults after premedication with corticosteroids and antihistamines. Contrast material reaction forms from the department of radiology for pediatric (under 19 years old) and adult patients were reviewed for the time period from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2006. All documented allergic-like reactions to i.v. gadolinium-containing contrast media after premedication with corticosteroids and antihistamines were identified. Forms were evaluated for reaction manifestations, management, and patient outcome. Our institutional electronic medical record system was accessed for each individual patient to identify pertinent medical history, including demographic information, history of allergic-like reaction to contrast media (gadolinium- or iodine-containing), and additional factors that led to prophylactic premedication. Eight patients experienced nine allergic-like reactions after the i.v. administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media despite premedication. A single patient had two breakthrough reactions. Six breakthrough reactions were mild, and three were moderate. No severe or fatal breakthrough reaction occurred. Eight of nine breakthrough reactions occurred in adults. All patients who experienced breakthrough reactions had a history of allergic-like reaction to either gadolinium- or iodine-containing contrast media. Allergic-like reactions to gadolinium-containing contrast media can occur despite premedication with corticosteroids and antihistamines.

  2. Experimental transmission of the chronic wasting disease agent to swine after oral or intracranial inoculation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. The potential for swine to serve as a host for the agent of chronic wasting disease is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of swine to the CWD agent following oral...

  3. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Young; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ha-Young; Seong, Hasoo; Shin, Byung Cheol; Yuk, Soon Hong; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Cho, Sun Hang

    2010-12-01

    Biocompatible poly-[ N-(2-hydroxyethyl)- d, l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol)-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16) conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd) via ethylenediamine (ED) was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  4. [Administration of MR contrast agents outside of approved indications (off-label use].

    PubMed

    Knopp, M V; Lodemann, M; Kage, U; Runge, V M

    2001-03-01

    The use of MRI contrast agents outside their labeled indications is routine in radiology. However, physicians feel frequently at unease. It is the aim of this paper to introduce the medical, juridicial and billing relevant issues in order to improve the knowledge on this topic. The basis for off-label use is the physician's prerogative, which finds its basis in the "declaration of Helsinki". Off-label use is allowed under special conditions and might be even the medical state of the art. The necessity for off-label use will continue to increase for MR-contrast agents, as clinical trials for registration purpose are quite costly and manufactures continuously will concentrate on the essential indications.

  5. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  6. Synthesis of cytocompatible Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashi, Zahra; Divband, Baharak; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Khatamian, Maasoumeh; Farahmand-Zahed, Farzane; Nazarlo, Ali Kiani; Gharehaghaji, Nahideh

    2017-09-01

    In this study, ZSM-5 nano zeolite was used as a support material for iron oxide nanoparticles and the potential ability of the nanocomposite for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was investigated. The nanocomposite was synthesized by hydrothermal method and characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. MRI was carried out by use of a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner. The T2 weighted images were prepared and the r2 relaxivity was calculated. The sizes of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and related nanocomposite were 13-24 nm and 80-150 nm, respectively. Results of MTT assay confirmed that the prepared nanocomposite is cytocompatible. The r2 relaxivity of the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite was 457.1 mM-1 s-1. This study suggests that the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite has potential to use as an MRI T2 contrast agent.

  7. Hydroxy double salts intercalated with Mn(II) complexes as potential contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miao; Li, Wanjing; Spillane, Dominic E. M.; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.; Williams, Gareth R.; Bligh, S. W. Annie

    2016-03-01

    A series of Mn(II) aminophosphonate complexes were successfully synthesized and intercalated into the hydroxy double salt [Zn5(OH)8]Cl2·yH2O. Complex incorporation led to an increase in the interlayer spacing from 7.8 to 10-12 Å. Infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of the characteristic vibration peaks of the Mn(II) complexes in the intercalates' spectra, indicating successful incorporation. The complex-loaded composites had somewhat lower proton relaxivities than the pure complexes. Nevertheless, these intercalates may have use as MRI contrast agents for patients with poor kidney function, where traditional Gd(III)-based contrast agents cause severe renal failure.

  8. Hepatobiliary contrast agents: differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions, pitfalls and other indications.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Flávia Angélica Ferreira; de Araújo, Antonio Luis Eiras; Oliveira Neto, Jaime Araújo; Parente, Daniella Braz

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of focal liver lesions is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the best imaging method for evaluating such lesions, but does not allow for the diagnosis in all cases. The use of hepatobiliary contrast agents increases the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and reduces the number of non-specific liver lesions. The main indications for the method include: differentiation between focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma; characterization of hepatocellular carcinomas in cirrhotic patients; detection of small liver metastases; evaluation of biliary anatomy; and characterization of postoperative biliary fistulas. The use of hepatobiliary contrast agents may reduce the need for invasive diagnostic procedures and further investigations with other imaging methods, besides the need for imaging follow-up.

  9. Acoustic cavitation of individual ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles confined in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaqwashi, Ali; McIntyre, David; Ammi, Azzdine

    2011-10-01

    Ultrasound targeted therapies mainly rely on the inertial cavitation of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles. Our objective is to determine the cavitation acoustic pressure threshold for the destruction of UCA microbubbles inside cellulose capillaries. Acoustic emission from individual Optison microbubbles confined inside a 200-μm diameter capillary was detected using a passive cavitation detection system. Excitation signals from a 2.25 MHz transmitter were applied to the microbubbles while their acoustic emission was detected by a broadband 15 MHz receiver. Time traces were recorded (100 MHz sampling, 12- bit), and frequency-domain analysis of the received signals was performed to characterize microbubble cavitation. The cavitation acoustic pressure threshold was found to be 1 MPa inside the capillary in comparison with ˜0.7 MPa previously reported for unconfined UCA microbubbles. This work provides a clearer understanding of the role of ultrasound contrast agent dynamics inside a capillary.

  10. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  11. An analytical study of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic generation efficiency towards contrast agent and film design optimization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Kishor, Rahul; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Ruochong; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) and thermoacoustic (TA) effects have been explored in many applications, such as bio-imaging, laser-induced ultrasound generator, and sensitive electromagnetic (EM) wave film sensor. In this paper, we propose a compact analytical PA/TA generation model to incorporate EM, thermal and mechanical parameters, etc. From the derived analytical model, both intuitive predictions and quantitative simulations are performed. It shows that beyond the EM absorption improvement, there are many other physical parameters that deserve careful consideration when designing contrast agents or film composites, followed by simulation study. Lastly, several sets of experimental results are presented to prove the feasibility of the proposed analytical model. Overall, the proposed compact model could work as a clear guidance and predication for improved PA/TA contrast agents and film generator/sensor designs in the domain area.

  12. Synthesis and Relaxometric Studies of a Dendrimer-Based pH-Responsive MRI Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Meser; Woods, Mark; Caravan, Peter; Opina, Ana C. L.; Spiller, Marga; Fettinger, James C.

    2009-01-01

    The design of effective pH responsive MRI contrast agents is a key goal in the development of new diagnostic methods for conditions such as kidney disease and cancer. A key factor determining the effectiveness of an agent is the difference between the relaxivity of the “on” state compared to that of the “off” state. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to improve the pH-responsive action of a low molecular weight agent by conjugating it to a macromolecular construct. The synthesis of a bifunctional pH responsive agent is reported. As part of that synthetic pathway we examine the Ing–Manske reaction, identifying an undesirable by-product and establishing effective conditions for promoting a clean and effective reaction. Reaction of the bifunctional pH responsive agent with a G5-PAMAM dendrimer yielded a product with an average of 96 chelates per dendrimer. The relaxivity of the dendrimer conjugate rises from 10.8 mm−1 s−1 (pH 9) to 24.0 mm−1 s−1 (pH 6) per Gd3+ ion. This more than doubles the relaxivity pH response, Δr1, of our agent from just 51% for the original low molecular weight chelate to 122% for the dendrimer. PMID:18601236

  13. Acoustic characterization and pharmacokinetic analyses of new nanobubble ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanping; Rognin, Nicolas G; Krupka, Tianyi M; Solorio, Luis; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Guenette, Gilles; Sanders, Christopher; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Exner, Agata A

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to the clinically used microbubble ultrasound contrast agents, nanoscale bubbles (or nanobubbles) may potentially extravasate into tumors that exhibit more permeable vasculature, facilitating targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery. Our group recently presented a simple strategy using the non-ionic surfactant Pluronic as a size control excipient to produce nanobubbles with a mean diameter of 200 nm that exhibited stability and echogenicity on par with microbubbles. The objective of this study was to carry out an in-depth characterization of nanobubble properties as compared with Definity microbubbles, both in vitro and in vivo. Through use of a tissue-mimicking phantom, in vitro experiments measured the echogenicity of the contrast agent solutions and the contrast agent dissolution rate over time. Nanobubbles were found to be more echogenic than Definity microbubbles at three different harmonic frequencies (8, 6.2 and 3.5 MHz). Definity microbubbles also dissolved 1.67 times faster than nanobubbles. Pharmacokinetic studies were then performed in vivo in a subcutaneous human colorectal adenocarcinoma (LS174T) in mice. The peak enhancement and decay rates of contrast agents after bolus injection in the liver, kidney and tumor were analyzed. No significant differences were observed in peak enhancement between the nanobubble and Definity groups in the three tested regions (tumor, liver and kidney). However, the decay rates of nanobubbles in tumor and kidney were significantly slower than those of Definity in the first 200-s fast initial phase. There were no significant differences in the decay rates in the liver in the initial phase or in three regions of interest in the terminal phase. Our results suggest that the stability and acoustic properties of the new nanobubble contrast agents are superior to those of the clinically used Definity microbubbles. The slower washout of nanobubbles in tumors suggests potential entrapment of the bubbles within

  14. A new macromolecular paramagnetic MR contrast agent binds to activated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Chaubet, Frédéric; Bertholon, Isabelle; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bazeli, Ramin; Alsaid, Hasan; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Zahir, Charaf; Even, Pascale; Bachelet, Laure; Touat, Ziad; Lancelot, Eric; Corot, Claire; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Letourneur, Didier

    2007-07-01

    A new functionalized macromolecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent has been developed from a carboxymethyldextran-Gd(DOTA) devoid of biospecificity. The functionalized contrast agent was synthesized in order to mimic PSGL-1, the main ligand of P-selectin, a glycoprotein mainly expressed on the surface of activated platelets. The starting compound, CM1, was first carboxymethylated by monochloroacetic acid leading to a series of 10 derivatives varying in their carboxymethyl content. CM8 derivative, with a degree of substitution in carboxymethyl of 0.84, was chosen for subsequent fluorolabeling and sulfation to give CM8FS. CM8FS has an average number molecular weight of 27 000 +/- 500 g/mol, a hydrodynamic radius of 5.7 +/- 0.2 nm and a high relaxivity (r(1) = 11.2/mM (Gd)/s at 60 MHz). Flow cytometry experiments on whole human blood or on isolated platelets evidenced in vitro a preferential binding of CM8FS on TRAP-activated human platelets. Interestingly, CM8FS did not bind to other blood cells or to resting platelets. Pellets of TRAP-activated human platelets have also been imaged in tubes with a 1.5 T MR imager. A MR signal was observed for activated platelets incubated with CM8FS. Altogether, these in vitro results evidenced the recognition of activated human platelets by a fluorescent paramagnetic contrast agent grafted with carboxyl and sulfate groups. This biomimetic approach associated with the versatile macromolecular platform appears promising for the development of new contrast agents for molecular imaging of activated platelets in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysms.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of a high relaxivity manganese(II)-based MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Troughton, Jeffrey S; Greenfield, Matthew T; Greenwood, Jaclyn M; Dumas, Stéphane; Wiethoff, Andrea J; Wang, Jufeng; Spiller, Marga; McMurry, Thomas J; Caravan, Peter

    2004-10-04

    The manganese(II) ion has many favorable properties that lead to its potential use as an MRI contrast agent: high spin number, long electronic relaxation time, labile water exchange. The present work describes the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a novel Mn(II) complex (MnL1) based on EDTA and also contains a moiety that noncovalently binds the complex to serum albumin, the same moiety used in the gadolinium based contrast agent MS-325. Ultrafiltration albumin binding measurements (0.1 mM, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) indicated that the complex binds well to plasma proteins (rabbit: 96 +/- 2% bound, human: 93 +/- 2% bound), and most likely to serum albumin (rabbit: 89 +/- 2% bound, human 98 +/- 2% bound). Observed relaxivities (+/- 5%) of the complex were measured (20 MHz, 37 degrees C, 0.1 mM, pH 7.4) in HEPES buffer (r(1) = 5.8 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), rabbit plasma (r(1) = 51 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), human plasma (r(1) = 46 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), 4.5% rabbit serum albumin (r(1) = 47 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), and 4.5% human serum albumin (r(1) = 48 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)). The water exchange rate was near optimal for an MRI contrast agent (k(298) = 2.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(8) s(-)(1)). Variable temperature NMRD profiles indicated that the high relaxivity was due to slow tumbling of the albumin-bound complex and fast exchange of the inner sphere water. The concept of a high relaxivity Mn(II)-based contrast agent was validated by imaging at 1.5 T. In a rabbit model of carotid artery injury, MnL1 clearly delineated both arteries and veins while also distinguishing between healthy tissue and regions of vessel damage.

  16. Supramolecular protein cage composite MR contrast agents with extremely efficient relaxivity properties.

    PubMed

    Liepold, Lars O; Abedin, Md Joynal; Buckhouse, Emily D; Frank, Joseph A; Young, Mark J; Douglas, Trevor

    2009-12-01

    A DTPA-Gd containing polymer was grown in the interior of a heat shock protein cage resulting in T(1) particle relaxivities of 4200 mM(-1) sec(-1) for the 12 nm particle. Relaxivity parameters were determined, and this analysis suggests that the rotational correlation time has been optimized while the water exchange lifetime is longer than optimal. This synthetic approach holds much promise for the development of next generation contrast agents and this report will aid in their design.

  17. Macrophages mediated diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis using fibrin based magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Periyathambi, Prabu; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Manickavasagam, Kanagavel

    2017-01-01

    A variety of bioimaging tools assists in the diagnosis and evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other osteoarthritis. However, detection of RA in the early stages by targeting its macrophages with suitable contrast agents will help in arresting the progression of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of using magnetic fibrin nanoparticles (MFNPs) conjugated with folic acid (FA-MFNPs) as a specific contrast agent to target the activated macrophages, which overexpress the folate receptors (FR) in the knee joints of rats with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). FA-MFNPs were spherical with an average size of 18.3±1.6nm. In vitro studies have shown effective internalization of FA-MFNPs into the Raw264.7 macrophage cells. In vivo studies were carried out by injecting FA-MFNPs intravenously into the arthritic rats. The results showed enhanced MR imaging in the synovium of arthritic joints. Prussian blue histological staining confirmed uptake of FA-MFNPs by macrophages in the synovial tissue. The animal experiment results indicate that FA-MFNPs can be used as a specific MRI contrast agent in identifying phagocytic active macrophages in the synovial joints. Blood is the precursor source for synthesising the fibrin-based iron oxide (magnetic) nanoparticles (MFNPs) with diameters between 12 and 15nm. It has excellent superparamagnetic behaviour, biocompatibility, osteogenic potency, hemocompatibility, and biodegradable properties. MFNPs-based nanocomposites might be a promising contrast agent for bioimaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-invasive detection of apoptosis using magnetic resonance imaging and a targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Beauregard, D A; Loizou, L; Davletov, B; Brindle, K M

    2001-11-01

    The C2 domain of synaptotagmin I, which binds to anionic phospholipids in cell membranes, was shown to bind to the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells by both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Conjugation of the protein to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles allowed detection of this binding using magnetic resonance imaging. Detection of apoptotic cells, using this novel contrast agent, was demonstrated both in vitro, with isolated apoptotic tumor cells, and in vivo, in a tumor treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  19. Experimental Study of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Mediated Heat Transfer for Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razansky, D.; Adam, D. R.; Einziger, P. D.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCA) have been recently suggested as efficient enhancers of ultrasonic power deposition in tissue. The ultrasonic energy absorption by UCA, considered as disadvantageous in diagnostic imaging, might be valuable in therapeutic applications such as targeted hyperthermia or ablation treatments. The current study, based on theoretical predictions, was designed to experimentally measure the dissipation and heating effects of encapsulated UCA (Optison™) in a well-controlled and calibrated environment.

  20. Highly relaxing gadolinium based MRI contrast agents responsive to Mg2+ sensing.

    PubMed

    Abada, Sabah; Lecointre, Alexandre; Elhabiri, Mourad; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tallec, Gaylord; Mazzanti, Marinella; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2012-04-28

    A Gd complex based on a polyphosphonated pyridyl ligand shows a very high stability in aqueous solution (log K(EuL) = 25.7), a high relaxivity (8.5 mM(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and 20 MHz) and a marked and selective relaxivity enhancement (37%) in the presence of Mg(2+), opening interesting perspectives for the design of cation responsive contrast agents.

  1. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  2. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-01-01

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex® IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist®, Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex®, AMAG Pharma; Sinerem®, Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan®, Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist® is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme®) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors. PMID:26715826

  3. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors.

  4. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  5. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zehri, Aqib H.; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F.; Mooney, Michael A.; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Preul, Mark C.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery. PMID:24872922

  6. Injectable microbubbles as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound imaging: the key role of perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Ernest G; Klein, David H; Mattrey, Robert M; Riess, Jean G

    2003-07-21

    Ultrasonography has, until recently, lacked effective contrast-enhancing agents. Micrometer-sized gas bubbles that resonate at a diagnostic frequency are ideal reflectors for ultrasound. However, simple air bubbles, when injected into the blood stream, disappear within seconds through the combined effects of Laplace pressure, blood pressure, and exposure to ultrasound energy. Use of fluorocarbon vapor, by extending the persistence of microbubbles in vivo from seconds to minutes, propelled contrast ultrasonography into clinical practice. Imaging techniques that selectively suppress tissue, but not microbubble signal, further increase image contrast. Approved products consist of C3F8 or SF6 microbubbles, and N2 microbubbles osmotically stabilized with C6F14. These agents allow the detection and characterization of cardiovascular abnormalities and solid organ lesions, such as tumors. By providing higher quality images, they improve the accuracy and confidence of disease diagnosis, and can play a decisive role in clinical decision making. New objectives include agents that target specific cells for the molecular imaging of disease, and drug and gene delivery, including ultrasound-triggered delivery.

  7. Peptidyl Molecular Imaging Contrast Agents Using a New Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Pagel, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A versatile method is disclosed for solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of molecular imaging contrast agents. A DO3A moiety was derivatized to introduce a CBZ-protected amino group and then coupled to a polymeric support. CBZ cleavage with Et2AlCl/thioanisole was optimized for SPPS. Amino acids were then coupled to the aminoDOTA loaded resin using conventional step-wise Fmoc SPPS to create a product with DOTA coupled to the C-terminus of the peptide. In a second study, the DO3A moiety was coupled to a glycine-loaded polymeric support, and amino acids were then coupled to the amino-DOTA-peptide loaded resin using SPPS, to incorporate DOTA within the peptide sequence. The peptide-(Tm3+-DOTA) amide showed a PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) effect, which demonstrated the utility of this contrast agent for molecular imaging. These results demonstrate the advantages of exploiting SPPS methodologies through the development of unique DOTA derivatives to create peptide-based molecular imaging contrast agents. PMID:17330953

  8. NIR-activated iron oxides as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Pei-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Chia; Li, Meng-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are commonly used contrast agents for theranostic nanomedicines because of their advantages of good biocompatibility, high stability in physiological conditions, low cytotoxicity and excellent safety record in clinical settings for human use. In this study, we developed a NIR-activated iron oxide (NIR-Fe3O4) nanoparticle as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unlike traditional iron oxides, the developed NIR-Fe3O4 owns biocompatibility and optical tunability capable of providing strong optical absorption in the NIR range for PA signal generation. Its intrinsic magnetic property enables the active magnetic tumor targeting. Phantom experiments were performed to confirm the tunability of NIR-Fe3O4's optical absorption in NIR and demonstrate its magnetic targeting capability. The PA signal response of NIR-Fe3O4 as a function of concentration was also investigated. The results showed that the PA signal of NIR-Fe3O4 with OD=1.25 was comparable to that of blood at 715 nm - the wavelength of peak absorption of the used NIR-Fe3O4. Moreover, the PA signal from NIR-Fe3O4 could be further improved by magnetic targeting. Overall, we proved that the potential of the developed NIR-Fe3O4 as a good tumor targeting contrast agent of PA imaging.

  9. Insonation frequency selection may assist detection and therapeutic delivery of targeted ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Payne, Edward; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasound-targeted drug delivery relies on the unique nature of ultrasound contrast agents--they are microbubbles that respond strongly to ultrasound. Intravenously injected microbubbles are smaller than a blood cell. By increasing the ultrasound power, the bubbles can be ruptured at the targeted endothelial wall, locally releasing any molecules in the bubble shell. Furthermore, ultrasound-activated microbubbles are known to cause sonoporation--the process by which ultrasound drives molecules through cellular membranes. However, techniques are required to selectively detect and rupture only those microbubbles on target walls. Experiments are presented on the behaviour of microbubbles on walls. For accuracy, imaging measurements are made on model microbubbles larger than contrast agents. Bubble size was varied and the resonant frequency peak determined. Microbubbles on walls have a shifted frequency in good agreement with theory: a 20-25% downshift from the frequency when far from walls. Effects other than the presence of the wall account for less than 5% of the shift. Theory predicts the frequency downshift should be sustained for actual contrast-agent sized bubbles. The effect of real, compliant cell walls requires investigation. An appropriate downshift in the applied ultrasound frequency could selectively tune gene or drug delivery. To make this feasible, it may be necessary to manufacture monodispersed microbubbles.

  10. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-01

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  11. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Zehri, Aqib H; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F; Mooney, Michael A; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Preul, Mark C; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. A COMPREHENSIVE LITERATURE SEARCH WAS PERFORMED UTILIZING PUBMED AND KEY WORDS: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery.

  12. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-07

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  13. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  14. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pengfei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Renhua

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca2+) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca2+-sensitive MRI.

  15. Preserving Enhancement in Freeze-Dried Contrast Agent ST68: Examination of Excipients

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Carl; Forsberg, Flemming; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    The perfluorcarbon (perfluorobutane) ultrasound contrast agent ST68, composed of sonicated mixtures of non-ionic surfactants, is stable in solution for only a few weeks at 4°C. Freeze-drying critically diminished ST68’s ability to reflect ultrasound (its echogenicity). A method of incorporating specific lyoprotectants before lyophilization was investigated. Reintroduction of perfluorobutane to the protected freeze-dried sample, followed by reconstituting with preserved echogenicity. Glucose, trehalose, sucrose, and mannitol were tested at 100 mM and in vitro echogenicity data was collected from samples with dose concentrations of 50 µl/l to 300 µl/l. Glucose was found to be the best lyoprotectant providing an average (n=3) maximum peak enhancement of 23.2 ± 1.2 dB in vitro, measured at 5 MHz, 684 kPa, and a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 Hz (p<0.05 over freeze-dried ST68 control) and 20.8 ± 0.8 dB in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits at 5 MHz and a PRF of 6.7 kHz. Pulse inversion harmonic US images of a rabbit kidney, pre- and post-contrast injection (0.1 ml/kg), showed excellent enhancement and clear vascular delineation, similar to that of the original agent. For the first time this contrast agent can be successfully freeze-dried yielding a longer self-life without the need for refrigeration. PMID:20540998

  16. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice.

  17. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Casula, Maria F; Corrias, Anna; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sen, Tapas; Floris, Patrizia; Bruce, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and relaxometric study of ferrofluids based on iron oxide, with potential for use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). The effect of different cost-effective, water-based surface modification approaches which can be easily scaled-up for the large scale synthesis of the ferrofluids has been investigated. Surface modification was achieved by silanization, and/or coating with non-toxic commercial dispersants (a lauric polysorbate and a block copolymer with pigment affinic groups, namely Tween 20 and Disperbyk 190) which were added after or during iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. It was observed that all the materials synthesized functioned as negative contrast agents at physiological temperature and at frequencies covered by clinical imagers. The relaxometric properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were significantly improved after surface coating with stabilizers compared to the original iron oxide nanoparticles, with particular reference to the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The results indicate that the optimization of the preparation of colloidal magnetic ferrofluids by surface modification is effective in the design of novel contrast agents for MRI by enabling better or more effective interaction between the coated iron oxide nanoparticles and protons present in their aqueous environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-time 3D MRI of contrast agents in whole living mice.

    PubMed

    Bled, Emilie; Hassen, Wadie Ben; Pourtau, Line; Mellet, Philippe; Lanz, Titus; Schüler, Dorothee; Voisin, Pierre; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric; Miraux, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    A specific mouse whole body coil and a dedicated gradient system at 4.7 T were coupled with an ultra-fast 3D gradient echo MRI and keyhole reconstruction technique to obtain 3D whole-body dynamic T(1)-weighted or T(2)*-weighted imaging. The technique was used to visualize the real-time distribution of non-targeting T(1) and T(2)* contrast agent (CA) in a glioma-bearing mouse model. T(1) dynamic contrast-enhancement imaging was performed with a fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence [echo time/repetition time (TE/TR), 1.32/3.7 ms] before and after CA injection (Gd-DOTA and BSA-Gd-DOTA) for 21 min. The temporal resolution was 1 image/6.5 s. T(2)* imaging (TE/TR, 4/8 ms) was performed before and after iron-based (small and ultra-small particles of iron oxide) CA injection for 45 min. The temporal resolution was 1 image/14 s. Signal-to-noise ratio curves were determined in various mouse organs. The whole-body coil and gradient systems made it possible to acquire data with sufficient and homogeneous signal-to-noise ratio on the whole animal. The spatial resolution allowed adequate depiction of the major organs, blood vessels and brain glioma. The distribution and the time-course of T(1) and T(2)* contrasts upon contrast agent injection were also assessed. 3D whole-body mouse MRI is feasible at high spatial resolution in movie mode and can be applied successfully to visualize real-time contrast agent distribution. This method should be effective in future preclinical molecular imaging studies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd2-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd2-DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pKa, complex constant, and T1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd2-DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd2-DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r1) of 7.613mM(-1)s(-1) (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd2-DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd2-DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd2-DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd2-DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd2-DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasonically induced dynamics of a contrast agent microbubble between two parallel elastic walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2013-10-01

    This work presents the derivation of a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation that describes the radial oscillation of a contrast agent microbubble between two elastic walls, assuming that the bubble is attached to one of them. The obtained equation is then used in numerical simulations in order to establish how the presence of the second wall affects the resonance properties and the scattered echo of the contrast microbubble. The effect of encapsulation on the dynamics of the microbubble is simulated by the Marmottant shell model which is commonly used for the modeling of the dynamics of lipid-shelled contrast agents. Two cases are examined. In the first, the mechanical properties of the walls are set to correspond to OptiCell chambers which are widely used in experiments on microbubble contrast agents. In the second, the properties of the walls correspond to walls of blood vessels. It is shown that the presence of the second wall increases the resonance frequency of the contrast microbubble and decreases the amplitudes of the radial oscillation and the scattered echo of the microbubble as compared to the case that the second wall is absent. It is also shown that the presence of the second wall can change noticeably the intensity of the second harmonic in the spectrum of the scattered pressure. It is demonstrated that, depending on the value of the driving frequency, the presence of the second wall can either increase or decrease the intensity of the second harmonic as compared to its intensity in the case that the second wall is absent.