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Sample records for oral epithelium regenerate

  1. [Injury and reparative regeneration of the oral mucosal epithelium after cytostatic drugs administration (tissue, cell and molecular mechanisms)].

    PubMed

    Bykov, V L; Leont'eva, I V

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the systematized summary of current literature data and the authors' own findings on the regularities of human and animal surface oral mucosal epithelium (OME) injury caused by cytostatic drugs (CSD) administration, and on the ways of its regeneration after the cytostatic chemotherapy (CSCT) discontinuation. Tissue, cell and molecular mechanisms of CSCT effects on OME, are described. The direct effects of CSD included the epithelial layer attenuation with the derangement of its architecture, epitheliocyte proliferation suppression, apoptosis activation, and differentiation disturbances (involving the broad spectrum of cytological, cytochemical, ultrastructural and molecular-biological changes). In severe cases, these processes resulted in the loss of the epithelial layer integrity with the development of ulceration. Complete epithelial regeneration requires a long period after the CSCT discontinuation. Indirect effects of CSD on OME are associated with the microbial invasion and the diffusion of microbial vital activity products into the epithelium with concurrent leukopenia, immunosuppression and decreased salivary secretion.

  2. Effect of carbonated drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Ayesha; Ilyas, Muhammad Sharjeel; Jafari, Fahim Haider; Farzana, Fauzia

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbonated drinks are the second most consumed non-alcoholic beverages in the world after tea. The effects of these drinks on hard tissues and vital organs of the body have been proved beyond doubt. This study, however, explains the effect of these drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium. Methods Thirty-six male Wistar rats were considered for the study. A circular wound of 3.0 mm was created on the buccal mucosa of all animals and they were divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 were fed with chow pellet and water, while those in group 2 were fed with a commercially available carbonated drink instead of water. Six animals from each group were euthanized at 0, 7, and 21 days. Wound site was histologically assessed for differences in thickness and characteristics of the regenerating epithelium between two groups. Results There was a marked difference in the healing pattern between the two groups. Animals in group 1 showed a normal healing pattern at the end of day 21. In the group 2, the regenerated epithelium showed hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis along with acanthosis at the end of the experiment with a subsequent delayed inflammatory reaction at day 21. Conclusion Consumption of carbonated drinks can disrupt oral wound healing. The contents in carbonated drinks have a proinflammatory action on the soft tissue. Results suggest that epithelial changes seen in experimental group 2 could be a result of constant irritation by the acidic and fizzy nature of carbonated drinks. PMID:26937370

  3. Expression of Ki-67 in normal oral epithelium, leukoplakic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birajdar, Smita Shrishail; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M; Gadivan, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To demonstrate the presence, location and pattern of cell proliferation in different histological grades of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral epithelium (NOE) using an antibody directed against the Ki-67 antigen and its intensity of staining evaluated respectively. Materials and Methods: A total number of 100 archival paraffin embedded blocks obtained from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology were studied. The case details were retrieved which consisted of histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC (n = 20), low risk OED (n = 30), high risk OED (n = 30) and normal appearing mucosa (n = 20) were taken as standard for comparison. Ki-67 immunostaining was detected. Ki-67 positive cells were counted in the five random high power fields in each case. Results: Ki-67 labeling Index (LI) was restricted to the basal and parabasal layers of the normal oral epithelium irrespective of age, sex and site whereas it was seen in the basal, suprabasal and spinous layers in OED. Ki-67 LI is increased in high risk cases than the low risk cases of OED. Ki-67 positive cells in OSCC were located in the periphery of the tumor nests than the center, where frequent mitoses were observed. Conclusion: The architectural alteration evaluated by Ki-67 antibody in proliferating cell distribution in the layers of epithelial dysplasias may provide useful information to evaluate the grading of OED. Ki-67 LI increased in high risk cases than low risk cases of OED. This study showed that over expression of Ki-67 antigen between well-differentiated and poorly differentiated OSCC was in accordance with histologic grade of malignancy but not in accordance with moderately differentiated OSCC. PMID:25328294

  4. Caspase-3 expression in normal oral epithelium, oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, Veeran; Austin, Ravi David; Siddavaram, Nagini; Thiruneelakandan, Sambanthan; Nassar, Mohamed Hanifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Context: The epithelium atrophy, as the oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) progresses, is believed to be an after effect of stromal fibrosis, hyalinization, decrease in vascularity and cellularity and is considered as “ischemic atrophy.” Due to hypoxia, caspase-3 get activation and subsequent decrease in viable cell count can occur. Aims and Objectives: To determine caspase-3 expression in various grades of OSMF and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to find out whether upregulation of apoptosis is responsible for the epithelial changes in OSMF. Subjects and Methods: The control tissue (15 samples from normal oral mucosa) and study group comprising 97 cases of OSMF of different grades and OSCC associated with OSMF were stained with caspase-3 antibody, and the percentage of positive cells was calculated using ImageJ software. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's honest significance difference test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: There was a nuclear expression of caspase-3 in basal and parabasal layers of normal epithelium. There was cytoplasmic expression of caspase-3 in OSMF without dysplasia, total absence of caspase-3 expression in dysplastic epithelium and in majority cases of OSCC. The caspase-3 percentage was increased in OSMF (0%–53%) when compared with OSCC (0%–8%). The statistical comparison of caspase-3 among normal, OSMF and OSCC patients revealed significant correlation (P < 0.00010). The comparison within different grades of OSMF and between dysplastic and nondysplastic epithelium OSMF also showed significance (P < 0.019). Conclusions: The decreased expression of caspase-3 in disease progression reflects its role in the malignant transformation. PMID:27721610

  5. Notch regulation of progenitor cell behavior in quiescent and regenerating auditory epithelium of mature birds

    PubMed Central

    Daudet, Nicolas; Gibson, Robin; Shang, Jialin; Bernard, Amy; Lewis, Julian; Stone, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Unlike mammals, birds regenerate auditory hair cells (HCs) after injury. During regeneration, mature non-sensory supporting cells (SCs) leave quiescence and convert into HCs, through non-mitotic or mitotic mechanisms. During embryogenesis, Notch ligands from nascent HCs exert lateral inhibition, restricting HC production. Here, we examined whether Notch signalling (1) is needed in mature birds to maintain the HC/SC pattern in the undamaged auditory epithelium or (2) governs SC behavior once HCs are injured. We show that Notch pathway genes are transcribed in the mature undamaged epithelium, and after HC injury, their transcription is upregulated in the region of highest mitotic activity. In vitro treatment with DAPT, an inhibitor of Notch activity, had no effect on SCs in the undamaged epithelium. Following HC damage, DAPT had no direct effect on SC division. However, after damage, DAPT caused excessive regeneration of HCs at the expense of SCs, through both mitotic and non-mitotic mechanisms. Conversely, overexpression of activated Notch in SCs after damage caused them to maintain their phenotype and inhibited HC regeneration. Therefore, signalling through Notch is not required for SC quiescence in the healthy epithelium or to initiate HC regeneration after damage. Rather, Notch prevents SCs from regenerating excessive HCs after damage. PMID:19013445

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  7. Developmental Plasticity of Patterned and Regenerating Oral Organs.

    PubMed

    Streelman, J Todd; Bloomquist, Ryan F; Fowler, Teresa E

    2015-01-01

    In many aquatic vertebrates, including bony and cartilaginous fishes, teeth and taste buds colocalize on jaw elements. In these animals, taste buds are renewed continuously throughout life, whereas teeth undergo cycled whole-organ replacement by various means. Recently, studies of cichlid fishes have yielded new insights into the development and regeneration of these dental and sensory oral organs. Tooth and taste bud densities covary positively across species with different feeding strategies, controlled by common regions of the genome and integrated molecular signals. Developing teeth and taste buds share a bipotent epithelium during early patterning stages, from which dental and taste fields are specified. Moreover, these organs share a common epithelial ribbon that supports label-retaining cells during later stages of regeneration. During both patterning and regeneration stages, dental organs can be converted to taste bud fate by manipulation of BMP signaling. These observations highlight a surprising long-term plasticity between dental and sensory organ types. Here, we review these findings and discuss the implications of developmental plasticity that spans the continuum of craniofacial organ patterning and regeneration. PMID:26589931

  8. Developmental plasticity of patterned and regenerating oral organs

    PubMed Central

    Streelman, J. Todd; Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Fowler, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    In many aquatic vertebrates, including bony and cartilaginous fishes, teeth and taste buds co-localize on jaw elements. In these animals, taste buds are renewed continuously throughout life, whereas teeth undergo cycled whole organ replacement by various means. Recently, studies of cichlid fishes have yielded new insights into the development and regeneration of these dental and sensory oral organs. Tooth and taste bud densities co-vary positively across species with different feeding strategies, controlled by common regions of the genome and integrated molecular signals. Developing teeth and taste buds share a bipotent epithelium during early patterning stages, from which dental and taste fields are specified. Moreover, these organs share a common epithelial ribbon that supports label-retaining cells during later stages of regeneration. During both patterning and regeneration stages, dental organs can be converted to taste bud fate by manipulation of BMP signaling. These observations highlight a surprising long-term plasticity between dental and sensory organ types. Here, we review these findings and discuss the implications of developmental plasticity that spans the continuum of craniofacial organ patterning and regeneration. PMID:26589931

  9. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make up the outer surface of the body. Epithelial cells help to protect or enclose organs. Most produce mucus or other secretions. Certain ...

  10. Regeneration of the uterine epithelium in later stages of pseudopregnancy in the rabbit. An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Busch, L C; Winterhager, E; Fischer, B

    1986-01-01

    Morphological changes of the uterine epithelium in later stages of pseudopregnancy in the rabbit have been studied using different morphological methods. The highly proliferated mucosa with numerous symplasms of a pseudopregnant animal returns to the morphology of a nonpregnant animal by apoptosis, moderate necrosis and lytic transformation of symplasms back to typical endometrial cells without desquamation of cells. The first signs of lytic transformation are observed on Day 8 of pseudopregnancy. Enhanced regeneration with apoptosis and lysis of the symplasmic nuclei is observed between Day 14 and Day 16. Full restoration of the epithelium with reappearance of ciliated cells, typical columnar and partly mucified epithelial cells is not completed earlier than Day 24 p. hCG. This epithelium, however, differs clearly from the epithelium of a virgin rabbit due to several residues of epithelial transformation. Thus, from a morphological point of view, pseudopregnancy in the rabbit lasts up to or even longer than Day 28 p. hCG with persisting ultrastructural remnants of the preceding cycle.

  11. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  12. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability. PMID:26308461

  13. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability. PMID:26308461

  14. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  15. Cultivated Oral Mucosa Epithelium in Ocular Surface Reconstruction in Aniridia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Orzechowska-Wylegala, Boguslawa; Wowra, Bogumil; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Grolik, Maria; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Maria; Puzzolo, Domenico; Wylegala, Edward A.; Micali, Antonio; Aragona, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Efficacy of cultivated oral mucosa epithelial transplantation (COMET) procedure in corneal epithelium restoration of aniridia patients. Methods. Study subjects were aniridia patients (13 patients; 17 eyes) with irregular, vascular conjunctival pannus involving visual axis who underwent autologous transplantation of cultivated epithelium. For the procedure oral mucosa epithelial cells were obtained from buccal mucosa with further enzymatic treatment. Suspension of single cells was seeded on previously prepared denuded amniotic membrane. Cultures were carried on culture dishes inserts in the presence of the inactivated with Mitomycin C monolayer of 3T3 fibroblasts. Cultures were carried for seven days. Stratified oral mucosa epithelium with its amniotic membrane carrier was transplanted on the surgically denuded corneal surface of aniridia patients with total or subtotal limbal stem cell deficiency. Outcome Measures. Corneal surface, epithelial regularity, and visual acuity improvement were evaluated. Results. At the end of the observation period, 76.4% of the eyes had regular transparent epithelium and 23.5% had developed epithelial defects or central corneal haze; in 88.2% of cases visual acuity had increased. VA range was from HM 0.05 before the surgery to HM up to 0.1 after surgery. Conclusion. Application of cultivated oral mucosa epithelium restores regular epithelium on the corneal surface with moderate improvement in quality of vision. PMID:26451366

  16. Trop2 marks transient gastric fetal epithelium and adult regenerating cells after epithelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Vallone, Valeria; Leprovots, Morgane; Strollo, Sandra; Vasile, Gabriela; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frederick; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mouse fetal intestinal progenitors lining the epithelium prior to villogenesis grow as spheroids when cultured ex vivo and express the transmembrane glycoprotein Trop2 as a marker. Here, we report the characterization of Trop2-expressing cells from fetal pre-glandular stomach, growing as immortal undifferentiated spheroids, and their relationship with gastric development and regeneration. Trop2+ cells generating gastric spheroids differed from adult glandular Lgr5+ stem cells, but appeared highly related to fetal intestinal spheroids. Although they shared a common spheroid signature, intestinal and gastric fetal spheroid-generating cells expressed organ-specific transcription factors and were committed to intestinal and glandular gastric differentiation, respectively. Trop2 expression was transient during glandular stomach development, being lost at the onset of gland formation, whereas it persisted in the squamous forestomach. Undetectable under homeostasis, Trop2 was strongly re-expressed in glands after acute Lgr5+ stem cell ablation or following indomethacin-induced injury. These highly proliferative reactive adult Trop2+ cells exhibited a transcriptome displaying similarity with that of gastric embryonic Trop2+ cells, suggesting that epithelium regeneration in adult stomach glands involves the partial re-expression of a fetal genetic program. PMID:26989172

  17. GRHL2 coordinates regeneration of a polarized mucociliary epithelium from basal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xia; Bali, Aman S.; Randell, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudostratified airway epithelium of the lung is composed of polarized ciliated and secretory cells maintained by basal stem/progenitor cells. An important question is how lineage choice and differentiation are coordinated with apical–basal polarity and epithelial morphogenesis. Our previous studies indicated a key integrative role for the transcription factor Grainyhead-like 2 (Grhl2). In this study, we present further evidence for this model using conditional gene deletion during the regeneration of airway epithelium and clonal organoid culture. We also use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in primary human basal cells differentiating into organoids and mucociliary epithelium in vitro. Loss of Grhl2 inhibits organoid morphogenesis and the differentiation of ciliated cells and reduces the expression of both notch and ciliogenesis genes (Mcidas, Rfx2, and Myb) with distinct Grhl2 regulatory sites. The genome editing of other putative target genes reveals roles for zinc finger transcription factor Znf750 and small membrane adhesion glycoprotein in promoting ciliogenesis and barrier function as part of a network of genes coordinately regulated by Grhl2. PMID:26527742

  18. TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression in normal oral epithelium oral dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Fernanda-Paula; Corrêa Pontes, Flávia-Sirotheau; Cury, Sérgio-Elias; Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Rebelo-Pontes, Hélder; Pinto-Júnior, Décio-dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of TWIST and p-Akt proteins in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), correlating their expressions with the histological features of the lesions. Study design: Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 10 normal oral epithelium, 30 OL and 20 OSCC formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Immunoperoxidase reactions for TWIST and p-Akt proteins were applied on the specimens and the positivity of the reactions was calculated for 1000 epithelial cells. Results: Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post tests revealed a significant difference in TWIST and p-Akt immunoexpression among normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. In addition, a significant positive correlation was found between TWIST and p-Akt expressions according to the Pearson’s correlation test. Conclusions: The results obtained in the current study suggest that TWIST and p-Akt may participate of the multi-step process of oral carcinogenesis since its early stages. Key words: Oral cancer, oral leukoplakia, dysplasia, immunohistochemistry. PMID:21743395

  19. Effect of Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma on Pathogenic Oral Biofilms and In Vitro Reconstituted Oral Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Zago, Chaiene Evelin; Tyhovych, Natalia; Duarte, Simone; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Considering the ability of atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (ACP) to disrupt the biofilm matrix and rupture cell structure, it can be an efficient tool against virulent oral biofilms. However, it is fundamental that ACP does not cause damage to oral tissue. So, this study evaluated (1) the antimicrobial effect of ACP on single- and dual-species biofilms of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as well as (2) the biological safety of ACP on in vitro reconstituted oral epithelium. Standardized cell suspensions of each microorganism were prepared for biofilm culture on acrylic resin discs at 37°C for 48 hours. The biofilms were submitted to ACP treatment at 10 mm of plasma tip-to-sample distance during 60 seconds. Positive controls were penicillin G and fluconazole for S. aureus and C. albicans, respectively. The biofilms were analyzed through counting of viable colonies, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy for detection of reactive oxygen species. The in vitro reconstituted oral epithelium was submitted to similar ACP treatment and analyzed through histology, cytotoxocity test (LDH release), viability test (MTT assay) and imunnohistochemistry (Ki67 expression). All plasma-treated biofilms presented significant log10 CFU/mL reduction, alteration in microorganism/biofilm morphology, and reduced viability in comparison to negative and positive controls. In addition, fluorescence microscopy revealed presence of reactive oxygen species in all plasma-treated biofilms. Low cytotoxicity and high viability were observed in oral epithelium of negative control and plasma group. Histology showed neither sign of necrosis nor significant alteration in plasma-treated epithelium. Ki67-positive cells revealed maintenance of cell proliferation in plasma-treated epithelium. Atmospheric-pressure cold plasma is a promissing approach to eliminate single- and dual-species biofilms of C. albicans and S. aureus without having

  20. Effect of Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma on Pathogenic Oral Biofilms and In Vitro Reconstituted Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Chaiene Evelin; Tyhovych, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Considering the ability of atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (ACP) to disrupt the biofilm matrix and rupture cell structure, it can be an efficient tool against virulent oral biofilms. However, it is fundamental that ACP does not cause damage to oral tissue. So, this study evaluated (1) the antimicrobial effect of ACP on single- and dual-species biofilms of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as well as (2) the biological safety of ACP on in vitro reconstituted oral epithelium. Standardized cell suspensions of each microorganism were prepared for biofilm culture on acrylic resin discs at 37°C for 48 hours. The biofilms were submitted to ACP treatment at 10 mm of plasma tip-to-sample distance during 60 seconds. Positive controls were penicillin G and fluconazole for S. aureus and C. albicans, respectively. The biofilms were analyzed through counting of viable colonies, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy for detection of reactive oxygen species. The in vitro reconstituted oral epithelium was submitted to similar ACP treatment and analyzed through histology, cytotoxocity test (LDH release), viability test (MTT assay) and imunnohistochemistry (Ki67 expression). All plasma-treated biofilms presented significant log10 CFU/mL reduction, alteration in microorganism/biofilm morphology, and reduced viability in comparison to negative and positive controls. In addition, fluorescence microscopy revealed presence of reactive oxygen species in all plasma-treated biofilms. Low cytotoxicity and high viability were observed in oral epithelium of negative control and plasma group. Histology showed neither sign of necrosis nor significant alteration in plasma-treated epithelium. Ki67-positive cells revealed maintenance of cell proliferation in plasma-treated epithelium. Atmospheric-pressure cold plasma is a promissing approach to eliminate single- and dual-species biofilms of C. albicans and S. aureus without having

  1. Uniform expression of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in epithelia regenerated with cultured normal, immortalised and malignant human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, J J; Hansson, A; Nilsson, J A; Höög, J O; Grafström, R C

    2001-01-01

    The human oral epithelium is a target for damage from the inhalation of formaldehyde. However, most experimental studies on this chemical have relied on laboratory animals that are obligatory nose breathers, including rats and mice. Therefore, in vitro model systems that mimic the structure of the human oral epithelium and which retain normal tissue-specific metabolic competence are desirable. Based on the established role of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3), also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, as the primary enzyme catalysing the detoxification of formaldehyde, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of ADH3 in organotypic epithelia regenerated with normal (NOK), immortalised (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human oral keratinocytes. Organotypic epithelia, usually consisting of 5-10 cell layers, were produced at the air-liquid interface of collagen gels containing human oral fibroblasts, after culture for 10 days in a standardised serum-free medium. Immunochemical staining demonstrated uniform expression of ADH3 in these organotypic epithelia, as well as in the epithelial cells of oral tissue. The specificity of the ADH3 antiserum was ascertained from the complete neutralisation of the immunochemical reaction with purified ADH3 protein. Assessment of the staining intensities indicated that the expression levels were similar among the regenerated epithelia. Furthermore, the regenerated epithelia showed similar ADH3 expression to the epithelium in oral tissue. Therefore, a tissue-like expression pattern for ADH3 can be generated from the culture of various oral keratinocyte lines in an organotypic state. Similar expression levels among the various cell lines indicate the preservation of ADH3 during malignant transformation, and therefore that NOK, SVpgC2a and SqCC/Y1 represent functional models for in vitro studies of formaldehyde metabolism in human oral mucosa.

  2. BMP signaling and cellular dynamics during regeneration of airway epithelium from basal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Tomomi; Gao, Xia; Hong, Charles C.; Hotten, Danielle; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the lung contains ciliated and secretory luminal cells and basal stem/progenitor cells. To identify signals controlling basal cell behavior we screened factors that alter their self-renewal and differentiation in a clonal organoid (tracheosphere) assay. This revealed that inhibitors of the canonical BMP signaling pathway promote proliferation but do not affect lineage choice, whereas exogenous Bmp4 inhibits proliferation and differentiation. We therefore followed changes in BMP pathway components in vivo in the mouse trachea during epithelial regeneration from basal cells after injury. The findings suggest that BMP signaling normally constrains proliferation at steady state and this brake is released transiently during repair by the upregulation of endogenous BMP antagonists. Early in repair, the packing of epithelial cells along the basal lamina increases, but density is later restored by active extrusion of apoptotic cells. Systemic administration of the BMP antagonist LDN-193189 during repair initially increases epithelial cell number but, following the shedding phase, normal density is restored. Taken together, these results reveal crucial roles for both BMP signaling and cell shedding in homeostasis of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:26811382

  3. BMP signaling and cellular dynamics during regeneration of airway epithelium from basal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Tomomi; Gao, Xia; Hong, Charles C; Hotten, Danielle; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2016-03-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the lung contains ciliated and secretory luminal cells and basal stem/progenitor cells. To identify signals controlling basal cell behavior we screened factors that alter their self-renewal and differentiation in a clonal organoid (tracheosphere) assay. This revealed that inhibitors of the canonical BMP signaling pathway promote proliferation but do not affect lineage choice, whereas exogenous Bmp4 inhibits proliferation and differentiation. We therefore followed changes in BMP pathway components in vivo in the mouse trachea during epithelial regeneration from basal cells after injury. The findings suggest that BMP signaling normally constrains proliferation at steady state and this brake is released transiently during repair by the upregulation of endogenous BMP antagonists. Early in repair, the packing of epithelial cells along the basal lamina increases, but density is later restored by active extrusion of apoptotic cells. Systemic administration of the BMP antagonist LDN-193189 during repair initially increases epithelial cell number but, following the shedding phase, normal density is restored. Taken together, these results reveal crucial roles for both BMP signaling and cell shedding in homeostasis of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:26811382

  4. An immunohistological study of cytokeratin 20 in human and mammalian oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A W; Cort, E M; Patel, P; Berkovitz, B K

    2000-10-01

    Cytokeratin (CK) 20 is a low molecular-weight intermediate filament reportedly expressed only by benign and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium, urothelium and Merkel cells. The main aims here were to map its expression in normal oral mucosa of humans and other mammals, and to determine whether it was expressed by abnormal human oral epithelium. Salivary and odontogenic epithelium were also analysed. An immunoperoxidase method was used on wax-embedded and cryostat sections. In addition, double-labelling experiments were undertaken to determine the association between CK 20 expression and that of CK 8/18 or S100 protein. Normal human oral mucosa from four sites, together with abdominal skin, was studied in autopsy samples from 32 individuals. CK 20-positive, basally situated, round or angular cells, consistent with Merkel cells, were recorded in 24/32 (75.0%) samples of mandibular gingiva, 25/32 (78.1%) samples of hard palate, 7/32 (21.9%) samples of buccal mucosa, 0/32 samples of lateral border of tongue, and 2/32 (6.3%) samples of abdominal skin. Double-labelling showed that all CK 20-positive Merkel cells also expressed CK 8/18 and S100. The only other cells to express CK 20 were human taste buds. There was no expression by dysplastic or invasive oral epithelium from biopsy samples. Colonic mucosa showed luminal-cell positivity in man, marmoset, ferret, rabbit and guinea-pig, but oral mucosa was universally negative in non-human species. It is concluded that in oral mucosa CK 20 is a specific marker of Merkel cells and taste buds, that Merkel cells are more frequently present in keratinized than non-keratinized oral mucosa, that CK 20-positive Merkel cells are also S100-positive, that there may be interspecies variations in CK 20 polypeptide composition and that, by contrast to urothelium, CK 20 has no value in the diagnosis of oral epithelial dysplasia.

  5. Substance P and NK-1R expression in oral precancerous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel A; Brener, S; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Tostes, D; Bravo, M; Esteban, F

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the presence and distribution of substance P and neurokinin 1 receptor in oral premalignant epithelium and their relation with the presence of dysplasia, and to analyze whether the expression of substance P can be considered an early oncogenic event in oral carcinogenesis. substance P and neurokinin 1 receptor expression was immunohistochemically studied in 83 oral carcinomas and adjacent non-tumor epithelia. The presence and degree of epithelial dysplasia was assessed according to WHO criteria. The nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane expression of substance P and the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of neurokinin 1 receptor were assessed in tumor and adjacent non-tumor epithelium. Nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of substance P in non-tumor epithelium was significantly associated with the presence of epithelial dysplasia (p<0.001) and carcinoma in situ (p=0.021). Nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane expressions of substance P in non-tumor epithelium were significantly (p<0.001) associated with its expression in the corresponding tumor. These findings suggest that substance P plays a role in early oral carcinogenesis by promoting the proliferation and growth of premalignant fields.

  6. Promoting epithelium regeneration for esophageal tissue engineering through basement membrane reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jingjing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yabin; Hou, Lei; Liu, Yuxin

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds mimicking hierarchical features of native extracellular matrices may facilitate cell growth and anatomical tissue regeneration. In our previous study, esophageal basement membrane (BM) was shown to be composed of interwoven fibers with mean diameter of 66 ± 24 nm (range 28-165 nm) and with abundant pores of unequal sizes. The main extracellular matrix (ECM) contents found in porcine esophageal BM were collagen IV, laminin, entactin, and proteoglycans. In this work, biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and silk fibroin (SF) were spun with electrospinning technology, both individually and in combination, to fabricate fibrous scaffolds with diameters between 64 and 200 nm. The surface morphologies of PCL, PCL/SF, and SF scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscopy. Their mechanical properties were tested and the cytocompatibility was evaluated in vitro via culture of primary epithelial cells (ECs). The SF or PCL/SF scaffold favorably promoted epithelial cell attachment and proliferation comparing with PCL scaffold. However, mitochondrial activity of epithelial cells was greatly promoted when major BM proteins were coated onto the electrospun scaffold to provide an ECM-like structure. Results from in vivo tests revealed that the electrospun scaffolds coated with BM protein possess good biocompatibility and capability to promote epithelium regeneration.

  7. Lineage-negative Progenitors Mobilize to Regenerate Lung Epithelium after Major Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Andrew E.; Brumwell, Alexis N.; Xi, Ying; Gotts, Jeffrey; Brownfield, Doug G.; Treutlein, Barbara; Tan, Kevin; Tan, Victor; Liu, Fengchun; Looney, Mark R.; Matthay, Michael; Rock, Jason R.; Chapman, Harold A.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly, tissue regeneration is achieved in two ways: by proliferation of common differentiated cells and/or by deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells. Which of these pathways applies is both organ and injury-specific1–4. Current paradigms in the lung posit that epithelial repair can be attributed to cells expressing mature lineage markers5–8. In contrast we here define the regenerative role of previously uncharacterized, rare lineage-negative epithelial stem/progenitor (LNEPs) cells present within normal distal lung. Quiescent LNEPs activate a ΔNp63/cytokeratin 5 (Krt5+) remodeling program after influenza or bleomycin injury. Activated cells proliferate and migrate widely to occupy heavily injured areas depleted of mature lineages, whereupon they differentiate toward mature epithelium. Lineage tracing revealed scant contribution of pre-existing mature epithelial cells in such repair, whereas orthotopic transplantation of LNEPs, isolated by a definitive surface profile identified through single cell sequencing, directly demonstrated the proliferative capacity and multipotency of this population. LNEPs require Notch signaling to activate the ΔNp63/Krt5+ program whereas subsequent Notch blockade promotes an alveolar cell fate. Persistent Notch signaling post-injury led to parenchymal micro-honeycombing, indicative of failed regeneration. Lungs from fibrosis patients show analogous honeycomb cysts with evidence of hyperactive Notch signaling. Our findings indicate distinct stem/progenitor cell pools repopulate injured tissue depending on the extent of injury, and the outcomes of regeneration or fibrosis may ride in part on the dynamics of LNEP Notch signaling. PMID:25533958

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection of oral epithelium inhibits neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed Central

    Madianos, P N; Papapanou, P N; Sandros, J

    1997-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory disorders caused by microorganisms of dental plaque that colonize the gingival sulcus and, subsequently, the periodontal pocket. As in other mucosal infections, the host response to plaque bacteria is characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the gingival crevice. Neutrophil migration through the epithelial lining of the gingival pocket is thought to be the first line of defense against plaque bacteria. In order to model this phenomenon in vitro, we used the oral epithelial cell line KB and human PMNs in the Transwell system and examined the impact of Porphyromonas gingivalis-epithelial cell interactions on subsequent PMN transepithelial migration. We demonstrate here that P. gingivalis infection of oral epithelial cells failed to trigger transmigration of PMNs. Furthermore, it significantly inhibited neutrophil transmigration actively induced by stimuli such as N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and the intestinal pathogen enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The ability of P. gingivalis to block PMN transmigration was strongly positively correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. In addition, P. gingivalis attenuated the production of IL-8 and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by epithelial cells. The ability of P. gingivalis to block neutrophil migration across an intact epithelial barrier may critically impair the potential of the host to confront the bacterial challenge and thus may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:9316996

  9. Neuropilin 1 Receptor Is Up-Regulated in Dysplastic Epithelium and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Gallottini, Marina; Martins, Fabiana; Li, Erik; Mudge, Dayna R; Nakayama, Hironao; Hida, Kyoko; Panigrahy, Dipak; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    Neuropilins are receptors for disparate ligands, including proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibitory class 3 semaphorin (SEMA3) family members. Differentiated cells in skin epithelium and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma highly express the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor. We examined the expression of NRP1 in human and mouse oral mucosa. NRP1 was significantly up-regulated in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NRP1 receptor localized to the outer suprabasal epithelial layers in normal tongue, an expression pattern similar to the normal skin epidermis. However, dysplastic tongue epithelium and OSCC up-regulated NRP1 in basal and proliferating epithelial layers, a profile unseen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. NRP1 up-regulation is observed in a mouse carcinogen-induced OSCC model and in human tongue OSCC biopsies. Human OSCC cell lines express NRP1 protein in vitro and in mouse tongue xenografts. Sites of capillary infiltration into orthotopic OSCC tumors correlate with high NRP1 expression. HSC3 xenografts, which express the highest NRP1 levels of the cell lines examined, showed massive intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. SEMA3A inhibited OSCC cell migration, suggesting that the NRP1 receptor was bioactive in OSCC. In conclusion, NRP1 is regulated in the oral epithelium and is selectively up-regulated during epithelial dysplasia. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester proangiogenic ligands within the neoplastic compartment, thereby recruiting neovessels toward tumor cells. PMID:26877262

  10. Nicotine modulates gelatinase B (MMP-9) and epilysin (MMP-28) expression in reconstituted human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Renò, Filippo; Rocchetti, Vincenzo; Migliario, Mario; Cannas, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Oral epithelial keratinocytes express nicotinic cholinergic receptors which activation modulates keratinocytes differentiation and migration through different metabolic pathways. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn-dependent enzyme involved in cell migration. Among them, gelatinase B (MMP-9) and epilysin (MMP-28) are two MMPs expressed by human keratinocytes during both wound healing and proliferation. Their expression has been investigated in a reconstituted human oral epithelium (HOE) exposed to nicotine (Nic, 1-50 μM) for 72 h both in the absence and presence of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (Mec), H7, a PKC inhibitor and PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor (PD). At the end of treatment, MMP-28 expression has been analyzed in epithelium sections using an anti-MMP-28 antibody, whereas MMP-9 presence and activity has been measured in cell-conditioned medium analyzed by gelatine zymography. The expression of MMP-9 was reduced by Nic in a dose-dependent fashion and this effect was antagonized by Mec, H7 and PD. On the other hand, Nic increased the expression of MMP-28, and this effect was blocked both by H7 and PD, whereas Mec even enforced it. Nic effects on MMP-9 and MMP-28 expression by oral keratinocytes were not previously reported and these data suggest MMPs expression mediated by PKC and MAPK as a possible target for Nic toxicity in oral epithelium.

  11. Origin of Ameloblastoma From Basal Cells of the Oral Epithelium- Establishing the Relation Using Neuroectodermal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Suneela, S; Narayan, T V; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Mohanty, Leeky; Shenoy, Sadhana; Swaminathan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Basal cell layer of the oral epithelium has been rightfully regarded as a potential source of odontogenic tumours and cysts, but, without substantial evidence. Also, whether the basal cell layer retains within it, some properties of ectomesenchyme, which was imbibed during the early embryogenesis and hence its neuroectodermal relation, is not known. Here, an attempt is made to establish the hidden neuroectodermal potential of the oral epithelium, especially the basal layer, by observing the expression of known neuroectodermal markers, NSE (Neuron Specific Enolase), Synaptophysin and CD99. The expression of the same markers has also been studied in Ameloblastoma, connecting it with oral epithelium, in turn establishing basal cell layer as a potential source of Ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Sections of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue samples of 20 cases of Ameloblastoma and 10 cases of Normal Retromolar mucosa, were stained immunohistochemically with NSE, Synaptophysin, CD99 and also with CK-19 and evaluated for positive expression. Results: Positive reaction was obtained in all the cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM (Normal Retromolar mucosa) with NSE, all the cases of Ameloblastoma and eight cases of NRM with Synaptophysin and in six cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM with CD99. The staining was diffuse and more marked in case of NSE than Synaptophysin and CD99. CK19 staining done to assure that the tissue antigenicity was maintained was positive in all the samples. Interpretation and Conclusion: A strong relationship between the neuroectoderm, Ameloblastoma and the basal layer of the oral epithelium is established by the study. It favours the hypothesis that the basal cell layer of oral mucosa may be the sought out culprit in most cases of the Ameloblastomas, especially those occurring in the non-tooth bearing area. This would call for the need to incorporate additional therapy in the form of mucosal striping along with the

  12. Repair and regeneration of tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands in a mouse model of hypoxic-ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    HEGAB, AHMED E.; NICKERSON, DEREK W.; HA, VI LUAN; DARMAWAN, DAPHNE O.; GOMPERTS, BRIGITTE N.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The heterotopic syngeneic tracheal transplant mouse model is an acute hypoxic-ischemic injury model that undergoes complete repair and regeneration. We hypothesized that the repair and regeneration process of the surface epithelium and submucosal glands would occur in a reproducible pattern that could be followed by the expression of specific markers of epithelial cell types. Methods We used the syngeneic heterotopic tracheal transplant model to develop a temporal and spatial map of cellular repair and regeneration by examining the tracheal grafts at post-transplant days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14. We used pulsed BrdU and immunofluorescent staining to identify and follow proliferating and repairing cell populations. Results We confirmed the reproducibility of the injury and repair in the model and we found a distinct sequence of reappearance of the various stem/ progenitor and differentiated cell populations of the tracheal surface epithelium and submucosal glands. In the initial phase, the basal and duct cells that survived the injury proliferated to re-epithelialize the basement membrane with K5 and K14 expressing cells. Then these cells proliferated further and differentiated to restore the function of the epithelium. During this repair process, TROP-2 marked all repairing submucosal gland tubules and ducts. Non-CCSP-expressing serous cells were found to differentiate 4–5 days before Clara, mucus and ciliated cells. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the reparative process of the airway epithelium will allow us to identify cell-specific mechanisms of repair that could be used as novel therapeutic approaches for abnormal repair leading to airway diseases. PMID:22617027

  13. Increase in immune cell infiltration with progression of oral epithelium from hyperkeratosis to dysplasia and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gannot, G; Gannot, I; Vered, H; Buchner, A; Keisari, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, epithelium derived lesions of various pathological manifestations were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for mononuclear cell infiltration. The infiltrate under the transformed epithelium of oral lesions, was examined for differences in the composition of immune mononuclear cells as the epithelium moves from hyperkeratosis through various degrees of dysplasia to squamous cell carcinoma. The study was performed on 53 human tongue tissues diagnosed as hyperkeratosis (11 cases), mild dysplasia (nine cases), moderate and severe dysplasia (14 cases) and squamous cell carcinoma (19 cases). A similar analysis was performed on 30 parotid gland tissues diagnosed as pleomorphic adenoma (14 cases) and carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (16 cases). Immunohistochemical analysis of various surface markers of the tumour infiltrating immune cells was performed and correlated with the transformation level as defined by morphology and the expression of p53 in the epithelium. The results revealed that, in the tongue lesions, the changes in the epithelium from normal appearance to transformed were accompanied by a corresponding increase in the infiltration of CD4, CD8, CD14, CD19+20, and HLA/DR positive cells. The most significant change was an increase in B lymphocytes in tongue lesions, that was in accordance with the transformation level (P<0.001). In the salivary gland, a significant number of cases did not show an infiltrate. In cases where an infiltrate was present, a similar pattern was observed and the more malignant tissues exhibited a higher degree of immune cell infiltration. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1444–1448. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600282 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11986779

  14. The chronicles of Porphyromonas gingivalis: the microbium, the human oral epithelium and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    The microbiota of the human oral mucosa consists of a myriad of bacterial species that normally exist in commensal harmony with the host. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an aetiological agent in severe forms of periodontitis (a chronic inflammatory disease), is a prominent component of the oral microbiome and a successful colonizer of the oral epithelium. This Gram-negative anaerobe can also exist within the host epithelium without the existence of overt disease. Gingival epithelial cells, the outer lining of the gingival mucosa, which function as an important part of the innate immune system, are among the first host cells colonized by P. gingivalis. This review describes recent studies implicating the co-existence and intracellular adaptation of the organism in these target host cells. Specifically, recent findings on the putative mechanisms of persistence, intercellular dissemination and opportunism are highlighted. These new findings may also represent an original and valuable model for mechanistic characterization of other successful host-adapted, self-limiting, persistent intracellular bacteria in human epithelial tissues. PMID:18832296

  15. Proliferation of the intestinal epithelium and of the regenerating liver of rats with epidermal growth factor deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ivashchenko, Yu.D.; Gut, I.T.; Osipova, L.A.; Garmanchuk, L.V.; Khranovskaya, L.N.; Bykorez, A.I.

    1986-09-01

    The presence of specific receptors for epidermal growth factor (EGF) in hepatocytes and enterocytes, changes in their number during the period of postresection regeneration of the liver, and also the inexplicably high concentrations of this powerful growth factor in the saliva determined the main purpose of this investigation, which was to study the effect of EGF deficiency, produced by submandibular sialadenectomy, on proliferation of the intestinal and hepatic epithelium during postresection regeneration of these organs. The experiments were carried out on rats that received an intraperitoneal injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine. The specific activity of /sup 125/I-EGF was 12,000 cpm/ng. The EGF concentration in the rats' blood serum, saliva, and urine was determined by radioimmunoassay. Bound /sup 125/I-EGF was precipitated. Results indicate that EGF is a regulatory factor which modifies proliferation.

  16. Regeneration of Vocal Fold Mucosa Using Tissue-Engineered Structures with Oral Mucosal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukahori, Mioko; Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sato, Kiminori; Sueyoshi, Shintaro; Kurita, Takashi; Umeno, Hirohito; Monden, Yu; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Scarred vocal folds result in irregular vibrations during phonation due to stiffness of the vocal fold mucosa. To date, a completely satisfactory corrective procedure has yet to be achieved. We hypothesize that a potential treatment option for this disease is to replace scarred vocal folds with organotypic mucosa. The purpose of this study is to regenerate vocal fold mucosa using a tissue-engineered structure with autologous oral mucosal cells. Study Design Animal experiment using eight beagles (including three controls). Methods A 3 mm by 3 mm specimen of canine oral mucosa was surgically excised and divided into epithelial and subepithelial tissues. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and cultured separately. The proliferated epithelial cells were co-cultured on oriented collagen gels containing the proliferated fibroblasts for an additional two weeks. The organotypic cultured tissues were transplanted to the mucosa-deficient vocal folds. Two months after transplantation, vocal fold vibrations and morphological characteristics were observed. Results A tissue-engineered vocal fold mucosa, consisting of stratified epithelium and lamina propria, was successfully fabricated to closely resemble the normal layered vocal fold mucosa. Laryngeal stroboscopy revealed regular but slightly small mucosal waves at the transplanted site. Immunohistochemically, stratified epithelium expressed cytokeratin, and the distributed cells in the lamina propria expressed vimentin. Elastic Van Gieson staining revealed a decreased number of elastic fibers in the lamina propria of the transplanted site. Conclusion The fabricated mucosa with autologous oral mucosal cells successfully restored the vocal fold mucosa. This reconstruction technique could offer substantial clinical advantages for treating intractable diseases such as scarring of the vocal folds. PMID:26730600

  17. Histatin 5 inhibits adhesion of C. albicans to Reconstructed Human Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Moffa, Eduardo B.; Mussi, Maria C. M.; Xiao, Yizhi; Garrido, Saulo S.; Machado, Maria A. A. M.; Giampaolo, Eunice T.; Siqueira, Walter L.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most pathogenic fungal species, commonly colonizing on human mucosal surfaces. As a polymorphic species, C. albicans is capable of switching between yeast and hyphal forms, causing an array of mucosal and disseminated infections with high mortality. While the yeast form is most commonly associated with systemic disease, the hyphae are more adept at adhering to and penetrating host tissue and are therefore frequently observed in mucosal fungal infections, most commonly oral candidiasis. The formation of a saliva-derived protein pellicle on the mucosa surface can provide protection against C. albicans on oral epithelial cells, and narrow information is available on the mucosal pellicle composition. Histatins are one of the most abundant salivary proteins and presents antifungal and antibacterial activities against many species of the oral microbiota, however, its presence has never been studied in oral mucosa pellicle. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of histatin 5 to protect the Human Oral Epithelium against C. albicans adhesion. Human Oral Epithelial Tissues (HOET) were incubated with PBS containing histatin 5 for 2 h, followed by incubation with C. albicans for 1 h at 37°C. The tissues were then washed several times in PBS, transferred to fresh RPMI and incubated for 16 h at 37°C at 5% CO2. HOET were then prepared for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. In addition, the TUNEL assay was employed to evaluate the apoptosis of epithelial cells using fluorescent microscopy. HOET pre-incubated with histatin 5 showed a lower rate of C. albicans growth and cell apoptosis when compared to the control groups (HOET alone and HOET incubated with C. albicans). The data suggest that the coating with histatin 5 is able to reduce C. albicans colonization on epithelial cell surfaces and also protect the basal cell layers from undergoing apoptosis. PMID:26379655

  18. Histatin 5 inhibits adhesion of C. albicans to Reconstructed Human Oral Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Moffa, Eduardo B; Mussi, Maria C M; Xiao, Yizhi; Garrido, Saulo S; Machado, Maria A A M; Giampaolo, Eunice T; Siqueira, Walter L

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most pathogenic fungal species, commonly colonizing on human mucosal surfaces. As a polymorphic species, C. albicans is capable of switching between yeast and hyphal forms, causing an array of mucosal and disseminated infections with high mortality. While the yeast form is most commonly associated with systemic disease, the hyphae are more adept at adhering to and penetrating host tissue and are therefore frequently observed in mucosal fungal infections, most commonly oral candidiasis. The formation of a saliva-derived protein pellicle on the mucosa surface can provide protection against C. albicans on oral epithelial cells, and narrow information is available on the mucosal pellicle composition. Histatins are one of the most abundant salivary proteins and presents antifungal and antibacterial activities against many species of the oral microbiota, however, its presence has never been studied in oral mucosa pellicle. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of histatin 5 to protect the Human Oral Epithelium against C. albicans adhesion. Human Oral Epithelial Tissues (HOET) were incubated with PBS containing histatin 5 for 2 h, followed by incubation with C. albicans for 1 h at 37°C. The tissues were then washed several times in PBS, transferred to fresh RPMI and incubated for 16 h at 37°C at 5% CO2. HOET were then prepared for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. In addition, the TUNEL assay was employed to evaluate the apoptosis of epithelial cells using fluorescent microscopy. HOET pre-incubated with histatin 5 showed a lower rate of C. albicans growth and cell apoptosis when compared to the control groups (HOET alone and HOET incubated with C. albicans). The data suggest that the coating with histatin 5 is able to reduce C. albicans colonization on epithelial cell surfaces and also protect the basal cell layers from undergoing apoptosis.

  19. Degeneration and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium following inhalation exposure to methyl bromide: pathology, cell kinetics, and olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Hurtt, M E; Thomas, D A; Working, P K; Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T

    1988-06-30

    The effects of acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide (MeBr) on the olfactory epithelium of male F-344 rats was investigated by morphologic examination of animals killed at varying timepoints during and following exposure to 200 ppm MeBr 6 hr/day for 5 days. Cell replication rate and histopathology were used to assess the kinetics of repair. In addition, olfactory function, using the buried food pellet test, was assessed and the result compared with morphological recovery. Extensive destruction of the olfactory epithelium was evident in animals killed directly after a single 6-hr exposure to MeBr. Histologic features of these lesions indicate that the primary, or most severe, effect of MeBr exposure was on the sustentacular cells and mature sensory cells; basal cells were generally unaffected. By Day 3, despite continued exposure, there was replacement of the olfactory epithelium by a squamous cell layer that increased in thickness and basophilic cytoplasmic staining over the next 2 days of exposure. One week postexposure, the epithelial region was covered by a layer of polyhedral, basophilic cells, and from 2 to 10 weeks postexposure, the epithelium exhibited progressive reorganization to reform the original olfactory epithelium pattern. By Week 10, 75-80% of the olfactory epithelium appeared morphologically normal. Cell replication showed a single peak of olfactory epithelial cell proliferation at Day 3 of exposure, with a labeling index of 14.5% compared to 0.7% in controls. Cell replication rates returned gradually to control levels by Week 10 postexposure. Behavioral tests of olfactory function in animals after a single 6-hr exposure to 200 ppm MeBr demonstrated a loss of the sense of smell, with recovery of this function by Day 6. Exposure to 90 ppm caused no observable effect on olfactory function or morphology. These findings demonstrate that the olfactory mucosa is highly sensitive to the toxic effects of MeBr and that olfactory epithelial cell

  20. Histological features of oral epithelium in seven animal species: As a reference for selecting animal models.

    PubMed

    Sa, Guoliang; Xiong, Xuepeng; Wu, Tianfu; Yang, Jincheng; He, Sangang; Zhao, Yifang

    2016-01-01

    Several animals have been used as models for basic and clinical research on oral mucosa. Few studies have focused on the selection of an appropriate animal model. This study aimed to provide histological references for selecting a potential model. Histological features were assessed by exploring 6 morphological characteristics and 2 immunohistochemical markers. The morphological characteristics included keratinization, basal membrane appearance, epithelial thickness, rete ridge length, adjacent rete ridge distance, and regional variation; the immunohistochemical markers included Ki67 (a proliferative marker) and Cytokeratin 19 (CK19; a stemness marker). The histological similarity of each species compared to humans was calculated according to the designated scoring criteria. The results showed that the buccal mucosae from dog and pig were non-keratinized, with similar rete ridge length and distance, compared to that of humans. The dog, rat, and cavy mucosae had analogous gross appearances in the basal membrane. The dog oral mucosae shared similar epithelial thickness with human oral mucosae. Compared to the human mucosa, the dog, pig, rat, and rabbit mucosae exhibited corresponding regional variations. The Ki67-positive cells in human and canine mucosae were predominantly localized in the suprabasal layers, whereas most of the proliferative cells were in the basal layer in other species. CK19 immunoreactivities were detected only in human and canine mucosae. The canine mucosae gained the highest point value (14), whereas the scores for the pig, rat, rabbit, cavy, sheep, and buffalo mucosae were 8, 6, 5, 5, 5, and 2, respectively. The histological variations in the oral epithelium of diverse animal species are considerable; the mucosae from dogs are most similar to human mucosae, implicating its histological basis as an animal model.

  1. Assessment of nuclear abnormalities in exfoliated cells from the oral epithelium of mobile phone users.

    PubMed

    Souza, Leonardo da Cunha Menezes; Cerqueira, Eneida de Moraes Marcílio; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Transmission and reception of mobile telephony signals take place through electromagnetic wave radiation, or electromagnetic radiofrequency fields, between the mobile terminal and the radio base station. Based on reports in the literature on adverse effects from exposure to this type of radiation, the objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of such exposure, by means of the micronucleus test on exfoliated cells from the oral epithelium. The sample included 45 individuals distributed in 3 groups according to the amount of time in hours per week (t) spent using mobile phones: group I, t > 5 h; group II, t > 1 h and ≤ 5 h; and group III, t ≤ 1 h. Cells from the oral mucosa were analyzed to assess the numbers of micronuclei, broken egg structures and degenerative nuclear abnormalities indicative of apoptosis (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis and pyknosis) or necrosis (karyolysis in addition to these changes). The occurrences of micronuclei and degenerative nuclear abnormalities did not differ between the groups, but the number of broken egg (structures that may be associated with gene amplification) was significantly greater in the individuals in group I (p < 0.05).

  2. Epithelial-connective tissue cross-talk is essential for regeneration of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2005-02-01

    Epithelial cells of the gastrointestine undergo a rapid cell-renewal and originate from stem cells throughout the life of the organisms. Previous studies have provided a solid body of evidence to show that the epithelial cell-renewal is under the strict control of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions between the epithelium and the connective tissue. Especially, the microenvironment around the stem cells called "niche" is thought to play important roles in this control, and its disruption leads to diseases or disorders such as cancer in the human gastrointestine. Although understanding how the niche affects the stem cells is clinically important, its mechanisms still remain mostly unknown at the molecular level, possibly due to difficulties in the identification of the stem cells in the gastrointestine. Recent progress in cell and molecular biology is gradually beginning to shed light on some of the key signaling pathways in the cell-renewal of the intestinal epithelium, such as Wnt/T-cell factor (TCF)/beta-catenin, Notch, Sonic hedgehog (Shh)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways, which are also involved in embryonic organogenesis and/or adult carcinogenesis. At present, only fragmentary information is available on their precise functions in the intestine. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of evidence that such signaling pathways have conservative functions in the intestine throughout terrestrial vertebrates, suggesting the usefulness of experimental animals to clarify molecular mechanisms regulating epithelial cell-renewal. In this article, I review some recent findings in this field, with particular focus on our studies using the Xenopus laevis intestine, where the stem cells form the mammalian-type intestinal epithelium under the control of connective tissue during metamorphosis. This Xenopus experimental system will certainly serve as a useful model for the study of the intestinal niche, whose clarification is urgently

  3. Adult Thymic Medullary Epithelium Is Maintained and Regenerated by Lineage-Restricted Cells Rather Than Bipotent Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Zuklys, Saulius; Sakata, Mie; Mayer, Carlos E; Hamazaki, Yoko; Minato, Nagahiro; Hollander, Georg A; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play an essential role in establishing self-tolerance in T cells. mTECs originate from bipotent TEC progenitors that generate both mTECs and cortical TECs (cTECs), although mTEC-restricted progenitors also have been reported. Here, we report in vivo fate-mapping analysis of cells that transcribe β5t, a cTEC trait expressed in bipotent progenitors, during a given period in mice. We show that, in adult mice, most mTECs are derived from progenitors that transcribe β5t during embryogenesis and the neonatal period up to 1 week of age. The contribution of adult β5t(+) progenitors was minor even during injury-triggered regeneration. Our results further demonstrate that adult mTEC-restricted progenitors are derived from perinatal β5t(+) progenitors. These results indicate that the adult thymic medullary epithelium is maintained and regenerated by mTEC-lineage cells that pass beyond the bipotent stage during early ontogeny. PMID:26549457

  4. Mesenchymal to epithelial transition during tissue homeostasis and regeneration: Patching up the Drosophila midgut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Zeus A.; Reiff, Tobias; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are responsible for preserving morphology and function of adult tissues. Stem cells divide to self-renew and to generate progenitor cells to sustain cell demand from the tissue throughout the organism's life. Unlike stem cells, the progenitor cells have limited proliferation potential but have the capacity to terminally differentiate and thereby to substitute older or damaged mature cells. Recent findings indicate that adult stem cells can adapt their division kinetics dynamically to match changes in tissue demand during homeostasis and regeneration. However, cell turnover not only requires stem cell division but also needs timed differentiation of the progenitor cells, which has been much less explored. In this Extra View article, we discuss the ability of progenitor cells to actively postpone terminal differentiation in the absence of a local demand and how tissue demand activates terminal differentiation via a conserved mesenchymal-epithelial transition program revealed in our recent EMBO J paper and other published and unpublished data. The extent of the significance of these results is discussed for models of tissue dynamics during both homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26760955

  5. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods.

  6. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods. PMID:23831526

  7. Regeneration of oral siphon pigment organs in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Auger, Hélène; Sasakura, Yasunori; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Jeffery, William R

    2010-03-15

    Ascidians have powerful capacities for regeneration but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we examine oral siphon regeneration in the solitary ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Following amputation, the oral siphon rapidly reforms oral pigment organs (OPO) at its distal margin prior to slower regeneration of proximal siphon parts. The early stages of oral siphon reformation include cell proliferation and re-growth of the siphon nerves, although the neural complex (adult brain and associated organs) is not required for regeneration. Young animals reform OPO more rapidly after amputation than old animals indicating that regeneration is age dependent. UV irradiation, microcautery, and cultured siphon explant experiments indicate that OPOs are replaced as independent units based on local differentiation of progenitor cells within the siphon, rather than by cell migration from a distant source in the body. The typical pattern of eight OPOs and siphon lobes is restored with fidelity after distal amputation of the oral siphon, but as many as 16 OPOs and lobes can be reformed following proximal amputation near the siphon base. Thus, the pattern of OPO regeneration is determined by cues positioned along the proximal distal axis of the oral siphon. A model is presented in which columns of siphon tissue along the proximal-distal axis below pre-existing OPO are responsible for reproducing the normal OPO pattern during regeneration. This study reveals previously unknown principles of oral siphon and OPO regeneration that will be important for developing Ciona as a regeneration model in urochordates, which may be the closest living relatives of vertebrates.

  8. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  9. Regeneration of tissues of the oral complex: current clinical trends and research advances.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thomas T; Mui, Brennan; Mehrabzadeh, Mahsa; Chea, Yannie; Chaudhry, Zoya; Chaudhry, Kamran; Tran, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative therapy in oral health care is limited by both the body's natural capacity for regeneration and the materials and methods currently available. Research on various aspects of regenerative therapy, such as tissue engineering and stem cell and gene therapy, has produced promising results. Compelling advances, ranging from the discovery and characterization of stem cell populations in oral tissue to the engineering and transplantation of whole tooth structures, could result in exciting new treatment methods for clinicians in the near future. In this review, we discuss the limitations of natural healing and regeneration of various tissues of the oral complex, including teeth, periodontium and salivary glands, and summarize current treatment methods for tissue damage as well as research advances in oral tissue regeneration.

  10. Regeneration, Stem Cells, and Aging in the Tunicate Ciona: Insights from the Oral Siphon.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration studies in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis have recently been focused on the potential of adult stem cells to replace injured tissues and organs during the adult life cycle using the oral siphon (OS) as a model. The OS has oral siphon pigment organs (OPOs) along its rim and an underlying network of muscle fibers in its tube. Different regeneration processes are triggered by OS amputation at the tip, along the tube, or at the base. One process involves the replacement of OPOs without new cell division by direct differentiation of locally deployed stem cells or stem cells that migrate from the branchial sac. Another process involves blastema formation by the migration of progenitor cells produced from branchial sac stem cells. The capacity for complete and accurate OS regeneration declines continuously during the adult life cycle. Finally, after an age threshold is reached, OS regeneration ceases in old animals. The loss of regeneration capacity in old animals involves the depletion of stem cells in the branchial sac, the inability of branchial sac progenitor cells to migrate to the sites of regeneration, and defective oral pigment organ replacement. The significance of the OS model for studying regeneration, stem cells, and aging will be enhanced by the application of molecular methods.

  11. Regeneration, Stem Cells, and Aging in the Tunicate Ciona: Insights from the Oral Siphon.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration studies in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis have recently been focused on the potential of adult stem cells to replace injured tissues and organs during the adult life cycle using the oral siphon (OS) as a model. The OS has oral siphon pigment organs (OPOs) along its rim and an underlying network of muscle fibers in its tube. Different regeneration processes are triggered by OS amputation at the tip, along the tube, or at the base. One process involves the replacement of OPOs without new cell division by direct differentiation of locally deployed stem cells or stem cells that migrate from the branchial sac. Another process involves blastema formation by the migration of progenitor cells produced from branchial sac stem cells. The capacity for complete and accurate OS regeneration declines continuously during the adult life cycle. Finally, after an age threshold is reached, OS regeneration ceases in old animals. The loss of regeneration capacity in old animals involves the depletion of stem cells in the branchial sac, the inability of branchial sac progenitor cells to migrate to the sites of regeneration, and defective oral pigment organ replacement. The significance of the OS model for studying regeneration, stem cells, and aging will be enhanced by the application of molecular methods. PMID:26404471

  12. EDTA separation and recombination of epithelium and connective tissue of human oral mucosa. Studies of tissue transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Dabelsteen, E; Harder, F

    1985-01-01

    A possible epithelial-mesenchymal interaction in determining epithelial histologic features of human oral mucosa was examined. The study comprised 74 biopsies of normal buccal mucosa and 54 biopsies of normal palatal mucosa. Epithelium was separated from connective tissue by the use of 1 mM ethylenediamine tetraacetate dihydrate. Self-recombined and cross-recombined epithelial and connective tissues and connective tissue sheets alone were transplanted to subcutaneous sites of nude mice. Histologic examination of cross-recombined palatal epithelium/buccal connective tissue transplants showed a change in keratinization pattern but no major change in number of epithelial cell layers as the result of connective tissue influence. Transplanted sheets of connective tissue after growth for 14 days showed that complete separation of biopsies from buccal mucosa had been obtained. However, palatal mucosa had been incompletely separated as evidenced by re-epithelialization of most of the connective tissue transplants. The consequences of the incomplete palatal epithelium-connective tissue separation are discussed.

  13. Overexpression of BMP-2/4, -5 and BMPR-IA associated with malignancy of oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Tipoe, G L; Liong, E C; Lau, T Y; Fung, P C; Leung, K M

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), BMP receptor type IA and carcinogenesis of oral epithelium. A retrospective study was performed on material obtained from oral mucosa, including nine cases of normal mucosa (NB), eight cases of nonspecific chronic inflammation (NCI), seven cases of hyperkeratosis (HK), five cases of squamous cell papilloma (SCP), 29 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with various grades of differentiation and 10 cases of epithelium adjacent to carcinoma (EAC). Six cases of NB from hard palate (NHP) were chosen as a control group. The benign groups consisted of NCI, HK and SCP. The antibodies against BMP-2/4, -5, receptor BMPR-IA and purified bovine BMP (bBMP-McAb) were utilised using an immunocytochemical method. The results demonstrated that the immunostaining of BMP-2/4, BMP-5, BMPR-IA and bBMP-McAb was weak and not consistent in normal and benign groups. The immunoreactivity level was independent of the clinical and pathological grading of SCC. All cases of SCC showed positive staining for BMP-2/4, BMP-5, BMPR-IA and bBMP-McAb except for three cases and one case of SCC which negatively stained for BMP-2/4 and BMP-5, respectively. The staining intensity and proportion of the positively stained cells were markedly increased in SCC when compared with that of the normal and benign groups except for EAC. The metastatic carcinoma cells in lymph nodes were strongly and positively stained for BMP-2/4 and BMP-5 when compared with the primary lesions. Our results indicate that there was an overexpression of BMP-2/4, BMP-5, bBMP-McAb and BMPR-IA in the high-risk premalignant and malignant lesions of oral epithelium. Our findings suggest that BMP-2/4 and BMP-5 but not BMPR-IA might be involved in the metastasis of oral carcinoma cells.

  14. Skp2 Is Necessary for Myc-Induced Keratinocyte Proliferation but Dispensable for Myc Oncogenic Activity in the Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sistrunk, Christopher; Macias, Everardo; Nakayama, Keiichi; Kim, Yongbaek; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2011-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Myc accelerates the rate of cell proliferation, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Moreover, p27Kip1 protein levels are regulated by ubiquitin-mediated turnover, leading to destruction by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2. Therefore, we hypothesize that a lack of Skp2 expression should lead to increased p27Kip1 levels and further inhibition of Myc-mediated proliferation and tumorigenesis. Myc expression in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) led to increased keratinocyte proliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors within the oral cavity. We generated K5-Myc–transgenic mice in an Skp2-null background. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that Myc-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation was abolished by the loss of Skp2. However, Skp2 ablation did not affect Myc-driven tumorigenesis because the incidence, latency, and degree of differentiation of oral tumors were identical between K5-Myc/Skp2+/+ and K5-Myc/Skp2−/− mice. Altogether, these findings suggest that Skp2 and p27Kip1 are critical for Myc-driven keratinocyte proliferation; however, Myc-mediated tumorigenesis in the oral epithelium is independent of the Skp2-p27Kip1 axis. PMID:21641375

  15. Zinc iodide-osmium staining of membrane-coating granules in keratinized and non-keratinized mammalian oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Squier, C A

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of keratinized and non-keratinized oral epithelium were examined in the electron microscope after being stained with zinc iodide-osmium. In both types of tissue, reaction was seen in unmyelinated nerves, in the specific granules of epithelial Langerhans cells and within lysosome-like organelles and small vesicles associated with Golgi systems. In keratinized epithelia, the reaction was also present in the membrane-coating granules and between the deepest cells of the keratinized layer. In contrast, the membrane-coating granules of non-keratinized epithelia lacked Zn iodide-osmium staining despite the presence of reaction in adjacent Golgi systems. It is suggested that Zn iodide-osmium stains glycolipid or glycoprotein material in the cell. This material is elaborated in the Golgi systems from which lysosomes and the membrane-coating granules of keratinized tissues are probably derived.

  16. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  17. Oral administration of polyamines ameliorates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury and promotes liver regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Shinya; Teratani, Takumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Zhao, Xiangdong; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Masano, Yuki; Kasahara, Naoya; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Uemura, Tadahiro; Kaido, Toshimi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell growth and differentiation. They play important roles in protection from liver damage and promotion of liver regeneration. However, little is known about the effect of oral exogenous polyamine administration on liver damage and regeneration. This study investigated the impact of polyamines (spermidine and spermine) on ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and liver regeneration. We used a rat model in which a 70% hepatectomy after 40 minutes of ischemia was performed to mimic the clinical condition of living donor partial liver transplantation (LT). Male Lewis rats were separated into 2 groups: a polyamine group given polyamines before and after operation as treatment and a vehicle group given distilled water as placebo. The levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase at 6, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion were significantly lower in the polyamine group compared with those in the vehicle group. Polyamine treatment reduced the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines at 6 hours after reperfusion. Histological analysis showed significantly less necrosis and apoptosis in the polyamine group at 6 hours after reperfusion. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were also well preserved in the polyamine group. In addition, the regeneration of the remnant liver at 24, 48, and 168 hours after reperfusion was significantly accelerated, and the Ki-67 labeling index and the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein at 24 hours after reperfusion were significantly higher in the polyamine group compared with those in the vehicle group. In conclusion, perioperative oral polyamine administration attenuates liver IRI and promotes liver regeneration. It might be a new therapeutic option to improve the outcomes of partial LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1231-1244 2016 AASLD. PMID:27102080

  18. [Competence factors of retinal pigment epithelium cells for reprogramming in the neuronal direction during retinal regeneration in newts].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, E N

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have the unique ability to reprogram retinal cells @in vivo@ were analyzed in the adult newt. Our own data and that available in the literature on the peculiarities of the biology of these cells (from morphology to molecular profile, which can be associated with the capability of phenotype change) were summarized: It was established that the molecular traits of specialized and poorly differentiated cells are combined in RPE of the adult newt. It was registered that persistent (at a low level) proliferation and rapid change of specific cytoskeleton proteins can contribute to the success of RPE cell reprogramming in the neuronal direction. Each of the considered factors of competence for reprogramming can be found for animal RPE, whose cells are not able @in vivo@ to change the phenotype to a neuronal one; however, their totality (supported by the epigenetic state permissive for conversion) is probably an internal property of only newt RPE. PMID:25872395

  19. [Competence factors of retinal pigment epithelium cells for reprogramming in the neuronal direction during retinal regeneration in newts].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, E N

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have the unique ability to reprogram retinal cells @in vivo@ were analyzed in the adult newt. Our own data and that available in the literature on the peculiarities of the biology of these cells (from morphology to molecular profile, which can be associated with the capability of phenotype change) were summarized: It was established that the molecular traits of specialized and poorly differentiated cells are combined in RPE of the adult newt. It was registered that persistent (at a low level) proliferation and rapid change of specific cytoskeleton proteins can contribute to the success of RPE cell reprogramming in the neuronal direction. Each of the considered factors of competence for reprogramming can be found for animal RPE, whose cells are not able @in vivo@ to change the phenotype to a neuronal one; however, their totality (supported by the epigenetic state permissive for conversion) is probably an internal property of only newt RPE.

  20. Distinct mechanisms underlie oral vs aboral regeneration in the cnidarian Hydractinia echinata

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Brian; Thompson, Kerry; Frank, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians possess remarkable powers of regeneration, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this capability are unclear. Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. This process is necessary for head regeneration. Knocking down Piwi1, Vasa, Pl10 or Ncol1 expressed by blastema cells inhibited regeneration but not blastema formation. EdU pulse-chase experiments and in vivo tracking of individual transgenic Piwi1+ stem cells showed that the cellular source for blastema formation is migration of stem cells from a remote area. Surprisingly, no blastema developed at the aboral pole after stolon removal. Instead, polyps transformed into stolons and then budded polyps. Hence, distinct mechanisms act to regenerate different body parts in Hydractinia. This model, where stem cell behavior can be monitored in vivo at single cell resolution, offers new insights for regenerative biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05506.001 PMID:25884246

  1. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Aldine R; Johnston, Hereroa T; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  2. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    O'Valle, Francisco; Lanis, Alejandro; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M.; Wang, Hom-Lay; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled) and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes. PMID:26064899

  3. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Aldine R.; Johnston, Hereroa T.; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F.; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  4. Overcoming the diffusion barrier of mucus and absorption barrier of epithelium by self-assembled nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wei; Zhu, Xi; Liu, Min; Li, Lian; Zhong, Jiaju; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated great potential for the oral delivery of protein drugs that have very limited oral bioavailability. Orally administered NPs could be absorbed by the epithelial tissue only if they successfully permeate through the mucus that covers the epithelium. However, efficient epithelial absorption and mucus permeation require very different surface properties of a nanocarrier. We herein report self-assembled NPs for efficient oral delivery of insulin by facilitating both of these two processes. The NPs possess a nanocomplex core composed of insulin and cell penetrating peptide (CPP), and a dissociable hydrophilic coating of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (pHPMA) derivatives. After systematic screening using mucus-secreting epithelial cells, NPs exhibit excellent permeation in mucus due to the "mucus-inert" pHPMA coating, as well as high epithelial absorption mediated by CPP. The investigation of NP behavior shows that the pHPMA molecules gradually dissociate from the NP surface as it permeates through mucus, and the CPP-rich core is revealed in time for subsequent transepithelial transport through the secretory endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pathway and endocytic recycling pathway. The NPs exhibit 20-fold higher absorption than free insulin on mucus-secreting epithelium cells, and orally administered NPs generate a prominent hypoglycemic response and an increase of the serum insulin concentration in diabetic rats. Our study provides the evidence of using pHPMA as dissociable "mucus-inert" agent to enhance mucus permeation of NPs, and validates a strategy to overcome the multiple absorption barriers using NP platform with dissociable hydrophilic coating and drug-loaded CPP-rich core.

  5. The junction zone of human epithelium and foreign stroma. Ultrastructural observations in human oral mucosal transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Andersen, L; Harder, F

    1984-07-01

    This study describes ultrastructural features of epithelial-stromal junction of human buccal and palatal mucosal transplants and their outgrowths in nude mice. The investigation included transplant epithelium overlying human connective tissue in 27 cases, epithelial outgrowth formed over murine connective tissue in 33 cases, and over Millipore filter in 12 cases. The epithelial-stromal junction of the transplants differed from the normal state only in the presence of lamina densa loops projecting into the connective tissue and in lamina densa interruptions and duplications. In contrast the epithelial outgrowths demonstrated flattening of epithelial basal cells, lack of proximal epithelial cell projections, lack of complete hemidesmosome complexes, lack of distinct lamina densa, and lack of anchoring fibrils. It is suggested that these changes may be due to lack of necessary interaction between the human epithelium and the foreign stroma.

  6. Carbamazepine transbuccal delivery: the histo-morphological features of reconstituted human oral epithelium and buccal porcine mucosae in the transmucosal permeation.

    PubMed

    Campisi, G; Paderni, C; Saccone, R; Siragusa, M G; Lo Muzio, L; Tripodo, C; Giannola, L I; Florena, A M

    2008-01-01

    Transbuccal drug delivery is an attractive way of administration since several well-known advantages are provided, especially with respect to peroral management. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an anticonvulsant which is useful in controlling neuropathic pain, and it is currently administered by peroral route, although its absorption and bioavailability is limited due to various factors. The oral cavity could be an interesting site for transbuccal CBZ delivery due to two properties: slow administration of constant low drug doses and less dose-related side effects. However, in transbuccal absorption a major limitation could be the low permeability of the mucosa which results in low drug bioavailability; thus the aptitude of the drug to penetrate the buccal mucosa has to be assessed by using tissue models resembling human normal mucosa. In our experience, CBZ well permeates mucosal membranes. In order to assess the efficacy of CBZ transbuccal delivery and to verify the reliability of these tissues in permeability testing before and after the passage of CBZ, the histo-morphological features of reconstituted human oral (RHO) epithelium (E) and buccal porcine mucosae were investigated. Significant histological changes due to CBZ passage were observed both in RHO-E and porcine mucosa. The main findings detected in RHO samples were cellular swellings with a signet ring-like appearance, nuclear swelling, prominent nucleoli lined against the nuclear membrane and the presence of keratohyalin granules. The most striking finding regarding porcine buccal mucosa was a cytoplasmic vacuolization, mainly involving the basal layer. PMID:19144275

  7. Positive effect of oral supplementation with glycosaminoglycans and antioxidants on the regeneration of osteochondral defects in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Handl, M; Amler, E; Bräun, K; Holzheu, J; Trc, T; Imhoff, A B; Lytvynets, A; Filová, E; Kolárová, H; Kotyk, A; Martínek, V

    2007-01-01

    The effect of oral supplementation with glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and radical scavengers (vitamin E/selenium) on the regeneration of osteochondral defects was investigated in rabbits. After introduction of defined osteochondral defects in the knee joint, groups of ten animals were given a GAG/vitamin E/selenium mixture or a placebo (milk sugar) for 6 weeks. Following sacrifice, histological and histochemical analysis was performed. The amount of synovial fluid was increased in the placebo group, while the viscosity of the synovial fluid was significantly enhanced in the GAG group. The amount of sulfated GAG in the osteochondral regenerates (8.8 +/- 3.6 % vs. 6.0 +/- 5.6 %; p <0.03) was significantly higher in the GAG group. In both groups, the GAG amount in the cartilage of the operated knee was significantly higher than in the non-involved knee (p <0.05). Histological analysis of the regenerates in the GAG group was superior in comparison with the placebo group. For the first time, a biological effect following oral supplementation with GAG was demonstrated in healing of osteochondral defects in vivo. These findings support the known positive clinical results.

  8. Role of Se+Zn in regeneration (Ki-67) following Pb toxicity (p53andcad) in the germinal epithelium of adult Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Falana, B A; Ogundele, O M; Duru, F I; Oshinubi, A A; Falode, D T

    2013-01-15

    The germinal epithelium is the delicate epithelial lining of the seminiferous tubule lying on the blood-testes barrier; formed by the sustenacular cells of Sertoli and the adjoining basement epithelium this study addresses the effect of lead (Pb) toxicity on the epithelium and the proliferative effect of Zinc (Zn) and Selenium (Se) administered in trace concentration. Sixty F1 generation adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of 15 animals each. Group 1 received normal saline, group 2: 100 mg kg(-1) of lead acetate, group 3: 100 mg kg(-1) of lead acetate then 2.25 mg kg(-1) each of Zinc (Chelated zinc) and Selenium (Sodium Selenium) and group 4: 2.25 mg kg(-1) of zinc and selenium (Se+Zn). The duration of treatment was 56 days following which the animals were sacrificed on the 57th day and the testes harvested and fixed in Bouin's fluid. Pb induced toxicity can follow a mitochondria pathway involving Cathepsin D (CAD) or a cytoplasmic pathway involving p53 (protein 53; a 53 KDa nucleolase), the most predominant form of cell death is apoptosis which can result from both pathways. Se+Zn treatment improves proliferation and counters Pb toxicity by substitution, activation of enzymes (radical scavengers and vitamins), growth factors, activation of endothelial factors and activation of oxygen radical scavengers.

  9. Neural Stem Cell-based Intraocular Administration of Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor Promotes Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush Injury in Rat: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Gao, Yan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is regarded as a multifunctional protein possessing neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. PEDF has a very short half-life, and it would require multiple injections to maintain a therapeutically relevant level without a delivery system. However, multiple injections are prone to cause local damage or infection. To overcome this, we chose a cell-based system that provided sustained delivery of PEDF and compared the effect of weekly injections of PEDF and neural stem cell (NSC)-based intraocular administration of PEDF on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. Methods: Seventy-two rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group with injections of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=24), group with weekly injections of PEDF (n=24), and group with NSC-based administration of PEDF (n=24). Western blot was used to analyze the PEDF protein level 2 weeks after injection. Retinal flat mounts and immunohistochemistry were employed to analyze RGC survival and axon regeneration 2 weeks and 4 weeks after injection. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA in SPSS (version 19.0). A P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The PEDF protein level in the group with NSC-based administration of PEDF increased compared with that in the groups with injections of PEDF and PBS (P<0.05). The PEDF-modified NSCs differentiated into GFAP-positive astrocytes andβ-tubulin-III-positive neurons. NSC-based administration of PEDF effectively increased RGC survival and improved the axon regeneration of the optic nerve compared with weekly injections of PEDF. Conclusion: Subretinal space transplantation of PEDF-secreting NSCs sustained high concentrations of PEDF, differentiated into neurons and astrocytes, and significantly promoted RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. PMID:27582587

  10. Nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-titanium dioxide exhibit different subcellular distribution and apoptotic profile in human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Fang, Wanru; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Chia, Sing Ling; Tan, Kai Soo; Hong, Catherine Hsu Ling; Leong, David Tai

    2014-05-14

    Nanomaterials (NMs) such as titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) are widely used in food, personal care, and many household products. Due to their extensive usage, the risk of human exposure is increased and may trigger NMs specific biological outcomes as the NMs interface with the cells. However, the interaction of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA with cells, their uptake and subcellular distribution, and the cytotoxic effects are poorly understood. Herein, we characterized and examined the cellular internalization, inflammatory response and cytotoxic effects of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA using TR146 human oral buccal epithelial cells as an in vitro model. We showed both types of NMs were able to bind to the cellular membrane and passage into the cells in a dose dependent manner. Strikingly, both types of NMs exhibited distinct subcellular distribution profile with nano-HA displaying a higher preference to accumulate near the cell membrane compared to nano-TiO2. Exposure to both types of NMs caused an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and expression of inflammatory transcripts with increasing NMs concentration. Although cells treated with nano-HA induces minimal apoptosis, nano-TiO2 treated samples displayed approximately 28% early apoptosis after 24 h of NMs exposure. We further showed that nano-TiO2 mediated cell death is independent of the classical p53-Bax apoptosis pathway. Our findings provided insights into the potential cellular fates of human oral epithelial cells as they interface with industrial grade nano-HA and nano-TiO2.

  11. Nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-titanium dioxide exhibit different subcellular distribution and apoptotic profile in human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Fang, Wanru; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Chia, Sing Ling; Tan, Kai Soo; Hong, Catherine Hsu Ling; Leong, David Tai

    2014-05-14

    Nanomaterials (NMs) such as titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) are widely used in food, personal care, and many household products. Due to their extensive usage, the risk of human exposure is increased and may trigger NMs specific biological outcomes as the NMs interface with the cells. However, the interaction of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA with cells, their uptake and subcellular distribution, and the cytotoxic effects are poorly understood. Herein, we characterized and examined the cellular internalization, inflammatory response and cytotoxic effects of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA using TR146 human oral buccal epithelial cells as an in vitro model. We showed both types of NMs were able to bind to the cellular membrane and passage into the cells in a dose dependent manner. Strikingly, both types of NMs exhibited distinct subcellular distribution profile with nano-HA displaying a higher preference to accumulate near the cell membrane compared to nano-TiO2. Exposure to both types of NMs caused an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and expression of inflammatory transcripts with increasing NMs concentration. Although cells treated with nano-HA induces minimal apoptosis, nano-TiO2 treated samples displayed approximately 28% early apoptosis after 24 h of NMs exposure. We further showed that nano-TiO2 mediated cell death is independent of the classical p53-Bax apoptosis pathway. Our findings provided insights into the potential cellular fates of human oral epithelial cells as they interface with industrial grade nano-HA and nano-TiO2. PMID:24734929

  12. A single nucleotide polymorphism associated with isolated cleft lip and palate, thyroid cancer and hypothyroidism alters the activity of an oral epithelium and thyroid enhancer near FOXE1.

    PubMed

    Lidral, Andrew C; Liu, Huan; Bullard, Steven A; Bonde, Greg; Machida, Junichiro; Visel, Axel; Uribe, Lina M Moreno; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad; Cornell, Robert A

    2015-07-15

    Three common diseases, isolated cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP), hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer all map to the FOXE1 locus, but causative variants have yet to be identified. In patients with CLP, the frequency of coding mutations in FOXE1 fails to account for the risk attributable to this locus, suggesting that the common risk alleles reside in nearby regulatory elements. Using a combination of zebrafish and mouse transgenesis, we screened 15 conserved non-coding sequences for enhancer activity, identifying three that regulate expression in a tissue specific pattern consistent with endogenous foxe1 expression. These three, located -82.4, -67.7 and +22.6 kb from the FOXE1 start codon, are all active in the oral epithelium or branchial arches. The -67.7 and +22.6 kb elements are also active in the developing heart, and the -67.7 kb element uniquely directs expression in the developing thyroid. Within the -67.7 kb element is the SNP rs7850258 that is associated with all three diseases. Quantitative reporter assays in oral epithelial and thyroid cell lines show that the rs7850258 allele (G) associated with CLP and hypothyroidism has significantly greater enhancer activity than the allele associated with thyroid cancer (A). Moreover, consistent with predicted transcription factor binding differences, the -67.7 kb element containing rs7850258 allele G is significantly more responsive to both MYC and ARNT than allele A. By demonstrating that this common non-coding variant alters FOXE1 expression, we have identified at least in part the functional basis for the genetic risk of these seemingly disparate disorders.

  13. A single nucleotide polymorphism associated with isolated cleft lip and palate, thyroid cancer and hypothyroidism alters the activity of an oral epithelium and thyroid enhancer near FOXE1

    PubMed Central

    Lidral, Andrew C.; Liu, Huan; Bullard, Steven A.; Bonde, Greg; Machida, Junichiro; Visel, Axel; Uribe, Lina M. Moreno; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad; Cornell, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Three common diseases, isolated cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP), hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer all map to the FOXE1 locus, but causative variants have yet to be identified. In patients with CLP, the frequency of coding mutations in FOXE1 fails to account for the risk attributable to this locus, suggesting that the common risk alleles reside in nearby regulatory elements. Using a combination of zebrafish and mouse transgenesis, we screened 15 conserved non-coding sequences for enhancer activity, identifying three that regulate expression in a tissue specific pattern consistent with endogenous foxe1 expression. These three, located −82.4, −67.7 and +22.6 kb from the FOXE1 start codon, are all active in the oral epithelium or branchial arches. The −67.7 and +22.6 kb elements are also active in the developing heart, and the −67.7 kb element uniquely directs expression in the developing thyroid. Within the −67.7 kb element is the SNP rs7850258 that is associated with all three diseases. Quantitative reporter assays in oral epithelial and thyroid cell lines show that the rs7850258 allele (G) associated with CLP and hypothyroidism has significantly greater enhancer activity than the allele associated with thyroid cancer (A). Moreover, consistent with predicted transcription factor binding differences, the −67.7 kb element containing rs7850258 allele G is significantly more responsive to both MYC and ARNT than allele A. By demonstrating that this common non-coding variant alters FOXE1 expression, we have identified at least in part the functional basis for the genetic risk of these seemingly disparate disorders. PMID:25652407

  14. Light and electron microscopic studies of the intestinal epithelium in Notoplana humilis (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida): the contribution of mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts to intestinal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke; Ishida, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    Some free-living flatworms in the phylum Platyhelminthes possess strong regenerative capability that depends on putative pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. These neoblasts are defined based on several criteria, including their proliferative capacity and the presence of cellular components known as chromatoid bodies. Polyclads, which are marine flatworms, have the potential to be a good model system for stem cell research, yet little information is available regarding neoblasts and regeneration. In this study, transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining analyses, using antibodies against phospho-histone H3 and BrdU, were used to identify two populations of neoblasts in the polyclad Notoplana humilis: mesodermal neoblasts (located in the mesenchymal space) and gastrodermal neoblasts (located within the intestine, where granular club cells and phagocytic cells are also located). Light and electron microscopic analyses also suggested that phagocytic cells and mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts, but not granular club cells, migrated into blastemas and remodeled the intestine during regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that, in polyclads, intestinal regeneration is accomplished by mechanisms underlying both morphallaxis (remodeling of pre-existing tissues) and epimorphosis (de novo tissue formation derived from mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts). Based on the assumption that gastrodermal neoblasts, which are derived from mesodermal neoblasts, are intestinal stem cells, we propose a model to study intestinal regeneration.

  15. Carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) for corneal epithelium reconstruction: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Wood, Andrew; Hoft, Richard; Pan, Derek; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Makalinao, Andrew; French, Samuel W; Niihara, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the therapeutic effects of carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) transplantation for experimentally induced severe rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Buccal biopsies were performed and CAOMECS were cultured and transplanted onto diseased corneas. Six-month follow-up examinations indicated that three out of four corneas with CAOMECS grafts showed a decrease in superficial vascularization, while almost all the sham corneas did not show a similar decrease. H&E staining of corneas showed that CAOMECS transplantation reduced blood vessel invasion of central cornea, reduced lymphocyte infiltration and fibrotic tissue formation. DeltaNp63 stained markedly in the grafted cornea and to a lesser extent in the sham corneas. PCNA and Ki-67 staining were much greater in the sham corneas than in the grafted and normal corneas. K3 and K13 staining demonstrated that CAOMECS transplanted corneas had much more K3- and less K13- positive cells compared to the sham corneas. Muc5AC was decreased in the central region of grafted corneas. Very little alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA) staining was detected in grafted corneas, while there was a greater amount of aSMA staining in sham corneas. Staining for anti-angiogenic factor TIMP -3 was also increased, and pro-angiogenic factor MMP-3 was decreased in grafted corneas compared to sham corneas. Our results indicate that CAOMECS grafts resulted in improved epithelialization of the corneal surface and decreased vascularization and fibrosis of the diseased corneas.

  16. Carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) for corneal epithelium reconstruction: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Wood, Andrew; Hoft, Richard; Pan, Derek; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Makalinao, Andrew; French, Samuel W; Niihara, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the therapeutic effects of carrier-free cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) transplantation for experimentally induced severe rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Buccal biopsies were performed and CAOMECS were cultured and transplanted onto diseased corneas. Six-month follow-up examinations indicated that three out of four corneas with CAOMECS grafts showed a decrease in superficial vascularization, while almost all the sham corneas did not show a similar decrease. H&E staining of corneas showed that CAOMECS transplantation reduced blood vessel invasion of central cornea, reduced lymphocyte infiltration and fibrotic tissue formation. DeltaNp63 stained markedly in the grafted cornea and to a lesser extent in the sham corneas. PCNA and Ki-67 staining were much greater in the sham corneas than in the grafted and normal corneas. K3 and K13 staining demonstrated that CAOMECS transplanted corneas had much more K3- and less K13- positive cells compared to the sham corneas. Muc5AC was decreased in the central region of grafted corneas. Very little alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA) staining was detected in grafted corneas, while there was a greater amount of aSMA staining in sham corneas. Staining for anti-angiogenic factor TIMP -3 was also increased, and pro-angiogenic factor MMP-3 was decreased in grafted corneas compared to sham corneas. Our results indicate that CAOMECS grafts resulted in improved epithelialization of the corneal surface and decreased vascularization and fibrosis of the diseased corneas. PMID:25881998

  17. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in dental and oral surgery: from the wound healing to bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a new approach to tissue regeneration and it is becoming a valuable adjunct to promote healing in many procedures in dental and oral surgery, especially in aging patients. PRP derives from the centrifugation of the patient's own blood and it contains growth factors that influence wound healing, thereby playing an important role in tissue repairing mechanisms. The use of PRP in surgical practice could have beneficial outcomes, reducing bleeding and enhancing soft tissue healing and bone regeneration. Studies conducted on humans have yielded promising results regarding the application of PRP to many dental and oral surgical procedures (i.e. tooth extractions, periodontal surgery, implant surgery). The use of PRP has also been proposed in the management of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) with the aim of enhancing wound healing and bone maturation. The aims of this narrative review are: i) to describe the different uses of PRP in dental surgery (tooth extractions and periodontal surgery) and oral surgery (soft tissues and bone tissue surgery, implant surgery and BRONJ surgery); and ii) to discuss its efficacy, efficiency and risk/benefit ratio. This review suggests that the use of PRP in the alveolar socket after tooth extractions is certainly capable of improving soft tissue healing and positively influencing bone regeneration but the latter effect seems to decrease a few days after the extraction. PRP has produced better results in periodontal therapy in association with other materials than when it is used alone. Promising results have also been obtained in implant surgery, when PRP was used in isolation as a coating material. The combination of necrotic bone curettage and PRP application seem to be encouraging for the treatment of refractory BRONJ, as it has proven successful outcomes with minimal invasivity. Since PRP is free from potential risks for patients, not difficult to obtain and use, it can be employed

  18. Improved peripheral nerve regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral lumbrokinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chung; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic effects of lumbrokinase, a group of enzymes extracted from the earthworm, on peripheral-nerve regeneration using well-defined sciatic nerve lesion paradigms in diabetic rats induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ). We found that lumbrokinase therapy could improve the rats' circulatory blood flow and promote the regeneration of axons in a silicone rubber conduit after nerve transection. Lumbrokinase treatment could also improve the neuromuscular functions with better nerve conductive performances. Immunohistochemical staining showed that lumbrokinase could dramatically promote calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and cause a marked increase in the number of macrophages recruited within the distal nerve stumps. In addition, the lumbrokinase could stimulate the secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1), nerve growth factor (NGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dissected diabetic sciatic nerve segments. In conclusion, the administration of lumbrokinase after nerve repair surgery in diabetic rats was found to have remarkable effects on promoting peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25787300

  19. An IP3R3- and NPY-Expressing Microvillous Cell Mediates Tissue Homeostasis and Regeneration in the Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Hayoz, Sebastien; Hutch, Chelsea R.; Iqbal, Tania R.; Pooley, Apryl E.; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent release of neurotrophic factors plays an important role in the maintenance of neurons, yet the release mechanisms are understudied. The inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor is a calcium release channel that has a physiological role in cell growth, development, sensory perception, neuronal signaling and secretion. In the olfactory system, the IP3 receptor subtype 3 (IP3R3) is expressed exclusively in a microvillous cell subtype that is the predominant cell expressing neurotrophic factor neuropeptide Y (NPY). We hypothesized that IP3R3-expressing microvillous cells secrete sufficient NPY needed for both the continual maintenance of the neuronal population and for neuroregeneration following injury. We addressed this question by assessing the release of NPY and the regenerative capabilities of wild type, IP3R3+/−, and IP3R3−/− mice. Injury, simulated using extracellular ATP, induced IP3 receptor-mediated NPY release in wild-type mice. ATP-evoked NPY release was impaired in IP3R3−/− mice, suggesting that IP3R3 contributes to NPY release following injury. Under normal physiological conditions, both IP3R3−/− mice and explants from these mice had fewer progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate into immature neurons. Although the number of mature neurons and the in vivo rate of proliferation were not altered, the proliferative response to the olfactotoxicant satratoxin G and olfactory bulb ablation injury was compromised in the olfactory epithelium of IP3R3−/− mice. The reductions in both NPY release and number of progenitor cells in IP3R3−/− mice point to a role of the IP3R3 in tissue homeostasis and neuroregeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that IP3R3 expressing microvillous cells are actively responsive to injury and promote recovery. PMID:23516531

  20. An IP3R3- and NPY-expressing microvillous cell mediates tissue homeostasis and regeneration in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cuihong; Hayoz, Sebastien; Hutch, Chelsea R; Iqbal, Tania R; Pooley, Apryl E; Hegg, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent release of neurotrophic factors plays an important role in the maintenance of neurons, yet the release mechanisms are understudied. The inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor is a calcium release channel that has a physiological role in cell growth, development, sensory perception, neuronal signaling and secretion. In the olfactory system, the IP3 receptor subtype 3 (IP3R3) is expressed exclusively in a microvillous cell subtype that is the predominant cell expressing neurotrophic factor neuropeptide Y (NPY). We hypothesized that IP3R3-expressing microvillous cells secrete sufficient NPY needed for both the continual maintenance of the neuronal population and for neuroregeneration following injury. We addressed this question by assessing the release of NPY and the regenerative capabilities of wild type, IP3R3(+/-), and IP3R3(-/-) mice. Injury, simulated using extracellular ATP, induced IP3 receptor-mediated NPY release in wild-type mice. ATP-evoked NPY release was impaired in IP3R3(-/-) mice, suggesting that IP3R3 contributes to NPY release following injury. Under normal physiological conditions, both IP3R3(-/-) mice and explants from these mice had fewer progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate into immature neurons. Although the number of mature neurons and the in vivo rate of proliferation were not altered, the proliferative response to the olfactotoxicant satratoxin G and olfactory bulb ablation injury was compromised in the olfactory epithelium of IP3R3(-/-) mice. The reductions in both NPY release and number of progenitor cells in IP3R3(-/-) mice point to a role of the IP3R3 in tissue homeostasis and neuroregeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that IP3R3 expressing microvillous cells are actively responsive to injury and promote recovery.

  1. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  2. Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2011-04-01

    Even though dentistry was not a specialized branch of Ayurveda, it is included in its Shalakya Tantra (system of surgery). Problems such as deformities of the oral cavity, plaques and infections were managed in ancient India. Traditional medicine can treat various infectious and chronic conditions. Research has shown that all kinds of chewing sticks described in ancient Ayurveda texts have medicinal and anti-cariogenic properties. Its oil pulling (Kaval, Gandush) practice is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases. Amla (Emblic myrobalan), is a general rebuilder of oral health. Bilberry fruit (Vaccinium myrtillus) and hawthorn berry (Crateagus oxycanthus) stabilize collagen, strengthening the gum tissue. Liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabral) promotes anti-cavity action, reduces plaque, and has an antibacterial effect. Use of safe, quality products and practices should be ensured based on available evidence if traditional medicine is to be acknowledged as part of primary health care. Scientific validations of the Ayurveda dental health practices could justify their incorporation into modern dental care. Publicity of these techniques using appropriate media would benefit the general population by giving more confidence in the ancient practices, thus preventing tooth decay and loss.

  3. Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2011-01-01

    Even though dentistry was not a specialized branch of Ayurveda, it is included in its Shalakya Tantra (system of surgery). Problems such as deformities of the oral cavity, plaques and infections were managed in ancient India. Traditional medicine can treat various infectious and chronic conditions. Research has shown that all kinds of chewing sticks described in ancient Ayurveda texts have medicinal and anti-cariogenic properties. Its oil pulling (Kaval, Gandush) practice is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases. Amla (Emblic myrobalan), is a general rebuilder of oral health. Bilberry fruit (Vaccinium myrtillus) and hawthorn berry (Crateagus oxycanthus) stabilize collagen, strengthening the gum tissue. Liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabral) promotes anti-cavity action, reduces plaque, and has an antibacterial effect. Use of safe, quality products and practices should be ensured based on available evidence if traditional medicine is to be acknowledged as part of primary health care. Scientific validations of the Ayurveda dental health practices could justify their incorporation into modern dental care. Publicity of these techniques using appropriate media would benefit the general population by giving more confidence in the ancient practices, thus preventing tooth decay and loss. PMID:21760690

  4. Intracellular transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Xia, Dengning; Zhu, Quanlei; Hu, Lei; Gan, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the main barrier restricting the oral delivery of low-permeability drugs. Over recent years, numerous nanocarriers have been designed to improve the efficiency of oral drug delivery. However, the intracellular processes determining the transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium remain elusive, and only limited enhancement of the oral bioavailability of drugs has been achieved. Here, we review the processes involved in nanocarrier trafficking across the intestinal epithelium, including apical endocytosis, intracellular transport, and basolateral exocytosis. Understanding the complex intracellular processes of nanocarrier trafficking is particularly essential for the rational design of oral drug delivery systems. PMID:27094490

  5. Irf6 directly regulates Klf17 in zebrafish periderm and Klf4 in murine oral epithelium, and dominant-negative KLF4 variants are present in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Jia, Zhonglin; Smith, Tiffany; Eshete, Mekonen; Butali, Azeez; Dunnwald, Martine; Murray, Jeffrey; Cornell, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic (NS) cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common disorder with a strong genetic underpinning. Genome-wide association studies have detected common variants associated with this disorder, but a large portion of the genetic risk for NSCL/P is conferred by unidentified rare sequence variants. Mutations in IRF6 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 6) and GRHL3 (Grainyhead-like 3) cause Van der Woude syndrome, which includes CL/P. Both genes encode members of a regulatory network governing periderm differentiation in model organisms. Here, we report that Krüppel-like factor 17 (Klf17), like Grhl3, acts downstream of Irf6 in this network in zebrafish periderm. Although Klf17 expression is absent from mammalian oral epithelium, a close homologue, Klf4, is expressed in this tissue and is required for the differentiation of epidermis. Chromosome configuration capture and reporter assays indicated that IRF6 directly regulates an oral-epithelium enhancer of KLF4. To test whether rare missense variants of KLF4 contribute risk for NSCL/P, we sequenced KLF4 in approximately 1000 NSCL/P cases and 300 controls. By one statistical test, missense variants of KLF4 as a group were enriched in cases versus controls. Moreover, two patient-derived KLF4 variants disrupted periderm differentiation upon forced expression in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that they have dominant-negative effect. These results indicate that rare NSCL/P risk variants can be found in members of the gene regulatory network governing periderm differentiation. PMID:26692521

  6. E-cadherin in non-tumor epithelium adjacent to oral cancer as risk marker for the development of multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, M A; Bravo, M; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Acebal, F; Esteban, F

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the loss of E-cadherin is a risk factor for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and whether it could serve as a diagnostic marker for oral premalignant fields. We studied 77 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) with associated non-tumour epithelia from 61 patients. Immunohistochemical studies (antibody NHC-38) were used to investigate E-cadherin expression, which was completely lost in basal (48% of cases) and parabasal (43%) layers of non-tumour epithelia close to the tumour and in basal (47%) and parabasal (38%) layers of non-tumour epithelia distant from the tumour. In multiple tumours E-cadherin expression was significantly lower than in single tumours in the basal, parabasal layers, and the middle third of close (p=0.002, <0.001, <0.001) and distant (p=0.041, p<0.001, p=0.005) non-tumour epithelia, respectively. Downregulation of E-cadherin may be valuable as a risk marker for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and for the diagnosis of premalignant fields.

  7. [Tissue and cell interactions in the oral mucosa after cytostatic drugs administration].

    PubMed

    Bykov, V L; Leont'eva, I V

    2011-01-01

    In the preceding work ("Morphology", 2011, issue 2), the regularities of oral mucosal (OM) epithelium injury after the cytostatic drug (CSD) treatment and its further regeneration, were reviewed. This paper presents the systematized summary of current literature data and the authors' own findings on the regularities of CSD effect on non-epithelial OM cell populations and their interactions with each other and the epithelium. The changes of intraepithelial tissue homeostasis, associated with CSD effect on intraepithelial lymphocytes, granulocytes, dendritic antigen presenting cells and melanocytes, interacting with epitheliocytes, are described. The data are presented, indicating that along with the epithelium, the cell populations of lamina propria and submucosal connective tissue, as well as the small blood vessels, are important targets of CSD in the OM tissues. The concept of a unifying model, describing tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms of the oral mucositis development after CSD treatment, is reviewed.

  8. Effect of oral administration of mutagens found in food on the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in the colonic epithelium of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, D.B.; Stuart, E.; Heddle, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate there is a link between dietary factors and the incidence of colon cancer, and it has been suggested mutagens in foods might be responsible for initiating the carcinogenic process. Some food mutagens are formed during the cooking process. For example, certain heterocyclic amines, including Trp-P-2 (3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-n) indole) and MeIQ (2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline), which have been isolated from broiled meat and fish at low (ng/g) levels, are extremely potent mutagens in the Ames Salmonella/microsome test and can induce mutation in cultured mammalian cells as well. Other mutagens in foods are natural products; quercetin, a flavanoid widely distributed in plant products, is mutagenic to Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells. As most of the evidence implicating substance in food as mutagenic carcinogens comes from in vitro studies, it is of interest to determine whether these compounds can also exert genotoxic effects in vivo, particularly in colonic tissue. The ability to induce nuclear aberrations in vivo in murine colonic epithelial tissue has been suggested to be a property of colon carcinogens specifically, and several mutagens found in cooked food, including MeIQ and Trp-P-2, have been found to produce such nucleotoxicity. The authors report here tests of the ability of MeIQ, Trp-P-2, and quercetin to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the colonic epithelium of mice.

  9. Oral exposure to environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene impacts the intestinal epithelium and induces gut microbial shifts in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ribière, Céline; Peyret, Pierre; Parisot, Nicolas; Darcha, Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre J.; Barnich, Nicolas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Boucher, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis are associated with a wide range of human diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases. The physiopathology of these diseases has multifactorial aetiology in which environmental factors, particularly pollution could play a crucial role. Among the different pollutants listed, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are subject to increased monitoring due to their wide distribution and high toxicity on Humans. Here, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the impact of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, most toxic PAH) oral exposure on the faecal and intestinal mucosa-associated bacteria in C57BL/6 mice. Intestinal inflammation was also evaluated by histological observations. BaP oral exposure significantly altered the composition and the abundance of the gut microbiota and led to moderate inflammation in ileal and colonic mucosa. More severe lesions were observed in ileal segment. Shifts in gut microbiota associated with moderate inflammatory signs in intestinal mucosa would suggest the establishment of a pro-inflammatory intestinal environment following BaP oral exposure. Therefore, under conditions of genetic susceptibility and in association with other environmental factors, exposure to this pollutant could trigger and/or accelerate the development of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27503127

  10. Oral exposure to environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene impacts the intestinal epithelium and induces gut microbial shifts in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribière, Céline; Peyret, Pierre; Parisot, Nicolas; Darcha, Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre J; Barnich, Nicolas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Boucher, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota dysbiosis are associated with a wide range of human diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases. The physiopathology of these diseases has multifactorial aetiology in which environmental factors, particularly pollution could play a crucial role. Among the different pollutants listed, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are subject to increased monitoring due to their wide distribution and high toxicity on Humans. Here, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the impact of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, most toxic PAH) oral exposure on the faecal and intestinal mucosa-associated bacteria in C57BL/6 mice. Intestinal inflammation was also evaluated by histological observations. BaP oral exposure significantly altered the composition and the abundance of the gut microbiota and led to moderate inflammation in ileal and colonic mucosa. More severe lesions were observed in ileal segment. Shifts in gut microbiota associated with moderate inflammatory signs in intestinal mucosa would suggest the establishment of a pro-inflammatory intestinal environment following BaP oral exposure. Therefore, under conditions of genetic susceptibility and in association with other environmental factors, exposure to this pollutant could trigger and/or accelerate the development of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27503127

  11. Changes in the adult vertebrate auditory sensory epithelium after trauma.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C

    2013-03-01

    Auditory hair cells transduce sound vibrations into membrane potential changes, ultimately leading to changes in neuronal firing and sound perception. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and repair capabilities of traumatized auditory sensory epithelium in the adult vertebrate ear. Injured mammalian auditory epithelium repairs itself by forming permanent scars but is unable to regenerate replacement hair cells. In contrast, injured non-mammalian vertebrate ear generates replacement hair cells to restore hearing functions. Non-sensory support cells within the auditory epithelium play key roles in the repair processes.

  12. The Role of E-Cadherin in Maintaining the Barrier Function of Corneal Epithelium after Treatment with Cultured Autologous Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheet Grafts for Limbal Stem Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, Richard H.; Wood, Andrew; Oliva, Joan; Niihara, Hope; Makalinao, Andrew; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Pan, Derek; Tiger, Kumar; Garcia, Julio; Laporte, Amanda; French, Samuel W.; Niihara, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS. E-cadherin and beta-catenin localization at the cell membrane was reduced in LSCD corneas, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a restoration of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. LSCD corneas did not show continuous staining for ZO-1 or for Cnx43, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a positive expression of ZO-1 and Cnx43. Cascade Blue® hydrazide did not pass through CAOMECS. Because E-cadherin interactions are calcium-dependent, EGTA was used to chelate calcium and disrupt cell adhesion. EGTA-treated CAOMECS completely detached from cell culture surface, and E-cadherin levels were significantly decreased. In conclusion, E cadherin high expression contributed to CAOMECS tight and gap junction protein recruitment at the cell membrane, thus promoting cellular adhesion and a functional barrier to protect the ocular surface. PMID:27777792

  13. Examination of the reticular epithelium of the bovine pharyngeal tonsil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), located at the posterior of the nasopharynx is ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular composition of this important epithe...

  14. The permeability of a keratinizing squamous epithelium in culture.

    PubMed

    Squier, C A; Fejerskov, O; Jepsen, A

    1978-05-01

    Horseradish peroxidase or lanthanum was applied to the surface of keratinized oral epithelium growing in tissue culture and the extent of penetration of these substances examined with the electron microscope. Both tracer substances penetrated between the superficial keratinized squames of the tissue, the lanthanum reaching the basal cell layer and the peroxidase diffusing to within 3--8 cells of the basal layer. The permeability of the keratinized layer in this epithelium is in contrast to the situation in vivo where an intercellular barrier is found in the superficial layer. This difference might be related to the absence of membrane-coating granules from the tissue maintained in culture.

  15. Denervation resulting in dento-alveolar ankylosis associated with decreased Malassez epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, K; Yamashiro, T; Fukunaga, T; Balam, T A; Zheng, L; Takano-Yamamoto, T

    2004-08-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve denervation causes appreciable decreases in the distribution of epithelial rests of Malassez. To explore roles of the Malassez epithelium, we attempted to evaluate possible changes in dento-alveolar tissues surrounding this epithelium by experimental denervation. We found that denervation led to dento-alveolar ankylosis with a decrease in the width of the periodontal spaces. Interestingly, with regeneration of the Malassez epithelium 10 weeks after the denervation, the periodontal space width showed a correspondingly significant increase. These findings suggest that the Malassez epithelium may be involved in the maintenance of periodontal space and that sensory innervation might be indirectly associated with it. In addition, it is of interest that denervation activated root resorption of the coronal root surface and that the consequently resorbed lacunae were repaired by cellular cementum. It is suggested that Malassez epithelium may negatively regulate root resorption and induce acellular cementum formation. PMID:15271971

  16. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  17. Limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Simon, András; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    Limb regeneration is observed in certain members of the animal phyla. Some animals keep this ability during their entire life while others lose it at some time during development. How do animals regenerate limbs? Is it possible to find unifying, conserved mechanisms of limb regeneration or have different species evolved distinct means of replacing a lost limb? How is limb regeneration similar or different to limb development? Studies on many organisms, including echinoderms, arthropods, and chordates have provided significant knowledge about limb regeneration. In this focus article, we concentrate on tetrapod limb regeneration as studied in three model amphibians: newts, axolotls, and frogs. We review recent progress on tissue interactions during limb regeneration, and place those findings into an evolutionary context. PMID:24009038

  18. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Corneal cells for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, S; Nakamura, T

    2005-01-01

    In cases of corneal epithelial stem cell deficiency where ocular surface reconstruction is required, corneal epithelial replacement using a tissue engineering technique shows great potential. Autologous cultivated corneal epithelial stem cell sheets are the safest and most reliable forms of sheet we can use for such treatment; however, they are not useful for treating bilaterally affected ocular surface disorders. In order to treat such cases, we must choose either an allogeneic cultivated corneal epithelial sheet or an autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet. If we use the former, the threat of immunological reaction must be dealt with. Therefore, it is imperative that we have a basic understanding of the immunological aspects of ocular surface reconstruction using allogeneic tissues. When using an autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet, a basic understanding of ocular surface epithelial biology is required as the sheet is not exactly the same as corneal epithelium. PMID:16080287

  20. Orthogonal arrays in normal and injured respiratory airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E

    1985-02-01

    Orthogonal arrays are found on plasma membranes of glial cells, in the central nervous system, on muscle plasma membranes at neuromuscular junctions, and on a variety of epithelial cells. These structures have been correlated with ion flux. With the aid of freeze fracture technique, orthogonal particle arrays were found on plasma membranes on airway epithelial cells of rats and hamsters. They have been found in abundance at the base of secretory cells throughout normal airway epithelium. These structures were found to increase in number during regeneration in response to injury and they were found in great numbers on plasma membranes of all airway cells in response to acute and chronic NO2 exposure. The lateral and basal plasma membranes of the respiratory epithelium are a new source for studying orthogonal arrays. The normal number and distribution of these arrays can be perturbed in response to mechanical and chemical injury. PMID:3968185

  1. Transcriptional regulatory network during development in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Im, SeungYeong; Moon, Cheil

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration, a process of reconstitution of the entire tissue, occurs throughout life in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Regeneration of OE consists of several stages: proliferation of progenitors, cell fate determination between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, their differentiation and maturation. How the differentiated cell types that comprise the OE are regenerated, is one of the central questions in olfactory developmental neurobiology. The past decade has witnessed considerable progress regarding the regulation of transcription factors (TFs) involved in the remarkable regenerative potential of OE. Here, we review current state of knowledge of the transcriptional regulatory networks that are powerful modulators of the acquisition and maintenance of developmental stages during regeneration in the OE. Advance in our understanding of regeneration will not only shed light on the basic principles of adult plasticity of cell identity, but may also lead to new approaches for using stem cells and reprogramming after injury or degenerative neurological diseases. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(11): 599-608] PMID:26303973

  2. Liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  3. Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review will provide an overview of the models of study currently utilized in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus will be placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration including small for size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting edge topics in liver regeneration including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a three dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation will be proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration. PMID:24495569

  4. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  5. Thymic generation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jason; Malin, Mark; Sutherland, Jayne; Gray, Daniel; Hollander, George; Boyd, Richard

    2003-10-01

    The thymus is a complex epithelial organ in which thymocyte development is dependent upon the sequential contribution of morphologically and phenotypically distinct stromal cell compartments. It is these microenvironments that provide the unique combination of cellular interactions, cytokines, and chemokines to induce thymocyte precursors to undergo a differentiation program that leads to the generation of functional T cells. Despite the indispensable role of thymic epithelium in the generation of T cells, the mediators of this process and the differentiation pathway undertaken by the primordial thymic epithelial cells are not well defined. There is a lack of lineage-specific cell-surface-associated markers, which are needed to characterize putative thymic epithelial stem cell populations. This review explores the role of thymic stromal cells in T-cell development and thymic organogenesis, as well as the molecular signals that contribute to the growth and expansion of primordial thymic epithelial cells. It highlights recent advances in these areas, which have allowed for a lineage relationship amongst thymic epithelial cell subsets to be proposed. While many fundamental questions remain to be addressed, collectively these works have broadened our understanding of how the thymic epithelium becomes specialized in the ability to support thymocyte differentiation. They should also facilitate the development of novel, rationally based therapeutic strategies for the regeneration and manipulation of thymic function in the treatment of many clinical conditions in which defective T cells have an important etiological role.

  6. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme‐derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self‐renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap‐junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research. PMID:27499869

  7. A curriculum vitae of teeth: evolution, generation, regeneration.

    PubMed

    Koussoulakou, Despina S; Margaritis, Lukas H; Koussoulakos, Stauros L

    2009-01-01

    The ancestor of recent vertebrate teeth was a tooth-like structure on the outer body surface of jawless fishes. Over the course of 500,000,000 years of evolution, many of those structures migrated into the mouth cavity. In addition, the total number of teeth per dentition generally decreased and teeth morphological complexity increased. Teeth form mainly on the jaws within the mouth cavity through mutual, delicate interactions between dental epithelium and oral ectomesenchyme. These interactions involve spatially restricted expression of several, teeth-related genes and the secretion of various transcription and signaling factors. Congenital disturbances in tooth formation, acquired dental diseases and odontogenic tumors affect millions of people and rank human oral pathology as the second most frequent clinical problem. On the basis of substantial experimental evidence and advances in bioengineering, many scientists strongly believe that a deep knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of a given tooth in its natural position, in vivo, will be useful in the near future to prevent and treat teeth pathologies and malformations and for in vitro and in vivo teeth tissue regeneration.

  8. A Curriculum Vitae of Teeth: Evolution, Generation, Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koussoulakou, Despina S.; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Koussoulakos, Stauros L.

    2009-01-01

    The ancestor of recent vertebrate teeth was a tooth-like structure on the outer body surface of jawless fishes. Over the course of 500,000,000 years of evolution, many of those structures migrated into the mouth cavity. In addition, the total number of teeth per dentition generally decreased and teeth morphological complexity increased. Teeth form mainly on the jaws within the mouth cavity through mutual, delicate interactions between dental epithelium and oral ectomesenchyme. These interactions involve spatially restricted expression of several, teeth-related genes and the secretion of various transcription and signaling factors. Congenital disturbances in tooth formation, acquired dental diseases and odontogenic tumors affect millions of people and rank human oral pathology as the second most frequent clinical problem. On the basis of substantial experimental evidence and advances in bioengineering, many scientists strongly believe that a deep knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of a given tooth in its natural position, in vivo, will be useful in the near future to prevent and treat teeth pathologies and malformations and for in vitro and in vivo teeth tissue regeneration. PMID:19266065

  9. Ex vivo generation of a functional and regenerative wound epithelium from axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) skin.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Donald R; Satoh, Akira; Mandefro, Berhan; Cummings, Gillian M; Gardiner, David M; Rugg, Elizabeth L

    2010-10-01

    Urodele amphibians (salamanders) are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate structurally complete and fully functional limbs. Regeneration is a stepwise process that requires interactions between keratinocytes, nerves and fibroblasts. The formation of a wound epithelium covering the amputation site is an early and necessary event in the process but the molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the wound epithelium in regeneration remain unclear. We have developed an ex vivo model that recapitulates many features of in vivo wound healing. The model comprises a circular explant of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb skin with a central circular, full thickness wound. Re-epithelialization of the wound area is rapid (typically <11 h) and is dependent on metalloproteinase activity. The ex vivo wound epithelium is viable, responds to neuronal signals and is able to participate in ectopic blastema formation and limb regeneration. This ex vivo model provides a reproducible and tractable system in which to study the cellular and molecular events that underlie wound healing and regeneration.

  10. Eye enucleation and regeneration of neural retina in axolotl larvae (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Yew, D T

    1985-01-01

    The eyes of Axolotl larvae were enucleated at stages 30 and 37. Animals with single dorsomedian eyes resulted in the first case (i.e. stage 30). When a piece of pigment epithelium was re-implanted into stage 37 animals at the site of the lesion, limited regeneration was observed when the implant formed a vesicle, but, when the pigment epithelium remained "open" regeneration of the neural retina was extensive. The possible resons for this difference was discussed.

  11. Kidney Regeneration: Common Themes From the Embryo to the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Cirio, M. Cecilia; de Groh, Eric D.; de Caestecker, Mark P.; Davidson, Alan J.; Hukriede, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate kidney has an inherent ability to regenerate following acute damage. Successful regeneration of the injured kidney requires the rapid replacement of damaged tubular epithelial cells and reconstitution of normal tubular function. Identifying the cells that participate in the regeneration process as well as the molecular mechanisms involved may reveal therapeutic targets for the treatment of kidney disease. Renal regeneration is associated with the expression of genetic pathways that are necessary for kidney organogenesis, suggesting that the regenerating tubular epithelium may be ‘reprogrammed’ to a less-differentiated, progenitor state. This review will highlight data from various vertebrate models supporting the hypothesis that nephrogenic genes are reactivated as part of the process of kidney regeneration following acute kidney injury (AKI). Emphasis will be placed on the reactivation of developmental pathways and how our understanding of the resulting regeneration process may be enhanced by lessons learned in the embryonic kidney. PMID:24005792

  12. Postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in bioengineered amelogenesis and dentinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Mo; Schiff, Michael D.; Lee, Chang H.; Kong, Kimi; Embree, Mildred C.; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent incisors provide a classic model for studying epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in development. However, postnatal stem/progenitor cells in rodent incisors have not been exploited for tooth regeneration. Here, we characterized postnatal rat incisor epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells and found that they formed enamel- and dentin-like tissues in vivo. Epithelium and mesenchyme cells were harvested separately from the apical region of postnatal 4–5 day rat incisors. Epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes were confirmed by immunocytochemistry, CFU assay and/or multi-lineage differentiation. CK14+, Sox2+ and Lgr5+ epithelium stem cells from the cervical loop significantly enhanced amelogenin and ameloblastin expression upon BMP4 or FGF3 stimulation, signifying their differentiation towards ameloblast-like cells, whereas mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells upon BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a treatment robustly expressed Dspp, a hallmark of odontoblastic differentiation. We then control-released microencapsulated BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a in transplants of epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in the renal capsule of athymic mice in vivo. Enamel and dentin-like tissues were generated in two integrated layers with specific expression of amelogenin and ameloblastin in the newly formed, de novo enamel-like tissue, and DSP in dentin-like tissue. These findings suggest that postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells can be primed by pivotal signals towards bioengineered tooth regeneration. PMID:24345734

  13. Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a very complex and well-orchestrated phenomenon. It is carried out by the participation of all mature liver cell types. The process is associated with signaling cascades involving growth factors, cytokines, matrix remodeling, and several feedbacks of stimulation and inhibition of growth related signals. Liver manages to restore any lost mass and adjust its size to that of the organism, while at the same time providing full support for body homeostasis during the entire regenerative process. In situations when hepatocytes or biliary cells are blocked from regeneration, these cell types can function as facultative stem cells for each other. PMID:17559071

  14. Regionalisation of early head ectoderm is regulated by endoderm and prepatterns the orofacial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kim E; Healy, Christopher; Morgan, Pamela; Sharpe, Paul T

    2004-10-01

    The oral epithelium becomes regionalised proximodistally early in development, and this is reflected by the spatial expression of signalling molecules such as Fgf8 and Bmp4. This regionalisation is responsible for regulating the spatial expression of genes in the underlying mesenchyme. These genes are required for the spatial patterning of bone, cartilage orofacial development and, in mammals, teeth. The mechanism and timing of this important regionalisation during head epithelium development are not known. Using lipophilic dyes to fate map the oral epithelium in chick embryos, we show that the cells that will occupy the epithelium of the distal and the proximal mandible primordium already occupy different spatial locations in the developing head ectoderm prior to the formation of the first pharyngeal arch and neural crest migration. Moreover, the ectoderm cells fated to become proximal oral epithelium express Fgf8 and this expression requires the presence of endoderm. Thus, the first fundamental patterning process in jaw morphogenesis is controlled by the early separation of specific areas of ectoderm that are regulated by ectoderm-endoderm interactions, and does not involve neural crest cells.

  15. Histology, Immunohistochemistry and Ultrastructure of the Bovine Palatine Tonsil with Special Emphasis on Reticular Epithelium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paired palatine tonsils are located at the junction of the nasopharynx and oropharynx; ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through either the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular and functional composi...

  16. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Boaz E.; Stapleton, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development. PMID:24436352

  17. [Regeneration and fibrosis of corneal tissues].

    PubMed

    Simirskiĭ, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the features of the regeneration of corneal tissue and its disorders leading to the development of fibrosis are considered. The data on the presence of stem (clonogenic) cell pool in the corneal tissues (epithelium, endothelium, stroma) are given; these cells can serve as a source for regeneration of the tissues at injury or various diseases. The main steps of regeneration of corneal tissues and their disorders that lead to outstripping proliferation of myofibroblasts and secretion of extracellular matrix in the wound area and eventually cause the formation of connective tissue scar and corneal opacity are considered. Particular attention is given to the successes of translational medicine in the treatment of corneal tissue fibrosis. The methods of cell therapy aimed at the restoration of stem cell pool of corneal tissues are the most promising. Gene therapy provides more opportunities; one of its main objectives is the suppression of the myofibroblast proliferation responsible for the development of fibrosis.

  18. Snai1 regulates cell lineage allocation and stem cell maintenance in the mouse intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Horvay, Katja; Jardé, Thierry; Casagranda, Franca; Perreau, Victoria M; Haigh, Katharina; Nefzger, Christian M; Akhtar, Reyhan; Gridley, Thomas; Berx, Geert; Haigh, Jody J; Barker, Nick; Polo, Jose M; Hime, Gary R; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Snail family members regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during invasion of intestinal tumours, but their role in normal intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Studies in breast and skin epithelia indicate that Snail proteins promote an undifferentiated state. Here, we demonstrate that conditional knockout of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium results in apoptotic loss of crypt base columnar stem cells and bias towards differentiation of secretory lineages. In vitro organoid cultures derived from Snai1 conditional knockout mice also undergo apoptosis when Snai1 is deleted. Conversely, ectopic expression of Snai1 in the intestinal epithelium in vivo results in the expansion of the crypt base columnar cell pool and a decrease in secretory enteroendocrine and Paneth cells. Following conditional deletion of Snai1, the intestinal epithelium fails to produce a proliferative response following radiation-induced damage indicating a fundamental requirement for Snai1 in epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that Snai1 is required for regulation of lineage choice, maintenance of CBC stem cells and regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following damage. PMID:25759216

  19. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  20. Cementum and Periodontal Ligament Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Menicanin, Danijela; Hynes, K; Han, J; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    The unique anatomy and composition of the periodontium make periodontal tissue healing and regeneration a complex process. Periodontal regeneration aims to recapitulate the crucial stages of wound healing associated with periodontal development in order to restore lost tissues to their original form and function and for regeneration to occur, healing events must progress in an ordered and programmed sequence both temporally and spatially, replicating key developmental events. A number of procedures have been employed to promote true and predictable regeneration of the periodontium. Principally, the approaches are based on the use of graft materials to compensate for the bone loss incurred as a result of periodontal disease, use of barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration and use of bioactive molecules. More recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been integrated into research and applications of regenerative dentistry, including periodontics, to aim to manage damaged and lost oral tissues, through reconstruction and regeneration of the periodontium and alleviate the shortcomings of more conventional therapeutic options. The essential components for generating effective cellular based therapeutic strategies include a population of multi-potential progenitor cells, presence of signalling molecules/inductive morphogenic signals and a conductive extracellular matrix scaffold or appropriate delivery system. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered suitable candidates for cell-based tissue engineering strategies owing to their extensive expansion rate and potential to differentiate into cells of multiple organs and systems. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple tissue sources have been investigated in pre-clinical animal studies and clinical settings for the treatment and regeneration of the periodontium.

  1. IGF signaling between blastema and wound epidermis is required for fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chablais, Fabian; Jazwinska, Anna

    2010-03-01

    In mammals, the loss of a limb is irreversible. By contrast, urodele amphibians and teleost fish are capable of nearly perfect regeneration of lost appendages. This ability depends on direct interaction between the wound epithelium and mesenchymal progenitor cells of the blastema. It has been known for decades that contact between the wound epithelium and the underlying blastema is essential for successful regeneration. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that upon amputation the blastema induces expression of the ligand Igf2b, which then activates IGF signaling specifically in cells of the adjacent apical epithelium. Inhibition of IGF signaling by either morpholino antisense technology, or by specific chemical inhibitors of Igf1 receptor function NVP-AEW541 and NVP-ADW742, impairs fin regeneration. At the cellular level, this block in regeneration is reflected by a lack of the distinctive basal epithelium, increased apoptosis in the wound epidermis and reduced proliferation of blastema cells. Furthermore, induction of the blastemal and wound epidermal markers cannot be supported in the absence of IGF signaling. These data provide evidence that Igf2b expressed in the blastema promotes the properties of the adjacent wound epidermis, which subsequently are necessary for blastema function. Thus, IGF signaling upregulated upon fin amputation represents a signal from the blastema to the wound epithelium, a crucial step in appendage regeneration.

  2. Morphologic changes in basal cells during repair of tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. Z.; Evans, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Burke, A. S.; Zhu, Q.; Herndon, D. N.; Barrow, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Basal cells are differentiated with respect to junctional adhesion mechanisms and play a role in attachment of columnar epithelium to the basal lamina. Although much is known about nonciliated and ciliated cell differentiation during the repair process after injury, little is known about the basal cell. We studied the morphology of basal cells and quantitated junctional adhesion structures during repair of tracheal epithelium exposed to toxic cotton smoke. Ten adult ewes were given a smoke injury to a portion of the upper cervical trachea and were killed at 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 days after injury for morphometric studies. At 4 days, there was a stratified reparative epithelium over the basal lamina, which was two to four cells in depth. The basal cells were identified by their hemidesmosome (HD) attachment to the basal lamina. Basal cells were about 69% larger than controls and flattened rather than columnar. The amount of HD attachment was 192% greater than controls. In contrast, volume density of cytokeratin filaments had decreased about 47%. Basal cells had returned to normal numbers and size and a columnar shape by day 18. The amount of desmosome (D) and HD attachment and volume density of cytokeratins had also reached control levels by day 18. These data indicate that morphology of basal cells changes during the initial stages of reparative regeneration but returns to normal by 18 days. Morphologic changes appear to reflect changes in size of the cell associated with cell division rather than differentiation of recently divided basal cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1381564

  3. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  4. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  5. Quantification of PCNA+ cells within odontogenic jaw cyst epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, T J; Browne, R M; Matthews, J B

    1994-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reactivity of the epithelial linings of the three major types of odontogenic cyst with a monoclonal antibody to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA; clone PC10). PCNA expression was studied in odontogenic cysts (n = 31) and normal oral epithelium (n = 10) using a biotin-streptavidin method on routinely processed paraffin sections. PCNA+ cells were counted manually and related to the length of basement membrane (mm) and the epithelial area (mm2) as determined by TV image analysis. The epithelial linings of odontogenic keratocysts (OKC; n = 11) contained the highest number of PCNA+ cells, most of which were located in the suprabasal layers. The mean value of PCNA+ cells in OKC linings (94.4 +/- 22.7 cells/mm) was similar to that of oral epithelia (80.8 +/- 20.6 cells/mm), but both were significantly higher than that of dentigerous (n = 10, 5.1 +/- 3.0 cells/mm) and radicular (n = 10, 11.0 +/- 4.1 cells/mm) cyst linings (P < 0.005). The epithelial distribution of PCNA+ cells differed between groups with the basal/suprabasal PCNA+ cell ratio in OKC linings (0.05 +/- 0.02) being significantly lower than that of normal oral epithelium (0.5 +/- 0.14), dentigerous (1.6 +/- 1.23) and radicular (1.9 +/- 1.09) cyst linings respectively (P < 0.005). These results demonstrate differences in PCNA expression between the epithelial linings of the major odontogenic cyst types, indicating differences in proliferative and differentiation processes within these lesions.

  6. Small intestinal stem cell identity is maintained with functional Paneth cells in heterotopically grafted epithelium onto the colon

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Mochizuki, Wakana; Matsumoto, Taichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Okada, Yukinori; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    To develop stem cell therapy for small intestinal (SI) diseases, it is essential to determine whether SI stem cells in culture retain their tissue regeneration capabilities. By using a heterotopic transplantation approach, we show that cultured murine SI epithelial organoids are able to reconstitute self-renewing epithelia in the colon. When stably integrated, the SI-derived grafts show many features unique only to the SI but distinct from the colonic epithelium. Our study provides evidence that cultured adult SI stem cells could be a source for cell therapy of intestinal diseases, maintaining their identity along the gastrointestinal tract through an epithelium-intrinsic mechanism. PMID:25128495

  7. Thymus epithelium induces tissue-specific tolerance

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Most current models of T cell development include a positive selection step in the thymus that occurs when T cells interact with thymic epithelium and a negative selection step after encounters with bone marrow-derived cells. We show here that developing T cells are tolerized when they recognize antigens expressed by thymic epithelium, that the tolerance is tissue specific, and that it can occur by deletion of the reactive T cells. PMID:8459209

  8. Lesion of the Olfactory Epithelium Accelerates Prion Neuroinvasion and Disease Onset when Prion Replication Is Restricted to Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Jenna; Wiley, James A.; Bessen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural prion diseases of ruminants are moderately contagious and while the gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of prion agent entry, other mucosae may be entry sites in a subset of infections. In the current study we examined prion neuroinvasion and disease induction following disruption of the olfactory epithelium in the nasal mucosa since this site contains environmentally exposed olfactory sensory neurons that project directly into the central nervous system. Here we provide evidence for accelerated prion neuroinvasion and clinical onset from the olfactory mucosa after disruption and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium and when prion replication is restricted to neurons. In transgenic mice with neuron restricted replication of prions, there was a reduction in survival when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation and there was >25% decrease in the prion incubation period. In a second model, the neurotropic DY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy was not pathogenic in hamsters by the nasal route, but 50% of animals exhibited brain infection and/or disease when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation. A time course analysis of prion deposition in the brain following loss of the olfactory epithelium in models of neuron-restricted prion replication suggests that neuroinvasion from the olfactory mucosa is via the olfactory nerve or brain stem associated cranial nerves. We propose that induction of neurogenesis after damage to the olfactory epithelium can lead to prion infection of immature olfactory sensory neurons and accelerate prion spread to the brain. PMID:25822718

  9. Optimizing modulation frequency for structured illumination in a fiber-optic microendoscope to image nuclear morphometry in columnar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Keahey, P A; Tkaczyk, T S; Schmeler, K M; Richards-Kortum, R R

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic microendoscopes have shown promise to image the changes in nuclear morphometry that accompany the development of precancerous lesions in tissue with squamous epithelium such as in the oral mucosa and cervix. However, fiber-optic microendoscopy image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated by scattering within tissue. The scattering coefficient of tissues with columnar epithelium can be greater than that of squamous epithelium resulting in decreased image quality. To address this challenge, we present a small and portable microendoscope system capable of performing optical sectioning using structured illumination (SI) in real-time. Several optical phantoms were developed and used to quantify the sectioning capabilities of the system. Columnar epithelium from cervical tissue specimens was then imaged ex vivo, and we demonstrate that the addition of SI achieves higher image contrast, enabling visualization of nuclear morphology.

  10. Differential Expression Patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 in Nasal Polyp Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Yu, Xue Min; Li, Ying Ying; Chen, De Hua; Li, Tian Ying; Shen, Liang; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors play an important role in airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation. The current study investigates the expression profiles of EGF, EGFR and ERBB4 in patients with nasal polyps (NP), and their response to glucocorticosteroid (GC) treatment. Fifty patients with NP (40 without GC treatment and 10 with oral GC) and 20 control subjects with septal deviation were recruited into the study. Protein levels of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 were evaluated by immune-staining. In healthy nasal epithelium, EGF and EGFR localized within p63+ basal cells, while ERBB4 localized within ciliated cells. GC-naïve NP epithelium showed weak expression of EGF in 90% of samples versus 5% of controls. EGFR was significantly increased in the epithelium with basal cell hyperplasia from GC-naïve NPs (78%, 31/40) compared to controls (23%, 4/17). EGFR was also found in some degranulating goblet cells. ERBB4 expression was significantly higher in hyperplastic epithelium from GC-naïve NPs (65%, 26/40) than in controls (6%, 1/17). GC treatment restored the EGF expression and normalized the EGFR and ERBB4 expression in NPs. Differential expression patterns of EGF, EGFR, and ERBB4 are essential in epithelial restitution and remodeling in nasal epithelium. PMID:27285994

  11. Possibility of mixed progenitor cells in sea star arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernroth, Bodil; Farahani, Farhad; Brunborg, Gunnar; Dupont, Sam; Dejmek, Annika; Sköld, Helen Nilsson

    2010-09-15

    In contrast to most vertebrates, invertebrate deuterostome echinoderms, such as the sea star Asterias rubens, undergo regeneration of lost body parts. The current hypothesis suggests that differentiated cells are the main source for regenerating arm in sea stars, but there is little information regarding the origin and identity of these cells. Here, we show that several organs distant to the regenerating arm responded by proliferation, most significantly in the coelomic epithelium and larger cells of the pyloric caeca. Analyzing markers for proliferating cells and parameters indicating cell ageing, such as levels of DNA damage, pigment, and lipofuscin contents as well as telomere length and telomerase activity, we suggest that cells contributing to the new arm likely originate from progenitors rather than differentiated cells. This is the first study showing that cells of mixed origin may be recruited from more distant sources of stem/progenitor cells in a sea star, and the first described indication of a role for pyloric caeca in arm regeneration. Data on growth rate during arm regeneration further indicate that regeneration is at the expense of whole animal growth. We propose a new working hypothesis for arm regeneration in sea stars involving four phases: wound healing by coelomocytes, migration of distant progenitor cells of mixed origin including from pyloric caeca, proliferation in these organs to compensate for cell loss, and finally, local proliferation in the regenerating arm.

  12. Cytological response of palatal epithelium to TiN-coated CoCr alloy denture.

    PubMed

    Lukomska-Szymańska, Monika; Brzeziński, Piotr M; Zieliński, Andrzej; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2012-04-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of titanium nitride coatings on CoCr alloy metal parts in framework dentures on human palatal epithelium cytology compared to framework dentures made with the same alloy but without titanium nitride coating, and to acrylic dentures. Every prosthetic restoration introduced into the oral cavity and remaining in direct contact with the palate exhibits a varied and harmful effect on the state of the palatal epithelium by disturbing its keratinization. CoCr alloy dentures produce a significantly greater perturbation of keratinization compared to acrylic dentures. There is no evidence showing that a titanium nitride coating of the CoCr alloy plays a protective role in the environment of the oral cavity.

  13. Dkk2/Frzb in the dermal papillae regulates feather regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qiqi; Cai, Linyan; Fu, Yu; Chen, Xi; Yan, Zhipeng; Lin, Xiang; Zhou, Guixuan; Han, Hao; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-ming; Wu, Wei; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-03-15

    Avian feathers have robust growth and regeneration capability. To evaluate the contribution of signaling molecules and pathways in these processes, we profiled gene expression in the feather follicle using an absolute quantification approach. We identified hundreds of genes that mark specific components of the feather follicle: the dermal papillae (DP) which controls feather regeneration and axis formation, the pulp mesenchyme (Pp) which is derived from DP cells and nourishes the feather follicle, and the ramogenic zone epithelium (Erz) where a feather starts to branch. The feather DP is enriched in BMP/TGF-β signaling molecules and inhibitors for Wnt signaling including Dkk2/Frzb. Wnt ligands are mainly expressed in the feather epithelium and pulp. We find that while Wnt signaling is required for the maintenance of DP marker gene expression and feather regeneration, excessive Wnt signaling delays regeneration and reduces pulp formation. Manipulating Dkk2/Frzb expression by lentiviral-mediated overexpression, shRNA-knockdown, or by antibody neutralization resulted in dual feather axes formation. Our results suggest that the Wnt signaling in the proximal feather follicle is fine-tuned to accommodate feather regeneration and axis formation.

  14. The coelomic epithelium transcriptome from a clonal sea star, Coscinasterias muricata.

    PubMed

    Gabre, Jonatan L; Martinez, Pedro; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Abril, Josep F

    2015-12-01

    Coscinasterias is a cosmopolitan genus of large asteroid sea stars with the ability of somatic fission as a clonal reproductive strategy. During fission, the animals tear themselves apart across their central disc, where the lost body parts are regenerated afterwards. Here, we have sequenced and subsequently analysed the transcriptome of the coelomic epithelium of a clonal Coscinasterias muricata specimen from New Zealand. Out of the total 389,768 raw reads, 11,344 contigs were assembled and grouped into functions. Raw read and assembled contig sequences are available at NCBI (BioSample: SAMN03371637), while the annotated assembly can be accessed through the project transcriptome browser (compgen.bio.ub.edu/gbrowse/starfish_transcriptome/). Our data is valuable for future detailed exploration of the coelomic epithelium functions as well as for a better understanding of sea star physiology.

  15. The coelomic epithelium transcriptome from a clonal sea star, Coscinasterias muricata.

    PubMed

    Gabre, Jonatan L; Martinez, Pedro; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Abril, Josep F

    2015-12-01

    Coscinasterias is a cosmopolitan genus of large asteroid sea stars with the ability of somatic fission as a clonal reproductive strategy. During fission, the animals tear themselves apart across their central disc, where the lost body parts are regenerated afterwards. Here, we have sequenced and subsequently analysed the transcriptome of the coelomic epithelium of a clonal Coscinasterias muricata specimen from New Zealand. Out of the total 389,768 raw reads, 11,344 contigs were assembled and grouped into functions. Raw read and assembled contig sequences are available at NCBI (BioSample: SAMN03371637), while the annotated assembly can be accessed through the project transcriptome browser (compgen.bio.ub.edu/gbrowse/starfish_transcriptome/). Our data is valuable for future detailed exploration of the coelomic epithelium functions as well as for a better understanding of sea star physiology. PMID:26321383

  16. Expression of keratins in mouse vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Conti, I B; Lynch, M; Roop, D; Bhowmik, S; Majeski, P; Conti, C J

    1994-05-01

    In the epithelium of the rodent vagina proliferation and differentiation are tightly regulated by ovarian hormones. Estrogens stimulate proliferation and squamous differentiation, whereas progesterone redirects differentiation to a mucus-secreting epithelium formed by goblet-like cells. In the present study, we used monospecific keratin antibodies to show the expression and distribution of keratins in SENCAR mouse vaginal epithelium in different stages of the estral cycle and in ovariectomized animals. In ovariectomized animals, the vaginal epithelium expressed K6, K8, K13 and K14, but not K1. After estrogen treatment, K1 was expressed. During proestrus and estrus, the keratin pattern was essentially identical to that observed in 17 beta-estradiol-stimulated animals. In contrast, during the progestational stages (metaestrus and diestrus) or after progesterone treatment of ovariectomized mice, the most relevant change was the loss of K1. Together, these results show that K1 expression is induced by estrogens in the vaginal epithelium. In contrast, K6, K8, K13 and K14 are constitutively expressed even when squamous differentiation is not observed.

  17. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  18. Reduced shedding regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Songgang; Augenblick, John E.; Erbeznik, Raymond M.

    2007-05-22

    A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

  19. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  20. [Autocrine growth mechanisms of cholesteatoma epithelium].

    PubMed

    Schilling, V; Holly, A; Bujía, J; Schulz, P

    1993-07-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) are known to be produced by normal human keratinocytes stimulating their proliferation. The distribution and expression of TGF alpha and IL-1 alpha were examined in specimens of middle ear cholesteatoma by means of immunohistochemical methods using a monoclonal antibody against TGF alpha and a polyclonal one against IL-1 alpha. Normal retroauricular skin was stained for comparison. Staining for TGF alpha was consistently stronger in cholesteatoma epithelium than in normal epidermis, and encompassed all epithelial cell layers. Immune cells occurring in the stroma of cholesteatoma also reacted positively for TGF alpha. The intensity of staining for IL-1 alpha was markedly stronger in cholesteatoma tissue than in normal epidermis. All cellular layers of the squamous epithelium of cholesteatoma stained strongly and uniformly for IL-1 alpha, whereas the keratin layer was negative for IL-1 alpha. In the connective tissue beneath the cholesteatoma epithelium intensely positive cells were scattered between negative stromal cells. These data are consistent with autocrine stimulation of the squamous epithelium of cholesteatoma by TGF alpha and IL-1 alpha as well as with a paracrine stimulation by immune cells. Both factors contribute to the unrestrained growth of cholesteatoma in the middle ear cavity.

  1. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  2. Identification and molecular regulation of neural stem cells in the olfactory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Beites, Crestina L.; Kawauchi, Shimako; Crocker, Candice E.; Calof, Anne L. . E-mail: alcalof@uci.edu

    2005-06-10

    The sensory neurons that subserve olfaction, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), are regenerated throughout life, making the neuroepithelium in which they reside [the olfactory epithelium (OE)] an excellent model for studying how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate stem cell dynamics and neurogenesis during development and regeneration. Numerous studies indicate that transcription factors and signaling molecules together regulate generation of ORNs from stem and progenitor cells during development, and work on regenerative neurogenesis indicates that these same factors may operate at postnatal ages as well. This review describes our current knowledge of the identity of the OE neural stem cell; the different cell types that are thought to be the progeny (directly or indirectly) of this stem cell; and the factors that influence cell differentiation in the OE neuronal lineage. We review data suggesting that (1) the ORN lineage contains three distinct proliferating cell types-a stem cell and two populations of transit amplifying cells; (2) in established OE, these three cell types are present within the basal cell compartment of the epithelium; and (3) the stem cell that gives rise ultimately to ORNs may also generate two glial cell types of the primary olfactory pathway: sustentacular cells (SUS), which lie within OE proper; and olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), which envelope the olfactory nerve. In addition, we describe factors that are both made by and found within the microenvironment of OE stem and progenitor cells, and which exert crucial growth regulatory effects on these cells. Thus, as with other regenerating tissues, the basis of regeneration in the OE appears be a population of stem cells, which resides within a microenvironment (niche) consisting of factors crucial for maintenance of its capacity for proliferation and differentiation.

  3. [Bone regeneration in implantology. The use of Gore-Tex membranes: GTAM].

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, M; Tecucianu, J F; Slama, M; Celletti, R

    1991-05-01

    The use of expanded polytetrafluorethylene membranes to attain bone regeneration around dental implants is described. Membranes discourage "non-desirable" cells form colonizing the healing site. These cells are essentially derived from gingival epithelium and gingival connective tissue. It is suggested that this procedure could be employed directly after tooth extraction.

  4. IL-17 and VEGF are necessary for efficient corneal nerve regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contribution of acute inflammation to sensory nerve regeneration was investigated in the murine cornea using a model of corneal abrasion that removes the stratified epithelium and subbasal nerve plexus. Abrasion induced accumulation of IL-17(+) CCR6(+) yo T cells, neutrophils, and platelets in t...

  5. [Epithelium constitution for esophageal tissue engineering using electrospinning technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Lv, Jingjing; Yu, Xuechan; Kang, Cheng; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-12-01

    The basement membrane (BM) is crucial in regulating the physical and biological activities of esophageal epithelial cells which attach to the underlying BM. In order to simulate the natural construction of BM, we prepared the fibrous scaffolds using biodegradable polylactide (PLA) and silk fibroin (SF) as the materials via electrospinning technology. BM's proteins containing collagen (IV), laminin, entactin and proteoglycan were extracted from porcine esophagus and coated on the eletrospun fibers. Morphology, mechanical strength, biodegradability and cytocompatibility of the coated and uncoated scaffolds were tested and evaluated using scanning electron micrography, mechanical test system, immunofluorescence assay and western blotting with CK14 as the primary antibody. The fibrous scaffold PLA or PLA/SF, generated from the present protocol had good formation and mechanical and biodegradable properties. After coating with BM's proteins, the scaffold could enhance the growth and differentiation of esophageal epithelial cells, which would contribute to remodel and regenerate the tissue engineered epithelium and further contribute to engineer the whole esophagus in future.

  6. EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling mediates adult midgut epithelial homeostasis and regeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huaqi; Grenley, Marc O.; Bravo, Maria-Jose; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many tissues in higher animals undergo dynamic homeostatic growth, wherein damaged or aged cells are replaced by the progeny of resident stem cells. To maintain homeostasis, stem cells must respond to tissue needs. Here we show that in response to damage or stress in the intestinal (midgut) epithelium of adult Drosophila, multiple EGFR ligands and rhomboids (intramembrane proteases that activate some EGFR ligands) are induced, leading to the activation of EGFR signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Activation of EGFR signaling promotes ISC division and midgut epithelium regeneration, thus maintaining tissue homeostasis. ISCs defective in EGFR signaling cannot grow or divide, are poorly maintained, and cannot support midgut epithelium regeneration following enteric infection by the bacterium, Pseudomonas entomophila. Furthermore, ISC proliferation induced by Jak/Stat signaling is dependent upon EGFR signaling. Thus the EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling pathway plays central, essential roles in ISC maintenance and the feedback system that mediates intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21167805

  7. Lens regeneration from the cornea requires suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul W; Sun, Yu; Henry, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    The frog, Xenopus laevis, possesses a high capacity to regenerate various larval tissues, including the lens, which is capable of complete regeneration from the cornea epithelium. However, the molecular signaling mechanisms of cornea-lens regeneration are not fully understood. Previous work has implicated the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway, but molecular studies have been very limited. Iris-derived lens regeneration in the newt (Wolffian lens regeneration) has shown a necessity for active Wnt signaling in order to regenerate a new lens. Here we provide evidence that the Wnt signaling pathway plays a different role in the context of cornea-lens regeneration in Xenopus. We examined the expression of frizzled receptors and wnt ligands in the frog cornea epithelium. Numerous frizzled receptors (fzd1, fzd2, fzd3, fzd4, fzd6, fzd7, fzd8, and fzd10) and wnt ligands (wnt2b.a, wnt3a, wnt4, wnt5a, wnt5b, wnt6, wnt7b, wnt10a, wnt11, and wnt11b) are expressed in the cornea epithelium, demonstrating that this tissue is transcribing many of the ligands and receptors of the Wnt signaling pathway. When compared to flank epithelium, which is lens regeneration incompetent, only wnt11 and wnt11b are different (present only in the cornea epithelium), identifying them as potential regulators of cornea-lens regeneration. To detect changes in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling occurring within the cornea epithelium, axin2 expression was measured over the course of regeneration. axin2 is a well-established reporter of active Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and its expression shows a significant decrease at 24 h post-lentectomy. This decrease recovers to normal endogenous levels by 48 h. To test whether this signaling decrease was necessary for lens regeneration to occur, regenerating eyes were treated with either 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) or 1-azakenpaullone - both activators of Wnt signaling - resulting in a significant reduction in the percentage of cases with successful

  8. Wounded Embryonic Corneas Exhibit Nonfibrotic Regeneration and Complete Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Spurlin, James W.; Lwigale, Peter Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Wound healing in adult corneas is characterized by activation of keratocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis that results in fibrotic scar formation and loss of transparency. Since most fetal wounds heal without scaring, we investigated the regenerative potential of wounded embryonic corneas. Methods. On embryonic day (E) 7 chick corneas were wounded by making a linear incision traversing the epithelium and anterior stroma. Wounded corneas were collected between E7 and E18, and analyzed for apoptosis, cell proliferation, staining of ECM components, and corneal innervation. Results. Substantial wound retraction was observed within 16-hours postwounding (hpw) and partial re-epithelialized by 5-days postwounding (dpw). Corneal wounds were fully re-epithelialized by 11 dpw with no visible scars. There was no difference in the number of cells undergoing apoptosis between wounded and control corneas. Cell proliferation was reduced in the wounded corneas, albeit mitotic cells in the regenerating epithelium. Staining for alpha–smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), tenascin, and fibronectin was vivid but transient at the wound site. Staining for procollagen I, perlecan, and keratan sulfate proteoglycan was reduced at the wound site. Wounded corneas were fully regenerated by 11 dpw and showed similar patterns of staining for ECM components, albeit an increase in perlecan staining. Corneal innervation was inhibited during wound healing, but regenerated corneas were innervated similar to controls. Conclusions. These data show that minimal keratocyte activation, rapid ECM reconstruction, and proper innervation occur during nonfibrotic regeneration of the embryonic cornea. PMID:24003085

  9. A quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the keratinizing epithelium of noral human hard palate.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Schroeder, H E

    1975-01-01

    The epithelium of normal human hard palate was subjected to sterologic analysis. Ten biosies were selected from a total of twenty specimens collected from 9 to 16 year old females, and processed for light- and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from three strata (basale, spinosum, granulosum) in two locations (epithelial ridges and portions over connective tissue papillae). Stereologic point counting procedures were employed to analyse a total 1560 electron micrographs. In general, the thickness of the palate epithelium was 0.12 mm (over papillae) and 0.31 mm (in ridges), the epithelium is distinctly stratified, and homogeneously ortho-keratinized. From basal to granular layers, the composition of strata revealed decreasing densities of nuclei, mitochondria, membrane-bound organelles and aggregates of free ribosomes. Keratohyalin bodies and membrane coating granules increased, and cytoplasmic filaments with a constant diameter of about 85 A increased from 14 to 30% of cytoplasmic unit volume. The cytoplasmic ground substance occupied a stable 50% of the epithelial cytoplasm in all strata. The composition of basal layers in ridges differed from that over connective tissue papillae. The data are discussed in relation to the observations that (1) an increasing gradient of filament density is not the most characteristic feature of ortho-keratinizing oral epithelium and (2) differences in the degree of differentiation in cells of the stratum basale coincided with the comparable frequency distribution pattern of dividing cells.

  10. Oscarella lobularis (Homoscleromorpha, Porifera) Regeneration: Epithelial Morphogenesis and Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Borisenko, Ilya E; Lapébie, Pascal; Gazave, Eve; Tokina, Daria B; Borchiellini, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are known to possess remarkable reconstitutive and regenerative abilities ranging from common wounding or body part regeneration to more impressive re-building of a functional body from dissociated cells. Among the four sponge classes, Homoscleromorpha is notably the only sponge group to possess morphologically distinct basement membrane and specialized cell-junctions, and is therefore considered to possess true epithelia. The consequence of this peculiar organization is the predominance of epithelial morphogenesis during ontogenesis of these sponges. In this work we reveal the underlying cellular mechanisms used during morphogenesis accompanying ectosome regeneration in the homoscleromorph sponge model: Oscarella lobularis. We identified three main sources of novel exopinacoderm during the processes of its regeneration and the restoration of functional peripheral parts of the aquiferous system in O. lobularis: (1) intact exopinacoderm surrounding the wound surface, (2) the endopinacoderm from peripheral exhalant and inhalant canals, and (3) the intact choanoderm found on the wound surface. The basic morphogenetic processes during regeneration are the spreading and fusion of epithelial sheets that merge into one continuous epithelium. Transdifferentiation of choanocytes into exopinacocytes is also present. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is absent during regeneration. Moreover, we cannot reveal any other morphologically distinct pluripotent cells. In Oscarella, neither blastema formation nor local dedifferentiation and proliferation have been detected, which is probably due to the high morphogenetic plasticity of the tissue. Regeneration in O. lobularis goes through cell transdifferentiation and through the processes, when lost body parts are replaced by the remodeling of the remaining tissue. Morphogenesis during ectosome regeneration in O. lobularis is correlated with its true epithelial organization. Knowledge of the morphological basis of

  11. Oscarella lobularis (Homoscleromorpha, Porifera) Regeneration: Epithelial Morphogenesis and Metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ereskovsky, Alexander V.; Borisenko, Ilya E.; Lapébie, Pascal; Gazave, Eve; Tokina, Daria B.; Borchiellini, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are known to possess remarkable reconstitutive and regenerative abilities ranging from common wounding or body part regeneration to more impressive re-building of a functional body from dissociated cells. Among the four sponge classes, Homoscleromorpha is notably the only sponge group to possess morphologically distinct basement membrane and specialized cell-junctions, and is therefore considered to possess true epithelia. The consequence of this peculiar organization is the predominance of epithelial morphogenesis during ontogenesis of these sponges. In this work we reveal the underlying cellular mechanisms used during morphogenesis accompanying ectosome regeneration in the homoscleromorph sponge model: Oscarella lobularis. We identified three main sources of novel exopinacoderm during the processes of its regeneration and the restoration of functional peripheral parts of the aquiferous system in O. lobularis: (1) intact exopinacoderm surrounding the wound surface, (2) the endopinacoderm from peripheral exhalant and inhalant canals, and (3) the intact choanoderm found on the wound surface. The basic morphogenetic processes during regeneration are the spreading and fusion of epithelial sheets that merge into one continuous epithelium. Transdifferentiation of choanocytes into exopinacocytes is also present. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is absent during regeneration. Moreover, we cannot reveal any other morphologically distinct pluripotent cells. In Oscarella, neither blastema formation nor local dedifferentiation and proliferation have been detected, which is probably due to the high morphogenetic plasticity of the tissue. Regeneration in O. lobularis goes through cell transdifferentiation and through the processes, when lost body parts are replaced by the remodeling of the remaining tissue. Morphogenesis during ectosome regeneration in O. lobularis is correlated with its true epithelial organization. Knowledge of the morphological basis of

  12. Heterotopic transplantation of glycerin-preserved trachea: effect of respiratory epithelium desquamation on acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, M G; Edelweiss, M I A; Souza, F H; Moreschi, A H; Savegnago, F L; Macedo Neto, A V

    2005-07-01

    An effective preservation method and decreased rejection are essential for tracheal transplantation in the reconstruction of large airway defects. Our objective in the present study was to evaluate the antigenic properties of glycerin-preserved tracheal segments. Sixty-one tracheal segments (2.4 to 3.1 cm) were divided into three groups: autograft (N = 21), fresh allograft (N = 18) and glycerin-preserved allograft (N = 22). Two segments from different groups were implanted into the greater omentum of dogs (N = 31). After 28 days, the segments were harvested and analyzed for mononuclear infiltration score and for the presence of respiratory epithelium. The fresh allograft group presented the highest score for mononuclear infiltration (1.78 +/- 0.43, P < or = 0.001) when compared to the autograft and glycerin-preserved allograft groups. In contrast to the regenerated epithelium observed in autograft segments, all fresh allografts and glycerin-preserved allografts had desquamation of the respiratory mucosa. The low antigenicity observed in glycerin segments was probably the result of denudation of the respiratory epithelium and perhaps due to the decrease of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens.

  13. Ovarian surface epithelium at the junction area contains a cancer-prone stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Hwang, Chang-Il; Cheng, Chieh-Yang; Michurina, Tatyana V; Enikolopov, Grigori; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2013-03-14

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Some epithelial cancers are known to occur in transitional zones between two types of epithelium, whereas others have been shown to originate in epithelial tissue stem cells. The stem cell niche of the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), which is ruptured and regenerates during ovulation, has not yet been defined unequivocally. Here we identify the hilum region of the mouse ovary, the transitional (or junction) area between the OSE, mesothelium and tubal (oviductal) epithelium, as a previously unrecognized stem cell niche of the OSE. We find that cells of the hilum OSE are cycling slowly and express stem and/or progenitor cell markers ALDH1, LGR5, LEF1, CD133 and CK6B. These cells display long-term stem cell properties ex vivo and in vivo, as shown by our serial sphere generation and long-term lineage-tracing assays. Importantly, the hilum cells show increased transformation potential after inactivation of tumour suppressor genes Trp53 and Rb1, whose pathways are altered frequently in the most aggressive and common type of human EOC, high-grade serous adenocarcinoma. Our study supports experimentally the idea that susceptibility of transitional zones to malignant transformation may be explained by the presence of stem cell niches in those areas. Identification of a stem cell niche for the OSE may have important implications for understanding EOC pathogenesis.

  14. Heterotopic transplantation of glycerin-preserved trachea: effect of respiratory epithelium desquamation on acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, M G; Edelweiss, M I A; Souza, F H; Moreschi, A H; Savegnago, F L; Macedo Neto, A V

    2005-07-01

    An effective preservation method and decreased rejection are essential for tracheal transplantation in the reconstruction of large airway defects. Our objective in the present study was to evaluate the antigenic properties of glycerin-preserved tracheal segments. Sixty-one tracheal segments (2.4 to 3.1 cm) were divided into three groups: autograft (N = 21), fresh allograft (N = 18) and glycerin-preserved allograft (N = 22). Two segments from different groups were implanted into the greater omentum of dogs (N = 31). After 28 days, the segments were harvested and analyzed for mononuclear infiltration score and for the presence of respiratory epithelium. The fresh allograft group presented the highest score for mononuclear infiltration (1.78 +/- 0.43, P < or = 0.001) when compared to the autograft and glycerin-preserved allograft groups. In contrast to the regenerated epithelium observed in autograft segments, all fresh allografts and glycerin-preserved allografts had desquamation of the respiratory mucosa. The low antigenicity observed in glycerin segments was probably the result of denudation of the respiratory epithelium and perhaps due to the decrease of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens. PMID:16007278

  15. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  16. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  17. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  18. Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy of bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Leriche, Jean C.; Anderson, Marshall W.; Macaulay, Calum E.

    2009-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy permits the acquisition of high-resolution real-time confocal images of bronchial mucosa via the instrument channel of an endoscope. We report here on the construction and validation of a confocal fluorescence microendoscope and its use to acquire images of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Our objective is to develop an imaging method that can distinguish preneoplastic lesions from normal epithelium to enable us to study the natural history of these lesions and the efficacy of chemopreventive agents without biopsy removal of the lesion that can introduce a spontaneous regression bias. The instrument employs a laser-scanning engine and bronchoscope-compatible confocal probe consisting of a fiber-optic image guide and a graded-index objective lens. We assessed the potential of topical application of physiological pH cresyl violet (CV) as a fluorescence contrast-enhancing agent for the visualization of tissue morphology. Images acquired ex vivo with the confocal microendoscope were first compared with a bench-top confocal fluorescence microscope and conventional histology. Confocal images from five sites topically stained with CV were then acquired in vivo from high-risk smokers and compared to hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of biopsies taken from the same site. Sufficient contrast in the confocal imagery was obtained to identify cells in the bronchial epithelium. However, further improvements in the miniature objective lens are required to provide sufficient axial resolution for accurate classification of preneoplastic lesions.

  19. Development of the ovarian follicular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Lavranos, T C; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    1999-05-25

    A lot is known about the endocrine control of the development of ovarian follicles, but a key question now facing researchers is which molecular and cellular processes take part in control of follicular growth and development. The growth and development of ovarian follicles occurs postnatally and throughout adult life. In this review, we focus on the follicular epithelium (membrana granulosa) and its basal lamina. We discuss a model of how granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells and then enter different lineages before differentiation. The structure of the epithelium at the antral stage of development is presented, and the effects that follicle growth has on the behavior of the granulosa cells are discussed. Finally, we discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition. This would be expected if the behavior of the granulosa cells changes, or if the permeability of the basal lamina changes. It will be evident that the follicular epithelium has similarities to other epithelia in the body, but that it is more dynamic, as gross changes occur during the course of follicle development. This basic information will be important for the development of future reproductive technologies in both humans and animals, and possibly for understanding polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. PMID:10411332

  20. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  1. Novel organelles in primate retinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, A; Gouras, P

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating age-related changes in organelles in monkey retinal epithelium using transmission and analytic electron microscopy. We previously described a circular organelle in retinal epithelium with a diameter of about 0.5μm. The organelle is unique in containing a single, round vacuole within an otherwise electron dense interior. We suggested that the organelle might be a melanosome with lysosomal properties. We now find that there are two similar organelles with such a single vacuole but which differ in their chemical composition, electron density, cell location and according to age. Epon embedded sections from the macular epithelium of seven monkeys, ranging from 1 to 35 years of age, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A seven year old monkey was processed for analytic electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of the organelles. The number and location of the organelles in the retinal epithelium were determined. The chemical composition of these two organelles was different. One of the organelles contained high mole fractions of oxygen and nitrogen and little phosphorous characteristic of melanin; the other had little oxygen and nitrogen and higher mole fractions of phosphorous uncharacteristic of melanin, but more common with lysosomal organelles. The latter had an electron dense rim around the vacuole, a less electron dense interior than the melanin containing organelle and also contained iron. The melanin containing organelle was more common in young monkeys and in the middle third of the cell. The organelle without melanin was more common in old monkeys and localized in the basal third of the cell. Two similarly vacuolated organelles, not identified before in retinal epithelium, differ in their chemical composition. One contains melanin; the other does not. The former is more common in young and the latter more common in old monkeys. This suggests reorganization and or degradation of melanin-containing organelles

  2. Novel organelles in primate retinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, A; Gouras, P

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating age-related changes in organelles in monkey retinal epithelium using transmission and analytic electron microscopy. We previously described a circular organelle in retinal epithelium with a diameter of about 0.5μm. The organelle is unique in containing a single, round vacuole within an otherwise electron dense interior. We suggested that the organelle might be a melanosome with lysosomal properties. We now find that there are two similar organelles with such a single vacuole but which differ in their chemical composition, electron density, cell location and according to age. Epon embedded sections from the macular epithelium of seven monkeys, ranging from 1 to 35 years of age, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A seven year old monkey was processed for analytic electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of the organelles. The number and location of the organelles in the retinal epithelium were determined. The chemical composition of these two organelles was different. One of the organelles contained high mole fractions of oxygen and nitrogen and little phosphorous characteristic of melanin; the other had little oxygen and nitrogen and higher mole fractions of phosphorous uncharacteristic of melanin, but more common with lysosomal organelles. The latter had an electron dense rim around the vacuole, a less electron dense interior than the melanin containing organelle and also contained iron. The melanin containing organelle was more common in young monkeys and in the middle third of the cell. The organelle without melanin was more common in old monkeys and localized in the basal third of the cell. Two similarly vacuolated organelles, not identified before in retinal epithelium, differ in their chemical composition. One contains melanin; the other does not. The former is more common in young and the latter more common in old monkeys. This suggests reorganization and or degradation of melanin-containing organelles

  3. Retinoic acid regulation by CYP26 in vertebrate lens regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin G; Henry, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Xenopus laevis is among the few species that are capable of fully regenerating a lost lens de novo. This occurs upon removal of the lens, when secreted factors from the retina are permitted to reach the cornea epithelium and trigger it to form a new lens. Although many studies have investigated the retinal factors that initiate lens regeneration, relatively little is known about what factors support this process and make the cornea competent to form a lens. We presently investigate the role of Retinoic acid (RA) signaling in lens regeneration in Xenopus. RA is a highly important morphogen during vertebrate development, including the development of various eye tissues, and has been previously implicated in several regenerative processes as well. For instance, Wolffian lens regeneration in the newt requires active RA signaling. In contrast, we provide evidence here that lens regeneration in Xenopus actually depends on the attenuation of RA signaling, which is regulated by the RA-degrading enzyme CYP26. Using RTPCR we examined the expression of RA synthesis and metabolism related genes within ocular tissues. We found expression of aldh1a1, aldh1a2, and aldh1a3, as well as cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 in both normal and regenerating corneal tissue. On the other hand, cyp26c1 does not appear to be expressed in either control or regenerating corneas, but it is expressed in the lens. Additionally in the lens, we found expression of aldh1a1 and aldh1a2, but not aldh1a3. Using an inhibitor of CYP26, and separately using exogenous retinoids, as well as RA signaling inhibitors, we demonstrate that CYP26 activity is necessary for lens regeneration to occur. We also find using phosphorylated Histone H3 labeling that CYP26 antagonism reduces cell proliferation in the cornea, and using qPCR we find that exogenous retinoids alter the expression of putative corneal stem cell markers. Furthermore, the Xenopus cornea is composed of an outer layer and inner basal epithelium, as well as a

  4. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  5. Specialized progenitors and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells. PMID:23404104

  6. Reconstruction of damaged corneal epithelium using Venus-labeled limbal epithelial stem cells and tracking of surviving donor cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ji-Qing; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Hua, Jin-Lian; Liu, Wei-Shuai; Dou, Zhong-Ying; Lei, An-Min

    2013-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the self-renewal and replenishment of the corneal epithelium. Although it is possible to repair the ocular surface using limbal stem cell transplantation, the mechanisms behind this therapy are unclear. To investigate the distribution of surviving donor cells in a reconstructed corneal epithelium, we screened a Venus-labeled limbal stem cell strain in goats. Cells were cultivated on denuded human amniotic membrane for 21 days to produce Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets. The Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets were transplanted to goat models of limbal stem cell deficiency. At 3 months post-surgery, the damaged corneal epithelia were obviously improved in the transplanted group compared with the non-transplanted control, with the donor cells still residing in the reconstructed ocular surface epithelium. Using Venus as a marker, our results indicated that the location and survival of donor cells varied, depending on the corneal epithelial region. Additionally, immunofluorescent staining of the reconstructed corneal epithelium demonstrated that many P63(+) cells were unevenly distributed among basal and suprabasal epithelial layers. Our study provides a new model, and reveals some of the mechanisms involved in corneal epithelial cell regeneration research.

  7. Defective Barrier Function in Neosquamous Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S.; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as ‘neosquamous epithelium (NSE).’ Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. METHODS At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (RT) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJ) of NSE and USE was determined using qRT-PCR. Differential expression of claudin 4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. RESULTS USE was histologically normal while NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean RT and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low RT values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. CONCLUSIONS NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. Since this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation. PMID:23318477

  8. Ontogeny of the mouse vocal fold epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lungova, Vlasta; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Herriges, John; Sun, Xin; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation provides the first systematic determination of the cellular and molecular progression of vocal fold (VF) epithelium development in a murine model. We define five principal developmental events that constitute the progression from VF initiation in the embryonic anterior foregut tube to fully differentiated and functional adult tissue. These developmental events include (1) the initiation of the larynx and vocal folds with apposition of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (embryonic (E) day 10.5); (2) the establishment of the epithelial lamina with fusion of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (E11.5); (3) the epithelial lamina recanalization and separation of VFs (E13.5–18.5); (4) the stratification of the vocal folds (E13.5–18.5); and (5) the maturation of vocal fold epithelium (postnatal stages). The illustration of these morphogenetic events is substantiated by dynamic changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as the expression pattern of key transcription factors, FOXA2, SOX2 and NKX2-1 that specify and pattern the foregut endoderm. Furthermore, we documented the gradual conversion of VF epithelial cells from simple precursors expressing cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the embryo into mature stratified epithelial cells also expressing cytokeratins 5 and 14 in the adult. Interestingly, in the adult, cytokeratins 5 and 14 appear to be expressed in all cell layers in the VF, in contrast to their preferential localization to the basal cell layer in surrounding epithelium. To begin investigating the role of signaling molecules in vocal fold development, we characterized the expression pattern of SHH pathway genes, and how loss of Shh affects vocal fold development in the mutant. This study defines the cellular and molecular context and serves as the necessary foundation for future functional investigations of VF formation. PMID:25601450

  9. Extracellular matrix remodeling and metalloproteinase involvement during intestine regeneration in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, José L; Rosa, Rey; Ruiz, Dorcas L; García-Arrarás, José E

    2002-10-01

    The sea cucumber, Holothuria glaberrima, has the capacity to regenerate its internal organs. Intestinal regeneration is accomplished by the thickening of the mesenteric border and the invasion of this thickening by mucosal epithelium from the esophagus and the cloaca. Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling has been associated with morphogenetic events during embryonic development and regeneration. We have used immunohistochemical techniques against ECM components to show that differential changes occur in the ECM during early regeneration. Labeling of fibrous collagenous components and muscle-related laminin disappear from the regenerating intestine and mesentery, while fibronectin labeling and 4G7 (an echinoderm ECM component) are continuously present. Western blots confirm a decrease in fibrous collagen content during the first 2 weeks of regeneration. We have also identified five 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive bands in collagen gelatin zymographs. The gelatinolytic activities of these bands are enhanced during early stages of regeneration, suggesting that the metalloprotease activity is associated with ECM remodeling. Inhibition of MMPs in vivo with 1,10-phenanthroline, p-aminobenzoyl-Gly-Pro-D-Leu-D-Ala hydroxamate or N-CBZ-Pro-Leu-Gly hydroxamate produces a reversible inhibition of intestinal regeneration and ECM remodeling. Our results show that significant changes in ECM content occur during intestine regeneration in the sea cucumber and that the onset of these changes is correlated to the proteolytic activities of MMPs.

  10. Expression of complement 3 and complement 5 in newt limb and lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuko; Madhavan, Mayur; Call, Mindy K; Santiago, William; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2003-03-01

    Some urodele amphibians possess the capacity to regenerate their body parts, including the limbs and the lens of the eye. The molecular pathway(s) involved in urodele regeneration are largely unknown. We have previously suggested that complement may participate in limb regeneration in axolotls. To further define its role in the regenerative process, we have examined the pattern of distribution and spatiotemporal expression of two key components, C3 and C5, during limb and lens regeneration in the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. First, we have cloned newt cDNAs encoding C3 and C5 and have generated Abs specifically recognizing these molecules. Using these newt-specific probes, we have found by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis that these molecules are expressed during both limb and lens regeneration, but not in the normal limb and lens. The C3 and C5 proteins were expressed in a complementary fashion during limb regeneration, with C3 being expressed mainly in the blastema and C5 exclusively in the wound epithelium. Similarly, during the process of lens regeneration, C3 was detected in the iris and cornea, while C5 was present in the regenerating lens vesicle as well as the cornea. The distinct expression profile of complement proteins in regenerative tissues of the urodele lens and limb supports a nonimmunologic function of complement in tissue regeneration and constitutes the first systematic effort to dissect its involvement in regenerative processes of lower vertebrate species. PMID:12594255

  11. Interleukin-22 Promotes Intestinal Stem Cell-Mediated Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Jenq, Robert R.; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F.; Smith, Odette M.; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A.; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L.; O'Rourke, Kevin P.; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5+ crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance1,2. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Utilizing ex vivo organoid cultures, we provide evidence that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of Interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury3,4, increased the growth of murine small intestine (SI) organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both murine and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation, and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced Stat3 phosphorylation in Lgr5+ ISCs, and Stat3 was critical for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) enhanced recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration, and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Atoh1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independent of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration. PMID:26649819

  12. Objectivity in the classification of tumours of the nasal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, L.; Hyams, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of tumours derived from each of the four cell types of nasal epithelium is presented. Criticism is levelled at the adoption of additional terms for tissue types such as lympho-epithelium and transitional cell epithelium and tumours said to be derived from them. Electron microscopy is of assistance in classification particularly in the detection of evidence of keratin synthesis. The proposed classification of tumours of the nasal epithelium is: (1) Pseudostratified columnar epithelium: (a) papillary adenoma, (b) papillary carcinoma. (2) Squamous epithelium: (a) everted squamous papilloma, (b) inverted papilloma, (c) squamous carcinoma of any grade of differentiation from well differentiated to undifferentiated. (3) Melanocyte: malignant melanoma. (4) Olfactory neuroepithelium: olfactory neuroblastoma. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 21Fig. 20 PMID:1197175

  13. [Relative biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions and fast neutrons estimated from frequency of aberration mytoses in the retinal epithelium].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Shafirkin, A V; Fedorenko, B S

    2006-01-01

    Analyzed was the literature and authors' experimental data concerning lesion and recovery of epithelium cells of mice retina immediately and long after irradiation at different sources including single and partly fractionated irradiation by gamma- and X-rays, accelerated protons, helium, carbon and boron ions, and fast neutrons of the reactor range in a large spectrum of doses and LET. Reviewed are some new techniques of determining the RBE coefficient for these types of radiation; large values of the RBE coefficients for accelerated ions and neutrons (5-10 times higher than RBE coefficients calculated for the next day following irradiation) are a result of integration into calculation of the available data about the delayed disorders in retinal epithelium cell regeneration. PMID:17193969

  14. Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell sheets with bellows graft for rapid tracheal epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Park, Ju Young; Nam, Inn-Chul; Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Hyungseok; Choi, Yeongjin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Rapid functional epithelial regeneration on the luminal surface is essential when using artificial tracheal grafts to repair tracheal defects. In this study, we imposed human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell (hTMSC) sheets for tracheal epithelial regeneration, and then assessed their potential as a new clinical cell source. In vitro, hTMSCs sheets showed high capacity to differentiate into tracheal epithelium. We fabricated a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) tracheal graft by indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and created a composite construct by transplanting the hTMSC sheets to its luminal surface of the tracheal graft, then applied this tissue-engineered tracheal graft to non-circumferential tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model. 4 weeks after implantation, the luminal surface of tissue-engineered tracheal graft was covered by a mature and highly-ciliated epithelium, whereas tracheal grafts without hTMSC sheets were covered by only a thin, immature epithelium. Therefore, hTMSC sheets on the luminal surface of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft can accelerate the tracheal epithelial regeneration, and the tissue-engineered tracheal graft with hTMSC sheets provides a useful clinical alternative for tracheal epithelial regeneration.

  15. Notch Signaling and Atoh1 Expression During Hair Cell Regeneration in the Mouse Utricle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Peng; Chatterjee, Ishani; Batts, Shelley A.; Wong, Hiu Tung; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Gong, Shu-Sheng; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian vestibular epithelium has a limited capacity for spontaneous hair cell regeneration. The mechanism underlying the regeneration is not well understood. Because the Notch signaling pathway mediates the formation of the sensory epithelial mosaic patterning during ear development, it may also play a role in hair cell regeneration in the mature mammalian vestibular epithelium after a lesion. To investigate the process of spontaneous regeneration in the vestibular epithelium vis-à-vis changes in Notch signaling, we induced a unilateral lesion by infusing streptomycin into the mouse posterior semicircular canal, and examined Notch signaling molecules and their mRNA expression levels by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRTPCR), respectively. We detected Jagged1 in supporting cells in both normal and lesioned utricles. Atoh1, a marker for early developing hair cells, was absent in the intact mature tissue, but re-appeared after the lesion. Many cells were either positive for both Atoh1 and myosin VIIa, or for one of them. qRTPCR data showed a post trauma decrease of Hes5 and an increase in Atoh1. Atoh1 up-regulation may either be a result of Hes5 down-regulation or mediated by another signaling pathway. PMID:20433915

  16. [Immunomorphology of oral lichen planus].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Ivina, A A; Guseva, A V; Babichenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to immunohistochemical study of reticular and erosive forms of oral lichen planus. Morphological examination of the reticular form revealed the increased number of Langerhans cells (CD1a), mast cells (CD25) and T lymphocytes (CD4, CD8, CD16) in the oral epithelium. Activation of these cells leads to the secretion of TNF-α and destruction of basal keratinocytes, which manifests as a focal reduction of intercellular protein expression of E-cadherin. Destruction of basal keratinocytes in a reticular form of oral lichen planus is accompanied by a significant decrease in proliferative activity of the basal cell layer (21.7±10.2%) compared with normal mucosa (33.6±7.0%), p=0.0045. In erosive form along with the above changes IgG and C3d complement's elements are revealed, which confirms the activation of immune complex mechanisms in the erosion area.

  17. Flow cytometric DNA analysis of corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Roberson, M C; Brown, M F; Shock, J P; Pipkin, J L; Hinson, W G; Anson, J F

    1990-03-01

    We have modified an existing technique in order to perform DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) of corneal epithelium from the mouse, rat, chicken, rabbit, and human. This protocol permitted an investigation of human corneal scrapings from several categories: normal, aphakic bullous keratopathy (ABK), keratoconus (KC), Fuch's dystrophy, edema, epithelial dysplasia, and lipid degeneration. No abnormal characteristic cell-kinetic profile was detected when averaged DNA histograms were compared statistically between the normal and either ABK, KC, edema, or Fuch's dystrophy groups. Abnormal DNA histograms were recorded for cell samples that were taken 1) from three individuals who had epithelial dysplasia and 2) from one individual diagnosed with lipid degeneration. The former condition was characterized by histograms that had a subpopulation of cells with an aneuploid amount of DNA or had higher than normal percentages of cells in the S and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. Corneal cells from the patient who had lipid degeneration had an abnormally high percentage of cells in the G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. The availability of accurate DNA flow cytometric analysis of corneal epithelium allows further studies on this issue from both experimental and clinical situations.

  18. Enamel Regeneration - Current Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Baswaraj; H.K, Navin; K.B, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Dental Enamel is the outermost covering of teeth. It is hardest mineralized tissue present in the human body. Enamel faces the challenge of maintaining its integrity in a constant demineralization and remineralization within the oral environment and it is vulnerable to wear, damage, and decay. It cannot regenerate itself, because it is formed by a layer of cells that are lost after the tooth eruption. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials to restore lost enamel that cannot mimic natural enamel. With advances in material science and understanding of basic principles of organic matrix mediated mineralization paves a way for formation of synthetic enamel. The knowledge of enamel formation and understanding of protein interactions and their gene products function along with the isolation of postnatal stem cells from various sources in the oral cavity, and the development of smart materials for cell and growth factor delivery, makes possibility for biological based enamel regeneration. This article will review the recent endeavor on biomimetic synthesis and cell based strategies for enamel regeneration. PMID:25386548

  19. Ultra structural study of the rat cheek epithelium treated with Neem extract.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Muhammad Arshad; Khatoon, Nasira; Ghaffar, Rizwana Abdul

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of neem extract (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on the ultrastructure of the rat oral epithelium, because neem extract has been added in the tooth paste as an anti-plaque-forming substance in Asian countries. The non-toxic dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight of Neem extract (NBE) was applied daily to the surface of buccal epithelium for four weeks and controls did not receive Neem extract. After four weeks cheek epithelial tissues were excised and processed for light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Light microscopy did not show significant differences between NBE-treated and control epithelium. Difference between control and treated rats weight was non-significant. Moreover, time period was also non-significant. Irregular cell surfaces were noticed when compared to control specimens when examined by scanning electron microscopy. Under transmission electron microscopy, wider intercellular spaces were observed in the treated epithelial spinous cellular layers when compared to control. Further, more keratohyalin granules were present in experimental granular cells. It was concluded that present study showed differences between Neem-treated and control in epithelial tissues but these structural differences may not be related to adverse side effects of the Neem extract.

  20. Chemical genetics and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sumitra; Zhang, Liyun; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration involves interactions between multiple signaling pathways acting in a spatially and temporally complex manner. As signaling pathways are highly conserved, understanding how regeneration is controlled in animal models exhibiting robust regenerative capacities should aid efforts to stimulate repair in humans. One way to discover molecular regulators of regeneration is to alter gene/protein function and quantify effect(s) on the regenerative process: dedifferentiation/reprograming, stem/progenitor proliferation, migration/remodeling, progenitor cell differentiation and resolution. A powerful approach for applying this strategy to regenerative biology is chemical genetics, the use of small-molecule modulators of specific targets or signaling pathways. Here, we review advances that have been made using chemical genetics for hypothesis-focused and discovery-driven studies aimed at furthering understanding of how regeneration is controlled.

  1. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  2. Axonal regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Becker, Catherina G

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, fish and amphibia functionally regenerate axons in the central nervous system (CNS). The strengths of the zebrafish model, that is, transgenics and mutant availability, ease of gene expression analysis and manipulation and optical transparency of larvae lend themselves to the analysis of successful axonal regeneration. Analyses in larval and adult zebrafish suggest a high intrinsic capacity for axon regrowth, yet signaling pathways employed in axonal growth and pathfinding are similar to those in mammals. However, the lesioned CNS environment in zebrafish shows remarkably little scarring or expression of inhibitory molecules and regenerating axons use molecular cues in the environment to successfully navigate to their targets. Future zebrafish research, including screening techniques, will complete our picture of the mechanisms behind successful CNS axon regeneration in this vertebrate model organism.

  3. Melanin: the biophysiology of oral melanocytes and physiological oral pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The presence of melanocytes in the oral epithelium is a well-established fact, but their physiological functions are not well defined. Melanin provides protection from environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species; and melanocytes function as stress-sensors having the capacity both to react to and to produce a variety of microenvironmental cytokines and growth factors, modulating immune, inflammatory and antibacterial responses. Melanocytes also act as neuroendocrine cells producing local neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, catecholamines and opioids, and hormones of the melanocortin system such as proopiomelanocortin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone, that participate in intracellular and in intercellular signalling pathways, thus contributing to tissue homeostasis. There is a wide range of normal variation in melanin pigmentation of the oral mucosa. In general, darker skinned persons more frequently have oral melanin pigmentation than light-skinned persons. Variations in oral physiological pigmentation are genetically determined unless associated with some underlying disease. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the biophysiology of oral melanocytes, of the functions of melanin, and of physiological oral pigmentation. PMID:24661309

  4. Spatially limited growth of an epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforet, Maxime; Cochet, Olivier; Buguin, Axel; Silberzan, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    We present a study dealing with the growth of an epithelium on a spatially limited adhesive substrate. Adhesive patterns (typical size: 50μm to 500μm) are created by micro-fabrication techniques: A protein repellent polymeric gel homogeneously grafted on a coverslip is selectively ablated by plasma treatment through a thin layer of photoresist. The technique achieves a high resolution of patterning (around 2μm). After seeding cells (MDCK) on circular adhesive patterns, we let the monolayer grow for 30 hours after reaching the confluence. We use physical descriptors to describe migration and compaction. Two days after the confluence, we observe and characterize by confocal microscopy, the appearance of a tridimensionnal assembly of cells in the peripherical zone of the adhesive pattern (a ``rim''). Moreover using other patterns, the existence of a tissue line tension and internal pressure is investigated.

  5. Neuregulin-1 signaling is essential for nerve-dependent axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Johanna E; Freitas, Polina D; Bryant, Donald M; Whited, Jessica L; Monaghan, James R

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is capable of fully regenerating amputated limbs, but denervation of the limb inhibits the formation of the post-injury proliferative mass called the blastema. The molecular basis behind this phenomenon remains poorly understood, but previous studies have suggested that nerves support regeneration via the secretion of essential growth-promoting factors. An essential nerve-derived factor must be found in the blastema, capable of rescuing regeneration in denervated limbs, and its inhibition must prevent regeneration. Here, we show that the neuronally secreted protein Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) fulfills all these criteria in the axolotl. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization of NRG1 and its active receptor ErbB2 revealed that they are expressed in regenerating blastemas but lost upon denervation. NRG1 was localized to the wound epithelium prior to blastema formation and was later strongly expressed in proliferating blastemal cells. Supplementation by implantation of NRG1-soaked beads rescued regeneration to digits in denervated limbs, and pharmacological inhibition of NRG1 signaling reduced cell proliferation, blocked blastema formation and induced aberrant collagen deposition in fully innervated limbs. Taken together, our results show that nerve-dependent NRG1/ErbB2 signaling promotes blastemal proliferation in the regenerating limb and may play an essential role in blastema formation, thus providing insight into the longstanding question of why nerves are required for axolotl limb regeneration.

  6. Neuregulin-1 signaling is essential for nerve-dependent axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Johanna E; Freitas, Polina D; Bryant, Donald M; Whited, Jessica L; Monaghan, James R

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is capable of fully regenerating amputated limbs, but denervation of the limb inhibits the formation of the post-injury proliferative mass called the blastema. The molecular basis behind this phenomenon remains poorly understood, but previous studies have suggested that nerves support regeneration via the secretion of essential growth-promoting factors. An essential nerve-derived factor must be found in the blastema, capable of rescuing regeneration in denervated limbs, and its inhibition must prevent regeneration. Here, we show that the neuronally secreted protein Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) fulfills all these criteria in the axolotl. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization of NRG1 and its active receptor ErbB2 revealed that they are expressed in regenerating blastemas but lost upon denervation. NRG1 was localized to the wound epithelium prior to blastema formation and was later strongly expressed in proliferating blastemal cells. Supplementation by implantation of NRG1-soaked beads rescued regeneration to digits in denervated limbs, and pharmacological inhibition of NRG1 signaling reduced cell proliferation, blocked blastema formation and induced aberrant collagen deposition in fully innervated limbs. Taken together, our results show that nerve-dependent NRG1/ErbB2 signaling promotes blastemal proliferation in the regenerating limb and may play an essential role in blastema formation, thus providing insight into the longstanding question of why nerves are required for axolotl limb regeneration. PMID:27317805

  7. Neurotrophic regulation of fibroblast dedifferentiation during limb skeletal regeneration in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Cummings, Gillian M C; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2010-01-15

    The ability of animals to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive. Among tissues, the repair and remodeling of bone occurs during growth and in response to injury; however, loss of bone above a threshold amount is not regenerated, resulting in a "critical-size defect" (CSD). The development of therapies to replace or regenerate a CSD is a major focus of research in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Adult urodeles (salamanders) are unique in their ability to regenerate complex tissues perfectly, yet like mammals do not regenerate a CSD. We report on an experimental model for the regeneration of a CSD in the axolotl (the Excisional Regeneration Model) that allows for the identification of signals to induce fibroblast dedifferentiation and skeletal regeneration. This regenerative response is mediated in part by BMP signaling, as is the case in mammals; however, a complete regenerative response requires the induction of a population of undifferentiated, regeneration-competent cells. These cells can be induced by signaling from limb amputation to generate blastema cells that can be grafted to the wound, as well as by signaling from a nerve and a wound epithelium to induce blastema cells from fibroblasts within the wound environment. PMID:19944088

  8. Evolution of the chordate regeneration blastema: Differential gene expression and conserved role of notch signaling during siphon regeneration in the ascidian Ciona.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayuko; Goricki, Spela; Byerly, Mardi S; Satoh, Noriyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2015-09-15

    The regeneration of the oral siphon (OS) and other distal structures in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis occurs by epimorphosis involving the formation of a blastema of proliferating cells. Despite the longstanding use of Ciona as a model in molecular developmental biology, regeneration in this system has not been previously explored by molecular analysis. Here we have employed microarray analysis and quantitative real time RT-PCR to identify genes with differential expression profiles during OS regeneration. The majority of differentially expressed genes were downregulated during OS regeneration, suggesting roles in normal growth and homeostasis. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes was upregulated in the regenerating OS, suggesting functional roles during regeneration. Among the upregulated genes were key members of the Notch signaling pathway, including those encoding the delta and jagged ligands, two fringe modulators, and to a lesser extent the notch receptor. In situ hybridization showed a complementary pattern of delta1 and notch gene expression in the blastema of the regenerating OS. Chemical inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway reduced the levels of cell proliferation in the branchial sac, a stem cell niche that contributes progenitor cells to the regenerating OS, and in the OS regeneration blastema, where siphon muscle fibers eventually re-differentiate. Chemical inhibition also prevented the replacement of oral siphon pigment organs, sensory receptors rimming the entrance of the OS, and siphon muscle fibers, but had no effects on the formation of the wound epidermis. Since Notch signaling is involved in the maintenance of proliferative activity in both the Ciona and vertebrate regeneration blastema, the results suggest a conserved evolutionary role of this signaling pathway in chordate regeneration. The genes identified in this investigation provide the foundation for future molecular analysis of OS regeneration.

  9. Evolution of the chordate regeneration blastema: Differential gene expression and conserved role of notch signaling during siphon regeneration in the ascidian Ciona.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayuko; Goricki, Spela; Byerly, Mardi S; Satoh, Noriyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2015-09-15

    The regeneration of the oral siphon (OS) and other distal structures in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis occurs by epimorphosis involving the formation of a blastema of proliferating cells. Despite the longstanding use of Ciona as a model in molecular developmental biology, regeneration in this system has not been previously explored by molecular analysis. Here we have employed microarray analysis and quantitative real time RT-PCR to identify genes with differential expression profiles during OS regeneration. The majority of differentially expressed genes were downregulated during OS regeneration, suggesting roles in normal growth and homeostasis. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes was upregulated in the regenerating OS, suggesting functional roles during regeneration. Among the upregulated genes were key members of the Notch signaling pathway, including those encoding the delta and jagged ligands, two fringe modulators, and to a lesser extent the notch receptor. In situ hybridization showed a complementary pattern of delta1 and notch gene expression in the blastema of the regenerating OS. Chemical inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway reduced the levels of cell proliferation in the branchial sac, a stem cell niche that contributes progenitor cells to the regenerating OS, and in the OS regeneration blastema, where siphon muscle fibers eventually re-differentiate. Chemical inhibition also prevented the replacement of oral siphon pigment organs, sensory receptors rimming the entrance of the OS, and siphon muscle fibers, but had no effects on the formation of the wound epidermis. Since Notch signaling is involved in the maintenance of proliferative activity in both the Ciona and vertebrate regeneration blastema, the results suggest a conserved evolutionary role of this signaling pathway in chordate regeneration. The genes identified in this investigation provide the foundation for future molecular analysis of OS regeneration. PMID:26206613

  10. KRT14 marks a subpopulation of bladder basal cells with pivotal role in regeneration and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papafotiou, George; Paraskevopoulou, Varvara; Vasilaki, Eleni; Kanaki, Zoi; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Klinakis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The urothelium is a specialized epithelium that lines the urinary tract. It consists of three different cell types, namely, basal, intermediate and superficial cells arranged in relatively distinct cell layers. Normally, quiescent, it regenerates fast upon injury, but the regeneration process is not fully understood. Although several reports have indicated the existence of progenitors, their identity and exact topology, as well as their role in key processes such as tissue regeneration and carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Here we show that a minor subpopulation of basal cells, characterized by the expression of keratin 14, possesses self-renewal capacity and also gives rise to all cell types of the urothelium during natural and injury-induced regeneration. Moreover, these cells represent cells of origin of urothelial cancer. Our findings support the hypothesis of basally located progenitors with profound roles in urothelial homoeostasis. PMID:27320313

  11. Challenges and opportunities for tissue-engineering polarized epithelium.

    PubMed

    Paz, Ana C; Soleas, John; Poon, James C H; Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    The epithelium is one of the most important tissue types in the body and the specific organization of the epithelial cells in these tissues is important for achieving appropriate function. Since many tissues contain an epithelial component, engineering functional epithelium and understanding the factors that control epithelial maturation and organization are important for generating whole artificial organ replacements. Furthermore, disruption of the cellular organization leads to tissue malfunction and disease; therefore, engineered epithelium could provide a valuable in vitro model to study disease phenotypes. Despite the importance of epithelial tissues, a surprisingly limited amount of effort has been focused on organizing epithelial cells into artificial polarized epithelium with an appropriate structure that resembles that seen in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of epithelial tissue organization and highlight the importance of cell polarization to achieve appropriate epithelium function. We next describe the in vitro models that exist to create polarized epithelium and summarize attempts to engineer artificial epithelium for clinical use. Finally, we highlight the opportunities that exist to translate strategies from tissue engineering other tissues to generate polarized epithelium with a functional structure.

  12. Bronchial epithelium in children: a key player in asthma.

    PubMed

    Carsin, Ania; Mazenq, Julie; Ilstad, Alexandra; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial epithelium is a key element of the respiratory airways. It constitutes the interface between the environment and the host. It is a physical barrier with many chemical and immunological properties. The bronchial epithelium is abnormal in asthma, even in children. It represents a key component promoting airway inflammation and remodelling that can lead to chronic symptoms. In this review, we present an overview of bronchial epithelium and how to study it, with a specific focus on children. We report physical, chemical and immunological properties from ex vivo and in vitro studies. The responses to various deleterious agents, such as viruses or allergens, may lead to persistent abnormalities orchestrated by bronchial epithelial cells. As epithelium dysfunctions occur early in asthma, reprogramming the epithelium may represent an ambitious goal to induce asthma remission in children.

  13. Do Airway Epithelium Air–Liquid Cultures Represent the In Vivo Airway Epithelium Transcriptome?

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Anna; Tilley, Ann E.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells cultured in vitro at the air–liquid interface (ALI) form a pseudostratified epithelium that forms tight junctions and cilia, and produces mucin. These cells are widely used in models of differentiation, injury, and repair. To assess how closely the transcriptome of ALI epithelium matches that of in vivo airway epithelial cells, we used microarrays to compare the transcriptome of human large airway epithelial cells cultured at the ALI with the transcriptome of large airway epithelium obtained via bronchoscopy and brushing. Gene expression profiling showed that global gene expression correlated well between ALI cells and brushed cells, but with some differences. Gene expression patterns mirrored differences in proportions of cell types (ALIs have higher percentages of basal cells, whereas brushed cells have higher percentages of ciliated cells), that is, ALI cells expressed higher levels of basal cell–related genes, and brushed cells expressed higher levels of cilia-related genes. Pathway analysis showed that ALI cells had increased expression of cell cycle and proliferation genes, whereas brushed cells had increased expression of cytoskeletal organization and humoral immune response genes. Overall, ALI cells provide a good representation of the in vivo airway epithelial transcriptome, but for some biologic questions, the differences between in vitro and in vivo environments need to be considered. PMID:20525805

  14. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  15. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  16. Retinal pigment epithelium development, plasticity, and tissue homeostasis (Invited review for Experimental Eye Research)

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Sabine; Zou, ChangJiang; Levine, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a simple epithelium interposed between the neural retina and the choroid. Although only 1 cell-layer in thickness, the RPE is a virtual workhorse, acting in several capacities that are essential for visual function and preserving the structural and physiological integrities of neighboring tissues. Defects in RPE function, whether through chronic dysfunction or age-related decline, are associated with retinal degenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration. As such, investigations are focused on developing techniques to replace RPE through stem cell-based methods, motivated primarily because of the seemingly limited regeneration or self-repair properties of mature RPE. Despite this, RPE cells have an unusual capacity to transdifferentiate into various cell types, with the particular fate choices being highly context-dependent. In this review, we describe recent findings elucidating the mechanisms and steps of RPE development and propose a developmental framework for understanding the apparent contradiction in the capacity for low self-repair versus high transdifferentiation. PMID:24060344

  17. Trachea Epithelium as a “Canary” for Cigarette Smoking-induced Biologic Phenotype of the Small Airway Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Turetz, Meredith L.; O’Connor, Timothy P.; Tilley, Ann E.; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Dang, David; Teater, Matthew; Mezey, Jason; Clark, Andrew G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    The initial site of smoking-induced lung disease is the small airway epithelium, which is difficult and time consuming to sample by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We developed a rapid, office-based procedure to obtain trachea epithelium without conscious sedation from healthy nonsmokers (n=26) and healthy smokers (n=19, 27 ± 15 pack-yr). Gene expression differences (fold-change >1.5, p<0.01, Benjamini-Hochberg correction) were assessed with Affymetrix microarrays. 1,057 probe sets were differentially expressed in healthy smokers vs nonsmokers, representing >500 genes. Trachea gene expression was compared to an independent group of small airway epithelial samples (n=23 healthy nonsmokers, n=19 healthy smokers, 25 ± 12 pack-yr). The trachea epithelium is more sensitive to smoking, responding with 3-fold more differentially-expressed genes than small airway epithelium. The trachea transcriptome paralleled the small airway epithelium, with 156 of 167 (93%) genes that are significantly upand down-regulated by smoking in the small airway epithelium showing similar direction and magnitude of response to smoking in the trachea. Trachea epithelium can be obtained without conscious sedation, representing a less invasive surrogate “canary” for smoking-induced changes in the small airway epithelium. This should prove useful in epidemiologic studies correlating gene expression with clinical outcome in assessing smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:20443905

  18. Dpp signaling determines regional stem cell identity in the regenerating adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-07-11

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a series of epithelia that share functional requirements but also have distinct, highly specialized roles. Distinct populations of somatic stem cells (SCs) regenerate these epithelia, yet the mechanisms that maintain regional identities of these SCs are not well understood. Here, we identify a role for the BMP-like Dpp signaling pathway in diversifying regenerative processes in the adult gastrointestinal tract of Drosophila. Dpp secreted from enterocytes at the boundary between the posterior midgut and the middle midgut (MM) sets up a morphogen gradient that selectively directs copper cell (CC) regeneration from gastric SCs in the MM and thus determines the size of the CC region. In vertebrates, deregulation of BMP signaling has been associated with Barrett's metaplasia, wherein the squamous esophageal epithelium is replaced by a columnar epithelium, suggesting that the maintenance of regional SC identities by BMP is conserved.

  19. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn.

  20. Mesenchymal signaling in dorsoventral differentiation of palatal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Wern-Joo; Gwon, Gi-Jeong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Neupane, Sanjiv; Cho, Sung-Jin; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Choi, Je-Yong; An, Chang-Hyeon; Lee, Youngkyun; Shin, Hong-In; Lee, Sanggyu; Kim, Jae-Young

    2015-12-01

    After palatal fusion, the dorsal and ventral epithelia of the palatal shelf differentiate into the nasal and oral mucosa, respectively. The tissue-specific differentiation of palatal epithelia along the dorsal-ventral axis is regulated by the signaling molecules expressed in the underlying mesenchyme. Thus, as in many other epithelial organs, differentiation relies on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. To screen for region-specific mesenchymal signaling molecules that determine the fate of the palatal epithelia, we employed a laser microdissection (LMD) method. LMD allowed us to collect region-specific mesenchymal tissues at E13, prior to palatal fusion and the development of distinct dorsal and ventral epithelial morphology. Genome-wide screening was performed on the tissues collected using LMD to identify candidate mesenchymal signaling molecules. The microarray results were validated using real-time quantitative (qPCR) and in situ hybridization methods. The developmental role and interactions of the candidate genes were evaluated in in vitro-cultivated E13 palates using an anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN)-based loss-of-function approach. Apparent changes in the expression patterns of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and LIM homeobox 8 (Lhx8) were observed after knocking down each gene. Knock-down of Runx2 and Lhx8 also altered the immunolocalization pattern of cytokeratin18 (CK18), an established marker for nasal epithelium. These results were confirmed using Runx2 heterozygote mice. The mesenchymal signaling molecules Runx2 and Lhx8, which possess region-specific expression patterns along the dorsoventral axis, functionally interact to regulate the cellular and molecular characteristics of dorsal and ventral epithelia, suggesting that mesenchymal signaling molecules determine the dorsoventral fate of epithelial structures in the developing palate. PMID:26123167

  1. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  2. Microgravity effects on neural retina regeneration in the newt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E. N.; Anton, H. J.; Mitashov, V. I.

    Data on forelimb and eye lens regenerationin in urodeles under spaceflight conditions (SFC) have been obtained in our previous studies. Today, evidence is available that SFC stimulate regeneration in experimental animals rather than inhibit it. The results of control on-ground experiments with simulated microgravity suggest that the stimulatory effect of SFC is due largely to weightlessness. An original experimental model is proposed, which is convenient for comprehensively analyzing neural regeneration under SFC. The initial results described here concern regeneration of neural retina in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to microgravity simulated in radial clinostat. After clinorotation for seven days (until postoperation day 16), a positive effect of altered gravity on structural restoration of detached neural retina was confirmed by a number of criteria. Specifically, an increased number of Müllerian glial cells, an increased relative volume of the plexiform layers, reduced cell death, advanced redifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium, and extended areas of neural retina reattachment were detected in experimental newts. Moreover, cell proliferation in the inner nuclear layer of neural retina increased as compared with control. Thus, low gravity appears to intensify natural cytological and molecular mechanisms of neural retina regeneration in lower vertebrates.

  3. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  4. Progenitor Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple distinct epithelial domains are found throughout the airway that are distinguishable by location, structure, function, and cell-type composition. Several progenitor cell populations in the proximal airway have been identified to reside in confined microenvironmental niches including the submucosal glands (SMGs), which are embedded in the tracheal connective tissue between the surface epithelium and cartilage, and basal cells that reside within the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Current research suggests that regulatory pathways that coordinate development of the proximal airway and establishment of progenitor cell niches may overlap with pathways that control progenitor cell responses during airway regeneration following injury. SMGs have been shown to harbor epithelial progenitor cells, and this niche is dysregulated in diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, mechanisms that regulate progenitor cell proliferation and maintenance within this glandular niche are not completely understood. Here we discuss glandular progenitor cells during development and regeneration of the proximal airway and compare properties of glandular progenitors to those of basal cell progenitors in the SAE. Further investigation into glandular progenitor cell control will provide a direction for interrogating therapeutic interventions to correct aberrant conditions affecting the SMGs in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. PMID:24818588

  5. [Regeneration of the ocular surface: stem cells and reconstructive techniques].

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Moreno, J; Prósper, F; García, M; Echeveste, J

    2008-01-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue microscopically constituted by 5 well differentiated layers. The corneal epithelium is essential for corneal transparency and is found in a state of constant renovation throughout life on the basis of the population of limbocorneal stem cells. The localisation of these limbocorneal stem cells seems to be in the basal layers of the limbocorneal epithelium, of vital importance for maintaining the micro-environment of these limbocorneal stem cells, which depend on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Limbic insufficiency occurs when there is a partial or total loss of these limbocorneal stem cells. These clinical features lead to a corneal clouding with a resulting loss of vision. In these cases, corneal transplant only represents a temporary replacement of the corneal epithelium; it is necessary to carry out a prior treatment involving transplant of the autologous or allogeneic limbus, which enables regeneration of the population of damaged limbocorneal cells. To reduce the risk involved in the transplant of the limbus of the donor eye, techniques of cultivation of limbocorneal cells on the basis of small limbocorneal biopsies are proposed. PMID:18496580

  6. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Stem cells of the skin epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Laura; Fuchs, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Tissue stem cells form the cellular base for organ homeostasis and repair. Stem cells have the unusual ability to renew themselves over the lifetime of the organ while producing daughter cells that differentiate into one or multiple lineages. Difficult to identify and characterize in any tissue, these cells are nonetheless hotly pursued because they hold the potential promise of therapeutic reprogramming to grow human tissue in vitro, for the treatment of human disease. The mammalian skin epithelium exhibits remarkable turnover, punctuated by periods of even more rapid production after injury due to burn or wounding. The stem cells responsible for supplying this tissue with cellular substrate are not yet easily distinguishable from neighboring cells. However, in recent years a significant body of work has begun to characterize the skin epithelial stem cells, both in tissue culture and in mouse and human skin. Some epithelial cells cultured from skin exhibit prodigious proliferative potential; in fact, for >20 years now, cultured human skin has been used as a source of new skin to engraft onto damaged areas of burn patients, representing one of the first therapeutic uses of stem cells. Cell fate choices, including both self-renewal and differentiation, are crucial biological features of stem cells that are still poorly understood. Skin epithelial stem cells represent a ripe target for research into the fundamental mechanisms underlying these important processes. PMID:12913119

  8. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development.

  9. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  10. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  11. Oral Insulin Delivery: How Far Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of insulin may significantly improve the quality of life of diabetes patients who routinely receive insulin by the subcutaneous route. In fact, compared with this administration route, oral delivery of insulin in diabetes treatment offers many advantages: higher patient compliance, rapid hepatic insulinization, and avoidance of peripheral hyperinsulinemia and other adverse effects such as possible hypoglycemia and weight gain. However, the oral delivery of insulin remains a challenge because its oral absorption is limited. The main barriers faced by insulin in the gastrointestinal tract are degradation by proteolytic enzymes and lack of transport across the intestinal epithelium. Several strategies to deliver insulin orally have been proposed, but without much clinical or commercial success. Protein encapsulation into nanoparticles is regarded as a promising alternative to administer insulin orally because they have the ability to promote insulin paracellular or transcellular transport across the intestinal mucosa. In this review, different delivery systems intended to increase the oral bioavailability of insulin will be discussed, with a special focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems, as well as the efforts that pharmaceutical companies are making to bring to the market the first oral delivery system of insulin. The toxicological and safety data of delivery systems, the clinical value and progress of oral insulin delivery, and the future prospects in this research field will be also scrutinized. PMID:23567010

  12. [Ovarian surface epithelium and its histogenic relation to ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Dietl, J; Buchholz, F; Stoll, P

    1986-09-01

    Approximately 80 to 90 per cent of adult ovarian cancers are assumed to originate from ovarian surface cells. A series of morphological and biochemical studies has been recently conducted to test this. The ovarian surface epithelium shows permanent morphological changes such as crypts, inclusion cysts, villous processes and different forms of müllerian epithelium. The unique nature of ovarian surface changes and their abrupt disappearance in immediately adjacent mesothelia suggest that local factors may play an important part in modifying the growth and morphogenesis of the epithelium of the ovarian surface. Whether these endogenous and/or exogenous factors may also induce surface neoplasia is a moot point.

  13. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  14. Use of Mesothelial Cells and Biological Matrices for Tissue Engineering of Simple Epithelium Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Lachaud, Christian Claude; Rodriguez-Campins, Berta; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Soria, Bernat

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineering technologies have progressed rapidly through last decades resulting in the manufacture of quite complex bioartificial tissues with potential use for human organ and tissue regeneration. The manufacture of avascular monolayered tissues such as simple squamous epithelia was initiated a few decades ago and is attracting increasing interest. Their relative morphostructural simplicity makes of their biomimetization a goal, which is currently accessible. The mesothelium is a simple squamous epithelium in nature and is the monolayered tissue lining the walls of large celomic cavities (peritoneal, pericardial, and pleural) and internal organs housed inside. Interestingly, mesothelial cells can be harvested in clinically relevant numbers from several anatomical sources and not less important, they also display high transdifferentiation capacities and are low immunogenic characteristics, which endow these cells with therapeutic interest. Their combination with a suitable scaffold (biocompatible, degradable, and non-immunogenic) may allow the manufacture of tailored serosal membranes biomimetics with potential spanning a wide range of therapeutic applications, principally for the regeneration of simple squamous-like epithelia such as the visceral and parietal mesothelium vascular endothelium and corneal endothelium among others. Herein, we review recent research progresses in mesothelial cells biology and their clinical sources. We make a particular emphasis on reviewing the different types of biological scaffolds suitable for the manufacture of serosal mesothelial membranes biomimetics. Finally, we also review progresses made in mesothelial cells-based therapeutic applications and propose some possible future directions. PMID:26347862

  15. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  16. The cell biology of regeneration

    PubMed Central

    King, Ryan S.

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of complex structures after injury requires dramatic changes in cellular behavior. Regenerating tissues initiate a program that includes diverse processes such as wound healing, cell death, dedifferentiation, and stem (or progenitor) cell proliferation; furthermore, newly regenerated tissues must integrate polarity and positional identity cues with preexisting body structures. Gene knockdown approaches and transgenesis-based lineage and functional analyses have been instrumental in deciphering various aspects of regenerative processes in diverse animal models for studying regeneration. PMID:22391035

  17. Reconstituted Human Upper Airway Epithelium as 3-D In Vitro Model for Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    de Borja Callejas, Francisco; Martínez-Antón, Asunción; Alobid, Isam; Fuentes, Mireya; Cortijo, Julio; Picado, César

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary human airway epithelial cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) develop a well-differentiated epithelium. However, neither characterization of mucociliar differentiation overtime nor the inflammatory function of reconstituted nasal polyp (NP) epithelia have been described. Objectives 1st) To develop and characterize the mucociliar differentiation overtime of human epithelial cells of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) in ALI culture system; 2nd) To corroborate that 3D in vitro model of NP reconstituted epithelium maintains, compared to control nasal mucosa (NM), an inflammatory function. Methods Epithelial cells were obtained from 9 NP and 7 control NM, and differentiated in ALI culture for 28 days. Mucociliary differentiation was characterized at different times (0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days) using ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy; ΔNp63 (basal stem/progenitor cell), β-tubulin IV (cilia), and MUC5AC (goblet cell) expression by immunocytochemistry; and mucous (MUC5AC, MUC5B) and serous (Lactoferrin) secretion by ELISA. Inflammatory function of ALI cultures (at days 0, 14, and 28) through cytokine (IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) and chemokine (RANTES, MIG, MCP-1, IP-10, eotaxin-1, and GM-CSF) production was analysed by CBA (Cytometric Bead Array). Results In both NP and control NM ALI cultures, pseudostratified epithelium with ciliated, mucus-secreting, and basal cells were observed by electron microscopy at days 14 and 28. Displaying epithelial cell re-differentation, β-tubulin IV and MUC5AC positive cells increased, while ΔNp63 positive cells decreased overtime. No significant differences were found overtime in MUC5AC, MUC5B, and lactoferrin secretions between both ALI cultures. IL-8 and GM-CSF were significantly increased in NP compared to control NM regenerated epithelia. Conclusion Reconstituted epithelia from human NP epithelial cells cultured in ALI system provides a 3D in vitro model

  18. Regeneration: rewarding, but potentially risky.

    PubMed

    Egger, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    Some bilaterally symmetric animals, such as flatworms, annelids, and nemerteans, are renowned for their outstanding regeneration capacity-even a fraction of the body can give rise to a complete new animal. However, not all species of these taxa can regenerate equally well-some cannot regenerate at all. If regeneration was purely beneficial, why cannot all of members of the flat, round, and ribbon worms regenerate? At that, why cannot all other bilaterians, including humans, regenerate as well? Regeneration capacity is an obvious advantage in accidental, predatory, and parasitic loss of body parts and is also closely intertwined with asexual reproduction strategies. Regeneration is suspected to play a role in life span extension or even rejuvenation. An answer for reduced or missing regeneration capacity in many species may be found in limitations of the body plan, high costs, and inherent dangers of regeneration. Defects in adults and juveniles are shown, and similarities between development and regeneration are pointed out. With a focus on some worms, but also highlighting comparisons with other animal taxa, putative reasons for a limited and an advanced regeneration capacity are discussed in this article. PMID:19067421

  19. Tibetan medicine and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dhondup, Lobsang; Husted, Cynthia

    2009-08-01

    An overview of the concept of regeneration in Tibetan medicine is presented with descriptions of detoxification and tonification longevity protocols. The body must be fortified before receiving stronger treatments for regeneration. All disease is brought into balance with understanding of the interplay of the five elements, three humors, and their qualities and locations. The example of multiple sclerosis (MS) is given. The macroscopic three-humor interpretation of MS agrees with the microscopic three-humor description of demyelination, providing a new framework for the understanding and treatment of MS. Treatments for MS and other chronic conditions are based on age, season, time of day, and the individual's three-humor and hot (excess) and cold (deficiency) balance. Treatments to promote regeneration include nutrition, gentle exercise, herbal formulas, accessory therapies such as herbal baths and oils, and meditation. It is built into the theory of Tibetan medicine to have predictions about outcome and distinguish different disease patterns in patients with MS and other disorders. Taking into account daily and seasonal variations coupled with the changing nature of MS, it is critical to frequently evaluate people with MS and other chronic conditions for monitoring and adjustment of treatment for regeneration.

  20. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  1. Lipoma in oral mucosa: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Ali Tavakoli; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Khabazian, Arezu

    2010-01-01

    Lipoma is a common tumor of soft tissue. Its location on the oral mucosa is rare, representing 1% to 5% of benign oral tumors although it is the most mesenchymal tumor of the trunk and proximal por-tions of extremities. Lipoma of the oral cavity may occur in any region. The buccal mucosa, tongue, and floor of the mouth are among the common locations. The clinical presentation is typically as an asymptomatic yellowish mass. The overlying epithelium is intact, and superficial blood vessels are usually evident over the tumor. Other benign connective tissue lesions such as granular cell tumor, neurofibroma, traumatic fibroma and salivary gland lesions (mucocele and mixed tumor) might be included in differential diagnosis. We present two cases of oral lipoma in unusual locations: one in junction of soft and hard palate and the other in tongue. Both were rare in the literature.

  2. Spontaneous hair cell regeneration in the mouse utricle following gentamicin ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Beyer, Lisa A.; Atkin, Graham M.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-01-01

    Whereas most epithelial tissues turn-over and regenerate after a traumatic lesion, this restorative ability is diminished in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear; it is absent in the cochlea and exists only in a limited capacity in the vestibular epithelium. The extent of regeneration in vestibular hair cells has been characterized for several mammalian species including guinea pig, rat, and chinchilla, but not yet in mouse. As the fundamental model species for investigating hereditary disease, the mouse can be studied using a wide variety of genetic and molecular tools. To design a mouse model for vestibular hair cell regeneration research, an aminoglycoside-induced method of complete hair cell elimination was developed in our lab and applied to the murine utricle. Loss of utricular hair cells was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and corroborated by a loss of fluorescent signal in utricles from transgenic mice with GFP-positive hair cells. Regenerative capability was characterized at several time points up to six months following insult. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed that as early as two weeks after insult, a few immature hair cells, demonstrating the characteristic immature morphology indicative of regeneration, could be seen in the utricle. As time progressed, larger numbers of immature hair cells could be seen along with some mature cells resembling surface morphology of type II hair cells. By six months post-lesion, numerous regenerated hair cells were present in the utricle, however, neither their number nor their appearance was normal. A BrdU assay suggested that at least some of the regeneration of mouse vestibular hair cells involved mitosis. Our results demonstrate that the vestibular sensory epithelium in mice can spontaneously regenerate, elucidate the time course of this process, and identify involvement of mitosis in some cases. These data establish a road map of the murine vestibular regenerative process, which can be

  3. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailability of nutrients is an essential factor controlling primary productivity in the ocean. In addition to macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, availability of the trace element iron unequivocally affects growth rates and community structure of phytoplankton and thereby primary productivity in many ocean regions. External sources of iron such as Aeolian dust, upwelling of Fe-rich waters, and hydrothermal are reduced in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, and most Fe used by phytoplankton has been regenerated by zooplankton. While zooplankton regeneration of Fe was first shown two decades ago, major factors controlling this process such as chemical composition of prey and grazer taxonomy are not well constrained. As pH varies significantly in digestive systems between protozoa and mesozooplankton, we hypothesize that the extent and the bioavailability of regenerated Fe is a function of the digestive physiology. Furthermore, major element components such as silica for diatoms and calcium carbonate for cocolithophores may be able to buffer the pH of digestive systems of different grazer taxa. Such effects may further influence the magnitude and bioavailability of regenerated Fe. In order to constrain the effect of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on Fe bioavailability, 55Fe-labeled phytoplankton were fed to different grazers and unlabeled phytoplankton were subsequently inoculated to the filtrate of the grazing experiment in the regrowth phase of the experiment, and the uptake of 55Fe into the phytoplankton biomass was monitored over time. A parallel uptake experiment using inorganic 55Fe was used to compare the bioavailability of regenerated and inorganic Fe to the same phytoplankton species. Furthermore, some samples of the inorganic and the regenerated uptake experiments were treated with an oxalate rinse to remove any adsorbed Fe. This allowed us to estimate the adsorption of 55Fe from either source to the cell walls of

  4. Oral insulin--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Raj, N K Kavitha; Sharma, Chandra P

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally controlled quite well with the administration of oral medications or by the use of insulin injections. The current practice is the use of one or more doses, intermediate or long acting insulin per day. Oral insulin is a promising yet experimental method providing tight glycemic control for patients with diabetes. A biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantage over conventional drug delivery systems. The engineered polymer microspheres made of erodable polymer display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular lining can traverse both the mucosal epithelium and the follicle associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. Alginate, a natural polymer recovered from seaweed is being developed as a nanoparticle for the delivery of insulin without being destroyed in the stomach. Alginate is in fact finding application in biotechnology industry as thickening agent, a gelling agent and a colloid stabilizer. Alginate has in addition, several other properties that have enabled it to be used as a matrix for entrapment and for the delivery of a variety of proteins such as insulin and cells. These properties include: a relatively inert aqueous environment within the matrix; a mild room temperature encapsulation process free of organic solvents; a high gel porosity which allows for high diffusion rates of macromolecules; the ability to control this porosity with simple coating procedures and dissolution and biodegradation of the system under normal physiological conditions.

  5. Desmosomal component expression in normal, dysplastic, and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Nagamani; Gist, Julie; Smith, Tyler; Tylka, Daniel; Trogdon, Gavin; Wahl, James K

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC) is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The goal of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between histological diagnosed dysplasia and OSCC lesions and altered expression of desmosomal cell-cell adhesion molecules in the oral epithelium. Our data showed that oral SCC tissue samples showed decreased immunoreactivity of both desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 proteins compared to normal oral epithelium. Furthermore, significant decrease in desmoplakin immunoreactivity was observed in dysplastic tissue compared to normal oral epithelium. In contrast, the level of desmoglein-1 staining was unchanged between samples however desmoglein-1 was found localized to cell borders in oral SCC samples. These data suggest that changes in expression of desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 may prove to be a useful marker for changes in tissue morphology and provide a tool for identifying pre-neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:20585603

  6. Ultrastructural study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aihara, M

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium is presented. Biopsy samples were collected from four patients with full thickness burns at 9 days, 6 weeks and 5-21 months after grafting of the cultured epithelium. By the sixth week after transplantation, grafted cultured epithelial sheets had developed to consist of 10 to 20 layers of cells and the epithelium showed distinct basal, spinous, granular and horny layers, and a patchy basement membrane had formed. Langerhans cells and melanocytes were identifiable. From 5 months onwards flat basal cells became oval, and oval keratohyalin granules in the keratinocytes also assumed a normal irregular shape. Membrane-coating granules in the keratinocytes increased in number. The fine structures of desmosomes also showed a normal mature appearance. Furthermore, complete extension of the basement membrane could be observed. The maturation of cultured human epithelium is complete by 5 months after grafting.

  7. Tales of regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Poss, Kenneth D; Keating, Mark T; Nechiporuk, Alex

    2003-02-01

    Complex tissue regeneration involves exquisitely coordinated proliferation and patterning of adult cells after severe injury or amputation. Certain lower vertebrates such as urodele amphibians and teleost fish have a greater capacity for regeneration than mammals. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms of regeneration, and cellular mechanisms are incompletely defined. To address this deficiency, we and others have focused on the zebrafish model system. Several helpful tools and reagents are available for use with zebrafish, including the potential for genetic approaches to regeneration. Recent studies have shed light on the remarkable ability of zebrafish to regenerate fins. PMID:12557199

  8. Can MMP-9 be a Prognosticator Marker for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Shiva Kumar; Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours severely endanger the life of cancer patients. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the commonly found malignancies in the oral cavity and its survival rate has not improved from past few decades. Since an important risk factor for oral squamous cell carcinoma is the presence of epithelial dysplasia, it is necessary to check the presence of a prognosticator marker in both of them. As matrix metalloproteinase’s (MMP’s) are involved in degradation of type IV collagen, which are one of the important components of extracellular matrix components which play a relevant role in several steps of tumour progression such as invasion and metastasis. We have studied MMP-9 expression to evaluate its prognostic potential in oral cancers as well as oral epithelial dysplasia along with tissues of normal oral epithelium. Materials and Methods The expression was examined using immunohistochemistry procedure with MMP-9 in 100 samples including cases of epithelium from normal oral mucosa, oral dysplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. One set of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections of the three categories were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The sections were then evaluated under microscope. Data was examined for statistical significance using SPSS 13.0 by Mann-Whitney Test and Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results With MMP-9 gain of expression was noted from Control group to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic staining was seen with MMP-9. Statistically highly significant differences were seen between oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma and statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the oral squamous cell carcinoma group. Conclusion This study suggested that oral squamous cell carcinoma shows higher MMP-9 expression as compared to oral epithelial dysplasia followed by epithelium from normal oral mucosa. However, no correlation was found among the

  9. Human papillomavirus infections and oral tumors.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina

    2003-08-01

    In the past 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in human papillomaviruses (HPV) because of their potential role in the pathogenesis of malignant tumors. In 1983, we published the first evidence that HPV might be involved in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The identification of morphological similarities between oral and cervical mucosa lead us to this original proposal. In a recent meta-analysis, HPV was indeed confirmed as an independent risk factor for oral carcinoma. To date, totally more than 100 types of HPV have been identified. As in anogenital cancers, HPV type 16 is the most prevalent type in oral carcinomas. The benign oral lesions, associated with HPV infection, include squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verrucca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). Papillomas and condylomas are mostly caused by HPV type 6 or 11, while oral verrucas are associated with the skin types 2 or 4. A family history of FEH has been suggested. The FEH lesions are caused by HPV types 13 and 32, only detected in oral epithelium. In immunocompromised patients, benign HPV-induced lesions are characterized by atypical morphology and the simultaneous detection of multiple HPV types. Oral benign HPV lesions are mostly asymptomatic, and may persist or regress spontaneously.

  10. Tonsillar crypt epithelium is an important extra-central nervous system site for viral replication in EV71 encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    He, Yaoxin; Ong, Kien Chai; Gao, Zifen; Zhao, Xishun; Anderson, Virginia M; McNutt, Michael A; Wong, Kum Thong; Lu, Min

    2014-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71; family Picornaviridae, species human Enterovirus A) usually causes hand, foot, and mouth disease, which may rarely be complicated by fatal encephalomyelitis. We investigated extra-central nervous system (extra-CNS) tissues capable of supporting EV71 infection and replication, and have correlated tissue infection with expression of putative viral entry receptors, scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded CNS and extra-CNS tissues from seven autopsy cases were examined by IHC and in situ hybridization to evaluate viral antigens and RNA. Viral receptors were identified with IHC. In all seven cases, the CNS showed stereotypical distribution of inflammation and neuronal localization of viral antigens and RNA, confirming the clinical diagnosis of EV71 encephalomyelitis. In six cases in which tonsillar tissues were available, viral antigens and/or RNA were localized to squamous epithelium lining the tonsillar crypts. Tissues from the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, mesenteric nodes, spleen, and skin were all negative for viral antigens/RNA. Our novel findings strongly suggest that tonsillar crypt squamous epithelium supports active viral replication and represents an important source of viral shedding that facilitates person-to-person transmission by both the fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. It may also be a portal for viral entry. A correlation between viral infection and SCARB2 expression appears to be more significant than for PSGL-1 expression.

  11. Live imaging of baculovirus infection of midgut epithelium cells: a functional assay of per os infectivity factors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jingfang; van Lent, Jan W M; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2014-11-01

    The occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses are responsible for oral infection of insect hosts, whereas budded viruses (BVs) are responsible for systemic infection within the host. The ODV membrane proteins play crucial roles in mediating virus entry into midgut epithelium cells to initiate infection and are important factors in host-range determination. For Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), seven conserved ODV membrane proteins have been shown to be essential for oral infectivity and are called per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Information on the function of the individual PIF proteins in virus entry is limited, partly due to the lack of a good in vitro system for monitoring ODV entry. Here, we constructed a baculovirus with EGFP fused to the nucleocapsid to monitor virus entry into primary midgut epithelium cells ex vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The EGFP-labelled virus showed similar BV virulence and ODV infectivity as WT virus. The ability to bind and enter host cells was then visualized for WT AcMNPV and viruses with mutations in P74 (PIF0), PIF1 or PIF2, showing that P74 is required for ODV binding, whilst PIF1 and PIF2 play important roles in the entry of ODV after binding to midgut cells. This is the first live imaging of ODV entry into midgut cells and complements the genetic and biochemical evidence for the role of PIFs in the oral infection process. PMID:25006078

  12. Regulatory aspects of small molecule drugs for heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kathleen; Papinska, Anna; Mordwinkin, Nicholas

    2016-01-15

    Even though recent discoveries prove the existence of cardiac progenitor cells, internal regenerative capacity of the heart is minimal. As cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of deaths in the United States, a number of approaches are being used to develop treatments for heart repair and regeneration. Small molecule drugs are of particular interest as they are suited for oral administration and can be chemically synthesized. However, the regulatory process for the development of new treatment modalities is protracted, complex and expensive. One of the hurdles to development of appropriate therapies is the need for predictive preclinical models. The use of patient-derived cardiomyocytes from iPSC cells represents a novel tool for this purpose. Among other concepts for induction of heart regeneration, the most advanced is the combination of DPP-IV inhibitors with stem cell mobilizers. This review will focus on regulatory aspects as well as preclinical hurdles of development of new treatments for heart regeneration.

  13. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  14. Nonneoplastic changes in the olfactory epithelium--experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, B A

    1990-01-01

    Interest in the olfactory mucosa has increased in recent years, since it has been shown to possess a considerable amount of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activity and a wide variety of chemicals have been identified as olfactory toxins. Many chemicals induce lesions of a general nature in the olfactory mucosa, i.e., inflammation, degeneration, regeneration, and proliferation, whereas others cause more specific effects. Changes in the olfactory mucosa with reference to chemicals that initiate them are reviewed in this paper. Studies with 3-trifluoromethyl pyridine (3FMP) illustrate some of these general changes and show the importance of examining the olfactory mucosa at early time periods. The earliest damage seen by light microscopy was 6 hr after a single inhalation exposure to 3FMP, and by day 3, early regenerative changes were observed. Changes were seen by electron microscopy 30 min after an oral dose, and the primary site of toxicity appeared to be the Bowman's glands. Although atrophy of nerve bundles in the lamina propria would be the expected consequence of severe necrosis of the sensory cells, this is not always the case. Exposure to irritants such as acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine results in nerve bundle atrophy, but with chemicals such as 3FMP, 3-methylindole, and 3-methylfuran--which are activated by mixed-function oxidases--the nerve bundles remain intact. Future work, including metabolism studies, will provide information on the mode of action of these chemicals. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PLATE 16. PLATE 17. PMID:2200667

  15. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  16. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling promotes morphogenesis of blood vessels, wound epidermis, and actinotrichia during fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Thorimbert, Valentine; König, Désirée; Marro, Jan; Ruggiero, Florence; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Zebrafish fin regeneration involves initial formation of the wound epidermis and the blastema, followed by tissue morphogenesis. The mechanisms coordinating differentiation of distinct tissues of the regenerate are poorly understood. Here, we applied pharmacologic and transgenic approaches to address the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling during fin restoration. To map the BMP transcriptional activity, we analyzed the expression of the evolutionarily conserved direct phospho-Smad1 target gene, id1, and its homologs id2a and id3. This analysis revealed the BMP activity in the distal blastema, wound epidermis, osteoblasts, and blood vessels of the regenerate. Blocking the BMP function with a selective chemical inhibitor of BMP type I receptors, DMH1, suppressed id1 and id3 expression and arrested regeneration after blastema formation. We identified several previously uncharacterized functions of BMP during fin regeneration. Specifically, BMP signaling is required for remodeling of plexus into structured blood vessels in the rapidly growing regenerate. It organizes the wound epithelium by triggering wnt5b expression and promoting Collagen XIV-A deposition into the basement membrane. BMP represents the first known signaling that induces actinotrichia formation in the regenerate. Our data reveal a multifaceted role of BMP for coordinated morphogenesis of distinct tissues during regeneration of a complex vertebrate appendage.

  18. Cell dedifferentiation and epithelial to mesenchymal transitions during intestinal regeneration in H. glaberrima

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Determining the type and source of cells involved in regenerative processes has been one of the most important goals of researchers in the field of regeneration biology. We have previously used several cellular markers to characterize the cells involved in the regeneration of the intestine in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima. Results We have now obtained a monoclonal antibody that labels the mesothelium; the outer layer of the gut wall composed of peritoneocytes and myocytes. Using this antibody we studied the role of this tissue layer in the early stages of intestinal regeneration. We have now shown that the mesothelial cells of the mesentery, specifically the muscle component, undergo dedifferentiation from very early on in the regeneration process. Cell proliferation, on the other hand, increases much later, and mainly takes place in the mesothelium or coelomic epithelium of the regenerating intestinal rudiment. Moreover, we have found that the formation of the intestinal rudiment involves a novel regenerative mechanism where epithelial cells ingress into the connective tissue and acquire mesenchymal phenotypes. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that the dedifferentiating mesothelium provides the initial source of cells for the formation of the intestinal rudiment. At later stages, cell proliferation supplies additional cells necessary for the increase in size of the regenerate. Our data also shows that the mechanism of epithelial to mesenchymal transition provides many of the connective tissue cells found in the regenerating intestine. These results present some new and important information as to the cellular basis of organ regeneration and in particular to the process of regeneration of visceral organs. PMID:22004330

  19. Oral cenesthopathy.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Miura, Anna; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cenesthopathy is characterized by abnormal and strange bodily sensations and is classified as a 'delusional disorder, somatic type' or 'somatoform disorder' according to the DSM 5. The oral cavity is one of the frequent sites of cenesthopathy, thus the term 'oral cenesthopathy.' Patients with oral cenesthopathy complain of unusual sensations without corresponding abnormal findings in the oral area, such as excessive mucus secretion, a slimy sensation, or a feeling of coils or wires being present within the oral region. They usually visit multiple dentists rather than psychiatrists. Without a proper diagnosis, they repeatedly pursue unnecessary surgical procedures to remove their 'foreign body'. This sometimes creates a dilemma between the dentists and patients. The nosography of oral cenesthopathy has been discussed in some case reports and reviews but is overlooked in mainstream medicine. This review focuses on the various aspects of oral cenesthopathy. The estimated prevalence of cenesthopathy was 0.2 to 1.9 % in a study done at a Japanese university psychiatry clinic and 27 % in a study done at a Japanese psychosomatic dentistry clinic. Oral cenesthopathy do not have clear disposition, while some studies reported that elderly women were most commonly affected. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. However, recent studies have suggested a right > left asymmetrical pattern of the cerebral blood flow of patients with oral cenesthopathy. Antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy might be effective in some cases, though it is known to be intractable. To date, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, classification and treatment of oral cenesthopathy are unknown due to the few reports on the disorder, though there are a few case reports. To overcome this difficult medical condition, clinico-statistical and case-control studies done under rigorous criteria and with a large sample size are required. PMID

  20. Dynamic Regulation of Wnt7a Expression in the Primate Endometrium: Implications for Postmenstrual Regeneration and Secretory Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiujun; Krieg, Sacha; Hwang, Jong Yun; Dhal, Sabita; Kuo, Calvin J.; Lasley, Bill L.; Brenner, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the vital physiological role of endometrial regeneration during the menstrual cycle and the various pathological implications of abnormal growth of endometrial epithelial cells, the local factors and regulatory mechanisms involved in endometrial regeneration and growth have not been well characterized. Here, we examine the pattern, hormone dependence, and potential functions of Wnt7a (wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 7a), which is known to play a critical role in the formation of the mouse endometrial epithelium during embryonic development, in both human and artificially cycling rhesus macaque endometrium, and using a potent Wnt-antagonist in a mouse model of endometrial regeneration. Wnt7a transcript levels were examined using quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry was performed to detect Ki-67 and 3,5-bromodeoxyuridine. Stringent, fully conditional Wnt inhibition was achieved by adenoviral expression of Dickkopf-1 during artificial endometrial regeneration in mice. In macaques, Wnt7a expression was confined to the newly formed luminal epithelium (LE) and upper glands during the postmenstrual repair phase. The signal increased in the LE during the proliferative phase but decreased in the upper glands and was undetectable in the glands by the late proliferative phase. Interestingly, Wnt7a was completely suppressed in the LE and remained undetectable in other cell types after 7 d of progesterone treatment. The pattern of Wnt7a expression in the human endometrium was similar to that in macaques. Blockade of Wnt signaling during endometrial regeneration in mice resulted in a dramatic delay in reepithelialization and degeneration of glands and LE. These results strongly suggest, for the first time, a role for Wnt7a in postmenstrual regeneration and proliferation of endometrial glands and LE in primates, and its dramatic suppression by progesterone is likely essential for secretory transformation of the

  1. Developmental origin of the posterior pigmented epithelium of iris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Xiong, Kai; Lu, Lei; Gu, Dandan; Wang, Songtao; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Guomin

    2015-03-01

    Iris epithelium is a double-layered pigmented cuboidal epithelium. According to the current model, the neural retina and the posterior iris pigment epithelium (IPE) are derived from the inner wall of the optic cup, while the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the anterior IPE are derived from the outer wall of the optic cup during development. Our current study shows evidence, contradicting this model of fetal iris development. We demonstrate that human fetal iris expression patterns of Otx2 and Mitf transcription factors are similar, while the expressions of Otx2 and Sox2 are complementary. Furthermore, IPE and RPE exhibit identical morphologic development during the early embryonic period. Our results suggest that the outer layer of the optic cup forms two layers of the iris epithelium, and the posterior IPE is the inward-curling anterior rim of the outer layer of the optic cup. These findings provide a reasonable explanation of how IPE cells can be used as an appropriate substitute for RPE cells.

  2. Siphon regeneration capacity is compromised during aging in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a short life span and powerful regeneration capacities. The regeneration of the oral siphon (OS) involves wound healing, blastema formation, cell proliferation, and replacement of 8 oral pigment organs (OPO), the latter via differentiation and migration of stem/precursor cells from localized niches in the siphon. The restoration of OPO pattern during OS regeneration occurs with a high degree of accuracy through three successive cycles of amputation. It is shown here that oral siphons of the largest and oldest members of a wild Ciona population do not completely regenerate their siphons after amputation. The loss of regeneration capacity was accompanied by reduced cell proliferation. In contrast to arrested OS outgrowth, the stem/precursor cells responsible for OPO replacement "over-differentiate" after OS amputation in the oldest animals, the typical number of OPO is increased from 8 to 12-16, and malformed OPO are produced. Also in contrast to younger animals, the oldest animals of the population show arrested OPO development after two consecutive cycles of amputation and regeneration. We conclude that there is a size and age threshold in Ciona after which the regenerative capacity of the OS is compromised due to effects of aging on cell proliferation.

  3. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  4. Multidrug resistance protein 1 protects the choroid plexus epithelium and contributes to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wijnholds, Jan; de Lange, Elizabeth C.M.; Scheffer, George L.; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Mol, Carla A.A.M.; van der Valk, Martin; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Scheper, Rik J.; Breimer, Douwe D.; Borst, Piet

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a transporter protein that helps to protect normal cells and tumor cells against the influx of certain xenobiotics. We previously showed that Mrp1 protects against cytotoxic drugs at the testis-blood barrier, the oral epithelium, and the kidney urinary collecting duct tubules. Here, we generated Mrp1/Mdr1a/Mdr1b triple-knockout (TKO) mice, and used them together with Mdr1a/Mdr1b double-knockout (DKO) mice to study the contribution of Mrp1 to the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of etoposide. We observed increased toxicity in the TKO mice, which accumulated etoposide in brown adipose tissue, colon, salivary gland, heart, and the female urogenital system. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of Mrp1 in the oviduct, uterus, salivary gland, and choroid plexus (CP) epithelium. To explore the transport function of Mrp1 in the CP epithelium, we used TKO and DKO mice cannulated for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We show here that the lack of Mrp1 protein causes etoposide levels to increase about 10-fold in the CSF after intravenous administration of the drug. Our results indicate that Mrp1 helps to limit tissue distribution of certain drugs and contributes to the blood-CSF drug-permeability barrier. PMID:10675353

  5. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  6. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merzlyak, Anna; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-01-01

    Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy. PMID:24991085

  7. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Denise; Flint, Stephen R; Healy, Claire; Stassen, Leo F A

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  8. Ultrastructural localization of acid phosphatase in nonhuman primate vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    King, B F

    1985-01-01

    The vagina of the rhesus monkey is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. However, little is known regarding the cytochemical composition of its cell organelles and the substances found in the intercellular spaces. In this study we have examined the ultrastructural distribution of acid phosphatase in the vaginal epithelium. In basal and parabasal cells reaction product was found in some Golgi cisternae and vesicles and in a variety of cytoplasmic granules. Reaction product was also found in some, but not all, membrane-coating granules. In the upper layers of the epithelium, the membrane-coating granules extruded their contents and acid phosphatase was localized in the intercellular spaces. The possible roles of acid phosphatase in keratinization, desquamation, or modification of substances in the intercellular compartment are discussed.

  9. Bisphosphonates Inhibit Expression of p63 by Oral Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, E.L.; Baldwin, C.M.; Kuo, S.; D’Silva, N.J.; Feinberg, S.E.; Krebsbach, P.H.; Edwards, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), a side-effect of bisphosphonate therapy, is characterized by exposed bone that fails to heal within eight weeks. Healing time of oral epithelial wounds is decreased in the presence of amino-bisphosphonates; however, the mechanism remains unknown. We examined human tissue from individuals with ONJ and non-bisphosphonate-treated controlindividuals to identify changes in oral epithelium and connective tissue. Oral and intravenous bisphosphonate-treated ONJ sites had reduced numbers of basal epithelial progenitor cells, as demonstrated by a 13.8 ± 1.1% and 31.9 ± 5.8% reduction of p63 expression, respectively. No significant differences in proliferation rates, vessel density, or macrophage number were noted. In vitro treatment of clonal and primary oral keratinocytes with zoledronic acid (ZA) inhibited p63, and expression was rescued by the addition of mevalonate pathway intermediates. In addition, both ZA treatment and p63 shRNA knock-down impaired formation of 3D Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalents (EVPOME) and closure of an in vitro scratch assay. Analysis of our data suggests that bisphosphonate treatment may delay oral epithelial healing by interfering with p63-positive progenitor cells in the basal layer of the oral epithelium in a mevalonate-pathway-dependent manner. This delay in healing may increase the likelihood of osteonecrosis developing in already-compromised bone. PMID:21551338

  10. Closed end regeneration method

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2006-06-27

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g. metal, enzyme, etc. particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as irons, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  11. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  12. Minor Salivary Gland Changes in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Ragunathan, Yoithapprabhunath Thukanayakanpalayam; Lakshmi, Suman Jhansi; Nallusamy, Jaisanghar; Joseph, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most common etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is tobacco and tobacco related products which cause nuclear damage to the keratinocytes. The chemical carcinogens not only affect the lining of oral epithelium but also affect the lining epithelium of the excretory ducts of the salivary glands. Thus, there is a possibility of epithelial dysplasia of the salivary duct epithelium which may lead to potential malignant transformation. Aim The study was performed to see the changes in the minor salivary glands and excretory ducts in cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and OSCC. Materials and Methods A total of 278 archival cases of mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, OSCC including verrucous carcinoma were histopathologically evaluated to observe changes in the excretory ducts and the minor salivary glands. Results In the study there were 56.5% males and 43.5% females. The age group that was most commonly affected in both the sexes was 50-60 yr old. Buccal mucosa was the most common site of involvement. Ductal changes observed in the excretory duct include simple hyperplasia, metaplastic changes such as mucous, oncocytic & squamous, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and malignant cells. Acinar changes observed were degeneration, squamous metaplasia, myoepithelial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Both the excretory ducts and ducts within the gland showed dysplasia. Conclusion According to observations in our study it is suggested that histopathological interpretation for oral mucosal lesions especially oral epithelial dysplasias and OSCC should also include changes related to salivary gland tissue to provide a better treatment plan and prevent recurrence of the malignant tumours. PMID:27630945

  13. Minor Salivary Gland Changes in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Chitturi, Ravi Teja; Ragunathan, Yoithapprabhunath Thukanayakanpalayam; Lakshmi, Suman Jhansi; Nallusamy, Jaisanghar; Joseph, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most common etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is tobacco and tobacco related products which cause nuclear damage to the keratinocytes. The chemical carcinogens not only affect the lining of oral epithelium but also affect the lining epithelium of the excretory ducts of the salivary glands. Thus, there is a possibility of epithelial dysplasia of the salivary duct epithelium which may lead to potential malignant transformation. Aim The study was performed to see the changes in the minor salivary glands and excretory ducts in cases of oral epithelial dysplasia and OSCC. Materials and Methods A total of 278 archival cases of mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, OSCC including verrucous carcinoma were histopathologically evaluated to observe changes in the excretory ducts and the minor salivary glands. Results In the study there were 56.5% males and 43.5% females. The age group that was most commonly affected in both the sexes was 50-60 yr old. Buccal mucosa was the most common site of involvement. Ductal changes observed in the excretory duct include simple hyperplasia, metaplastic changes such as mucous, oncocytic & squamous, and infiltration of inflammatory cells and malignant cells. Acinar changes observed were degeneration, squamous metaplasia, myoepithelial cell proliferation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Both the excretory ducts and ducts within the gland showed dysplasia. Conclusion According to observations in our study it is suggested that histopathological interpretation for oral mucosal lesions especially oral epithelial dysplasias and OSCC should also include changes related to salivary gland tissue to provide a better treatment plan and prevent recurrence of the malignant tumours.

  14. Multipotent epithelial cells in the process of regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuo; Sugino, Yasuo; Sunanaga, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    The cellular and molecular features of multipotent epithelial cells during regeneration and asexual reproduction in colonial tunicates are described in the present study. The epicardium has been regarded as the endodermal tissue-forming epithelium in the order Enterogona, because only body fragments having the epicardium exhibit the regenerative potential. Epicardial cells in Polycitor proliferus have two peculiar features; they always accompany coelomic undifferentiated cells, and they contain various kinds of organelles in the cytoplasm. During strobilation a large amount of organelles are discarded in the lumen, and then, each tissue-forming cell takes an undifferentiated configuration. Septum cells in the stolon are also multipotent in Enterogona. Free cells with a similar configuration to the septum inhabit the hemocoel. They may provide a pool for epithelial septum cells. At the distal tip of the stolon, septum cells are columnar in shape and apparently undifferentiated. They are the precursor of the stolonial bud. In Pleurogona, the atrial epithelium of endodermal origin is multipotent. In Polyandrocarpa misakiensis, it consists of pigmented squamous cells. The cells have ultrastructurally fine granules in the cytoplasm. During budding, coelomic cells with similar morphology become associated with the atrial epithelium. Then, cells of organ placodes undergo dedifferentiation, enter a cell division cycle, and commence morphogenesis. Retinoic acid-related molecules are involved in this dedifferentiation process of multipotent cells. We conclude that in colonial tunicates two systems support the flexibility of tissue remodeling during regeneration and asexual reproduction; dedifferentiation of epithelial cells and epithelial transformation of coelomic free cells.

  15. Ultrastructure of free-ending nerve fibres in oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Chillida, E M; Rodrigo, J; Mayo, I; Arnedo, A; Gómez, A

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, at the ultrastructural level, the existence of free-ending, intraepithelial nerve fibres has been demonstrated in the oesophagus wall of adult cats and monkeys. Their form, the way they penetrate the epithelium, their location within the epithelium and their relationships with neighbouring cells have been established. A sensory function is suggested for this type of ending. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-15 Figs. 16-17 PMID:7333951

  16. The ionic components of normal human oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, D; Milne, G; Curtis, M; Nicholson, G

    1979-11-01

    The distribution of cations and anions in normal human oesophageal epithelium has been investigated with the pyroantimonate and silver-osmium tetroxide techniques. There is a discontinuous distribution of both ions in the intercellular space. The ions are associated with various organelles, as has already been described in the literature. Specifically, in the oesophageal epithelium, there are a few deposits of pyroantimonate and occasional silver in the membrane coating granules, but here is no apparent relationship of either ion with the tonofilaments or glycogen particles. The superficial cells are leaky and contain fewer ions than the deeper functional layer cells.

  17. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  18. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  19. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  20. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... its box has the American Dental Association's (ADA) seal of acceptance, it is good for your oral ... dispensed solutions have the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Other over-the-counter whitening products include whitening ...

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  2. Regeneration in insects.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J L; Theisen, H

    1999-08-01

    @9cIntroduction@21T issues exhibit an impressive ability to respond to a myriad of insults by repairing and regenerating complex structures. The elegant and orderly process of regeneration provides clues to the mechanisms of pattern formation but also offers the hope that the process might one day be manipulated to replace damaged body parts. To manipulate the process, it will be necessary to understand the genetic basis of the process. In the case of the insect leg, we are coming close to such a level of understanding and many of the lessons learned are relevant to vertebrate systems. A dynamic web of gene regulatory networks appears to create a robust self-organizing system that is at once extremely intricate but also perhaps simple in its reliance on a few key signaling pathways and a few simple processes, e.g. autoactivation and lateral inhibition. Here we will summarize what has been learned about the networks of gene regulation present in the Drosophila leg discs and then we will explore how the regenerative responses to different insults can be understood as predictable responses to these networks. Each of the regulatory networks could themselves serve as the subject of a detailed review and that is beyond the scope of this discussion. Here we will focus on the interplay between the regulatory networks in patterning the tissue.

  3. Spontaneous oral chytridiomycosis in wild bullfrog tadpoles in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KADEKARU, Sho; TAMUKAI, Ken-ichi; TOMINAGA, Atsushi; GOKA, Koichi; UNE, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infects Anuran larvae (tadpole) mouthparts and causes oral chytridiomycosis, which can be diagnosed in tadpoles by detecting mouthparts deformities. However, oral chytridiomycosis may or may not be observable, depending on species, tadpole stage and season, and has never been reported in Japan. We aimed to observe oral chytridiomycosis characteristics in bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeiana) tadpoles, determine associated pathologic features and investigate the usability of bullfrog tadpoles in Japanese Bd field surveys. Wild-captured bullfrog tadpole mouthparts were examined macroscopically, histopathologically and by molecular biological examination. Macroscopic lesions were observed in 21 of 59 tadpole mouthparts. Lesions were most frequently located in the lower jaw sheaths and were mainly recognized by partial depigmentation (11 tadpoles; some were completely depigmented) and thinning of the pigmented layer (10 tadpoles). Partial defects of the tips and blunt cutting edges of the jaw sheaths were observed with severe jaw sheath depigmentation. Whitened tooth rows were observed in 7 tadpoles. Histologically, the stratified epithelium (pigmented epithelium) showed partial or diffuse hypopigmentation or pigment loss. Irregular stratified epithelium thickening with hyperkeratosis or parakeratosis was observed in the jaw sheaths. Bd infection was confirmed in 20 of 21 tadpoles presenting jaw sheath deformities, by histopathological examination and/or nested polymerase chain reaction. Depigmentation and thinning of the pigmented layers of jaw sheaths were associated with Bd infection. Thus, diagnosis of Bd infection by macroscopic observation of bullfrog tadpole mouthparts is feasible. This is the first report of oral chytridiomycosis in wild bullfrog tadpoles in Japan. PMID:26685882

  4. [Histological aspects of posttraumatic regeneration].

    PubMed

    Truupyl'd Aiu

    1976-02-01

    A number of histological aspects (regeneration capacity, origins of regeneration, means of reparation) are discussed on the example of the reparative regeneration of the adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex is found to possess high regeneration capacity after a traumatic injury of the organ. Realization of this capacity is dependent on general and local conditions, the character and the volume of the injury and the degree of involvment of cambial zones being of substantial significance. Among these zones are the glomerular zone and the external part of the bundle zone, whose proliferating cells are the source of the reparative regeneration of the cortical substance. The reparation of the functioning mass of the adrenal cortex is performed by the type of regenerative hypertrophy or the reparative regeneration depending on the character of the trauma. After the first type, the division of cells and their differentiation occur within the limits of the available structural elements, after the second type- of the newly formed ones. Both types are evolutionally conditioned and are definitely similar eather to postnatal growth and physiological regeneration (regenerative hypertrophy), or to the embryonic histogenesis of the definitive adrenal cortex (reparative regeneration).

  5. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  6. Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  7. Noninvasive two-photon microscopy imaging of mouse retina and retinal pigment epithelium through the pupil of the eye.

    PubMed

    Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Hunter, Jennifer J; Williams, David R; Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-07-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy can image retinal molecular processes in vivo. Intrinsically fluorescent retinyl esters in subcellular structures called retinosomes are an integral part of the visual chromophore regeneration pathway. Fluorescent condensation products of all-trans-retinal accumulate in the eye with age and are also associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we report repetitive, dynamic imaging of these compounds in live mice through the pupil of the eye. By leveraging advanced adaptive optics, we developed a data acquisition algorithm that permitted the identification of retinosomes and condensation products in the retinal pigment epithelium by their characteristic localization, spectral properties and absence in genetically modified or drug-treated mice. This imaging approach has the potential to detect early molecular changes in retinoid metabolism that trigger light- and AMD-induced retinal defects and to assess the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions.

  8. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  9. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison.

  10. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  11. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison. PMID:19924548

  12. Development of tissue-engineered models of oral dysplasia and early invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colley, H E; Hearnden, V; Jones, A V; Weinreb, P H; Violette, S M; MacNeil, S; Thornhill, M H; Murdoch, C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current organotypic models of dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) lack the complexity that mimics in vivo tissue. Here we describe a three-dimensional in vitro model of the oral epithelium that replicates tumour progression from dysplasia to an invasive phenotype. Methods: The OSCC cell lines were seeded as a cell suspension (D20, Cal27) or as multicellular tumour spheroids (FaDu) with oral fibroblasts on to a de-epidermised acellular dermis to generate tissue-engineered models and compared with patient biopsies. Results: The D20 and Cal27 cells generated a model of epithelial dysplasia. Overtime Cal27 cells traversed the basement membrane and invaded the connective tissue to reproduce features of early invasive OSCC. When seeded onto a model of the normal oral mucosa, FaDu spheroids produced a histological picture mimicking carcinoma in situ with severe cellular atypia juxtaposed to normal epithelium. Conclusion: It is possible to culture in vitro models with the morphological appearance and histological characteristics of dysplasia and tumour cell invasion seen in vivo using native dermis. Such models could facilitate study of the molecular processes involved in malignant transformation, invasion and tumour growth as well as in vitro testing of new treatments, diagnostic tests and drug delivery systems for OSCC. PMID:21989184

  13. Implication of two different regeneration systems in limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Limb regeneration is a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as an axolotl. An amputated limb starts regenerating from a remaining stump (proximal) to lost finger tips (distal). In the present case, proximal−distal (PD) reorganization takes place in a regenerating tissue, called a blastema. It has been a mystery how an induced blastema recognizes its position and restores an exact replica of missing parts. Recently, a new experimental system called the accessory limb model (ALM) has been established. The gained ALM phenotypes are demanding to reconsider the reorganization PD positional values. Based on the ALM phenotype, it is reasonable to hypothesize that reorganization of positional values has a certain discontinuity and that two different regeneration systems cooperatively reorganize the PD axis to restore an original structure. In this review, PD axis reestablishments are focused on limb regeneration. Knowledge from ALM studies in axolotls and Xenopus is providing a novel concept of PD axis reorganization in limb regeneration. PMID:27499860

  14. [Selected aspects of oral contraception side effects].

    PubMed

    Wolski, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    The first hormonal pill was approved in the 60s of the twentieth century Since that time, oral contraception has been used worldwide by dozens of women due to its high availability as well as relative ease and safety of taking. The main side effects of oral contraception include elevated risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Estrogens increase the probability of VTE development, depending on the dose in medication, and third-generation progestins increase the risk of VTE development more than older-generation progestins. Also, the coexistence of hereditary thrombophilia increases the risk of VTE development in women using oral contraceptives. Other side effects include changes in the carbohydrate and lipid economy Progestins in oral contraceptives decrease HDL cholesterol levels but increase LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. Additionally estrogens are a recognized mitogenic factor for the epithelium of the mammary gland, acting proliferative on the glandular tissue and in the same way influence on the increased risk of breast cancer development. Patients sometimes complain about some subjective side symptoms such as headache, mood changes, nausea, back pain, breast pain and swelling, as well as decreased libido. Some patients discontinue oral contraception due to fear of side effects or temporary ailments before con- sulting their doctor what may result in unintended pregnancy The aim of the following paper was to present most frequent side effects of oral contraception, ways of their moni- toring and diagnosis. PMID:25669065

  15. Glutamine synthetase gene expression during the regeneration of the annelid Enchytraeus japonensis.

    PubMed

    Niva, Cintia Carla; Lee, Jae Min; Myohara, Maroko

    2008-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a highly regenerative oligochaete annelid that can regenerate a complete individual from a small body fragment in 4-5 days. In our previous study, we performed complementary deoxyribonucleic acid subtraction cloning to isolate genes that are upregulated during E. japonensis regeneration and identified glutamine synthetase (gs) as one of the most abundantly expressed genes during this process. In the present study, we show that the full-length sequence of E. japonensis glutamine synthetase (EjGS), which is the first reported annelid glutamine synthetase, is highly similar to other known class II glutamine synthetases. EjGS shows a 61-71% overall amino acid sequence identity with its counterparts in various other animal species, including Drosophila and mouse. We performed detailed expression analysis by in situ hybridization and reveal that strong gs expression occurs in the blastemal regions of regenerating E. japonensis soon after amputation. gs expression was detectable at the cell layer covering the wound and was found to persist in the epidermal cells during the formation and elongation of the blastema. Furthermore, in the elongated blastema, gs expression was detectable also in the presumptive regions of the brain, ventral nerve cord, and stomodeum. In the fully formed intact head, gs expression was also evident in the prostomium, brain, the anterior end of the ventral nerve cord, the epithelium of buccal and pharyngeal cavities, the pharyngeal pad, and in the esophageal appendages. In intact E. japonensis tails, gs expression was found in the growth zone in actively growing worms but not in full-grown individuals. In the nonblastemal regions of regenerating fragments and in intact worms, gs expression was also detected in the nephridia, chloragocytes, gut epithelium, epidermis, spermatids, and oocytes. These results suggest that EjGS may play roles in regeneration, nerve function, cell proliferation, nitrogenous waste excretion

  16. Establishment of a Novel Lingual Organoid Culture System: Generation of Organoids Having Mature Keratinized Epithelium from Adult Epithelial Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisha, Hiroko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kanno, Shohei; Tokuyama, Yoko; Komai, Yoshihiro; Ohe, Shuichi; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Omachi, Taichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-11-01

    Despite the strong need for the establishment of a lingual epithelial cell culture system, a simple and convenient culture method has not yet been established. Here, we report the establishment of a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Histological analyses showed that the generated organoids had both a stratified squamous epithelial cell layer and a stratum corneum. Very recently, we showed via a multicolor lineage tracing method that Bmi1-positive stem cells exist at the base of the epithelial basal layer in the interpapillary pit. Using our new culture system, we found that organoids could be generated by single Bmi1-positive stem cells and that in the established organoids, multiple Bmi1-positive stem cells were generated at the outermost layer. Moreover, we observed that organoids harvested at an early point in culture could be engrafted and maturate in the tongue of recipient mice and that the organoids generated from carcinogen-treated mice had an abnormal morphology. Thus, this culture system presents valuable settings for studying not only the regulatory mechanisms of lingual epithelium but also lingual regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  17. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  18. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  19. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  20. The regeneration of gingiva: its potential value for the recession of healthy gingiva.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui; Miao, Di; Liu, Juan; Meng, Shu; Wu, Yafei

    2010-01-01

    The partial withdrawal of healthy gingiva not only affects the appearance but also can bring about some complaints when the healthy gingiva is stimulated for some reasons. The junctional epithelium of gingiva moves to the root with aging, and compared with the tooth crown, the tooth root which has lower mineral content is prone to decay. Thus, gingival recession could lead to the root surface decay and make the tooth sensitive. Gingival recession is not reversible. Once the healthy gingiva shrinked, the teeth could feel uncomfortable, food impaction appeared and the original restorations have to be dismantled with new restorations on account of the exposure of coronal edges. Then the regeneration of gingiva is important. In this article, a hypothesis is proposed that free gingiva could get back to the former non-recessive location through guiding the healthy junctional epithelium to propagate along the crowns. Then the gingiva not only restores the beautiful outlook but also returns the natural barrier function.

  1. Pigmented epithelium induces complete retinal reconstitution from dispersed embryonic chick retinae in reaggregation culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rothermel, A; Willbold, E; Degrip, W J; Layer, P G

    1997-01-01

    Reaggregation of dispersed retinal cells of the chick embryo leads to histotypic retinospheroids in which the laminar organization remains incomplete: photoreceptors form rosettes which are surrounded by constituents of the other retinal layers. Here, for the first time, a complete arrangement of layers is achieved in cellular spheres (stratoids), provided that fully dispersed retinal cells are younger than embryonic day E6, and are reaggregated in the presence of a monolayer of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). A remarkable mechanism of stratoid formation from 1 to 15 days in vitro is revealed by the establishment of a radial Müller glia scaffold and of photoreceptors. During the first two days of reaggregation on RPE, rosettes are still observed. At this stage immunostaining with vimentin and F11 antibodies for radial Müller glia reveal a disorganized pattern. Subsequently, radial glia processes organize into long parallel fibre bundles which are arranged like spokes to stabilize the surface and centre of the stratoid. The opsin-specific antibody CERN 901 detects photoreceptors as they gradually build up an outer nuclear layer at the surface. These findings assign to the RPE a decisive role for the genesis and regeneration of a vertebrate retina. PMID:9332014

  2. A novel Bruch's membrane-mimetic electrospun substrate scaffold for human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ping; Wu, Kun-Chao; Zhu, Ying; Xiang, Lue; Li, Chong; Chen, Deng-Long; Chen, Feng; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Aijun; Li, Min; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Various artificial membranes have been used as scaffolds for retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) for monolayer reconstruction, however, long-term cell viability and functionality are still largely unknown. This study aimed to construct an ultrathin porous nanofibrous film to mimic Bruch's membrane, and in particular to investigate human RPE cell responses to the resultant substrates. An ultrathin porous nanofibrous membrane was fabricated by using regenerated wild Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (RWSF), polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gt) and displayed a thickness of 3-5 μm, with a high porosity and an average fiber diameter of 166 ± 85 nm. Human RPE cells seeded on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes showed a higher cell growth rate (p < 0.05), and a typical expression pattern of RPE signature genes, with reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. With long-term cultivation on the substrates, RPE cells exhibited characteristic polygonal morphology and development of apical microvilli. Immunocytochemisty demonstrated RPE-specific expression profiles in cells after 12-weeks of co-culture on RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes. Interestingly, the cells on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes functionally secreted polarized PEDF and phagocytosed labeled porcine POS. Furthermore, RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes transplanted subsclerally exhibited excellent biocompatibility without any evidence of inflammation or rejection. In conclusion, we established a novel RWSF-based substrate for growth of RPE cells with excellent cytocompatibility in vitro and biocompatibility in vivo for potential use as a prosthetic Bruch's membrane for RPE transplantation.

  3. Vasa, PL10, and Piwi gene expression during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Alitta virens.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Vitaly V; Kostyuchenko, Roman P

    2015-06-01

    Polychaetes are famous for their outstanding ability to regenerate lost body parts. Moreover, these worms possess a number of ancestral features in anatomy, development, and genetics, making them particularly suitable for comparative studies. Thus, fundamental as well as new undisclosed so far features of regenerative processes may be revealed, using polychaetes as a model. In the present work, we aimed to analyze the molecular basis of caudal regeneration in the nereid polychaete Alitta virens (formerly Nereis virens). We focused on homologues genes of RNA helicases Vasa and PL10 and ncRNA-binding proteins Piwi. These markers are suggested to play a significant role in maintenance of undifferentiated state of primordial germ cells and multipotent stem cells across invertebrates. In normal conditions, A. virens homologues of Vasa, PL10, and Piwi were differentially expressed in the subterminal growth zone and germline cells. Caudal amputation induced expression of studied genes de novo, which further accompanies all steps of regeneration. An early appearance of the transcripts in wound epithelium and internal blastemal cells suggests involvement of these genes in the well-known cell dedifferentiation events that assure polychaete regeneration. Provided interpretation of the gene expression dynamics implies the primary restoration of the pygidium and growth zone, which promotes following segment formation. Obtained results are valuable as a molecular fingerprint of the alterations occurring in regulatory state of locally regenerating tissues. PMID:25772273

  4. Lgr6 marks nail stem cells and is required for digit tip regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lehoczky, Jessica A.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    The tips of the digits of some mammals, including human infants and mice, are capable of complete regeneration after injury. This process is reliant on the presence of the overlaying nail organ and is mediated by a proliferative blastema. Epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been shown to be necessary for mouse digit tip regeneration. Here, we report on Lgr5 and Lgr6 (leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 and 6), two important agonists of the Wnt pathway that are known to be markers of several epithelial stem cell populations. We find that Lgr5 is expressed in a dermal population of cells adjacent to the specialized epithelia surrounding the keratinized nail plate. Moreover, Lgr5-expressing cells contribute to this dermis, but not the blastema, during digit tip regeneration. In contrast, we find that Lgr6 is expressed within cells of the nail matrix portion of the nail epithelium, as well as in a subset of cells in the bone and eccrine sweat glands. Genetic lineage analysis reveals that Lgr6-expressing cells give rise to the nail during homeostatic growth, demonstrating that Lgr6 is a marker of nail stem cells. Moreover, Lgr6-expressing cells contribute to the blastema, suggesting a potential direct role for Lgr6-expressing cells during digit tip regeneration. This role is confirmed by analysis of Lgr6-deficient mice, which have both a nail and bone regeneration defect. PMID:26460010

  5. The Effect of Plasma Exposure on Tail Regeneration of Tadpoles Xenopus Laevis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    June, Joyce; Rivie, Adonis; Ezuduemoih, Raphael; Menon, Jaishri; Martus, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Wound healing requires a balanced combination of nutrients and growth factors for healing and tissue regeneration. The effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus laevis is investigated. The exposure of the wound to the helium plasma immediately followed the amputation of 40% of the tail. Amputation of the tail initiates regeneration of spinal cord, muscle, notochord, skin and connective tissues. By 24 h, the wound was covered by wound epithelium and blastema was formed by day 5. There was increased angiogenesis in plasma exposed tail regenerate compared to the control following 5 d post amputation. Observed was an increase in NO production in the regenerate of plasma exposed tadpoles was derived from increased activity of nNOS and iNOS. Western blot analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor showed stronger bands for the protein in amputated tadpoles of both the groups. Analysis of the composition and characteristics of the plasma using optical emission spectroscopy indicates excited state species consisting of N2, N2+,and OH is present in the plasma. This study was supported, in part, by the NSF Grant 1040108.

  6. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles proceeds through activation of Sox2-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In contrast to mammals, amphibians, such as adult urodeles (for example, newts) and anuran larvae (for example, Xenopus) can regenerate their spinal cord after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. Results Here, we report that tail amputation results in a global increase of Sox2 levels and proliferation of Sox2+ cells. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Sox2 diminished proliferation of spinal cord resident cells affecting tail regeneration after amputation, suggesting that spinal cord regeneration is crucial for the whole process. After spinal cord transection, Sox2+ cells are found in the ablation gap forming aggregates. Furthermore, Sox2 levels correlated with regenerative capabilities during metamorphosis, observing a decrease in Sox2 levels at non-regenerative stages. Conclusions Sox2+ cells contribute to the regeneration of spinal cord after tail amputation and transection. Sox2 levels decreases during metamorphosis concomitantly with the lost of regenerative capabilities. Our results lead to a working hypothesis in which spinal cord damage activates proliferation and/or migration of Sox2+ cells, thus allowing regeneration of the spinal cord after tail amputation or reconstitution of the ependymal epithelium after spinal cord transection. PMID:22537391

  7. Epithelial expression of keratinocytes growth factor in oral precancer lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Murali, S.; Zunt, Susan L.; Goldblatt, Lawrence I.; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a potent epithelial mitogen that acts by binding the KGF receptors (KGFRs) expressed on epithelial cells and regulates proliferation and differentiation. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of KGF in the epithelium in oral precancer. Materials and Methods: Archival tissues of oral submucous fibrosis (SMF) and leukoplakia were assessed for epithelial KGF expression by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: KGF was predominantly expressed in the basal and parabasal cells in the epithelium of SMF tissues. KGF transcript in the epithelial cells increased with increasing severity of epithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia. Conclusion: Although widely reported as a product secreted by the mesenchymal cells, our data suggest that the KGF is also expressed in oral epithelial cells much like the expression in ovarian epithelial cells. Based on the localization of KGF in cells at the epithelial mesenchymal junction and that of the reported presence of KGFR in oral keratinocytes, a potential mechanism involving paracrine and autocrine interactions of KGF and KGFR in early stages of oral precancer is postulated. PMID:27274338

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR in oral leukoplakia: Association with clinicopathological features and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniela C.; Gleber-Netto, Frederico O.; Sousa, Sílvia F.; Bernardes, Vanessa F.; Guimarães-Abreu, Mauro H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate the immunoexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a sample of oral leukoplakias (OL) and to determine the receptor’s association with dysplasia, tobacco consumption, lesion site, and proliferation rate. Although EGFR should be overexpressed in some oral leukoplakias, the factors that may interfere with this expression and the influence of this receptor on epithelial proliferation have yet to be investigated. Study Design: Samples of oral leukoplakias (48) and of normal oral epithelium (10) were immunohistologically examined for expression of EGFR. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, and p27 were also performed in leukoplakias. EGFR expression was associated with clinical and pathological features. Results: EGFR was positive in 62.5% of the leukoplakias and 50% of normal oral epithelium. The number of EGFR positive OL located in high-risk sites was significantly higher than EGFR positive OL located in low-risk sites. Most of the p27 negative leukoplakias were EGFR positive, and the p27 index in the parabasal layer was diminished in the presence of dysplasia. Positivity for EGFR was not associated with dysplasia, tobacco exposure, or Ki-67. Conclusion: EGFR is expressed in leukoplakia regardless of dysplasia, but EGFR positivity should be more frequent in lesions sited in areas of high cancer risk. The association between EGFR and p27 may represent an important mechanism in the control of cellular proliferation and malignant progression of oral epithelium and therefore warrants further investigation. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, EGFR, p27, Ki-67, epithelial dysplasia. PMID:22322523

  9. Human vaginal epithelium and the epithelial lining of a cyst model constructed from it: a comparative light microscopic and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, I O; van Wyk, C W; Darling, M R

    2001-11-01

    The light microscopic features and keratin filament distribution of human vaginal epithelium resemble those of buccal mucosa. We used vaginal epithelium to establish a human cyst model in immunodeficient mice. To strengthen the view that this experimental cyst is a suitable model to study mucosal diseases, we compared specific light microscopic and ultra-structural features of vaginal epithelium and the epithelial lining of the cyst. Nineteen cyst walls and 6 specimens of vaginal mucosa, which had been used to establish the cysts, were examined. We counted the number of cell layers of 17 cyst linings and the 6 vaginal specimens. Surface keratinisation was evaluated on sections stained with the Picro-Mallory method. To demonstrate intercellular lamellae and membrane coating granules 2 cyst linings were examined ultra-structurally. The epithelium lining of the cyst wall was thinner than that of vaginal mucosa but the surface keratinisation and ultra-structural features of the intercellular lamellae and membrane coating granules were similar. We concluded that vaginal mucosa is a useful substitute for oral mucosa in the cyst model.

  10. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  11. FLAGELLAR REGENERATION IN PROTOZOAN FLAGELLATES

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Child, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    The flagella of populations of three protozoan species (Ochromonas, Euglena, and Astasia) were amputated and allowed to regenerate. The kinetics of regeneration in all species were characterized by a lag phase during which there was no apparent flagellar elongation; this phase was followed by elongation at a rate which constantly decelerated as the original length was regained. Inhibition by cycloheximide applied at the time of flagellar amputation showed that flagellar regeneration was dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. This was supported by evidence showing that a greater amount of leucine was incorporated into the proteins of regenerating than nonregenerating flagella. The degree of inhibition of flagellar elongation observed with cycloheximide depended on how soon after flagellar amputation it was applied: when applied to cells immediately following amputation, elongation was almost completely inhibited, but its application at various times thereafter permitted considerable elongation to occur prior to complete inhibition of flagellar elongation. Hence, a sufficient number of precursors were synthesized and accumulated prior to addition of cycloheximide so that their assembly (elongation) could occur for a time under conditions in which protein synthesis had been inhibited. Evidence that the site of this assembly may be at the tip of the elongating flagellum was obtained from radioautographic studies in which the flagella of Ochromonas were permitted to regenerate part way in the absence of labeled leucine and to complete their regeneration in the presence of the isotope. Possible mechanisms which may be operating to control flagellar regeneration are discussed in light of these and other observations. PMID:6033540

  12. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  13. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2015-01-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  14. Proximodistal patterning during limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2005-03-15

    Regeneration is an ability that has been observed extensively throughout metazoan phylogeny. Amongst vertebrates, the urodele amphibians stand out for their exceptional capacity to regenerate body parts such as the limb. During this process, only the missing portion of the limb is precisely replaced--amputation in the upper arm results in regeneration of the entire limb, while amputation at the wrist produces a hand. Limb regeneration occurs through the formation of a local proliferative zone called the blastema. Here, we examine how proximodistal identity is established in the blastema. Using cell marking and transplantation experiments, we show that distal identities have already been established in the earliest stages of blastemas examined. Transplantation of cells into new environments is not sufficient to respecify cell identity. However, overexpression of the CD59, a cell surface molecule previously implicated in proximodistal identity during limb regeneration, causes distal blastema cells to translocate to a more proximal location and causes defects in the patterning of the distal elements of the regenerate. We suggest a model for the limb regeneration blastema where by 4 days post-amputation the blastema is already divided into distinct growth zones; the cells of each zone are already specified to give rise to upper arm, lower arm, and hand. PMID:15733667

  15. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  16. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns. PMID:18333906

  17. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns.

  18. Oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  19. Evaluation of advanced regenerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    The major considerations are discussed which will affect the selection of a ceramic regenerative heat exchanger for an improved 100 HP automotive gas turbine engine. The regenerator considered for this application is about 36cm in diameter. Regenerator comparisons are made on the basis of material, method of fabrication, cost, and performance. A regenerator inlet temperature of 1000 C is assumed for performance comparisons, and laboratory test results are discussed for material comparisons at 1100 and 1200 C. Engine test results using the Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engine are also discussed.

  20. Reconstruction of a full-thickness collagen-based human oral mucosal equivalent.

    PubMed

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Auxenfans, Céline; Pierrillas, Pascal; Justin, Virginie; Breton, Pierre; Burillon, Carole; Hasirci, Vasif; Damour, Odile

    2009-11-01

    Tissue engineered human oral mucosa has the potential to be applied to the closure of surgical wounds after tissue deficits due to facial trauma, malignant lesion surgery or preposthetic procedure. It can also be used to elucidate the biology and pathology of oral mucosa and as a model alternative to animals for safety testing of oral care products. Using the technology previously developed in our laboratory for the production of a skin equivalent, we were able to reconstruct a nonkeratinized full-thickness human oral mucosal equivalent closely mimicking human native oral mucosa. The successive coculture of human lamina propria fibroblasts and human oral epithelial cells isolated from the nonkeratinized region of oral cavity in a porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-chitosan scaffold gave rise to a lamina propria equivalent (LPE) and then to an oral mucosa equivalent (OME). The results of the histology, immunohistology and transmission electron microscopy of this OME demonstrated the presence of a nonkeratinized pluristratified and differentiated epithelium as in native nonkeratinized human oral mucosa expressing both K13 and K3/76. This epithelium was firmly anchored to the LPE by a continuous and ultrastructurally well-organized basement membrane. In the LPE, fibroblasts synthesized new extracellular matrix where the average collagen fibre diameter was 28.4 nm, close to that of native oral mucosa. The proliferative capacity of the basal cells was demonstrated by the expression of Ki67. PMID:19698987

  1. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  2. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  3. Oral Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on other parts of the mouth. Credit: NIDCR publication: Mouth Problems + HIV Download: Low-Resolution Image High- ...

  4. Scar-free wound healing and regeneration following tail loss in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Stephanie Lynn; Lungu, Ilinca Mihaela; Vickaryous, Matthew Kenneth

    2012-10-01

    Many lizards are able to undergo scar-free wound healing and regeneration following loss of the tail. In most instances, lizard tail loss is facilitated by autotomy, an evolved mechanism that permits the tail to be self-detached at pre-existing fracture planes. However, it has also been reported that the tail can regenerate following surgical amputation outside the fracture plane. In this study, we used the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, to investigate and compare wound healing and regeneration following autotomy at a fracture plane and amputation outside the fracture plane. Both forms of tail loss undergo a nearly identical sequence of events leading to scar-free wound healing and regeneration. Early wound healing is characterized by transient myofibroblasts and the formation of a highly proliferative wound epithelium immunoreactive for the wound keratin marker WE6. The new tail forms from what is commonly referred to as a blastema, a mass of proliferating mesenchymal-like cells. Blastema cells express the protease matrix metalloproteinase-9. Apoptosis (demonstrated by activated caspase 3 immunostaining) is largely restricted to isolated cells of the original and regenerating tail tissues, although cell death also occurs within dermal structures at the original-regenerated tissue interface and among clusters of newly formed myocytes. Furthermore, the autotomized tail is unique in demonstrating apoptosis among cells adjacent to the fracture planes. Unlike mammals, transforming growth factor-β3 is not involved in wound healing. We demonstrate that scar-free wound healing and regeneration are intrinsic properties of the tail, unrelated to the location or mode of tail detachment.

  5. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  6. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable.

  7. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend its useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle was manually controlled in demonstration, readily automated to start and stop according to signals and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is that regeneration bed provides highly concentrated biocide source (200 mg/L) when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  8. Regeneration in Alfalfa Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Skokut, Thomas A.; Manchester, Jill; Schaefer, Jacob

    1985-01-01

    The production of somatic embryos in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., cv Regen S) is increased 5- to 10-fold by alanine and proline. However, utilization of nitrogen for synthesis of protein from alanine, proline, glutamate, and glycine is not qualitatively different, even though the latter two amino acids do not increase somatic embryo formation. These determinations were made by 15N labeling with detection by nuclear magnetic resonance. Overall metabolism of the nitrogen of proline, alanine, glutamate, and glycine is also similar in two regenerating and nonregenerating genotypes with similar germplasm, except that the levels of free amino acids are consistently higher in the nonregenerating line. In addition, when regeneration is suppressed in either of the two regenerating lines, the level of intracellular free amino acids increases. This increased level of metabolites is the only direct evidence provided by analysis of nitrogen metabolism of differences between the regenerating and nonregenerating states in alfalfa. PMID:16664455

  9. Control of growth during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongping; Irvine, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration is a process by which organisms replace damaged or amputated organs to restore normal body parts. Regeneration of many tissues or organs requires proliferation of stem cells or stem cell-like blastema cells. This regenerative growth is often initiated by cell death pathways induced by damage. The executors of regenerative growth are a group of growth-promoting signaling pathways, including JAK/STAT, EGFR, Hippo/YAP, and Wnt/β-catenin. These pathways are also essential to developmental growth, but in regeneration, they are activated in distinct ways and often at higher strengths, under the regulation by certain stress-responsive signaling pathways, including JNK signaling. Growth suppressors are important in termination of regeneration to prevent unlimited growth and also contribute to the loss of regenerative capacity in nonregenerative organs. Here, we review cellular and molecular growth regulation mechanisms induced by organ damage in several models with different regenerative capacities. PMID:24512707

  10. Lung development: orchestrating the generation and regeneration of a complex organ

    PubMed Central

    Herriges, Michael; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory system, which consists of the lungs, trachea and associated vasculature, is essential for terrestrial life. In recent years, extensive progress has been made in defining the temporal progression of lung development, and this has led to exciting discoveries, including the derivation of lung epithelium from pluripotent stem cells and the discovery of developmental pathways that are targets for new therapeutics. These discoveries have also provided new insights into the regenerative capacity of the respiratory system. This Review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lung development and regeneration, which will hopefully lead to better insights into both congenital and acquired lung diseases. PMID:24449833

  11. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  12. Expression of Two Classes of Pax6 Transcripts in Reprogramming Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells of the Adult Newt.

    PubMed

    Inami, Wataru; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Nakamura, Kenta; Yoshikawa, Taro; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-02-01

    The adult newt has the remarkable ability to regenerate a functional retina from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even when the neural retina (NR) is completely lost from the eye. In this system, RPE cells are reprogrammed into a unique state of multipotent cells, named RPESCs, in an early phase of retinal regeneration. However, the signals that trigger reprogramming remain unknown. Here, to approach this issue we focused on Pax6, a transcription factor known to be expressed in RPESCs. We first identified four classes (v1, v2, v3 and v4) of Pax6 variants in the eye of adult newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster. These variants were expressed in most tissues of the intact eye in different combinations but not in the RPE, choroid or sclera. On the basis of this information, we investigated the expression of Pax6 in RPE cells after the NR was removed from the eye by surgery (retinectomy), and found that two classes (v1 and v2) of Pax6 variants were newly expressed in RPE cells 10 days after retinectomy, both in vivo and in vitro (RLEC system). In the RLEC system, we found that Pax6 expression is mediated through a pathway separate from the MEK-ERK pathway, which is required for cell cycle re-entry of RPE cells. These results predict the existence of a pathway that may be of fundamental importance to a better understanding of the reprogramming of RPE cells in vivo. PMID:26853865

  13. Transcription factor p63 controls the reserve status but not the stemness of horizontal basal cells in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schnittke, Nikolai; Herrick, Daniel B.; Lin, Brian; Peterson, Jesse; Coleman, Julie H.; Packard, Adam I.; Jang, Woochan; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue stem cells can serve two broad functions: to participate actively in the maintenance and regeneration of a tissue or to wait in reserve and participate only when activated from a dormant state. The adult olfactory epithelium, a site for ongoing, life-long, robust neurogenesis, contains both of these functional stem cell types. Globose basal cells (GBCs) act as the active stem cell population and can give rise to all the differentiated cells found in the normal tissue. Horizontal basal cells (HBCs) act as reserve stem cells and remain dormant unless activated by tissue injury. Here we show that HBC activation following injury by the olfactotoxic gas methyl bromide is coincident with the down-regulation of protein 63 (p63) but anticipates HBC proliferation. Gain- and loss-of-function studies show that this down-regulation of p63 is necessary and sufficient for HBC activation. Moreover, activated HBCs give rise to GBCs that persist for months and continue to act as bona fide stem cells by participating in tissue maintenance and regeneration over the long term. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the dynamics between tissue stem cell subtypes and demonstrates that p63 regulates the reserve state but not the stem cell status of HBCs. PMID:26305958

  14. [Hormone-mediated reactions in the endosalpinx epithelium].

    PubMed

    Glukhovets, B I; Ukhov, Iu I; Lebedev, S S; Plastun, G A; Bulaeva, V P

    1983-07-01

    The epithelium of normal uterine tubes resected in 38 young women of the child-bearing age during the periods of the maximal physiological fluctuations of the ovarian steroid hormones levels has been studied. The correlative dependence between the morphometrical data and the results of quanitative biochemical analysis of the estrogen excretion has been investigated. The morphometric method reliably reflects the hormone-dependent variabilities of the oviduct epithelium and makes it possible to perform an objective morphological evaluation of the ovarian functional activity. The height and specific density of cells in the epithelial layer, portion of the aciliary cells and nuclear volume of the ciliary cells are the most important for diagnosis as compared to the excretory level of the estrogenic hormones. PMID:6625907

  15. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  16. The dorsal lingual epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa (Chelonia, Cryptodira).

    PubMed

    Josef Beisser, Christian; Lemell, Patrick; Weisgram, Josef

    2004-03-01

    This study employed light microscopic (LM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods to provide detailed morphological information on the histological and ultrastructural features of the dorsal tongue epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa. SEM revealed columnar papillae laterally, as well as papillae, which tend to have a ridge-like appearance in the center of the tongue. LM and TEM showed three different zones of lingual epithelium: a stratified apical area with serous cells at the top of the papillae, a stratified lateral area with both serous and mucus cells, and an unstratified glandular area consisting of distinct glandular ducts with mucus cells. Comparison with morphological data from other turtles shows that the lingual epithelial structure in R. p. incisa is in accordance with that observed for other generalized omnivores which prefer a terrestrial lifestyle, thus matching the ecological information about this species.

  17. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  18. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  19. Gallbladder epithelium as a niche for chronic Salmonella carriage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S

    2013-08-01

    Although typhoid fever has been intensively studied, chronic typhoid carriage still represents a problem for the transmission and persistence of the disease in areas of endemicity. This chronic state is highly associated with the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder of infected carriers upon which Salmonella can form robust biofilms. However, we hypothesize that in addition to gallstones, the gallbladder epithelium aids in the establishment/maintenance of chronic carriage. In this work, we present evidence of the role of the gallbladder epithelium in chronic carriage by a mechanism involving invasion, intracellular persistence, and biofilm formation. Salmonella was able to adhere to and invade polarized gallbladder epithelial cells apically in the absence and presence of bile in a Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-dependent manner. Intracellular replication of Salmonella was also evident at 12 and 24 h postinvasion. A flowthrough system revealed that Salmonella is able to adhere to and form extensive bacterial foci on gallbladder epithelial cells as early as 12 h postinoculation. In vivo experiments using a chronic mouse model of typhoid carriage showed invasion and damage of the gallbladder epithelium and lamina propria up to 2 months after Salmonella infection, with an abundant presence of macrophages, a relative absence of neutrophils, and extrusion of infected epithelial cells. Additionally, microcolonies of Salmonella cells were evident on the surface of the mouse gallbladder epithelia up to 21 days postinfection. These data reveal a second potential mechanism, intracellular persistence and/or bacterial aggregation in/on the gallbladder epithelium with luminal cell extrusion, for Salmonella maintenance in the gallbladder.

  20. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  1. Dietary nitrogen reduction enhances urea transport across goat rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muscher, A S; Schröder, B; Breves, G; Huber, K

    2010-10-01

    Ruminants are very capable of adapting their N homeostasis to a reduced dietary N intake. However, the limits of this physiological adaptation are still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the quantity of dietary N intake at which the needs of the animal are still satisfied. A study was performed in young White Saanen goats under conditions of dietary N reduction. Different semisynthetic diets with 19 to 7% CP were fed. Urea transport rates across the rumen epithelium from the blood into the ruminal fluid were quantified by Ussing chamber experiments. Reduced N intake increased urea transport rates across the mucosa, which could be inhibited by phloretin. The role of parietal urease in driving urea transfer across the epithelium was negligible because its activity was inhibited by antibiotics during in vitro incubations of the epithelium. Concentrations of ammonia in the ruminal fluid were decreased by reducing dietary N intake, accompanied by diminished urease activity at the smallest dietary N intake. Over the range of plasma urea concentrations observed in the different feeding groups, salivary urea concentrations were 73% of plasma urea concentrations. By plotting plasma urea concentrations against serosal to mucosal urea flux rates, a threshold at 1.75 mmol of urea/L of plasma could be assessed, below which urea flux was strongly increased. This indicates that rumen urea transfer could be stimulated by decreased plasma urea concentrations via unknown mechanisms. The physiological relevance of this adaptation of the rumen epithelium is that it is considered a central mechanism in the N homeostasis of growing goats under reduced N intake.

  2. ORAL LICHEN PLANUS AND ORAL LICHENOID REACTION--AN UPDATE.

    PubMed

    Rotim, Zeljko; Bolanca, Zeljana; Rogulj, Ana Andabak; Andabak, Matej; Boras, Vanja Vucićević; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir

    2015-12-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) are clinically and histopathologically similar diseases. Whereas OLP is a consequence of T cell mediated autoinflammatory process to a still unknown antigen, OLR might be caused by drugs, dental restorative materials and dental plaque. Pubmed was searched and 24 publications published over the last three years regarding etiology, diagnosis and malignant alteration were included in this study. Patients with OLR who have amalgam fillings near lesions should have them replaced, i.e. when possible they should be referred to patch test, as well as when drug-induced OLR are suspected. OLR lesions induced by drugs should disappear when the offending drug has been discontinued. Histology finding in OLR consists of more eosinophils, plasma cells and granulocytes in comparison to OLP lesions. Furthermore, OLP lesions showed more p53, bcl-2 and COX-2 positivity when compared to OLR. OLP is characterized by infiltration, atrophic epithelium, rete pegs and Max Joseph spaces, while deep infiltration into connective tissue and hyperkeratosis were the criteria for making the diagnosis of OLR. The number of degranulated mastocytes in the reticular layer, as well as the number of capillaries was higher in OLR in comparison to OLP. It seems that OLR are more prone to malignant alteration in comparison to OLP. PMID:27017728

  3. The oxidant role of 4-hydroxynonenal in corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longlong; Zong, Rongrong; Zhou, Jing; Ge, Lianping; Zhou, Tong; Ma, Jian-xing; Liu, Zuguo; Zhou, Yueping

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE or HNE) is a main endogenous product of cellular lipid peroxidation in tissues and is reported to play pathogenic roles in eye diseases. Here we investigated the association between 4-HNE and oxidative stress in the corneal epithelium. 4-HNE suppressed the cell viability of human corneal epithelial cells (HCE) in a concentration dependent manner. 4-HNE significantly increased the level of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), a marker of oxidative stress, in HCE cells and corneal epithelium of rats by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot analysis. To its underlying mechanistic on ROS system, 4-HNE elevated the ROS generation enzyme NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and induced the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2) and its downstream effectors: NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1) (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP). Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and ROS scavenger, antagonized the inhibitory and oxidant effects of 4-HNE on the corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion, 4-HNE plays an oxidant role in the corneal epithelium and this work provides a new strategy for the pathogenesis and treatment of corneal diseases.

  4. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  5. Integrin Beta 1 Suppresses Multilayering of a Simple Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jichao; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelia are classified as either simple, a single cell layer thick, or stratified (multilayered). Stratified epithelia arise from simple epithelia during development, and transcription factor p63 functions as a key positive regulator of epidermal stratification. Here we show that deletion of integrin beta 1 (Itgb1) in the developing mouse airway epithelium abrogates airway branching and converts this monolayer epithelium into a multilayer epithelium with more than 10 extra layers. Mutant lung epithelial cells change mitotic spindle orientation to seed outer layers, and cells in different layers become molecularly and functionally distinct, hallmarks of normal stratification. However, mutant lung epithelial cells do not activate p63 and do not switch to the stratified keratin profile of epidermal cells. These data, together with previous data implicating Itgb1 in regulation of epidermal stratification, suggest that the simple-versus-stratified developmental decision may involve not only stratification inducers like p63 but suppressors like Itgb1 that prevent simple epithelia from inappropriately activating key steps in the stratification program. PMID:23285215

  6. In vitro biology of corneal epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Yanoff, M

    1975-01-01

    Four main areas are explored: (1) the proper culture medium for corneal tissue; (2) the effect of serum on in vitro tissue growth; (3) the in vitro interrelationships between corneal epithelium and endothelium; and (4) the biology of cultures of whole corneas (organ cultures). Modified Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) proved to be an excellent culture fluid. Corneal tissue could be grown in MEM without serum or clot, thus providing a defined culture medium. The in vitro biology of outgrowths of multilayered corneal epithelium and monolayered corneal endothelium are discussed. Contact inhibition between epithelium and endothelium is demonstrated in whole corneal (organ) cultures. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 A FIGURE 14 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 17 A FIGURE 17 B FIGURE 17 C FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B PMID:1246815

  7. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  8. The pocket epithelium: a light- and electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Glauser, W; Schroeder, H E

    1982-03-01

    The POCKET epithelium is important for the pathogenesis of gingivitis and periodontitis. However, this epithelial variant has never been adequately described. The bioptic material with supraalveolar pockets originated from previous studies in which cotton floss ligatures were placed around the crowns of premolars in eight dogs. After periods of 4 to 21 days or up to 5 months, block biopsies comprising dental and gingival tissues were taken on the buccal side. The tissues were processed for light- and electron microscopic examination. The observations revealed that the pocket epithelium (1) does not attach to the tooth, (2) forms irregular ridges and, over connective tissue papillae, thin coverings which occasionally ulcerate, (3) consists of cells only some of which show a tendency to differentiate, (4) presents a basal lamina complex with discontinuities and multiplications, and (5) is infiltrated mainly by lymphocytes, T- and B-blasts and plasma cells, and is transmigrated by neutrophilic granulocytes. It is concluded that the mosaic-like structure of the pocket epithelium reflects the heterogeneity of the adjacent plaque, that this structure together with the absence of membrane coating granules is the basis for an extremely high permeability, and that epithelial ridges may conduct and collect foreign substances which thereby become more easily recognizable for leukocytes.

  9. The stat3/socs3a pathway is a key regulator of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin; Wang, Dongmei; Renaud, Gabriel; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; Wilson, Alexander F; Burgess, Shawn M

    2012-08-01

    All nonmammalian vertebrates studied can regenerate inner ear mechanosensory receptors (i.e., hair cells) (Corwin and Cotanche, 1988; Lombarte et al., 1993; Baird et al., 1996), but mammals possess only a very limited capacity for regeneration after birth (Roberson and Rubel, 1994). As a result, mammals experience permanent deficiencies in hearing and balance once their inner ear hair cells are lost. The mechanisms of hair cell regeneration are poorly understood. Because the inner ear sensory epithelium is highly conserved in all vertebrates (Fritzsch et al., 2007), we chose to study hair cell regeneration mechanism in adult zebrafish, hoping the results would be transferrable to inducing hair cell regeneration in mammals. We defined the comprehensive network of genes involved in hair cell regeneration in the inner ear of adult zebrafish with the powerful transcriptional profiling technique digital gene expression, which leverages the power of next-generation sequencing ('t Hoen et al., 2008). We also identified a key pathway, stat3/socs3, and demonstrated its role in promoting hair cell regeneration through stem cell activation, cell division, and differentiation. In addition, transient pharmacological inhibition of stat3 signaling accelerated hair cell regeneration without overproducing cells. Taking other published datasets into account (Sano et al., 1999; Schebesta et al., 2006; Dierssen et al., 2008; Riehle et al., 2008; Zhu et al., 2008; Qin et al., 2009), we propose that the stat3/socs3 pathway is a key response in all tissue regeneration and thus an important therapeutic target for a broad application in tissue repair and injury healing. PMID:22855815

  10. Anti-inflammatory and protective effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer on oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Hiromichi; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Hirao, Kouji; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Koji; Murakami, Keiji; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2015-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease initiated by a microbial biofilm formed in the periodontal pocket. Gingival epithelium plays important roles as the first physical barrier to bacterial invasion and in orchestrating the innate immune reaction via toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize various bacterial products, and maintaining its function. Newly developed oral care products to inhibit bacterial adherence, subsequent inflammatory reaction and protect the gingival epithelium are expected. We previously reported that 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer coating decreased bacterial adhesion to human oral keratinocytes, RT-7, and mouth-rinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacteria. In this study, regarding the possibility of MPC-polymer application for preventing the adherence of periodontal pathogen, subsequent inflammatory reaction and protection of gingival epithelium, we examined the effects of MPC-polymer on the adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, major periodontitis-related pathogen, and TLR2 ligand to RT-7 and subsequent interleukin (IL)-8 production. MPC-polymer treatment significantly reduced P. gingivalis adherence by 44% and TLR2-mediated IL-8 production by blocking the binding of its specific-ligand in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MPC-polymer pretreatment protected RT-7 from injury by chemical irritants, cetylpyridinium chloride. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is potentially useful for oral care to prevent oral infection and to maintain oral epithelial function. PMID:24753309

  11. Influence of the mesenchymal cell source on oral epithelial development.

    PubMed

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Rovere, Marie Rose; Haftek, Marek; Hasirci, Vasif; Damour, Odile

    2012-03-01

    The extent of the influence of mesenchymal tissue on epithelial development is still debated, and elucidation of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions should be of relevance for controlling normal as well as pathological growth and development. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the influence of the mesenchymal cell type on oral mucosa epithelial development in vitro, using tissue-engineering principles, by including three different sources for mesenchymal cell type, viz. oral mucosa, skin and cornea, each of them presenting a distinct type of epithelium in situ. We investigated epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, considering both morphological criteria and protein expression (filaggrin, keratin 10, keratin 12, keratin 13 and laminin 5). The results of the histology, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy of the three types of tissue-engineered constructs composed of mesenchymal cells of different sources (oral, dermal and corneal fibroblasts) and of the same oral epithelial cells showed that the mesenchymal cell source had a significant influence on the thickness and ultrastructure of the epithelium, but not on the differentiation of oral epithelial cells, which might be an intrinsic property of these cells due to their genetic programming. PMID:21548135

  12. Identification of Human Fibroblast Cell Lines as a Feeder Layer for Human Corneal Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Rong; Bian, Fang; Lin, Jing; Su, Zhitao; Qu, Yangluowa; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2012-01-01

    There is a great interest in using epithelium generated in vitro for tissue bioengineering. Mouse 3T3 fibroblasts have been used as a feeder layer to cultivate human epithelia including corneal epithelial cells for more than 3 decades. To avoid the use of xeno-components, we evaluated human fibroblasts as an alternative feeder supporting human corneal epithelial regeneration. Five human fibroblast cell lines were used for evaluation with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts as a control. Human epithelial cells isolated from fresh corneal limbal tissue were seeded on these feeders. Colony forming efficiency (CFE) and cell growth capacity were evaluated on days 5–14. The phenotype of the regenerated epithelia was evaluated by morphology and immunostaining with epithelial markers. cDNA microarray was used to analyze the gene expression profile of the supportive human fibroblasts. Among 5 strains of human fibroblasts evaluated, two newborn foreskin fibroblast cell lines, Hs68 and CCD1112Sk, were identified to strongly support human corneal epithelial growth. Tested for 10 passages, these fibroblasts continually showed a comparative efficiency to the 3T3 feeder layer for CFE and growth capacity of human corneal epithelial cells. Limbal epithelial cells seeded at 1×104 in a 35-mm dish (9.6 cm2) grew to confluence (about 1.87–2.41×106 cells) in 12–14 days, representing 187–241 fold expansion with over 7–8 doublings on these human feeders. The regenerated epithelia expressed K3, K12, connexin 43, p63, EGFR and integrin β1, resembling the phenotype of human corneal epithelium. DNA microarray revealed 3 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated genes, which may be involved in the functions of human fibroblast feeders. These findings demonstrate that commercial human fibroblast cell lines support human corneal epithelial regeneration, and have potential use in tissue bioengineering for corneal reconstruction. PMID:22723892

  13. Raman microspectroscopic study of oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Isha; Mamgain, Hitesh; Deshmukh, Atul; Kukreja, Lekha; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancer is the most common cancer among Indian males, with 5-year- survival-rates of less than 50%. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopic methods in non-invasive and objective diagnosis of oral cancers and confounding factors has already been demonstrated. The present Raman microspectroscopic study was undertaken for in-depth and site-specific analysis of normal and tumor tissues. 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained sections from 20 tissues were accrued. Raman data of 160 x 60 μm and 140 x 140 μm in normal and tumor sections, respectively, were acquired using WITec alpha 300R equipped with 532 nm laser, 50X objective and 600 gr/mm grating. Spectral data were corrected for CCDresponse, background. First-derivitized and vector-normalized data were then subjected to K-mean cluster analysis to generate Raman maps and correlated with their respective histopathology. In normal sections, stratification among epithelial layers i.e. basal, intermediate, superficial was observed. Tumor, stromal and inflammatory regions were identified in case of tumor section. Extracted spectra of the pathologically annotated regions were subjected to Principal component analysis. Findings suggest that all three layers of normal epithelium can be differentiated against tumor cells. In epithelium, basal and superficial layers can be separated while intermediate layer show misclassifications. In tumors, discrimination of inflammatory regions from tumor cells and tumor-stroma regions were observed. Finding of the study indicate Raman mapping can lead to molecular level insights of normal and pathological states.

  14. Effects of wheat germ agglutinin on human gastrointestinal epithelium: Insights from an experimental model of immune/epithelial cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Tomelleri, Carlo; Zanetti, Chiara; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Fusi, Marina; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant protein that binds specifically to sugars expressed, among many others, by human gastrointestinal epithelial and immune cells. WGA is a toxic compound and an anti-nutritional factor, but recent works have shown that it may have potential as an anti-tumor drug and as a carrier for oral drugs. To quantitate the toxicity threshold for WGA on normal epithelial cells we previously investigated the effects of the lectin on differentiated Caco2 cells, and showed that in the micromolar range of concentrations WGA could alter the integrity of the epithelium layer and increase its permeability to both mannitol and dextran. WGA was shown to be uptaken by Caco2 cells and only {approx} 0.1% molecules were observed to cross the epithelium layer by transcytosis. Here we show that at nanomolar concentrations WGA is unexpectedly bioactive on immune cells. The supernatants of WGA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can alter the integrity of the epithelium layer when administered to the basolateral side of differentiated Caco2 cells and the effects can be partially inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against IL1, IL6 and IL8. At nanomolar concentrations WGA stimulates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus the biological activity of WGA should be reconsidered by taking into account the effects of WGA on the immune system at the gastrointestinal interface. These results shed new light onto the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of gastrointestinal disorders observed in vivo upon dietary intake of wheat-based foods.

  15. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  16. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  17. Current strategies for the protection, regeneration, and replacement of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Maniu, Alma; Cosgarea, Marcel

    2012-08-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, which is often caused by degeneration of hair cells in the auditory epithelium, is permanent because lost hair cells cannot be replaced in mammals. In recent years, important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in hair cell damage and, more importantly, the reasons why hair cells cannot be regenerated spontaneously in mammals. The knowledge of the factors implicated in hair cell fate determination and of the mechanisms of hair cell regeneration in birds could help in the effort to find a treatment for hearing loss. Although cochlear implant technology is advanced, it still provides only moderate hearing capacity in sensorineural deaf individuals. Inducible stem cells and molecular therapies are appealing alternatives to the cochlear implant as they hold the promise of a cure. It is important to develop a safe and effective means to deliver stem cells or genes to the correct sites to stimulate regeneration in the right place. This review aims to synthesize the present knowledge in the field of sensorineural hearing loss, focusing on the mechanisms involved in hair cell development and regeneration, with the specific purpose of identifying new therapeutic strategies. Despite tremendous progress in this field, most of the concepts discussed in this review are still in the experimental stage.

  18. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability- even as an adult -to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:27640672

  19. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts

    PubMed Central

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability– even as an adult –to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:27640672

  20. The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, E. A. B.; Delorme, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although amniotes (reptiles, including birds, and mammals) are capable of replacing certain tissues, complete appendage regeneration is rare. Perhaps the most striking example is the lizard tail. Tail loss initiates a spontaneous epimorphic (blastema‐mediated) regenerative program, resulting in a fully functional but structurally non‐identical replacement. Here we review lizard tail regeneration with a particular focus on the blastema. In many lizards, the original tail has evolved a series of fracture planes, anatomical modifications that permit the tail to be self‐detached or autotomized. Following tail loss, the wound site is covered by a specialized wound epithelium under which the blastema develops. An outgrowth of the spinal cord, the ependymal tube, plays a key role in governing growth (and likely patterning) of the regenerate tail. In some species (e.g., geckos), the blastema forms as an apical aggregation of proliferating cells, similar to that of urodeles and teleosts. For other species (e.g., anoles) the identification of a proliferative blastema is less obvious, suggesting an unexpected diversity in regenerative mechanisms among tail‐regenerating lizards. PMID:27499867

  1. Distribution and time course of hair cell regeneration in the pigeon utricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, B. J.; Frank, T. C.; Newlands, S. D.; Dickman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular and cochlear regeneration following ototoxic insult from aminoglycoside antibiotics has been well documented, particularly in birds. In the present study, intraotic application of a 2 mg streptomycin paste was used to achieve complete vestibular hair cell destruction in pigeons (Columba livia) while preserving regenerative ability. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify hair cell density longitudinally during regeneration in three different utricular macula locations, including the striola, central and peripheral regions. The utricular epithelium was void of stereocilia (indicating hair cell loss) at 4 days after intraotic treatment with streptomycin. At 2 weeks the stereocilia began to appear randomly and mostly in an immature form. However, when present most kinocilia were polarized toward the developing striola. Initially, regeneration occurred more rapidly in the central and peripheral regions of the utricle as compared to the striola. As regeneration proceeded from 2 to 12 weeks, hair cell density in the striola region equaled the density noted in the central and peripheral regions. At 24 weeks, hair cell density of the central and peripheral regions was equal to normal values, however the striola region had a slightly greater hair cell density than that observed for normal animals.

  2. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-09-19

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability- even as an adult -to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders.

  3. Survivin expression in oral lichen planus: Role in malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Paremala, K; Makarla, Soumya; Sudhakar, M; Reshma, V

    2016-01-01

    Context: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a potentially malignant disease with a prevalence rate of 0.5–2.2%. It is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, in which cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells trigger apoptosis of the basal cells of oral epithelium. The reported progression of OLP to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) ranges from 0.4% to 6.5%. Apoptosis plays a major role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The evasion of apoptosis in the form of dysregulation of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) may lead to malignant transformation. Survivin belongs to the second gene family of IAPs, which is overexpressed in many tumors such as OSCC and gastric carcinomas, and its expression is widely involved in apoptosis as well as in tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: Sections were obtained from the paraffin-embedded archival blocks of patients diagnosed histologically as OLP, and cases with normal epithelium were used for comparison whereas cases with OSCC were used as positive control. Results: We analyzed the expression of survivin in OLP and normal epithelium. Survivin expression with moderate intensity was seen in the cells of basal layer with nuclear positivity in cases of OLP, whereas mild to nil expression was seen in normal epithelium with nuclear and cytoplasmic positivity in different layers. Conclusions: Survivin positivity was seen predominantly in the basal cells of OLP suggesting increased longevity of these cells which in turn might acquire dysplastic changes leading to increased risk of malignant transformation of this premalignant condition. Although the conversion rate may be low, the potential exists in the indolent course of the disease. PMID:27601815

  4. Hyaluronic acid production and hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during lens regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyk, W.M.; Zalik, S.E.; Dimitrov, E.

    1987-09-01

    The process of lens regeneration in newts involves the dedifferentiation of pigmented iris epithelial cells and their subsequent conversion into lens fibers. In vivo this cell-type conversion is restricted to the dorsal region of the iris. We have examined the patterns of hyaluronate accumulation and endogenous hyaluronidase activity in the newt iris during the course of lens regeneration in vivo. Accumulation of newly synthesized hyaluronate was estimated from the uptake of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine into cetylpyridinium chloride-precipitable material that was sensitive to Streptomyces hyaluronidase. Endogenous hyaluronidase activity was determined from the quantity of reducing N-acetylhexosamine released upon incubation of iris tissue extract with exogenous hyaluronate substrate. We found that incorporation of label into hyaluronate was consistently higher in the regeneration-activated irises of lentectomized eyes than in control irises from sham-operated eyes. Hyaluronate labeling was higher in the dorsal (lens-forming) region of the iris than in ventral (non-lens-forming) iris tissue during the regeneration process. Label accumulation into hyaluronate was maximum between 10 and 15 days after lentectomy, the period of most pronounced dedifferentiation in the dorsal iris epithelium. Both normal and regenerating irises demonstrated a high level of endogenous hyaluronidase activity with a pH optimum of 3.5-4.0. Hyaluronidase activity was 1.7 to 2 times higher in dorsal iris tissue than in ventral irises both prior to lentectomy and throughout the regeneration process. We suggest that enhanced hyaluronate accumulation may facilitate the dedifferentiation of iris epithelial cells in the dorsal iris and prevent precocious withdrawal from the cell cycle. The high level of hyaluronidase activity in the dorsal iris may promote the turnover and remodeling of extracellular matrix components required for cell-type conversion.

  5. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, Woo K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  6. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  7. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D. N.; Vallance, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program aims to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. The major cause of failure of early gas turbine regenerators was found to be chemical attack of the ceramic material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. Results of 53,065 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, show promise. Five aluminum silicate cores attained the durability objective of 10,000 hours at 800 C (1472 F). Another aluminum silicate core shows minimal evidence of chemical attack after 8071 hours at 982 C (1800 F). Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are included.

  8. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L. ); Naruse, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows inventory by difference'' for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  9. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Naruse, Y.

    1992-03-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows ``inventory by difference`` for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  10. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  11. Catalyst regeneration with flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes an integrated once through reactor system for regenerating acidic medium pore zeolite olefin or oxygenate feedstock conversion catalyst with flue gas. It comprises in combination: fluid catalytic cracking catalyst regenerator means for providing the flue gas containing oxygen; at least two fixed bed reactor means for containing the zeolite catalyst, the reactor means receivably connected to the regenerator means for alternately receiving the flue gas therefrom; feedstock conduit means connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring the feedstock thereto; conversion product conduit means receivably connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring the product therefrom; flue gas conduit means receivably connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring flue gas therefrom.

  12. Feasibility of a porcine oral mucosa equivalent: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Hemar, Julie; Hasirci, Vasif; Breton, Pierre; Damour, Odile

    2012-08-01

    Oral tissue engineering aims to treat and fill tissue deficits caused by congenital defects, facial trauma, or malignant lesion surgery, as well as to study the biology of oral mucosa. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) require a large animal model to evaluate cell-based devices, including tissue-engineered oral mucosa, prior to initiating human clinical studies. Porcine oral mucosa is non-keratinized and resembles that of humans more closely than any other animal in terms of structure and composition; however, there have not been any reports on the reconstruction of a porcine oral mucosa equivalent, probably due to the difficulty to culture porcine fibroblasts. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a 3D porcine oral mucosa equivalent based on a collagen-GAG-chitosan scaffold, as well as reconstructed porcine epithelium by using an amniotic membrane as support, or without any support in form of epithelial cell sheets by using thermoresponsive culture plates. Explants technique was used for the isolation of the porcine fibroblasts and a modified fibroblast medium containing 20% fetal calf serum was used for their culture. The histological and transmission electron microscopic analyses of the resulting porcine oral mucosa models showed the presence of non-keratinized epithelia expressing keratin 13, the major differentiation marker of non-keratinized oral mucosa, in all models, and the presence of newly synthesized collagen fibers in the lamina propria equivalent of the full-thickness model, indicating the functionality of porcine fibroblasts. PMID:22309108

  13. Goblet cell targeting nanoparticle containing drug-loaded micelle cores for oral delivery of insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiwen; Xu, Yining; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yuan

    2015-12-30

    Oral administration of insulin remains a challenge due to its poor enzymatic stability and inefficient permeation across epithelium. We herein developed a novel self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles by coating insulin-loaded dodecylamine-graft-γ-polyglutamic acid micelles with trimethyl chitosan (TMC). The TMC material was also conjugated with a goblet cell-targeting peptide to enhance the affinity of nanoparticles with epithelium. The developed nanoparticle possessed significantly enhanced colloid stability, drug protection ability and ameliorated drug release profile compared with graft copolymer micelles or ionic crosslinked TMC nanoparticles. For in vitro evaluation, Caco-2/HT29-MTX-E12 cell co-cultures, which composed of not only enterocyte-like cells but also mucus-secreting cells and secreted mucus layer, were applied to mimic the epithelium. Intracellular uptake and transcellular permeation of encapsulated drug were greatly enhanced for NPs as compared with free insulin or micelles. Goblet cell-targeting modification further increased the affinity of NPs with epithelium with changed cellular internalization mechanism. The influence of mucus on the cell uptake was also investigated. Ex vivo performed with rat mucosal tissue demonstrated that the nanoparticle could facilitate the permeation of encapsulated insulin across the intestinal epithelium. In vivo study preformed on diabetic rats showed that the orally administered nanoparticles elicited a prolonged hypoglycemic response with relative bioavailability of 7.05%.

  14. Ultrastructural effects of the nonsteroidal contraceptive centchroman on rat uterine luminal epithelium in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, P K; Nilsson, B O

    1984-01-01

    Centchroman (3,4-trans-2,2-dimethyl-3-phenyl-4-p-(beta-pyrrolidinoethoxy) -phenyl-7-methoxychroman), a nonsteroidal contraceptive developed by the Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India, was administered orally (1.25 mg/kg) to rats in a state of experimentally delayed implantation both during the progesterone treatment (preattachment stage) and in conjunction with the addition of estradiol (attachment stage). When given during preattachment, centchroman did not change the characteristic ultrastructure of the uterine epithelium significantly, except that there was an increase in the size and number of secondary lysosomes. Thus, no definite estrogenic or antiprogestational potency of centchroman was observed in this test system. However, when administered simultaneously with, before, or after estrogen during attachment, centchroman both abolished the estradiol-induced attachment reaction and produced or potentiated some changes of an estrogen type. Thus, no typical antiestrogen action but the sign of an estrogen action was observed in this test system. Further, the drug also produced certain specific changes in the lysosomal system of the epithelial cells during attachment. It is suggested that, in addition to some estrogenic effects, centchroman also possesses specific cellular effects, probably of a nonhormonal nature.

  15. Factors related to inflammation of the ovarian epithelium and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ness, R B; Grisso, J A; Cottreau, C; Klapper, J; Vergona, R; Wheeler, J E; Morgan, M; Schlesselman, J J

    2000-03-01

    Previous epidemiologic observations consistently suggest that suppression of ovulation, tubal ligation, and hysterectomy reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and that perineal talc use increases the risk. We examined these and other risk factors in the context of a new hypothesis: that inflammation may play a role in ovarian cancer risk. Ovulation entails ovarian epithelial inflammation; talc, endometriosis, cysts, and hyperthyroidism may be associated with inflammatory responses of the ovarian epithelium; gynecologic surgery may preclude irritants from reaching the ovaries via ascension from the lower genital tract. We evaluated these risk factors in a population-based case-control study. Cases 20-69 years of age with a recent diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (767) were compared with community controls (1,367). We found that a number of reproductive and contraceptive factors that suppress ovulation, including gravidity, breast feeding, and oral contraception, reduced the risk of ovarian cancer. Environmental factors and medical conditions that increased risk included talc use, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, and hyperthyroidism. Gynecologic surgery including hysterectomy and tubal ligation were protective. Tubal ligation afforded a risk reduction even 20 or more years after the surgery. The spectrum of associations provides support for the hypothesis that inflammation may mediate ovarian cancer risk.

  16. Ion transport across an isolated preparation of sheep rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, H G; Harrison, F A; Keynes, R D; Zurich, L

    1972-04-01

    1. The fluxes of isotopically labelled sodium, potassium and chloride passing in each direction across isolated sheets of rumen epithelium from the sheep have been measured under short-circuit conditions.2. With both sides of the epithelium bathed in chloride Ringer the mean sodium fluxes were 2.85 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 1.28 mumole/cm(2).hr in the reverse direction. In sulphate Ringer the sodium fluxes were 1.64 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.54 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.3. In chloride Ringer the mean potassium fluxes were 0.18 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.54 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen. In sulphate Ringer the potassium fluxes were 0.07 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.35 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.4. In chloride Ringer the mean chloride fluxes were 4.89 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 3.78 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.5. In chloride Ringer the mean value of the short-circuit current was 13 muA/cm(2), corresponding to a flux of 0.49 muequiv/cm(2).hr. When sulphate was substituted for chloride, the short-circuit current was increased by about 40%, and the net flux of sodium from rumen to blood fell by 30%.6. Neither the sodium nor the chloride fluxes changed significantly when the epithelium was temporarily open-circuited.

  17. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; St. George, J.A.; Wilson, D.W.; Dungworth, D.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components.

  18. In vitro reconstruction of human junctional and sulcular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dabija-Wolter, G; Bakken, V; Cimpan, M R; Johannessen, A C; Costea, D E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to develop and characterize standardized in vitro three-dimensional organotypic models of human junctional epithelium (JE) and sulcular epithelium (SE). METHODS Organotypic models were constructed by growing human normal gingival keratinocytes on top of collagen matrices populated with gingival fibroblasts (GF) or periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PLF). Tissues obtained were harvested at different time points and assessed for epithelial morphology, proliferation (Ki67), expression of JE-specific markers (ODAM and FDC-SP), cytokeratins (CK), transglutaminase, filaggrin, and basement membrane proteins (collagen IV and laminin1). RESULTS The epithelial component in 3- and 5-day organotypics showed limited differentiation and expressed Ki-67, ODAM, FDC-SP, CK 8, 13, 16, 19, and transglutaminase in a similar fashion to control JE samples. PLF supported better than GF expression of CK19 and suprabasal proliferation, although statistically significant only at day 5. Basement membrane proteins started to be deposited only from day 5. The rate of proliferating cells as well as the percentage of CK19-expressing cells decreased significantly in 7- and 9-day cultures. Day 7 organotypics presented higher number of epithelial cell layers, proliferating cells in suprabasal layers, and CK expression pattern similar to SE. CONCLUSION Both time in culture and fibroblast type had impact on epithelial phenotype. Five-day cultures with PLF are suggested as JE models, 7-day cultures with PLF or GF as SE models, while 9-day cultures with GF as gingival epithelium (GE) models. Such standard, reproducible models represent useful tools to study periodontal bacteria–host interactions in vitro. PMID:22947066

  19. Connexins form functional hemichannels in porcine ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of connexins in the ciliary epithelium is consistent with gap junctions between the pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) that form when connexon hemichannels from adjacent cells pair to form a channel. Here we present evidence that suggests undocked connexons may form functional hemichannels that permit exchange of substances between NPE and the aqueous humor. Intact porcine eyes were perfused via the ciliary artery and propidium iodide (PI) (MW 668) was added to the aqueous humor compartment as a tracer. After calcium-free solution containing PI was introduced into the aqueous humor compartment for 30 min, fluorescence microscopy revealed PI in the NPE cell layer. PI entry into the NPE was inhibited by calcium and by the connexin antagonist 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-AGA). Studies also were carried out with cultured porcine NPE. Under normal conditions, little PI entered the cultured cells but calcium-free medium stimulated PI accumulation and the entry was inhibited by 18-AGA. In cells loaded with calcein (MW 622), calcium-free solution stimulated calcein exit. 18-AGA partially suppressed calcein exit in calcium-free medium. Connexin 43 and connexin 50 proteins were detected by western blot analysis in both native and cultured NPE. In the intact eye, immunolocalization studies revealed connexin 50 at the basolateral, aqueous humor-facing, margin of the NPE. In contrast, connexin 43 was observed at the junction of the PE and NPE layer and on the basolateral membrane of PE. The results point to functional hemichannels at the NPE basolateral surface. It is feasible that hemichannels might contribute to the transfer of substances between the ciliary epithelium cytoplasm and aqueous humor. PMID:24262135

  20. Connexins form functional hemichannels in porcine ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of connexins in the ciliary epithelium is consistent with gap junctions between the pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) that form when connexon hemichannels from adjacent cells pair to form a channel. Here we present evidence that suggests undocked connexons may form functional hemichannels that permit exchange of substances between NPE and the aqueous humor. Intact porcine eyes were perfused via the ciliary artery and propidium iodide (PI) (MW 668) was added to the aqueous humor compartment as a tracer. After calcium-free solution containing PI was introduced into the aqueous humor compartment for 30 min, fluorescence microscopy revealed PI in the NPE cell layer. PI entry into the NPE was inhibited by calcium and by the connexin antagonist 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-AGA). Studies also were carried out with cultured porcine NPE. Under normal conditions, little PI entered the cultured cells but calcium-free medium stimulated PI accumulation and the entry was inhibited by 18-AGA. In cells loaded with calcein (MW 622), calcium-free solution stimulated calcein exit. 18-AGA partially suppressed calcein exit in calcium-free medium. Connexin 43 and connexin 50 proteins were detected by western blot analysis in both native and cultured NPE. In the intact eye, immunolocalization studies revealed connexin 50 at the basolateral, aqueous humor-facing, margin of the NPE. In contrast, connexin 43 was observed at the junction of the PE and NPE layer and on the basolateral membrane of PE. The results point to functional hemichannels at the NPE basolateral surface. It is feasible that hemichannels might contribute to the transfer of substances between the ciliary epithelium cytoplasm and aqueous humor.

  1. Expression of signaling components in embryonic eyelid epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the "eyelid closure pathways". However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms.

  2. Nonequilibrium thermodynamic model of the rat proximal tubule epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, A M

    1983-11-01

    The rat proximal tubule epithelium is represented as well-stirred, compliant cellular and paracellular compartments bounded by mucosal and serosal bathing solutions. With a uniform pCO2 throughout the epithelium, the model variables include the concentrations of Na, K, Cl, HCO3, H2PO4, HPO4, and H, as well as hydrostatic pressure and electrical potential. Except for a metabolically driven Na-K exchanger at the basolateral cell membrane, all membrane transport within the epithelium is passive and is represented by the linear equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In particular, this includes the cotransport of Na-Cl and Na-H2PO4 and countertransport of Na-H at the apical cell membrane. Experimental constraints on the choice of ionic conductivities are satisfied by allowing K-Cl cotransport at the basolateral membrane. The model equations include those for mass balance of the nonreacting species, as well as chemical equilibrium for the acidification reactions. Time-dependent terms are retained to permit the study of transient phenomena. In the steady state the energy dissipation is computed and verified equal to the sum of input from the Na-K exchanger plus the Gibbs free energy of mass addition to the system. The parameter dependence of coupled water transport is studied and shown to be consistent with the predictions of previous analytical models of the lateral intercellular space. Water transport in the presence of an end-proximal (HCO3-depleted) luminal solution is investigated. Here the lower permeability and higher reflection coefficient of HCO3 enhance net sodium and water transport. Due to enhanced flux across the tight junction, this process may permit proximal tubule Na transport to proceed with diminished energy dissipation.

  3. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290

  4. Stomatin immunoreactivity in ciliated cells of the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Britta; Stewart, Gordon W; Treharne, Kathryn J; Mehta, Anil; Knöpfle, Gisela; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Müller, Klaus-Michael; von Düring, Monika

    2003-07-01

    Stomatin is a widely distributed 32kD membrane protein of unknown function. In biochemical studies it is associated with cholesterol+sphingomyelin-rich 'rafts' in the cytomembrane. Genetic studies in C. elegans, supported by microscopic studies in mammalian tissue and co-expression studies in oocytes, suggest a functional link with the DEG/ENaC (degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel) superfamily of monovalent ion channels. Since ENaC channels play a prominent role in the physiology of the respiratory epithelium, we have studied the immunolocalization of stomatin in mature and developing human airway epithelium by means of Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Stomatin immunoreactivity (stomatin-IR) was found in the ciliated cells of the conductive airway epithelium in a distinct distribution pattern with the strongest signal along the cilia. Immunogold labelling revealed immunogold particles at the basal bodies, along the cilia, and at the membrane of the microvilli. The presence of stomatin-IR paralleled the stages of ciliogenesis in airway development, and its appearance preceded the elongation of the axoneme and the cilial outgrowth. Due to its presence in the different cellular locations in the ciliated cell, we suggest that stomatin is involved in various cellular functions. From its ultrastructural position, stomatin could be a candidate for a membrane-associated mechanotransducer with a role in the control of ciliary motility. Stomatin as a raft protein might be a microtubule associated protein moving along the outer surface of the microtubules to its terminal site of action in the cilia. Stomatin-IR in microvilli supports the hypothesis of a co-localization with beta- and gamma- ENaC and, in conclusion, their potential functional interaction to control the composition of periciliary mucus electrolytes. PMID:12759749

  5. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability tests/in industrial gas turbine engines. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate shows minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 7804 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 4983 hours at 982 C. The results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  6. Diet, Microbiome, and the Intestinal Epithelium: An Essential Triumvirate?

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Rivera; Conlin, Victoria Susan; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a critical barrier protecting the host against diverse luminal noxious agents, as well as preventing the uncontrolled uptake of bacteria that could activate an immune response in a susceptible host. The epithelial monolayer that constitutes this barrier is regulated by a meshwork of proteins that orchestrate complex biological function such as permeability, transepithelial electrical resistance, and movement of various macromolecules. Because of its key role in maintaining host homeostasis, factors regulating barrier function have attracted sustained attention from the research community. This paper will address the role of bacteria, bacterial-derived metabolism, and the interplay of dietary factors in controlling intestinal barrier function. PMID:23586037

  7. Expression of stanniocalcin in the epithelium of human choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A M; Zhang, K Z; Westberg, J A; Zhang, W M; Arola, J; Olsen, H S; Andersson, L C

    2000-12-29

    Stanniocalcin (STC) is a 28 kD glycoprotein hormone originally found in bony fish in which it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against hypercalcemia. The recently characterized mammalian STC shows about 70% homology with fish STC. The epithelial cells of proximal tubuli in human and rat kidney and brain neurons have been found to express STC. Here we show that the epithelium of the choroid plexus, already at 16 weeks of fetal age, and of plexus papillomas, synthesize and express STC. Our findings suggest that STC may be of importance for the distribution of calcium and phosphate between the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. PMID:11134638

  8. Combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kanmin; Mellington, Faye; Gout, Irina; Rokerya, Sofia; Olurin, Oyinkan Ibironke; El-Amir, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of combined hamatoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (CHR-RPE), illustrated with ultrasonography, optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography images. CHR-RPE could clinically mimic several other retinal conditions. Failure to distinguish it from serious malignancies such as choroidal melanoma or retinoblastoma has led to unnecessary enucleation in the past. Through these case reports and a review of literature, we show the diagnostic features of CHR-RPE, its key differential diagnoses and the management options. PMID:23162024

  9. Epithelial barrier and oral bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Groeger, Sabine E; Meyle, Joerg

    2015-10-01

    The oral epithelial barrier separates the host from the environment and provides the first line of defense against pathogens, exogenous substances and mechanical stress. It consists of underlying connective tissue and a stratified keratinized epithelium with a basement membrane, whose cells undergo terminal differentiation resulting in the formation of a mechanically resistant surface. Gingival keratinocytes are connected by various transmembrane proteins, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions and gap junctions, each of which has a specialized structure and specific functions. Periodontal pathogens are able to induce inflammatory responses that lead to attachment loss and periodontal destruction. A number of studies have demonstrated that the characteristics of pathogenic oral bacteria influence the expression and structural integrity of different cell-cell junctions. Tissue destruction can be mediated by host cells following stimulation with cytokines and bacterial products. Keratinocytes, the main cell type in gingival epithelial tissues, express a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Furthermore, the inflammatory mediators that may be secreted by oral keratinocytes are vascular endothelial growth factor, prostaglandin E2 , interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. The protein family of matrix metalloproteinases is able to degrade all types of extracellular matrix protein, and can process a number of bioactive molecules. Matrix metalloproteinase activities under inflammatory conditions are mostly deregulated and often increased, and those mainly relevant in periodontal disease are matrix metalloproteinases 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 13 and 24. Viral infection may also influence the epithelial barrier. Studies show that the expression of HIV proteins in the mucosal epithelium is correlated with the disruption of

  10. Whole population cell analysis of a landmark-rich mammalian epithelium reveals multiple elongation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Andrew D.; Brock, Lara J.; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Green, Jeremy B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue elongation is a fundamental component of developing and regenerating systems. Although localised proliferation is an important mechanism for tissue elongation, potentially important contributions of other elongation mechanisms, specifically cell shape change, orientated cell division and cell rearrangement, are rarely considered or quantified, particularly in mammalian systems. Their quantification, together with proliferation, provides a rigorous framework for the analysis of elongation. The mammalian palatal epithelium is a landmark-rich tissue, marked by regularly spaced ridges (rugae), making it an excellent model in which to analyse the contributions of cellular processes to directional tissue growth. We captured confocal stacks of entire fixed mouse palate epithelia throughout the mid-gestation growth period, labelled with membrane, nuclear and cell proliferation markers and segmented all cells (up to ∼20,000 per palate), allowing the quantification of cell shape and proliferation. Using the rugae as landmarks, these measures revealed that the so-called growth zone is a region of proliferation that is intermittently elevated at ruga initiation. The distribution of oriented cell division suggests that it is not a driver of tissue elongation, whereas cell shape analysis revealed that both elongation of cells leaving the growth zone and apico-basal cell rearrangements do contribute significantly to directional growth. Quantitative comparison of elongation processes indicated that proliferation contributes most to elongation at the growth zone, but cell shape change and rearrangement contribute as much as 40% of total elongation. We have demonstrated the utility of an approach to analysing the cellular mechanisms underlying tissue elongation in mammalian tissues. It should be broadly applied to higher-resolution analysis of links between genotypes and malformation phenotypes. PMID:24173805

  11. Sox2 and Pax6 Play Counteracting Roles in Regulating Neurogenesis within the Murine Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Adam I.; Lin, Brian; Schwob, James E.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult olfactory epithelium, the transcription factors Pax6 and Sox2 are co-expressed in sustentacular cells, horizontal basal cells (HBCs), and less-differentiated globose basal cells (GBCs)–both multipotent and transit amplifying categories—but are absent from immediate neuronal precursor GBCs and olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We used retroviral-vector transduction to over-express Pax6 and Sox2 individually and together during post-lesion recovery to determine how they regulate neuronal differentiation. Both Pax6 and Sox2, separately and together, can suppress the production of OSNs, as fewer clones contain neurons than with empty vector (EV), although this effect is not absolute. In this regard, Pax6 has the strongest effect when acting alone. In clones where neurons form, Pax6 reduces neuron numbers by comparison with EV, while Sox2 expands their numbers. Co-transduction with Pax6 and Sox2 produces an intermediate result. The increased production of OSNs driven by Sox2 is due to the expansion of neuronal progenitors, since proliferation and the numbers of Ascl1, Neurog1, and NeuroD1-expressing GBCs are increased. Conversely, Pax6 seems to accelerate neuronal differentiation, since Ascl1 labeling is reduced, while Neurog1- and NeuroD1-labeled GBCs are enriched. As a complement to the over-expression experiments, elimination of Sox2 in spared cells of floxed Sox2 mice, by retroviral Cre or by K5-driven CreERT2, reduces the production of OSNs and non-neuronal cells during OE regeneration. These data suggest that Pax6 and Sox2 have counteracting roles in regulating neurogenesis, in which Pax6 accelerates neuronal production, while Sox2 retards it and expands the pool of neuronal progenitors. PMID:27171428

  12. Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor Peptide Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Fibrogenesis is induced by repeated injury to the liver and reactive regeneration and leads eventually to liver cirrhosis. Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) has been shown to prevent liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). A 44 amino acid domain of PEDF (44-mer) was found to have a protective effect against various insults to several cell types. In this study, we investigated the capability of synthetic 44-mer to protect against liver injury in mice and in primary cultured hepatocytes. Acute liver injury, induced by CCl4, was evident from histological changes, such as cell necrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, and a concomitant reduction of glutathione (GSH) and GSH redox enzyme activities in the liver. Intraperitoneal injection of the 44-mer into CCl4-treated mice abolished the induction of AST and ALT and markedly reduced histological signs of liver injury. The 44-mer treatment can reduce hepatic oxidative stress as evident from lower levels of lipid hydroperoxide, and higher levels of GSH. CCl4 caused a reduction of Bcl-xL, PEDF and PPARγ, which was markedly restored by the 44-mer treatment. Consequently, the 44-mer suppressed liver fibrosis induced by repeated CCl4 injury. Furthermore, our observations in primary culture of rat hepatocytes showed that PEDF and the 44-mer protected primary rat hepatocytes against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and TGF-β1. PEDF/44-mer induced cell protective STAT3 phosphorylation. Pharmacological STAT3 inhibition prevented the antiapoptotic action of PEDF/44-mer. Among several PEDF receptor candidates that may be responsible for hepatocyte protection, we demonstrated that PNPLA2 was essential for PEDF/44-mer-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and antiapoptotic activity by using siRNA to selectively knockdown PNPLA2. In conclusion, the PEDF 44-mer protects hepatocytes from single and repeated CCl4 injury. This protective effect may stem from strengthening the counter oxidative stress capacity and

  13. Downregulation of Keratin 76 Expression during Oral Carcinogenesis of Human, Hamster and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Emma; Pandey, Manishkumar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kane, Shubhada; Patil, Asawari; Maru, Girish B.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Watt, Fiona M.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development. Methods We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO) mice. Results We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue. Conclusion The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted. PMID:23936238

  14. Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during digestive tract development and epithelial stem cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Ludovic; Marchal, Stéphane; Faure, Sandrine; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    The gastrointestinal tract develops from a simple and uniform tube into a complex organ with specific differentiation patterns along the anterior-posterior and dorso-ventral axes of asymmetry. It is derived from all three germ layers and their cross-talk is important for the regulated development of fetal and adult gastrointestinal structures and organs. Signals from the adjacent mesoderm are essential for the morphogenesis of the overlying epithelium. These mesenchymal-epithelial interactions govern the development and regionalization of the different gastrointestinal epithelia and involve most of the key morphogens and signaling pathways, such as the Hedgehog, BMPs, Notch, WNT, HOX, SOX and FOXF cascades. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying mesenchyme differentiation into smooth muscle cells influence the regionalization of the gastrointestinal epithelium through interactions with the enteric nervous system. In the neonatal and adult gastrointestinal tract, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions are essential for the maintenance of the epithelial regionalization and digestive epithelial homeostasis. Disruption of these interactions is also associated with bowel dysfunction potentially leading to epithelial tumor development. In this review, we will discuss various aspects of the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions observed during digestive epithelium development and differentiation and also during epithelial stem cell regeneration. PMID:26126787

  15. Prostate-regenerating capacity of cultured human adult prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Taylor, R A; Richards, M G; Sved, P; Wong, J; Eisinger, D; Xie, C; Salomon, R; Risbridger, G P; Dong, Q

    2010-01-01

    Experimentation with the progenitor/stem cells in adult prostate epithelium can be inconvenient due to a tight time line from tissue acquisition to cell isolation and to downstream experiments. To circumvent this inconvenience, we developed a simple technical procedure for culturing epithelial cells derived from human prostate tissue. In this study, benign prostate tissue was enzymatically digested and fractionated into epithelium and stroma, which were then cultured in the medium designed for prostate epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. The cultured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry. Prostate tissue-regenerating capacity of cultured cells in vitro was determined by co-culturing epithelial and stromal cells in dihydrotestosterone-containing RPMI. Cell lineages in formed acini-like structures were determined by immunohistochemistry. The culture of epithelial cells mainly consisted of basal cells. A minor population was negative for known lineage markers and positive for CD133. The culture also contained cells with high activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase. After co-culturing with stromal cells, the epithelial cells were able to form acini-like structures containing multiple cell lineages. Thus, the established culture of prostate epithelial cells provides an alternative source for studying progenitor/stem cells of prostate epithelium.

  16. Regulation of crustacean molting and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.; Graham, D.E.; Holland, C.A.; Soumoff, C.; Mykles, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The regulation of molting and regeneration by two antagonistic hormones is discussed. The time course of ecdysteroid titers in crustacean tissues has been followed during molt and regeneration cycles. (ACR)

  17. A model regenerator for a Stirling cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, James

    2001-05-01

    An essential feature of the engine patented by Robert Stirling in 1817 was the careful description of the idea of regeneration. In the standard thermodynamic cycle representation of the engine, regeneration is the storing and the reusing of the thermal energy released in the constant volume cooling part of the cycle. Due to the difficulty in treating regeneration quantitatively, introductory physics texts generally either ignore the concept or assume the regeneration to be perfect. As a result students obtain little or no understanding of regeneration. In addition there seem to be differing views in various texts about the efficiency of Stirling engines. In this work a simple finite element model regenerator is presented with which one can do simple calculations. The model does not accurately represent actual regeneration in a practical engine. But the model might help students gain better insight into Stirling engine efficiency and the idea of regeneration.

  18. An ancient dental gene set governs development and continuous regeneration of teeth in sharks.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Liam J; Martin, Kyle J; Cooper, Rory L; Metscher, Brian D; Underwood, Charlie J; Fraser, Gareth J

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of oral teeth is considered a major contributor to the overall success of jawed vertebrates. This is especially apparent in cartilaginous fishes including sharks and rays, which develop elaborate arrays of highly specialized teeth, organized in rows and retain the capacity for life-long regeneration. Perpetual regeneration of oral teeth has been either lost or highly reduced in many other lineages including important developmental model species, so cartilaginous fishes are uniquely suited for deep comparative analyses of tooth development and regeneration. Additionally, sharks and rays can offer crucial insights into the characters of the dentition in the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Despite this, tooth development and regeneration in chondrichthyans is poorly understood and remains virtually uncharacterized from a developmental genetic standpoint. Using the emerging chondrichthyan model, the catshark (Scyliorhinus spp.), we characterized the expression of genes homologous to those known to be expressed during stages of early dental competence, tooth initiation, morphogenesis, and regeneration in bony vertebrates. We have found that expression patterns of several genes from Hh, Wnt/β-catenin, Bmp and Fgf signalling pathways indicate deep conservation over ~450 million years of tooth development and regeneration. We describe how these genes participate in the initial emergence of the shark dentition and how they are redeployed during regeneration of successive tooth generations. We suggest that at the dawn of the vertebrate lineage, teeth (i) were most likely continuously regenerative structures, and (ii) utilised a core set of genes from members of key developmental signalling pathways that were instrumental in creating a dental legacy redeployed throughout vertebrate evolution. These data lay the foundation for further experimental investigations utilizing the unique regenerative capacity of chondrichthyan models to answer evolutionary

  19. An ancient dental gene set governs development and continuous regeneration of teeth in sharks.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Liam J; Martin, Kyle J; Cooper, Rory L; Metscher, Brian D; Underwood, Charlie J; Fraser, Gareth J

    2016-07-15

    The evolution of oral teeth is considered a major contributor to the overall success of jawed vertebrates. This is especially apparent in cartilaginous fishes including sharks and rays, which develop elaborate arrays of highly specialized teeth, organized in rows and retain the capacity for life-long regeneration. Perpetual regeneration of oral teeth has been either lost or highly reduced in many other lineages including important developmental model species, so cartilaginous fishes are uniquely suited for deep comparative analyses of tooth development and regeneration. Additionally, sharks and rays can offer crucial insights into the characters of the dentition in the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Despite this, tooth development and regeneration in chondrichthyans is poorly understood and remains virtually uncharacterized from a developmental genetic standpoint. Using the emerging chondrichthyan model, the catshark (Scyliorhinus spp.), we characterized the expression of genes homologous to those known to be expressed during stages of early dental competence, tooth initiation, morphogenesis, and regeneration in bony vertebrates. We have found that expression patterns of several genes from Hh, Wnt/β-catenin, Bmp and Fgf signalling pathways indicate deep conservation over ~450 million years of tooth development and regeneration. We describe how these genes participate in the initial emergence of the shark dentition and how they are redeployed during regeneration of successive tooth generations. We suggest that at the dawn of the vertebrate lineage, teeth (i) were most likely continuously regenerative structures, and (ii) utilised a core set of genes from members of key developmental signalling pathways that were instrumental in creating a dental legacy redeployed throughout vertebrate evolution. These data lay the foundation for further experimental investigations utilizing the unique regenerative capacity of chondrichthyan models to answer evolutionary

  20. Bioengineering strategies for regeneration of craniofacial bone: a review of emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Ward, B B; Brown, S E; Krebsbach, P H

    2010-11-01

    Although advances in surgical techniques and bone grafting have significantly improved the functional and cosmetic restoration of craniofacial structures lost because of trauma or disease, there are still significant limitations in our ability to regenerate these tissues. The regeneration of oral and craniofacial tissues presents a formidable challenge that requires synthesis of basic science, clinical science, and engineering technology. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field of study that addresses this challenge by applying the principles of engineering to biology and medicine toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, and improve normal function. This review will explore the impact of biomaterials design, stem cell biology and gene therapy on craniofacial tissue engineering.

  1. Histological changes in radial forearm skin flaps in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A; Johnston, E; Badran, D H; Neilson, M; Soutar, D S; Robertson, A G; McDonald, S W

    2004-04-01

    We reported previously that skin flaps transplanted to the oral cavity in reconstructive surgery for oral cancer frequently acquired the gross appearance of buccal mucosa. The changes were shown to be reactive in nature. The "changed" flaps generally had a heavier infiltration of leukocytes in the dermis and appeared to have thicker epithelium. The present study quantifies these parameters, as well as the numbers of intraepithelial leukocytes. The flaps that had acquired the gross appearance of oral mucosa had significantly thicker epithelium, larger numbers of dermal leukocytes, and more intraepidermal inflammatory cells per unit length than flaps that retained the gross appearance of thin skin. No correlation was found between these changes and radiotherapy. PMID:15042571

  2. Cryogenic regenerator including sarancarbon heat conduction matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Britcliffe, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A saran carbon matrix is employed to conduct heat through the heat storing volume of a cryogenic regenerator. When helium is adsorbed into the saran carbon matrix, the combination exhibits a volumetric specific heat much higher than previously used lead balls. A helium adsorbed saran regenerator should allow much lower refrigerator temperatures than those practically obtainable with lead based regenerators for regenerator type refrigeration systems.

  3. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  4. Role of topical drugs in treatment of oral mucosal diseases. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Soheyl; Gupta, Deepak; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Singla, Isha; Gupta, Rajesh; Goel, Varun

    2013-11-01

    Few topical formulations have been designed specifically to treat oral mucosal diseases. Local drug delivery may provide a more targeted and efficient option than systemic delivery for diseases of the oral mucosa. The permeability to the topical drugs differs according to the thickness of the epithelium and the extent of keratinization. The loss of the permeability barrier in the oral mucosa, due to ulceration or erosion, leads to rapid diffusion of the drug into tissues as compared to the intact areas of the mucosa. Oral mucosal delivery has the potential to treat many different conditions and diseases, such as oral cancer, mucositis, lichen planus, herpes simplex, candidiasis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, vesiculo-bullous diseases, neuropathic pain and salivary dysfunction. Each therapy requires distinct penetration and drug retention profiles in order to optimize treatment and minimize side effects. In this paper, topical medications are discussed, as these are advantageous for the treatment of oral mucosal lesions with fewer side effects.

  5. Salivary trefoil factor 3 enhances migration of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Storesund, Trond; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Kolltveit, Kristin M; Bryne, Magne; Schenck, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the mammalian TFF family. Trefoil factors are secreted onto mucosal surfaces of the entire body and exert different effects according to tissue location. Trefoil factors may enhance mucosal healing by modulating motogenic activity, inhibiting apoptosis, and promoting angiogenesis. Trefoil factor 3 is secreted from the submandibular gland and is present in whole saliva. The aim of this study was to assess the migratory and proliferative effects of TFF3 on primary oral human keratinocytes and oral cancer cell lines. The addition of TFF3 increased the migration of both normal oral keratinocytes and the cancer cell line D12, as evaluated by a two-dimensional scratch assay. By contrast, no increase in proliferation or energy metabolism was observed after stimulation with TFF3. Trefoil factor 3-enhanced migration was found to be driven partly by the extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk1/2) pathway, as shown by addition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD 98059. Previous functional studies on trefoil peptides have all been based on cells from monolayered epithelium like the intestinal mucosa; this is the first report to show that normal and cancerous keratinocytes from stratified epithelium respond to TFF stimuli. Taken together, salivary TFF3 is likely to contribute to oral wound healing. PMID:18353006

  6. Salivary trefoil factor 3 enhances migration of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Storesund, Trond; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Kolltveit, Kristin M; Bryne, Magne; Schenck, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the mammalian TFF family. Trefoil factors are secreted onto mucosal surfaces of the entire body and exert different effects according to tissue location. Trefoil factors may enhance mucosal healing by modulating motogenic activity, inhibiting apoptosis, and promoting angiogenesis. Trefoil factor 3 is secreted from the submandibular gland and is present in whole saliva. The aim of this study was to assess the migratory and proliferative effects of TFF3 on primary oral human keratinocytes and oral cancer cell lines. The addition of TFF3 increased the migration of both normal oral keratinocytes and the cancer cell line D12, as evaluated by a two-dimensional scratch assay. By contrast, no increase in proliferation or energy metabolism was observed after stimulation with TFF3. Trefoil factor 3-enhanced migration was found to be driven partly by the extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk1/2) pathway, as shown by addition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD 98059. Previous functional studies on trefoil peptides have all been based on cells from monolayered epithelium like the intestinal mucosa; this is the first report to show that normal and cancerous keratinocytes from stratified epithelium respond to TFF stimuli. Taken together, salivary TFF3 is likely to contribute to oral wound healing.

  7. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  8. The effects of lithogenic bile on gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, F G; Haley-Russell, D; Li, Y F; Husband, K J; Weisbrodt, N W; Dewey, R B

    1989-01-01

    Prairie dogs were fed a 1.2% cholesterol diet for up to 24 weeks to evaluate the effects of lithogenic bile on the mucosa of the gallbladder. There was a progressive increase in the lithogenic index of the gallbladder bile (1.44 +/- 0.15 at 4 weeks, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five of 70 animals developed gallstones between the second and fourth week. Increasing stone burden was associated with a 27% (p less than 0.05) decrease in the electrical resistance of the epithelium and a 60% (p less than 0.05) decrease in net sodium transport when measured isotopically in an Ussing chamber (3 weeks). After 4 months, seven of ten animals developed inflammatory mucosal polyps characterized by a heavy infiltration of plasma cells into an expanded matrix. Cellular infiltration began as early as 2 weeks. These changes occurred without alterations in the ultrastructural appearance of the epithelium. Images Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 5A and B. PMID:2774711

  9. The growth and differentiation of transitional epithelium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The development of rat transitional epithelial cells grown on conventional non-permeable surfaces was compared with development on permeable collagen supports. On glass or plastic surfaces, cells grew as expanding nomolayer sheets. Once confluent, growth continued with a bilayer being formed in most areas and apical cells being continuously sloughed off. Although most cells were interconnected by desmosomes, and junctional complexes were formed, no other indications of differentiation were observed. After 2-3 wk of growth, division stopped and cel death ensued. In contrast, single-cell suspensions plated on collagen-coated nylon disks reassociated into multicellular islands and commenced growth. Mitoses were confined to the basal cells in contact with the permeable substrate. The islands developed into epithelial trilayers, tapering to monolayers along spreading edges. Once the islands were confluent, stratification was completed and appeared similar to that observed in vivo. Germinal cells formed a basal lamina, and the upper layer was composed of large, flattened cells with an unusually thick asymmetrical plasma membrane on the apical surface. Electron microscopic and radioactive tracers demonstrated "leaky" zonulae occludentes with a restricted permeability to small molecules. The movement of urea was retarded in comparison to water. Unlike the slow turnover of adult epithelium in vivo, maturation and sloughing of apical cells were measurable. Transfer of cells could be effected and growth maintained for up to 4 mo. These results may indicate the necessity of a nutrient-permeable growth surface for the polarized differentiation of adult transitional epithelium. PMID:574872

  10. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  11. Electrodeposition of pronectin for titanium to augment gingival epithelium adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shingo; Asano, Kazunari; Miyazawa, Atsuko; Satoh, Tazuko; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    This paper is one trial of surface modification of titanium with pronectin F+ (PN) of an artificial protein to enhance gingival adhesion. Titanium plates were electrodeposited in the PN solution to prepare PN-electrodeposited titanium plates. When PN detachment from the PN-electrodeposited titanium plates was investigated, no detachment was observed, in contrast to the case of titanium plates simply coated with PN. A cell culture experiment demonstrated that electrodeposited PN had an inherent ability to enhance the initial attachment of gingival epithelial cells. The PN-electrodeposited titanium plates were implanted between the gingival epithelium and the underlying bone tissue of rabbits to evaluate epithelial growth on the plates and their gingival adhesion. Non-treated and PN-coated titanium plates were used as controls. PN electrodeposition enhanced epithelial growth and adhesion of titanium plates to a significantly great extent compared with PN-coated plates. These findings demonstrate that PN electrodeposition is a promising method to enhance epithelium adhesion onto a titanium surface.

  12. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase induction in arsenic-exposed rat bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in the environment. Many human cancers, including urothelial carcinoma (UC), show a dose-dependent relationship with arsenic exposure in the south-west coast of Taiwan (also known as the blackfoot disease (BFD) areas). However, the molecular mechanisms of arsenic-mediated UC carcinogenesis has not yet been defined. In vivo study, the rat bladder epithelium were exposed with arsenic for 48 h. The proteins were extracted from untreated and arsenic-treated rat bladder cells and utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Selected peptides were extracted from the gel and identified by quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) Ultima-Micromass spectra. The significantly difference expression of proteins in arsenic-treated groups as compared with untreated groups was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting. We found that thirteen proteins were down-regulated and nine proteins were up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder cells when compared with untreated groups. The IHC and western blotting results confirmed that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) protein was up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder epithelium. Expression of ALDH protein was significantly higher in UC patients from BFD areas than those from non-BFD areas using IHC (p=0.018). In conclusion, the ALDH protein expression could be used as molecular markers for arsenic-induced transformation.

  14. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Camilla A.; Breault, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we will review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including: the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF and MATH1. We will also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation including microRNA and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  15. Expression of acid phosphatase in the seminiferous epithelium of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Peruquetti, R L; Taboga, S R; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2010-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (AcPs) are known to provide phosphate to tissues that have high energy requirements, especially during development, growth and maturation. During spermatogenesis AcP activity is manifested in heterophagous lysosomes of Sertoli cells. This phagocytic function appears to be hormone-independent. We examined the expression pattern of AcP during the reproductive period of four species belonging to different vertebrate groups: Tilapia rendalli (Teleostei, Cichlidae), Dendropsophus minutus (Amphibia, Anura), Meriones unguiculatus (Mammalia, Rodentia), and Oryctolagus cuniculus (Mammalia, Lagomorpha). To demonstrate AcP activity, cryosections were processed for enzyme histochemistry by a modification of the method of Gömöri. AcP activity was similar in the testes of these four species. Testes of T. rendalli, D. minutus and M. unguiculatus showed an intense reaction in the Sertoli cell region. AcP activity was detected in the testes of D. minutus and O. cuniculus in seminiferous epithelium regions, where cells are found in more advanced stages of development. The seminiferous epithelium of all four species exhibited AcP activity, mainly in the cytoplasm of either Sertoli cells or germ cells. These findings reinforce the importance of AcP activity during the spermatogenesis process in vertebrates. PMID:20391346

  16. Selective gene expression by rat gastric corpus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, M.; Stengel, A.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is divided into several segments that have distinct functional properties, largely absorptive. The gastric corpus is the only segment thought of as largely secretory. Microarray hybridization of the gastric corpus mucosal epithelial cells was used to compare gene expression with other segments of the columnar GI tract followed by statistical data subtraction to identify genes selectively expressed by the rat gastric corpus mucosa. This provides a means of identifying less obvious specific functions of the corpus in addition to its secretion-related genes. For example, important properties found by this GI tract comparative transcriptome reflect the energy demand of acid secretion, a role in lipid metabolism, the large variety of resident neuroendocrine cells, responses to damaging agents and transcription factors defining differentiation of its epithelium. In terms of overlap of gastric corpus genes with the rest of the GI tract, the distal small bowel appears to express many of the gastric corpus genes in contrast to proximal small and large bowel. This differential map of gene expression by the gastric corpus epithelium will allow a more detailed description of major properties of the gastric corpus and may lead to the discovery of gastric corpus cell differentiation genes and those mis-regulated in gastric carcinomas. PMID:21177383

  17. Nanotopography follows force in TGF-β1 stimulated epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoelking, Gerold; Reiss, Bjoern; Wegener, Joachim; Oberleithner, Hans; Pavenstaedt, Hermann; Riethmuller, Christoph

    2010-07-01

    Inflammation and cellular fibrosis often imply an involvement of the cytokine TGF-β1. TGF-β1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT), a term describing the loss of epithelium-specific function. Indicative for this process are an elongated cell shape parallel to stress fibre formation. Many signalling pathways of TGF-β1 have been discovered, but mechanical aspects have not yet been investigated. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyse surface topography and mechanical properties of EMT in proximal kidney tubule epithelium (NRK52E). Elongated cells, an increase of stress fibre formation and a loss of microvillus compatible structures were observed as characteristic signs of EMT. Furthermore, AFM could identify an increase in stiffness by 71% after six days of stimulation with TGF-β1. As a novel topographical phenomenon, nodular protrusions emerged at the cell-cell junctions. They occurred preferentially at sites where stress fibres cross the border. Since these nodular protrusions were sensitive to inhibitors of force generation, they can indicate intracellular tension. The results demonstrate a manifest impact of elevated tension on the cellular topography.

  18. Mechanisms of Acid and Base Secretion by the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the main functions of the airway epithelium is to inactivate and remove infectious particles from inhaled air and thereby prevent infection of the distal lung. This function is achieved by mucociliary and cough clearance and by antimicrobial factors present in the airway surface liquid (ASL). There are indications that airway defenses are affected by the pH of the ASL and historically, acidification of the airway surfaces has been suggested as a measure of airway disease. However, even in health, the ASL is slightly acidic, and this acidity might be part of normal airway defense. Only recently research has focused on the mechanisms responsible for acid and base secretion into the ASL. Advances resulted from research into the airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) after it was found that the CFTR C1- channel conducts HCO3- and, therefore, may contribute to ASL pH. However, the acidity of the ASL indicated parallel mechanisms for H+ secretion. Recent investigations identified several H+ transporters in the apical membrane of the airway epithelium. These include H+ channels and ATP-driven H+ pumps, including a non-gastric isoform of the H+-K+ ATPase and a vacuolar-type H+ ATPase. Current knowledge of acid and base transporters and their potential roles in airway mucosal pH regulation is reviewed here. PMID:17091214

  19. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  20. New insights in wound response and repair of epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheryl; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery

    2013-05-01

    Epithelial wounds usually heal relatively quickly, but repair may be impaired by environmental stressors, such as hypoxic or diabetic states, rendering patients vulnerable to a number of corneal pathologies. Though this response appears simple, at first, years of research have uncovered the complicated biochemical pathways coordinating the wound healing response. Here, we investigate signaling cascades and individual proteins involved in the corneal epithelium's self-repair. We will explore how an epithelial cell migrates across the wound bed and attaches itself to its new post-injury surroundings, including its neighboring cells and the basement membrane, through focal adhesions and hemidesmosomes. We will also discuss how the cell coordinates this motion physiologically, through calcium signaling and protein phosphorylation, focusing on the communication through purinergic, glutamatergic, and growth factor receptors. Many of these aspects reflect and can be extended to similar epithelial surfaces, and can be used to facilitate wound healing in patients with various underlying pathologies. The collective library of laboratory and clinical research done around the world has demonstrated how important precise regulation of these processes is in order for the injured corneal epithelium to properly heal.

  1. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  2. Esophageal epithelium of women with AIDS: thickness and local immunity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laura; Silva, Renata; Olegário, Janaínna; Corrêa, Rosana; Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the esophageal epithelium (EE) and its local immunity. Esophageal fragments of autopsied women were collected from 1980 to 2008, and two groups were analyzed: with AIDS (n=17) and without AIDS (n=12). The measurement of the esophageal epithelium was carried out through the image analysis software ImageJ, and the immunostaining of Langerhans cells (LCs) was carried out using anti-S100 antibody. Women with AIDS, when compared with women without AIDS, had significantly thinner EE (220.6 versus 243.5 microm), a less number of LCs (6.2 versus 18.8 LCs/mm(2)), and a higher percentage of immature or morphologically altered LCs (66.6 versus 40.0%). The malnourished women, when compared with normonourished women, regardless of AIDS, had significantly thinner EE (227.1 versus 238.0 microm) and a less number of LCs (6.2 versus 12.5 LCs/mm(2)). The percentage of immature or morphologically altered LCs was the same in both groups. Additionally, the women with AIDS (7.0 versus 2.8%) and the malnourished women (5.8 versus 3.1%) presented a significantly higher percentage of fibrosis. We concluded that AIDS and malnutrition contribute to the decrease in esophagus local immunity and, therefore, to a possible increase in local opportunistic infections.

  3. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase induction in arsenic-exposed rat bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in the environment. Many human cancers, including urothelial carcinoma (UC), show a dose-dependent relationship with arsenic exposure in the south-west coast of Taiwan (also known as the blackfoot disease (BFD) areas). However, the molecular mechanisms of arsenic-mediated UC carcinogenesis has not yet been defined. In vivo study, the rat bladder epithelium were exposed with arsenic for 48 h. The proteins were extracted from untreated and arsenic-treated rat bladder cells and utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Selected peptides were extracted from the gel and identified by quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) Ultima-Micromass spectra. The significantly difference expression of proteins in arsenic-treated groups as compared with untreated groups was confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting. We found that thirteen proteins were down-regulated and nine proteins were up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder cells when compared with untreated groups. The IHC and western blotting results confirmed that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) protein was up-regulated in arsenic-treated rat bladder epithelium. Expression of ALDH protein was significantly higher in UC patients from BFD areas than those from non-BFD areas using IHC (p=0.018). In conclusion, the ALDH protein expression could be used as molecular markers for arsenic-induced transformation. PMID:26482281

  5. Regeneration: New Neurons Wire Up.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Pamela A

    2016-09-12

    Functional repair of damage in the nervous system requires re-establishment of precise patterns of synaptic connectivity. A new study shows that after selective ablation, zebrafish retinal neurons regenerate and reconstruct some, although not all, of their stereotypic wiring. PMID:27623258

  6. Stem cells and kidney regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Szu-Yu; Yang, Chian-Huei; Lin, Shuei-Liong

    2014-04-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating burden all over the world. In addition to preventing kidney injury, regenerating damaged renal tissue is as important as to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease to end stage renal disease. Although the kidney is a delicate organ and has only limited regenerative capacity compared to the other organs, an increasing understanding of renal development and renal reprogramming has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. Here, we will review the advances in the kidney regeneration including the manipulation of renal tubular cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages in renal disease. Several types of stem cells, such as bone marrow-derived cells, adipocyte-derived mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells are also applied for renal regeneration. Endogenous or lineage reprogrammed renal progenitor cells represent an attractive possibility for differentiation into multiple renal cell types. Angiogenesis can ameliorate hypoxia and renal fibrosis. Based on these studies and knowledge, we hope to innovate more reliable pharmacological or biotechnical methods for kidney regeneration medicine.

  7. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  8. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  9. Aging and regeneration in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Baddour, Joelle A; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2014-01-01

    Aging is marked by changes that affect organs and resident stem cell function. Shorting of telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, deregulation of genes and proteins, impaired cell-cell communication, and an altered systemic environment cause the eventual demise of cells. At the same time, reparative activities also decline. It is intriguing to correlate aging with the decline of regenerative abilities. Animal models with strong regenerative capabilities imply that aging processes might not be affecting regeneration. In this review, we selectively present age-dependent changes in stem/progenitor cells that are vital for tissue homeostasis and repair. In addition, the aging effect on regeneration following injury in organs such as lung, skeletal muscle, heart, nervous system, cochlear hair, lens, and liver are discussed. These tissues are also known for diseases such as heart attack, stroke, cognitive impairment, cataract, and hearing loss that occur mostly during aging in humans. Conclusively, vertebrate regeneration declines with age with the loss of stem/progenitor cell function. Future studies on improving the function of stem cells, along with studies in fish and amphibians where regeneration does not decline with age, will undoubtedly provide insights into both processes. PMID:24512711

  10. [Oral pain].

    PubMed

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  11. [Oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Guillat, J C

    1980-04-20

    OC (oral contraception) includes the combined and sequential methods, postcoital and progestin only contraception, mini pills, and macro pills. The mechanism of action of OC modifies the hypothalamo-hypophysary secretion, the uterine mucosa, and the cervical mucus. Effectiveness of OC is nearly 100%; prescription of OC requires a complete clinical and biological evaluation of the patient. Contraindications to OC are any form of cancer, hypertension, vascular or thrombotic antecedents, obesity, tabagism, diabetes. OC users must be checked at least every 6 months, and treatment can last, if there are no evident signs of side effects, until about age 40. The most commonly known side effects of OC are menstruation disorders, cardio- and cerebrovascular effects, hepatic and metabolic effects; there is no evidence that OC can cause carcinogenic effects, but it can increase teratogenic risk. The association of OC with such drugs as Rifampicine, anticonvulsants and/or tranquillizers, can nullify contraceptive effectiveness. PMID:6900393

  12. microRNA-dependent Temporal Gene Expression in the Ureteric Bud Epithelium during Mammalian Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Lindner, Volkhard; Wessels, Andy; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous study on mouse mutants with the ureteric bud (UB) epithelium-specific Dicer deletion (Dicer UB mutants) demonstrated the significance of UB epithelium-derived miRNAs in UB development. Results Our whole-genome transcriptional profiling showed that the Dicer mutant UB epithelium abnormally retained transcriptional features of the early UB epithelium and failed to express many genes associated with collecting duct differentiation. Further, we identified a temporal expression pattern of early UB genes during UB epithelium development in which gene expression was detected at early developmental stages and became undetectable by E14.5. In contrast, expression of early UB genes persisted at later stages in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium and increased at early stages. Our bioinformatics analysis of the abnormally persistently expressed early genes in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium showed significant enrichment of the let-7 family miRNA targets. We further identified a temporal expression pattern of let-7 miRNAs in the UB epithelium that is anti-parallel to that of some early UB genes during kidney development. Conclusions We propose a model in which the let-7 family miRNAs silence the expression of a subset of early genes in the UB epithelium at later developmental stages in order to promote collecting duct differentiation. PMID:25369991

  13. Bifidobacterium bifidum reduces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium in necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Khailova, Ludmila; Mount Patrick, Sarah K.; Arganbright, Kelly M.; Halpern, Melissa D.; Kinouchi, Toshi

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease of neonates, and clinical studies suggest the beneficial effect of probiotics in NEC prevention. Recently, we have shown that administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum protects against NEC in a rat model. Intestinal apoptosis can be suppressed by activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The present study investigates the effect of B. bifidum on intestinal apoptosis in the rat NEC model and in an intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), as a mechanism of protection against mucosal injury. Premature rats were divided into the following three groups: dam fed, hand fed with formula (NEC), or hand fed with formula supplemented with B. bifidum (NEC + B. bifidum). Intestinal Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), COX-2, PGE2, and apoptotic regulators were measured. The effect of B. bifidum was verified in IEC-6 cells using a model of cytokine-induced apoptosis. Administration of B. bifidum increased expression of TLR-2, COX-2, and PGE2 and significantly reduced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium of both in vivo and in vitro models. The Bax-to-Bcl-w ratio was shifted toward cell survival, and the number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells was markedly decreased in B. bifidum-treated rats. Experiments in IEC-6 cells showed anti-apoptotic effect of B. bifidum. Inhibition of COX-2 signaling blocked the protective effect of B. bifidum treatment in both in vivo and in vitro models. In conclusion, oral administration of B. bifidum activates TLR-2 in the intestinal epithelium. B. bifidum increases expression of COX-2, which leads to higher production of PGE2 in the ileum and protects against intestinal apoptosis associated with NEC. This study indicates the ability of B. bifidum to downregulate apoptosis in the rat NEC model and in IEC-6 cells by a COX-2-dependent matter and suggests a molecular mechanism by which this probiotic reduces mucosal injury and preserves

  14. Ultrastructural studies of the transitional zone in the nasopharyngeal epithelium, with special reference to the keratinizing process in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T

    1986-01-01

    In the nasopharynx of the SMA mouse, the 'intermediate epithelium' occupies the transitional zone between the ciliated columnar and the stratified squamous epithelia. The intermediate epithelium showed gradations ranging from ciliated stratified low-columnar through stratified cuboidal to stratified squamous type. It is suggested that the intermediate epithelium shows the various stages of the epithelium transforming from the ciliated columnar to the stratified squamous epithelium, and that the basal cells of the ciliated columnar epithelium serve as the germinal layer for the transformation. The intermediate epithelium containing a few keratohyalin granules and many membrane-coating granules represented earlier stages of keratinization. The width of the microprojections in the stratified squamous epithelium was about doubled compared to that in the intermediate epithelium. It is suggested that the difference in width is caused by cell membrane distortion associated with keratinization and is regarded as an important marker of the start of keratinization.

  15. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  16. Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai HS.; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1–2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules. PMID:23428883

  17. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  18. Non-thermal electromagnetic radiation damage to lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bormusov, Elvira; P Andley, Usha; Sharon, Naomi; Schächter, Levi; Lahav, Assaf; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2008-05-21

    High frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and other modern devices has the potential to damage eye tissues, but its effect on the lens epithelium is unknown at present. The objective of this study was to investigate the non-thermal effects of high frequency microwave electromagnetic radiation (1.1GHz, 2.22 mW) on the eye lens epithelium in situ. Bovine lenses were incubated in organ culture at 35°C for 10-15 days. A novel computer-controlled microwave source was used to investigate the effects of microwave radiation on the lenses. 58 lenses were used in this study. The lenses were divided into four groups: (1) Control lenses incubated in organ culture for 10 to15 days. (2) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated with 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwave radiation for 90 cycles of 50 minutes irradiation followed by 10 minutes pause and cultured up to 10 days. (3) Electromagnetic radiation exposure group treated as group 2 with 192 cycles of radiation and cultured for 15 days. (4) Lenses exposed to 39.5°C for 2 hours 3 times with 24 hours interval after each treatment beginning on the second day of the culture and cultured for 11 days. During the culture period, lens optical quality was followed daily by a computer-operated scanning laser beam. At the end of the culture period, control and treated lenses were analyzed morphologically and by assessment of the lens epithelial ATPase activity. Exposure to 1.1 GHz, 2.22 mW microwaves caused a reversible decrease in lens optical quality accompanied by irreversible morphological and biochemical damage to the lens epithelial cell layer. The effect of the electromagnetic radiation on the lens epithelium was remarkably different from those of conductive heat. The results of this investigation showed that electromagnetic fields from microwave radiation have a negative impact on the eye lens. The lens damage by electromagnetic fields was distinctly different from that caused by conductive heat.

  19. Development of parallel wire regenerator for cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes development of a novel regenerator geometry for cryocoolers. Parallel wire type is a wire bundle stacked in parallel with the flow in the housing, which is similar to a conventional parallel plate or tube. Simple and unique fabrication procedure is developed and fully depicted in this paper. Hydrodynamic and thermal experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the parallel wire regenerator. First, pressure drop characteristic of the parallel wire regenerator is compared to that of the screen mesh regenerator. Experimental result shows that the steady flow friction factor of the parallel wire type is three to five times smaller than that of the screen mesh type. Second, thermal ineffectiveness is determined by measuring the instantaneous pressure, the flow rate and the gas temperature at the warm and cold ends of the regenerator. The measured ineffectiveness of the parallel wire regenerator is larger than that of the screen regenerator due to the excessive axial conduction loss. To alleviate the intrinsic axial conduction loss of the parallel wire regenerator, segmentation is introduced and the experimental results reveal the favorable effect of the segmentation. Entropy generation calculation is adopted to compare the total losses between the screen regenerator and the parallel wire regenerator for various operating ranges. Simulation results show that the parallel wire regenerator can be an attractive candidate to improve cryocooler performance especially for the case of smaller NTU and lower cold-end temperature.

  20. Atoh1 expression and function during auditory hair cell regeneration in post-hatch chickens.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rebecca M; Hume, Clifford R; Stone, Jennifer S

    2012-07-01

    Loss of hair cells in humans leads to irreversible hearing deficits, since auditory hair cells are not replaced. In contrast, hair cells are regenerated in the auditory epithelium of mature birds after damage by non-sensory supporting cells that transdifferentiate into hair cells by mitotic and/or non-mitotic mechanisms. Factors controlling these processes are poorly understood. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ATOH1 is both necessary and sufficient for developmental hair cell differentiation, but it is unclear if it plays the same role in the mitotic and non-mitotic pathways in hair cell regeneration. We examined Atoh1 expression and function during hair cell regeneration in chickens. Atoh1 transcripts were increased in many supporting cells in the damaged auditory epithelium shortly after ototoxin administration and later became restricted to differentiating hair cells. Fate-mapping in vitro using an Atoh1 enhancer reporter demonstrated that only 56% of the supporting cells that spontaneously upregulate Atoh1 enhancer activity after damage acquired the hair cell fate. Inhibition of notch signaling using a gamma secretase antagonist stimulated an increase in Atoh1 reporter activity and induced a higher proportion of supporting cells with Atoh1 activity (73%) to differentiate as hair cells. Forced overexpression of Atoh1 in supporting cells triggered 66% of them to acquire the hair cell fate and nearly tripled their likelihood of cell cycle entry. These findings demonstrate that Atoh1 is broadly upregulated in supporting cells after damage, but a substantial proportion of supporting cells with Atoh1 activation fails to acquire hair cell features, in part due to gamma secretase-dependent activities.

  1. Use of the carbon dioxide laser in guided tissue regeneration wound healing in the beagle dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Parlar, Ates; Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A.; El-Khouli, Amr M.; Israel, Michael

    1996-04-01

    The concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) allowing cells from the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone to repopulate the treated root surface has shown the ability to obtain periodontal new attachment. Healing studies have also shown that conventional GTR therapy still does not exclude all the epithelium. This epithelial proliferation apically interferes with the establishment of the new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. The objective of this research study was to examine whether controlled de-epithelialization with the carbon dioxide laser during the healing phase after periodontal surgery, would retard the apical migration of the epithelium and thereby enhance the results obtained through guided tissue regeneration. Eight beagle dogs were used, the experimental side received de-epithelialization with the CO2 laser in conjunction with flap reflection and surgically created buccal osseous defects. Selected defects on each side were treated with ePTFE periodontal membranes. The laser de-epithelialization was repeated every 10 days until removal of the membranes. The control side received the same surgical treatment without laser application. This experimental design allowed histologic study of the new attachment obtained in defects treated with flap debridement with or without laser de-epithelialization and with or without ePTFE membranes. A statistical analysis was performed on the histometric data from 48 teeth in the 8 dogs after 4 months of healing. The results showed significant amounts of new attachment obtained from all four treatment modalities with no statistically significant differences for any one treatment. However, the trend towards enhanced regeneration with the combined treatment of laser and membrane vs. membrane alone or debridement alone was evident. The histologic analysis revealed a significant amount of newly formed `fat cementum' seen only on the laser treated teeth. This feature was the most remarkable finding of the

  2. Rhodopsin regeneration in the normal and in the detached/replaced retina of the skate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Ripps, H

    1992-11-01

    The bleaching and regeneration of rhodopsin in the skate retina was studied by means of fundus reflectometry, both in the normal eyecup preparation and after the retina had been detached and then replaced on the surface of the pigment epithelium (RPE). After bleaching virtually all the rhodopsin in the retinal test area of the normal eyecup, more than 90% of the photopigment was reformed after about 2 hr in darkness; over most of this time course, rhodopsin density rose linearly at a rate of 0.875% min-1 with a half-time of 55 min. Detaching the retina from its pigment epithelium resulted in a number of abnormalities, both structural and functional. Histological examination of the detached/replaced (D/R) retina showed striking alterations in the structural integrity of the RPE cells at their interface with the neural retina. The cells appeared vacuolated and misshapen, and the apical processes of the RPE, which normally ensheath the receptor outer segments, were shredded and free of their association with the visual cells. These morphological changes, as well as dilution of the IRBP content of the subretinal space caused by separation of the tissues, appear to be the main factors contributing to the functional abnormalities in rhodopsin kinetics. But despite these abnormalities and the persistent detachment, the rate of regeneration and the amount of rhodopsin reformed after bleaching were reduced by less than 50% of their normal values. The fact that a significant fraction of the bleached rhodopsin was regenerated under these conditions indicates that 11-cis retinal formed in the RPE was able to traverse a much greater than normal subretinal space to reach the opsin-bearing photoreceptor membranes. PMID:1478278

  3. Structural alteration of tight and adherens junctions in villous and crypt epithelium of the small and large intestine of conventional nursing piglets infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Eyerly, Bryan; Annamalai, Thavamathi; Lu, Zhongyan; Saif, Linda J

    2015-06-12

    Integrity of the intestinal epithelium is critical for proper functioning of the barrier that regulates absorption of water and restricts uptake of luminal bacteria. It is maintained mainly by tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). We conducted immunofluorescence (IF) staining for in situ identification of zonula occludin (ZO)-1 proteins for TJ and E-Cadherin proteins for AJ in the small and large intestinal villous and crypt epithelium of nursing pigs infected with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Twenty 9-day-old piglets [PEDV-infected (n=9) and Mock (n=11)] from PEDV seronegative sows, were orally inoculated [8.9 log₁₀ genomic equivalents/pig] with PEDV PC21A strain or mock. At post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1-5, infected pigs showed severe watery diarrhea and/or vomiting and severe atrophic enteritis. By immunohistochemistry, PEDV antigens were evident in enterocytes lining the villous epithelium. At PIDs 1-5, PEDV-infected pigs exhibited mildly to extensively disorganized, irregular distribution and reduced expression of ZO-1 or E-Cadherin in villous, but not crypt epithelial cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not in the large intestine, when compared to the negative controls. The structural destruction and disorganization of TJ and AJ were extensive in PEDV-infected pigs at PIDs 1-3, but then appeared to reversibly recover at PID 5, as evident by increased numbers of ZO-1-positive epithelial cells and markedly improved appearance of E-Cadherin-positive villous epithelium. Our results suggest a possible involvement of structurally impaired TJ and AJ in the pathogenesis of PEDV, potentially leading to secondary bacterial infections.

  4. Patterns of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and neuropeptide immunoreactivity during arm regeneration in the starfish Asterias rubens

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C.

    1998-01-01

    Regeneration of the arm of the starfish, Asterias rubens (L.) (Echinodermata: Asteroidea) was examined using two preparations. The first involved regeneration of the entire arm tip and its associated sensory structures and the second examined regeneration of a small section of radial nerve cord in the mid-arm region. Cell cycle activity was investigated by incorporation of the thymidine analogue, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Details of neuroanatomy were obtained by immunocytochemistry (ICC) using an antiserum to the recently isolated starfish neuropeptide, GFNSALMFamide (S1). BrdU labelling indicated that initial events occur by morphallaxis, with cell cycle activity first apparent after formation of a wound epidermis. As regeneration proceeded, BrdU immunoreactive (IR) nuclei revealed cell cycle activity in cells at the distal ends of the radial nerve cord epidermis, in the coelomic epithelium, the perihaemal and water vascular canal epithelia, and in the forming tube feet of both preparations. By varying the time between BrdU pulses and tissue fixation, the possible migration or differentiation of labelled cells was investigated. Neuropeptide ICC indicated the extension of S1-IR nerve fibres into the regenerating area, soon after initial wound healing processes were complete. These fibres were varicose and disorganized in appearance, when compared to the normal pattern of S1-IR in the radial nerve. S1-IR was also observed in cell bodies, which reappeared in the reforming optic cushion and radial nerve at later stages of regeneration. Double labelling studies with anti-BrdU and anti-S1 showed no co-localization in these cell bodies, in all the stages examined. It appeared that S1-IR cells were not undergoing, and had not recently undergone, cell cycle activity. It cannot be confirmed whether S1-IR neurons were derived from proliferating cells of epithelial origin, or from transdifferentiation of epithelial cells, although the former mechanism is suggested

  5. Conditional inactivation of p53 in mouse ovarian surface epithelium does not alter MIS driven Smad2-dominant negative epithelium-lined inclusion cysts or teratomas.

    PubMed

    Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Lantvit, Daniel D; Bosland, Maarten C; Burdette, Joanna E

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy among US women. The etiology of this disease, although poorly understood, may involve the ovarian surface epithelium or the epithelium of the fallopian tube fimbriae as the progenitor cell. Disruptions in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway and p53 are frequently found in chemotherapy-resistant serous ovarian tumors. Transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative form of Smad2 (Smad2DN), a downstream transcription factor of the TGFβ signaling pathway, targeted to tissues of the reproductive tract were created on a FVB background. These mice developed epithelium-lined inclusion cysts, a potential precursor lesion to ovarian cancer, which morphologically resembled oviductal epithelium but exhibited protein expression more closely resembling the ovarian surface epithelium. An additional genetic "hit" of p53 deletion was predicted to result in ovarian tumors. Tissue specific deletion of p53 in the ovaries and oviducts alone was attempted through intrabursal or intraoviductal injection of Cre-recombinase expressing adenovirus (AdCreGFP) into p53 (flox/flox) mice. Ovarian bursal cysts were detected in some mice 6 months after intrabursal injection. No pathological abnormalities were detected in mice with intraoviductal injections, which may be related to decreased infectivity of the oviductal epithelium with adenovirus as compared to the ovarian surface epithelium. Bitransgenic mice, expressing both the Smad2DN transgene and p53 (flox/flox), were then exposed to AdCreGFP in the bursa and oviductal lumen. These mice did not develop any additional phenotypes. Exposure to AdCreGFP is not an effective methodology for conditional deletion of floxed genes in oviductal epithelium and tissue specific promoters should be employed in future mouse models of the disease. In addition, a novel phenotype was observed in mice with high expression of the Smad2DN transgene as validated through q

  6. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Coch, Richard A.; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine. PMID:27429003

  7. Sugar expressions on the vaginal epithelium in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Youhei; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Nabeta, Motowo; Matsuu, Aya; Asano, Atsushi; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Sugar expressions were examined on the epithelium of both the middle portion of the vagina and the vaginal portion of the cervical canal (CC) in pregnant mice to understand the pathogenesis of bacterial infection in the female reproductive organ by using a panel of lectins. As a result, N-acetylglucosamine was positive before pregnant day (P) 7 but negative after P10 and at diestrus on both the vagina and the CC. In addition, some differences in sugar expressions were seen between them. These results suggest that sugar expressions on the mucosal surface would change not only site-specifically but also time-dependently, and these sugar differences indicate the possibility of the alteration of the settled bacterial species on the vaginal mucosa in pregnancy.

  8. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Jeanne N; Martin, Adam C

    2016-09-15

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical-basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT.

  9. Cytoarchitectural changes in lens epithelium of galactose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Gona, O

    1984-06-01

    Whole mounts of lens epithelia from rats fed on a galactose-rich diet for one, two, three or seven days were examined for morphological alterations. The meridional rows of epithelia from lenses of animals fed on galactose for seven days were found to be grossly disorganized or abnormally elongated. There was some indication that the cells were edematous and that the epithelium had become multilayered. These abnormalities apparently extended into the transitional zone. Evidence of the cytoarchitectural changes was present as early as one day after institution of the 30% galactose diet and progressed steadily over the period of observation. The findings provide support for the hypothesis that loss of meridional row integrity is a phenomenon common to development of most types of cortical cataracts.

  10. X-ray microanalysis of hamster tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, A.J.; Roomans, G.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Studies of ion transport across respiratory epithelia are of great interest if we are to understand the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystic fibrosis in which ion transport is abnormal. Concentrations of elements were determined in various subcellular regions of normal or isoproterenol-treated hamster tracheal epithelium, using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Samples of trachea were taken from animals under anesthesia and either frozen in situ or dissected and plunge frozen. Concentrations of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were higher in cytoplasm and nuclei of control epithelial cells in dissected samples than in cryoneedle samples. Following treatment with isoproterenol, a large decrease in the concentration of Cl was observed. The results confirm that cyclic AMP-regulated chloride secretion is unaffected by anesthesia.

  11. The regeneration capacity of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano—on repeated regeneration, rejuvenation, and the minimal size needed for regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ladurner, P.; Nimeth, K.; Gschwentner, R.; Rieger, R.

    2006-01-01

    The lion’s share of studies on regeneration in Plathelminthes (flatworms) has been so far carried out on a derived taxon of rhabditophorans, the freshwater planarians (Tricladida), and has shown this group’s outstanding regeneration capabilities in detail. Sharing a likely totipotent stem cell system, many other flatworm taxa are capable of regeneration as well. In this paper, we present the regeneration capacity of Macrostomum lignano, a representative of the Macrostomorpha, the basal-most taxon of rhabditophoran flatworms and one of the most basal extant bilaterian protostomes. Amputated or incised transversally, obliquely, and longitudinally at various cutting levels, M. lignano is able to regenerate the anterior-most body part (the rostrum) and any part posterior of the pharynx, but cannot regenerate a head. Repeated regeneration was observed for 29 successive amputations over a period of almost 12 months. Besides adults, also first-day hatchlings and older juveniles were shown to regenerate after transversal cutting. The minimum number of cells required for regeneration in adults (with a total of 25,000 cells) is 4,000, including 160 neoblasts. In hatchlings only 1,500 cells, including 50 neoblasts, are needed for regeneration. The life span of untreated M. lignano was determined to be about 10 months. PMID:16604349

  12. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  13. Morphological and glycan features of the camel oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Monaco, Davide; El Bahrawy, Khalid Ahmed; El-Sayed, Ashraf Abd El-Halim; Ciannarella, Francesca; Beneult, Benedicte; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele; Desantis, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    This study describes regional differences in the oviduct of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) during the growth phase (GP) and the mature phase (MP) of the follicular wave by means of morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glycohistochemistry investigations. Epithelium height significantly increased in the ampulla and decreased in the isthmus passing from the GP to the MP. Under SEM, non-ciliated cells displayed apical blebs (secretory) or short microvilli. Cilia glycocalyx expressed glycans terminating with sialic acid linked α2,6 to Gal/GalNAc (SNA affinity) throughout the oviducts of GP and MP and sialic acid linked α2,3 to Galβ1,3GalNAc (MAL II and KOH-sialidase (K-s)-PNA staining) throughout the MP oviducts. Non-ciliated cells displayed lectin-binding sites from the supra-nuclear cytoplasm to the luminal surface. Ampulla non-ciliated cells showed O-linked (mucin-type) sialoglycans (MAL II and K-s-PNA) during GP and MP and N-linked sialoglycans (SNA) during the MP. Isthmus non-ciliated cells expressed SNA reactivity in GP and MP, also K-s-PNA binders in MP, and MAL II and PNA affinity (Galβ1,3GalNAc) during GP. Galβ1,3GalNAc was sialilated in the non-ciliated cells of GP UTJ. Luminal surface lacked of Galβ1,3GalNAc in GP and MP, whereas it expressed α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialic acids. In GP intraluminal substance reacted with SNA, MAL II, K-s-PNA in ampulla and only with MAL II in the isthmus and UTJ. These results demonstrate that the morphology and the glycan pattern of the camel oviductal epithelium vary during the follicular wave and that could relate to the region-specific functions.

  14. Alterations in phenotypic biochemical markers in bladder epithelium during tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Rao, J Y; Hemstreet, G P; Hurst, R E; Bonner, R B; Jones, P L; Min, K W; Fradet, Y

    1993-09-01

    Phenotypic biochemical markers of oncogenesis and differentiation were mapped in bladder biopsies to investigate changes that occur in bladder tumorigenesis and to identify markers for increased bladder cancer risk. Touch preparations from biopsy specimens from 30 patients were obtained from tumors, the adjacent bladder epithelium, and random distant bladder epithelium. Markers, including DNA ploidy, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and oncoproteins, were quantified in individual cells by using quantitative fluorescence image analysis. Cluster analysis revealed the markers fell into three independent groups: (i) G-actin and EGFR; (ii) ploidy, cytology, and p185 (HER-2/neu oncoprotein) (ERBB2); and (iii) p300, a low-grade tumor antigen. Each marker displayed a gradient of abnormality from distant field to adjacent field to tumor. Different patterns for each marker suggested a developmental sequence of bladder cancer oncogenesis; G-actin was altered in 58% of distant biopsies (vs. 0/6 normals, P < 0.001), ploidy and cytology were altered in < 20% of distant fields and approximately 80% of tumors, and the other markers were intermediate. Patterns of EGFR and p185 suggest low-and high-grade tracks diverge early (P < 0.05 by Mann-Whitney U test for EGFR and ANOVA for p185). In conclusion, this study shows that a sequence of phenotypic changes accompanies development and progression of bladder cancers. Biochemical alterations in cells of the bladder field are often detectable before abnormal pathology, and markers previously thought to be limited to tumors were found in the field. The hierarchy of expression may be useful in identifying high-risk patients, assessing completeness of response to therapy, and monitoring and predicting recurrence. PMID:8367495

  15. The role of lens epithelium in sugar cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Houlder, N; Kinoshita, J H

    1990-06-01

    Previous evidence has shown clearly that sugar cataract formation results from unusually high intracellular levels of polyol. Documentation of polyol-related histological changes in the cortical fiber cells of the equatorial zone has been extensive. However, little attention has been given to the early changes in the lens epithelial cells, in spite of the fact that the highest level of aldose reductase is found in this layer of the lens. Also, cultured lens epithelial cells exposed to high sugar levels exhibit rapid accumulation of polyol and show ultrastructural alterations. Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the role of the lens epithelium in sugar cataract formation. Specifically, an attempt was made to localize the earliest fine structural lesions in intact lenses of galactose-fed rats and to test their relation to aldose reductase. Rats were fed either a normal diet or a 50% galactose diet with or without sorbinil, an aldose reductase inhibitor. Rats were killed at varying periods of time ranging from 6 to 96 hr, and the eyes were processed for light and electron microscopy. The first detectable abnormalities occurred after 36 hr of galactose feeding, and were limited to the central lens epithelium. Cell edema, apparent dilution of cytoplasm, rounding of nuclei, aberrant intracellular vacuoles, and loss of normal tortuosity of cell boundaries were the salient lesions. No changes were detectable in the equatorial zone until 48 hr, and no deviation from the control structure was found in any of the rats treated with an aldose reductase inhibitor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. NORMAL GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE F344 RAT NASAL TRANSITIONAL/RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The nasal epithelium is an important target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity in rodents. Gene expression profiles were determined in order to provide normal baseline data for nasal transitional/respiratory epithelium from healthy rats. Ce...

  17. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    PubMed

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4-8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer's patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines.

  18. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    PubMed

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4-8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer's patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines. PMID:26815859

  19. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4–8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer’s patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines. PMID:26815859

  20. Transepithelial Transport of Fc -Targeted Nanoparticles by the Neonatal Fc Receptor for Oral Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pridgen, Eric M.; Alexis, Frank; Kuo, Timothy T.; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Karnik, Rohit; Blumberg, Richard S.; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are poised to have a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases, but their broad application is limited because currently they can only be administered by parenteral methods. Oral administration of nanoparticles is preferred but remains a challenge because transport across the intestinal epithelium is limited. Here, we show that nanoparticles targeted to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), which is known to mediate the transport of IgG antibodies across epithelial barriers, are efficiently transported across the intestinal epithelium using both in vitro and in vivo models. In mice, orally administered FcRn-targeted nanoparticles crossed the intestinal epithelium and reached systemic circulation with a mean absorption efficiency of 13.7%*h compared with only 1.2%*h for non-targeted nanoparticles. In addition, targeted nanoparticles containing insulin as a model nanoparticle-based therapy for diabetes were orally administered at a clinically relevant insulin dose of 1.1 U/kg and elicited a prolonged hypoglycemic response in wild-type mice. This effect was abolished in FcRn knockout mice, indicating the enhanced nanoparticle transport was due specifically to FcRn. FcRn-targeted nanoparticles may have a major impact on the treatment of many diseases by enabling drugs currently limited by low bioavailability to be efficiently delivered though oral administration. PMID:24285486

  1. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27085002

  2. Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) Mediates Junctional Epithelium Attachment to Teeth via Integrin-ODAM-Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 (ARHGEF5)-RhoA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Ji, Suk; Park, Su-Jin; Choung, Han-Wool; Choi, Youngnim; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Park, Shin-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2015-06-01

    Adhesion of the junctional epithelium (JE) to the tooth surface is crucial for maintaining periodontal health. Although odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) is expressed in the JE, its molecular functions remain unknown. We investigated ODAM function during JE development and regeneration and its functional significance in the initiation and progression of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. ODAM was expressed in the normal JE of healthy teeth but absent in the pathologic pocket epithelium of diseased periodontium. In periodontitis and peri-implantitis, ODAM was extruded from the JE following onset with JE attachment loss and detected in gingival crevicular fluid. ODAM induced RhoA activity and the expression of downstream factors, including ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), by interacting with Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5). ODAM-mediated RhoA signaling resulted in actin filament rearrangement. Reduced ODAM and RhoA expression in integrin β3- and β6-knockout mice revealed that cytoskeleton reorganization in the JE occurred via integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. Fibronectin and laminin activated RhoA signaling via the integrin-ODAM pathway. Finally, ODAM was re-expressed with RhoA in regenerating JE after gingivectomy in vivo. These results suggest that ODAM expression in the JE reflects a healthy periodontium and that JE adhesion to the tooth surface is regulated via fibronectin/laminin-integrin-ODAM-ARHGEF5-RhoA signaling. We also propose that ODAM could be used as a biomarker of periodontitis and peri-implantitis.

  3. Oral Health in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin; Haber, Judith; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Bella, Abigail; Vasilyeva, Anna; Lange Kessler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Oral health is crucial to overall health. Because of normal physiologic changes, pregnancy is a time of particular vulnerability in terms of oral health. Pregnant women and their providers need more knowledge about the many changes that occur in the oral cavity during pregnancy. In this article we describe the importance of the recognition, prevention, and treatment of oral health problems in pregnant women. We offer educational strategies that integrate interprofessional oral health competencies. PMID:27281467

  4. Scattering attenuation microscopy of oral epithelial dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Pete H.; Adegun, Oluyori; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; Piper, Kim; Bader, Dan; Fortune, Farida

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for quantitative visualization of premalignant oral epithelium called scattering attenuation microscopy (SAM). Using low-coherence interferometry, SAM projects measurements of epithelial optical attenuation onto an image of the tissue surface as a color map. The measured attenuation is dominated by optical scattering that provides a metric of the severity of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Scattering is sensitive to the changes in size and distribution of nuclear material that are characteristic of OED, a condition recognized by the occurrence of basal-cell-like features throughout the epithelial depth. SAM measures the axial intensity change of light backscattered from epithelial tissue. Scattering measurements are obtained from sequential axial scans of a 3-D tissue volume and displayed as a 2-D SAM image. A novel segmentation method is used to confine scattering measurement to epithelial tissue. This is applied to oral biopsy samples obtained from 19 patients. Our results show that imaging of tissue scattering can be used to discriminate between different dysplastic severities and furthermore presents a powerful tool for identifying the most representative tissue site for biopsy.

  5. A brief history of hair cell regeneration research and speculations on the future.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Edwin W; Furrer, Stephanie A; Stone, Jennifer S

    2013-03-01

    Millions of people worldwide suffer from hearing and balance disorders caused by loss of the sensory hair cells that convert sound vibrations and head movements into electrical signals that are conveyed to the brain. In mammals, the great majority of hair cells are produced during embryogenesis. Hair cells that are lost after birth are virtually irreplaceable, leading to permanent disability. Other vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, produce hair cells throughout life. However, hair cell replacement after damage to the mature inner ear was either not investigated or assumed to be impossible until studies in the late 1980s proved this to be false. Adult birds were shown to regenerate lost hair cells in the auditory sensory epithelium after noise- and ototoxic drug-induced damage. Since then, the field of hair cell regeneration has continued to investigate the capacity of the auditory and vestibular epithelia in vertebrates (fishes, birds, reptiles, and mammals) to regenerate hair cells and to recover function, the molecular mechanisms governing these regenerative capabilities, and the prospect of designing biologically-based treatments for hearing loss and balance disorders. Here, we review the major findings of the field during the past 25 years and speculate how future inner ear repair may one day be achieved.

  6. Cellular and nerve regeneration within a biosynthetic extracellular matrix for corneal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengfu; Carlsson, David; Lohmann, Chris; Suuronen, Erik; Vascotto, Sandy; Kobuch, Karin; Sheardown, Heather; Munger, Rejean; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Griffith, May

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to determine whether key properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules can be replicated within tissue-engineered biosynthetic matrices to influence cellular properties and behavior. To achieve this, hydrated collagen and N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer-based ECMs were fabricated and tested on a corneal model. The structural and immunological simplicity of the cornea and importance of its extensive innervation for optimal functioning makes it an ideal test model. In addition, corneal failure is a clinically significant problem. Matrices were therefore designed to have the optical clarity and the proper dimensions, curvature, and biomechanical properties for use as corneal tissue replacements in transplantation. In vitro studies demonstrated that grafting of the laminin adhesion pentapeptide motif, YIGSR, to the hydrogels promoted epithelial stratification and neurite in-growth. Implants into pigs' corneas demonstrated successful in vivo regeneration of host corneal epithelium, stroma, and nerves. In particular, functional nerves were observed to rapidly regenerate in implants. By comparison, nerve regeneration in allograft controls was too slow to be observed during the experimental period, consistent with the behavior of human cornea transplants. Other corneal substitutes have been produced and tested, but here we report an implantable matrix that performs as a physiologically functional tissue substitute and not simply as a prosthetic device. These biosynthetic ECM replacements should have applicability to many areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, especially where nerve function is required. regenerative medicine | tissue engineering | cornea | implantation | innervation

  7. The anatomy and histology of caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Emily A B; Payne, Samantha L; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Caudal autotomy-the ability to self-detach the tail-is a dramatic adaptation common to many structural-grade lizards. For most species, tail loss is followed by the equally dramatic phenomenon of tail regeneration. Here we review the anatomy and histology of caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards, drawing heavily from research published over the past 2 decades. The autotomous tail is characterized by various structural adaptations, which act to minimize blood loss and trauma to adjacent tissues. The early phase of wound healing involves a leukocytic response but limited inflammation. Reepithelialization via a specialized wound epithelium is not only critical for scar-free healing but also necessary for subsequent tissue patterning and regenerative outgrowth. Regeneration begins with the formation of the blastema, a mass of proliferating mesenchymal-like cells. As the blastema expands, it is invaded by blood vessels and the spinal cord. Whereas the replacement tail outwardly resembles the original appendage, it differs in several notable respects, including the tissue composition and organization of the skeleton, muscular system, and spinal cord. Increasingly, the lizard tail is being recognized among biomedical scientists as an important model for the study of wound healing and multitissue restoration.

  8. Expression patterns of epiplakin1 in pancreas, pancreatic cancer and regenerating pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Baba, Hideo; Goto, Mizuki; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2008-07-01

    Epiplakin1 (Eppk1) is a plakin family gene with its function remains largely unknown, although the plakin genes are known to function in interconnecting cytoskeletal filaments and anchoring them at plasma membrane-associated adhesive junction. Here we analyzed the expression patterns of Eppk1 in the developing and adult pancreas in the mice. In the embryonic pancreas, Eppk1+/Pdx1+ and Eppk1+/Sox9+ pancreatic progenitor cells were observed in early pancreatic epithelium. Since Pdx1 expression overlapped with that of Sox9 at this stage, these multipotent progenitor cells are Eppk1+/Pdx1+/Sox9+ cells. Then Eppk1 expression becomes confined to Ngn3+ or Sox9+ endocrine progenitor cells, and p48+ exocrine progenitor cells, and then restricted to the duct cells and a cells at birth. In the adult pancreas, Eppk1 is expressed in centroacinar cells (CACs) and in duct cells. Eppk1 is observed in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), previously identified as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) precursor lesions. In addition, the expansion of Eppk1-positive cells occurs in a caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, an acinar cell regeneration model. Furthermore, in the partial pancreatectomy (Px) regeneration model using mice, Eppk1 is expressed in "ducts in foci", a tubular structure transiently induced. These results suggest that Eppk1 serves as a useful marker for detecting pancreatic progenitor cells in developing and regenerating pancreas.

  9. FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation is essential for the maintenance and regeneration of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Sun, Chenming; Liang, Zhanfeng; Li, Hongran; Chen, Lin; Luo, Haiying; Zhang, Hongmei; Ding, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoning; Qin, Zhihai; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) form a 3-dimentional network supporting thymocyte development and maturation. Besides epithelium and thymocytes, heterogeneous fibroblasts are essential components in maintaining thymic microenvironments. However, thymic fibroblast characteristics, development and function remain to be determined. We herein found that thymic non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ cells represent a unique Fibroblast specific protein 1 (FSP1)—fibroblast-derived cell subset. Deletion of these cells in FSP1-TK transgenic mice caused thymus atrophy due to the loss of TECs, especially mature medullary TECs (MHCIIhigh, CD80+ and Aire+). In a cyclophosphamide-induced thymus injury and regeneration model, lack of non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation significantly delayed thymus regeneration. In fact, thymic FSP1+ fibroblasts released more IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1 in the culture medium than their FSP1- counterparts. Further experiments showed that the FSP1 protein could directly enhance the proliferation and maturation of TECs in the in vitro culture systems. FSP1 knockout mice had significantly smaller thymus size and less TECs than their control. Collectively, our studies reveal that thymic CD45-FSP1+ cells are a subpopulation of fibroblasts, which is crucial for the maintenance and regeneration of TECs especially medullary TECs through providing IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1. PMID:26445893

  10. Raman mapping of oral buccal mucosa: a spectral histopathology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Isha; Kukreja, Lekha; Deshmukh, Atul; Singh, S. P.; Mamgain, Hitesh; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. One-fifth of the world's oral cancer subjects are from India and other South Asian countries. The present Raman mapping study was carried out to understand biochemical variations in normal and malignant oral buccal mucosa. Data were acquired using WITec alpha 300R instrument from 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained tissue sections. Raman maps of normal sections could resolve the layers of epithelium, i.e. basal, intermediate, and superficial. Inflammatory, tumor, and stromal regions are distinctly depicted on Raman maps of tumor sections. Mean and difference spectra of basal and inflammatory cells suggest abundance of DNA and carotenoids features. Strong cytochrome bands are observed in intermediate layers of normal and stromal regions of tumor. Epithelium and stromal regions of normal cells are classified by principal component analysis. Classification among cellular components of normal and tumor sections is also observed. Thus, the findings of the study further support the applicability of Raman mapping for providing molecular level insights in normal and malignant conditions.

  11. Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Morency, R; Laliberte, H; Delamarre, R

    1982-02-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) of the oral mucosa has been reported mainly among American Indians, Eskimos, and south Africans. Our investigation is the first among Canadian Indians and combines an epidemiological study of FEH in a Cree Indian population living in Fort Georges. P.Q., and a description of its histologic and ultrastructural features. The sample consists of 150 individuals divided into six age groups. The prevalence rate for all groups is 18.6%. Clinically the lesions are nodular, sessile, and tend to merge with the adjoining mucosa upon stretching. Histologically the hyperplasia is limited to the epithelium. E.M. shows papova-virus-like particles. Otolaryngologists' awareness of this lesion could possibly lead to its recognition on a larger scale.

  12. Fungal infections of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Zegarelli, D J

    1993-12-01

    Although several strains of Candida can infect the oral mucosa, the most commonly encountered oral fungal infection is Candida albicans, which may be highly infective because of its greater level of pathogenicity and adherence properties. C. albicans is an oral commensal in as many as 40% to 65% of healthy adult mouths. The papillated dorsal surface of the tongue and palatal mucosa beneath a maxillary denture are favored reservoir sites. Oral candidal infection almost always involves a compromised host. The compromise may be local or systemic. Local factors include decreased salivation and the weaning of dentures. Systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, and AIDS. Some have even implicated advanced age and the female gender as being mild predisposing factors. Furthermore, the C. albicans infection itself can depress a host's immune system. A patient with oral candidiasis can present with one or more of the following clinical forms: pseudomembranous, erythematous, hyperplastic, and denture erythematous. Many investigators accept median rhomboid glossitis as a form of chronic oral candidiasis. In some patients with angular cheilitis, genesis of the lesions is secondary to monilial infestation. Because C. albicans is a normal inhabitant in many mouths, diagnostic confirmation of infection often rests with successful response (i.e., resolution of lesions) to antifungal medications. This form of diagnostic confirmation can be further enhanced by culturing the offending microbe, preparing a fungal smear, or even incisional biopsy. The microscopic demonstration of fungal hyphae is highly diagnostic of the candidal infection, whether the hyphae are demonstrated on a PAS smear or on a biopsy within surface stratified squamous epithelium. Numerous medications exist for the treatment of oral candidiasis. They include the antibiotic nystatin as well as clotrimazole, ketoconazole, and fluconazole. Nystatin is safe and is used as a topical agent in rinse or

  13. Oral Leukoplakia as It Relates to HPV Infection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Feller, L.; Lemmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity and can be categorised according to its clinical appearance as homogeneous or nonhomogenous. Tobacco and areca nut use, either alone or in combination are the most common risk factors for oral leukoplakia, but some oral leukoplakias are idiopathic. Some leukoplakias arise within fields of precancerized oral epithelium in which the keratinocytes may be at different stages of cytogenetic transformation. Leukoplakias may unpredictably regress, may remain stable, or may progress to carcinoma. There is a greater risk of carcinomatous transformation of idiopathic leukoplakia, of non-homogenous leukoplakia, of leukoplakia affecting the floor of the mouth; the ventrolateral surface of the tongue and the maxillary retromolar and adjoining soft palate (collectively called high-risk sites), of leukoplakia with high-grade epithelial dysplasia, and of leukoplakia in which the keratinocytes carry cytogenetic alterations associated with carcinomatous transformation. Although there appears to be some link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral leukoplakia, there is little evidence to support a causal relationship either between HPV infection and oral leukoplakia or between HPV-infected leukoplakic keratinocytes and their carcinomatous transformation. PMID:22505902

  14. Structure and topographic distribution of oral denticles in elasmobranch fishes.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Carla J L; Collin, Shaun P

    2012-02-01

    The placoid scales, or denticles, of the external epidermis of elasmobranchs are well known as a hard protective coat over the skin to reduce abrasion or as elements to reduce hydrodynamic drag. However, the structure and function of denticles within the oral cavity is uncertain. Using stereological and scanning electron microscopy, this study examines the structure and distribution of oral denticles in a range of elasmobranchs. Of the batoids analyzed, only members of the Rhinobatidae possessed oral denticles, with no denticles found in the members sampled in the Gymnuridae or Dasyatidae. In contrast, oral denticles were located in all the selachians examined, except for members of the Orectolobidae. Within the selachians, the denticles of the Carcharhinidae have a grooved surface and a central spine, which is angled toward the posterior of the mouth. These denticular adaptations are beneficial to reduce hydrodynamic drag, an advantage for these free-swimming species with ram ventilation. Alternatively, members of the Hemiscyllidae have broad bulbous denticles that often overlap, providing a hard surface to protect the epithelium from abrasion during the consumption of hard-bodied prey. The distribution and high number of oral denticles appears to spatially compromise the capacity for oral (taste) papillae to populate the oropharyngeal cavity but provides increased friction and grip on prey items as they are manipulated within the mouth. PMID:22426629

  15. Neurosurgery: Functional regeneration after laser axotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Cinar, Hulusi; Cinar, Hediye Nese; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Jin, Yishi; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2004-12-01

    Understanding how nerves regenerate is an important step towards developing treatments for human neurological disease, but investigation has so far been limited to complex organisms (mouse and zebrafish) in the absence of precision techniques for severing axons (axotomy). Here we use femtosecond laser surgery for axotomy in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and show that these axons functionally regenerate after the operation. Application of this precise surgical technique should enable nerve regeneration to be studied in vivo in its most evolutionarily simple form.

  16. A quantitative metabolomics peek into planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Nivedita; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Rangiah, Kannan

    2015-05-21

    The fresh water planarian species Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging stem cell model because of its capability to regenerate a whole animal from a small piece of tissue. It is one of the best model systems to address the basic mechanisms essential for regeneration. Here, we are interested in studying the roles of various amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration, stem cell function and growth. We developed mass spectrometry based quantitative methods and validated the differential enrichment of 35 amines, 7 thiol metabolites and 4 nucleotides from both intact and regenerating planarians. Among the amines, alanine in sexual and asparagine in asexual are the highest (>1000 ng/mg) in the intact planarians. The levels of thiols such as cysteine and GSH are 651 and 1107 ng mg(-1) in planarians. Among the nucleotides, the level of cGMP is the lowest (0.03 ng mg(-1)) and the level of AMP is the highest (187 ng mg(-1)) in both of the planarian strains. We also noticed increasing levels of amines in both anterior and posterior regenerating planarians. The blastema from day 3 regenerating planarians also showed higher amounts of many amines. Interestingly, the thiol (cysteine and GSH) levels are well maintained during planarian regeneration. This suggests an inherent and effective mechanism to control induced oxidative stress because of the robust regeneration and stem cell proliferation. Like in intact planarians, the level of cGMP is also very low in regenerating planarians. Surprisingly, the levels of amines and thiols in head regenerating blastemas are ∼3 times higher compared to those for tail regenerating blastemas. Thus our results strongly indicate the potential roles of amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration.

  17. A quantitative metabolomics peek into planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Nivedita; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Rangiah, Kannan

    2015-05-21

    The fresh water planarian species Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging stem cell model because of its capability to regenerate a whole animal from a small piece of tissue. It is one of the best model systems to address the basic mechanisms essential for regeneration. Here, we are interested in studying the roles of various amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration, stem cell function and growth. We developed mass spectrometry based quantitative methods and validated the differential enrichment of 35 amines, 7 thiol metabolites and 4 nucleotides from both intact and regenerating planarians. Among the amines, alanine in sexual and asparagine in asexual are the highest (>1000 ng/mg) in the intact planarians. The levels of thiols such as cysteine and GSH are 651 and 1107 ng mg(-1) in planarians. Among the nucleotides, the level of cGMP is the lowest (0.03 ng mg(-1)) and the level of AMP is the highest (187 ng mg(-1)) in both of the planarian strains. We also noticed increasing levels of amines in both anterior and posterior regenerating planarians. The blastema from day 3 regenerating planarians also showed higher amounts of many amines. Interestingly, the thiol (cysteine and GSH) levels are well maintained during planarian regeneration. This suggests an inherent and effective mechanism to control induced oxidative stress because of the robust regeneration and stem cell proliferation. Like in intact planarians, the level of cGMP is also very low in regenerating planarians. Surprisingly, the levels of amines and thiols in head regenerating blastemas are ∼3 times higher compared to those for tail regenerating blastemas. Thus our results strongly indicate the potential roles of amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration. PMID:25815385

  18. Simple epithelium keratins are required for maintenance of hepatocyte integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, A.; Duclos, S.; Grenier, A.; Price, J.; Wilson-Heiner, M.; Baribault, H.; Marceau, N.

    1997-01-01

    Keratin 8 (K8)-deficient adult mice develop a severe disease of the gastrointestinal tract characterized mainly by colorectal hyperplasia and inflammation. Given that hepatocytes contain K8/K18 heteropolymers only, this animal model was used to assess the contribution of these simple epithelium keratins to hepatocyte structural and functional integrity. Homozygous mutant (HMZ), heterozygous, and wild-type (WT) mice were examined for hepatocyte structural and metabolic features and their survival to partial hepatectomy. Except for the presence of few necrotic foci, no other tissular or cellular alterations were observed in nonhepatectomized HMZ mouse livers; glycogen and lipid peroxidation levels were essentially normal, but a small reduction in bile flow was observed. In response to a single pentobarbital injection, HMZ mice had longer sleeping times than heterozygous and WT mice. After a two-thirds partial hepatectomy under pentobarbital anesthesia, all HMZ mice died within a few hours, whereas those anesthetized with ether survived for 1 to 2 days. One hour after hepatectomy after pentobarbital anesthesia, many hepatocytes contained erythrocytes and large vacuoles in the cytoplasm, which suggests damage at the plasma membrane level in response to a sudden increase in portal blood flow. In line with these findings, an uptake of trypan blue by HMZ but not WT mouse hepatocytes was observed during a 10 ml/minute perfusion via the portal vein with a dye-supplemented buffer. Subsequent cellular dispersion led to viable WT mouse hepatocytes but largely nonviable HMZ mouse hepatocytes. Better viability was obtained at lower perfusion rates. Partially hepatectomized heterozygous mice developed liver steatosis, a condition that was not associated with a change in K8 content but perhaps linked to the presence of the neo gene. Transgenic HMZ mouse rescue experiments with a full-length K8 gene confirmed that the phenotypic alterations observed in partially hepatectomized HMZ

  19. Development of an electrode for the artificial cochlear sensory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tona, Yosuke; Inaoka, Takatoshi; Ito, Juichi; Kawano, Satoyuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    An artificial cochlear sensory epithelium has been developed on the basis of a new concept that the piezoelectric membrane, which converts mechanical distortion into electricity, can mimic the function of the inner hair cell and basilar membrane of the mammalian cochlea. Our previous research demonstrated that the piezoelectric membrane generated electrical outputs in response to the sound stimulation after implantation into the guinea pig cochlea, whereas electrodes for the stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons have not been fabricated, and a method to fix the device in the cochlea is also required to show proof-of-concept. In the present study, to achieve proof-of-concept of hearing recovery by implantation of the artificial cochlear sensory epithelium, we fabricated new electrodes that stick into the cochlear modiolus, which also play a role in the fixation of the device in the cochlea. The efficacy of new electrodes for fixation of the device in the cochlea and for the stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons was estimated in guinea pigs. Four weeks after implantation, we confirmed that the devices were in place. Histological analysis of the implanted cochleae revealed inconspicuous fibrosis and scar formation compared with the sham-operated specimens (n = 5 for each). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling method was used to assess cell death due to surgical procedures in the cochleae that were harvested after 1 day (n = 6) and 7 days (n = 6) of implantation; there was no significant increase in apoptotic cell death in the implanted cochleae compared with sham-operated cochleae. In seven animals, serial measurements of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses were obtained, with the electrode positioned in the scala tympani and with the electrode inserted into the cochlear modiolus. With the insertion of electrodes into the cochlear modiolus, significant reduction was achieved in the thresholds of electrically evoked auditory

  20. Intranasal Location and Immunohistochemical Characterization of the Equine Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kupke, Alexandra; Wenisch, Sabine; Failing, Klaus; Herden, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is the only body site where neurons contact directly the environment and are therefore exposed to a broad variation of substances and insults. It can serve as portal of entry for neurotropic viruses which spread via the olfactory pathway to the central nervous system. For horses, it has been proposed and concluded mainly from rodent studies that different viruses, e.g., Borna disease virus, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), hendra virus, influenza virus, rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus can use this route. However, little is yet known about cytoarchitecture, protein expression and the intranasal location of the equine OE. Revealing differences in cytoarchitecture or protein expression pattern in comparison to rodents, canines, or humans might help to explain varying susceptibility to certain intranasal virus infections. On the other hand, disclosing similarities especially between rodents and other species, e.g., horses would help to underscore transferability of rodent models. Analysis of the complete noses of five adult horses revealed that in the equine OE two epithelial subtypes with distinct marker expression exist, designated as types a and b which resemble those previously described in dogs. Detailed statistical analysis was carried out to confirm the results obtained on the descriptive level. The equine OE was predominantly located in caudodorsal areas of the nasal turbinates with a significant decline in rostroventral direction, especially for type a. Immunohistochemically, olfactory marker protein and doublecortin (DCX) expression was found in more cells of OE type a, whereas expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and tropomyosin receptor kinase A was present in more cells of type b. Accordingly, type a resembles the mature epithelium, in contrast to the more juvenile type b. Protein expression profile was comparable to canine and rodent OE but equine types a and b were located differently within the nose and

  1. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts. PMID:25085416

  2. Unraveling tissue regeneration pathways using chemical genetics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lijoy K; Sengupta, Sumitra; Kawakami, Atsushi; Andreasen, Eric A; Löhr, Christiane V; Loynes, Catherine A; Renshaw, Stephen A; Peterson, Randall T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-11-30

    Identifying the molecular pathways that are required for regeneration remains one of the great challenges of regenerative medicine. Although genetic mutations have been useful for identifying some molecular pathways, small molecule probes of regenerative pathways might offer some advantages, including the ability to disrupt pathway function with precise temporal control. However, a vertebrate regeneration model amenable to rapid throughput small molecule screening is not currently available. We report here the development of a zebrafish early life stage fin regeneration model and its use in screening for small molecules that modulate tissue regeneration. By screening 2000 biologically active small molecules, we identified 17 that specifically inhibited regeneration. These compounds include a cluster of glucocorticoids, and we demonstrate that transient activation of the glucocorticoid receptor is sufficient to block regeneration, but only if activation occurs during wound healing/blastema formation. In addition, knockdown of the glucocorticoid receptor restores regenerative capability to nonregenerative, glucocorticoid-exposed zebrafish. To test whether the classical anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids is responsible for blocking regeneration, we prevented acute inflammation following amputation by antisense repression of the Pu.1 gene. Although loss of Pu.1 prevents the inflammatory response, regeneration is not affected. Collectively, these results indicate that signaling from exogenous glucocorticoids impairs blastema formation and limits regenerative capacity through an acute inflammation-independent mechanism. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of exploiting chemical genetics to define the pathways that govern vertebrate regeneration. PMID:17848559

  3. The cellular basis for animal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Elly; Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of animals to regenerate missing parts is a dramatic and poorly understood aspect of biology. The sources of new cells for these regenerative phenomena have been sought for decades. Recent advances involving cell fate tracking in complex tissues have shed new light on the cellular underpinnings of regeneration in Hydra, planarians, zebrafish, Xenopus, and Axolotl. Planarians accomplish regeneration with use of adult pluripotent stem cells, whereas several vertebrates utilize a collection of lineage-restricted progenitors from different tissues. Together, an array of cellular strategies—from pluripotent stem cells to tissue-specific stem cells and dedifferentiation—are utilized for regeneration. PMID:21763617

  4. Mosaic analysis of stem cell function and wound healing in the mouse corneal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L; Ramaesh, Thaya; Kleinjan, Dirk A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background The mouse corneal epithelium is a continuously renewing 5–6 cell thick protective layer covering the corneal surface, which regenerates rapidly when injured. It is maintained by peripherally located limbal stem cells (LSCs) that produce transient amplifying cells (TACs) which proliferate, migrate centripetally, differentiate and are eventually shed from the epithelial surface. LSC activity is required both for normal tissue maintenance and wound healing. Mosaic analysis can provide insights into LSC function, cell movement and cell mixing during tissue maintenance and repair. The present study investigates cell streaming during corneal maintenance and repair and changes in LSC function with age. Results The initial pattern of corneal epithelial patches in XLacZ+/- X-inactivation mosaics was replaced after birth by radial stripes, indicating activation of LSCs. Stripe patterns (clockwise, anticlockwise or midline) were independent between paired eyes. Wound healing in organ culture was analysed by mosaic analysis of XLacZ+/- eyes or time-lapse imaging of GFP mosaics. Both central and peripheral wounds healed clonally, with cells moving in from all around the wound circumference without significant cell mixing, to reconstitute striping patterns. Mosaic analysis revealed that wounds can heal asymmetrically. Healing of peripheral wounds produced stripe patterns that mimicked some aberrant striping patterns observed in unwounded corneas. Quantitative analysis provided no evidence for an uneven distribution of LSC clones but showed that corrected corneal epithelial stripe numbers declined with age (implying declining LSC function) but stabilised after 39 weeks. Conclusion Striping patterns, produced by centripetal movement, are defined independently and stochastically in individual eyes. Little cell mixing occurs during the initial phase of wound healing and the direction of cell movement is determined by the position of the wound and not by population

  5. Airway responsiveness: role of inflammation, epithelium damage and smooth muscle tension.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulianis, K I; Domali, A; Molyvdas, P A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the effect of epithelium damage on mechanical responses of airway smooth muscles under different resting tension. We performed acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-5) M)-induced contraction on tracheal strips from 30 rabbits in five groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) before and after epithelium removal. At low resting tension (0.5-1.5 g), the epithelium removal decreased the ACh-induced contractions. At 2 g resting tension, the epithelium removal increased the ACh-induced contractions of airways with intact epithelium about 20%. At 2.5 g resting tension, the elevation of contraction is about 25% (P<0.01). Consequently, after epithelium loss, the resting tension determines the airway smooth muscles responsiveness. In asthma, mediators such as ACh act on already contracted inflammatory airways, which results in additional increase of contraction. In contrast, low resting tension, a condition that simulates normal tidal breathing, protects from bronchoconstriction even when the epithelium is damaged. PMID:10704081

  6. [Regeneration of planarians: experimental object].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Kreshchenko, I D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the expediency of using invertebrates, such as flatworms and planarians, as experimental objects. Free-living planarian flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes, class Turbellaria) are invertebrate animals in which a bilateral symmetry appears for the first time in evolution and organs and tissues form. As the highest ecological link of the food chain--predators--these animals are characterized by a set of behavioral reactions controlled by a differentiated central nervous system. Planarians have unsurpassed ability to regenerate lost or damaged body parts. Owing to the ease of their breeding and their convenience for manipulations, these animals are used to study the influence of chemical and physical factors on the processes of life, growth, and reproduction. Currently, planarians are recognized as a model for biological research in the field of regeneration, stem cell biology, study of their proliferation and differentiation, as well as the regulatory mechanisms of morphogenetic processes. The genome of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea was fully sequenced, which opened up the opportunity to work with this object at the molecular biological level. Furthermore, planarians are used in neurobiological and toxicological studies, in studying the evolutionary aspects of centralization of the nervous system, mechanisms of muscle contraction, and in the development of new antiparasitic drugs. This review aims to demonstrate the relevance and diversity of research conducted on simple biological objects--planarians--to awider audience to show the historical continuity of these studies and their wide geographical distribution and to focus on the studies carried out in Russia, which, as a rule, are not included in the foreign reviews on planarian regeneration.

  7. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  8. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  9. Regenerator matrix physical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Among several cellular ceramic structures manufactured by various suppliers for regenerator application in a gas turbine engine, three have the best potential for achieving durability and performance objectives for use in gas turbines, Stirling engines, and waste heat recovery systems: (1) an aluminum-silicate sinusoidal flow passage made from a corrugated wate paper process; (2) an extruded isosceles triangle flow passage; and (3) a second generation matrix incorporating a square flow passage formed by an embossing process. Key physical and thermal property data for these configurations presented include: heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics, compressive strength, tensile strength and elasticity, thermal expansion characteristics, chanical attack, and thermal stability.

  10. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  11. Stem cell therapy in oral and maxillofacial region: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, PM; Manikandhan, R; Muthu, MS; Abraham, S

    2012-01-01

    Cells with unique capacity for self-renewal and potency are called stem cells. With appropriate biochemical signals stem cells can be transformed into desirable cells. The idea behind this article is to shortly review the obtained literature on stem cell with respect to their properties, types and advantages of dental stem cells. Emphasis has been given to the possibilities of stem cell therapy in the oral and maxillofacial region including regeneration of tooth and craniofacial defects. PMID:22434942

  12. Expression of CD1a by Langerhan’s Cells in Oral Lichen Planus - A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sakki, Esther Priyadarshini; Kumar, Yennavaram Vijay; Kolimi, Sadananda; Perika, Ravi; Karthik, Kalepu Venkata; Kumar, Kandukuri Mahesh; Kalyan, Venumbaka Siva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Langerhan’s Cells (LCs) are dendritic cells of the oral epithelium which play a role in a series of oral lesions from gingivitis to oral cancer. Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is an oral mucosal T-lymphocyte mediated immunologic reaction to an unidentified putative antigen or allergen. Aim The aim of this study was to quantify the presence of immature LCs in OLP comparing them with normal epithelium. Materials and Methods A retrospective study using 30 of OLP cases were conducted. Immunohistochemistry was performed using polyclonal anti-CD1a antibodies to identify LCs in 10 cases of normal tissue and 30 samples of OLP. The distribution of LCs among lesional tissue and normal mucosa was analysed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results LC population in OLP was significantly higher when compared to the normal epithelium (p<0.001). Conclusion The increase in LCs indicates the active role played during the antigen detection in OLP and subsequent presentation to T-lymphocytes. PMID:27504405

  13. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth.

  14. Absorption and exchange of water across rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Dobson, A; Sellers, A F; Gatewood, V H

    1976-11-01

    The osmotic pressure of solutions in the ventral sac of the rumen of the conscious cow was varied with Na Cl or mannitol. The mucosal blood flow measured by HTO clearance was minimal when the lumen contained an isotonic solution and rose threefold when the rumen was hypo- or hypertonic to plasma by 150 mosmol/kg. Thus osmotic gradients actoss the rumen epithelium stimulated mucosal blood flow. Using osmotic gradients small enough to avoid blood flow stimulation, the net water flow could be enhanced by butyrate, a chemical stimulator of blood flow. Thus water movement was partially limited by blood flow. This implied an appreciable change in osmotic pressure of the capillary blood toward that of the rumen contents. The relative importance of blood flow, membrane permeability, and solute uptake on water transport was assessed. The osmotic pressure in the rumen was stationary when the rumen solution was distinctly hypotonic to plasma. The absorbate in the absence of an osmotic gradient was thus hypertonic. The net uptake of solute increased rapidly when the solution in the lumen was hypertonic to plasma. This gave rise to a more rapid rate of change of osmotic pressure in the rumen under this condition.

  15. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  16. Expression profile of maize (Zea mays) scutellar epithelium during imbibition.

    PubMed

    Tnani, Hedia; García-Muniz, Nora; Vicient, Carlos M; López-Ribera, Ignacio

    2012-09-15

    The scutellum is a shield-shaped structure surrounding the embryo axis in grass species. The scutellar epithelium (Sep) is a monolayer of cells in contact with the endosperm. The Sep plays an important role during seed germination in the secretion of gibberellins and hydrolytic enzymes and in the transport of the hydrolized products to the growing embryo. We identified 30 genes predominantly expressed after imbibition in the Sep as compared to other parts of the scutellum. A high proportion of these genes is involved in metabolic processes. Some other identified genes are involved in the synthesis or modification of cell walls, which may be reflected in the changes of cell shape and cell wall composition that can be observed during imbibition. One of the genes encodes a proteinase that belongs to a proteinase family typical of carnivorous plants. Almost nothing is known about their role in other plants or organs, but the scutellar presence may point to a "digestive" function during germination. Genes involved in the production of energy and the transport of peptides were also identified.

  17. In vitro function of cyst epithelium from human polycystic kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, R D

    1985-01-01

    It is thought that cysts in polycystic kidneys originate from nephron segments and function in a manner similar to the segment or origin. The indirect evidence for this derives from studies of microanatomy and cyst fluid composition. Cysts with low Na+ have been classified as distal, whereas cysts with high Na+ have been classified as proximal. In order to directly determine the transport characteristics of cyst epithelium, cysts from a human polycystic kidney were studied in vitro using Ussing chamber techniques. Composition of cyst fluid was determined in parallel with these studies. Cysts with low Na+ (gradient cysts) demonstrate characteristics consistent with distal nephron origin including elevated potential difference (PD), short-circuit current (Isc), and low conductance. PD and Isc of gradient cysts were amiloride sensitive. Nongradient cysts, however, require additional characterization. At least two types of nongradient cysts were identified, one with characteristics consistent with proximal nephron origin and another apparently without function. These studies are the first direct evidence for active transport of cysts from human polycystic kidney and provide strong evidence to support the concept that cysts function in the same manner as the nephron segment of origin. PMID:4056045

  18. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  19. Retinal pigment epithelium transplantation: concepts, challenges, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P; Thomson, H A J; Luff, A J; Lotery, A J

    2015-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells that supports the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that are essential for retinal function. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment, and the primary pathogenic mechanism is thought to arise in the RPE layer. RPE cell structure and function are well understood, the cells are readily sustainable in laboratory culture and, unlike other cell types within the retina, RPE cells do not require synaptic connections to perform their role. These factors, together with the relative ease of outer retinal imaging, make RPE cells an attractive target for cell transplantation compared with other cell types in the retina or central nervous system. Seminal experiments in rats with an inherited RPE dystrophy have demonstrated that RPE transplantation can prevent photoreceptor loss and maintain visual function. This review provides an update on the progress made so far on RPE transplantation in human eyes, outlines potential sources of donor cells, and describes the technical and surgical challenges faced by the transplanting surgeon. Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cells, combined with novel surgical instrumentation, hold considerable promise, and support the concept of RPE transplantation as a regenerative strategy in AMD. PMID:26043704

  20. Tumorigenesis and peritoneal colonization from fallopian tube epithelium.

    PubMed

    Eddie, Sharon L; Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Ó hAinmhir, Eoghainin; Moyle-Heyrman, Georgette; Lantvit, Dan D; Wei, Jian-Jun; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Burdette, Joanna E

    2015-08-21

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy, primarily because its origin and initiation factors are unknown. A secretory murine oviductal epithelial (MOE) model was generated to address the hypothesis that the fallopian tube is an origin for high-grade serous cancer. MOE cells were stably altered to express mutation in p53, silence PTEN, activate AKT, and amplify KRAS alone and in combination, to define if this cell type gives rise to tumors and what genetic alterations are required to drive malignancy. Cell lines were characterized in vitro and allografted into mice. Silencing PTEN formed high-grade carcinoma with wide spread tumor explants including metastasis into the ovary. Addition of p53 mutation to PTEN silencing did not enhance this phenotype, whereas addition of KRAS mutation reduced survival. Interestingly, PTEN silencing and KRAS mutation originating from ovarian surface epithelium generated endometrioid carcinoma, suggesting that different cellular origins with identical genetic manipulations can give rise to distinct cancer histotypes. Defining the roles of specific signaling modifications in tumorigenesis from the fallopian tube/oviduct is essential for early detection and development of targeted therapeutics. Further, syngeneic MOE allografts provide an ideal model for pre-clinical testing in an in vivo environment with an intact immune system.

  1. Development of rumen metabolism and ruminal epithelium in lambs.

    PubMed

    Zitnan, R; Bomba, A; Sommer, A; Kolodzieyski, L

    1993-01-01

    The concentrations of volatile fatty acids and the development of rumen epithelium and microflora adhered to rumen wall in suckling lambs were observed. Total VFA concentration increased with age. The differences between the 1st (28.5 mmol.l-1) and 4th week of age (78.7 mmol.l-1) and between 6th (82.1 mmol.l-1 and 10th week of age (117.4 mmol.l-1) were significant (p < 0.01). The highest molar proportion of acetic acid (71.2 mol%) was observed in 1 week-old lambs and the highest molar proportion of propionic acid in 6 week-old lambs (20.8 mol%). Length and surface characteristics of papillae changed dramatically over the 10-week period. In samples from 1-week and 4-week-old lambs, the papilla surface was relatively smooth and epithelial cells were relatively thin and flat. In samples from 6-week and 10-week-old lambs the tissue topography was typically rough. In the 1-week-old lambs the cocci, single rods and short rods in pairs were present at very low population levels. At 4 weeks the epimural community became notably more complex and bacteria were present at a higher population level. The dominant morphotype at 6 weeks was a rod-shaped end-on attached bacterium. The epimural microflora became the most complex at 10 weeks.

  2. The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cardenas, Hernán

    2006-09-01

    The present work investigates the effects of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) on sodium transport in the isolated skin of the toad Pleurodema thaul. A submaximal concentration of the drug (0.2 mM) applied to the outer surface of the epithelium increased the electrical parameters short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (PD) by over 28%, whereas only a higher concentration (1 mM) induced over a 45% decrease in these parameters when applied to the inner surface. The amiloride test showed that the outer surface stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inner surface inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). Exploration of these effects of CBZ on the outer surface showed that 0.2 mM increased net Na+ (22Na) influx by 20% and 0.6 mM CBZ decreased Na+ mucosa-serosa flux by 19%, a result in agreement with the finding that higher concentrations of CBZ applied to the inner surface not only decreased ENa but also sodium conductance (GNa). PMID:16542818

  3. The antiepileptic drug phenytoin affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of phenytoin on isolated Pleurodema thaul toad skin were investigated. Low (micromolar) concentrations of the antiepileptic agent applied to the outside surface of the toad epithelium increased the electrical parameters (short-circuit current and potential difference) by over 40%, reflecting stimulation of Na(+) transport, whereas higher (millimolar concentrations, outside and inside surface) decreased both electric parameters, the effect being greater at the inside surface (40% and 80% decrease, respectively). The amiloride test showed that the stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). It is concluded that the drug interaction with membrane lipid bilayers might result in a distortion of the lipid-protein interface contributing to disturbance of Na(+) epithelial channel activity. After applying the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker ouabain and replacing the Na(+) ions in the outer Ringer's solution by choline, it was concluded that both active and passive transport are involved in sodium absorption, although active transport predominates. PMID:16314149

  4. Role of Epithelium Sodium Channel in Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruo-Yu; Yang, Shu-Hua; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review the recent developments in the mechanisms of epithelium sodium channels (ENaCs) induced bone formation and regulation. Data Sources: Studies written in English or Chinese were searched using Medline, PubMed and the index of Chinese-language literature with time restriction from 2005 to 2014. Keywords included ENaC, bone, bone formation, osteonecrosis, estrogen, and osteoporosis. Data from published articles about the structure of ENaC, mechanism of ENaC in bone formation in recent domestic and foreign literature were selected. Study Selection: Abstract and full text of all studies were required to obtain. Studies those were not accessible and those did not focus on the keywords were excluded. Results: ENaCs are tripolymer ion channels which are assembled from homologous α, β, and γ subunits. Crystal structure of ENaCs suggests that ENaC has a central ion-channel located in the central symmetry axis of the three subunits. ENaCs are protease sensitive channels whose iron-channel activity is regulated by the proteolytic reaction. Channel opening probability of ENaCs is regulated by proteinases, mechanical force, and shear stress. Several molecules are involved in regulation of ENaCs in bone formation, including nitride oxide synthases, voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and cyclooxygenase-2. Conclusion: The pathway of ENaC involved in shear stress has an effect on stimulating osteoblasts even bone formation by estrogen interference. PMID:26904995

  5. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk. PMID:23509726

  6. Compensatory plasticity in the olfactory epithelium: age, timing, and reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Casey N.

    2015-01-01

    Like other biological systems, olfaction responds “homeostatically” to enduring change in the stimulus environment. This adaptive mechanism, referred to as compensatory plasticity, has been studied almost exclusively in developing animals. Thus it is unknown if this phenomenon is limited to ontogenesis and irreversible, characteristics common to some other forms of plasticity. Here we explore the effects of odor deprivation on the adult mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) using nasal plugs to eliminate nasal airflow unilaterally. Plugs were in place for 2–6 wk after which electroolfactograms (EOGs) were recorded from the occluded and open sides of the nasal cavity. Mean EOG amplitudes were significantly greater on the occluded than on the open side. The duration of plugging did not affect the results, suggesting that maximal compensation occurs within 2 wk or less. The magnitude of the EOG difference between the open and occluded side in plugged mice was comparable to adults that had undergone surgical naris occlusion as neonates. When plugs were removed after 4 wk followed by 2 wk of recovery, mean EOG amplitudes were not significantly different between the always-open and previously plugged sides of the nasal cavity suggesting that this form of plasticity is reversible. Taken together, these results suggest that compensatory plasticity is a constitutive mechanism of olfactory receptor neurons that allows these cells to recalibrate their stimulus-response relationship to fit the statistics of their current odor environment. PMID:26269548

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  8. Keratinization of the esophageal epithelium of domesticated mammals.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wilfried; Schoennagel, Britta; Kacza, Johannes; Busche, Roger; Hornickel, Isabelle Nina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Schnapper, Anke

    2014-01-01

    We studied the esophageal epithelium for keratinization characteristics from samples of domesticated mammals of three nutrition groups (herbivores: horse, cattle, sheep; omnivores: pig, dog, rat; carnivores: cat) using histochemistry (keratins, disulfides), sulfur measurements, and cryo-SEM. Keratins were found in all esophageal layers of all species, except for the equine Stratum corneum. The positive reaction staining of Pan-keratin was remarkable, but decreased in intensity toward the outer layers, whereas in the pig and cat, staining was confined to the corneal layer. The herbivores revealed positive staining reactions in the upper Stratum spinosum, particularly in the sheep. Regarding single keratins, CK6 immunostating was found in most esophageal layers, but only weakly or negatively in the porcine and equine Stratum corneum. CK13 staining was restricted to the sheep and here was found in all layers. CK14 could be detected in the equine and feline Stratum basale, and upper vital layers of the dog and rat. CK17 appeared only in the Stratum spinosum and Stratum granulosum, but in all layers of the dog and cat. Disulfides reacted strongest in the Stratum corneum of the herbivores, as corroborated by the sulfur concentrations in the esophagus. Our study emphasized that keratins are very important for the mechanical stability of the epithelial cells and cell layers of the mammalian esophagus. The role of these keratins in the esophageal epithelia is of specific interest owing to the varying feed qualities and mechanical loads of different nutrition groups, which have to be countered.

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  10. Proteinases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa evoke mucin release by tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, J D; Tandler, B; Liedtke, C M; Boat, T F

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the potential of exoproducts from pathogenic bacteria to stimulate the release of high molecular weight mucins from goblet cells of airway epithelium in a rabbit tracheal explant system. Culture supernatants from proteolytic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens, but not supernatants from a number of non-proteolytic strains, released mucins from goblet cells. Highly purified elastase and alkaline proteinase from P. aeruginosa stimulated goblet cell mucin release in a dose-dependent fashion. Lipopolysaccharide, exotoxin A, and alginate of P. aeruginosa did not possess mucin release properties. Proteolytic activity was required for mucin release by P. aeruginosa elastase, but such release in goblet cells was not mediated by cyclic AMP. Morphologic studies suggested rapid release of mucins from goblet cells was response to elastase by a process resembling apocrine secretion. Several nonbacterial proteinases mimicked the effect of Pseudomonas proteases. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that bacterial and other play a role in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic lung infections. Images PMID:6568227

  11. Rod Photopigment Kinetics After Photodisruption of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Advances in retinal imaging have led to the discovery of long-lasting retinal changes caused by light exposures below published safety limits, including disruption of the RPE. To investigate the functional consequences of RPE disruption, we combined adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy with retinal densitometry. Methods. A modified adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) measured the apparent density and regeneration rate of rhodopsin in two macaques before and after four different 568-nm retinal radiant exposures (RREs; 400–3200 J/cm2). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to measure the optical path length through the photoreceptor outer segments before and after RPE disruption. Results. All tested RREs caused visible RPE disruption. Apparent rhodopsin density was significantly reduced following 1600 (P = 0.01) and 3200 J/cm2 (P = 0.007) exposures. No significant change in apparent density was observed in response to 800 J/cm2. Surprisingly, exposure to 400 J/cm2 showed a significant increase in apparent density (P = 0.047). Rhodopsin recovery rate was not significantly affected by these RREs. Optical coherence tomography measurements showed a significant decrease in the optical path length through the photoreceptor outer segments for RREs above 800 J/cm2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. At higher RREs, optical path length through the outer segments was reduced. However, the rate of photopigment regeneration was unchanged. While some ambiguity remains as to the correlation between measured reflectivity and absolute rhodopsin density; at the lowest RREs, RPE disruption appears not to be accompanied by a loss of apparent rhodopsin density, which would have been indicative of functional loss. PMID:25316724

  12. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  13. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  14. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].