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Sample records for oral glucose tolerance

  1. Monitoring breath during oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Ghimenti, S; Tabucchi, S; Lomonaco, T; Di Francesco, F; Fuoco, R; Onor, M; Lenzi, S; Trivella, M G

    2013-03-01

    The evolution of breath composition during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) was analysed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 16 subjects and correlated to blood glucose levels. The glucose tolerance tests classified five of the subjects as diabetics, eight as affected by impaired glucose tolerance and three as normoglycaemic. Acetone levels were generally higher in diabetics (average concentration values: diabetics, 300 ± 40 ppbv; impaired glucose tolerance, 350 ± 30 ppbv; normoglycaemic, 230 ± 20 ppbv) but the large inter-individual variability did not allow us to identify the three groups by this parameter alone. The exhalation of 3-hydroxy-butan-2-one and butane-2,3-dione, likely due to the metabolization of glucose by bacteria in the mouth, was also observed. Future work will involve the extension of the analyses to other volatile compounds by attempting to improve the level of discrimination between the various classes of subjects.

  2. Effect of Different Periods of Fasting on Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, C. H.; O'Regan, J.; O'Sullivan, D. J

    1973-01-01

    The effect of different periods of fasting on oral glucose tolerance was investigated in 33 subjects. It was found that glucose tolerance deteriorated as the fasting period became shorter. This effect was seen almost exclusively in subjects over 40 years of age. Only the fasting blood sugar was affected by the duration of the pretest fast in younger subjects. PMID:4733248

  3. Meal related glucose monitoring is a method of diagnosing glucose intolerance in pregnancies with high probability of gestational diabetes but normal glucose tolerance by oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    John, Mathew; Gopinath, Deepa

    2013-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosed by classical oral glucose tolerance test can result in fetal complications like macrosomia and polyhydramnios. Guidelines exist on management of patients diagnose by abnormal oral glucose tolerance test with diet modification followed by insulin. Even patients with abnormal oral glucose tolerance test maintaining apparently normal blood sugars with diet are advised insulin if there is accelerated fetal growth. But patients with normal oral glucose tolerance test can present with macrosomia and polyhydramnios. These patients are labelled as not having gestational diabetes mellitus and are followed up with repeat oral glucose tolerance test. We hypothesise that these patients may have an altered placental threshold to glucose or abnormal sensitivity of fetal tissues to glucose. Meal related glucose monitoring in these patients can identify minor abnormalities in glucose disturbance and should be treated to targets similar to physiological levels of glucose in non pregnant adults.

  4. Evaluation of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Children With Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Varlamis, Sotirios; Vavatsi, Norma; Pavlou, Evangelos; Kotsis, Vasileios; Spilioti, Martha; Kavga, Maria; Varlamis, George; Sotiriadou, Foteini; Agakidou, Eleni; Voutoufianakis, Spyridon; Evangeliou, Athanasios E

    2013-11-01

    Glucose metabolism of children with drug-resistant epilepsy, controlled by antiepileptic drugs epilepsy, and first-time nonfebrile seizures was studied through the performance of an oral glucose tolerance test and through insulin, C-peptide, and glycosylated hemoglobin measurements. In the refractory epilepsy group, there were more abnormal oral glucose tolerance test results (62.07%) in comparison to the controlled epilepsy group (25%) and the group of first-time seizures (21.21%). There was a significant difference between the group of refractory epilepsy and every other group concerning the abnormality of the oral glucose tolerance test (P < .05). The mean values of insulin, HbA1c, and C-peptide levels were normal for all groups. The results of the present study suggest that there is a distinction of refractory epilepsies from the drug-controlled ones and the first-induced seizures relating to their metabolic profile, regardless of the type of seizures.

  5. New insulin sensitivity index from the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Youichiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Sakurai, Masaru; Shindo, Hisakazu; Ohkubo, Eizho; Aida, Kaoru; Harii, Norikazu; Taki, Katsumi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Shimura, Hiroki; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    A new insulin sensitivity index was devised on the basis of an autoregressive model and its validity was investigated. Using data from the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 115 subjects were divided into 3 groups: 40 with normal glucose tolerance, 34 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The new insulin sensitivity index: oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (GSI) was calculated from five sets of plasma glucose and insulin levels obtained at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during OGTT using a formula based on an autoregressive model. Forty-three of the 115 subjects were examined for insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. GSI decreased in the order of normal glucose tolerance group>impaired glucose tolerance group>diabetic group. There was a significant correlation between GSI and the ISI derived from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study data in all 43 subjects who underwent both tests (r=0.72; P<0.0001). The ISI calculated by previous methods poorly correlated with the ISIs obtained by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. In conclusion, this new insulin sensitivity index based on the data obtained from OGTT using an autoregressive model is comparable to an insulin sensitivity index by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and may be superior to previous indexes that have been devised to determine insulin sensitivity from OGTT data.

  6. An integrated glucose-insulin model to describe oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Silber, Hanna E; Frey, Nicolas; Gieschke, Ronald; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Jorga, Karin; Karlsson, Mats O

    2007-10-01

    An integrated model for the glucose-insulin system describing oral glucose tolerance test data was developed, extending on a previously introduced model for intravenous glucose provocations. Model extensions comprised the description of glucose absorption by a chain of transit compartments with a mean transit time of 35 minutes, a bioavailability of 80%, and a representation of the incretin effect, expressed as a direct effect of the glucose absorption rate on insulin secretion. The ability of the model to predict the incretin effect was assessed by simulating the observed difference in insulin response following an oral glucose tolerance test compared with an isoglycemic glucose infusion mimicking an oral glucose tolerance test profile. The extension of the integrated glucose-insulin model to gain information from oral glucose tolerance test data considerably expands its range of applications because the oral glucose tolerance test is one of the most common glucose challenge experiments for assessing the efficacy of hypoglycemic agents in clinical drug development.

  7. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 <11.1 mmol/L), and none with diabetes. Using the continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L (IGT) in 9 children (69%) and >11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of <2.7 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). No glycemic abnormality was detected using HbA1C (5.7 ± 0.3%). 11/13 patients had HOMA values >2.6 and QUICKI values <0.35 denoting insulin resistance. Beta cell mass percent (B %) = 200 ± 94.8% and insulin sensitivity values (IS)=50.4 ± 45.5% denoted insulin resistance with hyper-insulinaemia and preserved beta cell mass. In obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  8. Evaluation of a Self-Administered Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, M. Angelyn; Price, Hermione C.; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L.; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E.C.; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. RESULTS The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. CONCLUSIONS Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. PMID:23321216

  9. Evaluation of a self-administered oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bethel, M Angelyn; Price, Hermione C; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E C; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R

    2013-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes.

  10. The immediate effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise on oral glucose tolerance across the glucose tolerance continuum

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Sine H.; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente K.; van Hall, Gerrit; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated glucose tolerance and postprandial glucose fluxes immediately after a single bout of aerobic exercise in subjects representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum. Twenty‐four men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or type 2 diabetes (T2D; age: 56 ± 1 years; body mass index: 27.8 ± 0.7 kg/m2, P > 0.05) underwent a 180‐min oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) combined with constant intravenous infusion of [6,6‐2H2]glucose and ingestion of [U‐13C]glucose, following 1 h of exercise (50% of peak aerobic power) or rest. In both trials, plasma glucose concentrations and kinetics, insulin, C‐peptide, and glucagon were measured. Rates (mg kg−1 min−1) of glucose appearance from endogenous (RaEndo) and exogenous (oral glucose; RaOGTT) sources, and glucose disappearance (Rd) were determined. We found that exercise increased RaEndo, RaOGTT, and Rd (all P < 0.0001) in all groups with a tendency for a greater (~20%) peak RaOGTT value in NGT subjects when compared to IGT and T2D subjects. Accordingly, following exercise, the plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT was increased in NGT subjects (P < 0.05), while unchanged in subjects with IGT and T2D. In conclusion, while a single bout of moderate‐intensity exercise increased the postprandial glucose response in NGT subjects, glucose tolerance following exercise was preserved in the two hyperglycemic groups. Thus, postprandial plasma glucose responses immediately following exercise are dependent on the underlying degree of glycemic control. PMID:25168869

  11. Heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test and associated cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Hulman, Adam; Simmons, Rebecca K; Vistisen, Dorte; Tabák, Adam G; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Alssema, Marjan; Rutters, Femke; Koopman, Anitra D M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Kirwan, John P; Hansen, Torben; Jonsson, Anna; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Astrup, Arne; Pedersen, Oluf; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Witte, Daniel R; Færch, Kristine

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to examine heterogeneity in glucose response curves during an oral glucose tolerance test with multiple measurements and to compare cardiometabolic risk profiles between identified glucose response curve groups. We analyzed data from 1,267 individuals without diabetes from five studies in Denmark, the Netherlands and the USA. Each study included between 5 and 11 measurements at different time points during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, resulting in 9,602 plasma glucose measurements. Latent class trajectories with a cubic specification for time were fitted to identify different patterns of plasma glucose change during the oral glucose tolerance test. Cardiometabolic risk factor profiles were compared between the identified groups. Using latent class trajectory analysis, five glucose response curves were identified. Despite similar fasting and 2-h values, glucose peaks and peak times varied greatly between groups, ranging from 7-12 mmol/L, and 35-70 min. The group with the lowest and earliest plasma glucose peak had the lowest estimated cardiovascular risk, while the group with the most delayed plasma glucose peak and the highest 2-h value had the highest estimated risk. One group, with normal fasting and 2-h values, exhibited an unusual profile, with the highest glucose peak and the highest proportion of smokers and men. The heterogeneity in glucose response curves and the distinct cardiometabolic risk profiles may reflect different underlying physiologies. Our results warrant more detailed studies to identify the source of the heterogeneity across the different phenotypes and whether these differences play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  12. [Flat curves of oral glucose tolerance tests (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Slama, G; Tchobroutsky, G

    1980-04-26

    Patients are often referred to diabetologists on account of a flat curve of oral glucose tolerance test. This abnormality, however, is virtually never associated with a serious metabolic disorder and in any case, it never points to a disease that cannot be diagnosed by questioning or by straightforward clinical examination, nor confirmed by a more specific laboratory test. The curve may be flat for technical reasons (e.g. rejection of the glucose administered, timing of blood withdrawals and assays), for physiological reasons (differences between venous and arteriolo-capillary blood), or for pathological reasons (interaction with drugs, pituitary, thyroid or adrenal insufficiency, digestive malabsorption) but it never implies organic hypoglycaemia nor diabetes mellitus.

  13. Serum progranulin concentrations are not responsive during oral lipid tolerance test and oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Leszczak, S; Ober, I; Schäffler, A; Karrasch, T

    2015-07-01

    The postprandial regulation of progranulin by oral uptake of lipids and carbohydrates in healthy individuals has not yet been investigated. The regulation of progranulin in 2 large cohorts of healthy volunteers during oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT; n=100) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; n=100) was analyzed. One hundred healthy volunteers underwent OLTT and OGTT in an outpatient setting. Venous blood was drawn at 0 hours (h) (fasting) and at 2, 4, and 6 h in OLTT or 1 and 2 h in OGTT. A novel OLTT solution completely free of carbohydrates and protein was applied. Subjects were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters. Serum concentrations of progranulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circulating progranulin levels remained unchanged during OLTT and OGTT. Fasting progranulin levels ranged between 31.3±8.7 and 40.6±7.7 ng/ml and were not different in subgroups addressing BMI, gender, family history, smoking habits, and hormonal contraception. There was a reciprocal correlation of progranulin with HDL (negative) and LDL cholesterol levels (positive). In healthy adults, fasting and postprandial circulating progranulin levels are not different in BMI subgroups. Oral uptake of carbohydrates and lipids does not influence circulating progranulin levels in a short-term manner. A postprandial and short-term regulation of this adipokine is absent, at least in healthy subjects. There is a negative correlation of progranulin with HDL cholesterol, but a positive correlation with LDL cholesterol. This reciprocal association might be of physiological importance for an individual's atherosclerotic risk.

  14. The "muffin test"--an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test for detecting impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Traub, Michael L; Jain, Akas; Maslow, Bat-Sheva; Pal, Lubna; Stein, Daniel T; Santoro, Nanette; Freeman, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the "muffin test" (MT) with that of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in diagnosing impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This is a cross-sectional study in a single academic institution. The participants were 73 women aged 42 to 58 years, less than 36 months after menopause, recruited for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study Trial. After a 10-hour fasting blood draw, the participants were provided a muffin and a beverage. Two-hour glucose levels were assessed. A subset underwent metabolic testing consisting of an OGTT (n = 12) and a mixed-meal tolerance test (n = 10). The main outcome measures were the prevalence of IGT and 2-hour glucose measurements after each testing method. Two-hour glucose levels were linearly related to fasting values by multivariable linear regression. This association was exaggerated in overweight (body mass index, 25 kg/m2) women (coefficient, 1.43; P < 0.001). Two-hour OGTT and MT glucose levels were comparable (P > 0.05); 2-hour glucose levels after OGTT were slightly lower than after the mixed-meal tolerance test (P < 0.05). The prevalence of IGT was 11% (8 of 73). Fasting plasma glucose alone would have missed 63% of cases (five of eight cases). The MT demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing IGT compared with the gold standard OGTT. This small pilot study should be confirmed in a larger prospective group of participants.

  15. Orally administered glucagon-like peptide-1 affects glucose homeostasis following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Poller, B; Castelli, M C; Friedman, K; Huber, A R; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts several effects on glucose homeostasis and reduces food intake. After its release from intestinal L cells, GLP-1 is subject to (i) rapid breakdown by dipeptidyl peptidase IV and (ii) high liver extraction. The highest concentrations of GLP-1 are found in the splanchnic blood rather than in the systemic circulation. An oral delivery system would mimic endogenous secretion. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) effects of a single dose (2 mg) of oral GLP-1 administered prior to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 16 healthy males. GLP-1 was rapidly absorbed from the gut, leading to tenfold higher plasma concentrations compared with controls. The PD profile was consistent with reported pharmacology; GLP-1 significantly stimulated basal insulin release (P < 0.027), with marked effects on glucose levels. The postprandial glucose peak was delayed with GLP-1, suggesting an effect on gastric emptying.

  16. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.

  17. Oral glucose tolerance and hormonal response in heroin-dependent males.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L; Ghodse, A H

    1973-06-09

    Tests on 12 heroin addicts showed that their response to a glucose load differed from that in normal controls. Though the fasting blood sugar was normal, the rise in blood glucose after a standard 50-g oral glucose tolerance test was delayed and the rise smaller than in the controls. The heroin addicts had high resting insulin levels and a delayed peak response to an oral glucose load, and their growth hormone response was also abnormal.

  18. Correspondence of continuous interstitial glucose measurement against arterialised and capillary glucose following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dye, Louise; Mansfield, Michael; Lasikiewicz, Nicola; Mahawish, Lena; Schnell, Rainer; Talbot, Duncan; Chauhan, Hitesh; Croden, Fiona; Lawton, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the Glucoday continuous interstitial ambulatory glucose-monitoring device (AGD) against plasma glucose measured from arterialised venous (AV) and glucose from capillary whole blood (finger prick, FP) in non-diabetic subjects in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. Fifteen healthy overweight men (age 30-49 years, BMI 26-31 kg/m2) participated. Glucose levels were measured before, during and after consumption of an oral 75 g glucose load using twelve FP samples and forty-four 1 ml AV blood samples during 180 min. Interstitial glucose was measured via the AGD. Three venous samples for fasting insulin were taken to estimate insulin resistance. Profiles of AGD, AV and FP glucose were generated for each participant. Glucose values for each minute of the measurement period were interpolated using a locally weighted scatterplot smoother. Data were compared using Bland-Altman plots that showed good correspondence between all pairs of measurements. Concordance between the three methods was 0.8771 (Kendall's W, n 15, P < 0.001). Concordance was greater between AV and FP (W = 0.9696) than AGD and AV (W = 0.8770) or AGD and FP (W = 0.8764). Analysis of time to peak glucose indicated that AGD measures lagged approximately 15 min behind FP and AV measures. Percent body fat was significantly correlated with time to peak glucose levels for each measure, while BMI and estimated insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment, HOMA) were not. In conclusion, AGD shows good correspondence with FP and AV glucose measures in response to a glucose load with a 15 min time lag. Taking this into account, AGD has potential application in nutrition and behaviour studies.

  19. Hepatic portal vein denervation impairs oral glucose tolerance but not exenatide's effect on glycemia.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kolka, Cathryn M; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-10-15

    The hepatoportal area is an important glucohomeostatic metabolic sensor, sensing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have reported previously that activation of hepatoportal sensors by intraportal infusion of glucose and GLP-1 or by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 receptor activator exenatide and of intraportal glucose improved glycemia independent of corresponding changes in pancreatic hormones. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated via the portal vein (PV) or by direct action on the liver itself. To test whether receptors in the PV mediate exenatide's beneficial effect on glucose tolerance, we performed 1) paired oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with and without exenatide and 2) intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after PV denervation in canines. Denervation of the portal vein affected oral glucose tolerance; post-denervation (POST-DEN) OGTT glucose and insulin AUC were 50% higher than before denervation (P = 0.01). However, portal denervation did not impair exenatide's effect to improve oral glucose tolerance (exenatide effect: 48 ± 12 mmol·l⁻¹·min before vs. 64 ± 26 mmol·l⁻¹·min after, P = 0.67). There were no changes in insulin sensitivity or secretion during IVGTTs. Portal vein sensing might play a role in controlling oral glucose tolerance during physiological conditions but not in pharmacological activation of GLP-1 receptors by exenatide.

  20. An integrated glucose-insulin model to describe oral glucose tolerance test data in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Silber, Hanna E; Frey, Nicolas; Karlsson, Mats O

    2010-03-01

    The extension of the previously developed integrated models for glucose and insulin (IGI) to include the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy volunteers could be valuable to better understand the differences between healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Data from an OGTT in 23 healthy volunteers were used. Analysis was based on the previously developed intravenous model with extensions for glucose absorption and incretin effect on insulin secretion. The need for additional structural components was evaluated. The model was evaluated by simulation and a bootstrap. Multiple glucose and insulin concentration peaks were observed in most individuals as well as hypoglycemic episodes in the second half of the experiment. The OGTT data were successfully described by the extended basic model. An additional control mechanism of insulin on glucose production improved the description of the data. The model showed good predictive properties, and parameters were estimated with good precision. In conclusion, a previously presented integrated model has been extended to describe glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy volunteers following an OGTT. The characterization of the differences between the healthy and diabetic stages in the IGI model could potentially be used to extrapolate drug effect from healthy volunteers to T2DM.

  1. An elevated 1-h post- load glucose level during the oral glucose tolerance test detects prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Buysschaert, Martin; Bergman, Michael; Yanogo, Donald; Jagannathan, Ram; Buysschaert, Benoit; Preumont, Vanessa

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnosis of dysglycemic states by conventional oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) criteria (fasting and 2-h plasma glucose) with the 1-h post-load plasma glucose level. 34 individuals (mean age: 55±13years; BMI: 27.7±6.3kg/m(2)) at risk for prediabetes were administered a 75g OGTT. Individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or prediabetes were identified according to fasting and/or 2-h plasma glucose (PG) concentrations. Subsequently, subjects were divided in 2 groups: group 1 (n=21) with a 1-h PG<155mg/dl and group 2 (n=13) with a 1-h PG≥155mg/dl. HOMA was performed to assess β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. NGT or prediabetes based on conventional criteria correlated with the 1-h PGglucose value ≥155mg/dl is strongly associated with conventional criteria for (pre)diabetes and alterations of β-cell function. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of celiac superior mesenteric ganglionectomy on glucose homeostasis and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance testing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Atsushi; Shikuma, Junpei; Ogihara, Norikazu; Eiki, Jun-ichi; Kanazawa, Masao; Notoya, Yōko; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Odawara, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in the body. In the prandial state, some of the glucose which is absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract is converted into glycogen and stored in the liver. In contrast, the liver produces glucose by glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis while fasting. Thus, the liver contributes to maintaining blood glucose level within normoglycemic range. Glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are regulated by various mechanisms including hormones, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and the hepatic glucose content. In this study, we examined a rat model in which the celiac superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) was resected. We attempted to elucidate how the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating glucose homeostasis by assessing the effects of CSMG resection on glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test, and by examining hepatic glycogen content and hepatic glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity. On the oral glucose tolerance test, CSMG-resected rats demonstrated improved glucose tolerance and significantly increased GP activity compared with sham-operated rats, whereas there were no significant differences in insulin, glucagon or catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating the rate of glycogen consumption through GP activity. In conclusion, the examined rat model showed that the celiac sympathetic nervous system regulates hepatic glucose metabolism in conjunction with vagal nerve innervations and is a critical component in the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis.

  3. Metabolic Profiling of the Response to an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Detects Subtle Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wopereis, Suzan; Rubingh, Carina M.; van Erk, Marjan J.; Verheij, Elwin R.; van Vliet, Trinette; Cnubben, Nicole H. P.; Smilde, Age K.; van der Greef, Jan; van Ommen, Ben; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. Methodology To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. Conclusions Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men. PMID:19242536

  4. Acute fructose administration decreases the glycemic response to an oral glucose tolerance test in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Moore, M C; Cherrington, A D; Mann, S L; Davis, S N

    2000-12-01

    In animal models, a small (catalytic) dose of fructose administered with glucose decreases the glycemic response to the glucose load. Therefore, we examined the effect of fructose on glucose tolerance in 11 healthy human volunteers (5 men and 6 women). Each subject underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on 2 separate occasions, at least 1 week apart. Each OGTT consisted of 75 g glucose with or without 7.5 g fructose (OGTT+F or OGTT-F), in random order. Arterialized blood samples were obtained from a heated dorsal hand vein twice before ingestion of the carbohydrate and every 15 min for 2 h afterward. The area under the curve (AUC) of the change in plasma glucose was 19% less in OGTT+F vs. OGTT-F (P: < 0.05). Glucose tolerance was improved by fructose in 9 subjects and worsened in 2. All 6 subjects with the largest glucose AUC during OGTT-F had a decreased response during OGTT+F (31 +/- 5% decrease). The insulin AUC did not differ between the 2 studies. Of the 9 subjects with improved glucose tolerance during the OGTT+F, 5 had smaller insulin AUC during the OGTT+F than the OGTT-F. Plasma glucagon concentrations declined similarly during OGTT-F and OGTT+F. The blood lactate response was about 50% greater during the OGTT+F (P: < 0.05). Neither nonesterified fatty acid nor triglyceride concentrations differed between the two OGTT. In conclusion, low dose fructose improves the glycemic response to an oral glucose load in normal adults without significantly enhancing the insulin or triglyceride response. Fructose appears most effective in those normal individuals who have the poorest glucose tolerance.

  5. Oral glucose tolerance test reduces arterial baroreflex sensitivity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kenneth M; Tedder, Gale; Lockhart, Chris; Meneilly, Graydon S

    2008-03-01

    Although postprandial decreases in blood pressure are a common cause of syncope in the older adult population, the postprandial effects of the oral glucose tolerance test on blood pressure and the arterial baroreflex remain poorly characterized in older adults. Therefore, arterial blood pressure and the arterial baroreflex were studied in 19 healthy older adults (mean age 71.7 +/- 1.1 years) who were given a standardized oral glucose load (75 g) or an isovolumetric sham drink during 2 separate sessions. All measures were taken for 120 min after treatment. Baroreflex function was assessed by using the spontaneous baroreflex method (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS). Subjects demonstrated a decrease in BRS after oral glucose that was not seen in the placebo session (two-way analysis of variance, p = 0.04). There was no significant change in systolic, mean, or diastolic blood pressure; together with a drop in BRS, this resulted in a significant tachycardia post glucose (two-way analysis of variance, p < 0.001). We conclude that healthy older adults can successfully maintain blood pressure during an oral glucose tolerance test despite a decrease in arterial BRS. Decreased BRS resulted in a tachycardic response to glucose.

  6. Sitagliptin improves glycaemic excursion after a meal or after an oral glucose load in Japanese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Kadowaki, T; Terauchi, Y; Okamoto, T; Sato, A; Okuyama, K; Arjona Ferreira, J C; Goldstein, B J

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of sitagliptin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In a double-blind, parallel-group study, 242 Japanese subjects with IGT, determined by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at week -1, were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to placebo (n = 83), sitagliptin 25 mg (n = 82) or 50 mg (n = 77) once daily for 8 weeks. Glycaemic variables were assessed using another OGTT at week 7 and meal tolerance tests (MTTs) at weeks 0 and 8. Primary and secondary endpoints were percent change from baseline in glucose total area under the curve 0-2 h (AUC(0 -2 h)) during the MTT and OGTT, respectively. Least squares mean percent change from baseline in glucose AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT were -2.4, -9.5 and -11.5%, and during the OGTT were -3.7, -21.4 and -20.1% with placebo, sitagliptin 25 mg once daily, and 50 mg once daily, respectively (p < 0.001 for either sitagliptin dose vs placebo in both tests). Sitagliptin treatment enhanced early insulin response during the OGTT and decreased total insulin response, assessed as the total AUC(0 -2 h) during the MTT. Sitagliptin treatment also suppressed glucagon response during the MTT. The incidence of adverse events, including hypoglycaemia, was low and generally similar in all treatment groups. Treatment with sitagliptin significantly reduced glucose excursions during both an MTT and an OGTT; this effect was associated with an increase in early insulin secretion after oral glucose loading as well as a blunted glucagon response during an MTT. Sitagliptin was generally well tolerated in subjects with IGT. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Simulation of oral glucose tolerance tests and the corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion studies for calculation of the incretin effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeungseon; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Jung Chan; Choi, Karam; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sungwan

    2014-03-01

    The incretin effect, which is a unique stimulus of insulin secretion in response to oral ingestion of nutrients, is calculated by the difference in insulin secretory responses from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion (IIGI) study. The OGTT model of this study, which is individualized by fitting the glucose profiles during an OGTT, was developed to predict the glucose profile during an IIGI study in the same subject. Also, the model predicts the insulin and incretin profiles during both studies. The incretin effect, estimated by simulation, was compared with that measured by physiologic studies from eight human subjects with normal glucose tolerance, and the result exhibited a good correlation (r > 0.8); the incretin effect from the simulation was 56.5% ± 10.6% while the one from the measured data was 52.5% ± 19.6%. In conclusion, the parameters of the OGTT model have been successfully estimated to predict the profiles of both OGTTs and IIGI studies. Therefore, with glucose data from the OGTT alone, this model could control and predict the physiologic responses, including insulin secretion during OGTTs and IIGI studies, which could eventually eliminate the need for complex and cumbersome IIGI studies in incretin research.

  8. The effect of age and diet on the oral glucose tolerance test in ponies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Reid, S W; Love, S

    1997-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of age and diet on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy ponies, OGTTs were performed on 2 groups of British native breed ponies (Group A: 7 foals [6-9 months], Group B: 7 mature individuals [6-13 years]) when maintained on either a high fibre pelleted ration only (Groups A and B) or a hay only diet (Group B). Plasma glucose response, following oral glucose administration, for Group A (basal plasma glucose concentration [Glu0] 4.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/l (mean +/- s.d.) increasing to 11.5 +/- 1.3 mmol/l at 90 min) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from that observed for Group B (Glu0 of 4.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/l increasing to 6.8 +/- 1.3 mmol/l at 90 min), when fed the same diet. For Group B ponies, the plasma glucose response, following oral glucose administration, was significantly different (P < 0.05) when fed hay only (Glu0 4.6 +/- 0.4 mmol/l increasing to 9.6 +/- 2.1 mmol/l at 150 min) compared to when fed the high fibre pelleted ration. These results indicate that both age and diet have a significant effect on plasma glucose concentrations measured during an OGTT.

  9. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003466.htm Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant To use the sharing features on this ... is broken) Alternative Names Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test; ...

  10. Effect of glycemia on plasma incretins and the incretin effect during oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; Aulinger, Benedict; D'Alessio, David A

    2012-11-01

    The incretin effect, reflecting the enhancement of postprandial insulin secretion by factors including the intestinal hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, increases in proportion to meal size. However, it is unknown whether the incretin effect is dependent on ambient glucose. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of plasma glycemia on the incretin effect. Thirteen healthy subjects consumed 50 g oral glucose solution mixed with d-xylose during fixed hyperglycemia at 8 and 10.5 mmol/L, on 3 separate days, twice at lower glycemia (LOW) and once at higher values (HIGH). The relative increase in insulin release after glucose ingestion at fixed hyperglycemia, a surrogate for the incretin effect, was similar among all three studies. The GLP-1 response to oral glucose was significantly lower at higher plasma glycemia, as was the appearance of d-xylose after the meal. Between the two LOW studies, the reproducibility of insulin release in response to intravenous glucose alone and intravenous plus ingested glucose was similar. These findings indicate that the incretin contribution to postprandial insulin release is independent of glycemia in healthy individuals, despite differences in GLP-1 secretion. The incretin effect is a reproducible trait among humans with normal glucose tolerance.

  11. Deterioration of insulin release rate response to glucose during oral glucose tolerance test is associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes in normal glucose tolerance subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; He, Shihui; Sun, Yao; Li, Guangwei; Xu, Qingsong; Wang, Chen; Jia, Weiping

    2017-09-01

    β-Cell dedifferentiation, characterized by loss of glucose sensitivity (β-cell glucose sensitivity [βCGS]), has been reported to play an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Traditionally, βCGS was derived from C-peptide-based method. However, C-peptide was not routinely examined in normal subjects and diabetes never treated with insulin. Thus, the aim of the study was to evaluate the use of insulin in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in estimation of β-cell glucose response ability. A total of 1,599 subjects including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and T2D were included in the study. A subgroup of NGT subjects (n = 591) were followed up for an average duration of 56.88 ± 20.76 months. Insulin release rate (IRRINS ) in the function of glucose (IRRINS response to glucose [IRRG]) during OGTT was compared with βCGS. Both βCGS derived from C-peptide by deconvolution approach and IRRG by insulin release progressively declined from NGT to IGT and T2D. Both βCGS and IRRG were associated with deposit of first-phase insulin secretion (DI1st ). After 56.88 ± 20.76 months, 32 (5.41%) NGT subjects had developed T2D. NGT subjects who progressed to diabetes after follow-up had lower IRRG and DI1st levels than those who did not (P < 0.01). Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that decreased IRRG was a significant independent risk predictor for future diabetes after adjustment of age, body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-insulin resistance, DI1st and family history. NGT subjects with decreased IRRG during OGTT had defective early insulin secretion and were at higher risk of developing diabetes. IRRG could be a useful T2D predictor in NGT subjects. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(9):756-766, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Diurnal Variation in Oral Glucose Tolerance: Blood Sugar and Plasma Insulin Levels Morning, Afternoon, and Evening

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, R. J.; Baker, I. A.; Keen, H.; Oakley, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty-four subjects received three oral glucose tolerance tests, in the morning, afternoon, and evening of separate days. The mean blood sugar levels in the afternoon and evening tests were similar, and they were both significantly higher than those in the morning test. Plasma immunoreactive insulin levels, however, were highest in the morning test. The pattern of insulin levels during the afternoon and evening tests resembled that described as typical of maturity-onset diabetes. PMID:5058728

  13. [Insulin response and NEFA behavior in volunteers with a flat response to oral glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Viviani, G; Cordera, R; Maiello, M; De Micheli, A; Odetti, P; Corsi, L; Boeri, D; Prando, R

    1979-07-15

    The insulin response and the NEFA behaviour of 7 lean and 8 obese subjects with a flat response to an oral glucose tolerance test have been studied. A flat response has been defined as one in which the maximum glycemic increase and the area of increase does not exceed 32 mg% and 18 mg% respectively. The insulin response and the NEFA behaviour were similar both in lean and in obese subjects to controls with normal O.G.T.T. The glucose/I.R.I. ratios were increased. A possible physiopathological interpretation is proposed.

  14. Relationships of Early And Late Glycemic Responses With Gastric Emptying During An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Chinmay S; Horowitz, Michael; Trahair, Laurence G; Wishart, Judith M; Bound, Michelle; Lange, Kylie; Rayner, Christopher K; Jones, Karen L

    2015-09-01

    The early glycemic response during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is directly related to the rate of gastric emptying (GE). There is little information about the effect of GE on the blood glucose at either 60 min (a predictor of diabetes) or 120 min (used diagnostically). This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between glycemic responses at 30, 60, and 120 min and GE following a 75-g OGTT in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Eighty-two subjects in the general community without diabetes (57 NGT, 25 IGT) and 16 with T2D consumed a 75-g glucose drink labeled with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid. GE (by scintigraphy) and glycemia were measured from t = 0-120 min and relationships between blood glucose (absolute, change from baseline, and area under the curve) and GE at 30, 60, and 120 min determined. There were no differences in GE. There were relationships between the blood glucose at 30 min and GE (NGT: r = 0.40; P < .01; IGT: r = 0.49; P = .02; T2D: r = 0.62; P = .01). There was also a relationship between the blood glucose at 60 min and GE in IGT (r = 0.52; P = .02) and T2D (r = 0.77; P < .01), but not NGT (r = 0.16; P = .24). In NGT, there was an inverse relationship between blood glucose at 120 min and GE (r = -0.30; P = .02), but not in IGT (r = 0.05; P = .82) or T2D (r = 0.37; P = .16). GE is a determinant of the glycemic response to an OGTT in NGT, IGT, and T2D but these relationships differ and are time dependent.

  15. Validation of insulin sensitivity indices from oral glucose tolerance test parameters in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yeckel, Catherine W; Weiss, Ram; Dziura, James; Taksali, Sara E; Dufour, Sylvie; Burgert, Tania S; Tamborlane, William V; Caprio, Sonia

    2004-03-01

    Given the extreme increase in prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and the potential for metabolic syndrome in obese youth, identifying simplified indexes for assessing stimulated insulin sensitivity is critical. The purpose of this study was validation of two surrogate indexes of insulin sensitivity determined from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT): the composite whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) and the insulin sensitivity index (ISI). An obese population (aged 8-18 yr) of normal and impaired glucose tolerance individuals was studied. One group (n = 38) performed both the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and OGTT for comparison of insulin sensitivity measurements as well as (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy estimates of intramyocellular lipid content. Another larger (n = 368) cohort participated only in an OGTT. Both the WBISI and ISI represented good estimates (r = 0.78 and 0.74; P < 0.0005) for clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (glucose disposed, M-value), respectively. In the large cohort, the surrogate indexes demonstrated the shift toward poorer function and increased risk profile as a function of insulin resistance. Additionally, the WBISI and ISI correlated with intramyocellular lipid content (r = -0.74 and -0.71; P < 0.0001), a tissue marker for insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity can be estimated using plasma glucose and insulin responses derived from the OGTT in obese youth with normal and impaired glucose tolerance.

  16. The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test heralds biomarkers of type 2 diabetes risk in obese youth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The shape of the glucose response curve during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), monophasic versus biphasic, identifies physiologically distinct groups of individuals with differences in insulin secretion and sensitivity. We aimed to verify the value of the OGTT-glucose response curve against m...

  17. Response of incretins (GIP and GLP-1) to an oral glucose load in female and male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Ikawa, Takashi; Akagami, Takafumi; Murai, Kazuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose profile and the response of incretins in healthy young subjects by the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We first reported that plasma glucose and GIP levels were higher in males during the early phase of the OGTT.

  18. The Effect of Environmental Temperature on Glucose and Insulin After an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Charles L; Slivka, Dustin R; Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Rose, Shawn M; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in cold (C), neutral (N), and hot (H) environments. Eleven males completed three 4-hour climate-controlled OGTT trials (C, 7.2°C; N, 22°C; and H, 43°C). Participants remained semireclined for 60 minutes before ingesting a 1.8 g/kg glucose beverage. Skin and rectal core temperatures were continuously monitored. Blood was collected just before glucose ingestion (time 0) and at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes, and analyzed for serum glucose, insulin, hematocrit, and hemoglobin. Expired gases were collected upon entering the chamber (-60 minutes), before glucose ingestion (0 minutes), and at 60, 120, and 180 minutes to determine V(O2) and respiratory exchange ratio. Rectal core temperature was greater in the H condition compared with both C and N (P < .001). Rectal core temperature was not different between C and N, whereas skin temperature was different across all trials (H greater than N greater than C). The V(O2) was greater in C than in both H and N during all time points. Carbohydrate oxidation was greater in C compared with H and N (P < 0.001). Glucose was higher during H compared with C and N (P ≤ 0.002). Glucose was elevated in C compared with N. Insulin was higher in H compared with C (P = 0.009). Area under the curve for serum glucose was greater in H compared with C and N (P ≤ 0.001); however, there was no significant difference in area under the curve for insulin. These data indicate that after an OGTT, glucose and insulin are elevated in a hot environment. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intestinal transit of a glucose bolus and incretin kinetics: a mathematical model with application to the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salinari, Serenella; Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2011-06-01

    The rate of appearance (R(a)) of exogenous glucose in plasma after glucose ingestion is presently measured by tracer techniques that cannot be used in standard clinical testing such as the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We propose a mathematical model that represents in a simple way the gastric emptying, the transport of glucose along the intestinal tract, and its absorption from gut lumen into portal blood. The model gives the R(a) time course in terms of parameters with a physiological counterpart and provides an expression for the release of incretin hormones as related to glucose transit into gut lumen. Glucose absorption was represented by assuming two components related to a proximal and a distal transporter. Model performance was evaluated by numerical simulations. The model was then validated by fitting OGTT glucose and GLP-1 data in healthy controls and type 2 diabetic patients, and useful information was obtained for the rate of gastric emptying, the rate of glucose absorption, the R(a) profile, the insulin sensitivity, and the glucose effectiveness. Model-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity were well correlated (r = 0.929 in controls and 0.886 in diabetic patients) to data obtained from the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Although the proposed OGTT analysis requires the measurement of an additional hormone concentration (GLP-1), it appears to be a reasonable choice since it avoids complex and expensive techniques, such as isotopes for glucose R(a) measurement and direct assessment of gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and gives additional correlated information, thus largely compensating for the extra expense.

  20. The effect of low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kamau, R K; Maina, F W; Kigondu, C; Mati, J K

    1990-08-01

    The effect of a low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test was studied in 29, 30 and 9 indigenous Kenyan women respectively. Glucose tolerance test was performed before treatment was started and then after 1,3 and 6 months in microgynon users. The mean areas under the glucose curves were also significantly elevated. Significant increase in blood glucose values were noted only at 30 minutes after 6 months of use of the progestogen-only oral contraceptive but the mean blood glucose values were higher than in the control after 1,3 and 6 months of use. However, the mean values of the areas under the glucose curves were significantly elevated after 1,3, and 6 months of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate users showed significantly lower fasting blood glucose values at 60 and 90 minutes after 1 month of use, after which the blood glucose values returned to the pre-treatment values. The mean values of the glucose curve areas showed no significant change. It is concluded that both microgynon and minipill cause relative impairment of glucose tolerance test as early as after 1 month of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate does not impair oral glucose tolerance for at least the first 6 months of use. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Effects of an oral glucose tolerance test on the myogenic response in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Lott, Mary E J; Hogeman, Cynthia; Herr, Michael; Gabbay, Robert; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2007-01-01

    The myogenic response, the inherent ability of blood vessels to rapidly respond to changes in transmural pressure, is involved in local blood flow autoregulation. Animal studies suggest that both acute hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may impair myogenic vasoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an oral glucose load on brachial mean blood velocity (MBV) during increases in forearm transmural pressure in humans. Eight healthy men and women (38 +/- 5 yr) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). MBV (in cm/s; Doppler ultrasound) responses to a rise in forearm transmural pressure (arm tank suction, -50 mmHg) were studied before and every 30 min for 120 min during the OGTT. Before the start of the OGTT, MBV was lower than baseline values 30 and 60 s after the application of negative pressure. This suggests that myogenic constriction was present. During the OGTT, blood glucose rose from 88 +/- 2 to 120 +/- 6 mg/dl (P < 0.05) and insulin rose from 14 +/- 1 to 101 +/- 32 microU/ml (P < 0.05). Glucose loading attenuated the reduction in MBV with arm suction (Delta-0.73 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-1.67 +/- 0.43 cm/s and Delta-1.07 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-2.38 +/- 0.54 cm/s, respectively, during 30 and 60 s of suction postglucose compared with preglucose values; all P < 0.05). We observed no such time effect for myogenic responses during a sham OGTT. In an additional 5 subjects, glucose loading had no effect on brachial diameters with the application of negative pressure. Oral glucose loading leads to attenuated myogenic vasoconstriction in healthy individuals. The role that this diminished postglucose reactivity plays in mediating postprandial hypotension and/or orthostasis needs to be further explored.

  2. Prevalence of diabetes in Catalonia (Spain): an oral glucose tolerance test-based population study.

    PubMed

    Castell, C; Tresserras, R; Serra, J; Goday, A; Lloveras, G; Salleras, L

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in the adult population of Catalonia and study their association with obesity, central obesity, hypertension and smoking habit. A random sample of 3839 subjects aged 30-89 years participated in this cross-sectional study: 2214 subjects underwent a health examination with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and 1625 were interviewed by phone. Diabetes prevalence (known and unknown) in the 30-89-year-old population was 10.3%, (95% CI: 9.1-11.6). In this age group, the prevalence rates of known diabetes, unknown diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were 6.4, 3.9 and 11.9% in men and 6.9, 3.4 and 11.9% in women. The age adjusted prevalence to the world population for the 30-64-year-old age group was 6.1% (7.1% in men and 5.2% in women).The factors significantly associated with diabetes were age, obesity, hypertension and family history of diabetes. The high ratio of previously known diabetic cases to newly discovered ones, specially in the oldest age group, suggests good levels of awareness and medical services. The prevalence in Catalonia is similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries.

  3. Caffeine ingestion before an oral glucose tolerance test impairs blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lindsay E; Savani, Sonali; Battram, Danielle S; McLaren, Drew H; Sathasivam, Premila; Graham, Terry E

    2004-10-01

    Caffeine ingestion negatively affects insulin sensitivity during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in lean and obese men, but this has not been studied in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We examined the effects of caffeine ingestion on insulin and glucose homeostasis in obese men with type 2 diabetes. Men (n = 12) with type 2 diabetes (age = 49 +/- 2 y, BMI = 32 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) underwent 2 trials, 1 wk apart, in a randomized, double-blind design. Each trial was conducted after withdrawal from caffeine, alcohol, exercise, and oral hypoglycemic agents for 48 h and an overnight fast. Subjects randomly ingested caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or placebo capsules and 1 h later began a 3 h 75 g OGTT. Caffeine increased (P < 0.05) serum insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide concentrations during the OGTT relative to placebo. Insulin area under the curve was 25% greater (P < 0.05) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Despite this, blood glucose concentration was also increased (P < 0.01) in the caffeine trial. After caffeine ingestion, blood glucose remained elevated (P < 0.01) at 3 h postglucose load (8.9 +/- 0.7 mmol/L) compared with baseline (6.7 +/- 0.4 mmol/L). The insulin sensitivity index was lower (14%, P = 0.02) after caffeine than after placebo ingestion. Overall, despite elevated and prolonged proinsulin, C-peptide, and insulin responses after caffeine ingestion, blood glucose was also increased, suggesting an acute caffeine-induced impairment in blood glucose management in men with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice.

  5. The oral glucose tolerance test is frequently abnormal in patients with uncontrolled epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vianna, J B M; Atallah, A N; Prado, G F; Valente, O; Duarte-Barros, M L; Vianna, E C S; Mello, L E A M

    2006-08-01

    The clinical efficacy of the ketogenic diet as therapy for patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy prompted us to investigate the glucose metabolism of these patients under an oral overload of glucose, that is, in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Thirty patients (12 males, 18 females; age range: 17-59, mean: 35.1) with difficult-to-treat epilepsy, 23 patients with controlled epilepsy (11 males, 12 females; age range: 14-66, mean: 36.9), and 39 control subjects (18 males, 21 females; age range: 16-58, mean: 33.3) were evaluated with the OGTT. For patients with epilepsy, we also measured C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin in the fasting state. Glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dL at any point of the curve were considered to be abnormal. All subjects in the control group and the group with controlled epilepsy had a normal OGTT. In contrast, all 30 patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy had at least one point on the OGTT curve below the normal range (P<0.001), most often 180 and 240 minutes after the oral glucose load (P<0.001). C-peptide levels were significantly lower in the group with difficult-to-treat epilepsy as compared with the group with controlled epilepsy. Fasting glycohemoglobin and insulin levels did not differ between the two patient groups. We suggest that undiagnosed metabolic disturbances in patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may somehow contribute to their refractoriness to conventional pharmacological therapy. We propose the hypothesis that calorie-restricted diets aimed at correcting OGTT curves may prove beneficial in treating patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy. Our hypothesis generates a clear endpoint for the diet, and its demonstration would provide new standards for diet-based antiepileptic regimens. Accordingly, our results may help in understanding the positive consequences of ketogenic or calorie-restricted diets in persons with seizures.

  6. Is There a Threshold Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Value for Predicting Adverse Pregnancy Outcome?

    PubMed

    Stuebe, Alison M; Landon, Mark B; Lai, Yinglei; Klebanoff, Mark; Ramin, Susan M; Wapner, Ronald J; Varner, Michael W; Rouse, Dwight J; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to determine whether there is a threshold 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value associated with accelerated risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a secondary analysis of a cohort of women with untreated mild gestational glucose intolerance, we used generalized additive models with smoothing splines to explore nonlinear associations between each of the 3-hour OGTT values (fasting, 1-hour, 2-hour, and 3-hour) and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including the study's composite outcome (perinatal mortality, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, neonatal hyperinsulinemia, and/or birth trauma), large for gestational age birth weight, small for gestational age birth weight, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, gestational hypertension (gHTN), and preeclampsia. Among the 1,360 eligible women, each timed OGTT value was linearly associated with increased odds of composite adverse outcome. We found evidence of a departure from linearity only for the association between fasting glucose and gHTN/preeclampsia, with a stronger association for values of 85 to 94 mg/dL (p = 0.03). We found no evidence of departure from linearity for any other OGTT values and measured outcomes (all chi-square test p-values ≥ 0.05). In a population of untreated women with mild gestational glucose intolerance and fasting OGTT < 95 mg/dL, we found an increasing risk of gHTN with a fasting glucose between 85 and 94 mg/dL. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Mycoprotein reduces glycemia and insulinemia when taken with an oral-glucose-tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, W H; Ward, T

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mycoprotein, a food produced by the continuous fermentation of Fusarium graminearum (Schwabe), on acute glycemia and insulinemia in normal healthy individuals. Subjects participated in two single-meal study periods in a crossover design. After an overnight fast, subjects were given milkshakes containing mycoprotein or a control substance, which were isoenergetic and nutrient balanced. Each milkshake contained 75 g carbohydrate, equivalent to a standard World Health Organization oral-glucose-tolerance test. Blood samples were taken fasting and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min postprandially for the measurement of serum glucose and insulin. Glycemia was reduced postmeal after mycoprotein compared with the control and was statistically significant at 60 min (13% reduction). Insulinemia was reduced postmeal after mycoprotein compared with the control and was statistically significant at 30 min (19% reduction) and 60 min (36% reduction) postmeal. These results may be significant in the dietary treatment of diabetes.

  8. An oral lipid challenge and acute intake of caffeinated coffee additively decrease glucose tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Robinson, Lindsay E; Graham, Terry E

    2011-04-01

    Lipid-induced insulin resistance has been investigated primarily with i.v. infusions, and caffeine-induced insulin resistance, with alkaloid caffeine. The effects of orally consumed lipids and coffee have not been established and to our knowledge have never been simultaneously investigated. The goals of this study were to determine whether an oral lipid challenge and caffeinated coffee would disrupt glucose homeostasis and to characterize their respective incretin responses. It was hypothesized that oral ingestion of saturated lipids would impair glucose tolerance and that caffeinated coffee would further hinder glucose management. Ten young, healthy males participated in 5 trials in a randomized, cross-over design. At time 0 h, they underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT: 1 g lipid/kg body weight) or consumed water, followed 5 h later by caffeinated (5 mg/kg) coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or water. At 6 h, volunteers underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Consumption of the OFTT increased glucose concentrations (P < 0.05) after a subsequent OGTT. At 7 h, caffeinated coffee produced the highest glucose concentrations (P < 0.05). Glucagon-like peptide-1 active (GLP-1a) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were both increased for up to 6 h in all OFTT trials (P < 0.05). Compared to all other treatments, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee produced higher GLP-1a response at 6.25 h (P < 0.05), whereas only caffeinated coffee increased GIP secretion (P < 0.05). These results show that oral consumption of lipids and caffeinated coffee can independently and additively decrease glucose tolerance. Incretin hormones could explain at least in part this impaired glucose homeostasis.

  9. Postprandial serum C-peptide to plasma glucose concentration ratio correlates with oral glucose tolerance test- and glucose clamp-based disposition indexes.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yoko; Komada, Hisako; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Hashimoto, Naoko; Hirota, Yushi; Ogawa, Wataru; Seino, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    The C-peptide index (CPI), a ratio of serum C-peptide to plasma glucose levels, is a readily measured index of β-cell function. The difference in the physiological features reflected by the index measured under fasting (F-CPI) or postprandial (PP-CPI) conditions has remained unclear, however. We investigated the relationship of the two CPIs to indexes of insulin secretion measured with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or with hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses as well as to disposition indexes (indexes of insulin secretion adjusted for insulin sensitivity) calculated from OGTT- or clamp-based analyses. We also examined the relationship between glucose tolerance and the clamp-based disposition index. The clamp-based disposition index declined progressively from normal glucose tolerance to impaired glucose tolerance to Type 2 diabetes, and it strongly correlated with the 2-h plasma glucose level during an OGTT. For patients with Type 2 diabetes, both F-CPI and PP-CPI correlated with indexes of insulin secretion including HOMA-β, the insulinogenic index, the ratio of the area under the insulin curve to that under the glucose curve during an OGTT, the serum C-peptide level after glucagon challenge, as well as early and total insulin secretion measured with a hyperglycemic clamp. PP-CPI, but not F-CPI, was significantly correlated with clamp-based and OGTT-based disposition indexes. F-CPI was correlated only with unadjusted indexes of insulin secretion, whereas PP-CPI was correlated with such indexes as well as with those adjusted for insulin sensitivity. The better clinical utility of PP-CPI might be attributable to these physiological characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum high-molecular weight adiponectin decreases abruptly after an oral glucose load in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, but not those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Noriyuki; Hara, Kenji; Yatsuka, Chikako; Nakano, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Suetsugu, Mariko; Nakamachi, Takafumi; Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko; Haruki, Kohsuke; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2009-10-01

    Adiponectin exists in the blood as 3 forms, which are a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form. We investigated whether circulating HMW adiponectin levels were altered by oral glucose or fat ingestion. Forty male subjects underwent a 75-g oral glucose loading test (OGTT), and 11 healthy subjects (5 women and 6 men) received a fat loading test. Serum levels of HMW and total adiponectin were measured during the OGTT and the fat loading test. The fat loading test was performed for at least 8 hours. Among the 40 male subjects, 11 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 9 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 11 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 9 had diabetes mellitus (DM). In all 40 subjects, the serum total adiponectin level did not change significantly, whereas serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly after a glucose load and reached 92.2% of the basal level at 120 minutes after the OGTT (P < .01). The HMW to total adiponectin ratio decreased significantly from 0.47 +/- 0.15 at baseline to 0.43 +/- 0.13 at 120 minutes after a glucose load (P < .05). Serum HMW adiponectin measured at 120 minutes after the OGTT decreased significantly to 86.0% and 85.6% of the basal level in subjects with NGT or IFG, respectively (both P < .01). In subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or DM, however, serum HMW adiponectin did not change. The area under the curve for insulin at 30 minutes after a glucose load during the OGTT was significantly larger in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .05). In addition, the insulinogenic index (DeltaI(0-30)/DeltaG(0-30)) was significantly higher in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .001). Percentage changes in serum HMW adiponectin of the baseline at 120 minutes correlated negatively with those in serum insulin (r = -0.468, P = .0023), but not plasma glucose, of the baseline at 30 minutes in 40 subjects. On the other hand, serum triglycerides increased significantly after an oral fat load in

  11. The role of ranitidine infusion on glucose, insulin and C-peptide serum levels induced by oral glucose tolerance test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Orlando, C; D'Alessandro, R; De Bellis, G; Porcellini, M; Coltorti, M

    1986-01-01

    In 9 healthy subjects we evaluated the effect of a constant ranitidine infusion (100 mg) on glucose (mg/dl), insulin (microU/ml) and C-peptide (ng/ml) serum levels promoted by oral glucose tolerance test (75 g). Ranitidine significantly increased the area under concentration/time curves for glucose and insulin but not that of C-peptide. Our data indicate that ranitidine does not affect pancreatic insulin release nor peripheral glucose utilization and are consistent with the hypothesis that ranitidine influences the hepatic clearance of glucose and insulin both of which undergo high first-pass liver extraction.

  12. Evaluation of suppression of growth hormone levels following a 75g oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Nazaimoon, W M; Ng, M L; Satgunasingam, N; Khalid, B A

    1992-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) levels were measured after a 75g oral glucose load (OGTT) in normal adults, patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and acromegaly. Nadir GH levels at 2-hour post-OGTT in normal subjects ranged from 0.4 to 8.4 mIU/L, the 95% confidence interval being 0.4-4.4 mIU/L. In IGT and IDDM subjects basal fasting GH levels were not significantly different from normal and did not alter during OGTT. The high fasting GH level measured in one each of the IGT and IDDM patients was suppressible at 1-hour after glucose intake. In contrast, acromegalic patients had elevated fasting GH levels (11.8-178 mIU/L) although in 3 patients, the levels were mildly elevated and overlapped with normal. OGTT failed or only partially suppressed GH secretion in all acromegalics. Therefore, elevated fasting GH levels are not diagnostic and OGTT is required for accurate diagnosis and assessment of treatment of acromegalic patients.

  13. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreases following oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Pako, Judit; Montvai, David; Kovacs, Dorottya; Koller, Zsofia; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2015-12-15

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH is a widely measured non-invasive marker of airway acidity. However, some methodological aspects have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on EBC pH in attempt to better standardize its measurement. Seventeen healthy subjects (24  ±  2 years, 6 men, 11 women) participated in the study. EBC collection and capillary blood glucose measurements were performed before as well as 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after a standardized OGTT test. The rate of respiratory droplet dilution and pH were evaluated in EBC. Blood glucose significantly increased at 30 min and maintained elevation after 60 and 120 min following OGTT. Compared to baseline (7.99  ±  0.25) EBC pH significantly decreased immediately after OGTT (7.41  ±  0.47); this drop sustained over 30 (7.44  ±  0.72) and 60 min (7.62  ±  0.44) without a significant difference at 120 min (7.78  ±  0.26). No change was observed in the rate of respiratory droplet dilution. There was no relationship between blood glucose and EBC pH values. Sugar intake may significantly decrease EBC pH. This effect needs to be considered when performing EBC pH studies. Further experiments are also warranted to investigate the effect of diet on other exhaled biomarkers.

  14. New-onset diabetes after transplantation--role of oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosis and study of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh K; Narayan, Girish

    2013-09-01

    To determine the role of the oral glucose tolerance test in the early detection of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and to compare the various risk factors and insulin kinetics in the transplant patients, we studied 41 live-related renal allograft recipients who were not diabetic before transplantation. Immunosuppression included triple drug therapy (cyclosporine, azathioprine and steroids) and rejection episodes were treated with methyl prednisolone (30 mg/kg IV × 3 days). All the study patients were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at Day 90 post-transplant and classified as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and NODAT as per the World Health Organization guidelines. Insulin levels were also determined at 0, ½ hour, 1 hour and 2 hours during OGTT. NODAT was noted in 29.2% of the study patients, IFG in 4.8% of the study patients and NGT in 65.8% of the study patients. All the groups had normal fasting plasma glucose, but higher than normal insulin levels, suggesting insulin resistance. The patients with overt NODAT had, in addition, low fasting insulin (insulin secretory defect). OGTT may be used for the early detection of NODAT. Although insulin resistance is detected in the majority of post-transplant patients, NODAT also reveals also an insulin secretory defect.

  15. Changes of the plasma metabolome during an oral glucose tolerance test: is there more than glucose to look at?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinjie; Peter, Andreas; Fritsche, Jens; Elcnerova, Michaela; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin D; Xu, Guowang; Lehmann, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) is a common tool to provoke a metabolic challenge for scientific purposes, as well as for diagnostic reasons, to monitor the kinetics of glucose and insulin. Here, we aimed to follow the variety of physiological changes of the whole metabolic pattern in plasma during an oGTT in healthy subjects in a nontargeted reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometric metabolomics approach. We detected 11,500 metabolite ion masses/individual. Applying multivariate data analysis, four major groups of metabolites have been detected as the most discriminating oGTT biomarkers: free fatty acids (FFA), acylcarnitines, bile acids, and lysophosphatidylcholines. We found in detail 1) a strong decrease of all saturated and monounsaturated FFA studied during the oGTT; 2) a significant faster decline of palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1) FFA levels than their saturated counterparts; 3) a strong relative increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fatty acid pattern at 120 min; and 4) a clear decrease in plasma C10:0, C12:0, and C14:1 acylcarnitine levels. These data reflect the switch from beta-oxidation to glycolysis and fat storage during the oGTT. Moreover, the bile acids glycocholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid were highly discriminative, showing a biphasic kinetic with a maximum of a 4.5- to 6-fold increase at 30 min after glucose ingestion, a significant decrease over the next 60 min followed by an increase until the end of the oGTT. Lysophosphatidylcholines were also increased significantly. The findings of our metabolomics study reveal detailed insights in the complex physiological regulation of the metabolism during an oGTT offering novel perspectives of this widely used procedure.

  16. Oral glucose tolerance test effects on endothelial inflammation markers in healthy subjects and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, G; D'Angelo, A; Salvadeo, S A T; Ferrari, I; Fogari, E; Gravina, A; Mereu, R; Palumbo, I; Maffioli, P; Randazzo, S; Cicero, A F G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on the level of endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation markers in healthy subjects (H) and diabetic overweight patients (D). We enrolled 256 healthy subjects and 274 type 2 diabetic patients. We evaluated blood glucose (BG), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at baseline and after OGTT. We observed that BG, sICAM-1, IL-6, hs-CRP, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and TNF-alpha values were higher in D group than in H group. In a large sample of adult healthy subjects and type 2 diabetics we observed that both answer to an OGTT with a significant increase in biomarkers of systemic low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction such as hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin. Type 2 diabetics experienced, however, a more significant increase in TNF-alpha, and sE-selectin.

  17. Predictive ability of fasting plasma glucose for a diabetic 2-h postload glucose value in oral glucose tolerance test: spectrum effect.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Jale; Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Harmanci, Ayla; Karaagaoglu, Ergun; Gurlek, Alper

    2007-01-01

    The performance of diagnostic tests may vary according to patient characteristics. The aim of this study is to find out the factors, if any, that may affect the performance of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to predict a diabetic 2-h postload glucose level (> or =200 mg/dl) in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). One hundred ninety-six patients with known risk factors for diabetes mellitus to whom OGTT was applied were included. Factors that may have an effect on the performance of FPG in prediction of a diabetic value in OGTT were determined by using logistic regression and likelihood ratios (LRs). The cutoff of FPG predicting a 2-h postload glucose of > or =200 mg/dl was calculated by receiver operating characteristic curve as 110 mg/dl (sensitivity, 76.7%; specificity, 75.9%). Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body mass index (BMI) influenced sensitivity, whereas age, family history, and presence of hyperlipidemia affected specificity of FPG. Significant factors for positive LR were age and hyperlipidemia, whereas sex, smoking, hyperlipidemia, physical inactivity, WHR, and BMI influenced negative LR. Fasting plasma glucose performance as a diagnostic test can be affected by many factors that are clearly stated as risk factors for diabetes mellitus. These data emphasize how the interpretation of a diagnostic test varies as the patient characteristics vary; the criteria that we confidently rely on may not be that reliable, changing between just two different patients.

  18. Comparing glucose and insulin data from the two-hour oral glucose tolerance test in metabolic syndrome subjects and marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Altuve, Miguel; Perpinan, Gilberto; Severeyn, Erika; Wong, Sara

    2016-08-01

    Glucose is the main energy source of the body's cells and is essential for normal metabolism. Two pancreatic hormones, insulin and glucagon, are involved in glucose home-ostasis. Alteration in the plasma glucose and insulin concentrations could lead to distinct symptoms and diseases, ranging from mental function impairment to coma and even death. Type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are typical examples of abnormal glucose metabolism that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a medical test used to screen for prediabetes, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. In the 5-sample 2-hour OGTT, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations are measured after a fast and then after oral intake of glucose, at intervals of 30 minutes. In this work, a statistical analysis is carried out to find significant differences between the five stages of the OGTT for plasma glucose and insulin data. In addition, the behavior of the glucose and insulin data is compared between subjects with the metabolic syndrome and marathon runners. Results show that marathon runners have plasma glucose and insulin levels significantly lower (p <; 0.05) than people with the metabolic syndrome in all the stages of the OGTT. Insulin secretion decreases in marathon runners due to a significant reduction in plasma glucose concentration, but insulin secretion does not decrease in metabolic syndrome subjects due to insulin resistance, consequently plasma glucose concentration does not achieve normal levels.

  19. Evidence that the oral glucose-tolerance test does not provide a uniform stimulus to pancreatic islets in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Leacy, E A; Cowley, D M

    1989-07-01

    Fifty consecutive pregnant patients referred for a glucose-tolerance test were classified on the basis of increasing (n = 20) or decreasing (n = 28) hematocrit after an oral 75-g glucose load. (The hematocrit did not change in the other two patients.) Patients with increasing hematocrit, a response previously seen in patients with the dumping syndrome, showed significantly flatter increases in glucose concentrations in plasma after the load. The mean decrease in the concentration of phosphate in plasma, measured as an index of glucose uptake by cells, was significantly less (P less than 0.05) 2 h after the load in the group with flatter glucose responses, suggesting that the flat response is ascribable to poor glucose absorption rather than to an exaggerated insulin response. These results indicate that the oral glucose-tolerance test stresses the pancreatic islets differently in different pregnant subjects, owing to individual variations in the gastrointestinal handling of the glucose load. Consequently, patients may give a "normal" result who might otherwise become hyperglycemic after normal meals. We suggest that alternative screening procedures be investigated to assess pregnant patients postprandially.

  20. A single dose of sodium nitrate does not improve oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Naomi M; Hansen, Dominique; Kouw, Imre W K; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Blackwell, Jamie R; Jones, Andrew M; Gibala, Martin J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation has been proposed as an emerging treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that ingestion of a single bolus of dietary NO3(-) ingestion improves oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men with type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin, 7.3% ± 0.2%) participated in a randomized crossover experiment. The subjects ingested a glucose beverage 2.5 hours after consumption of either sodium NO3(-) (0.15 mmol NaNO3(-) · kg(-1)) or a placebo solution. Venous blood samples were collected before ingestion of the glucose beverage and every 30 minutes thereafter during a 2-hour period to assess postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. The results show that plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels were increased after NaNO3(-) as opposed to placebo ingestion (treatment-effect, P = .001). Despite the elevated plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels, ingestion of NaNO3(-) did not attenuate the postprandial rise in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (time × treatment interaction, P = .41 for glucose, P = .93 for insulin). Despite the lack of effect on oral glucose tolerance, basal plasma glucose concentrations measured 2.5 hours after NaNO3(-) ingestion were lower when compared with the placebo treatment (7.5 ± 0.4 vs 8.3 ± 0.4 mmol/L, respectively; P = .04). We conclude that ingestion of a single dose of dietary NO3(-) does not improve subsequent oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Urinary N-acetyl-β-d-Glucosaminidase Levels are Positively Correlated With 2-Hr Plasma Glucose Levels During Oral Glucose Tolerance Testing in Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Motoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Masao; Motoyama, Masayuki; Ohara, Makoto; Suzuki, Kazunari; Igari, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakano, Hiroshi; Oba, Kenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) excretion is increased in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This study investigated when during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) the plasma glucose, urine glucose, and insulin levels correlate most strongly with urinary N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) levels in prediabetic subjects. Methods The OGTT was administered to 80 subjects who had not yet received a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) and in whom HbA1c levels were ≤6.8% and fasting plasma glucose levels were <7.0 mmol/l. Forty-two subjects had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 31 had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 7 had DM according to World Health Organization criteria. Serum levels of cystatin C, the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the urinary albumin-to-creatinine (Cr) ratio, urinary and serum β2-microglobulin, and urinary NAG were measured as markers of renal function. Results NAG levels were significantly higher in subjects with DM and in subjects with IGT than in subjects with NGT. No significant associations were observed between glycemic status and other markers of renal function. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the NAG level was positively correlated with plasma glucose levels at 120 min of the OGTT and was associated with the glycemic status of prediabetic patients. Conclusion These results suggest that postprandial hyperglycemia is an independent factor that causes renal tubular damage in prediabetes patients. PMID:23143631

  2. Short-Term Regulation of Lipocalin-2 but not RBP-4 During Oral Lipid Tolerance Test and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Leszczak, S; Ober, I; Schäffler, A; Karrasch, T

    2016-02-01

    The postprandial regulation of lipocalin-2 and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4) by oral uptake of lipids and carbohydrates in healthy individuals has not yet been investigated. The regulation of lipocalin-2 and RBP-4 in 2 large cohorts of healthy volunteers during oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT; n=100) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; n=100) was analyzed. One hundred healthy volunteers underwent OLTT and OGTT in an outpatient setting. Venous blood was drawn after 0, 2, 4, and 6 h in OLTT and after 0, 1, and 2 h in OGTT. In order to dissect carbohydrate-induced from lipid-induced effects, a novel OLTT solution completely free of carbohydrates and protein was applied. Subjects were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters. Serum concentrations of lipocalin-2 and RBP-4 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Whereas RBP-4 levels remained unchanged during OGTT, lipocalin-2 concentrations significantly decreased during OGTT. During OLTT, RBP-4 levels were not influenced, whereas lipocalin-2 levels decreased significantly and stepwise. Fasting concentrations of RBP-4 were negatively correlated with BMI and waist-hip ratio, whereas lipocalin-2 levels were positively associated with BMI and waist-hip ratio. Female users of hormonal contraception had higher RBP-4 levels than females not on contraceptives. There is no significant short-term regulation of RBP-4 by orally ingested lipids or carbohydrates. Lipocalin-2 is downregulated after lipid and carbohydrate ingestion and this kind of regulation was not predicted by age, sex, triglycerides, glucose, or insulin levels.

  3. Amantadine reduces glucagon and enhances insulin secretion throughout the oral glucose tolerance test: central plus peripheral nervous system mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Lechin, Marcel E; Baez, Scarlet

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the trial was to examine the effects of amantadine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) plus insulin, glucagon and neurotransmitters circulating levels. Previous findings showed that hyperinsulinism and type 2 diabetes are positively associated with neural sympathetic and adrenal sympathetic activities, respectively. These peripheral sympathetic branches depend on the pontine (A5-noradrenergic) and the rostral ventrolateral (C1-adrenergic) medullary nuclei. They are excited by glutamate axons which act at NMDA postsynaptic receptors. Research design and methods One OGTT plus placebo and one OGTT plus oral amantadine test were carried out two weeks apart in 15 caucasic normal voluntary humans. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, plasma-free serotonin, platelet serotonin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were measured throughout the 180-minute testing period. Results Maximal reductions of plasma glucose and glucagon plus exacerbated insulin rises were significantly greater throughout the oral glucose plus amantadine test than those registered throughout the oral glucose plus placebo challenge. The above findings were paralleled by greater than normal noradrenaline/adrenaline plasma ratio increases. In addition, maximal reductions of the platelet serotonin and plasma serotonin circulating values contrasted with the normal rises of these parameters, always registered during the glucose load plus placebo challenge. Conclusion This study supports the theory that amantadine might be a powerful antidiabetic tool and could be added to the therapeutic arsenal against type 2 diabetes. PMID:21437134

  4. Oral administration of corn zein hydrolysate stimulates GLP-1 and GIP secretion and improves glucose tolerance in male normal rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Noriyuki; Hira, Tohru; Yamada, Nao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ileal administration of the dietary protein hydrolysate prepared from corn zein (ZeinH) stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and attenuated hyperglycemia in rats. In this study, to examine whether oral administration of ZeinH improves glucose tolerance by stimulating GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secretion, glucose tolerance tests were performed in normal Sprague-Dawley male rats and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) male rats. The test solution was gavaged before ip glucose injection in normal rats or gavaged together with glucose in GK rats. Blood samples were collected from the tail vein or by using the jugular catheter to measure glucose, insulin, GLP-1, and GIP levels. In the ip glucose tolerance test, oral administration of ZeinH (2 g/kg) significantly suppressed the glycemic response accompanied by an immediate increase in plasma GLP-1 and GIP levels in normal rats. In contrast, oral administration of another dietary peptide, meat hydrolysate, did not elicit a similar effect. The glucose-lowering effect of ZeinH was attenuated by a GLP-1 receptor antagonist or by a GIP receptor antagonist. Furthermore, oral ZeinH induced GLP-1 secretion and reduced glycemic response in GK rats under the oral glucose tolerance test. These results indicate that the oral administration of the dietary peptide ZeinH improves glucose tolerance in normal and diabetic rats by its incretin-releasing activity, namely, the incretinotropic effect.

  5. Pre-Type 1 Diabetes Dysmetabolism: Maximal sensitivity achieved with Both Oral and Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jennifer M.; McFann, Kim; Harrison, Leonard C.; Fourlanos, Spiros; Krischer, Jeffrey; Cuthbertson, David; Chase, H. Peter; Eisenbarth, George S.; Group, the DPT-1 Study

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of intravenous (IVGTT) and oral (OGTT) glucose tolerance tests abnormalities to diabetes development in a high-risk pre-diabetic cohort and identify an optimal testing strategy for detecting pre-clinical diabetes. Study design Diabetes Prevention Trial Type 1 randomized subjects to oral (n=372) and parenteral (n=339) insulin prevention trials. Subjects were followed with IVGTTs and OGTTs. Factors associated with progression to diabetes were evaluated. Results Survival analysis revealed that higher quartiles of 2-hour glucose and lower quartiles of FPIR at baseline were associated with decreased diabetes-free survival. Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that baseline BMI, FPIR and 2-hour glucose levels were significantly associated with an increased hazard for diabetes. On testing performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis, 3% (1/32) had normal first phase insulin response (FPIR) and normal 2-hour glucose on OGTT. The sensitivities for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and low FPIR performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis were equivalent (76% vs. 73%). Conclusions Most (97%) subjects had abnormal IVGTTs and/or OGTTs prior to the development of diabetes. The highest sensitivity is achieved using both tests. PMID:17188609

  6. Oral glucose tolerance test for preoperative assessment of liver function in liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Rachapoodivenkata, Raghavendra Rao

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims We intended to determine the role of the Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), in addition to volumetry, in preoperative assessment of patients undergoing liver resection. Methods This was a prospective study conducted at a tertiary care hospital, between February 2009 and February 2011. OGTT curve (parabolic/linear), linearity index (LI) and Parenchymal Hepatic Resection Rate (PHRR) were correlated with postoperative outcomes in terms of postoperative liver failure (PLF), by 50-50 criteria, morbidity, mortality and hospital stay. Results Of the 33 patients included in the study, 23 (69.7%) patients underwent major liver resections. Hepatocellular carcinoma (30.3%) was the leading indication. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 72.7%, but major complications occurred in 3 (9.1%) patients only. There was no 90-day mortality. The 50-50 criteria were met by 3 patients undergoing major resection. Significant correlation was noted between the linear OGTT curve and the overall hospital stay (12.1 days vs. 9.6 days in parabolic; p=0.04). Patients with linear OGTT met the 50-50 criteria more often (18%) than those having a parabolic curve (4.5%; p=0.25). Although the OGTT was more often linear with occurrence of morbidity (41.7% vs 11.1%), major morbidity (66.7% vs 30%) and PLF by 50-50 criteria (66.7% vs 30%), it was not statistically significant. The linearity index was marginally lower (0.9 vs 1.2) in the presence of major morbidity and PLF by 50-50 criteria. Conclusions Linear OGTT affects the PLF and major morbidity, therein impacting the hospital stay. OGTT LI and PHRR can help predict postoperative outcome for a given extent of liver resection. PMID:28317039

  7. Single Fasting Plasma Glucose Versus 75-g Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test in Prediction of Adverse Perinatal Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Songying; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Lifang; He, Jianrong; Li, Weidong; Chen, Niannian; Wen, Xingxuan; Xiao, Wanqing; Yuan, Mingyang; Qiu, Lan; Cheng, Kar Keung; Xia, Huimin; Mol, Ben Willem J; Qiu, Xiu

    2017-02-01

    There remains uncertainty regarding whether a single fasting glucose measurement is sufficient to predict risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. We included 12,594 pregnant women who underwent a 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) at 22-28weeks' gestation in the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study, China. Outcomes were large for gestational age (LGA) baby, cesarean section, and spontaneous preterm birth. We calculated the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (AUCs) to assess the capacity of OGTT glucose values to predict adverse outcomes, and compared the AUCs of different components of OGTT. 1325 women had a LGA baby (10.5%). Glucose measurements were linearly associated with LGA, with strongest associations for fasting glucose (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.45). Weaker associations were observed for cesarean section and spontaneous preterm birth. Fasting glucose have a comparable discriminative power for prediction of LGA to the combination of fasting, 1h, and 2h glucose values during OGTT (AUCs, 0.611 vs. 0.614, P=0.166). The LGA risk was consistently increased in women with abnormal fasting glucose (≥5.1mmol/l), irrespective of 1h or 2h glucose levels. A single fasting glucose measurement performs comparably to 75-g OGTT in predicting risk of having a LGA baby. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and assessment of the disposition index based on the oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with different glycaemic status.

    PubMed

    Santos, J L; Yévenes, I; Cataldo, L R; Morales, M; Galgani, J; Arancibia, C; Vega, J; Olmos, P; Flores, M; Valderas, J P; Pollak, F

    2016-06-01

    Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity indexes are related by hyperbolic functions, allowing the calculation of the disposition index (DI) as the product of the acute insulin response (AIR) and the insulin sensitivity index (Si) from intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Our objective was to develop an oral-DI based on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to assess its association with glucose tolerance status. This research is structured in three studies. Study 1: OGTT were performed in 833 non-diabetic Chilean women (18-60 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus. Study 2: an independent group of n = 57 non-diabetic (18-46 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus carried out an OGTT and an abbreviated IVGTT. Study 3: a sample of 1674 Chilean adults (18-60 years) with different glycaemic status performed an OGTT. An adequate statistical fit for a rectangular hyperbola was found between the area under the curve of insulin-to-glucose ratio (AUCI/G-R) and the Matsuda ISI-COMP index (study 1). The oral-DI derived as AUCI/G-R × ISI-COMP was previously termed insulin-secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). ISSI-2 significantly correlated with DI from IVGTT (rho = 0.34; p = 0.009) (study 2). ISSI-2 shows important differences across groups of subjects with different glycaemic status (study 3). We have confirmed that ISSI-2 replicates the mathematical properties of DI, showing significant correlations with DI from the abbreviated MM-IVGTT. These results indicate that ISSI-2 constitutes a surrogate measure of insulin secretion relative to insulin sensitivity and emphasizes the pivotal role of impaired insulin secretion in the development of glucose homeostasis dysregulation.

  9. Detecting Prediabetes and Diabetes: Agreement between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thai Adults.

    PubMed

    Aekplakorn, Wichai; Tantayotai, Valla; Numsangkul, Sakawduan; Sripho, Wilarwan; Tatsato, Nutchanat; Burapasiriwat, Tuanjai; Pipatsart, Rachada; Sansom, Premsuree; Luckanajantachote, Pranee; Chawarokorn, Pongpat; Thanonghan, Anek; Lakhamkaew, Watchira; Mungkung, Aungsumalin; Boonkean, Rungnapa; Chantapoon, Chanidsa; Kungsri, Mayuree; Luanseng, Kasetsak; Chaiyajit, Kornsinun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate an agreement in identifying dysglycemia between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and the 2 hr postprandial glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population with high risk of diabetes. A total of 6,884 individuals aged 35-65 years recruited for a community-based diabetes prevention program were tested for prediabetes including impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetes. The agreement was assessed by Kappa statistics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with missed prediabetes and diabetes by FPG. A total of 2671 (38.8%) individuals with prediabetes were identified. The prevalence of prediabetes identified by FPG and OGTT was 32.2% and 22.3%, respectively. The proportions of diabetes classified by OGTT were two times higher than those identified by FPG (11.0% versus 5.4%, resp.). The Kappa statistics for agreement of both tests was 0.55. Overall, FPG missed 46.3% of all prediabetes and 54.7% of all diabetes cases. Prediabetes was more likely to be missed by FPG among female, people aged <45 yrs, and those without family history of diabetes. The detection of prediabetes and diabetes using FPG only may miss half of the cases. Benefit of adding OGTT to FPG in some specific groups should be confirmed.

  10. Detecting Prediabetes and Diabetes: Agreement between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tantayotai, Valla; Numsangkul, Sakawduan; Sripho, Wilarwan; Tatsato, Nutchanat; Burapasiriwat, Tuanjai; Pipatsart, Rachada; Sansom, Premsuree; Luckanajantachote, Pranee; Chawarokorn, Pongpat; Thanonghan, Anek; Lakhamkaew, Watchira; Mungkung, Aungsumalin; Boonkean, Rungnapa; Chantapoon, Chanidsa; Kungsri, Mayuree; Luanseng, Kasetsak; Chaiyajit, Kornsinun

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate an agreement in identifying dysglycemia between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and the 2 hr postprandial glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population with high risk of diabetes. Methods. A total of 6,884 individuals aged 35–65 years recruited for a community-based diabetes prevention program were tested for prediabetes including impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetes. The agreement was assessed by Kappa statistics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with missed prediabetes and diabetes by FPG. Results. A total of 2671 (38.8%) individuals with prediabetes were identified. The prevalence of prediabetes identified by FPG and OGTT was 32.2% and 22.3%, respectively. The proportions of diabetes classified by OGTT were two times higher than those identified by FPG (11.0% versus 5.4%, resp.). The Kappa statistics for agreement of both tests was 0.55. Overall, FPG missed 46.3% of all prediabetes and 54.7% of all diabetes cases. Prediabetes was more likely to be missed by FPG among female, people aged <45 yrs, and those without family history of diabetes. Conclusion. The detection of prediabetes and diabetes using FPG only may miss half of the cases. Benefit of adding OGTT to FPG in some specific groups should be confirmed. PMID:26347060

  11. Insulin resistance and lipid profile during an oral glucose tolerance test in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zx; Wu, Y; Zhu, Xy; Fang, Q; Chen, Dq

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare changes in insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during pregnancy and those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overall, 105 pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, 50 with NGT and 55 with GDM according to NDDG standard, were enrolled into the study. The levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and the insulin levels, blood glucose levels at 1, 2 and 3 hours post oral glucose administration during an OGTT (5.8, 10.6, 9.2 and 8.1 mmol/L, respectively) were measured. Then, insulin resistance (IR) index was calculated. There was no significant difference in fasting, 3-h insulin levels and 3-h blood glucose levels between those with NGT and those with GDM (P > 0.05). However, 1-h and 2-h insulin levels, fasting and 1-h and 2-h blood glucose levels in women with GDM were significantly higher than those in the NGT group (P < 0.05). Fasting TC and TG levels in the GDM group were significantly higher than those with NGT (P = 0.031 and P = 0.025, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that TG and TC levels were positively correlated with homoeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.67 and r = 0.78, respectively; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that insulin sensitivity in women with GDM was significantly lower than that observed in those with NGT. Reducing IR and blood lipids in women with GDM could potentially improve maternal and foetal outcomes.

  12. The effect of short-term dietary supplementation with glucose on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose and oral glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Cunningham, K M; Wishart, J M; Jones, K L; Read, N W

    1996-04-01

    Recent observations indicate that gastric emptying may be influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of a high glucose diet on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, and the impact of any changes in gastric emptying on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in response to glucose and fructose loads. Gastric emptying of glucose and fructose (both 75 g dissolved in 350 ml water) were measured in seven normal volunteers on separate days while each was on a "standard' diet and an identical diet supplemented with 440 g/day of glucose for 4-7 days. Venous blood samples for measurement of plasma glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels were taken immediately before and for 180 min after ingestion of glucose and fructose loads. Dietary glucose supplementation accelerated gastric emptying of glucose (50% emptying time 82 +/- 8 vs 106 +/- 10 min, p = 0.004) and fructose (73 +/- 9 vs 106 +/- 9 min, p = 0.001). After ingestion of glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin (p < 0.05) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (p < 0.05) were higher during the glucose-supplemented diet. In contrast, plasma glucose concentrations at 60 min and 75 min were lower (p < 0.05) on the glucose-supplemented diet. We conclude that short-term supplementation of the diet with glucose accelerates gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, presumably as a result of reduced feedback inhibition of gastric emptying from small intestinal luminal receptors. More rapid gastric emptying of glucose has a significant impact on glucose tolerance.

  13. Comparison of A1C to Oral Glucose Tolerance Test for the Diagnosis of Prediabetes in Overweight and Obese Youth.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Aditi; Naraparaju, Gayathri; Friedman, Miriam; Perez-Colon, Sheila; Umpaichitra, Vatcharapan; Chin, Vivian L

    2017-07-01

    IN BRIEF This study reports performance of A1C against the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in predicting prediabetes among overweight and obese African-American and Caribbean children. A retrospective chart review was completed for 230 children. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to find the predictive performances of different tests against the OGTT. A1C alone is a poor discriminator of prediabetes in our study population, with low sensitivity (70%) and specificity (48.8%). BMI z score, A1C, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance are significant predictors of prediabetes and, when taken together, provide better discrimination for prediabetes.

  14. Glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects with different stages of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Xu, Feng; Su, Jian-Bin; Wang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Jin-Feng; Wu, Gang; Jin, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Glucose variability could be an independent risk factor for diabetes complications in addition to average glucose. The deficiency in islet β cell secretion and insulin sensitivity, the two important pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetes, are responsible for glycemic disorders. The oral disposition index evaluated by product of insulin secretion and sensitivity is a useful marker of islet β cell function. The aim of the study is to investigate glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects across a range of glucose tolerance from the normal to overt type 2 diabetes. 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in total 220 subjects: 47 with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 52 with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, 8 with isolated impaired fasting glucose [IFG], 18 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and 26 with combined IFG and IGT), 61 screen-diagnosed diabetes by isolated 2-h glucose (DM2h) and 60 newly diagnosed diabetes by both fasting and 2-h glucose (DM). Insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda index, ISI), insulin secretion index (ΔI30/ΔG30), and integrated β cell function measured by the oral disposition index (ΔI30/ΔG30 multiplied by the ISI) were derived from OGTT. All subjects were monitored using the continuous glucose monitoring system for consecutive 72 hours. The multiple parameters of glycemic variability included the standard deviation of blood glucose (SD), mean of blood glucose (MBG), high blood glucose index (HBGI), continuous overlapping net glycemic action calculated every 1 h (CONGA1), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE). From the NGR to IGM to DM2h to DM group, the respective values of SD (mean ± SD) (0.9 ± 0.3, 1.5 ± 0.5, 1.9 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/), MBG (5.9 ± 0.5, 6.7 ± 0.7, 7.7 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.5 mmol/L), HGBI [median(Q1-Q3)][0.8(0.2-1.2), 2.0(1.2-3.7), 3.8(2.4-5.6) and 6

  15. Glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects with different stages of glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose variability could be an independent risk factor for diabetes complications in addition to average glucose. The deficiency in islet β cell secretion and insulin sensitivity, the two important pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetes, are responsible for glycemic disorders. The oral disposition index evaluated by product of insulin secretion and sensitivity is a useful marker of islet β cell function. The aim of the study is to investigate glycemic variability in relation to oral disposition index in the subjects across a range of glucose tolerance from the normal to overt type 2 diabetes. Methods 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in total 220 subjects: 47 with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 52 with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM, 8 with isolated impaired fasting glucose [IFG], 18 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and 26 with combined IFG and IGT), 61 screen-diagnosed diabetes by isolated 2-h glucose (DM2h) and 60 newly diagnosed diabetes by both fasting and 2-h glucose (DM). Insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda index, ISI), insulin secretion index (ΔI30/ΔG30), and integrated β cell function measured by the oral disposition index (ΔI30/ΔG30 multiplied by the ISI) were derived from OGTT. All subjects were monitored using the continuous glucose monitoring system for consecutive 72 hours. The multiple parameters of glycemic variability included the standard deviation of blood glucose (SD), mean of blood glucose (MBG), high blood glucose index (HBGI), continuous overlapping net glycemic action calculated every 1 h (CONGA1), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE). Results From the NGR to IGM to DM2h to DM group, the respective values of SD (mean ± SD) (0.9 ± 0.3, 1.5 ± 0.5, 1.9 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/), MBG (5.9 ± 0.5, 6.7 ± 0.7, 7.7 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.5 mmol/L), HGBI [median(Q1–Q3)][0.8(0.2–1.2), 2.0(1.2–3.7), 3

  16. Evaluation of a Minimally Invasive System for Measuring Glucose Area under the Curve during Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests: Usefulness of Sweat Monitoring for Precise Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Yushi; Hashimoto, Naoko; Ogawa, Wataru; Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Toshihiro, Matsuo; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Tomita, Koji; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kosugi, Keisuke; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Hiromu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We developed a system for measuring glucose area under the curve (AUC) using minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Sweat contamination during interstitial fluid glucose (IG) extraction affects the accuracy of glucose AUC measurement, because this technology uses extracted sodium ion levels as an internal standard. Therefore, we developed a sweat monitoring patch to reduce this effect and investigated its efficacy in volunteers undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Materials and Methods: Fifty diabetes mellitus inpatients and 10 healthy subjects undergoing the 75 g OGTT were included. Two sites on the forearm were pretreated with microneedle arrays, then hydrogels for interstitial fluid extraction were placed on the treated sites. Simultaneously, hydrogels for sweat monitoring were placed on untreated sites near the treated sites. Plasma glucose (PG) levels were measured every 30 min for 2 h to calculate reference AUC values. Using MIET, IG AUC was calculated from extracted glucose and sodium ion levels after attachment of the hydrogel for 2 h. Results: Good correlation between IG AUC measurements using MIET and reference AUCs measured using PG levels was confirmed over a wide AUC range (202–610 mg/h/dl) after correction for the sweat-induced error detected by the hydrogel patches on the nonpretreated skin. Strong correlation between IG AUC and peak glucose levels indicates that glucose spikes can be easily detected by this system. Conclusion: We confirmed the effectiveness of a sweat monitoring patch for precise AUC measurement using MIET. This novel, easy-to-use system has potential for glucose excursion evaluation in daily clinical practice. PMID:23759401

  17. Relationships of the early insulin secretory response and oral disposition index with gastric emptying in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Chinmay S; Rayner, Christopher K; Lange, Kylie; Bound, Michelle; Wishart, Judith; Jones, Karen L; Kahn, Steven E; Horowitz, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The oral disposition index, the product of the early insulin secretory response during an oral glucose tolerance test and insulin sensitivity, is used widely for both the prediction of, and evaluation of the response to interventions, in type 2 diabetes. Gastric emptying, which determines small intestinal exposure of nutrients, modulates postprandial glycemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the insulin secretory response and the disposition index (DI) related to gastric emptying in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. Thirty-nine subjects consumed a 350 mL drink containing 75 g glucose labeled with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid. Gastric emptying (by scintigraphy), blood glucose (G) and plasma insulin (I) were measured between t = 0-120 min. The rate of gastric emptying was derived from the time taken for 50% emptying (T50) and expressed as kcal/min. The early insulin secretory response was estimated by the ratio of the change in insulin (∆I0-30) to that of glucose at 30 min (∆G0-30) represented as ∆I0-30/∆G0-30 Insulin sensitivity was estimated as 1/fasting insulin and the DI was then calculated as ∆I0-30/∆G0-30 × 1/fasting insulin. There was a direct relationship between ∆G0-30 and gastric emptying (r = 0.47, P = 0.003). While there was no association of either ∆I0-30 (r = -0.16, P = 0.34) or fasting insulin (r = 0.21, P = 0.20), there were inverse relationships between the early insulin secretory response (r = -0.45, P = 0.004) and the DI (r = -0.33, P = 0.041), with gastric emptying. We conclude that gastric emptying is associated with both insulin secretion and the disposition index in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, such that when gastric emptying is relatively more rapid, both the early insulin secretory response and the disposition index are less. These findings should be interpreted as "hypothesis generating" and provide the rationale for longitudinal studies to examine the impact of baseline

  18. Factors associated with the glucose-lowering effect of vildagliptin identified from the results of the oral glucose tolerance test in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the factors contributing to the glucose-lowering effect of vildagliptin, we analyzed the results of the oral glucose tolerance test together with several clinical parameters in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes before and after 24 weeks of treatment with vildagliptin. The data of the 13 patients who satisfactorily completed the follow-up examinations were included. After 24 weeks treatment with vildagliptin, the patients were classified into a responder group (69.2%) and a non-responder group (30.8%); the responders consisting of subjects whose HbA1c decreased following 24 weeks treatment with vildagliptin, and the non-responders consisting of subjects who did not show any significant decrease of HbA1c. There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups before administration of vildagliptin. After 24 weeks of treatment, HbA1c was significantly reduced from 7.3 ± 0.5% to 6.7 ± 0.5% in the responder group (P = 0.0077), while it tended to rather increased from 7.1 ± 0.6% to 7.5 ± 0.7% in the non-responder group (P = 0.0679). Also, parameters reflecting the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, such as the insulinogenic index and oral disposition index, were significantly higher in the responder group than in the non-responder group, whereas insulin sensitivity was similar between the two groups. These results suggest that the difference in the degree of improvement of the glucose tolerance between the responder group and non-responder group in this study could be associated with the effect of vildagliptin on the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but not on the insulin sensitivity.

  19. Assessment of incretins in oral glucose and lipid tolerance tests may be indicative in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome aggravation.

    PubMed

    Kiec-Klimczak, M; Malczewska-Malec, M; Razny, U; Zdzienicka, A; Gruca, A; Goralska, J; Pach, D; Gilis-Januszewska, A; Dembinska-Kiec, A; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A

    2016-04-01

    Incretins stimulated by oral meals are claimed to be protective for the pancreatic beta cells, to increase insulin secretion, to inhibit glucagon release, slow gastric emptying (glucagon-like peptide-1) and suppress appetite. Recently it has however been suggested that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is putative early biomarker of metabolic consequences of the obesity associated proinflammatory state. The study was aimed to compare the release of incretins and some of early markers of inflammation at the fasting and postprandial period induced by functional oral glucose as well as lipid load in healthy controls and patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) to see if functional tests may be helpful in searching for the inflammatory status of patients. Fifty patients with MS and 20 healthy volunteers (C) participated in this study. The 3-hour oral glucose (OGTT) and the 8-hour oral lipid (OLTT) tolerance tests were performed. At fasting leptin and adiponectin, as well as every 30 minutes of OGTT and every 2 hours of OLTT blood concentration of GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucose, insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acids, glutathione peroxidase, interleukin-6, sE-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) and visfatin were measured. At fasting and during both OGTT and OLTT the level of incretins did not differ between the MS and the C group. Both glucose and lipids reach food activated incretins secretion. Glucose was the main GLP-1 release activator, while the lipid load activated evidently GIP secretion. A significantly larger AUC-GIP after the lipid-rich meal over the carbohydrate meal was observed, while statistically bigger value of AUC-GLP-1 was noticed in OGTT than in OLTT (P < 0.001) within each of the investigated groups. In patients with the highest fasting plasma GIP concentration (3(rd) tertile), IL-6, MCP-1, sE-selectin and visfatin blood levels were increased and correlated with glutathione peroxydase, leptin

  20. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  1. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  2. Gestational diabetes alters the fetal heart rate variability during an oral glucose tolerance test: a fetal magnetocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Fehlert, E; Willmann, K; Fritsche, L; Linder, K; Mat-Husin, H; Schleger, F; Weiss, M; Kiefer-Schmidt, I; Brucker, S; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2016-12-28

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) potentially harms the child before birth. We previously found GDM to be associated with developmental changes in the central nervous system. We now hypothesise that GDM may also impact on the fetal autonomic nervous system under metabolic stress like an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We measured heart rate variability (HRV) of mothers and fetuses during a three-point OGTT using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Measurements were performed in the fMEG Centre in Tübingen. After exclusion of 23 participants, 13 pregnant women with GDM and 36 pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance were examined. All women underwent the same examination setting with OGTT during which fMCG was recorded three times. Parameters of heart rate variability were measured. Compared with mothers with normal glucose regulation, mothers with GDM showed increased heart rate but no significant differences of maternal HRV. In contrast, HRV in fetuses of mothers with GDM differed from those in the metabolically healthy group regarding standard deviation normal to normal beat (SDNN) (P = 0.012), low-frequency band (P = 0.008) and high-frequency band (P = 0.031). These HRV parameters exhibit a decrease only in GDM fetuses during the second hour of the OGTT. These results show an altered response of the fetal autonomic nervous system to metabolic stress in GDM-complicated pregnancies. Hence, disturbances in maternal glucose metabolism might not only impact on the central nervous system of the fetus but may also affect the fetal autonomic nervous system. Metabolic stress reveals a different response of fetal autonomic nervous system in GDM-complicated pregnancies. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Decrease of serum S100B during an oral glucose tolerance test correlates inversely with the insulin response.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Johann; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Schiltz, Kolja; Haase, Thekla; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Müller, Ulf J; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Borucki, Katrin; Schroeter, Matthias L; Isermann, Berend; Bogerts, Bernhard; Westphal, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Increased S100B serum levels have been considered as a marker of glial pathology, brain damage, and blood-brain-barrier impairment. However, S100B expression has also been detected outside the nervous system, suggesting that altered S100B serum levels may not exclusively reflect brain-specific pathologies. Notably, S100B secretion in adipocytes seems to be down-regulated by insulin, and up-regulated by stress and fasting. Therefore, we assumed that dynamic changes of S100B could be observed by challenging healthy subjects with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). OGTT was performed in 17 healthy adult test persons (9 male and 8 female). Apart from S100B, glucose, free fatty acids, insulin, C-peptide, and cortisol were determined in all samples after an overnight fast (0 h), as well as 1h and 2h after ingestion of 75 g glucose. Mean S100B concentrations decreased about 20% during the first hour after glucose ingestion (P<0.001). This decrease of S100B levels was not related to the declining morning peak of cortisol. However, the decrease of serum-S100B 1h after glucose ingestion correlated inversely with the respective changes of serum-insulin (r = -0.484, P=0.049) and serum-C-peptide (r = -0.570, P = 0.017). Our study suggests an inverse correlation between insulin secretion and S100B release after a standardized OGTT. Additional experiments, including the administration of insulin and the measurement of other food intake-related factors are important to ascertain an insulin-regulated S100B release in vivo. To improve comparability between clinical studies assessing conditions with rather mild changes of serum S100B, blood should be taken in a more standardized way (e.g., after fasting overnight).

  4. Beyond glucose: metabolic shifts in responses to the effects of the oral glucose tolerance test and the high-fructose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhai; Yang, Zhu; Liu, Hongde; Tang, Leihan; Cai, Zongwei

    2011-05-01

    High-fructose diet-fed rats as one of the insulin resistant models was used widely for understanding the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Systems-level metabolic profiling of the rat model, however, has not been deciphered clearly. To address this issue, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was employed to unlock the metabolic snapshots of the oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) effect in either healthy or diabetic rats, as well as to delineate the metabolic signatures in tissues of rats fed with high-fructose diet. Several differentiating metabolites were highlighted to reveal the metabolic perturbation of the oGTT effects in healthy and diabetic rats, which involved amino acid biosynthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids and purine metabolism. Surprisingly, the patterns of relationships for the metabolic phenotypes by using data mining revealed that glucose ingestion might induce the healthy group to display its trajectory towards diabetic status, while only a very slight influence was observed on the high-fructose diet-fed rats 120 min after glucose ingestion. The data treatment for liver, skeletal muscle and brain tissues suggested that oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation and the declined antioxidant, the elevated amino acids and the perturbation of fatty acids, were caused by the high-fructose diet in liver and skeletal muscle tissues. On the other hand, the up-regulation in purine biosynthesis and the decreased concentrations for amino acids were observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus tissues. Collectively, the obtained results might provide a new insight not only for the impairment of glucose tolerance but also for the dietary style in rats.

  5. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Sophie R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Parker, Helen; Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Bloom, Stephen R.; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in these cells. Method Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre) to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay. Results Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01) in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01) and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01) GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01). Conclusion AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27010458

  6. The association between HbA1c, fasting glucose, 1-hour glucose and 2-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Follow-up of clinical trial. 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Relative risk of CVD. Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes.

  7. The shape of the glucose concentration curve during an oral glucose tolerance test predicts risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Xu, Ping; Libman, Ingrid M; Becker, Dorothy J; Marks, Jennifer B; Skyler, Jay S; Palmer, Jerry P; Sosenko, Jay M

    2017-09-27

    We aimed to examine: (1) whether specific glucose-response curve shapes during OGTTs are predictive of type 1 diabetes development; and (2) the extent to which the glucose-response curve is influenced by insulin secretion. Autoantibody-positive relatives of people with type 1 diabetes whose baseline OGTT met the definition of a monophasic or biphasic glucose-response curve were followed for the development of type 1 diabetes (n = 2627). A monophasic curve was defined as an increase in OGTT glucose between 30 and 90 min followed by a decline of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l between 90 and 120 min. A biphasic response curve was defined as a decrease in glucose after an initial increase, followed by a second increase of ≥ 0.25 mmol/l. Associations of type 1 diabetes risk with glucose curve shapes were examined using cumulative incidence curve comparisons and proportional hazards regression. C-peptide responses were compared with and without adjustments for potential confounders. The majority of participants had a monophasic curve at baseline (n = 1732 [66%] vs n = 895 [34%]). The biphasic group had a lower cumulative incidence of type 1 diabetes (p < 0.001), which persisted after adjustments for age, sex, BMI z score and number of autoantibodies (p < 0.001). Among the monophasic group, the risk of type 1 diabetes was greater for those with a glucose peak at 90 min than for those with a peak at 30 min; the difference persisted after adjustments (p < 0.001). Compared with the biphasic group, the monophasic group had a lower early C-peptide (30-0 min) response, a lower C-peptide index (30-0 min C-peptide/30-0 min glucose), as well as a greater 2 h C-peptide level (p < 0.001 for all). Those with biphasic glucose curves have a lower risk of progression to type 1 diabetes than those with monophasic curves, and the risk among the monophasic group is increased when the glucose peak occurs at 90 min than at 30 min. Differences in glucose curve shapes between

  8. Hemolysis is a major cause of variability in insulin measurement during oral glucose tolerance test in children.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Giorgio; Sulas, Maria Giovanna; Mairate, Elisabetta; Bardone, Maria Beatrice; Rolla, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is widely employed to evaluate insulin resistance in children with growth hormone deficiency. Due to the difficulty in blood sampling, hemolysis is a frequent pre-analytic interference. The present study was performed to characterize the effects of hemolysis on insulin assays, in order to assess the need to generate automatic hemolysis reports and/or to reject hemolyzed samples. Insulin plasma levels were measured using a Siemens ADVIA Centaur on samples obtained from children with suspected GH deficiency at risk for insulin resistance during OGTT. The presence of hemolysis (with a concentration of free hemoglobin above 75 mg/dL) promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in immunoreactive insulin at any time-point evaluated during OGTT. As a consequence, the variability of insulin is particularly high (often exceeding 100% of the mean value) as compared to that of glucose. This variability is markedly reduced after removal of the hemolyzed samples. When hemolysis is not taken into account a misinterpretation of insulin secretion pattern can occur. It is therefore imperative to: (i) analyze blood samples immediately after sampling, (ii) reject samples with a concentration of free hemoglobin equal to or above 125 mg/dL and (iii) always report the possible interference.

  9. The effect of treatment on pregnancy outcomes in women with one elevated oral glucose tolerance test value.

    PubMed

    Kokanalı, Mahmut Kuntay; Tokmak, Aytekin; Kaymak, Oktay; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Bilge, Ümit

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether dietary intervention could reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity in pregnancies with one elevated 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value. The study was conducted among patients with positive 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) and one elevated 100 g OGTT value. Plasma glucose value of 140 mg/dL was used as the threshold to define an abnormal GCT result. Carpenter and Coustan criteria were used to evaluate the OGTT results. Seventy-four women with normal GCT values comprised group I. Ninety-nine women with one elevated 100 g OGTT value who were given a caloric diet and 102 women with one elevated OGTT value in group III who received antenatal care with no special diet were randomly assigned to groups II and III, respectively. All women were followed up until the end of pregnancy. Poor maternal outcome was defined as: cesarean delivery performed due to cephalopelvic disproportion, failure to progress or fetal distress, preeclampsia, and/or preterm labor. Poor perinatal outcome was defined as: small for gestational age, large for gestational age or admission to a neonatal intensive care unit. The groups were compared in terms of maternal and perinatal outcomes. The rates of macrosomia and large for gestational age incidence were significantly higher in group III as compared to groups I and II. When we examined the multivariate effects of the risk factors considered to be predictive of poor maternal outcomes, group III was the only statistically significant risk factor (OR=3.90, 95% CI:1.95- 7.84; p=<0.001). In terms of poor perinatal outcome, one elevated OGTT value (group III) was the only significant risk factor (OR=2.92, 95% CI:1.56-5.46; p=<0.001). Women with one elevated OGTT value benefit from a structured program of diet therapy aimed to reduce adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes.

  10. Clinical outcomes of pregnancies complicated by mild gestational diabetes mellitus differ by combinations of abnormal oral glucose tolerance test values.

    PubMed

    Black, Mary Helen; Sacks, David A; Xiang, Anny H; Lawrence, Jean M

    2010-12-01

    To examine the association between levels of hyperglycemia, determined by each prenatal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value (fasting, 1 and 2 h), and maternal and perinatal outcomes and to determine whether the risk for these outcomes differs for women whose value(s) equaled or exceeded the thresholds for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) established by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). This article discusses a retrospective study of 8,711 women, delivering at ≥ 20 weeks' gestation, who had a prenatal 2-h 75-g OGTT without a prior 50-g challenge and were not treated with insulin, glyburide, diet, and/or exercise during pregnancy. Associations between adverse outcomes and elevated OGTT values are reported. After excluding treated women, 19.4% of the remaining women had IADPSG-defined GDM. Continuous fasting, 1- and 2-h OGTT measures, and GDM (yes/no) were significantly associated with most adverse outcomes. However, the magnitude and significance of risk for these outcomes differed by various combinations of abnormal glucose values. Women with normal fasting and elevated postload values were at higher risk for preterm delivery, gestational hypertension, and having an infant with hyperbilirubinema, whereas women with elevated fasting and normal postload values were at higher risk of having a large-for-gestational-age infant, compared with women without GDM. Risks for different adverse outcomes vary depending on which single or combined IADPSG-defined OGTT thresholds are equaled or exceeded. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether changing pre- and postprandial glucose targets during pregnancy will more uniformly reduce adverse outcomes.

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Pregnancies Complicated by Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Differ by Combinations of Abnormal Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Values

    PubMed Central

    Black, Mary Helen; Sacks, David A.; Xiang, Anny H.; Lawrence, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between levels of hyperglycemia, determined by each prenatal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value (fasting, 1 and 2 h), and maternal and perinatal outcomes and to determine whether the risk for these outcomes differs for women whose value(s) equaled or exceeded the thresholds for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) established by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This article discusses a retrospective study of 8,711 women, delivering at ≥20 weeks' gestation, who had a prenatal 2-h 75-g OGTT without a prior 50-g challenge and were not treated with insulin, glyburide, diet, and/or exercise during pregnancy. Associations between adverse outcomes and elevated OGTT values are reported. RESULTS After excluding treated women, 19.4% of the remaining women had IADPSG-defined GDM. Continuous fasting, 1- and 2-h OGTT measures, and GDM (yes/no) were significantly associated with most adverse outcomes. However, the magnitude and significance of risk for these outcomes differed by various combinations of abnormal glucose values. Women with normal fasting and elevated postload values were at higher risk for preterm delivery, gestational hypertension, and having an infant with hyperbilirubinema, whereas women with elevated fasting and normal postload values were at higher risk of having a large-for-gestational-age infant, compared with women without GDM. CONCLUSIONS Risks for different adverse outcomes vary depending on which single or combined IADPSG-defined OGTT thresholds are equaled or exceeded. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether changing pre- and postprandial glucose targets during pregnancy will more uniformly reduce adverse outcomes. PMID:20843973

  12. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM): Relationship Between Higher Cutoff Values for 100 g Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) and Insulin Requirement During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ares, Jessica; Martín-Nieto, Alicia; Díaz-Naya, Lucía; Tartón, Teresa; Menéndez-Prada, Teresa; Ragnarsson, Cecilia S; Delgado-Álvarez, Elías; Menéndez-Torre, Edelmiro

    2017-07-01

    Objectives To study if there is any relationship about higher cutoff values for 100 g oral glucose tolerance test and the need for insulin in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective population-based study of 201 women diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) between January 2012 and June 2014 in the area of Oviedo, Asturias, Spain. According to diagnostic criteria recommended by GEDE, NDDG, gestational diabetes is diagnosed if two or more plasma glucose levels meet or exceed the following threshold: fasting glucose of 105 mg/dl, 1-h 190 mg/dl, 2-h 165 mg/dl, or 3-h 145 mg/dl. We aim to know if there is any relationship between higher cutoffs and insulin requirement. Results 36 out of 201 patients (17.91%) needed insulin to achieve the targets of blood glucose control. There were no differences in mean maternal age and birthweights. Fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in women with further need for insulin than those who only needed diet and exercise (p < 0.001). Also, blood glucose levels 2 h after the oral glucose intake were statistically different between the two groups (p 0.032). AUC for fasting glucose value was the highest according to ROC curve. Conclusions Fasting cutoff vales for 100 g oral glucose tolerance test are consistently higher in women diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes that further needed insulin to achieve adequate blood glucose control. The positive predictive value of fasting glucose value 105 mg/dl on OGTT was 81.1%, whereas for the cut-off 95 mg/dl it was 54.0%.

  13. Effects of basswood honey, honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution, and oral glucose tolerance test solution on serum insulin, glucose, and C-peptide concentrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Sheybani, Babak; Hauenschild, Annette; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Bretzel, Reinhard G; Winter, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Studies suggest that honey has less influence on serum glucose concentrations than monosaccharides and disaccharides. This study aimed to confirm these findings conclusively by comparing directly the effects of honey, an identical sugar solution, and oral glucose tolerance (OGT) test solution on serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide values in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy men with a mean age of 27.7 years, a mean body mass index of 23.2 kg/m(2), and no history of metabolic disorders participated in the study. Subjects underwent OGT testing to establish values and exclude preclinical diabetes. One week later they were randomly assigned to basswood honey or a glucose-fructose solution (honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution). The following week subjects were given the other solution. All solutions contained 75 g of glucose. Serum glucose was measured before drinking test solutions and every 10 minutes for 120 minutes afterwards. C-peptide and insulin were measured at 60 and 120 minutes. Serum insulin and C-peptide values at 60 minutes were significantly lower for honey. The mean serum glucose concentration was also lower for honey, but direct comparisons at the various times showed no statistically significant differences between solutions. However, the area under the concentration-time profile for glucose response was lower for the honey than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Honey had less effect on serum glucose, C-peptide, and insulin values than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Further study to elucidate underlying mechanisms may be worthwhile, as may investigation of the implications of these findings for diabetic patients.

  14. [Evaluation of oral glucose tolerance test in the assessment of reserved function of liver for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wen, T; Zheng, G; Meng, X; Chen, L

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oral glucose tolerance test(OGTT)in the assessment of reserved function of liver for predicting the tolerability of patients to hepatectomy and hence provided a criteria for selecting the candidates for undergoing hepatectomy, since the majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients were associated with posthepatitis cirrhosis. The preoperative and postoperative OGTT and liver biopsy for pathological investigation were carried out in 62 cases of hepatecomized patients and 49 cases of unresected patients for comparison. The results revealed that the patients whose preoperative OGTT curve was of P type recovered uneventfully after hepatectomy, but those whose curve was of L type of tolerated poorly to hepatectomy and were liable to postoperative hepatic failure and complications. The severity of cirrbosis in those poor risk patients fell to C III or C IV histological degree. 29 patients with intermediate feature of OGTT curve between P type and L type, i.e. I type underwent regional vascular occlusion at hepatic hilus as hepatectomy, and infusion of Danshen extract solution before vascular occlusion to prevent hepatocytes from reperfusion injury. Of them, 20 recovered uneventfully, 8 suffered from complications such as ascites and/or juandice, and 1 died within 1 month after operation. The followup study showed that the survival time of patients with P type OGTT curve was longer than that of I type, and the latter was longer than that of L type. The pattern of OGTT curve could change from preoperative P type to postoperative L type, depending on the severity of vascular interruption of liver and the ischemic injury to hepatocytic mass in operation.

  15. Higher incremental insulin area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test predicts less food intake and weight gain.

    PubMed

    He, J; Votruba, S; Venti, C; Krakoff, J

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the correlation of peripheral insulin concentrations with food intake and body weight. Cross sectional and longitudinal clinical study: we investigated the association of peripheral insulin concentrations in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with subsequent measures of ad libitum food intake and body weight change. Food intake analysis: Pima Indians (n=67, 63% male; body mass index (mean ± s.d.) 34.2 ± 9.4 kg m(-2)) with normal glucose regulation (NGR; fasting glucose <5.6 mmol l(-1) and 2-h glucose <7.8 mmol l(-1)) participated in a study of ad libitum food intake measured over 3 days by an automated vending machine system. Weight change analysis: Pima Indians with NGR (n=339) who also participated in a longitudinal study of risks for type 2 diabetes and had follow-up weights. Food intake analysis: incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for insulin during the OGTT was negatively associated with mean daily ad libitum energy intake (DEI) (r=-0.26, P=0.04), calories consumed as percent weight-maintenance energy needs (%WMEN) (r=-0.38, P=0.002) and carbohydrate intake (gram per day) (r=-0.35, P=0.005). Adjustment for age and sex attenuated the association of iAUC with DEI (P=0.06) not with %WMEN and carbohydrate intake (P=0.005, P=0.008). Weight change analysis: after adjustment for age, sex, follow-up time and initial body weight, higher insulin iAUC predicted less absolute and percent weight change (β=-6.9, P=0.02; β=-0.08, P=0.008, respectively). In healthy Pima Indians with NGR, higher plasma iAUC during an OGTT predicted lower food intake and carbohydrate consumption and less weight gain. These data indicated a role for peripheral insulin as a negative feedback signal in the regulation of energy intake and body weight.

  16. The Clamp-Like Index: a novel and highly sensitive insulin sensitivity index to calculate hyperinsulinemic clamp glucose infusion rates from oral glucose tolerance tests in nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Anderwald, Christian; Anderwald-Stadler, Marietta; Promintzer, Miriam; Prager, Gerhard; Mandl, Martina; Nowotny, Peter; Bischof, Martin G; Wolzt, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kästenbauer, Thomas; Pacini, Giovanni; Luger, Anton; Krebs, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Insulin resistance, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the metabolic syndrome, can not only predict type 2 diabetes development but also cardiovascular disease. Thus, precise insulin resistance measurement in individuals at risk for metabolic diseases would support clinical risk stratification. However, the gold standard for measuring insulin resistance, the hyperinsulinemic clamp test, is too labor intensive to be performed in large clinical studies/settings. Using plasma glucose and C-peptide concentrations from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), we developed the novel "clamp-like index" (CLIX) for insulin sensitivity calculation and compared CLIX to clamp glucose infusion rates (GIR) (100-120 min). We evaluated CLIX in 89 nondiabetic subjects (58 female and 31 male, aged 45 +/- 1 years, BMI 27.5 +/- 0.8 kg/m(2)) who underwent frequently sampled 3-h 75-g OGTTs and 2-h hyperinsulinemic-isoglycemic clamp (40 mU/min per m(2)) tests. CLIX, calculated as serum creatinine (x0.85 if male)/(mean AUC(glucose) x mean AUC(C-peptide)) x 6,600, was highly correlated (r = 0.670, P < 10(-12)) with and comparable to clamp GIRs(100-120 min). In subgroup analyses, GIRs(100-120 min) were lower (P < 0.005) in type 2 diabetic offspring (6.2 +/- 0.7 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1)) than in sex-, age-, and BMI-matched subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes (8.6 +/- 0.5 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1)), which was also reflected by CLIX (insulin-resistant offspring 6.4 +/- 0.6 vs. those without a family history of type 2 diabetes 9.0 +/- 0.5; P < 0.002). When compared with normal-weight subjects (GIR 8.8 +/- 0.4 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1); CLIX 9.0 +/- 0.5), both GIRs(100-120 min) and CLIX of obese (5.2 +/- 0.9 mg x min (-1) x kg(-1); 5.7 +/- 0.9) and morbidly obese (2.4 +/- 0.4 mg x min (-1) x kg(-1); 3.3 +/- 0.5) humans were lower (each P < 0.02). CLIX, a novel index obtained from plasma OGTT glucose and C-peptide levels and serum creatinine, without inclusion of anthropometrical

  17. Serum Galanin Levels in Young Healthy Lean and Obese Non-Diabetic Men during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Alzate, Héctor Fabio; Agudelo-Zapata, Yessica; González-Clavijo, Angélica María; Poveda, Natalia E.; Espinel-Pachón, Cristian Felipe; Escamilla-Castro, Jorge Augusto; Márquez-Julio, Heidy Lorena; Alvarado-Quintero, Hernando; Rojas-Rodríguez, Fabián Guillermo; Arteaga-Díaz, Juan Manuel; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier Hernando; Garcés-Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Vrontakis, Maria; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raul M.; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Caminos, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) is a neuropeptide involved in the homeostasis of energy metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum levels of GAL during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in lean and obese young men. This cross-sectional study included 30 obese non-diabetic young men (median 22 years; mean BMI 37 kg/m2) and 30 healthy lean men (median 23 years; mean BMI 22 kg/m2). Serum GAL was determined during OGTT. The results of this study include that serum GAL levels showed a reduction during OGTT compared with basal levels in the lean subjects group. Conversely, serum GAL levels increased significantly during OGTT in obese subjects. Serum GAL levels were also higher in obese non-diabetic men compared with lean subjects during fasting and in every period of the OGTT (p < 0.001). Serum GAL levels were positively correlated with BMI, total fat, visceral fat, HOMA–IR, total cholesterol, triglycerides and Leptin. A multiple regression analysis revealed that serum insulin levels at 30, 60 and 120 minutes during the OGTT is the most predictive variable for serum GAL levels (p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum GAL levels are significantly higher in the obese group compared with lean subjects during an OGTT. PMID:27550417

  18. Glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast: oral insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating agent: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Mizrahi, Tal; Raz, Itamar; Mirsky, Nitsa

    2012-09-01

    In search for an effective oral treatment for diabetes, we examined the capacity of glucose tolerance factor (GTF) extracted from yeast and administered orally to reduce hyperglycaemia in rat models exhibiting insulin deficiency. The cellular effect of GTF on the insulin signalling pathway was investigated in vitro. GTF (oral bolus), insulin (intraperitoneal) or their combination was administered to streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or hyperglycaemic Cohen diabetic-sensitive (hyp-CDs) rats. Blood glucose (BG) and insulin levels were measured in the postprandial (PP) state and during an oral glucose tolerance test. Deoxy-glucose transport and insulin signal transduction were assessed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and myoblasts incubated with the GTF. Low dose of insulin produced a 34 and 12·5 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. GTF induced a 33 and 17 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. When combined with insulin, a respective decrease (58 and 42 %) in BG levels was observed, suggesting a partially additive (hyp-CDs) or synergistic (STZ rats) effect of the GTF and insulin. GTF did not induce insulin secretion in hyp-CDs rats, yet it lowered their BG levels, proposing an effect on glucose clearance by peripheral tissues. GTF induced a dose-dependent increase in deoxy-glucose transport into myoblasts and fat cells similar to insulin, while the combined treatment resulted in augmented transport rate. GTF induced a dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. GTF exerts remarkable insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating effects, both in vivo and in vitro. It produces an insulin-like effect by acting on cellular signals downstream of the insulin receptor. These results demonstrate a potential source for a novel oral medication for diabetes.

  19. Effects of Oral Administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on Glucose Tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ndong, Moussa; Uehara, Mariko; Katsumata, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal plants constitute an important source of potential therapeutic agents for diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Moringa oleifera (MO) Lam, Moringacea, on glucose tolerance in Wistar rats and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, modeled type 2 diabetes. Major polyphenols in MO powder were quercetin glucosides, rutin, kaempferol glycosides and chlorogenic acids by HPLC analysis. As the results of glucose tolerance test, MO significantly decreased the blood glucose at 20, 30, 45and 60 min for GK rats and at 10, 30 and 45 min for Wistar rats (p<0.05) compared to the both controls after glucose administration. The area under the curve of changes in the blood glucose was significantly higher in the GK control group than in the GK plus MO group (p<0.05) in the periods 30–60 min and 60–120 min. Furthermore, MO significantly decreased stomach emptying in GK rats (p<0.05). The results indicated that MO has an ameliorating effect for glucose intolerance, and the effect might be mediated by quercetin-3-glucoside and fiber contents in MO leaf powder. The action of MO was greater in GK rats than in Wistar rats. PMID:18398501

  20. Plasma total oxidant and antioxidant status after oral glucose tolerance and mixed meal tests in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucukaydın, Zehra; Duran, Cevdet; Basaran, Mustafa; Camlica, Fatos; Erdem, Sami Said; Basaran, Ahmet; Kutlu, Orkide; Burnik, Ferda Sevimli; Elmas, Halis; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2016-10-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) and increased oxidative stress (OS) are the characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and mixed meal tests (MMT) on plasma total oxidant (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) in patients with PCOS and the relationship between these parameters and IR, calculated via homeostasis of model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) and Matsuda's insulin sensitivity index (ISI) derived from OGTT and MMT. Twenty-two patients with PCOS, and age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched 20 women as controls were enrolled into the study. Five-hour OGTT and MMT were performed on different days, and before and after these tests, plasma TOS and TAS levels were investigated. IR was calculated with HOMA-IR and Matsuda's ISI. HOMA-IR levels were higher in patients with PCOS, compared to controls, while Matsuda's ISI derived from OGTT and MMT was higher in controls. Plasma TOS levels before OGTT and MMT were higher in patients with PCOS than controls, while TAS levels were similar. After OGTT, plasma TOS levels became decreased at 5th hour, when compared to baseline values in PCOS group. Likewise, the same decrement was found in controls, but the decrement was not significant. After OGTT and MMT at 5th hour, no changes were observed in TAS levels, compared to baseline. Matsuda's ISIs derived from OGTT and MMT can be used instead of each other, and interestingly, we found a decrease in TOS levels after OGTT in patients with PCOS.

  1. Delphinidin-Rich Maqui Berry Extract (Delphinol®) Lowers Fasting and Postprandial Glycemia and Insulinemia in Prediabetic Individuals during Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Jorge L.; Salgado, Ana-María; Lyon, Carolina; Vigil, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Delphinidin anthocyanins have previously been associated with the inhibition of glucose absorption. Blood glucose lowering effects have been ascribed to maqui berry (Aristotelia chilensis) extracts in humans after boiled rice consumption. In this study, we aimed to explore whether a standardized delphinidin-rich extract from maqui berry (Delphinol) affects glucose metabolism in prediabetic humans based on glycemia and insulinemia curves obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a challenge with pure glucose. Volunteers underwent four consecutive OGTTs with at least one week washout period, in which different doses of Delphinol were administered one hour before glucose intake. Delphinol significantly and dose-dependently lowered basal glycemia and insulinemia. Lower doses delayed postprandial glycemic and insulinemic peaks, while higher doses reversed this tendency. Glycemia peaks were dose-dependently lowered, while insulinemia peaks were higher for the lowest dose and lower for other doses. The total glucose available in blood was unaffected by treatments, while the total insulin availability was increased by low doses and decreased by the highest dose. Taken together, these open exploratory results suggest that Delphinol could be acting through three possible mechanisms: by inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, by an incretin-mediated effect, or by improving insulin sensitivity. PMID:28025651

  2. Dietary intake of boiled breadfruit (Treculia africana) seeds did not improve hyperglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: Effect on the oral glucose tolerance of normoglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Eleazu, Chinedum; Ezekwibe, Ifeoma; Egbe, Mary; Saidu, Sanni; Eleazu, Kate; Egedigwe, Chima

    2017-01-01

    Although African breadfruit (Treculia africana) is said to be useful in the dietary management of diabetes, the effect of cooking on its glycemic index has not been reported. Hence this study has investi- gated the effect of a dietary intake of boiled breadfruit on the serum glucose, glucose tolerance, body weights and relative organ weights of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Twenty albino rats were used and were divided into four groups of five rats. Groups 1 (normal control) and 2 (diabetic control) received standard rat pellets while groups 3 (diabetic-test group) and 4 (non-diabetic) rats received breadfruit. The blood glucose of the normoglycemic rats fed standard rat feeds peaked at 30 min (149.75 ±11.12 mg/dl) following oral glucose loading (3 g/kg) but reduced to 85.25 ±21.05 mg/dl after another 90 min, while the blood glucose of the normoglycemic rats fed breadfruit peaked at 30 min (146.25 ±15.22 mg/dl) follow- ing oral glucose loading, but elevated (130.75 ±36.69 mg/dl) after another 90 min. There was significant elevation (P < 0.05) of the serum glucose, relative liver weight (RLW) and relative kidney weight (RKW) but a significant decrease in the body weights of the diabetic control compared with the normal control; no sig- nificant difference (P > 0.05) in the serum glucose, body weights, RLW and RKW of the test group compared with the diabetic control, and no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the serum glucose, body weights, RLW and RKW of the normal rats fed the breadfruit diet compared to the normal control. The study showed that the traditional method of cooking African breadfruit negatively affects its hypoglycemic property.

  3. Comparison of oral glucose tolerance tests and mixed meals in patients with apparent idiopathic postabsorptive hypoglycemia: absence of hypoglycemia after meals.

    PubMed

    Charles, M A; Hofeldt, F; Shackelford, A; Waldeck, N; Dodson, L E; Bunker, D; Coggins, J T; Eichner, H

    1981-06-01

    The relationship between symptoms of idiopathic postabsorptive hypoglycemia and glucose homeostasis was evaluated by giving oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and mixed meals to 18 patients and 16 controls. Chemical hypoglycemia after OGTT occurred as often in patients referred because of possible hypoglycemia symptoms, 18 out of 80 (23%), as in controls, 4 out of 16 (25%). After glucose, patients showed both clinical and chemical hypoglycemia (mean +/- SE plasma glucose, 48 +/- 3 mg/dl), but insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone responses were similar to controls. After mixed meals, no chemical hypoglycemia occurred in patients (mean plasma glucose, 79 +/- 3 mg/dl), yet 14 out of 18 (78%) had symptoms and/or signs consistent with hypoglycemia. No abnormality of glucose homeostasis was observed after meals that could account for symptoms or signs experienced by patients with idiopathic postabsorptive hypoglycemia. Since factors other than hypoglycemia appear to be involved, the disorder should be termed the idiopathic postprandial syndrome to avoid the connotation of chemical hypoglycemia.

  4. Role of various indices derived from an oral glucose tolerance test in the prediction of conversion from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye An; Ku, Eu Jeong; Khang, Ah Reum; Hong, Eun Shil; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2014-11-01

    The clinical implications of prediabetes for development of type 2 diabetes may differ for Asian ethnicity. We investigated various indices derived from a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in people with prediabetes to predict their future risk of diabetes. We recruited 406 consecutive subjects with prediabetes from 2005 to 2006 and followed them up every 3-6 months for up to 9 years. Prediabetes was defined as isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), combined glucose intolerance (CGI), or isolated elevated HbA1c (5.7-6.4%, 39-46 mmol/mol) without IFG or IGT. The rate of diabetes conversion was compared between prediabetes categories. The association of glycemic indices with development of diabetes was also investigated. Eighty-one patients were diagnosed with diabetes during the 9-year follow-up (median 46.0 months). The rate of diabetes conversion was higher in subjects with CGI (31.9%), or isolated IGT (18.5%) than in those with isolated IFG (15.2%) or isolated elevated HbA1c (10.9%). Surrogate markers reflecting β-cell dysfunction were more closely associated with diabetes conversion than insulin resistance indices. Subjects with a 30-min postload glucose ≥ 165 mg/dL and a 30-min C-peptide < 5 ng/mL had 8.83 times greater risk (95% confidence interval 2.98-26.16) of developing diabetes than other prediabetic subjects. In Asians, at least Koreans, β-cell dysfunction seems to be the major determinant for diabetes conversion. A combination of high glucose and low C-peptide levels at 30 min after OGTT may be a good predictor for diabetes conversion in this population. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Investigation of the correlation between 100 gram oral glucose tolerance test results and maternal leptin levels during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Şengül, Özlem Baykara; Mungan, Tamer; Erdemoğlu, Evrim; İslamoğlu, Göksel; Kıyak, Nuran

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between maternal leptin levels and 100 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) results as well as the correlation between leptin levels and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and glucose intolerance during pregnancy. Material and Method: 104 subjects with gestational weeks ranging from 24 to 32 weeks who had increased 50 gr OGTT values (>140) were included in this study. After the screening test, 100 gr OGTT was administered to the subjects. Sixty cases were selected from these subjects; twenty patients with one abnormal test result were identified as “glucose intolerant” group (Group 1), 20 patients with two abnormal test values were diagnosed with GDM (Group 2) and 20 patients with normal test results constituted the control group. The serum leptin levels of the groups were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The serum leptin level was 8.4±5.1 ng/ml for group 1, 9.1±5.3 ng/ml for group 2 and 6.3±4.6 ng/ml for the control group. Although serum leptin levels for group 1 and 2 was observed to be higher than the control group, the result was not statistically significant (p>0.05). This result did not change after adjusting for body mass index (BMI). Conclusion There is no statistically significant difference between leptin levels among three groups. PMID:24591860

  6. Quantitative analysis of methylglyoxal, glyoxal and free advanced glycation end-products in the plasma of Wistar rats during the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Jing; Aikawa, Chiwa; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the production behavior of free adducts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in Wistar rats under acute hyperglycemic conditions. Five AGE-free adducts as well as their precursors (i.e., highly reactive carbonyl intermediates of methylglyoxal and glyoxal) in rat plasma were quantitatively determined at greater than nanomolar levels using the liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method coupled with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate and 2,3-diaminonaphthalene derivatization techniques. An oral glucose (2 g/kg dose) tolerance test to 10-week-old Wistar rats provided evidence that the plasma levels of diabetes-related metabolites did not change acutely within 120 min, irrespective of increasing blood glucose levels.

  7. Identification of the mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator from oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetic patients based on an integrated glucose-insulin model.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Karlsson, Mats O; Frey, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    A mechanistic drug-disease model was developed on the basis of a previously published integrated glucose-insulin model by Jauslin et al. A glucokinase activator was used as a test compound to evaluate the model's ability to identify a drug's mechanism of action and estimate its effects on glucose and insulin profiles following oral glucose tolerance tests. A kinetic-pharmacodynamic approach was chosen to describe the drug's pharmacodynamic effects in a dose-response-time model. Four possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic drugs were evaluated, and the corresponding affected model parameters were identified: insulin secretion, glucose production, insulin effect on glucose elimination, and insulin-independent glucose elimination. Inclusion of drug effects in the model at these sites of action was first tested one-by-one and then in combination. The results demonstrate the ability of this model to identify the dual mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator and describe and predict its effects: Estimating a stimulating drug effect on insulin secretion and an inhibiting effect on glucose output resulted in a significantly better model fit than any other combination of effect sites. The model may be used for dose finding in early clinical drug development and for gaining more insight into a drug candidate's mechanism of action.

  8. Effectiveness of Medium-Chain Triglyceride Oil Therapy in Two Japanese Citrin-Deficient Siblings: Evaluation Using Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Kawamoto, Norio; Kawamoto, Minako; Kamiya, Toshiya; Tanimoto, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Kure, Shigeo; Numakura, Chikahiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-12-01

    Citrin deficiency, an inherited defect of the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform (citrin), may cause impairment of glycolysis because of an increase in the cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio. We report a Japanese boy whose main complaint was recurrent hypoglycemic episodes. He was suspected as having citrin deficiency because of his peculiar preference for protein- and fat-rich food. His young sister also had a similar food preference. Both siblings were diagnosed with citrin deficiency by genetic analysis. The brother and sister underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 10 and 7 yr of age, respectively. Blood glucose, ammonia, lactic acid, pyruvic acid, and insulin levels were monitored before starting the test, and then every 30 min. During this test, they maintained blood glucose levels until 180 min. At 210 min, they experienced vomiting, feeling ill, and decreased blood glucose levels (2.9 and 2.8 mmol/l in the brother and sister, respectively). The sister and brother recovered uneventfully by intravenous glucose injection. In a second OGTT, 4 months after medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil supplementation, they had no major symptoms and normal glucose levels were maintained, even after 240 min. Additionally, after MCT oil therapy, their food preference slightly changed as they started eating more carbohydrates. Our OGTT data suggest excess carbohydrate intake has adverse consequences in patients with citrin deficiency, including hypoglycemia after a few hours. MCT oil therapy may be effective in preventing such hypoglycemia and improving metabolic derangement, even during the so-called apparently healthy period.

  9. Effect of fructose or sucrose feeding with different levels on oral glucose tolerance test in normal and type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sanghee; Kim, You Jin

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether acute fructose or sucrose administration at different levels (0.05 g/kg, 0.1 g/kg or 0.4 g/kg body weight) might affect oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. In OGTT, there were no significant differences in glucose responses between acute fructose- and sucrose-administered groups. However, in normal rats, the AUCs of the blood glucose response for the fructose-administered groups tended to be lower than those of the control and sucrose-administered groups. The AUCs of the lower levels fructoseor sucrose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those of higher levels fructose- or sucrose-administered groups. In type 2 diabetic rats, only the AUC of the lowest level of fructose-administered (0.05 g/kg body weight) group was slightly smaller than that of the control group. The AUCs of fructose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those of the sucrose-administered groups, and the AUCs of lower levels fructose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those fed higher levels of fructose. We concluded from this experiment that fructose has tendency to be more effective in blood glucose regulation than sucrose, and moreover, that smaller amount of fructose is preferred to larger amount. Specifically, our experiments indicated that the fructose level of 0.05 g/kg body weight as dietary supplement was the most effective amount for blood glucose regulation from the pool of 0.05 g/kg, 0.1 g/kg and 0.4 g/kg body weights. Therefore, our results suggest the use of fructose as the substitute sweetener for sucrose, which may be beneficial for blood glucose regulation. PMID:20016727

  10. Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males.

    PubMed

    Moisey, Lesley L; Robinson, Lindsay E; Graham, Terry E

    2010-03-01

    Caffeine and caffeinated coffee (CC) elicit acute insulin insensitivity when ingested before a carbohydrate load. The effects of CC on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when co-ingested with a high carbohydrate meal and on postprandial metabolism of a subsequent (second) carbohydrate load have not been studied. In a randomised, crossover design, ten healthy males ingested either CC (5 mg caffeine/kg body weight), decaffeinated coffee (DC) or water (W; equal volume) co-ingested with a high glycaemic index cereal followed 3 h later by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. After the initial meal, insulin area under the curve (AUC) and insulin sensitivity index did not differ between treatments, although glucose AUC for CC (107 (sem 18) mmol/l x 3 h) and DC (74 (sem 15) mmol/l x 3 h) was greater than W ( - 0.2 (sem 29) mmol/l x 3 h, P < 0.05). After the second carbohydrate load, insulin AUC for CC was 49 % and 57 % greater (P < 0.01) than for DC and W, respectively. Despite the greater insulin response, glucose AUC for CC (217 (sem 24) mmol/l x 2 h) was greater than both DC (126 (sem 11) mmol/l x 2 h, P = 0.01) and W (55 (sem 34) mmol/l x 2 h, P < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity index after the second meal was lower after CC (8.2 (sem 0.9)) compared with both DC (12.4 (sem 1.2), P < 0.01) and W (13.4 (sem 1.4), P < 0.001). Co-ingestion of CC with one meal resulted in insulin insensitivity during the postprandial phase of a second meal in the absence of further CC ingestion. Thus, CC may play a role in daily glycaemic management.

  11. Improvement in glucose tolerance due to Momordica charantia (karela).

    PubMed

    Leatherdale, B A; Panesar, R K; Singh, G; Atkins, T W; Bailey, C J; Bignell, A H

    1981-06-06

    The effect of karela (Momordica charantia), a fruit indigenous to South America and Asia, on glucose and insulin concentrations was studied in nine non-insulin-dependent diabetics and six non-diabetic laboratory rats. A water-soluble extract of the fruits significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations during a 50 g oral glucose tolerance test in the diabetics and after force-feeding in the rats. Fried karela fruits consumed as a daily supplement to the diet produced a small but significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Improvement in glucose tolerance was not associated with an increase in serum insulin responses. These results show that karela improves glucose tolerance in diabetes. Doctors supervising Asian diabetics should be aware of the fruit's hypoglycaemic properties.

  12. Improvement in glucose tolerance due to Momordica charantia (karela).

    PubMed Central

    Leatherdale, B A; Panesar, R K; Singh, G; Atkins, T W; Bailey, C J; Bignell, A H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of karela (Momordica charantia), a fruit indigenous to South America and Asia, on glucose and insulin concentrations was studied in nine non-insulin-dependent diabetics and six non-diabetic laboratory rats. A water-soluble extract of the fruits significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations during a 50 g oral glucose tolerance test in the diabetics and after force-feeding in the rats. Fried karela fruits consumed as a daily supplement to the diet produced a small but significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Improvement in glucose tolerance was not associated with an increase in serum insulin responses. These results show that karela improves glucose tolerance in diabetes. Doctors supervising Asian diabetics should be aware of the fruit's hypoglycaemic properties. PMID:6786635

  13. Mitochondrial DNA copy number augments performance of A1C and oral glucose tolerance testing in the prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Beom; Koh, InSong; Nam, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Lee, Hong Kyu; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2017-01-01

    Here, we tested the performance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN) in predicting future type 2 diabetes (n = 1108). We used the baseline clinical data (age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and the mtDNA-CN, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels and results of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) including fasting plasma glucose, 1-hour glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels, to predict future diabetes. We built a prediction model using the baseline data and the diabetes status at biannual follow-up of 8 years. The mean area under curve (AUC) for all follow-ups of the full model including all variables was 0.92 ± 0.04 (mean ± standard deviation), while that of the model excluding the mtDNA-CN was 0.90 ± 0.03. The sensitivity of the f4ull model was much greater than that of the model not including mtDNA-CN: the mean sensitivities of the model with and without mtDNA-CN were 0.60 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.04, respectively. We found that the mtDNA-CN of peripheral leukocytes is a biomarker that augments the predictive power for future diabetes of A1C and OGTT. We believe that these results could provide invaluable information for developing strategies for the management of diabetes. PMID:28251996

  14. Oral glucose tolerance test performance in olanzapine-treated schizophrenia-spectrum patients is predicted by BMI and triglycerides but not olanzapine dose or duration.

    PubMed

    Guina, Jeffrey; Roy, Sayon; Gupta, Ankur; Langleben, Daniel D; Elman, Igor

    2017-07-01

    Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, is associated with glucoregulatory abnormalities, but the nature of this link is not fully elucidated. This is the first olanzapine oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) study to consider treatment dose and duration, and to compare complementary indices respectively assessing insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) and resistance (homeostasis model assessment). Body mass index (BMI), body composition, plasma lipids, and oGTT were measured in olanzapine-treated nondiabetic patients with DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n = 35). While only one previously undiagnosed participant met diabetes criteria based on fasting plasma glucose alone (≥126 mg/dL), seven were diagnosed with oGTT (2-hr plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dL). Multiple regression analyses revealed that the Matsuda index correlated with BMI (p < 0.0001) and plasma triglycerides (p = 0.01), but not with age, olanzapine dose, olanzapine treatment duration, or plasma cholesterol. Homeostasis model assessment and fasting plasma glucose correlated with triglycerides only (p < 0.0001 for both). Our data suggest that BMI and triglycerides may be implicated in olanzapine-related glucoregulatory abnormalities. The lack of correlation between glucoregulatory abnormalities and olanzapine dose or treatment duration suggests preexisting metabolic disturbances and/or disturbances arising early in the course of treatment. Clinicians prescribing antipsychotics should consider oGTT, especially in patients with obesity and/or hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. [The monophasic pattern in oral glucose tolerance test as a predictive risk factor of type 2 diabetes in obese paediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura D; Enes, Patricia; Martín-Frías, María; Roldán, Belén; Yelmo, Rosa; Barrio, Raquel

    2017-10-01

    The onset of obesity at young ages is strongly associated with the early development of type 2diabetes (T2D). The shape of the curves of glucose and insulin curves during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) could predict the risk of developing T2D. To analyse the morphology of the OGTT and determine T2D risk factors in a mainly Caucasian population of children and adolescents. Observational retrospective study including 588 patients (309 males, 279 females) with a mean age of 11.1±2years, and of whom 90.3% were Caucasian. Risk factors for T2D were compared in patients with a monophasic or biphasic pattern during the performance of an OGTT, as well as anthropometric and biochemical variables, insulin resistance, and beta-cell function. The shape of the glucose curve was monophasic in 50.2% of patients (50.8% male), biphasic in 48.5% (47.6% males), and indeterminate in 1.3%. The monophasic pattern showed lower insulin-sensitivity and worse beta-cell function. Patients with a biphasic pattern had a higher BMI, waist circumference, and blood pressure, although the results were not significant. Latin-American patients had significantly lower serum glucose levels with higher insulin levels during the OGTT. The pattern of response to an OGTT reflects different metabolic phenotypes. Paediatric patients with a biphasic pattern have lower risk-profiling for T2D. The performing of an OGTT could be useful to implement early intervention strategies in children and adolescents with obesity, in order to prevent the development of pre-diabetes or T2D. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of glycemic abnormalities in adolescents with beta thalassemia using continuous glucose monitoring and oral glucose tolerance in adolescents and young adults with β-thalassemia major: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Yasin, Mohamed; El-Awwa, Ahmed; De Sanctis, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both insulin deficiency and resistance are reported in patients with β-thalassemia major (BTM). The use of continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGM), among the different methods for early detection of glycemic abnormalities, has not been studied thoroughly in these adolescents. Materials and Methods: To assess the oralglucose tolerance (OGT) and 72-h continuous glucose concentration by the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) was conducted in 16 adolescents with BTM who were receiving regular blood transfusions every 2-4 weeks and iron-chelation therapy since early childhood. Results: Sixteen adolescents with BTM (age: 19.75 ± 3 years) were investigated. Using OGTT, (25%) had impaired fasting blood (plasma) glucose concentration (BG) (>5.6 mmol/L). 2-h after the glucose load, one of them had BG = 16.2 mmol/L (diabetic) and two had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (BG > 7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L). Monitoring the maximum (postprandial) BG using CGMS,4 adolescents were diagnosed with diabetes (25%) (BG >11.1 mmol/L) and 9 with IGT (56%). HOMA and QUICKI revealed levels <2.6 (1.6 ± 0.8) and >0.33 (0.36 ± 0.03), respectively, ruling out significant insulin resistance in these adolescents. There was a significant negative correlation between the β-cell function (B%) on one hand and the fasting and the 2-h BG (r=−0.6, and − 0.48, P < 0.01, respectively) on the other hand. Neither fasting serum insulin nor c-peptide concentrations were correlated with fasting BG or ferritin levels. The average and maximum blood glucose levels during CGM were significantly correlated with the fasting BG (r = 0.68 and 0.39, respectively, with P < 0.01) and with the BG at 2-hour after oral glucose intake (r = 0.87 and 0.86 respectively, with P < 0.001). Ferritin concentrations were correlated with the fasting BG and the 2-h blood glucose levels in the OGTT (r

  17. Glucose tolerance during pregnancy in Asian women.

    PubMed

    Samanta, A; Burden, M L; Burden, A C; Jones, G R

    1989-08-01

    The present study was aimed at examining differences in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) between two ethnic populations (immigrant Asians and indigenous White Caucasians) residing in Leicester, U.K. The study was divided into two parts: to determine the prevalence of GDM and to determine the level at which glycaemia may impose a risk to the mother and the foetus. Of a total of 12,005 pregnancies (4561 Asian and 7444 White Caucasian), over a 3-year period, 314 (6.8%) Asian and 504 (6.7%) White Caucasian were given a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 28-32 weeks for indications of 'large for date' pregnancies, hydramnios, glycosuria, a history of previous abortions, stillbirths, congenital abnormalities or glucose intolerance, and family history of diabetes. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) was taken as a 2-h venous plasma glucose greater than or equal to 7.8 mmol/l which reverted to normal when formally tested during the puerperium (WHO criteria, 1985). AGT was found in 1.38% Asian and 0.87% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01). This was further divided into impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (2-h value 7.8-11.1 mmol/l) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (2-h value greater than or equal to 11.1 mmol/l). IGT was found in 1.2% Asian and 0.84% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01), and GDM in 0.18% and 0.02% respectively (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Increased hemoglobin A1c threshold for prediabetes remarkably improving the agreement between A1c and oral glucose tolerance test criteria in obese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Ma, Hao; Na, Lixin; Jiang, Shuo; Lv, Lin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Na, Guanqiong; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear why the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes, especially prediabetes, between diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria, is substantially discordant. We aimed to evaluate the effects of obesity on the agreement between HbA1c and OGTT for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes and identify the optimal HbA1c cutoff values in different body mass index (BMI) classifications. In a population-based, cross-sectional study in Harbin, China, 4325 individuals aged 20-74 years without a prior diagnosed diabetes were involved in this study. measure The performance and optimal cutoff points of HbA1c were assessed by receiver-operating characteristic curve. The contribution of BMI to HbA1c was analyzed by structural equational model. The agreement between HbA1c criteria and OGTT decreased with BMI gain (κ = 0.359, 0.312, and 0.275 in a normal weight, overweight, and obese population, respectively). The structural equational model results showed that BMI was significantly associated with HbA1c in normal glucose tolerance and prediabetes subjects but not in diabetes subjects. At a specificity of 80% for prediabetes and 97.5% for diabetes, the optimal HbA1c cutoff points for prediabetes and diabetes were 5.6% and 6.4% in normal-weight, 5.7% and 6.5% in overweight, and 6.0% and 6.5% in an obese population. When the new HbA1c cutoff values were used, the agreement in obese subjects increased almost to the level in normal-weight subjects. The poor agreement between HbA1c and OGTT criteria in an obese population can be significantly improved through increasing the HbA1c threshold for prediabetes.

  19. Racial differences in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations and insulin dynamics during oral glucose tolerance test in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez-Mieyer, PA; Cowan, PA; Umpierrez, GE; Lustig, RH; Cashion, AK; Burghen, GA

    2006-01-01

    Obese African-American (AA) subjects have higher resting and stimulated insulin concentrations than obese Caucasians (C), which could not be explained by the severity of obesity or the degree of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether differences in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), the most potent incretin that regulates insulin secretion, might explain racial differences in insulin response. Accordingly, we measured fasting and stimulated glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 levels during a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 26 obese C (age 38 ± 2 y, body mass index 44 ± 1 kg/m2) and 16 obese AA (age 36 ± 2 y, BMI 46 ± 2 kg/m2) subjects. Corrected insulin response (CIR30), a measure of β-cell activity, whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI), and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, GLP-1, and C-peptide/insulin ratio were computed from the OGTT. Glucose levels, fasting and during the OGTT, were similar between racial groups; 32% of the C and 31% of the AA subjects had impaired glucose tolerance. With a similar WBISI, AAs had significantly higher CIR30 (2.3 ± 0.4 vs 1.01 ± 0.1), insulin response (IAUC: 23 974 ± 4828 vs 14 478 ± 1463), and lower insulin clearance (0.07 ± 0.01 vs 0.11 ± 0.01) than C (all, P<0.01). Obese AAs also had higher fasting GLP-1 (6.7 ± 2.5 vs 4.5 ± 1.1) and GLP-1AUC (1174.7 ± 412 vs 822.4 ± 191) than C (both, P<0.02). Our results indicate that obese AAs had higher concentrations of GLP-1 both at fasting and during the OGTT than obese C. The increased GLP-1 concentration could explain the greater insulin concentration and the increased prevalence of hyperinsulinemia-associated disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes in AAs. PMID:14574347

  20. Islet cell antibody-positive versus -negative phenotypic type 2 diabetes in youth: does the oral glucose tolerance test distinguish between the two?

    PubMed

    Tfayli, Hala; Bacha, Fida; Gungor, Neslihan; Arslanian, Silva

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Using the clamp technique, youths with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (CDx-type 2 diabetes) and positive pancreatic autoantibodies (Ab(+)) were shown to have severe impairment in insulin secretion and less insulin resistance than their peers with negative antibodies (Ab(-)). In this study, we investigated whether oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived indexes of insulin secretion and sensitivity could distinguish between these two groups. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 25 Ab(-), 11 Ab(+) CDx-type 2 diabetic, and 21 obese control youths had an OGTT. Fasting and OGTT-derived indexes of insulin sensitivity (including the Matsuda index, homeostasis model assessment [HOMA] of insulin resistance, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, and glucose-to-insulin ratio) and insulin secretion (HOMA of insulin secretion and 30-min insulogenic and C-peptide indexes) were used. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 responses were assessed. RESULTS Fasting C-peptide and C-peptide-to-glucose ratio, and C-peptide area under the curve (AUC) were significantly lower in the Ab(+) CDx-type 2 diabetic patients. Other OGTT-derived surrogate indexes of insulin sensitivity and secretion were not different between the Ab(+) versus Ab(-) patients. GLP-1 during the OGTT was highest in the Ab(+) youths compared with the other two groups, but this difference disappeared after adjusting for BMI. Ab(+) and Ab(-) CDx-type 2 diabetes had relative hyperglucagonemia compared with control subjects. CONCLUSIONS The clinical measures of fasting and OGTT-derived surrogate indexes of insulin sensitivity and secretion, except for fasting C-peptide and C-peptide AUC, are less sensitive tools to distinguish metabolic/pathopysiological differences, detected by the clamp, between Ab(+) and Ab(-) CDx-type 2 diabetic youths. This underscores the importance of using more sensitive methods and the importance of determining antibody status in obese youths with CDx-type 2

  1. Random plasma glucose in serendipitous screening for glucose intolerance: screening for impaired glucose tolerance study 2.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Foster, Jovonne K; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Varughese, Rincy M; Tsui, Circe W; Koch, David D; Twombly, Jennifer G; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    With positive results from diabetes prevention studies, there is interest in convenient ways to incorporate screening for glucose intolerance into routine care and to limit the need for fasting diagnostic tests. The aim of this study is to determine whether random plasma glucose (RPG) could be used to screen for glucose intolerance. This is a cross-sectional study. The participants of this study include a voluntary sample of 990 adults not known to have diabetes. RPG was measured, and each subject had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test several weeks later. Glucose intolerance targets included diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose(110) (IFG(110); fasting glucose, 110-125 mg/dl, and 2 h glucose < 140 mg/dl). Screening performance was measured by area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AROC). Mean age was 48 years, and body mass index (BMI) was 30.4 kg/m(2); 66% were women, and 52% were black; 5.1% had previously unrecognized diabetes, and 24.0% had any "high-risk" glucose intolerance (diabetes or IGT or IFG(110)). The AROC was 0.80 (95% CI 0.74-0.86) for RPG to identify diabetes and 0.72 (0.68-0.75) to identify any glucose intolerance, both highly significant (p < 0.001). Screening performance was generally consistent at different times of the day, regardless of meal status, and across a range of risk factors such as age, BMI, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. RPG values should be considered by health care providers to be an opportunistic initial screening test and used to prompt further evaluation of patients at risk of glucose intolerance. Such "serendipitous screening" could help to identify unrecognized diabetes and prediabetes.

  2. Effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise on short-term low-carbohydrate/high-fat intake-induced postprandial glucose metabolism during an oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Numao, Shigeharu; Kawano, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoya; Yamada, Yuka; Konishi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masaki; Sakamoto, Shizuo

    2013-10-01

    A single bout of exercise can improve acute postprandial glucose metabolism aggravated by short-term low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet (HFD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on short-term HFD-induced postprandial glucose and incretin metabolism during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Eleven healthy young men (age [mean±SE] 27±1 years; body mass index, 22±1 kg/m(2)) performed three, 3-day interventions in randomized order: (1) a normal diet (ND: ~22% fat), (2) an HFD (~69% fat) and (3) an HFD with a single bout of aerobic exercise (HFDEx). The exercise (50% peak oxygen consumption; ~200 kcal) was performed on the third day in HFDEx. An OGTT was performed after each 3-day dietary intervention. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) of plasma glucose levels during the OGTT was significantly higher in the HFD and HFDEx trials than in the ND trial (P=0.001). In addition, the iAUC of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) level was significantly higher in the HFD trial than in the ND and HFDEx trials (P=0.04). The first-phase insulin secretion indexes were significantly lower in the HFD (P=0.01 and 0.002) and HFDEx trials (P=0.05 and 0.008) than in the ND trial. A single bout of aerobic exercise did not improve the short-term HFD-induced aggravation of postprandial glucose and insulin metabolism during the OGTT. However, it did normalize the increased postprandial GLP-1 level induced by HFD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines during an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Eik, W.; Marcon, S.S.; Krupek, T.; Previdelli, I.T.S.; Pereira, O.C.N.; Silva, M.A.R.C.P.; Bazotte, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of postprandial glycemia on blood levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines during an oral glucose tolerance test in non-diabetic patients with symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia. Eleven patients with clinical symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia received an oral glucose solution (75 g) Blood was collected at 0 (baseline), 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after glucose ingestion and the plasma concentrations of interferon-α (IFN-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin-12 (IL-12), interleukin 13 (IL-13), interleukin 15 (IL-15), interleukin 17 (IL-17), IFN-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic), eotaxin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and 1β (MIP-1β) were evaluated. Overall, glycemic levels increased, reached its maximum at 30 min (phase 1), returned to baseline levels at 120 min (phase 2), followed by a mild hypoglycemia at 180 min (phase 3). During phase 1, cytokine blood levels were maintained. However, we observed a synchronous fall (P<0.05) in the concentrations of pro-inflammatory (IL-15, IL-17, MCP-1) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (FGF-basic, IL-13, IL-1RA) during phase 2. Furthermore, a simultaneous rise (P<0.05) of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IL-5, IL-17) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-13, FGF-basic) occurred during phase 3. Thus, mild acute hypoglycemia but not a physiological increase of glycemia

  4. Random Plasma Glucose in Serendipitous Screening for Glucose Intolerance: Screening for Impaired Glucose Tolerance Study 2

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, David C.; Kolm, Paul; Foster, Jovonne K.; Weintraub, William S.; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K.; Varughese, Rincy M.; Tsui, Circe W.; Koch, David D.; Twombly, Jennifer G.; Venkat Narayan, K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background With positive results from diabetes prevention studies, there is interest in convenient ways to incorporate screening for glucose intolerance into routine care and to limit the need for fasting diagnostic tests. Objective The aim of this study is to determine whether random plasma glucose (RPG) could be used to screen for glucose intolerance. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Participants The participants of this study include a voluntary sample of 990 adults not known to have diabetes. Measurements RPG was measured, and each subject had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test several weeks later. Glucose intolerance targets included diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose110 (IFG110; fasting glucose, 110–125 mg/dl, and 2 h glucose < 140 mg/dl). Screening performance was measured by area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AROC). Results Mean age was 48 years, and body mass index (BMI) was 30.4 kg/m2; 66% were women, and 52% were black; 5.1% had previously unrecognized diabetes, and 24.0% had any “high-risk” glucose intolerance (diabetes or IGT or IFG110). The AROC was 0.80 (95% CI 0.74–0.86) for RPG to identify diabetes and 0.72 (0.68–0.75) to identify any glucose intolerance, both highly significant (p < 0.001). Screening performance was generally consistent at different times of the day, regardless of meal status, and across a range of risk factors such as age, BMI, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure. Conclusions RPG values should be considered by health care providers to be an opportunistic initial screening test and used to prompt further evaluation of patients at risk of glucose intolerance. Such “serendipitous screening” could help to identify unrecognized diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:18335280

  5. Glucose patterns during an oral glucose tolerance test and associations with future diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rate.

    PubMed

    Hulman, Adam; Vistisen, Dorte; Glümer, Charlotte; Bergman, Michael; Witte, Daniel R; Færch, Kristine

    2017-10-06

    In addition to blood glucose concentrations measured in the fasting state and 2 h after an OGTT, intermediate measures during an OGTT may provide additional information regarding a person's risk of future diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). First, we aimed to characterise heterogeneity of glycaemic patterns based on three time points during an OGTT. Second, we compared the incidences of diabetes and CVD and all-cause mortality rates among those with different patterns. Our cohort study included 5861 participants without diabetes at baseline from the Danish Inter99 study. At baseline, all participants underwent an OGTT with measurements of plasma glucose levels at 0, 30 and 120 min. Latent class mixed-effects models were fitted to identify distinct patterns of glycaemic response during the OGTT. Information regarding incident diabetes, CVD and all-cause mortality rates during a median follow-up time of 11, 12 and 13 years, respectively, was extracted from national registers. Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for several cardiometabolic risk factors were used to compare the risk of diabetes, CVD and all-cause mortality among individuals in the different latent classes. Four distinct glucose patterns during the OGTT were identified. One pattern was characterised by high 30 min but low 2 h glucose values. Participants with this pattern had an increased risk of developing diabetes compared with participants with lower 30 min and 2 h glucose levels (HR 4.1 [95% CI 2.2, 7.6]) and participants with higher 2 h but lower 30 min glucose levels (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0, 2.2]). Furthermore, the all-cause mortality rate differed between the groups with significantly higher rates in the two groups with elevated 30 min glucose. Only small non-significant differences in risk of future CVD were observed across latent classes after confounder adjustment. Elevated 30 min glucose is associated with increased risk of diabetes and all-cause mortality rate

  6. Agreement and Reliability of Fasted and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test-Derived Indices of Insulin Sensitivity and Beta Cell Function in Boys.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Emma Joanne; Williams, Craig Anthony; Jackman, Sarah Rebecca; Armstrong, Neil; Barker, Alan R

    2017-06-01

    Assessment of plasma insulin and glucose outcomes is important in paediatric studies aimed at reducing future risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study are to determine the between-method agreement and the day-to-day reliability of fasting and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in healthy boys. Fasting and OGTT assesments of insulin resistance and β-cell function were performed on 28 boys (12.3±2.9 years). Measurements were repeated after 1 week (fasting, n=28) and 1 day (OGTT, n=8). Agreement between estimates of insulin resistance and β-cell function was examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Reliability was assessed using change in the mean, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV). The Matsuda index was positively related with QUICKI (r=0.88, P<0.001) and negatively related to HOMA-IR (r=-0.76, P<0.001). The Cederholm index was not significantly related with fasting estimates of insulin resistance (all r<0.40, P>0.05). For reliability, QUICKI had the lowest CV% for the fasting (4.7%) and the Cederholm index for the OGTT (6.4%) estimates. The largest CV% was observed in fasting insulin (30.8%) and insulinogenic index 30' (62.5%). This study highlights differences in between-method agreement and day-to-day reliability for estimates of insulin resistance in youth. The low CV supports the use of the FGIR (fasting) and Cederholm (OGTT) indices in this population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Impaired glucose tolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Gordon, Paul H; Dupuis, Luc; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Simon, Dominique; Salachas, Francois; Corcia, Philippe; Frochot, Vincent; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Jardel, Claude; Coussieu, Christiane; Le Forestier, Nadine; Lacomblez, Lucette; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to analyse carbohydrate metabolism in a series of ALS patients and to examine potential association with parameters of lipid metabolism and clinical features. Glucose tolerance was assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test in 21 non-diabetic ALS patients and compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Lipids and lactate/pyruvate ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) were also measured in ALS patients. Mann-Whitney U-tests analysed continuous data and Fisher's exact tests assessed categorical data. Blood glucose determined 120 min after the glucose bolus was significantly higher in patients with ALS (7.41 mmol/l+/-1.68) compared to controls (6.05+/-1.44, p=0.006). ALS patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) according to WHO criteria (n=7, 33%) were more likely to have elevated free fatty acids (FFA) levels compared to patients with normal glucose tolerance (0.77 nmol/l+/-0.30 vs. 0.57+/-0.19, p=0.04). IGT was not associated with disease duration or severity. In conclusion, patients with ALS show abnormal glucose tolerance that could be associated with increased FFA levels, a key determinant of insulin resistance. The origin of glucose homeostasis abnormalities in ALS may be multifactorial and deserves further investigation.

  8. Effect of glucose ingestion in plasma markers of inflammation and oxidative stress: analysis of 16 plasma markers from oral glucose tolerance test samples of normal and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Soon Young; Hong, Won Kyung; Jung, Seung Eun; Kang, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jun-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2013-02-01

    Sixteen plasma markers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured during OGTT in 54 subjects. Leptin, RBP4, CRP, OPN, ANG, MDC, and MCSF concentrations significantly decreased during OGTT (P<0.05). IL6, IL8, and MCP3 concentrations significantly increased during OGTT (P<0.05). These results provide evidence that glucose ingestion affects systemic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  9. Impact of Glucose Tolerance Status, Sex, and Body Size on Glucose Absorption Patterns During OGTTs

    PubMed Central

    Færch, Kristine; Pacini, Giovanni; Nolan, John J.; Hansen, Torben; Tura, Andrea; Vistisen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We studied whether patterns of glucose absorption during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were abnormal in individuals with impaired glucose regulation and whether they were related to sex and body size (height and fat-free mass). We also examined how well differences in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function measured by gold-standard tests were reflected in the corresponding OGTT-derived estimates. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS With validated methods, various aspects of glucose absorption were estimated from 12-point, 3-h, 75-g OGTTs in 66 individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), or isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT). Insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were measured with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance tests, respectively. Surrogate markers of both conditions were calculated from OGTTs. RESULTS More rapid glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.036) and reduced late glucose absorption (P ≤ 0.039) were observed in the i-IFG group relative to NGT and i-IGT groups. Women with i-IGT had a lower early glucose absorption than did men with i-IGT (P = 0.041); however, this difference did not persist when differences in body size were taken into account (P > 0.28). Faster glucose absorption was related to higher fasting (P = 0.001) and lower 2-h (P = 0.001) glucose levels and to greater height and fat-free mass (P < 0.001). All OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, but only one of three measures of β-cell function, reflected the differences for these parameters between those with normal and impaired glucose regulation as measured by gold-standard tests. CONCLUSIONS Glucose absorption patterns during an OGTT are significantly related to plasma glucose levels and body size, which should be taken into account when estimating β-cell function from OGTTs in epidemiological studies. PMID:24062321

  10. Screening for dysglycaemia in patients with coronary artery disease as reflected by fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, and HbA1c: a report from EUROASPIRE IV--a survey from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Gyberg, Viveca; De Bacquer, Dirk; Kotseva, Kornelia; De Backer, Guy; Schnell, Oliver; Sundvall, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wood, David; Rydén, Lars

    2015-05-14

    Three methods are used to identify dysglycaemia: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load plasma glucose (2hPG) from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The aim was to describe the yield and concordance of FPG, HbA1c, and 2hPG alone, or in combination, to identify dysglycaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. In EUROASPIRE IV, a cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18-80 years with coronary artery disease in 24 European countries, 4004 patients with no reported history of diabetes had FPG, 2hPG, and HbA1c measured. All participants were divided into different glycaemic categories according to the ADA and WHO criteria for dysglycaemia. Using all screening tests together, 1158 (29%) had undetected diabetes. Out of them, the proportion identified by FPG was 75%, by 2hPG 40%, by HbA1c 17%, by FPG + HbA1c 81%, and by OGTT (=FPG + 2hPG) 96%. Only 7% were detected by all three methods FPG, 2hPG, and HbA1c. The ADA criteria (FPG + HbA1c) identified 90% of the population as having dysglycaemia compared with 73% with the WHO criteria (OGTT = FPG + 2hPG). Screening according to the ADA criteria for FPG + HbA1c identified 2643 (66%) as having a 'high risk for diabetes', while the WHO criteria for FPG + 2hPG identified 1829 patients (46%). In patients with established coronary artery disease, the OGTT identifies the largest number of patients with previously undiagnosed diabetes and should be the preferred test when assessing the glycaemic state of such patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The Leu7Pro polymorphism of preproNPY is associated with decreased insulin secretion, delayed ghrelin suppression, and increased cardiovascular responsiveness to norepinephrine during oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Ulriikka; Kuusela, Tom; Jartti, Tuomas; Pesonen, Ullamari; Koulu, Markku; Vahlberg, Tero; Kallio, Jaana

    2005-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a role in angiogenesis, cardiovascular regulation, and hormone secretion. The leucine7 to proline7 (Leu7Pro) polymorphism of preproNPY is associated with vascular diseases and has an impact on hormone levels in healthy subjects. The current study investigated the role of the Leu7Pro polymorphism in metabolic and cardiovascular autonomic regulation. A 5-h oral glucose tolerance test was performed on 27 healthy volunteers representing two preproNPY genotypes (Leu7/Pro7 and Leu7/Leu7) matched for age, sex, body mass index and physical activity. Simultaneously we performed cardiovascular autonomic function tests and plasma measurements of sympathetic transmitters, glucose, insulin, and ghrelin. The subjects with Leu7/Pro7 genotype had decreased plasma NPY, norepinephrine (NE), and insulin concentrations and insulin to glucose ratios. The suppression of ghrelin concentrations after glucose ingestion was delayed in these subjects. They also had increased heart rate variability indices and baroreflex sensitivity. However, they displayed significant negative association of NE concentration with variability of low-frequency R-R-intervals and with baroreflex sensitivity. The Leu7Pro polymorphism of preproNPY is related to decreased level of basal sympathetic activity, decreased insulin secretion, and delayed ghrelin suppression during oral glucose tolerance test. The increased responsiveness of autonomic functions to NE associated with the polymorphism may be connected to increased cardiovascular vulnerability.

  12. Amino Acid and Biogenic Amine Profile Deviations in an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Comparison between Healthy and Hyperlipidaemia Individuals Based on Targeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Gu, Wenbo; Ma, Xuan; Liu, Yuxin; Jiang, Lidan; Feng, Rennan; Liu, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is characterized by a disturbance in lipid metabolism and is a primary risk factor for the development of insulin resistance (IR) and a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the changes in postprandial amino acid and biogenic amine profiles provoked by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in HLP patients using targeted metabolomics. We used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze the serum amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of 35 control and 35 HLP subjects during an OGTT. The amino acid and biogenic amine profiles from 30 HLP subjects were detected as independent samples to validate the changes in the metabolites. There were differences in the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles between the HLP individuals and the healthy controls at baseline and after the OGTT. The per cent changes of 13 metabolites from fasting to the 2 h samples during the OGTT in the HLP patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls. The lipid parameters were associated with the changes in valine, isoleucine, creatine, creatinine, dimethylglycine, asparagine, serine, and tyrosine (all p < 0.05) during the OGTT in the HLP group. The postprandial changes in isoleucine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during the OGTT were positively associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; all p < 0.05) in the HLP group. Elevated oxidative stress and disordered energy metabolism during OGTTs are important characteristics of metabolic perturbations in HLP. Our findings offer new insights into the complex physiological regulation of metabolism during the OGTT in HLP. PMID:27338465

  13. Screening of gestational diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy by oral glucose tolerance test and glycosylated fibronectin: study protocol for an international, prospective, multicentre cohort trial

    PubMed Central

    Huhn, E A; Fischer, T; Göbl, C S; Todesco Bernasconi, M; Kreft, M; Kunze, M; Schoetzau, A; Dölzlmüller, E; Eppel, W; Husslein, P; Ochsenbein-Koelble, N; Zimmermann, R; Bäz, E; Prömpeler, H; Bruder, E; Hahn, S; Hoesli, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is of increasing importance; new diagnostic approaches for the assessment of GDM in early pregnancy were recently suggested. We evaluate the diagnostic power of an ‘early’ oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 75 g and glycosylated fibronectin (glyFn) for GDM screening in a normal cohort. Methods and analysis In a prospective cohort study, 748 singleton pregnancies are recruited in 6 centres in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. Women are screened for pre-existing diabetes mellitus and GDM by an ‘early’ OGTT 75 g and/or the new biomarker, glyFn, at 12–15 weeks of gestation. Different screening strategies are compared to evaluate the impact on detection of GDM by an OGTT 75 g at 24–28 weeks of gestation as recommended by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). A new screening algorithm is created by using multivariable risk estimation based on ‘early’ OGTT 75 g and/or glyFn results, incorporating maternal risk factors. Recruitment began in May 2014. Ethics and dissemination This study received ethical approval from the ethics committees in Basel, Zurich, Vienna, Salzburg and Freiburg. It was registered under http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02035059) on 12 January 2014. Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02035059. PMID:27733413

  14. Glucose tolerance testing in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Uhde, T W; Vittone, B J; Post, R M

    1984-11-01

    Seven of nine patients with panic disorder given a standard glucose tolerance test developed symptomatic hypoglycemia but not panic attacks. These findings suggest that hypoglycemia is an unlikely cause of "spontaneous" panic attacks in this population.

  15. Glucose tolerance and insulin response to glucose load in body builders.

    PubMed

    Szczypaczewska, M; Nazar, K; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H

    1989-02-01

    To find out to what extent body composition affects glucose tolerance, blood glucose (BG) and insulin (IRI) responses to a 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were compared in 10 male body builders, 11 untrained lean control subjects, and 11 mildly obese men, all of similar age (19-35 years). In comparison with the remaining two groups, the body builders had the lowest percentage of fat, although their lean body mass (LBM) in absolute terms did not differ from that in obese subjects. Both BG and IRI concentrations during the OGTT were the lowest in body builders, medium in controls, and the highest in obese men. The differences in glucose tolerance between the groups were also demonstrated by comparison of the subjects' BG levels during the OGTT with the respective mean BG values obtained in a reference group of 42 healthy nonobese men aged from 20 to 55 years. The data indicate that body builders show better glucose tolerance and improved insulin action in comparison with untrained, nonobese subjects of similar age and body weight. Lean body mass in absolute terms cannot, however, be considered as a sole determinant of the insulin action in the body since in mildly obese subjects glucose tolerance was considerably reduced in spite of the fact that their LBM was similar to that in body builders. Either muscle hypertrophy or reduced adiposity may account for the beneficial effects of body building on glucose metabolism.

  16. Degree of obesity and glucose allostasis are major effectors of glucose tolerance dynamics in obese youth.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Cali, Anna M; Dziura, James; Burgert, Tania S; Tamborlane, William V; Caprio, Sonia

    2007-07-01

    One of the signals for the beta-cell to maintain an adequate response to worsening insulin sensitivity is elevated ambient glycemia, namely the concept of "glucose allostasis." We examined whether glucose allostasis can be demonstrated using oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and the effects of the dynamics of beta-cell demand on longitudinal changes of glucose tolerance in obese youth. A cross-sectional analysis of 784 OGTTs of obese youth was used to demonstrate the concept of allostasis, and a longitudinal assessment of 181 subjects was used to examine the effects of changes in beta-cell demand and the degree of obesity on glucose tolerance. Glucose allostasis can be demonstrated using indexes derived from an OGTT. Increasing beta-cell demand and the degree of obesity at baseline were independently related to elevations in ambient glycemia over time. Baseline BMI Z score was a significant contributor to elevated glucose levels on the second OGTT, while the change in degree of obesity during follow-up was not. Increasing beta-cell demand related to worsening insulin sensitivity and the degree of obesity per se have independent roles in the development of elevated glucose levels over time. This implicates that peripheral insulin sensitization and/or beta-cell enhancement alongside a significant reduction in obesity may be needed to prevent the development of altered glucose metabolism in obese youth.

  17. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects.

  18. Risk factor screening to identify women requiring oral glucose tolerance testing to diagnose gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis and analysis of two pregnancy cohorts.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Diane; Simmonds, Mark; Bryant, Maria; Lawlor, Debbie A; Dunne, Fidelma; Tuffnell, Derek; Sheldon, Trevor A

    2017-01-01

    Easily identifiable risk factors including: obesity and ethnicity at high risk of diabetes are commonly used to indicate which women should be offered the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to diagnose gestational diabetes (GDM). Evidence regarding these risk factors is limited however. We conducted a systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis and individual participant data (IPD) analysis to evaluate the performance of risk factors in identifying women with GDM. We searched MEDLINE, Medline in Process, Embase, Maternity and Infant Care and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) up to August 2016 and conducted additional reference checking. We included observational, cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies reporting the performance characteristics of risk factors used to identify women at high risk of GDM. We had access to IPD from the Born in Bradford and Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy cohorts, all pregnant women in the two cohorts with data on risk factors and OGTT results were included. Twenty nine published studies with 211,698 women for the SR and a further 14,103 women from two birth cohorts (Born in Bradford and the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy study) for the IPD analysis were included. Six studies assessed the screening performance of guidelines; six examined combinations of risk factors; eight evaluated the number of risk factors and nine examined prediction models or scores. Meta-analysis using data from published studies suggests that irrespective of the method used, risk factors do not identify women with GDM well. Using IPD and combining risk factors to produce the highest sensitivities, results in low specificities (and so higher false positives). Strategies that use the risk factors of age (>25 or >30) and BMI (>25 or 30) perform as well as other strategies with additional risk factors included. Risk factor screening methods are poor predictors of which pregnant women will be diagnosed with GDM. A simple approach of

  19. Evaluation of two highly sensitive assays for serum IGF-1 and GH determination following oral glucose tolerance test in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    García de la Torre, Nuria; Durán, Alejandra; de Miguel, Paz; Angel Díaz, José; Hervás, Felipe; Puente, Montserrat; Charro, Aniceto

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate 2 highly sensitive assays for serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone (GH) determination following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy controls. Nineteen healthy adults underwent a standard 75g OGTT and GH and IGF-1 were measured. Serum GH and IGF-1 levels were assayed by a sensitive immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and a highly sensitive chemiluminescent immunometric assay (CLIA). The mean IGF-1 concentration was 153±65ng/ml measured by IRMA and 144±56ng/ml measured by CLIA. The median (interquartile range) basal GH concentrations by IRMAvs CLIA were 0.8 (0.5-3) μg/l vs 0.5 (0.1-2.4) μg/l. The median nadir GH measured by IRMA in these subjects was 0.4 (0.3-0.5) μg/l, and the mean nadir GH by CLIA was 0.08 (0.01-0.22) μg/I. When a ratio of basal IRMA/CLIA GH was calculated in each subject, the median ratio of basal IRMA/CLIA GH concentrations in subjects overall was 1.68. Similarly, the median ratio of nadir IRMA/CLIA GH values was 4.44. One of the subjects did not achieve GH suppression into the established normal range, with a GH nadir of 1.2 μg/l by IRMA and 1 μg/l by CLIA, overlapping with the traditional cut-off defining acromegaly when GH suppression was measured by IRMA. Highly sensitive chemiluminescent immunometric assays should be used to assess the GH/IGF-1 axis. In our opinion, there is no need for a lower GH suppression cut-off for diagnosing acromegaly. We found no significant gender-, BMI- or age-related differences in nadir GH levels and thus our results do not support different OGTT criteria for screening of acromegaly in men and women, or in younger and older subjects. Copyright © 2008 Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Improvements in glucose tolerance with Bikram Yoga in older obese adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Stacy D; Dhindsa, Mandeep; Cunningham, Emily; Tarumi, Takashi; Alkatan, Mohammed; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2013-10-01

    Bikram yoga is an exotic form of physical activity combining hatha yoga and thermal therapy that could positively impact metabolic health. Although this increasingly popular alternative exercise may be ideal for obese adults due to its low impact nature, few studies have elucidated the health benefits associated with it. As an initial step, we determined the effect of Bikram yoga on glucose tolerance. Fourteen young lean and 15 older obese subjects completed an 8-week Bikram yoga intervention in which classes were completed 3 times per week. Glucose tolerance was assessed using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The area under the glucose curve following the oral glucose tolerance test was significantly reduced as a result of the Bikram Yoga intervention in older obese (P < 0.05) but not in young lean subjects. We concluded that a short-term Bikram yoga intervention improved glucose tolerance in older obese, but not in young lean adults.

  1. Ceylon cinnamon does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Berntorp, Kerstin; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown that the intake of 6 g Cinnamomum cassia reduces postprandial glucose and that the intake of 3 g C. cassia reduces insulin response, without affecting postprandial glucose concentrations. Coumarin, which may damage the liver, is present in C. cassia, but not in Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of C. zeylanicum on postprandial concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glycaemic index (GI) and insulinaemic index (GII) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A total of ten subjects with IGT were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with placebo or C. zeylanicum capsules. Finger-prick capillary blood samples were taken for glucose measurements and venous blood for insulin measurements, before and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the start of the OGTT. The ingestion of 6 g C. zeylanicum had no significant effect on glucose level, insulin response, GI or GII. Ingestion of C. zeylanicum does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin levels in human subjects. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Europe has suggested the replacement of C. cassia by C. zeylanicum or the use of aqueous extracts of C. cassia to lower coumarin exposure. However, the positive effects seen with C. cassia in subjects with poor glycaemic control would then be lost.

  2. Pregnane X receptor agonists impair postprandial glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rysä, J; Buler, M; Savolainen, M J; Ruskoaho, H; Hakkola, J; Hukkanen, J

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a randomized, open, placebo-controlled crossover trial to investigate the effects of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonist rifampin on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 healthy volunteers. The subjects were administered 600 mg rifampin or placebo once daily for 7 days, and OGTT was performed on the eighth day. The mean incremental glucose and insulin areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(incr)) increased by 192% (P = 0.008) and 45% (P = 0.031), respectively. The fasting glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, were not affected. The glucose AUC(incr) during OGTT was significantly increased in rats after 4-day treatment with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), an agonist of the rat PXR. The hepatic level of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) mRNA was downregulated by PCN. In conclusion, both human and rat PXR agonists elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, suggesting a detrimental role of PXR activation on glucose tolerance.

  3. Metabolite Profiles During Oral Glucose Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P.; Florez, Jose C.; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify distinct biological pathways of glucose metabolism, we conducted a systematic evaluation of biochemical changes after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a community-based population. Metabolic profiling was performed on 377 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring cohort participants (mean age 57 years, 42% women, BMI 30 kg/m2) before and after OGTT. Changes in metabolite levels were evaluated with paired Student t tests, cluster-based analyses, and multivariable linear regression to examine differences associated with insulin resistance. Of 110 metabolites tested, 91 significantly changed with OGTT (P ≤ 0.0005 for all). Amino acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates decreased after OGTT, and glycolysis products increased, consistent with physiological insulin actions. Other pathways affected by OGTT included decreases in serotonin derivatives, urea cycle metabolites, and B vitamins. We also observed an increase in conjugated, and a decrease in unconjugated, bile acids. Changes in β-hydroxybutyrate, isoleucine, lactate, and pyridoxate were blunted in those with insulin resistance. Our findings demonstrate changes in 91 metabolites representing distinct biological pathways that are perturbed in response to an OGTT. We also identify metabolite responses that distinguish individuals with and without insulin resistance. These findings suggest that unique metabolic phenotypes can be unmasked by OGTT in the prediabetic state. PMID:23382451

  4. Effect of physical restraint on glucose tolerance in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Yoshioka, Naoya; Kanazawa, Kanpei; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Tadahiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    Physiologic stress has been demonstrated to impair glucose tolerance. Glucose tolerance tests were performed using six cynomolgus monkeys. Chair-restrained subjects elicited higher elevations of plasma glucose and cortisol compared with squeezing device-restrained subjects. The responses to a glucose challenge are altered by different restraint procedures.

  5. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 on blood pressure, heart rate, gastric emptying, mesenteric blood flow and glycaemic responses to oral glucose in older individuals with normal glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Trahair, Laurence G; Horowitz, Michael; Stevens, Julie E; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Standfield, Scott; Piscitelli, Diana; Rayner, Christopher K; Deane, Adam M; Jones, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    A postprandial fall in BP occurs frequently in older individuals and in patients with type 2 diabetes. The magnitude of this decrease in BP is related to the rate of gastric emptying (GE). Intravenous administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) attenuates the hypotensive response to intraduodenal glucose in healthy older individuals. We sought to determine the effects of exogenous GLP-1 on BP, GE, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) flow and glycaemic response to oral ingestion of glucose in healthy older individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes. Fourteen older volunteers (six men, eight women; age 72.1 ± 1.1 years) and ten patients with type 2 diabetes (six men, four women; age 68.7 ± 3.4 years; HbA1c 6.6 ± 0.2% [48.5 ± 2.0 mmol/mol]; nine with blood glucose managed with metformin, two with a sulfonylurea and one with a dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 inhibitor) received an i.v. infusion of GLP-1 (0.9 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or saline (154 mmol/l NaCl) for 150 min (t = -30 min to t = 120 min) in randomised order. At t = 0 min, volunteers consumed a radiolabelled 75 g glucose drink. BP was assessed with an automated device, GE by scintigraphy and SMA flow by ultrasonography. Blood glucose and serum insulin were measured. GLP-1 attenuated the fall in diastolic BP after the glucose drink in older individuals (p < 0.05) and attenuated the fall in systolic and diastolic BP in patients with type 2 diabetes (p < 0.05). GE was faster in patients with type 2 diabetes than in healthy individuals (p < 0.05). In both groups, individuals had slower GE (p < 0.001), decreased SMA flow (p < 0.05) and a lower degree of glycaemia (p < 0.001) when receiving GLP-1. Intravenous GLP-1 attenuates the hypotensive response to orally administered glucose and decreases SMA flow, probably by slowing GE. GLP-1 and 'short-acting' GLP-1 agonists may be useful in the management of postprandial hypotension.

  6. A study of the interactive effects of oral contraceptive use and dietary fat intake on blood pressure, cardiovascular reactivity and glucose tolerance in normotensive women.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, N E; Barrington, V E; Branley, P; Louis, W J

    1998-03-01

    The interactive effects of combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and dietary fat intake on cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolic parameters were investigated in a comparative study of 16 normotensive OC users from Australia and 16 age- and weight-matched nonuser controls. The 6-week study's crossover design allocated women to consume either a high- or low-fat diet for 2-week periods. Analyses were performed at the end of each diet during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher in OC users than nonusers in both diet groups; however, responses of lipoprotein levels to the 2 diets did not differ between study groups. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased by 15% and 17%, respectively, in OC users, and by 14% each in non-OC users on the low-fat, compared to the high-fat, diet. Fasting plasma insulin levels, the insulin production response to administration of glucose, and resting clinic and night-time systolic blood pressures were all significantly reduced on the low-fat diet, but only in nonusers. In OC users, blood pressure responses to noradrenaline and maximal heart rate response to cold were significantly attenuated by the low-fat diet. During the low-fat diet, resting systolic, 24-hour systolic, and diastolic blood pressures and areas under the curve were significantly higher in the OC group. OC users also demonstrated a greater systolic sensitivity to administration of both noradrenaline and angiotensin II, and had a higher plasma renin activity, regardless of diet. Overall, these findings confirm that OCs can cause adverse effects on blood pressure, cardiovascular reactivity, and the insulin production response to glucose administration, and negate some of the beneficial effects of a low-fat diet.

  7. Biomarkers in Fasting Serum to Estimate Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, Allison B.; Gerwien, Robert W.; Kolberg, Janice A.; O’Shea, Sheila; Hamren, Sarah; Hein, Glenn P.; Xu, Xiaomei M.; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biomarkers for estimating reduced glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or impaired insulin secretion would be clinically useful, since these physiologic measures are important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 94 individuals, of whom 84 had 1 or more risk factors and 10 had no known risk factors for diabetes, underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. We measured 34 protein biomarkers associated with diabetes risk in 250-μL fasting serum samples. We applied multiple regression selection techniques to identify the most informative biomarkers and develop multivariate models to estimate glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. The ability of the glucose tolerance model to discriminate between diabetic individuals and those with impaired or normal glucose tolerance was evaluated by area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS Of the at-risk participants, 25 (30%) were found to have impaired glucose tolerance, and 11 (13%) diabetes. Using molecular counting technology, we assessed multiple biomarkers with high accuracy in small volume samples. Multivariate biomarker models derived from fasting samples correlated strongly with 2-h postload glucose tolerance (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001), composite insulin sensitivity index (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.0001), and insulin secretion (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the glucose tolerance model provided strong discrimination between diabetes vs impaired or normal glucose tolerance (AUC 0.89) and between diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance vs normal tolerance (AUC 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Biomarkers in fasting blood samples may be useful in estimating glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. PMID:21149503

  8. Nonsuppressed Glucagon After Glucose Challenge as a Potential Predictor for Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Róbert; Hakaste, Liisa H; Ahlqvist, Emma; Heni, Martin; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Stefan, Norbert; Gallwitz, Baptist; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Groop, Leif; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Glucagon levels are classically suppressed after glucose challenge. It is still not clear as to whether a lack of suppression contributes to hyperglycemia and thus to the development of diabetes. We investigated the association of postchallenge change in glucagon during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), hypothesizing that higher postchallenge glucagon levels are observed in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Glucagon levels were measured during OGTT in a total of 4,194 individuals without diabetes in three large European cohorts. Longitudinal changes in glucagon suppression were investigated in 50 participants undergoing a lifestyle intervention. Only 66-79% of participants showed suppression of glucagon at 120 min (fold change glucagon120/0 <1) during OGTT, whereas 21-34% presented with increasing glucagon levels (fold change glucagon120/0 ≥1). Participants with nonsuppressed glucagon120 had a lower risk of IGT in all cohorts (odds ratio 0.44-0.53, P < 0.01). They were also leaner and more insulin sensitive and had lower liver fat contents. In the longitudinal study, an increase of fold change glucagon120/0 was associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity (P = 0.003). We characterize nonsuppressed glucagon120 during the OGTT. Lower glucagon suppression after oral glucose administration is associated with a metabolically healthier phenotype, suggesting that it is not an adverse phenomenon. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Glucose tolerance in obese pregnant women determines newborn fat mass.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Emma M; Renault, Kristina M; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Nilas, Lisbet; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Hitz, Mette F; Michaelsen, Kim F; Cortes, Dina; Pryds, Ole

    2016-04-01

    Offspring of obese women have both short-term and long-term increased morbidities. We investigated the relationship between maternal 2-h plasma glucose level determined by an oral glucose tolerance test, degree of obesity, gestational weight gain and total fat, abdominal fat, and fat-free masses in the offspring of obese mothers. Obese mother-newborn dyads were recruited and 2-h plasma glucose levels were assessed during gestational weeks 27-30; neonatal body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning (DXA) within 48 h of birth. Among 264 term, healthy, and singleton infants eligible for inclusion, 248 were included. Of these, 205 (83%) obese mother-newborn dyads had a DXA scan and 2-h plasma glucose measurements. Linear regression analysis showed that birthweight z-scores correlated with 2-h plasma glucose levels (p = 0.002) after adjusting for gestational weight gain, maternal age, education, smoking, prepregnancy degree of obesity, parity, and birth length. Total (p = 0.012) and abdominal (p = 0.039) fat masses correlated with 2-h plasma glucose levels after adjusting for gestational weight gain, maternal age, education, smoking, prepregnancy degree of obesity, parity, gestational age, and newborn sex. There was no association between total (p = 0.88) and abdominal (p = 0.61) fat-free masses and 2-h plasma glucose. At 27-30 weeks of gestation, 2-h plasma glucose levels are related to total and abdominal newborn fat masses, but not to fat-free mass. Interventions targeting maternal postprandial glucose levels may induce more appropriate birthweight, thereby reducing the risk of subsequent morbidity. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  11. Maternal Arsenic Exposure and Impaired Glucose Tolerance during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Zota, Ami R.; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Hopkins, Marianne R.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Wright, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in general populations exposed to arsenic, but little is known about exposures during pregnancy and the association with gestational diabetes (GD). Objectives We studied 532 women living proximate to the Tar Creek Superfund Site to investigate whether arsenic exposure is associated with impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Methods Blood glucose was measured between 24 and 28 weeks gestation after a 1-hr oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) as part of routine prenatal care. Blood and hair were collected at delivery and analyzed for arsenic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with dynamic reaction cell. Results Arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 24.1 μg/L (ppb) (mean ± SD, 1.7 ±1.5) and 1.1 to 724.4 ng/g (ppb) (mean ± SD, 27.4 ± 61.6) in blood and hair, respectively. One-hour glucose levels ranged from 40 to 284 mg/dL (mean ± SD, 108.7 ± 29.5); impaired glucose tolerance was observed in 11.9% of women when using standard screening criterion (> 140 mg/dL). Adjusting for age, Native-American race, prepregnancy body mass index, Medicaid use, and marital status, women in the highest quartile of blood arsenic exposure had 2.8 higher odds of impaired GTT than women in the lowest quartile of exposure (95% confidence interval, 1.1–6.9) (p-trend = 0.008). Conclusions Among this population of pregnant women, arsenic exposure was associated with increased risk of impaired GTT at 24–28 weeks gestation and therefore may be associated with increased risk of GD. PMID:19654913

  12. Role of Regulatory Cells in Oral Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Marcin; O'Mahony, Liam

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is continuously exposed to great amounts of different antigens from both food and intestinal microbes. Immune tolerance to these antigens is very important for intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis. Oral tolerance is a specific type of peripheral tolerance induced by exposure to antigen via the oral route. Investigations on the role of intestinal immune system in preventing hypersensitivity reactions to innocuous dietary and microbial antigens have been intensively performed during the last 2 decades. In this review article, we discuss how food allergens are recognized by the intestinal immune system and draw attention to the role of regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells in the establishment of oral tolerance and tolerogenic features of intestinal dendritic cells. We also emphasize the potential role of tonsils in oral tolerance induction because of their anatomical location, cellular composition, and possible usage to develop novel ways of specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28102055

  13. Elevated 1-h post-challenge plasma glucose levels in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired glucose tolerance are associated with whole blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    Marini, Maria Adelaide; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Andreozzi, Francesco; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    It has been suggested that glucose levels ≥155 mg/dl at 1-h during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may predict development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events among adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT 1 h-high). Studies showed a link between increased blood viscosity and type 2 diabetes. However, whether blood viscosity is associated with dysglycemic conditions such as NGT 1 h-high, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is unsettled. 1723 non-diabetic adults underwent biochemical evaluation and OGTT. A validated formula based on hematocrit and total plasma proteins was employed to estimate whole blood viscosity. Subjects were categorized into NGT with 1 h glucose <155 mg/dL (NGT-1 h-low), NGT-1 h-high, IFG and/or IGT. Hematocrit and blood viscosity values appeared significantly higher in individuals with NGT 1 h-high, IFG and/or IGT as compared to NGT 1 h-low subjects. Blood viscosity was significantly correlated with age, waist circumference, blood pressure, HbA1c, fasting, 1- and 2-h post-challenge insulin levels, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, fibrinogen, white blood cell, and inversely correlated with high-density lipoprotein and insulin sensitivity. Of the four glycemic parameters, 1-h post-challenge glucose showed the strongest correlation with blood viscosity (β = 0.158, P < 0.0001) in a multivariate regression analysis model including several atherosclerosis risk factors. Our results demonstrate a positive relationship between blood viscosity and 1-h post-challenge plasma glucose. They also suggest that a subgroup of NGT individuals with 1-h post-challenge plasma >155 mg/dl have increased blood viscosity comparable to that observed in subjects with IFG and/or IGT.

  14. Calcium homeostasis during oral glucose load in healthy women.

    PubMed

    D'Erasmo, E; Pisani, D; Ragno, A; Raejntroph, N; Vecci, E; Acca, M

    1999-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that in healthy subjects during oral glucose tolerance test, serum calcium declines, while urinary calcium excretion increases, even if there is not a general agreement in this regard. The study was carried out in order to evaluate the effects of glucose oral load on calcium homeostasis in eight healthy adult women, also considering ionized calcium, plasma insulin and parathyroid hormone changes. The results showed a decline of total and ionized serum calcium (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively; maximum of the decrease at time 120'), in parallel with the increase of urinary calcium/ creatinine ratio (p < 0.05). Serum glucose and insulin increase (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0005 respectively; maximum value at time 60'), while the parathyroid hormone level decreases (maximum decline at time 120', p < 0.01). No changes were observed in fasting control subjects for all parameters considered. The changes of these parameters with time suggest that the effects of glucose oral load on calcium metabolism in healthy adult women may be the consequence of parathyroid hormone suppression induced by acute hyperglycemia/hyperinsulinemia. The results confirm in vivo the PTH behaviour in vitro, on cultured bovine parathyroid cells, with high glucose concentration.

  15. Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men Treated with St. John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Nielsen, Lene Buch-Krogh; Højlund, Kurt; Brøsen, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions: A: baseline; B: after 21 days of treatment with St. John's wort; and C: at least 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was ingested. Plasma glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide levels were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test and used for estimation of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) as well as indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We found that treatment with St. John's wort increased total and incremental glucose AUC and 2-hr plasma glucose levels. Surprisingly, this effect was sustained and even further increased 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was taken. No effect on indices of insulin sensitivity was seen, but indices of insulin secretion were reduced even after adjustment for insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study indicates that long-term treatment with St. John's wort may impair glucose tolerance by reducing insulin secretion in young, healthy men. The unregulated use of this over-the-counter drug might be a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

  16. Subscapular skinfold thickness distinguishes between transient and persistent impaired glucose tolerance: Study on Lifestyle-Intervention and Impaired Glucose Tolerance Maastricht (SLIM).

    PubMed

    Mensink, M; Feskens, E J M; Kruijshoop, M; de Bruin, T W A; Saris, W H M; Blaak, E E

    2003-07-01

    To assess whether adding anthropometric measurements to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) can help to distinguish between transient and persistent impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). From the SLIM project (Study on Lifestyle-Intervention and IGT Maastricht), a study designed to evaluate whether diet and physical activity intervention can improve glucose tolerance in subjects at risk for diabetes, 108 subjects with IGT underwent a repeated OGTT 2-4 months after the initial OGTT. Following the second test, subjects were classified as transient IGT, or persistent IGT. Anthropometric measurements, including body mass index, waist and hip circumference, sagittal and transverse abdominal diameters and skinfold thickness measurements, were done during the second OGTT. Persistent IGT was diagnosed in 47 subjects (44%), transient IGT in 40 (37%), impaired fasting glucose in eight subjects (7%), and diabetes in 13 cases (12%). Two-hour blood glucose levels at the initial OGTT and subscapular skinfold thickness were significantly higher in subjects with persistent IGT (2-h blood glucose 9.8+/-0.1 mmol/l vs. 10.2+/-0.1 mmol/l for transient IGT and persistent IGT, respectively; subscapular skinfold thickness 25.4+/-1.4 mm vs. 29.8+/-1.2 mm for transient IGT and persistent IGT, respectively). After adjustment for age, sex and family history of diabetes mellitus, logistic regression indicated that 2-h blood glucose level during the initial OGTT represented the strongest predictor of persistent IGT (P<0.02), followed by subscapular skinfold thickness (P<0.05). After adjustment for 2-h blood glucose levels during the first OGTT, subscapular skinfold thickness remained significantly associated with persistent IGT (odds ratio 1.84; P<0.05). In addition to the 2-h blood glucose level, subscapular skinfold thickness was the best predictor of persistent IGT, suggesting that adding simple anthropometric measures to oral glucose tolerance testing may improve the distinction between

  17. Effects of chronic caffeine administration on blood glucose levels and on glucose tolerance in healthy and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Z; Trujillo, X; Huerta, M; Trujillo-Hernández, B; Ríos-Silva, M; Onetti, C; Ortiz-Mesina, M; Sánchez-Pastor, E

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the effect of chronic caffeine use on risk reduction and prognosis of diabetes mellitus. In this 60-day study, five groups of 11 healthy male Wistar rats were selected to receive one of four doses (37.5, 56.2, 75.0 or 93.0 mg/kg per day) of caffeine orally or no caffeine (control). The effect of caffeine on glycaemia and glucose tolerance was evaluated. After 15 days, each group was treated with 60 mg/kg of streptozotocine to induce diabetes mellitus, and glycaemia and glucose tolerance were assessed for a further 45 days. In nondiabetic rats, caffeine had no effect on blood glucose. Compared with controls, the fasting blood glucose levels declined significantly in two caffeine-treated groups (93.0 mg/kg per day and 56.2 mg/kg per day) during the first 15 days following diabetes induction. Glucose tolerance was significantly improved 120 min after glucose loading in all caffeine-treated groups. The mean ± SE half-maximal effective concentration of caffeine was 35.79 ± 2.44 mg/dl. Blood glucose levels decreased, and glucose tolerance improved, in diabetic rats administered increasing doses of caffeine.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of gestational diabetes: An in silico investigation into the effects of pre-analytical processing on the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Erin; Lunt, Helen; Docherty, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Delayed separation of red cells from plasma causes pre analytical glucose loss, which in turn results in an under-diagnosis of GDM (gestational diabetes) based on the OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test). In silico investigations may help laboratory decision making, when exploring pragmatic improvements to sample processing. Late pregnancy 0, 1 and 2h 75g OGTT values were obtained from two distinct populations of pregnant women: 1. Values derived from the HAPO (Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome) Study and 2. New Zealand women identified as at higher risk of GDM by their caregivers, undergoing OGTT during routine antenatal care. In both populations studied, in silico modelling focussed on the effects of pre-analytical delays in plasma separation, when using fluoride collection tubes. Using a model that 'batched' samples from the three OGTT collection times, diagnostic sensitivity was estimated as follows: 66.1% for HAPO research population and 48.4% for the 1305 women receiving routine antenatal care. If samples were not batched, but processed shortly after each blood sample was collected, then sensitivity increased to 81%. Exploration of a range of clinical and laboratory scenarios using in silico modelling, showed that delaying the processing of pregnancy OGTT samples, using batched sample collection into fluoride tubes, causes unacceptable loss of GDM diagnostic sensitivity across two distinct population groups. This modelling approach will hopefully provide information that helps with final decision making around improved laboratory processing techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Infants and Young Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yaling; Norris, Andrew W; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xingshen; Uc, Aliye; Moran, Antoinette; Engelhardt, John F; Ode, Katie Larson

    2016-10-15

    In cystic fibrosis, abnormal glucose tolerance is associated with decreased lung function and worsened outcomes. Translational evidence indicates that abnormal glucose tolerance may begin in early life. To determine whether very young children with cystic fibrosis have increased abnormal glucose tolerance prevalence compared with control subjects. The secondary objective was to compare area under the curve for glucose and insulin in children with cystic fibrosis with control subjects. This is a prospective multicenter study in children ages 3 months to 5 years with and without cystic fibrosis. Oral glucose tolerance testing with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide was sampled at 0, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Twenty-three children with cystic fibrosis and nine control subjects had complete data. All control subjects had normal glucose tolerance. Nine of 23 subjects with cystic fibrosis had abnormal glucose tolerance (39%; P = 0.03). Of those, two met criteria for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, two indeterminate glycemia, and six impaired glucose tolerance. Children with cystic fibrosis failed to exhibit the normal increase in area under the curve insulin with age observed in control subjects (P < 0.01), despite increased area under the curve glucose (P = 0.02). Abnormal glucose tolerance is notably prevalent among young children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis lack the normal increase in insulin secretion that occurs in early childhood despite increased glucose. These findings demonstrate that glycemic abnormalities begin very early in cystic fibrosis, possibly because of insufficient insulin secretion.

  20. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  1. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  2. Altered glucose tolerance in women with deliberate self-harm.

    PubMed

    Westling, Sofie; Ahrén, Bo; Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Träskman-Bendz, Lil

    2009-07-01

    Disturbances in glucose metabolism are of importance for violent behaviour in men, but studies in women are lacking. We used the 5h-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in this study of 17 female psychiatric patients, selected for violent behaviour directed against themselves (deliberate self-harm) and 17 healthy controls matched for age and BMI. Following OGTT, patients had higher glucose levels at 30 min (p=0.007) and increased glucagon area under the curve (p=0.011). Since a co-morbid eating disorder might affect results, we as a post-hoc analysis subgrouped the patients and found that the increased glucagon levels only were present in patients with an eating disorder. In contrast, those without an eating disorder showed a significantly lower p-glucose nadir (p=0.015) and unaltered glucagon levels compared to controls. There were no significant differences in insulin and C-peptide levels between patients and controls. We conclude that deliberate self-harm in women may be associated with alterations in carbohydrate metabolism in certain groups. Eating disorder is a confounding factor.

  3. Oxytocin Improves β-Cell Responsivity and Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Klement, Johanna; Ott, Volker; Rapp, Kristina; Brede, Swantje; Piccinini, Francesca; Cobelli, Claudio; Lehnert, Hendrik; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    In addition to its pivotal role in psychosocial behavior, the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin contributes to metabolic control by suppressing eating behavior. Its involvement in glucose homeostasis is less clear, although pilot experiments suggest that oxytocin improves glucose homeostasis. We assessed the effect of intranasal oxytocin (24 IU) administered to 29 healthy, fasted male subjects on glucose homeostasis measured by means of an oral glucose tolerance test. Parameters of glucose metabolism were analyzed according to the oral minimal model. Oxytocin attenuated the peak excursion of plasma glucose and augmented the early increases in insulin and C-peptide concentrations in response to the glucose challenge, while slightly blunting insulin and C-peptide peaks. Oral minimal model analyses revealed that oxytocin compared with placebo induced a pronounced increase in β-cell responsivity (PHItotal) that was largely due to an enhanced dynamic response (PHId), and a more than twofold improvement in glucose tolerance (disposition index). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, glucagon, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were not or were only marginally affected. These results indicate that oxytocin plays a significant role in the acute regulation of glucose metabolism in healthy humans and render the oxytocin system a potential target of antidiabetic treatment. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Glucose tolerance in depressed inpatients, under treatment with mirtazapine and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hennings, J M; Ising, M; Grautoff, S; Himmerich, H; Pollmächer, T; Schaaf, L

    2010-02-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes have been associated with depression, and antidepressant treatment is assumed to improve impaired glucose tolerance. However, antidepressant treatment is also considered as a risk factor for the development of diabetes. Reports about glucose tolerance under antidepressant treatment frequently lack appropriate control groups. We conducted the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 10 healthy controls selected from an epidemiological sample with a negative lifetime history of mental Axis I disorder. Controls were carefully matched to a sample of inpatients with major depression that participated in an OGTT before and after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. All participants underwent a standard OGTT protocol. In patients, a second (after 2 weeks) and a third (after 4-6 weeks) OGTT was performed under treatment with mirtazapine. Compared to healthy controls, we observed significantly impaired glucose tolerance in acutely depressed patients. Effect size calculation indicated a moderate to large effects on glucose and insulin concentrations in response to an OGTT. Although glucose tolerance improved under mirtazapine treatment, insulin sensitivity was still impaired and remained significantly lower in patients compared to controls.

  5. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, P; Pacifico, L; Chiesa, C; Valerio, G; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Maffeis, C; Morandi, A; Invitti, C; Licenziati, M R; Loche, S; Tornese, G; Franco, F; Manco, M; Baroni, M G

    2017-04-01

    To investigate in a large sample of overweight/obese (OW/OB) children and adolescents the prevalence of prediabetic phenotypes such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and to assess their association with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hepatic steatosis (HS). Population data were obtained from the CARdiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents in ITALY study. Between 2003 and 2013, 3088 youths (972 children and 2116 adolescents) received oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and were included in the study. In 798 individuals, abdominal ultrasound for identification of HS was available. The prevalence of IFG (3.2 vs. 3.3%) and IGT (4.6 vs. 5.0%) was similar between children and adolescents. Children with isolated IGT had a 2-11 fold increased risk of high LDL-C, non-HDL-C, Tg/HDL-C ratio, and low insulin sensitivity, when compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). No significant association of IFG with any CMR factor was found in children. Among adolescents, IGT subjects, and to a lesser extent those with IFG, showed a worse CMR profile compared to NGT subgroup. In the overall sample, IGT phenotype showed a twofold increased risk of HS compared to NGT subgroup. Our study shows an unexpected similar prevalence of IFG and IGT between children and adolescents with overweight/obesity. The IGT phenotype was associated with a worse CMR profile in both children and adolescents. Phenotyping prediabetes conditions by OGTT should be done as part of prediction and prevention of cardiometabolic diseases in OW/OB youth since early childhood.

  6. Effects of Posture and Meal Volume on Gastric Emptying, Intestinal Transit, Oral Glucose Tolerance, Blood Pressure and Gastrointestinal Symptoms After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Debreceni, Tamara L; Burgstad, Carly M; Wishart, Judith M; Bellon, Max; Rayner, Chris K; Wittert, Gary A; Horowitz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of posture and drink volume on gastric/pouch emptying (G/PE), intestinal transit, hormones, absorption, glycaemia, blood pressure and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms after gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB)). Ten RYGB subjects were studied on four occasions in randomized order (sitting vs. supine posture; 50 vs. 150 ml of labelled water mixed with 3 g 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-OMG) and 50 g glucose). G/PE, caecal arrival time (CAT), blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), peptide YY (PYY), 3-OMG, blood pressure, heart rate and GI symptoms were assessed over 240 min. Controls were ten volunteers with no medical condition or previous abdominal surgery, who were studied with the 150-ml drink in the sitting position. Compared to controls, PE (P < 0.001) and CAT (P < 0.001) were substantially more rapid in RYGB subjects. In RYGB, PE was more rapid in the sitting position (2.5 ± 0.7 vs. 16.6 ± 5.3 min, P = 0.02) and tends to be faster after 150 ml than the 50-ml drinks (9.5 ± 2.9 vs. 14.0 ± 3.5 min, P = 0.16). The sitting position and larger volume drinks were associated with greater releases of insulin, GLP-1 and PYY, as well as more hypotension (P < 0.01), tachycardia (P < 0.01) and postprandial symptoms (P < 0.001). Pouch emptying, blood pressure and GI symptoms after RYGB are dependent on both posture and meal volume.

  7. Chronic renin inhibition with aliskiren improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle glucose transport activity in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Marchionne, Elizabeth M.; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie K.; Prasonnarong, Mujalin

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with whole body and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Moreover, this obesity-associated insulin resistance is reduced by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers. However, it is currently unknown whether specific inhibition of renin itself, the rate-limiting step in RAS functionality, improves insulin action in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Therefore, the present study assessed the effect of chronic, selective renin inhibition using aliskiren on glucose tolerance, whole body insulin sensitivity, and insulin action on the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. Obese Zucker rats were treated for 21 days with either vehicle or aliskiren (50 mg/kg body wt ip). Renin inhibition was associated with a significant lowering (10%, P < 0.05) of resting systolic blood pressure and induced reductions in fasting plasma glucose (11%) and free fatty acids (46%) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (13%). Glucose tolerance (glucose area under the curve) and whole body insulin sensitivity (inverse of the glucose-insulin index) during an oral glucose tolerance test were improved by 15% and 16%, respectively, following chronic renin inhibition. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in isolated soleus muscle of renin inhibitor-treated animals was increased by 36% and was associated with a 2.2-fold greater Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that chronic selective inhibition of renin activity leads to improvements in glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity in the insulin-resistant obese Zucker rat. Importantly, chronic renin inhibition is associated with upregulation of insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport, and it may involve improved Akt signaling. These data support the strategy

  8. Chronic renin inhibition with aliskiren improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle glucose transport activity in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Marchionne, Elizabeth M; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie K; Prasonnarong, Mujalin; Henriksen, Erik J

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with whole body and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Moreover, this obesity-associated insulin resistance is reduced by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers. However, it is currently unknown whether specific inhibition of renin itself, the rate-limiting step in RAS functionality, improves insulin action in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Therefore, the present study assessed the effect of chronic, selective renin inhibition using aliskiren on glucose tolerance, whole body insulin sensitivity, and insulin action on the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. Obese Zucker rats were treated for 21 days with either vehicle or aliskiren (50 mg/kg body wt ip). Renin inhibition was associated with a significant lowering (10%, P < 0.05) of resting systolic blood pressure and induced reductions in fasting plasma glucose (11%) and free fatty acids (46%) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (13%). Glucose tolerance (glucose area under the curve) and whole body insulin sensitivity (inverse of the glucose-insulin index) during an oral glucose tolerance test were improved by 15% and 16%, respectively, following chronic renin inhibition. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in isolated soleus muscle of renin inhibitor-treated animals was increased by 36% and was associated with a 2.2-fold greater Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that chronic selective inhibition of renin activity leads to improvements in glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity in the insulin-resistant obese Zucker rat. Importantly, chronic renin inhibition is associated with upregulation of insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport, and it may involve improved Akt signaling. These data support the

  9. Oral nitrate therapy does not affect glucose metabolism in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Duffy, Stephen J; Formosa, Melissa F; Ahimastos, Anna A; Thompson, Bruce R; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2009-11-01

    1. Previously, we demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) may be an important mediator of peripheral glucose disposal. The aim of the present study was to determine whether acute oral nitrate therapy improves glucose metabolism in healthy individuals. 2. Healthy men (n = 10), aged between 19 and 46 years, participated in a randomized cross-over placebo-controlled study. During Visit 1, participants received a dose-graded intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside (SNP; titrated from a dose of 0.5 microg/kg per min to a maximum of 2 microg/kg per min and delivered at a rate of 2 mL/min over 30 min). On Visits 2, 3 and 4, participants received oral extended-release isosorbide mononitrate (120 mg), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (160 mg) and placebo in a randomized Latin square design (one treatment per visit). The main outcome measures were plasma glucose and insulin levels and glucose tolerance determined by an oral glucose tolerance test following the SNP infusion and 3 h after nitrate/placebo administration. Exhaled NO, cGMP and pulmonary blood flow were also measured for 3 h after administration of nitrate/placebo and after SNP infusion. 3. None of the nitrate interventions influenced measures of glucose metabolism. Following SNP infusion, there was no change in plasma glucose (P = 0.42) or insulin (P = 0.25) levels, and the response to a glucose load did not different from baseline (P = 0.46). Similarly, neither of the oral nitrates altered plasma glucose (P = 0.24) or insulin levels (P = 0.90) or glucose tolerance (P = 0.56) compared with placebo. 4. In conclusion, these results indicate that acute oral nitrate therapy does not influence glucose metabolism. Studies using NO donors in a chronic setting are required to clarify the role of NO in mediating peripheral glucose uptake.

  10. U. S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Registry: Army Aviators with Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus (DM), use of oral hypoglycemic agents, or use of insulin for the period 1988 to 1992. The paper reviewed the...incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Army aviators. The study tabulated the incidence and age-specific annual rates of diabetes mellitus and

  11. Estimating risk factors and perinatal outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Baker, Arthur M; Haeri, Sina

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to identify potentially modifiable risk factors and outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a contemporary American teen population. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of all teenage deliveries (≤18 years old) at one institution over a 4-year period with documented oral glucose tolerance testing. All cases of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were identified using the Carpenter and Coustan diagnostic criteria and compared with teenage mothers with normal glucose tolerance testing. Of the 670 included teen deliveries, 668 were either African American or Hispanic/Latino; 31 (5%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (n = 5) or impaired glucose tolerance (n = 26). Higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index (34.3 ± 7.8 vs 30.3 ± 6.4, p = 0.001) and morbid obesity (body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m(2) , RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) were associated with gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. There was no association with weight gain above the Institute of Medicine recommended levels (RR 1.6, 95% CI 0.77-3.4). On postpregnancy follow up, three of the five (60%) teens with gestational diabetes and none of the 26 (0%) teens with impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Higher prepregnancy body mass index, especially morbid obesity, places the gravid teen at higher risk for development of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The potentially modifiable nature of these risk factors coupled with the emerging teen obesity epidemic underscores the need for increased public health focus on this problem. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Rosiglitazone improves glucose metabolism in obese adolescents with impaired glucose tolerance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cali, Anna M G; Pierpont, Bridget M; Taksali, Sara E; Allen, Karin; Shaw, Melissa M; Savoye, Mary; Caprio, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a prediabetic state fueling the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adolescents with marked obesity. Given the importance of insulin resistance, the poor β-cell compensation and the altered fat partitioning as underlying defects associated with this condition, it is crucial to determine the extent to which these underlying abnormalities can be reversed in obese adolescents. We tested, in a pilot study, whether rosiglitazone (ROSI) restores normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in obese adolescents with IGT by improving insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. In a small randomized, double-blind, placebo (PLA)-controlled study, lasting 4 months, 21 obese adolescents with IGT received either ROSI (8 mg daily) (n = 12, 5M/7F, BMI z-score 2.44 ± 0.11) or PLA (n = 9, 4M/5F, BMI z-score 2.41 ± 0.09). Before and after treatment, all subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, magnetic resonance imaging, and (1)H NMR assessment. After ROSI treatment, 58% of the subjects converted to NGT compared to 44% in the PLA group (P = 0.528). Restoration of NGT was associated with a significant increase in insulin sensitivity (P < 0.04) and a doubling in the disposition index (DI) (P < 0.04), whereas in the PLA group, these changes were not significant. The short-term use of ROSI appears to be safe in obese adolescents with IGT. ROSI restores NGT by increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, two principal pathophysiological abnormalities of IGT.

  13. Insulin Response to Oral Stimuli and Glucose Effectiveness Increased in Neuroglycopenia Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Li, Ping; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is a rare complication following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery for weight management. This study evaluates insulin secretion and action in response to oral and intravenous stimuli in persons with and without neuroglycopenia following RYGB. Design and Methods Cross-sectional cohort studies were performed at a single academic institution to assess insulin secretion and action during oral mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Results Insulin secretion was increased more following oral mixed meal than intravenous glucose in individuals with neuroglycopenia compared to the asymptomatic group. Reduced insulin clearance did not contribute to higher insulinemia. Glucose effectiveness at zero insulin, estimated during the intravenous glucose tolerance test, was also higher in those with neuroglycopenia. Insulin sensitivity did not differ between groups. Conclusions Increased beta cell response to oral stimuli and insulin-independent glucose disposal may both contribute to severe hypoglycemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. PMID:25755084

  14. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects.

  15. Differential associations of oral glucose tolerance test-derived measures of insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function with coronary artery calcification and microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Claire K; McNeill, Ann M; Girman, Cynthia J; Churchill, Timothy W; Terembula, Karen; Ferguson, Jane F; Shah, Rachana; Mehta, Nehal N; Qasim, Atif N; Rickels, Michael R; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We evaluated relationships of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT)-derived measures of insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function with indices of diabetes complications in a cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes who are free of overt cardiovascular or renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A subset of participants from the Penn Diabetes Heart Study (n = 672; mean age 59 ± 8 years; 67% male; 60% Caucasian) underwent a standard 2-h, 75-g OGTT. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI), and β-cell function was estimated using the Insulinogenic Index. Multivariable modeling was used to analyze associations between quartiles of each index with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and microalbuminuria. RESULTS The Insulinogenic Index and Matsuda ISI had distinct associations with cardiometabolic risk factors. The top quartile of the Matsuda ISI had a negative association with CAC that remained significant after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (Tobit ratio -0.78 [95% CI -1.51 to -0.05]; P = 0.035), but the Insulinogenic Index was not associated with CAC. Conversely, the highest quartile of the Insulinogenic Index, but not the Matsuda ISI, was associated with lower odds of microalbuminuria (OR 0.52 [95% CI 0.30-0.91]; P = 0.022); however, this association was attenuated in models that included duration of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Lower β-cell function is associated with microalbuminuria, a microvascular complication, while impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with higher CAC, a predictor of macrovascular complications. Despite these pathophysiological insights, the Matsuda ISI and Insulinogenic Index are unlikely to be translated into clinical use in type 2 diabetes beyond established clinical variables, such as obesity or duration of diabetes.

  16. Vitamin D status and resistance exercise training independently affect glucose tolerance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Vanessa M; Fleet, James C; Zhou, Jing; Conley, Travis B; Peacock, Munro; IglayReger, Heidi B; DePalma, Glen; Campbell, Wayne W

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the influence of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations on oral glucose tolerance, body composition, and muscle strength in older, nondiabetic adults who performed resistance exercise training (RT) while consuming diets with either 0.9 or 1.2 g protein kg(-1) d(-1). We hypothesized that individuals with insufficient 25(OH)D and/or high PTH would have less improvement in glucose tolerance after 12 weeks of RT compared with individuals with sufficient 25(OH)D and lower PTH. Sixteen men and 19 women (aged 61 ± 8 years; range, 50-80 years; body mass index, 26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) performed RT 3 times/wk for 12 weeks, with oral glucose tolerance tests done at baseline and postintervention. Protein intake did not influence the responses described below. Plasma glucose area under the curve (P = .02) and 2-hour plasma glucose concentration (P = .03) were higher for vitamin D-insufficient subjects (25[OH]D <50 nmol/L, n = 7) vs vitamin D-sufficient subjects (25[OH]D ≥50 nmol/L, n = 28). These differences remained significant after adjustment for age and body mass index. Resistance exercise training reduced fat mass (mean ± SD, -6% ± 7%; P < .001) and increased lean body mass (2% ± 3%, P < .001) and whole-body muscle strength (32% ± 17%, P < .001) in these weight-stable subjects but did not affect 25(OH)D or PTH concentrations. Oral glucose tolerance improved after RT (-10% ± 16% in glucose area under the curve and -21% ± 40% in 2-hour glucose, P = .001), but baseline 25(OH)D and PTH did not influence these RT-induced changes. These findings indicate that vitamin D status and RT independently affect glucose tolerance, and a training-induced improvement in glucose tolerance does not offset the negative effect of insufficient vitamin D status in older, nondiabetic adults.

  17. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  18. Abnormal glucose tolerance and increased risk for cardiovascular disease in Japanese-Americans with normal fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Liao, D; Shofer, J B; Boyko, E J; McNeely, M J; Leonetti, D L; Kahn, S E; Fujimoto, W Y

    2001-01-01

    To compare the American Diabetes Association (ADA) fasting glucose and the World Health Organization (WHO) oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) criteria for diagnosing diabetes and detecting people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Study subjects were 596 Japanese-Americans. Fasting insulin, lipids, and C-peptide levels; systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BPs); BMI (kg/m2); and total and intra-abdominal body fat distribution by computed tomography (CT) were measured. Study subjects were categorized by ADA criteria as having normal fasting glucose (NFG), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and diabetic fasting glucose and by WHO criteria for a 75-g OGTT as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetic glucose tolerance (DGT). Of 503 patients with NFG, 176 had IGT and 20 had DGT These patients had worse CVD risk factors than those with NGT . The mean values for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively, and analysis of covariance P values, adjusted for age and sex, are as follows; intra-abdominal fat area by CT 69.7, 95.0, and 101.1 cm2 (P < 0.0001); total CT fat area 437.7, 523.3, and 489.8 cm2 (P < 0.0001); fasting triglycerides 1.40, 1.77, and 1.74 mmol/l (P = 0.002); fasting HDL cholesterol 1.56, 1.50, and 1.49 mmol/l (P = 0.02); C-peptide 0.80, 0.90, 0.95 nmol/l (P = 0.002); systolic BP 124.9, 132.4, and 136.9 mmHg (P = 0.0035); diastolic BP 74.8, 77.7, and 78.2 mmHg (P = 0.01). NFG patients who had IGT or DGT had more intra-abdominal fat and total adiposity; higher insulin, C-peptide, and triglyceride levels; lower HDL cholesterol levels; and higher BPs than those with NGT. Classification by fasting glucose misses many Japanese-Americans with abnormal glucose tolerance and less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles.

  19. Different levels of thyroid hormones between impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance: free T3 affects the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in opposite ways.

    PubMed

    Jing, Su; Xiaoying, Ding; Ying, Xu; Rui, Liu; Mingyu, Gu; Yuting, Chen; Yanhua, Yin; Yufan, Wang; Haiyan, Sun; Yongde, Peng

    2014-06-01

    There is an association between thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus. To investigate thyroid hormone levels in different glucose metabolic statuses, analyse relationships between thyroid hormone levels and different categories of prediabetes and metabolic parameters within a large euthyroid nondiabetic population. A total of 3328 subjects without diabetes or thyroid dysfunction were included in this cross-sectional study. Subjects were divided in to four groups [normal glucose tolerance (NGR), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and combined glucose intolerance (CGI)] according to the results of oral glucose tolerance test. Participants were then divided into four groups according to the quartile of free T3 (FT3) in their blood. Subjects with IFG had higher levels of FT3 and ratio of FT3 to FT4 (FT3/FT4), but lower level of free T4 (FT4) than subjects with IGT. FT3/FT4 was negatively associated with postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) [standardized β (β) = -0·087; P < 0·001]. The prevalence of IFG and CGI was increased with the level of FT3, while the prevalence of IGT was decreased with the level of FT3 (P for trend: <0·001, 0·003 and <0·001, respectively). FT3 was negatively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 0·409, 95% CI 0·179-0·935), whereas FT4 was positively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 1·296, 95% CI 1·004-1·673). Free thyroid hormone levels were different between subjects with IFG and IGT. FT3 affects the prevalence of IFG and IGT in opposite ways. The difference in thyroid hormone levels may play an important role in the different pathological mechanisms of IFG and IGT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Impaired glucose tolerance in midlife and longitudinal changes in brain function during aging.

    PubMed

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Beason-Held, Lori L; An, Yang; Kraut, Michael; Metter, Jeffrey; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; O'Brien, Richard; Resnick, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in midlife subsequently show regionally specific longitudinal changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) relative to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Sixty-four cognitively normal participants in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent serial (15)O-water positron emission tomography scans (age at first scan, 69.6 ± 7.5 years) and oral glucose tolerance tests 12 years earlier (age at first oral glucose tolerance test, 57.2 ± 11.1 years). Using voxel-based analysis, we compared changes in rCBF over an 8-year period between 15 participants with IGT in midlife and 49 with NGT. Significant differences were observed in longitudinal change in rCBF between the IGT and NGT groups. The predominant pattern was greater rCBF decline in the IGT group in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. Some brain regions in the frontal and temporal cortices also showed greater longitudinal increments in rCBF in the IGT group. Our findings suggest that IGT in midlife is associated with subsequent longitudinal changes in brain function during aging even in cognitively normal older individuals.

  1. Effect of acacia polyphenol on glucose homeostasis in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: A randomized multicenter feeding trial

    PubMed Central

    OGAWA, SOSUKE; MATSUMAE, TOMOYUKI; KATAOKA, TAKESHI; YAZAKI, YOSHIKAZU; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEYO

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vitro and animal studies, as well as clinical trials have indicated that plant-derived polyphenols exert beneficial effects on glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. This clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of acacia polyphenol (AP) on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in non-diabetic subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a total of 34 enrolled subjects. The subjects were randomly assigned to the AP-containing dietary supplement (AP supplement; in a daily dose of 250 mg as AP; n=17) or placebo (n=17) and the intervention was continued for 8 weeks. Prior to the start of the intervention (baseline) and after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention, plasma glucose and insulin were measured during a two-hour OGTT. Compared with the baseline, plasma glucose and insulin levels at 90 and/or 120 min, as well as the total area under the curve values during the OGTT (AUC0→2h) for glucose and insulin, were significantly reduced in the AP group, but not in the placebo group after intervention for 8 weeks. The decline from baseline in plasma glucose and insulin at 90 or 120 min of the OGTT for the AP group was significantly greater compared with that of the placebo group after 8 weeks of intervention. No AP supplement-related adverse side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the study period. The AP supplement may have the potential to improve glucose homeostasis in subjects with IGT. PMID:23837032

  2. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Richa; Hivert, Marie-France; Langenberg, Claudia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Pankow, James S; Vollenweider, Peter; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dupuis, Josée; Jackson, Anne U; Kao, W H Linda; Li, Man; Glazer, Nicole L; Manning, Alisa K; Luan, Jian’an; Stringham, Heather M; Prokopenko, Inga; Johnson, Toby; Grarup, Niels; Boesgaard, Trine W; Lecoeur, Cécile; Shrader, Peter; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Ingelsson, Erik; Couper, David J; Rice, Kenneth; Song, Kijoung; Andreasen, Camilla H; Dina, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Pattou, François; Taneera, Jalal; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rybin, Denis; Ardlie, Kristin; Sampson, Michael; Qi, Lu; van Hoek, Mandy; Weedon, Michael N; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Voight, Benjamin F; Grallert, Harald; Balkau, Beverley; Bergman, Richard N; Bielinski, Suzette J; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Buchanan, Thomas A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabriel J; Delplanque, Jerome; Doney, Alex; Egan, Josephine M; Erdos, Michael R; Firmann, Mathieu; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Hingorani, Aroon; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Kivimaki, Mika; Kovacs, Peter; Krohn, Knut; Kumari, Meena; Lauritzen, Torsten; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Mayor, Vladimir; McAteer, Jarred B; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Palmer, Colin N A; Pakyz, Ruth; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Pearson, Daniel; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scott, Laura J; Sharp, Stephen J; Sijbrands, Eric; Singleton, Andrew; Siscovick, David S; Smith, Nicholas L; Sparsø, Thomas; Swift, Amy J; Syddall, Holly; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Waeber, Gérard; Walley, Andrew; Waterworth, Dawn M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhao, Jing Hua; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H Erich; Wilson, James F; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hu, Frank B; Morris, Andrew D; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Nilsson, Peter; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Shuldiner, Alan R; Walker, Mark; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Williams, Gordon H; Nathan, David M; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Cooper, Cyrus; Marmot, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mooser, Vincent; Stumvoll, Michael; Loos, Ruth J F; Altshuler, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958–30,620). We identify variants at the GIPR locus associated with 2-h glucose level (rs10423928, β (s.e.m.) = 0.09 (0.01) mmol/l per A allele, P = 2.0 × 10−15). The GIPR A-allele carriers also showed decreased insulin secretion (n = 22,492; insulinogenic index, P = 1.0 × 10−17; ratio of insulin to glucose area under the curve, P = 1.3 × 10−16) and diminished incretin effect (n = 804; P = 4.3 × 10−4). We also identified variants at ADCY5 (rs2877716, P = 4.2 × 10−16), VPS13C (rs17271305, P = 4.1 × 10−8), GCKR (rs1260326, P = 7.1 × 10−11) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 4.2 × 10−10) associated with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09–1.15, P = 4.8 × 10−18). PMID:20081857

  3. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB.

  4. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  5. Glucose tolerance of 2- to 5-yr-old offspring of diabetic mothers.

    PubMed

    Buinauskiene, Jurate; Baliutaviciene, Dalia; Zalinkevicius, Rimas

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and some risk factors for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in 2- to 5-yr-old offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM). The glucose tolerance of 51 offspring born to women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes (type 1) and of 109 children of the control group was analyzed. Our results showed that the fasting glycemia of ODM was similar, when compared to the controls, but 2 h after the glucose loading the glycemia of ODM was significantly higher than that in the control group (5.47 +/- 1.79 mmol/L vs. 4.86 +/- 1.13 mmol/L). Normal glucose tolerance was found in 68.6% of ODM and 86.2% of controls; IGT was found in 17.6% of ODM and 4.6% of controls. Children with macrosomia at birth or overweight at 2-5 yr had IGT at 2-5 yr more often than children with normal weight at birth or normal weight at 2-5 yr. A significant, though relatively low, positive correlation was found between the duration of breastfeeding and fasting glycemia (r=0.241, p <0.01), and positive correlation was found between the duration of breastfeeding and glycemia 2 h after glucose loading (r=0.458, p=0.002) in the offspring of diabetic mothers. In conclusion, the average glycemia of ODM after glucose loading was higher than that in the control group. Macrosomia after birth, overweight, and obesity in childhood had a significant influence on the glucose tolerance of the ODM. The results of the oral glucose tolerance test correlated with the length of breastfeeding.

  6. Oral tolerance induction for human food allergy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Geunwoong; Lee, Jae Ho

    2012-04-01

    Food allergies are classified as IgE-mediated and non-IgE mediated type. The number of successful reports of immunotherapy, namely tolerance induction for food allergy (TIFA) are increasing, bringing hope for meaningful positive and radical treatment of food allergy. Therapeutic characteristics of the clinical course in TIFA for NFA are different from TIFA for IFA. Cytokines including IL-10, TGF-β and IFN-γ and regulatory cells such as Treg and Breg, are involved in immune tolerance. IFN-γ has been used for tolerance induction of food allergy as an immunomodulatory biologics. A definitive distinction between IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated food allergies is absolutely essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Original SOTI using IFN-γ is more effective then conventional SOTI without IFN-γ. Especially, IFN-γ is absolutely necessary for the tolerance induction of NFA. This review highlights and updates the advances in the conceptual immunological background and the clinical characteristics of oral tolerance induction for food allergy.

  7. Dietary trimethylamine N-oxide exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

    2014-10-01

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an oxidation product of trimethylamine (TMA) and is present in many aquatic foods. Here, we investigated the effects of TMAO on glucose tolerance in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the control, high fat (HF), and TMAO groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, and the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary TMAO increased fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and exacerbated the impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signal pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and glucose transport in liver. mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine MCP-1 increased significantly and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 greatly decreased in adipose tissue. Our results suggest that dietary TMAO exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance, obstructs the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, and causes adipose tissue inflammation in mice fed a high fat diet.

  8. Imparied glucose tolerance in long-term lithium-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Müller-Oerlinghausen, B; Passoth, P M; Poser, W; Pudel, V

    1979-01-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed twice in patients under long-term lithium treatment. Blood glucose and plasma insulin were determined. The oGTT results were evaluated by three criteria (Köbberling-Creutzfeldt, WHO, and Epidemiological Study Group of the European Diabetes Association) and were compared to two representative reference studies from normal populations. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance in the patients was three times higher than expected on the basis of the studies on normal populations. The variability of the oGTT curves between the first and second tests as well as the steepness of the time-course of the 'insulinogenic index' suggested mild disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism (mild diabetes) in some of the patients. It is considered unlikely that the impairment of glucose tolerance in the patients was a direct pharmacological effect of lithium salts. The possible role of age, sex, manic-depressive disease, additional medication, and particularly obesity in the effects of long-term lithium treatment on glucose tolerance is discussed. The authors suggest that the oGTT should be carried out periodically in long-term, lithium-treated patients over the age of 40 years in order to detect abnormalities in their carbohydrate metabolism.

  9. Cacao liquor procyanidin extract improves glucose tolerance by enhancing GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Okabe, Masaaki; Natsume, Midori; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance are associated with the increased risk of the metabolic syndrome and other severe health problems. The insulin-sensitive GLUT4 regulates glucose homoeostasis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. In this study, we investigated whether cacao liquor procyanidin (CLPr) extract, which contains epicatechin, catechin and other procyanidins, improves glucose tolerance by promoting GLUT4 translocation and enhances glucose uptake in muscle cells. Our results demonstrated that CLPr increased glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner and promoted GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane of L6 myotubes. Oral administration of a single dose of CLPr suppressed the hyperglycaemic response after carbohydrate ingestion, which was accompanied by enhanced GLUT4 translocation in ICR mice. These effects of CLPr were independent of α-glucosidase inhibition in the small intestine. CLPr also promoted GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle of C57BL/6 mice fed a CLPr-supplemented diet for 7 d. These results indicate that CLPr is a beneficial food material for improvement of glucose tolerance by promoting GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane of skeletal muscle.

  10. Distinguishing between persistent and transient impaired glucose tolerance using a prediction model.

    PubMed

    Bourn, D M; Williams, S M; Mann, J I

    1992-10-01

    Screening for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes was carried out in 777 people and those with high blood glucose levels completed three 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Blood lipid levels, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, body mass index, and blood pressure were also measured and family history of Type 2 diabetes recorded. Fifty people were identified with IGT and of these 21 were found to have persistent IGT and 29 transient IGT. A model including the variables body mass index, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, fasting triglycerides and family history of Type 2 diabetes was developed using the Speigelhalter-Knill-Jones weighting method to predict subjects with persistent IGT. This model could be useful in identifying people with persistent IGT and therefore eliminate the need for repeat OGTTs which are time consuming and expensive.

  11. Prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance and risk factors in urban and rural Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Norlaila; Kamarudin, Nor Azmi; Ismail, Ab Aziz; Khir, Amir Sharifuddin; Ismail, Ikram Shah; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Kadir, Khalid Abdul; Yaacob, Nor Azwany; Ali, Osman; Isa, Siti Harnida Md; Wan Bebakar, Wan Mohamad; wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon

    2011-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes among rural and urban Malaysians. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among 3,879 Malaysian adults (1,335 men and 2,544 women). All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The overall prevalence of prediabetes was 22.1% (30.2% in men and 69.8% in women). Isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were found in 3.4 and 16.1% of the study population, respectively, whereas 2.6% of the subjects had both IFG and IGT. Based on an OGTT, the prevalence of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes was 12.6% (31.0% in men and 69.0% in women). The prediabetic subjects also had an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. The large proportion of undiagnosed cases of prediabetes and diabetes reflects the lack of public awareness of the disease.

  12. Physical activity of relatively high intensity in mid-pregnancy predicts lower glucose tolerance levels.

    PubMed

    Medek, Helga; Halldorsson, Thorhallur; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Geirsson, Reynir T

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity (PA) is recommended as part of therapy for patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Whether such recommendations are also justified for pregnant women is less well established. We investigated the association between PA and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. A non-selective sample of 217 pregnant women was recruited at a routine 20 week ultrasound examination. Participants answered the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) about frequency, intensity and duration of daily physical activity in the past 7 days and underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks. A subset of 72 overweight/obese pregnant women wore a pedometer for 1 week with assessment of IPAQ score and pedometric correlations to this. Of the sample, 177 attended for OGTT; 51% were overweight or obese. The mean (SD) fasting glucose was 4.5 (0.4) mmol/L, and 12% had gestational diabetes mellitus. Only one-third engaged in vigorous PA. After adjustment for pre-pregnancy BMI, age and parity, those engaging in vigorous PA had significantly lower fasting glucose levels (by 0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.03-0.27) compared with those not vigorously active. This decrease was similar in both normal and overweight/obese women. There were fewer cases of gestational diabetes (p = 0.03) among the vigorously active women (3/56; 5%) than among those who were not active (19/121; 16%). No association with glucose tolerance was observed for physical activity of moderate intensity. Only vigorous physical activity appears beneficial with respect to maternal glucose tolerance, both among normal, overweight and obese women. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Natural history and physiological determinants of changes in glucose tolerance in a non-diabetic population: the RISC Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, E; Natali, A; Muscelli, E; Nilsson, P M; Golay, A; Laakso, M; Beck-Nielsen, H; Mari, A

    2011-06-01

    The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area. We analysed the data from a population-based cohort of 1,048 non-diabetic, normotensive men and women (aged 30-60 years) in whom insulin sensitivity was measured by the glucose clamp technique (M/I index; average glucose infusion rate/steady-state insulin concentration) and beta cell function was estimated by mathematical modelling of the oral glucose tolerance test at baseline and 3 years later. Seventy-seven per cent of the participants had normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 5% were glucose intolerant both at baseline and follow up; glucose tolerance worsened in 13% (progressors) and improved in 6% (regressors). The metabolic phenotype of the latter three groups was similar (higher prevalence of familial diabetes, older age, higher waist-to-hip ratio, higher fasting and 2 h plasma glucose, higher fasting and 2 h plasma insulin, lower insulin sensitivity and reduced beta cell glucose sensitivity with increased absolute insulin secretion). Adjusting for these factors in a logistic model, progression was predicted by insulin resistance (bottom M/I quartile, OR 2.52 [95% CI 1.51-4.21]) and beta cell glucose insensitivity (bottom quartile, OR 2.39 [95% CI 1.6-3.93]) independently of waist-to-hip ratio (OR 1.44 [95% CI 1.13-1.84] for one SD). At follow up, insulin sensitivity and beta cell glucose sensitivity were unchanged in the stable NGT and stable non-NGT groups, worsened in progressors and improved in regressors. Glucose tolerance deteriorates over time in young, healthy Europids. Progressors, regressors and glucose-intolerant participants share a common baseline phenotype. Insulin sensitivity and beta cell glucose sensitivity predict and track changes in glucose tolerance independently of sex, age and obesity.

  14. Radioactive Iodine Therapy and Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Roghaieh; Shafiei, Babak; Azizi, Fereidoun; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy is commonly used as an adjuvant therapy in follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and in the treatment of Graves’ disease (GD). The basis of this therapy is the accumulation of radioactive iodine by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) in the thyroid gland. Expression of NIS by extrathyroidal tissues such as islets of pancreas has been reported. Radioactive iodine uptake by pancreatic beta-cells can potentially damage these cells. In this study, we discuss the possible associations between radioactive iodine and glucose intolerance. Overall, radioactive iodine uptake by the pancreas may damage beta-cells and predispose patients to glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes, particularly in patients exposed to radioactive iodine therapy following total thyroidectomy. Further studies are needed to clarify and confirm this association. PMID:28670511

  15. A1C Is Associated With Intima-Media Thickness in Individuals With Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Thomas; Mai, Knut; Fischer-Rosinský, Antje; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Spranger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE One-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was recently proposed as a valuable marker to identify individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and increased intima-media thickness (IMT). However, central markers of glycemic control were not considered. The aim of this study was to identify which marker of glycemic control is most informative with respect to the variation of IMT in individuals with NGT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cardiovascular risk factors, glucose metabolism (OGTT), and IMT were determined in 1,219 nondiabetic individuals (851 women, 368 men; 558 with NGT). RESULTS One-hour glucose and A1C levels were significantly correlated to carotid IMT in individuals with NGT, whereas fasting and 2-h glucose levels were not informative. Only A1C was associated with IMT independent of other confounders, whereas 1-h glucose was not informative. Comparable results were found in the total cohort, including individuals with IFG and IGT. CONCLUSIONS A1C was the most informative glycemic marker with respect to IMT in individuals with NGT. PMID:19808917

  16. A1C is associated with intima-media thickness in individuals with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Thomas; Mai, Knut; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    One-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was recently proposed as a valuable marker to identify individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and increased intima-media thickness (IMT). However, central markers of glycemic control were not considered. The aim of this study was to identify which marker of glycemic control is most informative with respect to the variation of IMT in individuals with NGT. Cardiovascular risk factors, glucose metabolism (OGTT), and IMT were determined in 1,219 nondiabetic individuals (851 women, 368 men; 558 with NGT). One-hour glucose and A1C levels were significantly correlated to carotid IMT in individuals with NGT, whereas fasting and 2-h glucose levels were not informative. Only A1C was associated with IMT independent of other confounders, whereas 1-h glucose was not informative. Comparable results were found in the total cohort, including individuals with IFG and IGT. A1C was the most informative glycemic marker with respect to IMT in individuals with NGT.

  17. Genetic selection for resistance or susceptibility to oral tolerance to ovalbumin affects general mechanisms of tolerance induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamphorst, Alice O; da Silva, Maria F S; da Silva, Antônio C; Carvalho, Claudia R; Faria, Ana Maria C

    2004-12-01

    To study the genes involved in oral tolerance susceptibility, two strains of mice were genetically selected for susceptibility (TS) and resistance (TR) to oral tolerance to ovalbumin by bidirectional breeding. Herein we show that the genetic selection process is restricted neither to ovalbumin nor to oral tolerance. It affected oral tolerance to other proteins, such as casein, and tolerance induced the intravenous route.

  18. Effects of three day bed-rest on circulatory, metabolic and hormonal responses to oral glucose load in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Kubala, P.; Kaciuba-Uociako, H.; Nazar, K.; Titow-Stupnicka, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Endurance trained long distance runners and untrained individuals underwent three days of bed rest and oral glucose loading. Before and after bed rest, individuals were given glucose tolerance tests, and their heart rates, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and catecholamine interactions were measured. Results indicated that glucose tolerance is more affected by bed rest-induced deconditioning in untrained individuals than in trained individuals.

  19. Effects of three day bed-rest on circulatory, metabolic and hormonal responses to oral glucose load in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Kubala, P.; Kaciuba-Uociako, H.; Nazar, K.; Titow-Stupnicka, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Endurance trained long distance runners and untrained individuals underwent three days of bed rest and oral glucose loading. Before and after bed rest, individuals were given glucose tolerance tests, and their heart rates, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and catecholamine interactions were measured. Results indicated that glucose tolerance is more affected by bed rest-induced deconditioning in untrained individuals than in trained individuals.

  20. Mice with Deletion of Neuromedin B Receptor Exhibit Decreased Oral Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Release.

    PubMed

    Paula, G S M; Souza, L L; Bressane, N O S; Maravalhas, R; Wilieman, M; Bento-Bernardes, T; Silva, K R; Mendonca, L S; Oliveira, K J; Pazos-Moura, C C

    2016-12-01

    Neuromedin B (NB) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) are bombesin-like peptides, found in the gastrointestinal tube and pancreas, among other tissues. Consistent data proposed that GRP stimulates insulin secretion, acting directly in pancreatic cells or in the release of gastrointestinal hormones that are incretins. However, the role of NB remains unclear. We examined the glucose homeostasis in mice with deletion of NB receptor (NBR-KO). Female NBR-KO exhibited similar fasting basal glucose with lower insulinemia (48.4%) and lower homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (50.5%) than wild type (WT). Additionally, they were more tolerant to oral glucose, demonstrated by a decrease in the area under the glucose curve (18%). In addition, 15 min after an oral glucose load, female and male NBR-KO showed lower insulin serum levels (45.6 and 26.8%, respectively) than WT, even though blood glucose rose to similar levels in both groups. Single injection of NB, one hour before the oral glucose administration, tended to induce higher serum insulin in WT (28.9%, p=0.3), however the same did not occur in NBR-KO. They showed no changes in fasting insulin content in pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, however, the fasting serum levels of glucagon-like peptide, a potent incretin, exhibited a strong trend to reduction (40%, p=0.07). Collectively, mice with deletion of NB receptor have lower insulinemia, especially in response to oral glucose, and females also exhibited a better glucose tolerance, suggesting the involvement of NB and its receptor in regulation of insulin secretion induced by incretins, and also, in insulin sensitivity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Apolipoprotein E Genotype and Sex Influence Glucose Tolerance in Older Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Angela J.; Banks, William A.; Hernandez Saucedo, Hector; Craft, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose intolerance and apolipoprotein ε4 allele (E4+) are risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin sensitizers show promise for treating AD, but are less effective in E4+ individuals. Little is known about how the APOE genotype influences glucose metabolism. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 319 older adults who underwent oral glucose tolerance tests; a subset had insulin, amyloid beta (Aβ42), and Mini Mental Status Examination. Glucose and insulin patterns with respect to cognitive diagnosis, E4 status, and sex were examined with analysis of covariance and Pearson correlation. Results People with cognitive impairment had higher fasting insulin levels. E4 status did not affect fasting glucose values, whereas men had higher fasting glucose levels than women. E4+ men had the lowest and E4+ women had the highest glucose levels, compared to E4- groups; insulin did not differ by sex or E4 group. E4 status and sex moderated correlations between metabolic measures and AD risk factors including age and Aβ. Conclusions Insulin resistance was associated with cognitive impairment, and sex, E4 status, and glucose values are interrelated in older adults at risk of AD. Understanding glucose metabolism for different APOE and sex groups may help elucidate differences in therapeutic responses. PMID:27065114

  2. Postprandial glucose response to selected tropical fruits in normal glucose-tolerant Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Edo, A; Eregie, A; Adediran, O; Ohwovoriole, A; Ebengho, S

    2011-01-01

    The glycemic response to commonly eaten fruits in Nigeria has not been reported. Therefore, this study assessed the plasma glucose response to selected fruits in Nigeria. Ten normal glucose-tolerant subjects randomly consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of three fruits: banana (Musa paradisiaca), pineapple (Ananus comosus), and pawpaw (Carica papaya), and a 50-g glucose load at 1-week intervals. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and half-hourly over a 2-h period post-ingestion of the fruits or glucose. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose concentrations. Plasma glucose responses were assessed by the peak plasma glucose concentration, maximum increase in plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level, and incremental area under the glucose curve and glycemic index (GI). The results showed that the blood glucose response to these three fruits was similar in terms of their incremental areas under the glucose curve, maximum increase in plasma glucose, and glycemic indices (GIs). The 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level of banana was significantly higher than that of pineapple, P < 0.025. The mean ± SEM GI values were as follows: pawpaw; 86 ± 26.8%; banana, 75.1 ± 21.8%; pineapple, 64.5 ± 11.3%. The GI of glucose is taken as 100. The GI of pineapple was significantly lower than that of glucose (P < 0.05). Banana, pawpaw, and pineapple produced a similar postprandial glucose response. Measured portions of these fruits may be used as fruit exchanges with pineapple having the most favorable glycemic response.

  3. Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance Breakdown in Food Allergy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0553 TITLE: Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance Breakdown in Food Allergy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Talal...AND SUBTITLE Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance Breakdown in Food Allergy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...mast cell expansion perpetuates oral intolerance to allergen, and that their acute depletion enables tolerance induction in established food allergy

  4. Lifestyle intervention according to general recommendations improves glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Marco; Blaak, Ellen E; Corpeleijn, Eefje; Saris, Wim H; de Bruin, Tjerk W; Feskens, Edith J

    2003-12-01

    Changing dietary and physical activity habits has the potential to postpone or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. However, it needs to be assessed whether moderate interventions, in agreement with current guidelines for the general population, are effective. We evaluated the impact of a 2-year combined diet and physical activity intervention program on glucose tolerance in Dutch subjects at increased risk for developing diabetes. Subjects with glucose intolerance were randomly assigned to either the lifestyle intervention group (INT) or control group (CON). The INT received regular dietary advice and was stimulated to increase their physical activity. The CON received a brief leaflet about healthy diet and increased physical activity. Primary outcome measure was the change in glucose tolerance. In total, 88 subjects completed 2 years of intervention (40 subjects in the INT, 48 subjects in the CON, mean BMI 29.4 kg/m2). Subjects in the INT reduced their body weight, waist circumference, and (saturated) fat intake and improved their aerobic capacity. Two-hour plasma glucose concentration declined from 8.7 to 8.0 mM in the INT and rose from 8.6 to 9.4 mM in the CON (p < 0.01). Subjects adherent to both the diet and exercise intervention showed the largest reduction in 2-hour glucose levels. Our results showed that a lifestyle intervention program according to general recommendations improves glucose tolerance, even in a less obese and more physical active population. Furthermore, our results underscore the importance of combining diet and physical activity to improve glucose tolerance and insulin resistance.

  5. Glucose effectiveness is the major determinant of intravenous glucose tolerance in the rat.

    PubMed

    McArthur, M D; You, D; Klapstein, K; Finegood, D T

    1999-04-01

    To determine the importance of insulin for glucose disposal during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in rats, experiments were performed in four cohorts of conscious unrestrained rats fasted overnight. In cohorts 1-3, a bolus of tracer ([3-3H]glucose, 50 microCi) was given alone, with glucose (0.3 g/kg) to induce an endogenous insulin response (approximately 1,100 pmol/l), or with exogenous insulin to give physiological (1,700 pmol/l) or supraphysiological (12,000 pmol/l) plasma levels. Raising plasma insulin within the physiological range had no effect (P > 0.05), but supraphysiological levels induced hypoglycemia (7.3 +/- 0.2 to 3.6 +/- 0.2 mmol/l) and increased [3H]glucose disappearance rate (P < 0.001). In cohort 4, a primed, continuous tracer infusion was started 120 min before saline or glucose bolus injection. [3H]glucose levels fell 15-20%, and the disappearance rate rose 36% (P < 0.05) after glucose injection. These results indicate that in fasted rats a tracer bolus injection protocol is not sufficiently sensitive to measure the physiological effect of insulin released in response to a bolus of glucose because this effect of insulin is small. Glucose itself is the predominant mediator of glucose disposal after a bolus of glucose in the fasted rat.

  6. High-normal fasting glucose levels are associated with increased prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance in obese children.

    PubMed

    Grandone, A; Amato, A; Luongo, C; Santoro, N; Perrone, L; del Giudice, E Miraglia

    2008-12-01

    The natural history of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes among obese children is not clear. Although the cut-off for impaired fasting glucose (IFG) has recently been changed from 110 (6.1 mmol/l) to 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l), it does not seem a reliable way to find all subjects with impaired glucose homeostasis. The aim of our study was to determine whether high-normal fasting glucose level could predict the occurrence of IGT and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and twenty-three Italian obese children and adolescents were included in the study (176 females, mean age 11+/-2.9 yr; mean body mass index z-score: 3+/-0.6). Waist circumference, serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol HDL, blood pressure were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The prevalence of IFG and IGT were respectively 1.5% (5 subjects) and 5% (18 patients); no diabetic patients were found. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 20% of patients. Fasting glycemia values <100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l) have been divided in quintiles. Metabolic syndrome prevalence increased across quintiles, although not in a statistically significantly manner, but it could depend on the selected diagnostic criteria as no univocal definition exists for metabolic syndrome in youths. Interestingly high-normal fasting plasma glucose levels constitute an independent risk factor for IGT among obese children and adolescents; therefore, this very easy-to-use parameter may help to identify obese patients at increased risk of diabetes or at least could suggest in which subjects to perform an OGTT.

  7. Apple pectin affects the efficacy of epigallocatechin gallate on oral sucrose tolerance test in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Hori, S

    2011-11-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), a dietary polyphenol and a major tea catechin, is a known sucrase inhibitor. Since dietary pectin is known to modulate some of the functions of the gastrointestinal tract, we investigated whether it could specifically affect the efficacy of EGCg on an oral sucrose tolerance test in mice. Male Crj:CD-1 (ICR) mice (seven weeks old) were randomly divided into two groups and fed a 5 % apple pectin (PE) or 5 % cellulose (CE) diet (control diet) for 28 days. After the experimental diet period, all mice were fasted overnight. A volume of 0.2 mL EGCg (20 mg/mL) was orally administered to all the mice by stainless steel feeding needle via injection syringe and a sucrose tolerance test was performed. The blood glucose levels were measured in blood collected from the tail vein using the OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose monitoring system. Blood glucose levels at 30 minutes and 60 minutes after sucrose loading in the PE group were significantly higher than initial blood glucose levels. However, blood glucose levels at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 120 minutes after sucrose loading in the CE group were not significantly higher than initial blood glucose levels. After laparotomy, plasma lipids were also measured. Plasma triglyceride concentrations were significantly greater in the PE group than in the CE (control) group. This demonstrates that dietary pectin can affect the efficacy of EGCg on the oral sucrose tolerance test in mice.

  8. Improved tolerance to sequential glucose loading (Staub-Traugott effect): size and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Sandra; Muscelli, Elza; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Barsotti, Elisabetta; Astiarraga, Brenno D; Holst, Jens J; Mari, Andrea; Ferrannini, Ele

    2009-08-01

    Improved glucose tolerance to sequential glucose loading (Staub-Traugott effect) is an important determinant of day-to-day glycemic exposure. Its mechanisms have not been clearly established. We recruited 17 healthy volunteers to receive two sequential oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), at time 0 min and 180 min (Study I). The protocol was repeated on a separate day (Study II) except that plasma glucose was clamped at 8.3 mmol/l between 60 and 180 min. beta-Cell function was analyzed by mathematical modeling of C-peptide concentrations. In a subgroup, glucose kinetics were measured by a triple-tracer technique (infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose and labeling of the 2 glucose loads with [1-(2)H]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose). In both Studies I and II, the plasma glucose response to the second OGTT equaled 84 +/- 2% (P = 0.003) of the response to the first OGTT. Absolute insulin secretion was lower (37.8 +/- 4.3 vs. 42.8 +/- 5.1 nmol/m(2), P = 0.02), but glucose potentiation (i.e., higher secretion at the same glycemia) was stronger (1.08 +/- 0.02- vs. 0.92 +/- 0.02-fold, P = 0.006), the increment being higher in Study II (+36 +/- 5%) than Study I (+19 +/- 6%, P < 0.05). In pooled data, a higher glucose area during the first OGTT was associated with a higher potentiation during the second OGTT (rho=0.60, P = 0.002). Neither insulin clearance nor glucose clearance differed between loads, and appearance of glucose over 3 h totalled 60 +/- 6 g for the first load and 52 +/- 5 g for the second load (P = not significant). Fasting endogenous glucose production [13.3 +/- 0.6 micromol x min(-1) x kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1)] averaged 6.0 +/- 3.8 micromol x min(-1) x kg FFM(-1) between 0 and 180 min and 1.7 +/- 2.6 between 180 and 360 min (P < 0.03). Glucose potentiation and stronger suppression of endogenous glucose release are the main mechanisms underlying the Staub-Traugott effect.

  9. Acute caffeine ingestion and glucose tolerance in women with or without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lindsay E; Spafford, Christine; Graham, Terry E; Smith, Graeme N

    2009-04-01

    Recent work showing that caffeine impairs glucose tolerance may be of particular concern in pregnancy because of a possible negative effect on fetal outcome. The current study sought to assess the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on glucose tolerance in women with or without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Nineteen women whose routine GDM test was negative (control) and eight women with an initial positive GDM screen completed two trials one week apart in a double-blind randomized crossover study. Following an overnight fast, subjects ingested caffeine (3 mg/kg pre-pregnancy body weight) or an identical-appearing placebo (gelatin) capsule and one hour later began a 75 g 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. In the control group, caffeine did not significantly affect blood glucose, insulin, or C-peptide. In the GDM group, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was greater (P < 0.01), C-peptide AUC was greater (P < 0.05), and insulin sensitivity index was lower (18%, P < 0.05) after caffeine than after placebo. Caffeine impaired insulin sensitivity in women with GDM. Additional research regarding more specific dietary caffeine recommendations for women with GDM is warranted.

  10. Effect of an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise on Glucose Tolerance in Sedentary Men: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    GREENWALD, SAMANTHA; SEGER, EDWARD; NICHOLS, DAVID; RAY, ANDREW D.; RIDEOUT, TODD C.; GOSSELIN, LUC E.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance can have significant health consequences. The purposes of this preliminary study were to examine whether a single session of kettlebell exercise improves acute post-exercise glucose tolerance in sedentary individuals, and whether it was as effective as high-intensity interval running. Six sedentary male subjects underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test following three different conditions: 1) control (no exercise); 2) kettlebell exercise (2 sets of 7 exercises, 15 repetitions per exercise with 30 seconds rest between each exercise); or 3) high-intensity interval running (10 one-minute intervals at a workload corresponding to 90% VO2max interspersed with one-minute active recovery periods). Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (0 minutes), and 60 and 120 minutes after glucose ingestion. Both kettlebell and high-intensity interval running exercise significantly lowered blood glucose 60 minutes after glucose ingestion compared with control. However, there was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two exercise conditions at any time point. In addition, there were no significant differences in insulin concentration between high intensity interval running, kettlebell, and control conditions at all time points. Results indicate that an acute bout of kettlebell exercise is as effective as high intensity interval running at improving glucose tolerance in sedentary young men. PMID:27766136

  11. Effect of an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise on Glucose Tolerance in Sedentary Men: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Samantha; Seger, Edward; Nichols, David; Ray, Andrew D; Rideout, Todd C; Gosselin, Luc E

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance can have significant health consequences. The purposes of this preliminary study were to examine whether a single session of kettlebell exercise improves acute post-exercise glucose tolerance in sedentary individuals, and whether it was as effective as high-intensity interval running. Six sedentary male subjects underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test following three different conditions: 1) control (no exercise); 2) kettlebell exercise (2 sets of 7 exercises, 15 repetitions per exercise with 30 seconds rest between each exercise); or 3) high-intensity interval running (10 one-minute intervals at a workload corresponding to 90% VO2max interspersed with one-minute active recovery periods). Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (0 minutes), and 60 and 120 minutes after glucose ingestion. Both kettlebell and high-intensity interval running exercise significantly lowered blood glucose 60 minutes after glucose ingestion compared with control. However, there was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two exercise conditions at any time point. In addition, there were no significant differences in insulin concentration between high intensity interval running, kettlebell, and control conditions at all time points. Results indicate that an acute bout of kettlebell exercise is as effective as high intensity interval running at improving glucose tolerance in sedentary young men.

  12. Lipid storage by adipose tissue macrophages regulates systemic glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aouadi, Myriam; Vangala, Pranitha; Yawe, Joseph C.; Tencerova, Michaela; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Shen, Yuefei

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory pathways in adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) can impair glucose tolerance in obesity, but ATMs may also be beneficial as repositories for excess lipid that adipocytes are unable to store. To test this hypothesis, we selectively targeted visceral ATMs in obese mice with siRNA against lipoprotein lipase (LPL), leaving macrophages within other organs unaffected. Selective silencing of ATM LPL decreased foam cell formation in visceral adipose tissue of obese mice, consistent with a reduced supply of fatty acids from VLDL hydrolysis. Unexpectedly, silencing LPL also decreased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake (CD36) and esterification in ATMs. This deficit in fatty acid uptake capacity was associated with increased circulating serum free fatty acids. Importantly, ATM LPL silencing also caused a marked increase in circulating fatty acid-binding protein-4, an adipocyte-derived lipid chaperone previously reported to induce liver insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Consistent with this concept, obese mice with LPL-depleted ATMs exhibited higher hepatic glucose production from pyruvate and glucose intolerance. Silencing CD36 in ATMs also promoted glucose intolerance. Taken together, the data indicate that LPL secreted by ATMs enhances their ability to sequester excess lipid in obese mice, promoting systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:24986598

  13. Conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A Improves Glucose Tolerance in HCV-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Ammon; Kerscher, Corinna; Tura, Andrea; Herkner, Harald; Payer, Berit Anna; Mandorfer, Mattias; Werzowa, Johannes; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Reiberger, Thomas; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; Säemann, Marcus; Schmidt, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcineurin-inhibitors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increase the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. Chronic HCV infection promotes insulin resistance rather than beta-cell dysfunction. The objective was to elucidate whether a conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A affects fasting and/or dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or all in HCV-positive renal transplant recipients. Methods In this prospective, single-center study 10 HCV-positive renal transplant recipients underwent 2h-75g-oral glucose tolerance tests before and three months after the conversion of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Established oral glucose tolerance test-based parameters of fasting and dynamic insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were calculated. Data are expressed as median (IQR). Results After conversion, both fasting and challenged glucose levels decreased significantly. This was mainly attributable to a significant amelioration of post-prandial dynamic glucose sensitivity as measured by the oral glucose sensitivity-index OGIS [422.17 (370.82–441.92) vs. 468.80 (414.27–488.57) mL/min/m2, p = 0.005), which also resulted in significant improvements of the disposition index (p = 0.017) and adaptation index (p = 0.017) as markers of overall glucose tolerance and beta-cell function. Fasting insulin sensitivity (p = 0.721), insulinogenic index as marker of first-phase insulin secretion [0.064 (0.032–0.106) vs. 0.083 (0.054–0.144) nmol/mmol, p = 0.093) and hepatic insulin extraction (p = 0.646) remained unaltered. No changes of plasma HCV-RNA levels (p = 0.285) or liver stiffness (hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation, p = 0.463) were observed after the conversion of immunosuppression. Conclusions HCV-positive renal transplant recipients show significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin sensitivity and overall glucose tolerance after conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Considering the HCV

  14. Conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A Improves Glucose Tolerance in HCV-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Handisurya, Ammon; Kerscher, Corinna; Tura, Andrea; Herkner, Harald; Payer, Berit Anna; Mandorfer, Mattias; Werzowa, Johannes; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Reiberger, Thomas; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; Säemann, Marcus; Schmidt, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin-inhibitors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increase the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. Chronic HCV infection promotes insulin resistance rather than beta-cell dysfunction. The objective was to elucidate whether a conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A affects fasting and/or dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or all in HCV-positive renal transplant recipients. In this prospective, single-center study 10 HCV-positive renal transplant recipients underwent 2h-75g-oral glucose tolerance tests before and three months after the conversion of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Established oral glucose tolerance test-based parameters of fasting and dynamic insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were calculated. Data are expressed as median (IQR). After conversion, both fasting and challenged glucose levels decreased significantly. This was mainly attributable to a significant amelioration of post-prandial dynamic glucose sensitivity as measured by the oral glucose sensitivity-index OGIS [422.17 (370.82-441.92) vs. 468.80 (414.27-488.57) mL/min/m2, p = 0.005), which also resulted in significant improvements of the disposition index (p = 0.017) and adaptation index (p = 0.017) as markers of overall glucose tolerance and beta-cell function. Fasting insulin sensitivity (p = 0.721), insulinogenic index as marker of first-phase insulin secretion [0.064 (0.032-0.106) vs. 0.083 (0.054-0.144) nmol/mmol, p = 0.093) and hepatic insulin extraction (p = 0.646) remained unaltered. No changes of plasma HCV-RNA levels (p = 0.285) or liver stiffness (hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation, p = 0.463) were observed after the conversion of immunosuppression. HCV-positive renal transplant recipients show significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin sensitivity and overall glucose tolerance after conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Considering the HCV-induced insulin resistance, HCV-positive renal transplant

  15. Association between sleep architecture and glucose tolerance in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Li, Albert Martin; Au, Chun Ting; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Zhang, Jihui; Wong, Chun Kwok; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2015-01-01

    Short sleep duration is a contributing factor for decreased insulin sensitivity and hyperglycemia. Sleep architecture represents a cyclical pattern of sleep that shifts between sleep Stages N1, N2, N3 (slow wave sleep) and Stage R (rapid eye movement sleep). The aim of the present study was to examine the association between sleep architecture and glucose and insulin metabolism in both normal weight and overweight/obese children and adolescents. A total of 118 subjects participated in the study. Subjects under-went overnight polysomnography (PSG) when the percentage of total sleep time (% TST) spent at each sleep stage was recorded and an oral glucose tolerance test together was performed the next morning. We assessed glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function using 2-h glucose levels, the Matsuda index (IS(OGTT)), and insulin secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2), respectively. After adjustment for age, gender, body mass index z-score, pubertal status, and obstructive apnea hypopnea index, Stage N3 (% TST) was positively associated with IS(OGTT), whereas Stage N1 (%TST) exerted an opposite effect on IS(OGTT). Higher sleep efficiency and longer TST were independently associated with lower 2-h glucose levels, higher ISSI-2 and/or higher IS(OGTT). Stage N3, sleep efficiency and TST were protective factors in maintaining glucose and insulin homeostasis; however, Stage N1 functioned in the opposite direction.

  16. Assessment of circulating betatrophin concentrations in lean glucose-tolerant women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Erol, Onur; Özel, Mustafa Kemal; Ellidağ, Hamit Yaşar; Toptaş, Tayfun; Derbent, Aysel Uysal; Yılmaz, Necat

    2017-03-20

    The aims of the current study were to investigate the betatrophin levels in lean glucose-tolerant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and to explore the relationships between these levels and antropometric, hormonal and metabolic parameters. The study population consisted of 50 lean (body mass index [BMI] < 25 kg/m(2)) women diagnosed with PCOS using the Rotterdam criteria, and 60 age- and BMI-matched healthy controls without any features of clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism. Before recruitment, glucose tolerance was evaluated in all of the subjects using the 2-h 75 g oral glucose-tolerance test, and only those exhibiting normal glucose tolerance were enrolled. Serum betatrophin levels were significantly higher in women with PCOS (median 322.3; range 44.7-1989.3 ng/L) compared to the controls (median 199.9; range 6.2-1912.9 ng/L; p = .005). In the control group, no significant correlation was evident between betatrophin levels and clinical or biochemical parameters. In the PCOS group, betatrophin levels were positively correlated with prolactin levels (r = .286, p = .046) and negatively correlated with BMI (r = -.283, p = .049), waist/hip ratio (r = -.324, p = .023), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r = -.385, p = .006). Impact statement What is already known on this subject: Several studies have suggested that primary alteration in beta-cell function is a pathophysiological feature of PCOS, and insulin resistance is the most significant predictor of beta-cell dysfunction independent of obesity. Betatrophin is a circulating protein that is primarily expressed in the liver in humans. Early experimental investigations demonstrated that overexpression of betatrophin significantly promoted pancreatic beta-cell proliferation, insulin production and improved glucose tolerance. Few studies have investigated the association between PCOS and betatrophin. However, in contrast to our study, the

  17. Voluntary running improves glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    LaPier, T L; Swislocki, A L; Clark, R J; Rodnick, K J

    2001-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of voluntary exercise training on glucose metabolism and measures of insulin sensitivity in female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as normotensive controls. Exercising SHR were housed in running wheels for 8 weeks (SHRx8) or 16 weeks (SHRx16). At 22 weeks of age, we measured systolic blood pressure, performed oral glucose tolerance tests, and determined hexokinase activity and glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 content in skeletal muscle to assess intracellular glucose metabolism. Blood pressure was lower in WKY (139+/-12 mm Hg) than untrained SHR (216+/-13 mm Hg). Exercise training caused a reduction in blood pressure (-18 mm Hg) for SHRx8. After a brief (5-h) fast, serum glucose was lower in SHR that exercised compared with sedentary SHR, whereas insulin concentrations were identical between all SHR and WKY. Corresponding free fatty acids (FFA) were twofold higher in SHR than in WKY. In response to glucose, SHR demonstrated higher glucose and FFA responses, with exercise decreasing the glucose values in a dose-dependent manner. Although the insulin response was comparable in all groups, the glucose-to-insulin ratio was higher in SHR, indicating a relative insulin resistance for both glucose disposal and suppression of free fatty acids. Hexokinase activity and GLUT4 content were elevated 1.4- and 2.8-fold, respectively, in plantaris muscle of SHRx16, suggesting an improvement in the capacity for glucose transport and phosphorylation with exercise. These results provide evidence that voluntary running in female SHR lowers blood pressure and selectively increases glucose uptake and insulin action, but not suppression of FFA.

  18. A study of the effect of diet on glycosylated haemoglobin and albumin levels and glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ryle, A J; Davie, S; Gould, B J; Yudkin, J S

    1990-12-01

    As factors other than the degree of glucose tolerance or ambient blood glucose may determine glycosylated haemoglobin levels, we have investigated the effects of dietary glucose and soluble fibre supplementation on glucose tolerance, glycosylated haemoglobin and glycosylated albumin in non-diabetic subjects. Eleven non-diabetic subjects (7 M, 4 F; age 26.5 +/- 6.5 (+/- SD) yr; BMI 21.6 +/- 3.1 kg m-2) followed a high-soluble-fibre (5 g guar gum thrice daily)/low-glucose diet, or a low-soluble-fibre/high-glucose (500 ml glucose drink providing 100 g glucose per day) diet, each for 6 weeks, in randomized order. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed at recruitment and after each diet period, and fasting blood was assayed for glycosylated albumin by affinity chromatography, and glycosylated haemoglobin by four different methods. Adherence to guar and glucose supplementation was assessed at 89.5 +/- 7.5% and 97.1 +/- 3.5%, respectively. There was no significant effect of either diet on mean fasting, 1-h or 2-h plasma glucose concentration, or glycosylated haemoglobin levels by any assay. Glycosylated albumin was 1.71 +/- 0.35% at entry, fell to 1.33 +/- 0.30% (p less than 0.01) with high-fibre and rose to 1.95 +/- 0.23% (p less than 0.02) after a high-glucose diet. Insulin, total- and HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by either diet. A high-glucose diet increases, and a high-soluble-fibre diet decreases, levels of glycosylated albumin without effects on glucose tolerance or glycosylated haemoglobin.

  19. Risk of impaired glucose tolerance in normal weight hirsute women during four years observation.

    PubMed

    Andries, Magdalene; Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2010-08-01

    Hirsutism is a common disorder affecting 5-20% of women in reproductive age. Only limited follow-up data exist regarding the prognosis for glucose tolerance and metabolic risk factors in hirsutism. Sixty-nine Caucasian hirsute women underwent a clinical examination and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 1997-2002 (baseline) and during 2003-2004 (re-evaluation). The observation period was (median; range) 4 (2-7) years. During re-evaluation, body mass index (BMI) was 24.9 (22.4-29.0) kg/m(2) and total Ferriman-Gallwey score was 10 (7-15) (median; 25-75% quartile). The women had unchanged BMI compared to baseline but increased fasting and 2 hour glucose levels. Impaired OGTT outcome during follow-up was seen in 14/66 (21.2%) women, 5/66 (7.6%) developed diabetes. Women who took oral contraceptives had a significantly decreased area under the curve (AUC) for insulin during follow-up, whereas AUC glucose levels increased. The present data supported a high risk of diabetes in only moderately overweight hirsute women.

  20. Commonly used drugs impair oral tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Pecquet, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Campbell, John; German, Bruce; Turini, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Ibuprofen and antibiotics are commonly prescribed during early childhood. When given to mice at the time at which oral tolerance is induced, both treatments affect either the induction or the maintenance of oral tolerance. These results suggest that the coadministration of these and similarly acting drugs should be considered cautiously for infants at risk of allergy.

  1. Gut microbiota modulation with norfloxacin and ampicillin enhances glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Membrez, Mathieu; Blancher, Florence; Jaquet, Muriel; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Cani, Patrice D; Burcelin, Rémy G; Corthesy, Irène; Macé, Katherine; Chou, Chieh Jason

    2008-07-01

    Recent data suggest that the gut microbiota plays a significant role in fat accumulation. However, it is not clear whether gut microbiota is involved in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. To assess this issue, we modulated gut microbiota via antibiotics administration in two different mouse models with insulin resistance. Results from dose-determination studies showed that a combination of norfloxacin and ampicillin, at a dose of 1 g/L, maximally suppressed the numbers of cecal aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in ob/ob mice. After a 2-wk intervention with the antibiotic combination, both ob/ob and diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice showed a significant improvement in fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance. The improved glycemic control was independent of food intake or adiposity because pair-fed ob/ob mice were as glucose intolerant as the control ob/ob mice. Reduced liver triglycerides and increased liver glycogen correlated with improved glucose tolerance in the treated mice. Concomitant reduction of plasma lipopolysaccharides and increase of adiponectin further supported the antidiabetic effects of the antibiotic treatment in ob/ob mice. In summary, modulation of gut microbiota ameliorated glucose tolerance of mice by altering the expression of hepatic and intestinal genes involved in inflammation and metabolism, and by changing the hormonal, inflammatory, and metabolic status of the host.

  2. Immune tolerance elicited via unique ocular and oral routes.

    PubMed

    Ashour, H M

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance can be induced by numerous methods. This review article aims to draw lines of similarity and contrast between two unique models of immune tolerance, namely Anterior Chamber Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID) and Nickel-induced oral tolerance. ACAID is an immune tolerance model that leads to the generation of CD4(+) T regulatory cells and CD8(+) T regulatory cells in the periphery after the injection of an antigen into the anterior chamber of the eye. Nickel-induced oral tolerance is another immune tolerance model that is induced by the contact allergen Nickel and leads to the generation of Nickel-specific CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells after oral exposure. The goal of comparing different models of immune tolerance is to identify which mechanisms are universal and which mechanisms are model-specific. The knowledge of such mechanisms would allow scientists and clinicians to better intervene in different immune deregulation scenarios.

  3. Effects of oral glucose on systemic glucose metabolism during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in normal man.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, P L; Orskov, L; Grøfte, T; Møller, J; Holst, J J; Schmitz, O; Møller, N

    2000-12-01

    The widespread use of oral glucose in the treatment of hypoglycemia is mainly empirically based, and little is known about the time lag and subsequent magnitude of effects following its administration. To define the systemic impact and time course of effects following oral glucose during hypoglycemia, we investigated 7 healthy young men twice. On both occasions, a 6-hour hyperinsulinemic (1.5 mU/kg/min)-hypoglycemic clamp was performed to ensure similar plasma glucose profiles during a stepwise decrease toward a nadir less than 50 mg/100 mL after 3 hours. On the first occasion, subjects ingested 40 g glucose and 4 g 3-ortho-methylglucose ([3-OMG] to trace glucose absorption) dissolved in 400 mL tap water after 3.5 hours. The second examination was identical except for the omission of 40 g oral glucose, and glucose levels were clamped at hypoglycemic concentrations similar to those recorded on the first examination. Plasma glucose curves were superimposable, and all participants reached a nadir less than 50 mg/100 mL. Similar increases in growth hormone (GH) and glucagon were observed in both situations. The glucose infusion rates (GIRs) were lower after oral glucose, with the difference starting after 5 to 10 minutes, being statistically significant after 20 minutes, and reaching a maximum of 8.5 +/- 1.6 mg/kg/min after 40 minutes. Circulating 3-OMG increased after 20 minutes. In both situations, infusion of insulin resulted in insulin levels of approximately 150 microU/mL and a suppression of C-peptide levels from 2.0 to 1.1 nmol/L (P < .01). After glucose ingestion, both serum C-peptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increased (C-peptide from 1.1 +/- 0.05 to 1.4 +/- 0.05 nmol/L and GLP-1 from 3.2 +/- 0.8 to 18.1 +/- 3.3 pmol/L), in contrast to the situation without oral glucose (P < .05). Isotopically determined glucose turnover was similar. In conclusion, our data suggest that oral glucose affects systemic glucose metabolism rapidly after 5 to 10 minutes

  4. Oral 30% glucose provides sufficient sedation in newborns during MRI.

    PubMed

    Eker, H Evren; Cok, Oya Yalcin; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Aribogan, Anis

    2017-04-01

    Newborns are often sedated during MRI but sedation itself creates adverse events and management is more challenging in this environment. Oral glucose/sucrose administration has been studied in newborns during painful procedures; however, its effectiveness in keeping newborns sleepy and motionlessness during painless procedures has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to describe effectiveness of oral 30% glucose administration by comparing with intravenous midazolam sedation for newborns during MRI. One hundred twelve ASA II-III newborns who required care in the ICU and were scheduled for MRI with sedation were included. Group I received 30% glucose solution orally with 0.5-1 ml increments up to 2 ml/3 kg doses and group II received intravenous 0.1 mg/kg midazolam with 0.05 mg/kg repetition. The procedure was considered satisfactory when MRI images were not disturbed by patient movement after oral glucose or intravenous midazolam administration. The efficiency of the techniques, additional dose and rescue sedation requirements, blood glucose levels following oral 30% glucose suckling and presence of adverse events were recorded. Demographic data was similar between groups. The efficiency of the procedures were similar between groups (78.9%, in group I and 66.1%, in group II). The blood glucose levels were within normal range in group I whereas transient desaturation and apnea occurred in 8 neonates in group II (p = 0.006). Oral 30% glucose administration for newborns during MRI is as effective as standard sedation protocol with midazolam. Thereby, we recommend and support the integration of this safe and reliable technique into routine practice for newborns during MRI.

  5. Cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and by stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hafizur, Rahman M; Hameed, Abdul; Shukrana, Mishkat; Raza, Sayed Ali; Chishti, Sidra; Kabir, Nurul; Siddiqui, Rehan A

    2015-02-15

    Although the anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid, a pure compound from cinnamon, has been reported but its mechanism(s) is not yet clear. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism(s) of anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid in in vitro and in vivo non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. Non-obese type 2 diabetes was developed by injecting 90 mg/kg streptozotocin in 2-day-old Wistar pups. Cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde were administered orally to diabetic rats for assessing acute blood glucose lowering effect and improvement of glucose tolerance. Additionally, insulin secretory activity of cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde was evaluated in isolated mice islets. Cinnamic acid, but not cinnamaldehyde, decreased blood glucose levels in diabetic rats in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Oral administration of cinnamic acid with 5 and 10 mg/kg doses to diabetic rats improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. The improvement by 10 mg/kg cinnamic acid was comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). Further in vitro studies showed that cinnamaldehyde has little or no effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion; however, cinnamic acid significantly enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets. In conclusion, it can be said that cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

  6. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida Granule in Treatment of Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-Lin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Su, Wei-Juan; Chen, Ning-Ning; Lu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Lin; Li, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health problem worldwide. Several clinical trials have shown the superiority of the Traditional Chinese Medicine in delaying or reversing the development and progression of DM. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Jinlida (JLD) granule, a Chinese herbal recipe, in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and its effect on the prevention of DM. Methods: Sixty-five IGT patients were randomized to receive one bag of JLD granules three times daily (JLD group, n = 34) or no drug intervention (control group, n = 31) for 12 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body mass index, blood lipids levels, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance calculated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) of all the patients were observed and compared before and after the treatment. Results: Sixty-one participants completed the trial (32 in JLD group and 29 in the control group). There were statistically significant decreases in HbA1c (P < 0.001), 2-h plasma glucose (P < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.029) in JLD group compared with the control group after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment, two (6.9%) patients returned to normal blood glucose, and five (17.2%) patients turned into DM in control group, while in the JLD group, 14 (43.8%) returned to normal blood glucose and 2 (6.2%) turned into DM. There was a significant difference in the number of subjects who had normal glucose at the end of the study between two groups (P = 0.001). Conclusions: JLD granule effectively improved glucose control, increased the conversion of IGT to normal glucose, and improved the insulin resistance in patients with IGT. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value for IGT. PMID:27647185

  7. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida Granule in Treatment of Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-Lin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Su, Wei-Juan; Chen, Ning-Ning; Lu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Lin; Li, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2016-10-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health problem worldwide. Several clinical trials have shown the superiority of the Traditional Chinese Medicine in delaying or reversing the development and progression of DM. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Jinlida (JLD) granule, a Chinese herbal recipe, in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and its effect on the prevention of DM. Sixty-five IGT patients were randomized to receive one bag of JLD granules three times daily (JLD group, n = 34) or no drug intervention (control group, n = 31) for 12 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body mass index, blood lipids levels, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance calculated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) of all the patients were observed and compared before and after the treatment. Sixty-one participants completed the trial (32 in JLD group and 29 in the control group). There were statistically significant decreases in HbA1c (P < 0.001), 2-h plasma glucose (P < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.029) in JLD group compared with the control group after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment, two (6.9%) patients returned to normal blood glucose, and five (17.2%) patients turned into DM in control group, while in the JLD group, 14 (43.8%) returned to normal blood glucose and 2 (6.2%) turned into DM. There was a significant difference in the number of subjects who had normal glucose at the end of the study between two groups (P = 0.001). JLD granule effectively improved glucose control, increased the conversion of IGT to normal glucose, and improved the insulin resistance in patients with IGT. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value for IGT.

  8. Amino acid mixture acutely improves the glucose tolerance of healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Kammer, Lynne M; Ding, Zhenping; Lassiter, David G; Hwang, Jungyun; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2012-01-01

    Certain amino acids have been reported to influence carbohydrate metabolism and blood glucose clearance, as well as improve the glucose tolerance in animal models. We hypothesized that an amino acid mixture consisting of isoleucine and 4 additional amino acids would improve the glucose response of healthy overweight men and women to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twenty-two overweight healthy subjects completed 2 OGTTs after consuming 2 different test beverages. The amino acid mixture beverage (CHO/AA) consisted of 0.088 g cystine 2HCl, 0.043 g methionine, 0.086 g valine, 12.094 g isoleucine, 0.084 g leucine, and 100 g dextrose. The control beverage (CHO) consisted of 100 g dextrose only. Venous blood samples were drawn 10 minutes before the start of ingesting the drinks and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after the completion of the drinks. During the OGTT, the plasma glucose response for the CHO/AA treatment was significantly lower than that of the CHO treatment (P < .01), as was the plasma glucose area under the curve (CHO/AA 806 ± 31 mmol/L·3 hours vs CHO 942 ± 40 mmol/L·3 hours). Differences in plasma glucose between treatments occurred at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after supplement ingestion. Plasma glucagon during the CHO/AA treatment was significantly higher than during the CHO treatment. However, there were no significant differences in plasma insulin or C-peptide responses between treatments. These results suggest that the amino acid mixture lowers the glucose response to an OGTT in healthy overweight subjects in an insulin-independent manner.

  9. Human serum acylcarnitine profiles in different glucose tolerance states.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhang, Chunfang; Chen, Ling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2014-06-01

    To understand the relationship between serum acylcarnitine profiles and glucose tolerance status. We analyzed 61 subjects who were divided into three groups based on their glucose tolerance status: normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n=20,M/F=9/11, mean age 48 years), pre-diabetes (Pre-DM; n=20,M/F=11/9, mean age 51 years), or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n=21,M/F=8/13, mean age 49 years). Fasting serum free carnitine and acylcarnitine concentrations were determined using isotope dilution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with high performance liquid chromatography. In comparison with NGT subjects, Pre-DM and type 2 diabetes subjects showed serum metabonomic changes highlighted by dysregulation of mitochondrial fatty acid combustion. Of the long-chain carnitine esters, significantly higher palmitoylcarnitine (C16), 3-OH-hexadecanoylcarnitine (C16-OH), carnitine C20, carnitine C22, and carnitine C24 concentrations (all P<0.05) were noted in the newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes group, and even the pre-diabetes group. This research provides further evidence of alterations in serum acylcarnitine profiles being associated with worse glucoseintolerance. The findings may suggest different degrees of involvement of dysregulated mitochondrial function and incomplete long-chain fatty acid oxidation pathways in the natural course of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of coca chewing on the glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Galarza Guzmán, M; Peñaloza Imaña, R; Echalar Afcha, L; Aguilar Valerio, M; Spielvogel, H; Sauvain, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of coca chewing on the glucose tolerance test were measured. The subjects were 14 habitual coca chewers and 14 non-chewers. All were of Aymara ancestry and came from a rural community from the "Altiplano" close to the city of La Paz. The coca users chewed coca leaves during 3 1/2 hours of the test. The non-chewers showed a significant hypoglycemia at 120 minutes of the test. This effect was not observed in the coca chewers. The hormonal counter-regulation response to hypoglycemia worked perfectly in non-chewers, since glucose levels reached normal values at 180 minutes of the test. These results suggest that coca chewers, at high altitude do not present hypoglycemia, due to an antagonic action of coca metabolites on insulin; allowing a greater availability of glucose in the organism. This would have a positive effect on metabolism in an environment of hypobaric hypoxia, known to lead to situations of hypoglycemia.

  11. Distribution of fasting plasma glucose and prevalence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the Mexican paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Violante, Rafael; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2009-07-01

    Published data on the distribution of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in children are scarce. We therefore set out to examine the distribution of FPG and determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2-DM) in Mexican children aged 6-18 years in a community-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1534 apparently healthy children were randomly enrolled and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. IFG was defined by an FPG value between >or=100 and <126 mg/dL, IGT by glucose concentration 2-h post-load between >or=140 and <200 mg/dL, and T2-DM by glucose concentration 2-h post-load >or=200 mg/dL. The FPG level at the 75(th) percentile of distribution was 98.0, 100.0 and 99.0 mg/dL for children aged 6-9, 10-14 and 15-18 years, respectively; the 95(th) percentile of FPG was greater than 100 mg/dL for all the age strata. In the population overall, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, and T2-DM were 18.3%, 5.2% and 0.6%, respectively. Among obese children and adolescents, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, IFG + IGT and T2-DM were 19.1%, 5.7%, 2.5% and 1.3%. Our study shows a high prevalence of prediabetes and is the first that reports the distribution of FPG in Mexican children and adolescents.

  12. Detection of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Africans Is Improved by Combining A1C With Fasting Glucose: The Africans in America Study

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Caroline K.; O'Connor, Michelle Y.; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Lozier, Jay N.; Sacks, David B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20–64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. RESULTS Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). CONCLUSIONS No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. PMID:25338926

  13. Detection of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans is improved by combining A1C with fasting glucose: the Africans in America Study.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Anne E; Thoreson, Caroline K; O'Connor, Michelle Y; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Lozier, Jay N; Sacks, David B

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20-64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. Effect of Helicteres isora root extracts on glucose tolerance in glucose-induced hyperglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sama; Dayanand Reddy, G; Reddy, Y S R; Sathyavathy, D; Madhava Reddy, B

    2004-06-01

    The ethanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of Helicteres isora root showed significant oral hypoglycemic activity on glucose loaded rats at a dose of 250 mg/kg. The butanol extract showed maximum antihyperglycemic activity and effect being comparable to that of glibenclamide.

  15. Intermittent hypoxia training in prediabetes patients: Beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis, hypoxia tolerance and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Serebrovska, Tetiana V; Portnychenko, Alla G; Drevytska, Tetiana I; Portnichenko, Vladimir I; Xi, Lei; Egorov, Egor; Gavalko, Anna V; Naskalova, Svitlana; Chizhova, Valentina; Shatylo, Valeriy B

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed at examining beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) under prediabetic conditions. We investigate the effects of three-week IHT on blood glucose level, tolerance to acute hypoxia, and leukocyte mRNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its target genes, i.e. insulin receptor, facilitated glucose transporter-solute carrier family-2, and potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily J. Seven healthy and 11 prediabetic men and women (44-70 years of age) were examined before, next day and one month after three-week IHT (3 sessions per week, each session consisting 4 cycles of 5-min 12% O2 and 5-min room air breathing). We found that IHT afforded beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis in patients with prediabetes reducing fasting glucose and during standard oral glucose tolerance test. The most pronounced positive effects were observed at one month after IHT termination. IHT also significantly increased the tolerance to acute hypoxia (i.e. SaO2 level at 20th min of breathing with 12% O2) and improved functional parameters of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. IHT stimulated HIF-1α mRNA expression in blood leukocytes in healthy and prediabetic subjects, but in prediabetes patients the maximum increase was lagged. The greatest changes in mRNA expression of HIF-1α target genes occurred a month after IHT and coincided with the largest decrease in blood glucose levels. The higher expression of HIF-1α was positively associated with higher tolerance to hypoxia and better glucose homeostasis. In conclusion, our results suggest that IHT may be useful for preventing the development of type 2 diabetes. Impact statement The present study investigated the beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) in humans under prediabetic conditions. We found that three-week moderate IHT induced higher HIF-1α mRNA expressions as well as its target genes, which were positively correlated with higher tolerance to

  16. Sodium salicylate restores the impaired insulin response to glucose and improves glucose tolerance in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Consoli, G; Stante, A; Simeone, V; Ceriello, A; Paolisso, G; Torella, R

    1987-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon and growth hormone responses to intravenous glucose were evaluated in 10 heroin addicts in the basal state and during an infusion of sodium salicylate, an inhibitor of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis. Ten normal subjects, matched for age, sex and weight served as controls. In the basal state, the heroin addicts had markedly reduced insulin responses to intravenous glucose and low glucose disappearance rates (p less than 0.01 vs controls). The infusion of sodium salicylate caused a striking increase of the acute insulin response to intravenous glucose (from 14.5 +/- 4 microU/ml to 88 +/- 11 microU/ml, p less than 0.001) and restored to normal the reduced glucose tolerance (KG from 1.10 +/- 0.1% min-1 to 2.04 +/- 0.19% min-1). Hypoglycemic values were found in all addicts at the end of the test during salicylate infusion. Indomethacin pretreatment in five additional addicts also caused normalization of the impaired insulin responses to the intravenous glucose challenge and restored to normal the reduced glucose disappearance rate. Plasma glucagon and growth hormone levels were normally suppressed by glucose in addicts in basal conditions; sodium salicylate infusion completely overturned these hormonal responses which became positive in the first 15 min following the glucose challenge. These results demonstrate that the two prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors can restore the impaired B-cell response to glucose in heroin addicts to normal, indicating that this response is not lost but is inhibited by heroin itself or by other substances, perhaps by the endogenous prostaglandins.

  17. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-09-29

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended.

  18. Selective slow wave sleep but not rapid eye movement sleep suppression impairs morning glucose tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Nina; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Hyzy, Franziska; Richter, Annekatrin; Friedrich, Alexia; Benedict, Christian; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2013-10-01

    Shortened nocturnal sleep impairs morning glucose tolerance. The underlying mechanism of this effect is supposed to involve a reduced fraction of slow wave sleep (SWS). However, it remains unanswered if impaired glucose tolerance occurs due to specific SWS reduction or a general disturbance of sleep. Sixteen healthy men participated in three experimental conditions in a crossover design: SWS suppression, rapid eye movement (REM)-sleep disturbance, and regular sleep. Selective sleep stage disturbance was performed by means of an acoustic tone (532Hz) with gradually rising sound intensity. Blood concentrations of glucoregulatory parameters were measured upon an oral glucose tolerance test the next morning. Our data show that morning plasma glucose and serum insulin responses were significantly increased after selective SWS suppression. Moreover, SWS suppression reduced postprandial insulin sensitivity up to 20%, as determined by Matsuda Index. Contrastingly, disturbed REM-sleep did not affect glucose homeostasis. We conclude that specifically SWS reduction is critically involved in the impairment of glucose tolerance associated with disturbed sleep. Therefore, glucose metabolism in subjects predisposed to reduced SWS (e.g. depression, aging, obstructive sleep apnea, pharmacological treatment) should be thoroughly monitored.

  19. Glucose tolerance, blood lipid, insulin and glucagon concentration after single or continuous administration of aspartame in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Okuno, G; Kawakami, F; Tako, H; Kashihara, T; Shibamoto, S; Yamazaki, T; Yamamoto, K; Saeki, M

    1986-04-01

    A nutritive sweetener, aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) was administered orally to normal controls and diabetic patients in order to evaluate effects on blood glucose, lipids and pancreatic hormone secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in the same subjects as a control study of aspartame administration. In 7 normal controls and 22 untreated diabetics, a single dose of 500 mg aspartame, equivalent to 100 g glucose in sweetness, induced no increase in blood glucose concentration. Rather, a small but significant decrease in blood glucose was noticed 2 or 3 h after administration. The decrease in blood glucose was found to be smallest in the control and became greater as the diabetes increased in severity. No significant change in blood insulin or glucagon concentration during a 3-h period was observed in either the controls or the diabetics. The second study was designed to determine the effects of 2 weeks' continuous administration of 125 mg aspartame, equal in sweetness to the mean daily consumption of sugar (20-30 g) in Japan, to 9 hospitalized diabetics with steady-state glycemic control. The glucose tolerance showed no significant change after 2 weeks' administration. Fasting, 1 h and 2 h postprandial blood glucose, blood cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol were also unaffected. From these and other published results, aspartame would seem to be a useful alternative nutrient sweetener for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  20. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Barr, David; Herndon, David N

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months postburn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children before discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Twenty-four children, aged 4 to 17 years, with burns > or = 40% TBSA underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test before discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared with published oral glucose tolerance test data from healthy, nonburned children. There was a significant difference between severely burned children and nonburned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53 +/- 1.62 compared with the value in nonburned, healthy children of 1.28 +/- 0.16 (P < .05). Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury.

  1. Gut microbiota and diet in patients with different glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Egshatyan, Lilit; Kashtanova, Daria; Popenko, Anna; Tkacheva, Olga; Tyakht, Alexander; Alexeev, Dmitry; Karamnova, Natalia; Kostryukova, Elena; Babenko, Vladislav; Vakhitova, Maria; Boytsov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a serious disease. The gut microbiota (GM) has recently been identified as a new potential risk factor in addition to well-known diabetes risk factors. To investigate the GM composition in association with the dietary patterns in patients with different glucose tolerance, we analyzed 92 patients: with normal glucose tolerance (n=48), prediabetes (preD, n=24), and T2D (n=20). Metagenomic analysis was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The diet has been studied by a frequency method with a quantitative evaluation of food intake using a computer program. Microbiota in the samples was predominantly represented by Firmicutes, in a less degree by Bacteroidetes. Blautia was a dominant genus in all samples. The representation of Blautia, Serratia was lower in preD than in T2D patients, and even lower in those with normal glucose tolerance. After the clustering of the samples into groups according to the percentage of protein, fat, carbohydrates in the diet, the representation of the Bacteroides turned to be lower and Prevotella abundance turned to be higher in carbohydrate cluster. There were more patients with insulin resistance, T2D in the fat–protein cluster. Using the Calinski–Harabasz index identified the samples with more similar diets. It was discovered that half of the patients with a high-fat diet had normal tolerance, the others had T2D. The regression analysis showed that these T2D patients also had a higher representation of Blautia. Our study provides the further evidence concerning the structural modulation of the GM in the T2DM pathogenesis depending on the dietary patterns. PMID:26555712

  2. Ceratonia siliqua L. (immature carob bean) inhibits intestinal glucose absorption, improves glucose tolerance and protects against alloxan-induced diabetes in rat.

    PubMed

    Rtibi, Kaïs; Selmi, Slimen; Grami, Dhekra; Saidani, Khouloud; Sebai, Hichem; Amri, Mohamed; Eto, Bruno; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of immature carob pod aqueous extract (ICPAE) on intestinal glucose absorption in vitro and in vivo using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as well as the potential antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. OGTT was carried by administration of glucose (2 g kg(-1) , p.o.) and after treatment with extract (50, 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) body weight). Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (150 mg kg(-1) ). However, the extracts at various doses or glibenclamide (GLB, 10 mg kg(-1) body weight) were given by oral administration for 2 weeks. ICPAE (50-2000 µg mL(-1) ) exerted dose-dependent reduction of sodium-dependent glucose transport across isolated mice jejunum and the maximal inhibition exceeded 50%.The ICPAE treatment improved glucose tolerance. More importantly, ICPAE at various doses showed a significant reduction in blood glucose and biochemical profiles in diabetic rats. Our findings confirm that the degree of maturity of carob characterized by a different phytochemical composition may be responsible for these actions. Therefore, these compounds may be used as a food supplement in hyperglycemia and diabetes treatments. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: rationale and design of the Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) Trial.

    PubMed

    Califf, Robert M; Boolell, Mitradev; Haffner, Steven M; Bethel, M Angelyn; McMurray, John; Duggal, Anil; Holman, Rury R

    2008-10-01

    Patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) have increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lifestyle modification and medication can prevent or delay progression to diabetes (PD), but whether such interventions also reduce the risk of CVD has not been rigorously tested. The Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) trial is a multinational, randomized, double-blind, 2 x 2 factorial trial in subjects with IGT (on a screening oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) aged > or = 50 years with known CVD or aged > or = 55 years with > or = 1 CVD risk factor. Enrollment began in January 2002 and was completed January 2004, with 9,518 patients randomized to receive 1 of 4 possible treatment combinations as follows: nateglinide with valsartan, nateglinide with valsartan-placebo, nateglinide-placebo with valsartan, or nateglinide-placebo with valsartan-placebo. All subjects are participating in a clinic-based and telephone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing weight and dietary fat and increasing physical activity. The 3 coprimary end points are new onset of T2DM, a "core" composite of major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure), and an "extended" composite including the components of the core composite plus coronary revascularization and hospitalization for unstable angina. The study was designed to evaluate whether reducing postprandial hyperglycemia, blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or both interventions reduce the risk of T2DM or cardiovascular events in patients with IGT.

  4. Frequency and risk of metabolic syndrome in prediabetics versus normal glucose tolerant subjects -- a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Shahid; Ahmed, Syed Danish Haseen; Jamali, Shah Nawaz; Imran, Muhammad; Haque, Muhammad Saiful; Qasim, Rashida

    2015-05-01

    To compare the frequency and risk of metabolic syndrome in pre-diabetics against normal glucose-tolerant subjects attending diabetes screening camps in an urban centre. The cross-sectional study was carried out at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January to August, 2008, and comprised subjects recruited through diabetes screening camps. They were >30 years of age, without prior history of diabetes and were screened through fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical measurements were done. Frequency of different components and their constellation as metabolic syndrome were determined according to the Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. Relative risk was estimated to find the risk of metabolic syndrome in pre-diabetics versus normal glucose-tolerant subjects. The study sample comprised 80 subjects; 40(50%) normal glucose-tolerant in Group A and 40(50%) pre-diabetics in Group B. In Group A, there were 25(62.5%) men and 15(37.5%) women, while Group B had 22(55%) men and 18(45%) women. The mean age in Group A was 38.08±5.35 years, while in Group B it was 39.09±6.12 years. The frequency of various cardiovascular risk factors was higher in pre-diabetics (p< 0.05). Central obesity was the most prevalent risk factor (85%, CI: 75.74-96.06), followed by low levels of high density lipoprotein (82.5%, CI: 72.64-94.27), raised triglycerides (67.5%, CI: 55.35-82.01), hypertension (57.5%, CI: 44.68-72.82), and fasting plasma glucose >100mg/dl (42.5%, CI: 29.68-57.82). Metabolic syndrome was found in 23(57.5%) in Group B compared to 9(22.5%) Group B, according to Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria. Calculated relative risk indicated that Group B was 1.9 times more prone to be suffering from metabolic syndrome compared to Group A. Pre-diabetics were more prone to developing cardiovascular disorders than normal glucose-tolerant subjects.

  5. Characterization of the intravenous glucose tolerance test and the combined glucose-insulin test in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F J; Aguilera-Aguilera, R; Gonzalez-De Cara, C A; Toribio, R E; Estepa, J C; Perez-Ecija, A

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-insulin dynamic challenges such as the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and combined glucose-insulin test (CGIT) have not been described in donkeys. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the IVGTT and CGIT in healthy adult donkeys, and (2) to establish normal glucose-insulin proxies. Sixteen donkeys were used and body morphometric variables obtained each. For the IVGTT, glucose (300 mg/kg) was given IV. For the CGIT, glucose (150 mg/kg) followed by recombinant insulin (0.1 IU/kg) were administered IV. Blood samples for glucose and insulin determinations were collected over 300 min. In the IVGTT the positive phase lasted 160.9 ± 13.3 min, glucose concentration peaked at 323.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL and declined at a rate of 1.28 ± 0.15 mg/dL/min. The glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 21.4 ± 1.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and the insulin AUC was 7.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. The positive phase of the CGIT curve lasted 44 ± 3 min, with a glucose clearance rate of 2.01 ± 0.18 mg/dL/min. The negative phase lasted 255.9 ± 3 min, decreasing glucose concentration at rate of -0.63 ± 0.06 mg/dL/min, and reaching a nadir (33.1 ± 3.6 mg/dL) at 118.3 ± 6.3 min. The glucose and insulin AUC values were 15.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) mg/dL/min and 13.2 ± 0.9 × 10(3) µIU/mL/min. This is the first study characterizing CGIT and IVGTT, and glucose-insulin proxies in healthy adult donkeys. Distinct glucose dynamics, when compared with horses, support the use of species-specific protocols to assess endocrine function.

  6. The variation of glucose tolerance in a multi racial population.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, S L; Chandrasekharan, N

    1985-04-01

    The pattern of plasma and urine sugar changes after 50g glucose load in 1900 Malaysians (522 males and 1378 females) consisting predominantly of Malays, Chinese and Indians were studied. The data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The results show bimodal distribution of 120 min. plasma sugar values in the age groups 21 years and above and trimodal distribution in most groups above 40 years. The mean 120 minutes plasma sugar cut-off values for nondiabetics (ND), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetics (DM) of 8.4 and 11.1 mmol/l respectively were close to the values recommended by the National Diabetic Data Group (NDDG). Fifty two percent of all subjects showed peaked plasma sugar values at 60 minutes (14% of them had IGT, 12% DM), 25% peaked at 30 minutes (98% of them were ND). The rest showed peaked values at 90 minutes (17%), 120 minutes (4%) and 150 minutes (2%) and from this group forty two percent were DM and 23% had IGT. Reliance on urine sugar qualitative tests could misclassify 7.3% of subjects (predominantly elderly females) with hyperglycaemia of greater than 11 mmol/l. This study shows that in the 50 g glucose tolerance test, the NDDG criteria for ND, IGT, DM is still applicable to the Malaysian population. The sampling time could be reduced to four points at 0, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Blood analysis is the preferred method for the diagnosis of hyperglycaemia in elderly females.

  7. Activation of the gut calcium-sensing receptor by peptide agonists reduces rapid elevation of plasma glucose in response to oral glucose load in rats.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Maya; Hira, Tohru; Mitsunaga, Arimi; Sato, Eri; Nakajima, Shingo; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Eto, Yuzuru; Hara, Hiroshi

    2014-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in various tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. To investigate the role of gut CaSR on glycemic control, we examined whether single oral administration of CaSR agonist peptides affected the glycemic response in rats. Glucose tolerance tests were performed under oral or duodenal administration of various CaSR agonist peptides (γGlu-Cys, protamine, and poly-d-lysine hydrobromide) in conscious rats. Involvement of CaSR was determined by using a CaSR antagonist. Signaling pathways underlying CaSR agonist-modified glycemia were investigated using gut hormone receptor antagonists. The gastric emptying rate after the administration of CaSR agonist peptides was measured by the phenol red recovery method. Oral and duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides attenuated glycemic responses under the oral glucose tolerance test, but the administration of casein did not. The promotive effect on glucose tolerance was weakened by luminal pretreatment with a CaSR antagonist. Treatment with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist partially diminished the glucose-lowering effect of peptides. Furthermore, the gastric emptying rate was decreased by duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides. These results demonstrate that activation of the gut CaSR by peptide agonists promotes glucose tolerance in conscious rats. 5-HT3 receptor and the delayed gastric emptying rate appear to be involved in the glucose-lowering effect of CaSR agonist peptides. Thus, activation of gut CaSR by dietary peptides reduces glycemic responses so that gut CaSR may be a potential target for the improvement of postprandial glycemia.

  8. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... screening test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. The test may be done earlier if you ...

  9. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial comparing the effects of amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide on glucose tolerance in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stears, Anna J; Woods, Sarah H; Watts, Michaela M; Burton, Timothy J; Graggaber, Johann; Mir, Fraz A; Brown, Morris J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension guidelines advise limiting the dose of thiazide diuretics and avoiding combination with β-blockade, because of increased risk of diabetes mellitus. We tested whether changes in the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide and could be avoided by switching to amiloride. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies were performed. In study 1 (41 patients), we found that changes in glucose during a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with bendroflumethiazide. In study 2, 37 patients with essential hypertension received, in random order, 4 weeks of once-daily treatment with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 25 to 50 mg, nebivolol 5 to 10 mg, combination (HCTZ 25-50 mg+nebivolol 5-10 mg), amiloride (10-20 mg), and placebo. Each drug was force titrated at 2 weeks and separated by a 4-week placebo washout. At each visit, we recorded blood pressure and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Primary outcome was the difference in glucose (over the 2 hours of the oral glucose tolerance test) between 0 and 4 weeks, when HCTZ and amiloride were compared by repeated-measures analysis. For similar blood pressure reductions, there were opposite changes in glucose between the 2 diuretics (P<0.0001). Nebivolol did not impair glucose tolerance, either alone or in combination. There was a negative correlation between Δpotassium and Δ2-hour glucose (r=-0.28; P<0.0001). In 2 crossover studies, 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide diuretic impaired glucose tolerance. No impairment was seen with K(+)-sparing diuretic or β(1)-selective blockade. Substitution or addition of amiloride may be the solution to preventing thiazide-induced diabetes mellitus.

  10. Physical activity in elderly subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Baan, C A; Stolk, R P; Grobbee, D E; Witteman, J C; Feskens, E J

    1999-02-01

    The authors carried out a study to investigate the association between different indicators of physical activity and the prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and newly diagnosed diabetes (nDM) in a population-based cohort of elderly men and women in the Netherlands. A sample of participants of the Rotterdam Study (n = 1,016) aged 55-75 years who were not known to have diabetes mellitus underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Physical activity was assessed by means of a self-administered questionnaire and expressed as time spent on activities per week. Associations with the prevalence of IGT and nDM were assessed by logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, family history of diabetes, and smoking. A total of 745 subjects had normal glucose tolerance, 153 IGT, and 118 nDM. The total amount of time spent on physical activity decreased with increasing glucose intolerance. Adjusted for main confounders, vigorous activities such as bicycling (men: odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.49; women: OR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.18-0.78) and sports (men: OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.74) showed an inverse association with the presence of nDM. For IGT, the associations pointed in the same direction but did not reach statistical significance. These results indicate that physical inactivity and glucose intolerance are associated among older adults similar to the way they are associated among middle-aged adults.

  11. Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Tiemann, Courtney D.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Wice, Burton M.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS), such as sucralose, have been reported to have metabolic effects in animal models. However, the relevance of these findings to human subjects is not clear. We evaluated the acute effects of sucralose ingestion on the metabolic response to an oral glucose load in obese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seventeen obese subjects (BMI 42.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) who did not use NNS and were insulin sensitive (based on a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score ≤2.6) underwent a 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test on two separate occasions preceded by consuming either sucralose (experimental condition) or water (control condition) 10 min before the glucose load in a randomized crossover design. Indices of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and insulin clearance rates were estimated by using minimal models of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide kinetics. RESULTS Compared with the control condition, sucralose ingestion caused 1) a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations (4.2 ± 0.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; P = 0.03), 2) a 20 ± 8% greater incremental increase in insulin area under the curve (AUC) (P < 0.03), 3) a 22 ± 7% greater peak insulin secretion rate (P < 0.02), 4) a 7 ± 4% decrease in insulin clearance (P = 0.04), and 5) a 23 ± 20% decrease in SI (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences between conditions in active glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon incremental AUC, or indices of the sensitivity of the β-cell response to glucose. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS. PMID:23633524

  12. Sucralose affects glycemic and hormonal responses to an oral glucose load.

    PubMed

    Pepino, M Yanina; Tiemann, Courtney D; Patterson, Bruce W; Wice, Burton M; Klein, Samuel

    2013-09-01

    Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS), such as sucralose, have been reported to have metabolic effects in animal models. However, the relevance of these findings to human subjects is not clear. We evaluated the acute effects of sucralose ingestion on the metabolic response to an oral glucose load in obese subjects. Seventeen obese subjects (BMI 42.3 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)) who did not use NNS and were insulin sensitive (based on a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score ≤ 2.6) underwent a 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test on two separate occasions preceded by consuming either sucralose (experimental condition) or water (control condition) 10 min before the glucose load in a randomized crossover design. Indices of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and insulin clearance rates were estimated by using minimal models of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide kinetics. Compared with the control condition, sucralose ingestion caused 1) a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations (4.2 ± 0.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; P = 0.03), 2) a 20 ± 8% greater incremental increase in insulin area under the curve (AUC) (P < 0.03), 3) a 22 ± 7% greater peak insulin secretion rate (P < 0.02), 4) a 7 ± 4% decrease in insulin clearance (P = 0.04), and 5) a 23 ± 20% decrease in SI (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences between conditions in active glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon incremental AUC, or indices of the sensitivity of the β-cell response to glucose. These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS.

  13. Editorial: Oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    1975-01-11

    Much clinical experience has been gained in the use of the glucose/electrolyte oral solutions in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Those patients who are in shock or too weak to drink need intravenous fluids to correct their total deficit. With isotonic polyelectrolyte fluids rehydration may be achieved in 2-4 hours. Subsequently, most of these patients can be given oral fluids to replace continuing stool loss. Patients who are not in shock and who are sufficiently strong to drink at the outset nearly always can be rehydrated with oral fluids alone. Vomiting is most likely caused by acidosis and volume depletion, and these can be corrected in severely dehydrated patients by intravenous therapy and by oral therapy in those not in shock and able to drink by oral therapy. Proponents of oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for diarrhea, like other proponents of new treatments, have great visions of its benefits to the world, yet these visions require validation. The biggest problem will be getting glucose and electrolytes to where they are most needed -- at the level of home and village.

  14. Urinary C peptide creatinine ratio in pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance and type 1 diabetes: evidence for insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Markoska, Ankica; Valaiyapathi, Rajalakshmi; Thorn, Chloe; Dornhorst, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis In pregnancy, urinary C peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) reflects endogenous insulin secretion in women with normal glucose tolerance and type 1 diabetes. Research design and methods UCPCR and serum C peptide were measured in 90 glucose-tolerant women at 0 and 120 min during a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 28 weeks of gestation. UCPCR was measured in 2 samples obtained over 10 weeks apart in 7 pregnant women with longstanding type 1 diabetes. Results UCPCROGTT and serum C peptideOGTT of glucose-tolerant women were significantly correlated at 0 and 120 min (rs0.675, 0.541 respectively, p<0.0001). All 7 pregnant women with type 1 diabetes had detectable first sample UCPCR (median (range) 49 (6–1038) pmol/mmol) that rose in 6 women by 477 (29–1491) pmol/mmol. Conclusions Detectable UCPCR in pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance and type 1 diabetes is likely to reflect endogenous insulin secretion and hence β-cell activity. PMID:28090333

  15. Influence of the ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism on insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose tolerance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Fabrice; Patel, Sheila; Laville, Martine; Balkau, Beverley; Favuzzi, Angela; Monti, Lucilla D; Lalic, Nebojsa; Walker, Mark

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may be associated with metabolic benefits. However, data about the potential influence of the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) genotype on insulin resistance have been contradictory with studies of limited sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ACE gene I/D polymorphism and both insulin sensitivity and glucose intolerance in a large cohort of healthy subjects. A total of 1,286 participants in the Relationship Between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Study had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to assess whole-body insulin sensitivity. Age, BMI, waist, fat-free mass (ffm), and physical activity did not differ by ACE genotype. Fasting glucose and insulin were similar among genotypes, but 2-h glucose levels were higher in DD than in ID and II subjects (DD: 5.9 +/- 1.7; ID: 5.7 +/- 1.5; II: 5.6 +/- 1.5 mmol/l) (P = 0.004). Participants with the DD genotype were more likely to have impaired glucose tolerance than those with the ID and II genotypes (13.1 vs. 8.7%; P = 0.02). Insulin sensitivity was lower in participants with the DD genotype than in those with the II genotype (136 +/- 63 vs. 147 +/- 65 micromol x min(-1)x kg ffm(-1) x mmol(-1) x l(-1); P = 0.02). The presence of the D allele was associated with a trend, albeit not significant, for reduced insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test (P = 0.07). The ACE I/D polymorphism is associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity and with impaired glucose tolerance in our healthy population. These findings confirm potential interactions between the RAS and glucose metabolism.

  16. β-Cell Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Contributes to Improved Glucose Tolerance After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Garibay, Darline; McGavigan, Anne K; Lee, Seon A; Ficorilli, James V; Cox, Amy L; Michael, M Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W; Cummings, Bethany P

    2016-09-01

    Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces high rates of type 2 diabetes remission; however, the mechanisms responsible for this remain incompletely defined. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and is elevated after VSG. VSG-induced increases in postprandial GLP-1 secretion have been proposed to contribute to the glucoregulatory benefits of VSG; however, previous work has been equivocal. In order to test the contribution of enhanced β-cell GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling we used a β-cell-specific tamoxifen-inducible GLP-1R knockout mouse model. Male β-cell-specific Glp-1r(β-cell+/+) wild type (WT) and Glp-1r(β-cell-/-) knockout (KO) littermates were placed on a high-fat diet for 6 weeks and then switched to high-fat diet supplemented with tamoxifen for the rest of the study. Mice underwent sham or VSG surgery after 2 weeks of tamoxifen diet and were fed ad libitum postoperatively. Mice underwent oral glucose tolerance testing at 3 weeks and were euthanized at 6 weeks after surgery. VSG reduced body weight and food intake independent of genotype. However, glucose tolerance was only improved in VSG WT compared with sham WT, whereas VSG KO had impaired glucose tolerance relative to VSG WT. Augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test was blunted in VSG KO compared with VSG WT. Therefore, our data suggest that enhanced β-cell GLP-1R signaling contributes to improved glucose regulation after VSG by promoting increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  17. Limited OXPHOS capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of obesity in laboratory mice irrespective of the glucose tolerance status

    PubMed Central

    Schöttl, Theresa; Kappler, Lisa; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several human and rodent obesity studies speculate on a causal link between altered white adipocyte mitochondria in the obese state and changes in glucose homeostasis. We here aimed to dissect whether alterations in white adipocyte mitochondrial respiratory function are a specific phenomenon of obesity or impaired glucose tolerance or both. Methods Mature white adipocytes were purified from posterior subcutaneous and intraabdominal epididymal fat of four murine obesity models characterized by either impaired or normal oral glucose tolerance. Bioenergetic profiles, including basal, leak, and maximal respiration, were generated using high-resolution respirometry. Cell respiratory control ratios were calculated to evaluate mitochondrial respiratory function. Results Maximal respiration capacity and cell respiratory control ratios were diminished in white adipocytes of each of the four murine obesity models, both in the absence and the presence of impaired glucose tolerance. Limitation was more pronounced in adipocytes of intraabdominal versus subcutaneous fat. Conclusion Reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of murine obesity irrespective of the glucose tolerance status. Impaired respiratory capacity in white adipocytes solely is not sufficient for the development of systemic glucose intolerance. PMID:26413469

  18. Glucose tolerance in mice exposed to light-dark stimulus patterns mirroring dayshift and rotating shift schedules.

    PubMed

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Radetsky, Leora; Plitnick, Barbara; Rea, Mark S

    2017-01-12

    Glucose tolerance was measured in (nocturnal) mice exposed to light-dark stimulus patterns simulating those that (diurnal) humans would experience while working dayshift (DSS) and 2 rotating night shift patterns (1 rotating night shift per week [RSS1] and 3 rotating night shifts per week [RSS3]). Oral glucose tolerance tests were administered at the same time and light phase during the third week of each experimental session. In contrast to the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions, glucose levels reduced more quickly for the DSS condition. Glucose area-under-the-curve measured for the DSS condition was also significantly less than that for the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions. Circadian disruption for the 3 light-dark patterns was quantified using phasor magnitude based on the 24-h light-dark patterns and their associated activity-rest patterns. Circadian disruption for mice in the DSS condition was significantly less than that for the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions. This study extends previous studies showing that even 1 night of shift work decreases glucose tolerance and that circadian disruption is linked to glucose tolerance in mice.

  19. Glucose tolerance in mice exposed to light–dark stimulus patterns mirroring dayshift and rotating shift schedules

    PubMed Central

    Figueiro, Mariana G.; Radetsky, Leora; Plitnick, Barbara; Rea, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Glucose tolerance was measured in (nocturnal) mice exposed to light–dark stimulus patterns simulating those that (diurnal) humans would experience while working dayshift (DSS) and 2 rotating night shift patterns (1 rotating night shift per week [RSS1] and 3 rotating night shifts per week [RSS3]). Oral glucose tolerance tests were administered at the same time and light phase during the third week of each experimental session. In contrast to the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions, glucose levels reduced more quickly for the DSS condition. Glucose area-under-the-curve measured for the DSS condition was also significantly less than that for the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions. Circadian disruption for the 3 light–dark patterns was quantified using phasor magnitude based on the 24-h light–dark patterns and their associated activity–rest patterns. Circadian disruption for mice in the DSS condition was significantly less than that for the RSS1 and RSS3 conditions. This study extends previous studies showing that even 1 night of shift work decreases glucose tolerance and that circadian disruption is linked to glucose tolerance in mice. PMID:28079162

  20. Glucose and insulin tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, P; Genazzani, A R; Felber, J P; Facchini, V; Onano, A M; Romagnino, S; Facchinetti, F; Piras, G L

    1975-03-01

    On the basis of the behaviour during menstrual cycle of the pituitary hormones plasma levels, the Authors have studied during the different periods of the cycle (follicular, ovulatory and luteal) the effects of OGTT and ITT's on the plasma levels of Glucose, insulin, HGH and Cortisol. Significantly lower levels of IRI, HGH and Cortisol were found in follicular phase compared to ovulatory period and luteal phase except for Cortisol in luteal phase. A slightly higher glucose tolerance was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced hypoglicemia under insulin load. Reduced HGH response to ITT was found in follicular phase as well as a reduced Cortisol response compared to the results observed in ovulatory and luteal phase. These data sustain the concept that hormonal variations occurring in an ovulatory cycle are also capable of modifying the woman's body response to various stimuli such as OGTT and ITT.

  1. Blood glucose rise after lactose tolerance testing in infants.

    PubMed

    Paige, D M; Mellits, E D; Chiu, F Y; Davis, L; Bayless, T M; Cordano, A

    1978-02-01

    Lactose tolerance tests are used clinically to screen children and infants. It is assumed that absorption of a lactose challenge in infants would occur in a predictable pattern prior to weaning. Twenty-one infants from 3 to 12 months of age were studied. The maximum blood glucose rise over fasting levels ranged from 11.0 to 62.0 mg/100 ml; the mean was 32.6 mg/100 ml. Six infants had a maximum rise of less than 20 mg/100 ml. Eleven infants (52%) had a maximum rise of greater than 30 mg/100 ml. Signs of intolerance were not noted in any subject. Weight and length were normally disturbed. Results indicate the variance in glucose rise existing within a population of infants growing normally and consuming milk. Gastric emptying, digestion, and absorption may influence the blood glucose rise after a lactose test. Established glucose levels used as an index to lactose absorption in older children and adults may not accurately reflect lactase activity in infants.

  2. Restoring HSP70 deficiencies improves glucose tolerance in diabetic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, David M.; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Zhang, Li; Wagner, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) changes in diabetes mellitus (DM) in a nonhuman primate model. To this end, two studies were conducted in DM vervet monkeys. 1) Normal control and streptozotocin-induced DM monkeys (Stz-DM) that were differentiated into moderately or poorly controlled DM by judicious insulin administration were evaluated. Liver was collected at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk after streptozotocin, exposed to ex vivo heat shock at 42°C, and immunoblotted for heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), HSP70, and phosphorylated HSF1. 2) Spontaneous DM monkeys that were not pharmacologically induced were included in a crossover study of the HSP70-inducing drug geranylgeranylacetone (GGA). GGA at 20 mg/kg was given for 14 days with a 6-wk washout period. Glucose tolerance testing and plasma and muscle HSP70 were the primary outcome measurements. In Stz-DM, hyperglycemia reduced hepatic HSP70 in a dose-dependent fashion. HSF1 was increased in livers of monkeys with Stz-DM, but responses to ex vivo heat shock were impaired vs. normal monkeys. Activation of HSF1 appears to be important, because the phosphorylation change with heat stress was nearly perfectly correlated with HSP70 increases. Impaired HSF1 activation was also seen in Stz-DM after chronic hyperglycemia (>12 wk). In naturally occurring DM, increased circulating HSP70 resulted in significantly improved glucose tolerance and significant, positive trends in other measurements of insulin resistance. No change in muscle HSP70 content was observed. We conclude that increasing HSP70, potentially through targeting hyperglycemia-related deficits in HSF1 induction and activation in the liver, is a potent and viable strategy to improve glucose tolerance. PMID:21325107

  3. Oral tolerance to contact allergens: a common occurrence? A review.

    PubMed

    White, Jonathan M L; Goon, Anthony T J; Jowsey, Ian R; Basketter, David A; Mak, Rose K H; Kimber, Ian; McFadden, John P

    2007-05-01

    Experimental and clinical oral tolerance to contact allergens has been reported sporadically, most notably in respect of nickel, and is generally assumed to be an uncommon phenomenon. There has recently been increased understanding of the immunological mechanisms inducing and maintaining oral tolerance. There are several contact allergens, including fragrance, antioxidant, and preservative chemicals, to which subjects are exposed through both cutaneous and oral routes. We examine the possibility that oral tolerance to contact allergens may be more common than previously thought. Animal models of oral tolerance to contact allergens indicate that cutaneous exposure to small, subsensitizing doses of contact allergens might negate any subsequent attempts to induce tolerance by oral administration. Extrapolating these observations to common human practises raises the possibility that application of contact allergens (fragrances, preservatives and antioxidants) in consumer products used by children could prevent or inhibit the later acquisition of specific tolerance resulting from 'natural' dietary exposure after weaning. Existing data on formaldehyde may conflict with this theory, though this could be explained by allergen specificity. We propose that further work in this area is needed.

  4. Chronic Manganism: Preliminary Observations on Glucose Tolerance and Serum Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, M.; Ghaleb, H. A.; Haroun, E. A.; Hegazy, M. R.; Khayyal, M. A. H.

    1966-01-01

    An intravenous glucose tolerance test was carried out in 11 patients with chronic manganese poisoning. Prolonged reactionary hypoglycaemia was observed. The underlying mechanism is discussed. It may be due to a disturbance of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In seven of these patients total serum proteins were estimated and were separated electrophoretically. The albumin: globulin ratios were lower in patients than in controls. There were significant reductions in serum albumin concentrations and increases in concentrations of α1 and β globulins. PMID:5904101

  5. Ghrelin and leptin response to oral glucose challenge among antipsychotic drug-treated children.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Bertrand; Usubiaga, Helen; Cooper, Tom

    2007-12-01

    We investigated ghrelin, leptin, glucose, and insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test among children receiving antipsychotics. Hormone concentrations were assayed at fasting, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. The sample was composed of 9 obese (defined as at or above the 95th percentile for age) and 10 overweight/normal children (defined as less than the 95th percentile in weight) based on National Institutes of Health criteria. Ages of the obese (10.7 +/- 3.4 years) and the overweight/normal (13.1 +/- 1.6 years) did not differ. Leptin was significantly higher among the obese group and did not change consequent to glucose. Ghrelin did not differ between the groups, and when the values were combined, ghrelin decreased at 30 minutes and approached fasting concentrations at 120 minutes. To further explore our data, we constituted separate groups based upon z score changes. When weight gain defined as an increase in z score (X = 0.4), the nongainers showed leptin concentrations to decrease over time. Findings encourage further oral glucose tolerance test studies to explain the leptin response to weight gain seen among children receiving antipsychotic medication.

  6. Induction of oral tolerance in mice unresponsive to bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Saklayen, M G; Pesce, A J; Pollak, V E; Michael, J G

    1983-09-01

    C3H/HeJ lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-unresponsive and closely related C3H/HeSn LPS-responsive mice were rendered tolerant to hen albumin by antigen feeding before parenteral immunization. Both single and multiple feedings of antigen were effective in inducing tolerance to hen albumin in LPS-responsive and -unresponsive strains of mice. Our data demonstrate that ability to respond to LPS is not a prerequisite for induction of oral tolerance to a soluble protein antigen.

  7. Dosakaya Juice Assuages Development of Sucrose Induced Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Imbalance in Antioxidant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dommati Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S. R.; Shukla, Srishti; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Akshara, Dasari; Madhusudana, Kuncha; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to explore the effect of Dosakaya (DK) (Cucumis melo var. chito) juice on sucrose induced dysglycemia and disturbances in antioxidant defense in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were preconditioned with DK juice before administration of sucrose beverage continuously for 1-month. Blood glucose tolerance test and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis pathways in kidney were analyzed in different group of animals at the end of the study. Results: DK juice diffused (P < 0.001) hypertriglyceridemia inducing effect of sucrose and arrested sucrose induced weight gain. It improved glucose tolerance ability by significantly reducing (P < 0.05) first-hour glycemic excursion and decreasing 2 h glycemic load (P < 0.05) following oral glucose tolerance test in sucrose fed animals. Furthermore, disturbances in antioxidant defense mechanisms in terms of GSH homeostasis in kidney were restored due to juice feeding. DK juice administration checked reduction in GSH-S-transferase and glyoxalase-I activity, thus, significantly mitigated lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05), and formation of advanced glycation end-products (P < 0.001) in kidney and serum (P < 0.01). Quantitative analysis of juice found it a rich source of protein and polyphenols. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed the presence of multiple protein bands in whole fruit juice. Therefore, SDS-PAGE protein fingerprint of DK juice may serve as a quality control tool for standardization of juice. Conclusion: The whole fruit juice of DK may become cost-effective, affordable health beverage in extenuating ill-health effects of sugar consumption. This is the first report identifying DK juice in preventing development dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress induced due to chronic sucrose feeding in rats. SUMMARY Chronic sucrose consumption induced development of dysglycemia and also impaired antioxidant defense mechanism in rats. The oral administration of

  8. Dosakaya Juice Assuages Development of Sucrose Induced Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Imbalance in Antioxidant Defense.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dommati Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S R; Shukla, Srishti; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Akshara, Dasari; Madhusudana, Kuncha; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to explore the effect of Dosakaya (DK) (Cucumis melo var. chito) juice on sucrose induced dysglycemia and disturbances in antioxidant defense in rats. Rats were preconditioned with DK juice before administration of sucrose beverage continuously for 1-month. Blood glucose tolerance test and glutathione (GSH) homeostasis pathways in kidney were analyzed in different group of animals at the end of the study. DK juice diffused (P < 0.001) hypertriglyceridemia inducing effect of sucrose and arrested sucrose induced weight gain. It improved glucose tolerance ability by significantly reducing (P < 0.05) first-hour glycemic excursion and decreasing 2 h glycemic load (P < 0.05) following oral glucose tolerance test in sucrose fed animals. Furthermore, disturbances in antioxidant defense mechanisms in terms of GSH homeostasis in kidney were restored due to juice feeding. DK juice administration checked reduction in GSH-S-transferase and glyoxalase-I activity, thus, significantly mitigated lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05), and formation of advanced glycation end-products (P < 0.001) in kidney and serum (P < 0.01). Quantitative analysis of juice found it a rich source of protein and polyphenols. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed the presence of multiple protein bands in whole fruit juice. Therefore, SDS-PAGE protein fingerprint of DK juice may serve as a quality control tool for standardization of juice. The whole fruit juice of DK may become cost-effective, affordable health beverage in extenuating ill-health effects of sugar consumption. This is the first report identifying DK juice in preventing development dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress induced due to chronic sucrose feeding in rats. Chronic sucrose consumption induced development of dysglycemia and also impaired antioxidant defense mechanism in rats. The oral administration of Dosakaya juice prior to sucrose feeding however, mitigated the

  9. Preparation of patients submitted to thyroidectomy with oral glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Libiszewski, Michał; Drozda, Rafał; Smigielski, Janusz; Kuzdak, Krzysztof; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2012-05-01

    The AIM OF THE STUDY was to determine postoperative insulin-resistance in patients subject to total thyroidectomy, the prevalence of subjective feelings of hunger immediately before surgery, and the incidence of nausea/vomiting after surgery in patients prepared for elective operations by means of oral glucose solutions. The study group comprised 115 patients, including 71 patients prepared for surgery by means of oral glucose solutions (12.5% glucose) administered 12 and 3 hours before the procedure, at a dose of 800 and 400 ml. The control group comprised 44 patients prepared for surgery by means of the traditional manner- the last meal was served before 2pm the day before the surgical procedure, while fluids before 10pm. Considering both groups, we evaluated glucose and insulin levels three times, as well as determined the insulin-resistance ratio (HOMA-IR) 24 before, and 12 hours and 7 days after surgery. The incidence of nausea and vomiting after surgery, and the subjective feeling of hunger before surgery were also evaluated. Statistically significant differences considering insulin level and HOMA-IR values were observed during the II and III measurements. The glucose and insulin values, and the HOMA-IR insulin-resistance ratio, showed no statistically significant differences during measurement I. No statistically significant glucose level differences were observed during measurements II and III. A significantly greater subjective feeling of hunger before surgery and nausea/vomiting afterwards were observed in the control group. The preparation of patients with oral glucose solutions decreases the incidence of postoperative (thyroidectomy) insulin-resistance, and occurrence of nausea/vomiting during the postoperative period.

  10. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Induction of Oral Tolerance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Akiko; Shuto, Emi; Tsutsumi, Rie; Nakamoto, Mariko; Nii, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Oral tolerance is a phenomenon of induction of systemic unresponsiveness to antigens ingested by the oral route and loss of immune response. Studies have shown the importance of vitamin A in oral tolerance in vitro but not in an in vivo experimental model. Therefore, we carried out experiments to determine how vitamin A deficiency affects tolerance induction and the ability of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) CD11c(+) cells to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). Immunological tolerance was induced by oral ovalbumin (OVA) administration in vitamin A-sufficient mice. OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were significantly reduced. On the other hand, in vitamin A-deficient mice, both OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were not suppressed by oral OVA administration. Regarding induction of Tregs, the conversion rate of Foxp3(+) cells from naïve CD4(+) cell by CD11c(+) cells was decreased in vitamin A-deficient mice. Our study indicates that vitamin A deficiency causes the breakdown of oral tolerance in vivo.

  11. Glucose tolerance, lipids, and GLP-1 secretion in JCR:LA-cp rats fed a high protein fiber diet.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Raylene A; Russell, James C

    2008-01-01

    We have shown that individually, dietary fiber and protein increase secretion of the anorexigenic and insulinotropic hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Our objective was to combine, in one diet, high levels of fiber and protein to maximize GLP-1 secretion, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce weight gain. Lean (+/?) and obese (cp/cp) male James C Russell corpulent (JCR:LA-cp) rats lacking a functional leptin receptor were fed one of four experimental diets (control, high protein (HP), high fiber (HF, prebiotic fiber inulin), or combination (CB)) for 3 weeks. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed to evaluate plasma GLP-1, insulin and glucose. Plasma lipids and intestinal proglucagon mRNA expression were determined. Energy intake was lower with the HF diet in lean and obese rats. Weight gain did not differ between diets. Higher colonic proglucagon mRNA in lean rats fed a CB diet was associated with higher GLP-1 secretion during OGTT. The HP diet significantly reduced plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC) during OGTT in obese rats, which reflected both an increased GLP-1 AUC and higher fasting insulin. Diets containing inulin resulted in the lowest plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. Overall, combining HP with HF in the diet increased GLP-1 secretion in response to oral glucose, but did not improve glucose tolerance or lipid profiles more than the HF diet alone did. We also suggest that glycemic and insulinemic response to prebiotics differ among rat models and future research work should examine their role in improving glucose tolerance in diet-induced vs. genetic obesity with overt hyperleptinemia.

  12. Glucose Tolerance, Lipids, and GLP-1 Secretion in JCR:LA-cp Rats Fed a High Protein Fiber Diet

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Raylene A.; Russell, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We have shown that individually, dietary fiber and protein increase secretion of the anorexigenic and insulinotropic hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Objective Our objective was to combine, in one diet, high levels of fiber and protein to maximize GLP-1 secretion, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce weight gain. Methods and Procedures Lean (+/?) and obese (cp/cp) male James C Russell corpulent (JCR:LA-cp) rats lacking a functional leptin receptor were fed one of four experimental diets (control, high protein (HP), high fiber (HF, prebiotic fiber inulin), or combination (CB)) for 3 weeks. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed to evaluate plasma GLP-1, insulin and glucose. Plasma lipids and intestinal proglucagon mRNA expression were determined. Results Energy intake was lower with the HF diet in lean and obese rats. Weight gain did not differ between diets. Higher colonic proglucagon mRNA in lean rats fed a CB diet was associated with higher GLP-1 secretion during OGTT. The HP diet significantly reduced plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC) during OGTT in obese rats, which reflected both an increased GLP-1 AUC and higher fasting insulin. Diets containing inulin resulted in the lowest plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. Discussion Overall, combining HP with HF in the diet increased GLP-1 secretion in response to oral glucose, but did not improve glucose tolerance or lipid profiles more than the HF diet alone did. We also suggest that glycemic and insulinemic response to prebiotics differ among rat models and future research work should examine their role in improving glucose tolerance in diet-induced vs. genetic obesity with overt hyperleptinemia. PMID:18223610

  13. A Novel Test for IGT Utilizing Metabolite Markers of Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Eckhart, Andrea; Perichon, Regis; Wulff, Jacob; Mitchell, Matthew; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Wolfert, Robert; Button, Eric; Lawton, Kay; Elverson, Robert; Carr, Bernadette; Sinnott, Margaret; Ferrannini, Ele

    2014-01-01

    Background: The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is the only method to diagnose patients having impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), but its use has diminished considerably in recent years. Metabolomic profiling studies have identified a number of metabolites whose fasting levels are associated with dysglycemia and type 2 diabetes. These metabolites may serve as the basis of an alternative test for IGT. Method: Using the stable isotope dilution technique, quantitative assays were developed for 23 candidate biomarker metabolites. These metabolites were measured in fasting plasma samples taken just prior to an OGTT from 1623 nondiabetic subjects: 955 from the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Study (RISC Study; 11.7% IGT) and 668 subjects from the Diabetes Mellitus and Vascular Health Initiative (DMVhi) cohort from the DEXLIFE project (11.8% IGT). The associations between metabolites, anthropometric, and metabolic parameters and 2hPG values were assessed by Pearson correlation coefficients and Random Forest classification analysis to rank variables for their ability to distinguish IGT from normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Multivariate logistic regression models for estimating risk of IGT were developed and evaluated using AUCs calculated from the corresponding ROC curves. Results: A model based on the fasting plasma levels of glucose, α-hydroxybutyric acid, β-hydroxybutyric acid, 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid, linoleoylglycerophosphocholine, oleic acid, serine and vitamin B5 was optimized in the RISC cohort (AUC = 0.82) and validated in the DMVhi cohort (AUC = 0.83). Conclusions: A novel, all-metabolite-based test is shown to be a discriminate marker of IGT. It requires only a single fasted blood draw and may serve as a more convenient surrogate for the OGTT or as a means of identifying subjects likely to be IGT. PMID:25261439

  14. Effect of nematode Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and status of macrophage in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Takahide; Kajita, Kazuo; Mori, Ichiro; Hanamoto, Takayuki; Fujioka, Kei; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Usui, Taro; Takahashi, Noriko; Kitada, Yoshihiko; Taguchi, Koichiro; Uno, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hiroyuki; Wu, Zhiliang; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo; Kudo, Takuya; Furuya, Kazuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and (pro- or anti-inflammatory) macrophage status in adipose tissue. Ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice (obesity model) and C57/BL mice (control mice) were orally infected with (infected group) or without (uninfected group) 400 Trichinella per mouse. Four weeks later, the mice were subjected to investigation, which showed that fasting plasma glucose levels decreased in the infected group of C57/BL and ob/ob mice. Glucose tolerance, evaluated with intraperitoneal GTT, improved in the infected group of ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice compared with the uninfected groups. Additional assay included anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) markers and pro-inflammatory macrophage (M1) markers, with the aim to explore the effect of Trichinella infection on adipose tissue inflammation, since our previous study identified anti-inflammatory substances in secreted proteins by Trichinella. The result showed that mRNA levels of M2 markers, such as CD206, arginase and IL-10, increased, whereas M1 markers, such as CD11c, iNOS and IL-6, decreased in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Residential macrophages obtained from the peritoneal lavage exhibited lower M1 markers and higher M2 markers levels in the infected group than in the uninfected group. Trichinella infection increases the ratio of M2/M1 systemically, which results in an improvement in pro-inflammatory state in adipose tissue and amelioration of glucose tolerance in obese mice.

  15. Diabetes, glucose tolerance, and the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Eranti, Antti; Kerola, Tuomas; Aro, Aapo L; Tikkanen, Jani T; Rissanen, Harri A; Anttonen, Olli; Junttila, M Juhani; Knekt, Paul; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2016-02-24

    Diabetes predisposes to sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, it is uncertain whether greater proportion of cardiac deaths are sudden among diabetes patients than other subjects. It is also unclear whether the risk of SCD is pronounced already early in the course of the disease. The relationship of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and SCD is scarcely documented. A general population cohort of 10594 middle-aged subjects (mean age 44 years, 52.6 % male, follow-up duration 35-41 years) was divided into diabetes patients (n = 82), subjects with IGT (n = 3806, plasma glucose ≥9.58 mmol/l in one-hour glucose tolerance test), and controls (n = 6706). Diabetes patients had an increased risk of SCD after adjustment confounders (hazard ratio 2.62, 95 % confidence interval 1.46-4.70, p = 0.001) but risk for non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased and the proportion of SCD of cardiac deaths was not increased. The SCD risk persisted after exclusion of subjects with baseline cardiac disease or non-fatal cardiac events during the follow-up. Subjects with IGT were at increased risk for SCD (univariate hazard ratio 1.51; 95 % confidence interval 1.31-1.74; p < 0.001) and also for non-sudden cardiac deaths and non-fatal cardiac events but adjustments for other risk factors attenuated these effects. Diabetes was associated with increased risk of SCD but also the risk of non-sudden cardiac death was similarly increased. The proportion of cardiac deaths being sudden in subjects with diabetes was not increased. The higher SCD risk in diabetes patients was independent of known cardiac disease at baseline or occurrence of non-fatal cardiac event during the follow-up.

  16. Native fructose extracted from apple improves glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Dray, C; Colom, A; Guigné, C; Legonidec, S; Guibert, A; Ouarne, F; Valet, P

    2009-12-01

    Fructose is one of the most abundant monosaccharide in nature. It is also the sweetest naturally occurring carbohydrate. Since decades, fructose used for food preparations is not provided by fruit or vegetable but by a chemical process of starch or inulin conversion. We processed a new method of fructose extraction from apple and investigated the acute and long term effect of this carbohydrate on glucose metabolism in C57Bl6/j mice. By using the glycemic index (GI), we have shown that one of the sugars obtained from apple, FructiLight, has a very low impact on glycemic and insulin response during acute treatment compared to other sugars. This carbohydrate, essentially constituted by fructose, has also beneficial properties when administrated for long term treatment. Indeed, as two other sugars extracted from apple (FructiSweetApple and FructiSweet67), FructiLight exposure during 21 weeks in beverage has promoted an enhancement of glucose tolerance compared to glucose treatment without affecting food intake and weight. All these results indicate that apple-extracted sugars and more precisely fructose from these fruits could be a promising way to produce new food and sweet beverages.

  17. A novel risk classification paradigm for patients with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Bethel, M Angelyn; Chacra, Antonio R; Deedwania, Prakash; Fulcher, Gregory R; Holman, Rury R; Jenssen, Trond; Kahn, Steven E; Levitt, Naomi S; McMurray, John J V; Califf, Robert M; Raptis, Sotirios A; Thomas, Laine; Sun, Jie-Lena; Haffner, Steven M

    2013-07-15

    We used baseline data from the NAVIGATOR trial to (1) identify risk factors for diabetes progression in those with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk, (2) create models predicting 5-year incident diabetes, and (3) provide risk classification tools to guide clinical interventions. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models estimated 5-year incident diabetes risk and simplified models examined the relative importance of measures of glycemia in assessing diabetes risk. The C-statistic was used to compare models; reclassification analyses compare the models' ability to identify risk groups defined by potential therapies (routine or intensive lifestyle advice or pharmacologic therapy). Diabetes developed in 3,254 (35%) participants over 5 years median follow-up. The full prediction model included fasting and 2-hour glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values but demonstrated only moderate discrimination for diabetes (C = 0.70). Simplified models with only fasting glucose (C = 0.67) or oral glucose tolerance test values (C = 0.68) had higher C statistics than models with HbA1c alone (C = 0.63). The models were unlikely to inappropriately reclassify participants to risk groups that might receive pharmacologic therapy. Our results confirm that in a population with dysglycemia and high cardiovascular risk, traditional risk factors are appropriate predictors and glucose values are better predictors than HbA1c, but discrimination is moderate at best, illustrating the challenges of predicting diabetes in a high-risk population. In conclusion, our novel risk classification paradigm based on potential treatment could be used to guide clinical practice based on cost and availability of screening tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of malnutrition during the first year of life on adult plasma insulin and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    González-Barranco, J; Ríos-Torres, J M; Castillo-Martínez, L; López-Alvarenga, J C; Aguilar-Salinas, C A; Bouchard, C; Deprès, J P; Tremblay, A

    2003-08-01

    There is evidence linking intrauterine growth retardation with increased cardiovascular risk and diabetes mellitus (DM) later in life. However, little is known about the association between malnutrition during the first year of life and metabolic abnormalities in adulthood. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of documented malnutrition during the first year of life on glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, lipid profile, and blood pressure in early adulthood, as well as to assess the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and malnutrition on these variables. A study group of young men with a documented history of malnutrition during their first year of life was recruited from 4 pediatric hospitals in Mexico City and compared with a control group. Subjects included were 52 men, aged 20.2 +/- 3.6 years, with a mean birth weight of 3.0 +/- 0.7 kg and documented malnutrition in their first year of life; controls were 50 men, aged 23.3 +/- 1.8 years, with a mean birth weight of 3.2 +/- 0.5 kg. Insulin and glucose concentrations, fasting and in response to an oral glucose load, plasma lipids, blood pressure, and an insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were measured. The areas under the curves of glucose (AUCG) and insulin (AUCI) were significantly higher in cases (P =.012 and <.002, respectively), independent of birth weight, BMI, or age. BMI was significantly associated with fasting plasma insulin (FPI), AUCI, ISI, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentrations in cases, but not in controls. These data suggest that early malnutrition in extrauterine life, independently of birth weight, has an adverse effect on insulin metabolism and glucose tolerance in young men, and it worsens as body mass increases even within the normal range of BMI. Therefore, it is advisable to prevent obesity in individuals exposed to early malnutrition.

  19. [Pancreatic β-cell Functions Measured by Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Han Chinese with Varied Degree of Glucose Tolerance].

    PubMed

    Yue, Yu; He, Hua; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Xiagn-Xun; Chen, Da-Wei; Wang, Chun; Liu, Guan-Jian; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2016-09-01

    To compare the pancreatic β-cell functions of Han people between those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT),prediabetes (PD),and newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (NDDM), and to evaluate the value of the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in determining β-cell functions. A total of 169 volunteers of Han people (20-75 years old, 72 male and 97 female) without diagnosed diabetes were given 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release tests. The body mass index (BMI) of the participants ranged from 18.5 to 28.0 kg/m².They were categorized into NGT (n=87), PD (n=52) and NDDM (n=30) groupsaccording to the World Health Organization (WHO) 1999 criteria.Blood samples were taken to test triglyceride(TG),total cholesterol (TC),and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The participants were also given a 72 h continuous glucose monitoring. The β-cell functions were calculated using the OGTT and insulin release test results, which included homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR),homeostasis model assessment β-cell function (HOMA-B),basic secretion, early phase secretion, and second phase secretion. The area under the curve of glucose (AUC-G) was estimated through the CGMS.A multivariate stepwise regression model was developed to identify predictors of β-cell functions. Significant differences in age,BMI,HOMA-IR,HOMA-B,AUC-G, basic secretion, early phase secretion and second phase secretion were found between the NGT and PD groups (P<0.05) and between the NGT and NDDM groups (P<0.05). Differences in AUC-G and basic secretion and early phase secretion were found between the PD and NDDM groups (P<0.05),but not in age, BMI, HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, and second phase secretion.The multivariate stepwise regression analysis showed that HOMA-B (standardized partical regression coefficient β=-0.244,P=0.001), basic secretion (β=-0.355,P<0.001), and HbA1c (β=0.638,P<0.001) contributed significantly to the AUC-G. β-cell functions decline in

  20. Structural basis for glucose tolerance in GH1 β-glucosidases.

    PubMed

    de Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira; Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil; Souza, Flavio Henrique Moreira; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; Machado, Carla Botelho; Ward, Richard John; Jorge, Joao Atilio; Furriel, Rosa dos Prazeres Melo; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2014-06-01

    Product inhibition of β-glucosidases (BGs) by glucose is considered to be a limiting step in enzymatic technologies for plant-biomass saccharification. Remarkably, some β-glucosidases belonging to the GH1 family exhibit unusual properties, being tolerant to, or even stimulated by, high glucose concentrations. However, the structural basis for the glucose tolerance and stimulation of BGs is still elusive. To address this issue, the first crystal structure of a fungal β-glucosidase stimulated by glucose was solved in native and glucose-complexed forms, revealing that the shape and electrostatic properties of the entrance to the active site, including the +2 subsite, determine glucose tolerance. The aromatic Trp168 and the aliphatic Leu173 are conserved in glucose-tolerant GH1 enzymes and contribute to relieving enzyme inhibition by imposing constraints at the +2 subsite that limit the access of glucose to the -1 subsite. The GH1 family β-glucosidases are tenfold to 1000-fold more glucose tolerant than GH3 BGs, and comparative structural analysis shows a clear correlation between active-site accessibility and glucose tolerance. The active site of GH1 BGs is located in a deep and narrow cavity, which is in contrast to the shallow pocket in the GH3 family BGs. These findings shed light on the molecular basis for glucose tolerance and indicate that GH1 BGs are more suitable than GH3 BGs for biotechnological applications involving plant cell-wall saccharification.

  1. Determinants of Glycated Hemoglobin in Subjects With Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Subanalysis of the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Naoki; Sato, Juichi; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Tsujii, Satoru; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawazu, Shoji; Sato, Yuzo; Usui, Takeshi; Kamae, Isao; Yoshida, Toshihide; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sato, Shigeaki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Kaoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi; Group, JDPP Research

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited evidence is available about the relationship of lifestyle factors with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The aim of study was to identify such determinant factors of HbA1c in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Methods This cross-sectional study included 121 men and 124 women with impaired glucose tolerance, who were diagnosed based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Demographic and biochemical parameters, including the body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load glucose (2-h PG), and HbA1c, were measured. The pancreatic β-cell function and insulin resistance were assessed using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-β). Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Results The levels of FPG, 2-h PG, and carbohydrate intake were correlated with the HbA1c level in men, while the FPG and 2-h PG levels were correlated with the HbA1c level in women. In multiple regression analyses, BMI, FPG, 2-h PG, and white rice intake were associated with HbA1c levels in men, while BMI, FPG, HOMA-β, and bread intake were associated with HbA1c levels in women. Conclusions The present findings suggest that a substantial portion of HbA1c may be composed of not only glycemic but also several lifestyle factors in men with impaired glucose tolerance. These factors can be taken into consideration as modifiable determinants in assessing the HbA1c level for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of the disease course. PMID:28270897

  2. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2009-10-07

    Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the trial (RR 0.33; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.58). However, all trials had a considerable risk of bias and none

  3. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Search strategy We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. Main results This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the

  4. Skeletal muscle signaling associated with impaired glucose tolerance in spinal cord-injured men and the effects of contractile activity

    PubMed Central

    Yarar-Fisher, Ceren; Bickel, C. Scott; Windham, Samuel T.; McLain, Amie B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying poor glucose tolerance in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), along with its improvement after several weeks of neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise (NMES-RE) training, remain unclear, but presumably involve the affected skeletal musculature. We, therefore, investigated skeletal muscle signaling pathways associated with glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) translocation at rest and shortly after a single bout of NMES-RE in SCI (n = 12) vs. able-bodied (AB, n = 12) men. Subjects completed an oral glucose tolerance test during visit 1 and ≈90 NMES-RE isometric contractions of the quadriceps during visit 2. Muscle biopsies were collected before, and 10 and 60 min after, NMES-RE. We assessed transcript levels of GLUT-4 by quantitative PCR and protein levels of GLUT-4 and phosphorylated- and total AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α, CaMKII, Akt, and AS160 by immunoblotting. Impaired glucose tolerance in SCI was confirmed by higher (P < 0.05) plasma glucose concentrations than AB at all time points after glucose ingestion, despite equivalent insulin responses to the glucose load. GLUT-4 protein content was lower (P < 0.05) in SCI vs. AB at baseline. Main group effects revealed higher phosphorylation in SCI of AMPK-α, CaMKII, and Akt (P < 0.05), and Akt phosphorylation increased robustly (P < 0.05) following NMES-RE in SCI only. In SCI, low skeletal muscle GLUT-4 protein concentration may, in part, explain poor glucose tolerance, whereas heightened phosphorylation of relevant signaling proteins (AMPK-α, CaMKII) suggests a compensatory effort. Finally, it is encouraging to find (based on Akt) that SCI muscle remains both sensitive and responsive to mechanical loading (NMES-RE) even ≈22 yr after injury. PMID:23766505

  5. Effect of aging and oral tolerance on dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Simioni, P U; Fernandes, L G R; Gabriel, D L; Tamashiro, W M S C

    2010-01-01

    Oral tolerance can be induced in some mouse strains by gavage or spontaneous ingestion of dietary antigens. In the present study, we determined the influence of aging and oral tolerance on the secretion of co-stimulatory molecules by dendritic cells (DC), and on the ability of DC to induce proliferation and cytokine secretion by naive T cells from BALB/c and OVA transgenic (DO11.10) mice. We observed that oral tolerance could be induced in BALB/c mice (N = 5 in each group) of all ages (8, 20, 40, 60, and 80 weeks old), although a decline in specific antibody levels was observed in the sera of both tolerized and immunized mice with advancing age (40 to 80 weeks old). DC obtained from young, adult and middle-aged (8, 20, and 40 weeks old) tolerized mice were less efficient (65, 17 and 20%, respectively) than DC from immunized mice (P < 0.05) in inducing antigen-specific proliferation of naive T cells from both BALB/c and DO11.10 young mice, or in stimulating IFN-g, IL-4 and IL-10 production. However, TGF-beta levels were significantly elevated in co-cultures carried out with DC from tolerant mice (P < 0.05). DC from both immunized and tolerized old and very old (60 and 80 weeks old) mice were equally ineffective in inducing T cell proliferation and cytokine production (P < 0.05). A marked reduction in CD86+ marker expression was observed in DC isolated from both old and tolerized mice (75 and 50%, respectively). The results indicate that the aging process does not interfere with the establishment of oral tolerance in BALB/c mice, but reduces DC functions, probably due to the decline of the expression of the CD86 surface marker.

  6. Abnormal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in pancreas-specific Tcf7l2-null mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva Xavier, G; Mondragon, A; Sun, G; Chen, L; McGinty, J A; French, P M; Rutter, G A

    2012-10-01

    Individuals carrying type 2 diabetes risk alleles in TCF7L2 display decreased beta cell levels of T cell factor 7 like-2 (TCF7L2) immunoreactivity, and impaired insulin secretion and beta cell sensitivity to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Here, we sought to determine whether selective deletion of Tcf7l2 in mouse pancreas impairs insulin release and glucose homeostasis. Pancreas-specific Tcf7l2-null (pTcf7l2) mice were generated by crossing mice carrying conditional knockout alleles of Tcf7l2 (Tcf7l2-flox) with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the Pdx1 promoter (Pdx1.Cre). Gene expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and beta cell mass by optical projection tomography. Glucose tolerance, insulin secretion from isolated islets, and plasma insulin, glucagon and GLP-1 content were assessed by standard protocols. From 12 weeks of age, pTcf7l2 mice displayed decreased oral glucose tolerance vs control littermates; from 20 weeks they had glucose intolerance upon administration of glucose by the intraperitoneal route. pTcf7l2 islets displayed impaired insulin secretion in response to 17 (vs 3.0) mmol/l glucose (54.6 ± 4.6%, p < 0.01) or to 17 mmol/l glucose plus 100 nmol/l GLP-1 (44.3 ± 4.9%, p < 0.01) compared with control islets. Glp1r (42 ± 0.08%, p < 0.01) and Ins2 (15.4 ± 4.6%, p < 0.01) expression was significantly lower in pTcf7l2 islets than in controls. Maintained on a high-fat (but not on a normal) diet, pTcf7l2 mice displayed decreased expansion of pancreatic beta cell volume vs control littermates. No differences were observed in plasma insulin, proinsulin, glucagon or GLP-1 concentrations. Selective deletion of Tcf7l2 in the pancreas replicates key aspects of the altered glucose homeostasis in human carriers of TCF7L2 risk alleles, indicating the direct role of this factor in controlling beta cell function.

  7. Impact of maternal chromium restriction on glucose tolerance, plasma insulin and oxidative stress in WNIN rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, Inagadapa J N; Rao, Kalashikam Rajender; Raghunath, Manchala

    2011-12-01

    Robust evidence suggests that nutritional insult during fetal development could program the offspring to glucose intolerance, impaired insulin response and insulin resistance (IR). Considering the importance of chromium (Cr) in maintaining carbohydrate metabolism, this study determined the effect of maternal Cr restriction (CrR) on glucose metabolism and plasma insulin in Wistar/NIN (WNIN) rat offspring and the associated biochemical and/or molecular mechanisms. Female, weanling WNIN rats received ad libitum for 12 weeks, a control diet or the same with 65% restriction of Cr and mated with control males. Some of the Cr-restricted dams were rehabilitated from conception or parturition and their pups weaned on to control diet. At the time of weaning, half of the Cr restricted offspring were rehabilitated to control diet while others continued on Cr-restricted diet. Maternal CrR increased fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of IR, and area under the curve of glucose and insulin during oral glucose tolerance test in the offspring. Expression and activity of rate-limiting enzymes of glucose metabolism were comparable among different groups and expression of genes involved in insulin secretion was increased albeit in male offspring whereas antioxidant enzyme activities were decreased in offspring of both genders. Rehabilitation, in general, corrected the changes albeit partially. Maternal dietary CrR induced IR, impaired glucose tolerance in WNIN rat offspring and was associated with increased oxidative stress, which may predispose them to type 2 diabetes in their later life.

  8. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in subjects with reduced glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes - the Tromsø OGTT-study.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Moira S; Figenschau, Yngve; Almås, Bjørg; Njølstad, Inger; Jorde, Rolf

    2011-09-01

    The relationships between vitamin D concentrations, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance remain uncertain. During 2008 - 2010, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 3520 subjects from Tromsø, Norway. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in 1193 subjects with normal glucose tolerance, in 304 with isolated impaired fasting glucose, in 254 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance, in 139 with a combination of the two, and in 194 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Serum 25(OH)D did not differ between subjects with isolated impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance, but was lower in all groups of deranged glucose metabolism as compared with normal subjects. These differences could not be explained by differences in intakes of vitamin D from cod liver oil or other supplements and remained statistically significant after adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, physical activity score, and month of examination. When the cohort was divided according to serum 25(OH)D quartiles, there was an improvement in all measures of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, serum insulin, HbA(1c)) and estimates of insulin resistance (QUICKI , HOMA-IR, ISI(0.120)) with increasing serum 25(OH)D quartile. However, interventional studies are needed to prove a causal relationship between vitamin D and glucose metabolism.

  9. Impaired Increase of Plasma Abscisic Acid in Response to Oral Glucose Load in Type 2 Diabetes and in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ameri, Pietro; Bruzzone, Santina; Mannino, Elena; Sociali, Giovanna; Andraghetti, Gabriella; Salis, Annalisa; Ponta, Monica Laura; Briatore, Lucia; Adami, Giovanni F.; Ferraiolo, Antonella; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Maggi, Davide; Cordera, Renzo; Murialdo, Giovanni; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is present and active in humans, regulating glucose homeostasis. In normal glucose tolerant (NGT) human subjects, plasma ABA (ABAp) increases 5-fold after an oral glucose load. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an oral glucose load on ABAp in type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects. We chose two sub-groups of patients who underwent an oral glucose load for diagnostic purposes: i) 9 treatment-naive T2D subjects, and ii) 9 pregnant women with gestational diabetes (GDM), who underwent the glucose load before and 8–12 weeks after childbirth. Each group was compared with matched NGT controls. The increase of ABAp in response to glucose was found to be abrogated in T2D patients compared to NGT controls. A similar result was observed in the women with GDM compared to pregnant NGT controls; 8–12 weeks after childbirth, however, fasting ABAp and ABAp response to glucose were restored to normal in the GDM subjects, along with glucose tolerance. We also retrospectively compared fasting ABAp before and after bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) in obese, but not diabetic subjects, and in obese T2D patients, in which BPD resulted in the resolution of diabetes. Compared to pre-BPD values, basal ABAp significantly increased 1 month after BPD in T2D as well as in NGT subjects, in parallel with a reduction of fasting plasma glucose. These results indicate an impaired hyperglycemia-induced ABAp increase in T2D and in GDM and suggest a beneficial effect of elevated ABAp on glycemic control. PMID:25723556

  10. Impaired increase of plasma abscisic Acid in response to oral glucose load in type 2 diabetes and in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Pietro; Bruzzone, Santina; Mannino, Elena; Sociali, Giovanna; Andraghetti, Gabriella; Salis, Annalisa; Ponta, Monica Laura; Briatore, Lucia; Adami, Giovanni F; Ferraiolo, Antonella; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Maggi, Davide; Cordera, Renzo; Murialdo, Giovanni; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is present and active in humans, regulating glucose homeostasis. In normal glucose tolerant (NGT) human subjects, plasma ABA (ABAp) increases 5-fold after an oral glucose load. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an oral glucose load on ABAp in type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects. We chose two sub-groups of patients who underwent an oral glucose load for diagnostic purposes: i) 9 treatment-naive T2D subjects, and ii) 9 pregnant women with gestational diabetes (GDM), who underwent the glucose load before and 8-12 weeks after childbirth. Each group was compared with matched NGT controls. The increase of ABAp in response to glucose was found to be abrogated in T2D patients compared to NGT controls. A similar result was observed in the women with GDM compared to pregnant NGT controls; 8-12 weeks after childbirth, however, fasting ABAp and ABAp response to glucose were restored to normal in the GDM subjects, along with glucose tolerance. We also retrospectively compared fasting ABAp before and after bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) in obese, but not diabetic subjects, and in obese T2D patients, in which BPD resulted in the resolution of diabetes. Compared to pre-BPD values, basal ABAp significantly increased 1 month after BPD in T2D as well as in NGT subjects, in parallel with a reduction of fasting plasma glucose. These results indicate an impaired hyperglycemia-induced ABAp increase in T2D and in GDM and suggest a beneficial effect of elevated ABAp on glycemic control.

  11. Lactation Intensity and Postpartum Maternal Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Women With Recent GDM

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Erica P.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Chiang, Vicky; Crites, Yvonne; Walton, David; Azevedo, Robert A.; Fox, Gary; Elmasian, Cathie; Young, Stephen; Salvador, Nora; Lum, Michael; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Lo, Joan C.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Ferrara, Assiamira; Selby, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between breastfeeding intensity in relation to maternal blood glucose and insulin and glucose intolerance based on the postpartum 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results at 6–9 weeks after a pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We selected 522 participants enrolled into the Study of Women, Infant Feeding, and Type 2 Diabetes (SWIFT), a prospective observational cohort study of Kaiser Permanente Northern California members diagnosed with GDM using the 3-h 100-g OGTT by the Carpenter and Coustan criteria. Women were classified as normal, prediabetes, or diabetes according to American Diabetes Association criteria based on the postpartum 2-h 75-g OGTT results. RESULTS Compared with exclusive or mostly formula feeding (>17 oz formula per 24 h), exclusive breastfeeding and mostly breastfeeding (≤6 oz formula per 24 h) groups, respectively, had lower adjusted mean (95% CI) group differences in fasting plasma glucose (mg/dL) of −4.3 (−7.4 to −1.3) and −5.0 (−8.5 to −1.4), in fasting insulin (μU/mL) of −6.3 (−10.1 to −2.4) and −7.5 (−11.9 to −3.0), and in 2-h insulin of −21.4 (−41.0 to −1.7) and −36.5 (−59.3 to −13.7) (all P < 0.05). Exclusive or mostly breastfeeding groups had lower prevalence of diabetes or prediabetes (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Higher intensity of lactation was associated with improved fasting glucose and lower insulin levels at 6–9 weeks’ postpartum. Lactation may have favorable effects on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity that may reduce diabetes risk after GDM pregnancy. PMID:22011407

  12. Impaired glucose tolerance after brief heat exposure: a randomized crossover study in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Faure, Cécile; Charlot, Keyne; Henri, Stéphane; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    A high demand on thermoregulatory processes may challenge homoeostasis, particularly regarding glucose regulation. This has been understudied, although it might concern millions of humans. The objective of this project was to examine the isolated and combined effects of experimental short-term mild heat exposure and metabolic level on glucoregulation. Two experimental randomized crossover studies were conducted. Ten healthy young men participated in study A, which comprises four sessions in a fasting state at two metabolic levels [rest and exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen uptake (O2) for 40 min] in two environmental temperatures (warm: 31°C and control: 22°C). Each session ended with an ad libitum meal, resulting in similar energy intake across sessions. In study B, 12 healthy young men underwent two 3 h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in warm and control environmental temperatures. Venous blood was sampled at several time points. In study A, repeated measure ANOVAs revealed higher postprandial serum glucose and insulin levels with heat exposure. Glycaemia following the OGTT was higher in the warm temperature compared with control. The kinetics of the serum glucose response to the glucose load was also affected by the environmental temperature (temperature-by-time interaction, P=0.030), with differences between the warm and control conditions observed up to 90 min after the glucose load (all P<0.033). These studies provide evidence that heat exposure alters short-term glucoregulation. The implication of this environmental factor in the physiopathology of Type 2 diabetes has yet to be investigated.

  13. Green tea extract ingestion, fat oxidation, and glucose tolerance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Venables, Michelle C; Hulston, Carl J; Cox, Hannah R; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-03-01

    Green tea consumption is reportedly associated with various health-promoting properties. For example, it has been shown to promote fat oxidation in humans at rest and to prevent obesity and improve insulin sensitivity in mice. We investigated the effects of acute ingestion of green tea extract (GTE) on glucose tolerance and fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise in humans. Two studies were performed, both with a counter-balanced crossover design. In study A, 12 healthy men performed a 30-min cycling exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) before and after supplementation. In study B, 11 healthy men took an oral-glucose-tolerance test before and after supplementation. In the 24-h period before the experimental trials, participants ingested 3 capsules containing either GTE (total: 890 +/- 13 mg polyphenols and 366 +/- 5 mg EGCG) or a corn-flour placebo (total: 1729 +/- 22 mg). Average fat oxidation rates were 17% higher after ingestion of GTE than after ingestion of placebo (0.41 +/- 0.03 and 0.35 +/- 0.03 g/min, respectively; P < 0.05). Moreover, the contribution of fat oxidation to total energy expenditure was also significantly higher, by a similar percentage, after GTE supplementation. The insulin area under the curve decreased in both the GTE and placebo trials (3612 +/- 301 and 4280 +/- 309 microIU/dL . 120 min, respectively; P < 0.01), and there was a concomitant increase of 13% in insulin sensitivity. Acute GTE ingestion can increase fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise and can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy young men.

  14. Glucose tolerance and lipid-lipoprotein levels in middle-aged powerlifters.

    PubMed

    Hurley, B F; Hagberg, J M; Seals, D R; Ehsani, A A; Goldberg, A P; Holloszy, J O

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information regarding the effects of a form of strength training (powerlifting) on certain coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors in middle-aged men. The risk factors studied were the plasma lipid-lipoprotein profile, glucose tolerance and plasma insulin levels, all of which have been shown to be favourably influenced by endurance training in middle-aged and older men. Five elite powerlifters (52 +/- 9 years) were compared to distance runners and sedentary controls of similar age with whom they were matched in terms of body fatness as estimated from skin-fold thickness measurements. The powerlifters had a significantly (P less than 0.01) lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) level (34 +/- 4 mg/100 ml) than the sedentary controls (48 +/- 12 mg/100 ml) and runners (54 +/- 8 mg/100 ml). The total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio, a good indicator of CAD risk, was 41% higher in the powerlifters than in the controls, and 57% higher than in the runners (both P less than 0.01). The total area under the glucose tolerance curve during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for the powerlifters was 74% higher than for the sedentary controls (P less than 0.05) and 229% higher than for runners (P less than 0.01). Similarly, the total area under the OGTT insulin curve for the powerlifters was 68% higher than for sedentary controls and 332% higher than for the runners (P less than 0.001). These findings suggest that middle-aged powerlifters, in marked contrast to endurance athletes, have an increased risk of developing CAD.

  15. Effect of Rosiglitazone and Ramipril on β-Cell Function in People With Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Anthony J.; Zinman, Bernard; Sheridan, Patrick; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which ramipril and/or rosiglitazone changed β-cell function over time among individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who participated in the Diabetes Reduction Assessment With Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) Trial, which evaluated whether ramipril and/or rosiglitazone could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The present analysis included subjects (n = 982) from DREAM trial centers in Canada who had oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline, after 2 years, and at the end of the study. β-Cell function was assessed using the fasting proinsulin–to–C-peptide ratio (PI/C) and the insulinogenic index (defined as 30–0 min insulin/30–0 min glucose) divided by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (insulinogenic index [IGI]/insulin resistance [IR]). RESULTS Subjects receiving rosiglitazone had a significant increase in IGI/IR between baseline and end of study compared with the placebo group (25.59 vs. 1.94, P < 0.0001) and a significant decrease in PI/C (−0.010 vs. −0.006, P < 0.0001). In contrast, there were no significant changes in IGI/IR or PI/C in subjects receiving ramipril compared with placebo (11.71 vs. 18.15, P = 0.89, and −0.007 vs. −0.008, P = 0.64, respectively). The impact of rosiglitazone on IGI/IR and PI/C was similar within subgroups of isolated IGT and IFG + IGT (all P < 0.001). Effects were more modest in those with isolated IFG (IGI/IR: 8.95 vs. 2.13, P = 0.03; PI/C: −0.003 vs. −0.001, P = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with rosiglitazone, but not ramipril, resulted in significant improvements in measures of β-cell function over time in pre-diabetic subjects. Although the long-term sustainability of these improvements cannot be determined from the present study, these findings demonstrate that the diabetes preventive effect of rosiglitazone was

  16. Systemic effects of oral tolerance reduce the cutaneous scarring.

    PubMed

    Costa, Raquel Alves; Matos, Liana Biajoli Otoni; Cantaruti, Thiago Anselmo; de Souza, Kênia Soares; Vaz, Nelson Monteiro; Carvalho, Cláudia Rocha

    2016-03-01

    Immunological tolerance refer to the inhibition of specific immune responsiveness and the ingestion of proteins previous to immunization is a reliable method to induce (oral) tolerance. Parenteral exposure to tolerated antigens, in adjuvant, trigger indirect and systemic effects that inhibits concomitant immune responses to other unrelated antigens and also decrease unrelated inflammatory responses. Interesting, intraperitoneal (i.p.) exposure to orally-tolerated proteins soon before an incisional linear skin wound improves the healing by primary intention in mice. An important clinical and surgical objective is to identify strategies to improve wound healing and reduce scarring. To evaluate whether i.p. injection of an orally-tolerated protein improves wound healing by secondary intention and reduce scarring of full-thickness excisional skin injury. C57Bl/6 mice were turned tolerant to ovalbumin (OVA) by drinking a solution containing OVA; seven days later, they received an i.p. injection of OVA plus Al(OH)3 adjuvant immediately before two full-thickness excisional skin wounds, under anesthesia. The wound healing process was evaluated macro and microscopically after H&E, toluidine blue and Gomori's Trichrome staining. The presence of granulocytes, macrophages, miofibroblasts, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III was investigated by immunofluorescence and the levels of cytokines by flow cytometry or ELISA. Mice not tolerant to OVA were included as controls. The i.p. injection of OVA+Al(OH)3 in mice orally tolerant to OVA reduced the subsequent inflammatory response in the wound bed and the cutaneous scarring. There was a change in the pattern of collagen deposition making it more similar to the pattern observed in intact skin. In tolerant mice, mast cells and granulocytes (Ly-6C/G+), were reduced, while lymphocytes (CD3+) were increased in the wound bed. Time course analysis of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and growth factors showed slightly differences between

  17. Associations between maternal BMI as well as glucose tolerance and adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ying; Ye, Su-Qi; Zhong, Zhuo-Hui; Xu, Qiong; Mai, Wei-Bi; Yin, Cai-Xin; Zhu, Zhi-Qin; He, Xiao-Qian; Xiao, Qing

    2017-04-01

    This retrospective, cohort study examined the association between maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), independent of glucose tolerance and adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), for which there are few previous studies. Medical records from 2012 to 2015 at Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, China were reviewed for women previously diagnosed with PCOS with normal 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results (n = 1249). The separate and joint effects of maternal BMI and glucose levels on pregnancy outcomes were assessed. Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.02-1.45), preterm birth (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.08-2.17), and large for gestational age (LGA) (OR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.16-2.20). Elevated fasting glucose and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI were jointly associated with increased risks of HDP, preterm birth, and LGA. Therefore, among women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI is an independent risk factor of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  18. The hypertriglyceridemia is associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if hypertriglyceridemia is associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance. A total of 365 apparently healthy individuals aged 20-65 years were enrolled in a population-based cross-sectional study. Subjects were allocated into the groups with and without hypertriglyceridemia. Age, gender, body mass index, and waist circumference were matched criteria. Individuals with impaired fasting glucose, impaired fasting glucose+impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index ≥ 2.5, and/or chronic illnesses such as renal disease or malignancy were excluded. Hypertriglyceridemia was defined by triglycerides levels ≥ 150 mg/dL. Impaired glucose tolerance was defined by plasma glucose concentration 2-h post-load glucose ≥ 140 mg/dL <200 mg/dL. Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were required to have fasting plasma glucose levels <100 mg/dL. Logistic regression analysis was used to compute the odds ratio between hypertriglyceridemia (independent variable) and impaired glucose tolerance (dependent variable). A total of 132 and 233 subjects were allocated into the groups with and without hypertriglyceridemia, respectively. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance was 13.6% and 5.6% in the individuals with and without hypertriglyceridemia, p = 0.01. The logistic regression analysis adjusted by gender, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol showed that hypertriglyceridemia is significantly associated with impaired glucose tolerance (OR 2.34; 95% CI: 1.02-5.32, p = 0.04). Results of this study indicate that hypertriglyceridemia is independently associated with isolated impaired glucose tolerance in subjects without insulin resistance.

  19. Hypothalamic POMC Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance Despite Insulin Resistance by Increasing Glycosuria

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jessica M.; Fagel, Brian; Lam, Daniel D.; Qi, Nathan; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is essential for the physiological regulation of energy balance; however, its role in glucose homeostasis remains less clear. We show that hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc)POMC-deficient mice, which develop severe obesity and insulin resistance, unexpectedly exhibit improved glucose tolerance and remain protected from hyperglycemia. To explain these paradoxical phenotypes, we hypothesized that an insulin-independent pathway is responsible for the enhanced glucose tolerance. Indeed, the mutant mice demonstrated increased glucose effectiveness and exaggerated glycosuria relative to wild-type littermate controls at comparable blood glucose concentrations. Central administration of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan II in mutant mice reversed alterations in glucose tolerance and glycosuria, whereas, conversely, administration of the antagonist Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) to wild-type mice enhanced glucose tolerance. The glycosuria of ArcPOMC-deficient mice was due to decreased levels of renal GLUT 2 (rGLUT2) but not sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 and was associated with reduced renal catecholamine content. Epinephrine treatment abolished the genotype differences in glucose tolerance and rGLUT2 levels, suggesting that reduced renal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is the underlying mechanism for the observed glycosuria and improved glucose tolerance in ArcPOMC-deficient mice. Therefore, the ArcPOMC-SNS-rGLUT2 axis is potentially an insulin-independent therapeutic target to control diabetes. PMID:26467632

  20. Steroid-induced impairment of glucose tolerance: Prevalence among pediatric patients on long-term steroid use in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chikani, U N; Ibekwe, M U; Oguonu, T; Mungai, L; Bisi-Onyemaechi, A I; Ugege, O M; Ogbonna, I F; de Beaufort, Carine

    2017-03-06

    Glucocorticoid (referred to from here on as simply steroid) is used for effective treatment of various inflammatory disorders since its discovery in 1940s. However, these useful drugs cause important side effects, such as impairment of glucose tolerance. We sought to determine the prevalence of steroid-induced impairment of glucose tolerance in pediatric patients on long-term steroid use. A cross-sectional, descriptive and hospital-based study. Consenting subjects who met the inclusion criteria were screened with random glucometer measurements repeated twice. An average of both readings obtained from the initial measurement of their random blood glucose (RBG) and a repeat during the next clinic visit was taken as the RBG. Hundred patients were studied, 66 males/34 females. Subjects with nephrotic syndrome were 61 while 39 had asthma. Mean age of 10.13 years (range: 0.5-18 years); mean body mass index (BMI): 18.2 kg/m(2) (range: 6.6 to 26.30 kg/m(2) ). The subjects with nephrotic syndrome were on oral prednisolone while the asthmatics were on inhaled fluticasone, budesonide and oral methylprednisolone. Mean (range) duration of steroid use was 9.74 (0.5-72) months. Mean (range) RBG was 3.49 (3.3-7.5) mmol/L. None of the subjects showed abnormal RBG. However, the RBG was further categorized into low, moderate and high normal RBG. A positive correlation between longer duration of steroid use as well as high doses of both oral and inhaled steroids, and high normal RBG existed (P = .015). No statistically significant relationship existed between body mass index (BMI) percentile and RBG (P = .437). Low to moderate doses of oral and inhaled steroids should be used when indicated as they are associated with lesser risk of impairment of glucose tolerance in the pediatric population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of oral glucose on serum zinc in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.L.; Kohrs, M.B.; Horwitz, D.L.; Cyborski, C.K.; Czajka-Narins, D.M.; Kamath, S.

    1986-03-05

    To determine the effect of glucose loading on serum zinc concentrations, 34 elderly subjects aged 60-86 y were studied. Anthropometric data, medical and dietary histories were obtained. Serum zinc and glucose concentrations were obtained fasting and 1/2, 1, 1 1/2, 2 and 3 h after 75 g oral glucose load; glycohemoglobin and fasting serum lipids were also determined. For comparison, the subjects were categorized as: normal or low serum zinc concentrations; normal or high body mass index BMI; normal or high sum of skinfolds and normal or high serum cholesterol. Results showed that low serum zinc concentrations increased significantly over baseline values after the glucose load and did not return to fasting levels. On the other hand, mean serum zinc concentrations significantly declined without recovery for those with normal zinc values. For the total group, no significant differences were noted between fasting values and subsequent time periods. No correlations were noted between fasting serum zinc and area under the curve for zinc except in the high BMI group (positive correlation observed). For the high BMI group, fasting serum zinc differed significantly from the succeeding measurements except for 30 min. For the group as a whole, mean serum zinc concentration was within normal limits (76.9 +/- 2.8 mcg/ml): mean zinc intake was less than 2/3rds the RDA. They conclude that glucose ingestion may alter serum zinc and should be considered in interpreting these levels.

  2. Acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Aimée E; Olthof, Margreet R; Meeuse, Joke C; Seebus, Elin; Heine, Rob J; van Dam, Rob M

    2009-06-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. We conducted a randomized crossover trial of the effects of 12 g decaffeinated coffee, 1 g chlorogenic acid, 500 mg trigonelline, and placebo (1 g mannitol) on glucose and insulin concentrations during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 15 overweight men. Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline ingestion significantly reduced glucose (-0.7 mmol/l, P = 0.007, and -0.5 mmol/l, P = 0.024, respectively) and insulin (-73 pmol/l, P = 0.038, and -117 pmol/l, P = 0.007) concentrations 15 min following an OGTT compared with placebo. None of the treatments affected insulin or glucose area under the curve values during the OGTT compared with placebo. Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline reduced early glucose and insulin responses during an OGTT.

  3. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  4. The capsaicin analog nonivamide decreases total energy intake from a standardized breakfast and enhances plasma serotonin levels in moderately overweight men after administered in an oral glucose tolerance test: a randomized, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Hochkogler, Christina M; Rohm, Barbara; Hojdar, Karin; Pignitter, Marc; Widder, Sabine; Ley, Jakob P; Krammer, Gerhard E; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-06-01

    Since bolus administration of capsaicin has been shown to reduce appetite and ad libitum energy intake, this study elucidated the satiating effect of the less pungent capsaicin analog, nonivamide, on subjective feelings of hunger, ad libitum food intake, and satiating hormones in moderately overweight male subjects. Following a randomized, crossover design, 24 male subjects (BMI 27.5 ± 1.53 kg/m(2) ) received either 75 g glucose in 300 mL water (control treatment, CT) or the same glucose solution supplemented with 0.15 mg nonivamide (nonivamide treatment, NT). Ratings of hunger were assessed before and 2 h after each intervention by means of visual analog scales. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes from a standardized breakfast 2 h postintervention were calculated. Plasma glucose, insulin, peptide YY (3-36), glucagon-like peptide 1, and serotonin were quantified in blood samples drawn before and 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after each intervention. NT reduced subjective feelings of hunger and ad libitum energy and carbohydrate intakes from a standardized breakfast compared to CT. Plasma analysis revealed higher mean plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 and serotonin concentrations after NT versus CT. Addition of 0.15 mg nonivamide to a glucose solution reduced ad libitum energy intake from a standardized breakfast in moderately overweight men. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Dosing obese cats based on body weight spuriously affects some measures of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Reeve-Johnson, M K; Rand, J S; Anderson, S T; Appleton, D J; Morton, J M; Vankan, D

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective was to investigate whether dosing glucose by body weight results in spurious effects on measures of glucose tolerance in obese cats because volume of distribution does not increase linearly with body weight. Healthy research cats (n = 16; 6 castrated males, 10 spayed females) were used. A retrospective study was performed using glucose concentration data from glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests before and after cats were fed ad libitum for 9 to 12 mo to promote weight gain. The higher dose of glucose (0.5 vs 0.3 g/kg body weight) in the glucose tolerance tests increased 2-min glucose concentrations (P < 0.001), and there was a positive correlation between 2-min and 2-h glucose (r = 0.65, P = 0.006). Two-min (P = 0.016 and 0.019, respectively), and 2-h (P = 0.057 and 0.003, respectively) glucose concentrations, and glucose half-life (T1/2; P = 0.034 and <0.001 respectively) were positively associated with body weight and body condition score. Glucose dose should be decreased by 0.05 g for every kg above ideal body weight. Alternatively, for every unit of body condition score above 5 on a 9-point scale, observed 2-h glucose concentration should be adjusted down by 0.1 mmol/L. Dosing glucose based on body weight spuriously increases glucose concentrations at 2 h in obese cats and could lead to cats being incorrectly classified as having impaired glucose tolerance. This has important implications for clinical studies assessing the effect of interventions on glucose tolerance when lean and obese cats are compared.

  6. Acute postexercise effects of concentric and eccentric exercise on glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matthew David; Myers, Stephen David; Kelly, John Stephen Michael; Willems, Mark Elisabeth Theodorus

    2015-02-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance was shown to be present 48 hr following muscle-damaging eccentric exercise. We examined the acute effect of concentric and muscle-damaging eccentric exercise, matched for intensity, on the responses to a 2-hr 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Ten men (27 ± 9 years, 178 ± 7 cm, 75 ± 11 kg, VO₂max: 52.3 ± 7.3 ml · kg⁻¹ · min⁻¹) underwent three OGTTs after an overnight 12 hr fast: rest (control), 40-min (5 × 8-min with 2-min interbout rest) of concentric (level running, 0%, CON) or eccentric exercise (downhill running, -12%, ECC). Running intensity was matched at 60% of maximal metabolic equivalent. Maximal isometric force of m. quadriceps femoris of both legs was measured before and after the running protocols. Downhill running speed was higher (level: 9.7 ± 2.1, downhill: 13.8 ± 3.2 km · hr⁻¹, p < .01). Running protocols had similar VO₂max (p = .59), heart rates (p = .20) and respiratory exchange ratio values (p = .74) indicating matched intensity and metabolic demands. Downhill running resulted in higher isometric force deficits (level: 3.0 ± 6.7, downhill: 17.1 ± 7.3%, p < .01). During OGTTs, area-under-the-curve for plasma glucose (control: 724 ± 97, CON: 710 ± 77, ECC: 726 ± 72 mmol · L⁻¹ · 120 min, p = .86) and insulin (control: 24995 ± 11229, CON: 23319 ± 10417, ECC: 21842 ± 10171 pmol · L⁻¹ · 120 min, p = .48), peak glucose (control: 8.1 ± 1.3, CON: 7.7 ± 1.2, ECC: 7.7 ± 1.1 mmol · L⁻¹, p = .63) and peak insulin levels (control: 361 ± 188, CON: 322 ± 179, ECC: 299 ± 152 pmol · L⁻¹, p = .30) were similar. It was concluded that glucose tolerance and the insulin response to an OGTT were not changed immediately by muscle-damaging eccentric exercise.

  7. Seventy-five gram glucose tolerance test to assess carbohydrate malabsorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Urita, Yoshihisa; Ishihara, Susumu; Akimoto, Tatsuo; Kato, Hiroto; Hara, Noriko; Honda, Yoshiko; Nagai, Yoko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Shimada, Nagato; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Miki, Kazumasa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate non-invasively the incidence of absorption of carbohydrates in diabetic patients during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to determine whether malabsorption may be associated with insulin secretion and insulin resistance. METHODS: A standard 75-g OGTT was performed in 82 diabetic patients. The patients received 75 g of anhydrous glucose in 225 mL of water after an overnight fasting and breath samples were collected at baseline and up to 120 min after ingestion. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations were measured. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured before ingestion and at 30, 60, 90, 120 min post-ingestion. RESULTS: When carbohydrate malabsorption was defined as subjects with an increase of at least 10 ppm (parts per million) in hydrogen or methane excretion within a 2-h period, 28 (34%) had carbohydrate malabsorption. According to the result of increased breath test, 21 (75%) patients were classified as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and 7 (25%) as glucose malabsorption. Patients with carbohydrate malabsorption were older and had poor glycemic control as compared with those without carbohydrate malabsorption. The HOMA value, the sum of serum insulin during the test and the Δinsulin/Δglucose ratio were greater in patients with carbohydrate malabsorption. CONCLUSION: Insulin resistance may be overestimated by using these markers if the patient has carbohydrate malabsorption, or that carbohydrate malabsorption may be present prior to the development of insulin resistance. Hence carbohydrate malabsorption should be taken into account for estimating insulin resistance and β-cell function. PMID:16718794

  8. A Blend of Phellodendron and Crape Myrtle Improves Glucose Tolerance in Exercise-Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Robert E.; Farney, Tyler M.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Bloomer, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of a nutritional supplement containing a proprietary blend of Phellodendron and Crape Myrtle on serum glucose and insulin in response to a modified oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methods: Using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, 10 exercise-trained, non-diabetic men reported to the lab in a 10 hour fasted state, on two different mornings separated by 1–2 weeks, and were subjected to an OGTT by ingesting a 75 gram dextrose solution. Fifteen minutes prior to the OGTT subjects ingested either a dietary supplement containing a blend of Phellodendron and Crape Myrtle (SUPP) or a placebo (PLA). Blood samples were collected before ingestion of the SUPP or PLA and at 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 minutes post-ingestion of the dextrose load. Samples were analyzed for serum glucose and insulin. Results: In relation to serum glucose, a condition effect was noted (P = 0.01), with values lower for SUPP compared to PLA. In relation to serum insulin, a trend for a condition effect was noted (P = 0.06), with values lower for SUPP compared to PLA. Conclusion: These findings indicate that acute ingestion of a dietary supplement containing a blend of Phellodendron and Crape Myrtle can lower the serum glucose response to a modified OGTT, while resulting in a non-significant attenuation in insulin response. These data are specific to a small sample of exercise-trained, non-diabetic men. PMID:23946660

  9. Influence of the interleukin-6 -174 G/C gene polymorphism on exercise training-induced changes in glucose tolerance indexes.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jennifer A; Weiss, Edward P; Ghiu, Ioana A; Kulaputana, Onanong; Phares, Dana A; Ferrell, Robert E; Hagberg, James M

    2004-10-01

    A polymorphism in the IL-6 gene, a G-to-C substitution 176 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation site, has been associated with diabetes prevalence and insulin resistance. Interventions including exercise training are frequently used to modify cardiovascular disease risk factors. Consequently, this project examined associations between the IL-6 -174 genotype and oral glucose tolerance test outcomes in 50- to 75-yr-old sedentary men and postmenopausal women before and after aerobic exercise training. Among the 87 individuals who started the study, 56 were retested after 6 mo of aerobic exercise training. Subject characteristics at baseline did not differ between the IL-6 genotype groups with the exception of fasting glucose, which was higher (P = 0.02, covariates age, gender, and ethnicity) in the CC genotype group. The training-induced change in glucose area under the curve during the oral glucose tolerance test varied between the IL-6 -174 genotype groups (P = 0.05, covariates age, gender, ethnicity, baseline glucose area under the curve, and percent body fat change) with a significant decrease occurring only in the GG genotype group. Insulin outcomes did not differ among the groups at baseline or after training. Training-induced changes in weight, percent body fat, maximal oxygen consumption, fasting glucose, and an insulin sensitivity index also changed similarly among the genotype groups. In conclusion, fasting glucose and the extent to which glucose tolerance changes with exercise training may be influenced by the IL-6 -174 gene polymorphism.

  10. Age, BMI, and race are less important than random plasma glucose in identifying risk of glucose intolerance: the Screening for Impaired Glucose Tolerance Study (SIGT 5).

    PubMed

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Caudle, Jane M; Irving, Jade M; Koch, David D; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    Age, BMI, and race/ethnicity are used in National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines to prompt screening for pre-diabetes and diabetes, but cutoffs have not been evaluated rigorously. Random plasma glucose (RPG) was measured and 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 1,139 individuals without known diabetes. Screening performance was assessed by logistic regression and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC). NIDDK/ADA indicators age >45 years and BMI >25 kg/m(2) provided significant detection of both diabetes and dysglycemia (both AROCs 0.63), but screening was better with continuous-variable models of age, BMI, and race and better still with models of age, BMI, race, sex, and family history (AROC 0.78 and 0.72). However, screening was even better with RPG alone (AROCs 0.81 and 0.72). RPG >125 mg/dl could be used to prompt further evaluation with an OGTT. Use of age, BMI, and race/ethnicity in guidelines for screening to detect diabetes and pre-diabetes may be less important than evaluation of RPG. RPG should be investigated further as a convenient, inexpensive screen with good predictive utility.

  11. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V; Gydesen, Sofie; Ottosen, Ida; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present study we hypothesized that oral sCT as pharmacological intervention 1) exerted anti-hyperglycemic efficacy, and 2) enhanced insulin action in DIO-streptozotocin (DIO-STZ) diabetic rats. Diabetic hyperglycemia was induced in male selectively bred DIO rats by a single low dose (30mg/kg) injection of STZ. Oral sCT by gavage was delivered as once-daily administration with lead-in (2mg/kg) and maintenance (0.5mg/kg) dose of oral sCT for a total of 21 days. Food intake, body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin tolerance test, and parameters of insulin sensitivity were investigated. Plasma glucoregulatory hormones and pancreatic insulin content were analyzed. Oral sCT treatment induced a pronounced anorectic action during the 7 days lead-in period and markedly reduced food intake and body weight in conjunction with improved glucose homeostasis. During the maintenance period, oral sCT normalized food intake and attenuated weight loss, albeit sustained glycemic control by reducing fasting blood glucose and HbA1c levels compared to those of vehicle-treated rats at the end of study. Notably, plasma levels of insulin, glucagon, leptin and adiponectin were unaltered, albeit insulin action was enhanced in conjunction with protection of pancreatic insulin content. The results of the present study indicate that oral sCT exerts a novel insulin-sensitizing effect to improve glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Intragastric administration of allyl isothiocyanate reduces hyperglycemia in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) by enhancing blood glucose consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Mori, Noriyuki; Kurata, Manami; Yamazaki, Hanae; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nadamoto, Tomonori; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) on the blood glucose levels of mice using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. The intragastric administration of 25 mg/kg body weight AITC reduced the increase in blood glucose level after 2 g/kg body weight glucose was given intraperitoneally, compared with that of control mice. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the reduction, respiratory gas analysis employing (13)C-labeled glucose was performed. The intragastrically administering AITC increased (13)CO2 emission, compared to vehicle, after intraperitoneal administration of (13)C-labeled glucose. This indicated that AITC increased the utilization of exogenously administered glucose, which was excessive glucose in the blood. To examine whether transient receptor potential (TRP) channels mediated this reduction in the blood glucose levels, we used TRPA1 and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. Intragastrically administering AITC reduced the increase in the blood glucose level in TRPA1 KO mice but not in TRPV1 KO mice. These findings suggest that dietary AITC might reduce the increases in blood glucose levels by increasing the utilization of excessive glucose in the blood by activating TRPV1.

  13. Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol levels slightly increase rather than decrease after a glucose load in subjects with different glucose tolerance status.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Ma, Xiaojing; Yin, Jun; Wang, Yufei; He, Xingxing; Bao, Yuqian; Zhou, Jian; Jia, Weiping

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies showed that serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) levels are significantly reduced in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, it remains unclear how 1,5-AG levels acutely change in response to a glucose load. This study explored acute changes in 1,5-AG levels after a glucose load and the related influencing factors in individuals with differing degrees of glucose tolerance. A total of 681 participants (353 without DM and 328 with DM) without a prior history of DM were enrolled. All participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Fasting and postload (30, 60, 120, and 180 min) levels of plasma glucose, serum 1,5-AG, and insulin were measured. In all participant groups, serum 1,5-AG levels were slightly elevated after a glucose load and reached peak values at 120 min after loading (all P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that body weight was negatively associated with the difference between peak and baseline 1,5-AG levels (Δ1,5-AG, standardized β = -0.119, P < 0.01). A strong and positive association between 1,5-AG0 and Δ1,5-AG was also found independent of other confounding factors (standardized β = 0.376, P < 0.01). The ratio of the Δ1,5-AG to the 1,5-AG0 was higher in DM patients (7.3% [3.4-11.5%]) than in those without DM (6.2% [3.6-9.2%]). In contrast to the established decline in 1,5-AG levels with long-term hyperglycemia, the present study showed that serum 1,5-AG levels slightly increased by 6-7% after a glucose load. Further studies in different 1,5-AG transport models are needed to investigate the relevant metabolic pathways.

  14. A comprehensive review of oral glucosamine use and effects on glucose metabolism in normal and diabetic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R R; Marks, V; Leeds, A R; Anderson, J W

    2011-01-01

    Glucosamine (GlcN) is a widely utilized dietary supplement that is used to promote joint health. Reports that oral GlcN supplementation at usual doses adversely affects glucose metabolism in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance have raised concerns that GlcN should be contraindicated in individuals with diabetes and those at risk for developing it. This review addresses its potential, when used at typical doses, to affect glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals and those with diabetes or ‘pre-diabetes’. Publicly available scientific information and data on GlcN were systematically compiled using the electronic search tool, Dialog®, and reviewed with special emphasis on human studies. In long-term clinical trials, including those containing subjects with type 2 diabetes or ‘pre-diabetes’, GlcN produced a non-significant lowering of fasting blood glucose concentrations in all groups of subjects treated for periods of up to 3 years. Owing to limitations in study design, conclusions based on studies that report adverse affects of GlcN on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in pre-diabetic subjects are suspect. However, no definitive long-term studies of GlcN use for individuals with pre-diabetes are available. Nevertheless, based on available evidence, we conclude that GlcN has no effect on fasting blood glucose levels, glucose metabolism, or insulin sensitivity at any oral dose level in healthy subjects, individuals with diabetes, or those with impaired glucose tolerance. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21218504

  15. Clinical Neuropathy Scales in Neuropathy Associated with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay A.; Ruby, Sandra K.; Singh, Sujal; Zhan, Min; Russell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Disagreement exists on effective and sensitive outcome measures in neuropathy associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are costly, invasive and may have their problems with reproducibility and clinical applicability. A clinical measure of neuropathy that has sufficient sensitivity and correlates to invasive measures would enable significant future research. METHODS Data was collected prospectively on patients with IGT and symptomatic early neuropathy (neuropathy symptoms < 2 years) and normal controls. The seven scales that were examined were the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limb (NIS-LL), Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score (MNDS), modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scale (mTCNS), Total Neuropathy Score (Clinical) (TNSc), The Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), the Early Neuropathy Score (ENS), and the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS). RESULTS All seven clinical scales were determined to be excellent in discriminating between patients with neuropathy from controls without neuropathy. The strongest discrimination was seen with the mTCNS. The best sensitivity and specificity for the range of scores obtained, as determined by using receiver operating characteristic curves, was seen for the mTCNS followed by the TNSc. Most scales show a stronger correlation with measures of large than small fiber neuropathy. CONCULSIONS All seven scales identify patients with neuropathy. For the purpose of screening potential patients for a clinical study, the mTCNS followed by the TNSc would be most helpful to select patients with neuropathy. PMID:25690405

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome in idiopathic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Gordon

    2012-05-01

    Idiopathic neuropathy is one of the most common clinical problems encountered in general medical and neurological practices, accounting for up to 40% of all neuropathies in referral series. Several groups have reported an elevated prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in idiopathic neuropathy subjects, although the only carefully conducted case-control study suggested hypertriglyceridemia was a more important risk factor. The nature of the relationship between IGT and neuropathy is a subject of active debate. An evolving literature suggests metabolic syndrome, particularly dyslipidemia and obesity, are potent neuropathy risk factors for both idiopathic and diabetic neuropathy patients. Once established, diabetic neuropathy is likely to be very difficult to reverse. IGT-associated neuropathy, however, may be more amenable to therapy and could represent an ideal population in which to examine potential therapies for diabetes and obesity related neuropathies. Further research is needed to better define the epidemiological relation between IGT, metabolic syndrome, and neuropathy, its underlying pathophysiology, and to develop appropriate surrogate measures and clinical trials strategies.

  17. The impact of ageing, fasting and high-fat diet on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and glucose-sensing neural networks in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    van den Top, Marco; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Pattaranit, Ratchada; Michael, Natalie J; Munder, Astrid; Pryor, Jack T; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2017-08-23

    Obesity and aging are risk factors for diabetes. Here we investigated effects of aging, obesity and fasting on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and on glucose-sensing neuronal function in the arcuate nucleus of rats, with a view to providing insight into central mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis and how they change or are subject to dysfunction with aging and obesity. We show that following a glucose load, central glucose tolerance at the level of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma is significantly reduced in rats maintained on high fat diet (HFD). With aging, up to 2 years, central glucose tolerance was impaired in an age-dependent manner whilst peripheral glucose tolerance remained unaffected. Aging-induced peripheral glucose intolerance was improved by a 24 hour fast, whilst central glucose tolerance was not corrected. Pre-wean, immature animals have elevated basal plasma glucose levels and a delayed increase in central glucose levels following peripheral glucose injection compared to mature animals. Electrophysiological recording techniques revealed an energy-status-dependent role for glucose excited, inhibited and adapting neurons along with glucose-induced changes in synaptic transmission. We conclude that aging affects central whilst HFD profoundly affects central and peripheral glucose tolerance, and glucose-sensing neurons adapt function in an energy-status-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Green tea decoction improves glucose tolerance and reduces weight gain of rats fed normal and high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Chahira; Ducroc, Robert; Hamdaoui, Mohamed Hédi; Dhaouadi, Karima; Abaidi, Houda; Cluzeaud, Francoise; Nazaret, Corinne; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André

    2014-05-01

    Green tea containing polyphenols exerts antidiabetic and antiobesity effects, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In this study, we first analyzed and compared polyphenol compounds [epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin (EGC)] in decoction of green tea leaves versus usual green tea extracts. Second, the effects of acute (30 min) or chronic (6 weeks) oral administration of green tea decoction (GTD) on intestinal glucose absorption were studied in vitro in Ussing chamber, ex vivo using isolated jejunal loops and in vivo through glucose tolerance tests. Finally, we explore in rat model fed normal or high-fat diet the effects of GTD on body weight, blood parameters and on the relative expression of glucose transporters SGLT-1, GLUT2 and GLUT4. GTD cooked for 15 min contained the highest amounts of phenolic compounds. In fasted rats, acute administration of GTD inhibited SGLT-1 activity, increased GLUT2 activity and improved glucose tolerance. Similarly to GTD, acute administration of synthetic phenolic compounds (2/3 EGCG+1/3 EGC) inhibited SGLT-1 activity. Chronic administration of GTD in rat fed high-fat diet reduced body weight gain, circulating triglycerides and cholesterol and improved glucose tolerance. GTD-treated rats for 6 weeks display significantly reduced SGLT-1 and increased GLUT2 mRNA levels in the jejunum mucosa. Moreover, adipose tissue GLUT4 mRNA levels were increased. These results indicate that GTD, a traditional beverage rich in EGCG and EGC reduces intestinal SGLT-1/GLUT2 ratio, a hallmark of regulation of glucose absorption in enterocyte, and enhances adipose GLUT4 providing new insights in its possible role in the control of glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Successful oral tolerance induction in severe peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Clark, A T; Islam, S; King, Y; Deighton, J; Anagnostou, K; Ewan, P W

    2009-08-01

    Peanut allergy is common, potentially severe and rarely resolves causing impaired quality of life. No disease-modifying treatment exists and there is therefore a need to develop a therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate whether peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce clinical tolerance to peanut protein. Four peanut-allergic children underwent OIT. Preintervention oral challenges were performed to confirm clinical allergy and define the amount of protein required to cause a reaction (dose thresholds). OIT was then administered as daily doses of peanut flour increasing from 5 to 800 mg of protein with 2-weekly dose increases. After 6 further weeks of treatment, the oral challenge was repeated to define change in dose threshold and subjects continued daily treatment. Preintervention challenges confirmed peanut allergy and revealed dose thresholds of 5-50 mg (1/40-1/4 of a whole peanut); one subject had anaphylaxis during challenge and required adrenaline injection. All subjects tolerated immunotherapy updosing to 800 mg protein and i.m. adrenaline was not required. Each subject tolerated at least 10 whole peanuts (approximately 2.38 g protein) in postintervention challenges, an increase in dose threshold of at least 48-, 49-, 55- and 478-fold for the four subjects. We demonstrated a substantial increase in dose threshold after OIT in all subjects, including the subject with proven anaphylaxis. OIT was well tolerated and conferred protection against at least 10 peanuts, more than is likely to be encountered during accidental ingestion.

  20. The Oral Tolerance as a Complex Network Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro Jeferson; Delgobo, Murilo; Marino, Giovani Favero; Paludo, Kátia Sabrina; da Silva Baptista, Murilo; de Souza Pinto, Sandro Ely

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of oral tolerance refers to a local and systemic state of tolerance induced in the gut after its exposure to innocuous antigens. Recent findings have shown the interrelationship between cellular and molecular components of oral tolerance, but its representation through a network of interactions has not been investigated. Our work aims at identifying the causal relationship of each element in an oral tolerance network, and also to propose a phenomenological model that's capable of predicting the stochastic behavior of this network when under manipulation. We compared the changes of a "healthy" network caused by "knock-outs" (KOs) in two approaches: an analytical approach by the Perron Frobenius theory; and a computational approach, which we describe within this work in order to find numerical results for the model. Both approaches have shown the most relevant immunological components for this phenomena, that happens to corroborate the empirical results from animal models. Besides explain in a intelligible fashion how the components interacts in a complex manner, we also managed to describe and quantify the importance of KOs that hasn't been empirically tested.

  1. The Oral Tolerance as a Complex Network Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of oral tolerance refers to a local and systemic state of tolerance induced in the gut after its exposure to innocuous antigens. Recent findings have shown the interrelationship between cellular and molecular components of oral tolerance, but its representation through a network of interactions has not been investigated. Our work aims at identifying the causal relationship of each element in an oral tolerance network, and also to propose a phenomenological model that’s capable of predicting the stochastic behavior of this network when under manipulation. We compared the changes of a “healthy” network caused by “knock-outs” (KOs) in two approaches: an analytical approach by the Perron Frobenius theory; and a computational approach, which we describe within this work in order to find numerical results for the model. Both approaches have shown the most relevant immunological components for this phenomena, that happens to corroborate the empirical results from animal models. Besides explain in a intelligible fashion how the components interacts in a complex manner, we also managed to describe and quantify the importance of KOs that hasn’t been empirically tested. PMID:26115356

  2. Tolerosome-induced oral tolerance is MHC dependent

    PubMed Central

    Östman, Sofia; Taube, Maria; Telemo, Esbjörn

    2005-01-01

    Oral administration of a protein antigen generates a serum factor that induces tolerance when transferred into naïve recipients. This serum factor has been described in rats as consisting of exosome-like structures or tolerosomes, which express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHCII) and mediate antigen-specific tolerance. In this study, we investigated the functions of serum-derived tolerosomes both in vivo and in vitro. Tolerosomes were purified from the 100 000 g pellet fraction of serum from ovalbumin (OVA)-fed mice. When transferred into naïve recipient mice, the tolerosomes mediated OVA-specific tolerance. We also found that tolerosomes from OVA-fed mice induced the activation of OVA-specific T cells both in vivo and in vitro. The inoculation of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with an interferon-γ-producing cell line normalized the expression of MHCII in the intestinal epithelial cells and restored their ability to generate tolerosomes. Syngeneic but not allogeneic transfer of tolerosomes from OVA-fed donors induced tolerance in the recipients. Our results show that tolerosomes can be isolated from mouse serum, that tolerosome-induced oral tolerance requires MHCII expression in intestinal epithelial cells, and that tolerosomes are functional only in syngeneic recipients. PMID:16313360

  3. [The titration of double bonds in fatty acids of blood plasma in patients in testing of glucose tolerance].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Sazhina, N N; Evteeva, N M; Aripovskiĭ, A V; Tkhagalizhokova, E M

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with per oral glucose tolerance test applied to 20 patients with arterial hypertension. The blood plasma was analyzed to detect content of individual fatty acids, double bounds, glucose, insulin and metabolites of fatty acids. In patients with different resistance to insulin content of non-etherized fatty acids decreased approximatively up to 3 times. Without insulin resistance secretion of insulin in 2 hours after glucose load increased up to 3 times and content of individual fatty acids decreases in greater extent. Under insulin resistance secretion of insulin increases up to 8 times and decreasing of content of fatty acids is less expressed. The decrease in blood plasma of content of oleic and linoleic fatty acids and double bounds reflects effectiveness of effect of insulin--blockade of hydrolysis of triglycerides in subcutaneous adipocytes. The concentration of insulin positively correlates with initial content of palmitic fatty acid in the pool of lipids of blood plasma.

  4. Glucose tolerance: hypothesis testing on Malaysian diabetic community.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Syed Wasif; Sari, Yelly Oktavia; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Baig, Mirza R

    2014-01-01

    Our study objective was to evaluate glucose tolerance and effecting factors among diabetes patients' with home care program (PHCP) in Malaysian community. A 24-week longitudinal quasi-experimental -single blind - pre/post-test study design was used to assess the effectiveness of a diabetes education program to enhance self-care practices. An attrition rate of 25% implied longitudinal design of the study in the calculation of sample size. Hence the sample size of the study was 106 subjects (53 cases and 53 focus group). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Ethical clearance had been made prior to conducting this study. Of the 109 subjects who met the study-entry criteria, 3 subjects declined to participate due to lack of time and interest. No significant parameters were revealed in the demographic and clinical characteristics of participants who completed the study. Focus group showed significant reduction in HbA1c value with mean 1.1% as compared to cases with a mean 0.06%. Similarly, hypothesis on self-care management suggest significantly improved practices among focus group [M=2.94, SD=2.25] for case group M=0.47, SD=1.36; t[127.64]=-8.23, p≤0.001] with moderate effect size [eta squared=0.06]. Total physical activity was defined as the combination of non-leisure and leisure activities. There was a statistically significant difference for increase in total physical levels between the focus [M=14.01, SD=6.41] and case groups [13.21, SD=5.22; t[148.04]=-3.15, p=0.002] with no difference in the non-leisure activity [p=0.43]. As for the case group, there was no significant difference in SMBG practices from baseline [M=0.70, SD=1.35] to follow-up [M=0.47, SD=1.36, t[72]=0.97, P=0.34] and no relationship was found between the number of blood glucose tests done with demographic or clinical variables. This study offered improved self-care practices and physical activity after PHCP but with problematic dietary care. This might be due to social and cultural habits

  5. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Yang, Jessica N.; Garcia, Joanna I.; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Shea, Steven A.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers. PMID:25870289

  6. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Yang, Jessica N; Garcia, Joanna I; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M; Shea, Steven A; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2015-04-28

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show--by using two 8-d laboratory protocols--in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers.

  7. Exercise Training Reduces Intrathoracic Fat Regardless of Defective Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    HONKALA, SANNA M.; MOTIANI, KUMAIL K.; ESKELINEN, JARI-JOONAS; SAVOLAINEN, ANNA; SAUNAVAARA, VIRVA; VIRTANEN, KIRSI A.; LÖYTTYNIEMI, ELIISA; KAPANEN, JUKKA; KNUUTI, JUHANI; KALLIOKOSKI, KARI K.; HANNUKAINEN, JARNA C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Epicardial (EAT) and pericardial (PAT) fat masses and myocardial triglyceride content (MTC) are enlarged in obesity and insulin resistance. We studied whether the high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) similarly decrease ectopic fat in and around the heart and whether the decrease is similar in healthy subjects and subjects with defective glucose tolerance (DGT). Methods A total of 28 healthy men (body mass index = 20.7–30.0 kg·m−2, age = 40–55 yr) and 16 men with DGT (body mass index = 23.8–33.5 kg·m−2, age = 43–53 yr) were randomized into HIIT and MICT interventions for 2 wk. EAT and PAT were determined by computed tomography and MTC by 1H-MRS. Results At baseline, DGT subjects had impaired aerobic capacity and insulin sensitivity and higher levels of whole body fat, visceral fat, PAT, and EAT (P < 0.05, all) compared with healthy subjects. In the whole group, HIIT increased aerobic capacity (HIIT = 6%, MICT = 0.3%; time × training P = 0.007) and tended to improve insulin sensitivity (HIIT = 24%, MICT = 8%) as well as reduce MTC (HIIT = −42%, MICT = +23%) (time × training P = 0.06, both) more efficiently compared with MICT, and without differences in the training response between the healthy and the DGT subjects. However, both training modes decreased EAT (−5%) and PAT (−6%) fat (time P < 0.05) and not differently between the healthy and the DGT subjects. Conclusion Whole body fat, visceral fat, PAT, and EAT masses are enlarged in DGT. Both HIIT and MICT effectively reduce EAT and PAT in healthy and DGT subjects, whereas HIIT seems to be superior as regards improving aerobic capacity, whole-body insulin sensitivity, and MTC. PMID:28628064

  8. Participation of Leukotrienes in the Immune Modulation of Oral Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Sandra R. P.; Nomizo, Auro; Frantz, Fabiani G.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.; de Matos, Ana Paula Keller; Carrilho, Emanuel; Afonso, Ana; de Freitas Anibal, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Oral tolerance (OT) is characterized as a peripheral immune tolerance form, in which, mature lymphocytes in lymphoid tissues associated with mucosa, become non-functional or hypo responsive due to prior oral administration of antigen. OT is an important immunological phenomenon due to its therapeutic potential in inflammatory processes and others diseases. Here we evaluated leukotriene role in the induction of OT, as well as, the production of cytokines IL-5 and IFN-γ in leukotriene deficient animals (knock-out). Our results suggested that even in the presence of OT and leukotrienes absence, cytokine IFN-γ remains being secreted, which gives us an indication of immune system specificity and also that IFN-γ participates in various immune processes. PMID:28270799

  9. Opuntia ficus-indica ingestion stimulates peripheral disposal of oral glucose before and after exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Ramaekers, Monique; Pischel, Ivo; Hespel, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) cladode and fruit-skin extract on blood glucose and plasma insulin increments due to high-dose carbohydrate ingestion, before and after exercise. Healthy, physically active men (n = 6; 21.0 ± 1.6 years, 78.1 ± 6.0 kg) participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study involving 2 experimental sessions. In each session, the subjects successively underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at rest (OGTT(R)), a 30-min cycling bout at ~75% VO(2max), and another OGTT after exercise (OGTT(EX)). They received capsules containing either 1,000 mg OFI or placebo (PL) 30 min before and immediately after the OGTT(R). Blood samples were collected before (t₀) and at 30-min intervals after ingestion of 75 g glucose for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. In OGTT(EX) an additional 75-g oral glucose bolus was administered at t₆₀. In OGTT(R), OFI administration reduced the area under the glucose curve (AUC(GLUC)) by 26%, mainly due to lower blood glucose levels at t₃₀ and t₆₀ (p < .05). Furthermore, a higher serum insulin concentration was noted after OFI intake at baseline and at t₃₀ (p < .05). In OGTT(EX), blood glucose at t₆₀ was ~10% lower in OFI than in PL, which resulted in a decreased AUC(GLUC) (-37%, p < .05). However, insulin values and AUC(INS) were not different between OFI and PL. In conclusion, the current study shows that OFI extract can increase plasma insulin and thereby facilitate the clearance of an oral glucose load from the circulation at rest and after endurance exercise in healthy men.

  10. The impact of low and no-caloric sweeteners on glucose absorption, incretin secretion and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine B; Hashemi, Zohre; Subhan, Fatheema Begum

    2017-04-13

    The consumption of non-nutritive, low or no-calorie sweeteners (LCS) is increasing globally. Previously thought to be physiologically inert, there is a growing body of evidence that LCS not only provide a sweet taste but may also elicit metabolic effects in the gastrointestinal tract. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical and receptor-binding properties and effects on chemosensation of different LCS but focuses on the extent to which LCS stimulates glucose transport, incretin and insulin secretion, and effects on glucose tolerance. Aspartame and sucralose both bind to a similar region of the sweet receptor. For sucralose, the data are contradictory regarding effects on glucose tolerance in humans and may depend on the food or beverage matrix and the duration of administration, as suggested by longer-term rodent studies. For aspartame, there are fewer data. On the other hand, acesulfame-potassium (Ace-K) and saccharin have similar binding characteristics to each other but, while Ace-K may increase incretin secretion and glucose responses in humans, there are no data on saccharin except in rats, which show impaired glucose tolerance after chronic administration. Additional research, particularly of the effects of chronic consumption, is needed to provide concrete evidence for beneficial or detrimental effects of LCS on blood glucose regulation in humans.

  11. Randomized Pilot Study of Cabergoline, a Dopamine Receptor Agonist: Effects on Body Weight and Glucose Tolerance in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Charlisa D.; Karmally, Wahida; McMahon, Donald J.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.; Korner, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Aim Dopaminergic hypofunction and hyperprolactinemia have been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and glucose intolerance. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the efficacy of cabergoline, a dopamine receptor agonist, on body weight and glucose tolerance in obese non-diabetic persons with normal plasma prolactin levels. Materials and Methods This 16-week double blind, placebo-controlled pilot study randomized non- diabetic obese adults (BMI 30-42 kg/m2) to placebo or cabergoline (0.25 mg twice weekly for 4 weeks followed by 0.5 mg twice weekly for the next 12 weeks). Of 40 subjects enrolled, 29 completed 16 weeks: 16 randomized to placebo, 13 to cabergoline. All subjects were counseled on a 500 kcal/day calorie deficit diet. A 75 gm oral glucose tolerance test was performed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Results As expected, prolactin levels decreased after cabergoline (P<0.001). Weight loss was similar after placebo compared with cabergoline treatment: 1.0 vs 1.2% body weight, respectively. Fasting glucose levels did not differ between groups after treatment, however, 90 minute post-prandial glucose and insulin decreased in the cabergoline group only (P = 0.029). HOMA-IR increased by 40% after placebo, and 1.5% after cabergoline treatment. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that cabergoline therapy may improve glucose tolerance independent of weight loss, however, a larger, longer term study of dopamine receptor agonist therapy in obese individuals is warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:22074059

  12. Insulin resistance in first-trimester pregnant women with pre-pregnant glucose tolerance and history of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Xie, Q X; Chen, C Y; Yang, C; Li, Y Z; Chen, D M; Xie, M Q

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) has been reported to play an important role in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) among patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, scanted materials exist regarding the independent effect of IR on RSA. The aim of this study is to investigate the status of IR in first trimester pregnant patients with normal pre-pregnant glucose tolerance and history of RSA. This two-center case-control study enrolled totally 626 first trimester pregnant women including 161 patients with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion, who were pre-pregnantly glucose-tolerant according to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and 465 women with no history of abnormal pregnancies of any kind. Clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters were simultaneously measured in all participants. Serum beta-HCG, estradiol, progesterone, fasting plasma glucose and fasting plasma insulin levels, as well, the calculated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), fasting plasma glucose/insulin ratio(G/I) and pregnancy outcome were analyzed and compared. Serum beta-HCG and progesterone were found to be significantly lower in RSA group compared to controls. Subjects in RSA group were found to have higher HOMA-IR and lower G/I ratio than those in control group. Serum beta-HCG and progesterone were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR, and positively with G/I ratio even after adjustment for BMI. The spontaneous abortion rate within first trimester pregnancy of RSA patients was significantly higher than that in controls. In conclusion, woman with recurrent spontaneous abortion and normal pre-pregnant glucose metabolism tends to be more insulin resistant during first trimester pregnancy than healthy controls, no matter whether she has PCOS or not. Insulin resistance might be one of the direct causes that lead to recurrent abortion.

  13. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  14. Primary Defects in β-Cell Function Further Exacerbated by Worsening of Insulin Resistance Mark the Development of Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cali, Anna M.G.; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio; Dziura, James; Seyal, Aisha; Shaw, Melissa; Allen, Karin; Chen, Shu; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of increasing prevalence among obese adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to IGT in obese adolescents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We determined the evolution of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and glucose tolerance in a multiethnic group of 60 obese adolescents over the course of approximately 30 months. Each subject underwent three serial 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests. Dynamic, static, and total β-cell responsivity (Φd, Φs, and Φtot, respectively) and Si were assessed by oral C-peptide and glucose minimal models. The disposition index (DI), which adjusts insulin secretion for Si, was calculated. RESULTS—At baseline, all 60 subjects had NGT. Seventy-seven percent (46 subjects) maintained NGT over the three testing periods (nonprogressors), whereas 23% (14 subjects) developed IGT over time (progressors). At baseline, percent fat and BMI Z score were comparable between the groups. Fasting plasma glucose, 2-h glucose, glucose area under the curve at 180 min, and Φd were significantly different between the two groups at baseline, whereas Si was comparable between the two groups. Over time, although Si remained unchanged in nonprogressors, it steadily worsened by ∼45% (P > 0.04) in progressors. β-Cell responsivity decreased by 20% in progressors, whereas it remained stable in nonprogressors. The DI showed a progressive decline in progressors compared with a modest improvement in nonprogressors (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS—Obese adolescents who progress to IGT may manifest primary defects in β-cell function. In addition, progressive decline in Si further aggravates β-cell function, contributing to the worsening of glucose intolerance. PMID:19106382

  15. Primary defects in beta-cell function further exacerbated by worsening of insulin resistance mark the development of impaired glucose tolerance in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cali, Anna M G; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio; Dziura, James; Seyal, Aisha; Shaw, Melissa; Allen, Karin; Chen, Shu; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-03-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of increasing prevalence among obese adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to IGT in obese adolescents. We determined the evolution of beta-cell function, insulin sensitivity (S(I)), and glucose tolerance in a multiethnic group of 60 obese adolescents over the course of approximately 30 months. Each subject underwent three serial 3-h oral glucose tolerance tests. Dynamic, static, and total beta-cell responsivity (Phi(d), Phi(s), and Phi(tot), respectively) and S(i) were assessed by oral C-peptide and glucose minimal models. The disposition index (DI), which adjusts insulin secretion for S(i), was calculated. At baseline, all 60 subjects had NGT. Seventy-seven percent (46 subjects) maintained NGT over the three testing periods (nonprogressors), whereas 23% (14 subjects) developed IGT over time (progressors). At baseline, percent fat and BMI Z score were comparable between the groups. Fasting plasma glucose, 2-h glucose, glucose area under the curve at 180 min, and Phi(d) were significantly different between the two groups at baseline, whereas S(i) was comparable between the two groups. Over time, although S(i) remained unchanged in nonprogressors, it steadily worsened by approximately 45% (P > 0.04) in progressors. beta-Cell responsivity decreased by 20% in progressors, whereas it remained stable in nonprogressors. The DI showed a progressive decline in progressors compared with a modest improvement in nonprogressors (P = 0.02). Obese adolescents who progress to IGT may manifest primary defects in beta-cell function. In addition, progressive decline in S(i) further aggravates beta-cell function, contributing to the worsening of glucose intolerance.

  16. Hypothalamic POMC Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance Despite Insulin Resistance by Increasing Glycosuria.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H; Adams, Jessica M; Fagel, Brian; Lam, Daniel D; Qi, Nathan; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2016-03-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is essential for the physiological regulation of energy balance; however, its role in glucose homeostasis remains less clear. We show that hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc)POMC-deficient mice, which develop severe obesity and insulin resistance, unexpectedly exhibit improved glucose tolerance and remain protected from hyperglycemia. To explain these paradoxical phenotypes, we hypothesized that an insulin-independent pathway is responsible for the enhanced glucose tolerance. Indeed, the mutant mice demonstrated increased glucose effectiveness and exaggerated glycosuria relative to wild-type littermate controls at comparable blood glucose concentrations. Central administration of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan II in mutant mice reversed alterations in glucose tolerance and glycosuria, whereas, conversely, administration of the antagonist Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) to wild-type mice enhanced glucose tolerance. The glycosuria of ArcPOMC-deficient mice was due to decreased levels of renal GLUT 2 (rGLUT2) but not sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 and was associated with reduced renal catecholamine content. Epinephrine treatment abolished the genotype differences in glucose tolerance and rGLUT2 levels, suggesting that reduced renal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is the underlying mechanism for the observed glycosuria and improved glucose tolerance in ArcPOMC-deficient mice. Therefore, the ArcPOMC-SNS-rGLUT2 axis is potentially an insulin-independent therapeutic target to control diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. FFA2 Contribution to Gestational Glucose Tolerance Is Not Disrupted by Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Fisch, Robert; Bughara, Moneb; Wicksteed, Barton; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    During the insulin resistant phase of pregnancy, the mRNA expression of free fatty acid 2 receptor (Ffar2) is upregulated and as we recently reported, this receptor contributes to insulin secretion and pancreatic beta cell mass expansion in order to maintain normal glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. As impaired gestational glucose levels can affect metabolic health of offspring, we aimed to explore the role of maternal Ffar2 expression during pregnancy on the metabolic health of offspring and also the effects of antibiotics, which have been shown to disrupt gut microbiota fermentative activity (the source of the FFA2 ligands) on gestational glucose homeostasis. We found that maternal Ffar2 expression and impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy had no effect on the growth rates, ad lib glucose and glucose tolerance in the offspring between 3 and 6 weeks of age. To disrupt short chain fatty acid production, we chronically treated WT mice and Ffar2-/- mice with broad range antibiotics and further compared their glucose tolerance prior to pregnancy and at gestational day 15, and also quantified cecum and plasma SCFAs. We found that during pregnancy antibiotic treatment reduced the levels of SCFAs in the cecum of the mice, but resulted in elevated levels of plasma SCFAs and altered concentrations of individual SCFAs. Along with these changes, gestational glucose tolerance in WT mice, but not Ffar2-/- mice improved while on antibiotics. Additional data showed that gestational glucose tolerance worsened in Ffar2-/- mice during a second pregnancy. Together, these results indicate that antibiotic treatment alone is inadequate to deplete plasma SCFA concentrations, and that modulation of gut microbiota by antibiotics does not disrupt the contribution of FFA2 to gestational glucose tolerance. PMID:27959892

  18. Periodontal Infection, Impaired Fasting Glucose and Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Results from The Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nidhi; Papapanou, Panos N.; Rosenbaum, Michael; Jacobs, David R.; Desvarieux, Moïse; Demmer, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    Aim We investigated the relationship between periodontal disease, a clinical manifestation of periodontal infection, and prediabetes. Methods The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010 enrolled 1,165 diabetes-free adults (51% female) aged 30–80 years (mean ± SD=50±14) who received a full-mouth periodontal examination and an oral glucose tolerance test. Participants were classified as having none/mild, moderate or severe periodontitis and also according to mean probing depth≥2.19 mm or attachment loss≥1.78 mm, (respective 75th percentiles). Pre-diabetes was defined according to ADA criteria as either: i) impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds of IFG and IGT were regressed on levels of periodontitis category. Results The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for having IGT among participants with moderate or severe periodontitis, relative to participants with none/mild periodontitis were 1.07[0.50,2.25] and 1.93[1.18,3.17], P=0.02. The ORs for having IFG were 1.14[0.74, 1.77] and 1.12[0.58, 2.18], P =0.84. PD≥75th percentile was related to a 105% increase in the odds of IGT: OR[95%CI] =2.05[1.24, 3.39], P=0.005. Conclusions Periodontal infection was positively associated with prevalent impaired glucose tolerance in a cross-sectional study among a nationally representative sample. PMID:24708451

  19. Associations of lipid profiles with insulin resistance and β cell function in adults with normal glucose tolerance and different categories of impaired glucose regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xingxing; Han, Tingting; Chen, Yawen; Qiu, Huiying; Wu, Peihong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yaomin

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate the associations of dyslipidemia with insulin resistance and β cell function in individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and different categories of impaired glucose regulation (IGR). Methods 544 subjects (365 with dyslipidemia and/or IGR and 179 with normal lipid and glucose tolerance) were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). HOMA-IR was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Disposition index (DI) was used to evaluate β cell function. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess correlations among lipid profiles, insulin resistance and β cell function. Results Among subjects with NGT, those with dyslipidemia had higher level of HOMA-IR but lower level of DI. While among subjects with different categories of IGR, those with dyslipidemia and CGI had significantly decreased DI. No obvious differences of insulin resistance or β cell function were found in IFG or IGT subjects with or without dyslipidemia. TG and HDL-C were correlated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.79, p <0.001; β = -0.38, p = 0.027, respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups). Moreover, TG and TC were negatively correlated with DI (β = -2.17, p = 0.013; β = -2.01, p = 0.034 respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups) after adjusting for confounding parameters. Conclusions Dyslipidemia induces insulin resistance and impaired β cell response to insulin resistance in individuals with NGT. Furthermore, dyslipidemia diminishes β cell function in subjects with CGI. TG and HDL-C were correlated with insulin resistance, and TG, TC were negatively correlated with β cell response to insulin resistance in non-diabetic individuals. PMID:28199386

  20. Behaviour change among people with impaired glucose tolerance: Comparison of telephone-based and face-to-face advice.

    PubMed

    Betzlbacher, Anna-Franziska; Grady, Katherine; Savas, Linda; Cotterill, Sarah; Boaden, Ruth; Summers, Lucinda; Gibson, Martin

    2013-04-01

    To develop, implement and compare two lifestyle services for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Two localities were selected to implement two different service delivery models, telephone-based and face-to-face, supporting people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Impact was assessed by comparing weight, fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results at baseline and six months later. Both services were associated with an improvement in OGTT 2-h plasma glucose and weight. In the telephone intervention, 47.3% of participants who completed the project achieved both normal fasting plasma glucose (≤6.0 mmol/l) and normal plasma glucose levels (≤7.7 mmol/l). Participants had a mean weight loss of 3.3 kg (SD 4.3), equating to 3.4% of body weight (p < 0.001). In the face-to-face intervention, 46.3% of participants achieved normal plasma glucose (≤7.7 mmol/l) and a mean weight loss of 2.9 kg (SD 4.5), equating to 3.1% of bodyweight (p < 0.001). Local health providers can adapt existing service provision and tailor it to provide lifestyle programmes for people with impaired glucose tolerance. Both service delivery models offer effective diabetes prevention although each model may cater for different population needs and a choice of services might be the preferred option. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by changes in lifestyle among subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Tuomilehto, J; Lindström, J; Eriksson, J G; Valle, T T; Hämäläinen, H; Ilanne-Parikka, P; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, S; Laakso, M; Louheranta, A; Rastas, M; Salminen, V; Uusitupa, M

    2001-05-03

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasingly common, primarily because of increases in the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Whether type 2 diabetes can be prevented by interventions that affect the lifestyles of subjects at high risk for the disease is not known. We randomly assigned 522 middle-aged, overweight subjects (172 men and 350 women; mean age, 55 years; mean body-mass index [weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters], 31) with impaired glucose tolerance to either the intervention group or the control group. Each subject in the intervention group received individualized counseling aimed at reducing weight, total intake of fat, and intake of saturated fat and increasing intake of fiber and physical activity. An oral glucose-tolerance test was performed annually; the diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed by a second test. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.2 years. The mean (+/-SD) amount of weight lost between base line and the end of year 1 was 4.2+/-5.1 kg in the intervention group and 0.8+/-3.7 kg in the control group; the net loss by the end of year 2 was 3.5+/-5.5 kg in the intervention group and 0.8+/-4.4 kg in the control group (P<0.001 for both comparisons between the groups). The cumulative incidence of diabetes after four years was 11 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 6 to 15 percent) in the intervention group and 23 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 17 to 29 percent) in the control group. During the trial, the risk of diabetes was reduced by 58 percent (P<0.001) in the intervention group. The reduction in the incidence of diabetes was directly associated with changes in lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by changes in the lifestyles of high-risk subjects.

  2. Short-term glucose metabolism and gut hormone modulations after Billroth II gastrojejunostomy in nonobese gastric cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance and normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-juan; Xiao, Zhu; Yu, Hong-ling; Zhang, Xiang-xun; Cheng, Zhong; Tian, Hao-ming

    2013-08-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is effective in controlling blood glucose in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The alterations of gut hormones involving in glucose metabolism may play an important role. Our aim was to explore the short-term effects of Billroth II gastrojejunostomy (a similar type of RYGB) on glucose metabolism and gut hormone modulations in nonobese patients with different levels of blood glucose tolerance. Twenty one nonobese gastric cancer patients with different levels of blood glucose tolerance were submitted to Billroth II gastrojejunostomy. Among them, seven had T2DM, seven with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and the other seven had normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Body weight, glucose parameters, responses of plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) to 75 g glucose were measured at baseline and 3 months after surgery. Similar weight losses were observed in all groups. Blood glucose was reduced in T2DM and IGT patients. Fasting and 30-min plasma glucose were increased significantly in NGT. GLP-1 showed insignificant alterations in all groups. PYY was evaluated in T2DM and IGT but remained unchanged in the NGT group. Decreased fasting and AUC GIP were observed in patients with T2DM; however, fasting and 30-min GIP were increased in NGT patients. Billroth II gastrojejunostomy is effective in reducing blood glucose in nonobese patients with T2DM and IGT but could deteriorate early blood glucose in nonobese NGT in a 3-month time period. Variations of glucose and gut hormone changes in the three groups suggest a role of proximal intestine in the pathophysiology of T2DM. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term clinical effect of Tangyiping Granules () on patients with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Qin; Yang, Qing-Feng; Wang, Hua; Xu, Yun-Sheng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Yue-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the long-term clinical effect of Tangyiping Granules (, TYP) on patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to achieve normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and hence preventing them from conversion to diabetes mellitus (DM). In total, 127 participants with IGT were randomly assigned to the control (63 cases, 3 lost to follow-up) and treatment groups (64 cases, 4 lost to follow-up) according to the random number table. The control group received lifestyle intervention alone, while the patients in the treatment group took orally 10 g of TYP twice daily in addition to lifestyle intervention for 12 weeks. The rates of patients achieving NGT or experiencing conversion to DM as main outcome measure were observed at 3, 12, and 24 months after TYP treatment. The secondary outcome measures included fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (2hPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting insulin (FINS), 2-h insulin (2hINS), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), blood lipid and patients' complains of Chinese medicine (CM) symptoms before and after treatment. A higher proportion of the treatment group achieved NGT compared with the control group after 3-, 12- and 24-month follow-up (75.00% vs. 43.33%, 58.33% vs. 35.00%, 46.67% vs. 26.67%, respectively, P<0.05). The IGT to DM conversion rate of the treatment group was significantly lower than that of the control group at the end of 24-month follow-up (16.67% vs. 31.67%, P<0.05). Before treatment, FPG, 2hPG, HbA1c, FINS, 2hINS, HOMA-IR, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels had no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). After treatment, the 2hPG, HbA1c, HOMA-IR, and TG levels of the treatment group decreased significantly compared with those of the control group (P<0.05). CM symptoms such as exhaustion, irritability, chest tightness and breathless, spontaneous sweating, constipation, and dark thick and

  4. Plasma triglycerides after oral glucose load specifically associate with metabolic risk markers in healthy type 2 diabetes offspring.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Michaela; Tödter, Klaus; Altenburg, Christiane; Beisiegel, Ulrike; Scheja, Ludger

    2011-07-01

    To assess the potential of plasma triglycerides measured after glucose load as biomarker for insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, n=91) was performed in healthy type 2 diabetes offspring. Plasma lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and hormones were quantified in fasting and post-challenge samples. During the OGTT total plasma triglycerides decreased in most subjects, however, they increased in some individuals and this increase was strongly associated with metabolic risk factors. Subjects with increasing triglycerides (n=18) were more obese and insulin resistant than those with the most pronounced triglyceride decrease (n=18), as indicated by higher HOMA-IR, BMI and waist circumference. Correlation analysis (n=91) demonstrated that the changes of total plasma and VLDL-associated triglycerides between 0 h and 2 h (Δ-TG, Δ-VLDL-T) were strongly associated with risk factors. Δ-TG, and especially Δ-VLDL-T, correlated better than fasting triglycerides with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and fasting glucose. The correlations remained significant after adjustment for gender, age and HDL cholesterol. The observed increase of triglycerides after glucose load in subjects with signs of insulin resistance and obesity suggests that post-glucose triglyceride change is a potential novel biomarker for early detection of metabolic risk. The specific association of post-glucose triglyceride change with abdominal obesity and fasting glucose suggests a link to hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute effects of light and dark roasted coffee on glucose tolerance: a randomized, controlled crossover trial in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rakvaag, Elin; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Coffee contains caffeine and several other components that may modulate glucose regulation. The chlorogenic acids (CGA) in coffee have been indicated as constituents that may help to normalize the acute glucose response after a carbohydrate challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether two coffee beverages that differ in CGA content due to different roasting degrees will differentially affect glucose regulation. In a controlled crossover trial, 11 healthy fasted volunteers consumed 300 mL of either light (LIR) or dark (DAR) roasted coffee, or water, followed 30 min later by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 30, 60, and 120 min. Differences in glucose and insulin responses and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were analyzed. The CGA and caffeine contents in the coffees were analyzed using UPLC-MS/MS. No differences in glucose area under the curve (AUC) were found between treatments. Glucose concentrations were higher at 60 min after ingestion of DAR compared with water, while ingestion of LIR showed similar glucose concentrations as ingestion of water. Insulin AUC was higher after ingestion of DAR compared with water, and both coffees raised insulin concentrations and reduced ISI compared with water, with no difference between the two coffees. Two coffees with different CGA contents did not differentially affect glucose or insulin responses during an OGTT, but both increased the insulin response compared with water.

  6. Changes in metabolic indices in response to whole blood donation in male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Borai, Anwar; Livingstone, Callum; Farzal, Anwar; Baljoon, Dalal; Al Sofyani, Abeer; Bahijri, Suhad; Kadam, Ibrahim; Hafiz, Khalid; Abdelaal, Mohamed; Ferns, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the impact of venesection upon different metabolic indices in patients with various conditions (e.g., type 2 diabetes and iron overload). We aimed to investigate the changes on different metabolic indices including glycemic, iron, lipids and inflammatory markers at different time points after blood donation in male subjects with normal glucose tolerance. 42 male subjects were recruited to the study. Glucose tolerance was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test before (visit A) and after the blood donation (1day, visit B; 1week, visit C; 3weeks, visit D; and 3months, visit E). Fasting glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipids, uric acid, C-reactive protein, iron stores and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, ISI-gly) indices were measured. A repeated measures ANOVA was used for comparisons of quantitative variables between different visits. All subjects had normal glucose tolerance according to WHO criteria. Fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly higher (~2%, p<0.05; ~21%, p<0.01; and ~11%, p<0.05 respectively) at visit B following donation. At visit D, the mean±SE for HbA1c (5.28±0.06%) was significantly lower with a difference in percentage of ~-3% and p<0.05 compared to visit A (5.44±0.06%). Ferritin decreased significantly at visits B, C, D and E (~-8%, p<0.01, ~-24%, p<0.001, ~-39%, p<0.001 and ~-29%, p<0.01 respectively), when compared to visit A. At different time points after blood donation, glycemic status and iron stores are affected significantly in male blood donors with normal glucose tolerance. The changes were particularly evident three weeks after donation. Hence, the interpretation of these parameters in male blood donors needs to take this into account, and the mechanisms resulting in these effects need to be clarified. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in the urban population of 30 to 79 years of the city of São Carlos, São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Bosi, Paula Lima; Carvalho, Arlety Morais; Contrera, Daniele; Casale, Guilherme; Pereira, Marina Alexandre; Gronner, Matheus Ferreira; Diogo, Thatiana Melo; Torquarto, Maria Tereza da Costa Gonçalves; Oishi, Jorge; Leal, Angela Merice de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in the urban population aged 30-79 years of the city of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. It was performed a population survey, from August 2007 to June 2008. Non diabetic individuals, excluding pregnant women, and those with fasting capillary glycemia oral glucose tolerance test and classified as diabetic, with IGT or with normal glucose tolerance. The number of individuals who participated in the study was 1,116. The overall rates of DM and IGT were 13.5% and 5%, respectively. DM and IGT were associated with age, education, body mass index and waist. They were not associated with gender, race or income. The prevalence of DM has increased when compared with previous studies in Brazil and in the state. Improvement in the diagnosis has occurred, however, treatment requires optimization.

  8. Rosiglitazone fails to improve hypertriglyceridemia and glucose tolerance in CD36-deficient BN.SHR4 congenic rat strain.

    PubMed

    Seda, Ondrej; Kazdova, Ludmila; Krenova, Drahomira; Kren, Vladimir

    2003-01-15

    The favorable metabolic effects of thiazolidinediones are supposedly related to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma)-driven changes in lipid metabolism, particularly in free fatty acid (FFA) trafficking. The fatty acid translocase CD36 is one of the proposed PPARgamma targets to mediate this action. We assessed the effect of rosiglitazone (RSG, Avandia) administration in two inbred rat strains, BN/Cub and BN.SHR4 congenic strain, differing in 10 cM proximal segment of chromosome 4. Rats were fed high-sucrose diet with or without RSG for 1 wk. In BN.SHR4, which carries defective Cd36 allele of SHR origin, RSG failed to improve glucose tolerance (assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test), did not lower triglyceridemia, nor induced increases in epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue weights and adipose tissue glucose utilization, effects observed in BN/Cub. On the other hand, the RSG-treated BN.SHR4 showed lower concentrations of FFA and substantial increase in glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle. Altogether, these results support involvement of CD36 in RSG action, suggesting this pharmacogenetic interaction may be of particular importance in CD36-deficient humans.

  9. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal adiposity and liver fat content distribution in normal glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Borel, A L; Nazare, J A; Smith, J; Aschner, P; Barter, P; Van Gaal, L; Eng Tan, C; Wittchen, H U; Matsuzawa, Y; Kadowaki, T; Ross, R; Brulle-Wohlhueter, C; Alméras, N; Haffner, S M; Balkau, B; Després, J P

    2015-03-01

    To examine the specific distribution of liver fat content, visceral and subcutaneous adiposity in normal glucose tolerance (NGT/NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (iIFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (iIGT) and combined conditions (IFG+IGT), as well as with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (nT2D). Multicenter, international observational study: cross-sectional analysis. Two thousand five hundred and fifteen patients (50.0% women, 54.5% non-Caucasian) without previously known diabetes were recruited from 29 countries. Abdominal fat distribution was measured by computed tomography (CT). Liver fat was estimated using the CT-liver mean attenuation. Compared with NGT/NGT patients, increased visceral adiposity was found in iIFG, iIGT, IFG+IGT and nT2D; estimated liver fat progressively increased across these conditions. A one-s.d. increase in visceral adiposity was associated with an increased risk of having iIFG (men: odds ratio (OR) 1.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-1.74), women: OR 1.62 (1.29-2.04)), iIGT (men: OR 1.59 (1.15-2.01), women: OR 1.30 (0.96-1.76)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.64 (1.27-2.13), women: OR 1.83 (1.36-2.48)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.80 (1.35-2.42), women: OR 1.73 (1.25-2.41)). A one-s.d. increase in estimated liver fat was associated with iIGT (men: OR 1.46 (1.12-1.90), women: OR 1.81 (1.41-2.35)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.42 (1.14-1.77), women: OR 1.74 (1.35-2.26)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.77 (1.40-2.27), women: OR 2.38 (1.81-3.18)). Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women (OR 0.63 (0.45-0.88)). Liver fat was associated with iIGT but not with iIFG, whereas visceral adiposity was associated with both. Liver fat and visceral adiposity were associated with nT2D, whereas subcutaneous adiposity showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women.

  10. A Novel EPO Receptor Agonist Improves Glucose Tolerance via Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle in a Mouse Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Michael S.; Ort, Tatiana A.; James, Ian E.; Bugelski, Peter J.; Makropoulos, Dorie A.; Deutsch, Heather A.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Havekes, Louis M.; duBell, William H.; Wertheimer, Joshua D.; Picha, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with recombinant human Epo demonstrate an improvement in insulin sensitivity. We aimed to investigate whether CNTO 530, a novel Epo receptor agonist, could affect glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. A single administration of CNTO 530 significantly and dose-dependently reduced the area under the curve in a glucose tolerance test in diet-induced obese and diabetic mice after 14, 21, and 28 days. HOMA analysis suggested an improvement in insulin sensitivity, and this effect was confirmed by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Uptake of 14C-2-deoxy-D-glucose indicated that animals dosed with CNTO 530 transported more glucose into skeletal muscle and heart relative to control animals. In conclusion, CNTO530 has a profound effect on glucose tolerance in insulin-resistant rodents likely because of improving peripheral insulin sensitivity. This effect was observed with epoetin-α and darbepoetin-α, suggesting this is a class effect, but the effect with these compounds relative to CNTO530 was decreased in duration and magnitude. PMID:21754921

  11. Dairy fat intake is associated with glucose tolerance, hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity, and liver fat but not β-cell function in humans123

    PubMed Central

    Marcovina, Santica; Nelson, James E; Yeh, Matthew M; Kowdley, Kris V; Callahan, Holly S; Song, Xiaoling; Di, Chongzhi; Utzschneider, Kristina M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plasma phospholipid concentrations of trans-palmitoleic acid (trans-16:1n−7), a biomarker of dairy fat intake, are inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes in 2 US cohorts. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether the intake of trans-16:1n−7 in particular, or dairy fat in general, is associated with glucose tolerance and key factors determining glucose tolerance. Design: A cross-sectional investigation was undertaken in 17 men and women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and 15 body mass index (BMI)- and age-matched controls. The concentrations of trans-16:1n−7 and 2 other biomarkers of dairy fat intake, 15:0 and 17:0, were measured in plasma phospholipids and free fatty acids (FFAs). Liver fat was estimated by computed tomography–derived liver-spleen ratio. Intravenous-glucose-tolerance tests and oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed to assess β-cell function and hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. Results: In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, sex, and BMI, phospholipid 17:0, phospholipid trans-16:1n−7, FFA 15:0, and FFA 17:0 were inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, the area under the curve for glucose during an OGTT, and liver fat. Phospholipid trans-16:1n−7 was also positively associated with hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity. None of the biomarkers were associated with β-cell function. The associations between dairy fat intake and glucose tolerance were attenuated by adjusting for insulin sensitivity or liver fat, but strengthened by adjusting for β-cell function. Conclusion: Although we cannot rule out reverse causation, these data support the hypothesis that dairy fat improves glucose tolerance, possibly through a mechanism involving improved hepatic and systemic insulin sensitivity and reduced liver fat. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01289639. PMID:24740208

  12. Glucose concentration regulates freeze tolerance in the wood frog Rana sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; Lortz, P H

    1993-08-01

    In spring, the lowest temperature during freezing that can be survived by wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) from southern Ohio is approximately -3 degrees C. We investigated whether the thermal limit of freeze tolerance in these frogs is regulated by tissue levels of glucose, a putative cryoprotectant that is distributed to tissues during freezing. Frogs receiving exogenous glucose injections prior to freezing showed dose-dependent increases in glucose within the heart, liver, skeletal muscle and blood. Tissue glucose concentrations were further elevated during freezing by the production of endogenous glucose. Most glucose-loaded frogs survived freezing to -5 degrees C, whereas all control (saline-injected) frogs succumbed. Further, we investigated some mechanisms by which glucose might function as a cryoprotectant in R. sylvatica. Organ dehydration, a normal, beneficial response that reduces freezing injury to tissues, occurred independently of tissue glucose concentrations. However, elevated glucose levels reduced both body ice content and in vivo erythrocyte injury. These results not only provided conclusive evidence for glucose's cryoprotective role in R. sylvatica, but also revealed that tissue glucose level is a critical determinant of freeze tolerance capacity in this species.

  13. Cold tolerance in CCl4-treated rats and its modification by administration of garlic oil and glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, B.; Ahujarai, P. L.

    1984-06-01

    Male Wistar rats weighing 150 200 g maintained under standard laboratory conditions and given Hindustan Lever Pellets and water ad libitum were exposed to -20°C for determination of the rate of fall of rectal temperature and survival time. The rate of fall of body temperature was significantly increased and the survival time was reduced, when animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml/kg BW of CCl4 24 h but not 2 h earlier. Pre-treatment of the animals with 0.006 ml of garlic oil in a 2% solution of arachis oil for 3 days gave a significant protection to the animals against the CCl4-induced fall in cold tolerance. Administration of glucose orally 300 mg in 2 ml of saline eliminated the CCl4-induced fall in cold tolerance. The animals displayed a hypoglycemia 24 h, but not 2 h after injection of CCl4. CCl4-induced hypoglycemia was reduced by pre-treatment with garlic oil. The results indicate that the CCl4-induced reduction in cold tolerance is secondary to hypoglycemia and not due to the direct effect of CCl4 on the thermoregulatory mechanism in the CNS. The critical level of blood glucose below which the cold tolerance is reduced was found to be 76 mg/100 ml of blood.

  14. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-03-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity.

  15. Artificial sweeteners and mixture of food additives cause to break oral tolerance and induce food allergy in murine oral tolerance model for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Matsuhara, H; Miotani, S; Sako, Y; Matsui, T; Tanaka, H; Inagaki, N

    2017-09-01

    Processed foods are part of daily life. Almost all processed foods contain food additives such as sweeteners, preservatives and colourants. From childhood, it is difficult to avoid consuming food additives. It is thought that oral tolerance for food antigens is acquired during early life. If tolerance fails, adverse immune responses to food proteins may occur. We hypothesized that food additives prevent acquisition of oral tolerance and aimed to verify the safety of food additives. We induced experimental oral tolerance in mice for ovalbumin (OVA), a food antigen, by previous oral treatment with OVA before sensitization with OVA injections. Food additives were administered at the induction of oral tolerance, and food allergy was induced by repeated administration of OVA. Symptoms of food allergy were defined as a change in body temperature and allergic diarrhoea. Saccharin sodium and a mixture of food additives inhibited acquisition of oral tolerance. Hypothermia and allergic diarrhoea with elevation of OVA-specific IgE were induced in the murine model of oral tolerance. Analyses of antigen-presenting cells in mesenteric lymph nodes showed that food additives affected their manner of migration. Additionally, food additives decreased the proportion of CD25(hi) regulatory T cells among CD4(+) T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. A large amount of food additives may prevent acquisition of oral tolerance. Intake of food additives in early life may increase the risk of food allergies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Improved glucose tolerance after intensive life style intervention occurs without changes in muscle ceramide or triacylglycerol in morbidly obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Helge, J W; Stallknecht, B; Drachmann, T; Hellgren, L I; Jiménez-Jiménez, R; Andersen, J L; Richelsen, B; Bruun, J M

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of a 15-week life style intervention (hypocaloric diet and regular exercise) on glucose tolerance, skeletal muscle lipids and muscle metabolic adaptations in 14 female and 9 male morbidly obese subjects (age: 32.5±2.3 years, body mass index: 46.1±1.9 kg m(-2) ). Before and after the life style intervention, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed and a muscle biopsy was obtained in the fasted state. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured by an indirect test. After the intervention, body weight was decreased (P<0.05) by 11±1%, maximal oxygen uptake increased (P<0.05) by 18±5% and glucose tolerance increased (P<0.05) by 12±3%. Muscle glycogen was significantly increased by 47±14%, but muscle ceramide and triacylglycerol content remained completely unchanged. No sex difference was observed for any of these parameters, but during submaximal exercise a marked decrease (P<0.05) of 15±2% in respiratory exchange ratio was seen only in females indicating an enhanced fat oxidation. Despite a marked weight loss and an improved aerobic capacity muscle ceramide and triacylglycerol remained unchanged after intensive life style intervention, and muscle lipids hence do not seem to play a major role for the improved glucose tolerance in these morbidly obese subjects. Interestingly, only the females improved fat oxidation during submaximal exercise after the intervention implying the presence of a sex-dependent response to intensive life style adaptation. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  17. Insulin sensitivity and first-phase insulin secretion in obese Chinese with hyperglycemia in 30 and/or 60 min during glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yi-Fei; Gu, Wei-qiong; Zhang, Yu-wen; Su, Yu-xia; Chi, Zhen-ni; Wang, Wei-qing; Li, Xiao-ying; Ning, Guang

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and first-phase insulin secretion in obesity with hyperglycemia in 30 and/or 60 min during oral glucose tolerance (OGTT, glucose > or = 11.1 mmol/l, post-loading hyperglycemia, PLH) in Chinese population. A total of 196 nondiabetic subjects were included in the present study, among them 99 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT, subdivided into 32 lean NGT and 67 obese NGT), 74 had obesity with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 23 had obesity with PLH. A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed after fasting and at 30 min, 1, 2 and 3 h. Insulin sensitivity index (S(I)) was assessed by the Bergman's minimal model method with frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT), insulin secretion was determined by acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg). The disposition index (DI), the product of AIRg and S(I) was used to determine whether AIRg was adequate to compensate for insulin resistance. S(I) was significantly equally lower in three obese subgroups. AIRg was significantly increased in obese NGT as compared with lean NGT controls, and reduced to the same extent in IGT and PLH subjects. There was no significant difference among lean NGT, IGT and PLH subjects. DI value was reduced from obese NGT individuals, IGT and PLH subjects had a similar lower level of DI. In conclusion, our present results demonstrated that the pathophysiological basis of obese subjects with PLH were clearly insulin resistance and defective in first-phase insulin secretion as that in IGT subjects in Chinese population.

  18. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Straznicky, Nora E.; Grima, Mariee T.; Sari, Carolina I.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Phillips, Sarah E.; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A.; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B.; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m2), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged −7.5 ± 0.8, −8.1 ± 0.5, and −8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0−120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (−7 ± 3, −8 ± 4, −15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (−28 ± 8, −18 ± 6, and −25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0−120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects

  19. Comparable Attenuation of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity in Obese Subjects with Normal Glucose Tolerance, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, and Treatment Naïve Type 2 Diabetes following Equivalent Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Sari, Carolina I; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Phillips, Sarah E; Eikelis, Nina; Mariani, Justin A; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hering, Dagmara; Dixon, John B; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n = 15), impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n = 24), and newly-diagnosed T2D (n = 15) consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate) for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 ± 1 years), body mass index (BMI, 32.9 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)), and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged -7.5 ± 0.8, -8.1 ± 0.5, and -8.0 ± 0.9% of body weight in NGT, IGT, and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0-120) compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P <0.001). Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group × time, P = 0.04). The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (-7 ± 3, -8 ± 4, -15 ± 4 burst/100 hb, respectively) and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (-28 ± 8, -18 ± 6, and -25 ± 7%, respectively), time effect both P <0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, Δ insulin AUC0-120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst Δ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects with different

  20. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide confers early phase insulin release to oral glucose in rats: demonstration by a receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J T; Dayanandan, B; Habener, J F; Kieffer, T J

    2000-10-01

    A novel GIP receptor antagonist was developed to evaluate the acute role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in the insulin response to oral glucose in rats. Antisera to an extracellular epitope of the GIP receptor (GIPR) detected immunoreactive GIPR on rat pancreatic beta-cells. Purified GIPR antibody (GIPR Ab) specifically displaced GIP binding to the receptor and blocked GIP-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. When delivered to rats by ip injection, GIPR Ab had a half-life of approximately 4 days. Treatment with GIPR Ab (1 microg/g BW) blocked the potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP (60 pmol) but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, 60 pmol) in anesthetized rats. The insulin response to oral glucose was delayed in conscious unrestrained rats that were pretreated with GIPR Ab. Plasma insulin levels were approximately 35% lower at 10 min in GIPR Ab treated animals compared with controls. As a result, the glucose excursion was greater in the GIPR Ab treated group. Fasting plasma glucose levels were not altered by GIPR Ab. We conclude that release of GIP following oral glucose may act as an anticipatory signal to pancreatic beta-cells to promote rapid release of insulin for glucose disposal.

  1. Sexual dimorphism of hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance in Wistar fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Kava, R A; West, D B; Lukasik, V A; Greenwood, M R

    1989-02-01

    Obese and lean male and female Wistar fatty rats were fed a high-sucrose (68% of calories) diet from 5 to 22 wk of age. Obese males, but not obese females, developed hyperglycemia in the fed state and were more glucose intolerant during an intragastric glucose tolerance test than obese females. Lean Wistar fatty rats did not become hyperglycemic on the sucrose diet. Obese males also showed a smaller insulin response during the glucose tolerance test than did obese females. The Wistar fatty rat is a sexually dimorphic model of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in which the male but not the female obese rats become diabetic. The diabetic condition and impaired glucose tolerance in the obese male Wistar fatty rat may be related to impaired pancreatic insulin release and peripheral insulin resistance.

  2. Effect of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate on Glucose Tolerance in Generalized Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yauger, Belinda J.; Gorden, Phillip; Park, Jean; Cochran, Elaine; Stratton, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipodystrophy is a rare condition causing severe insulin resistance and frank diabetes. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a commonly used contraceptive, may worsen glucose tolerance in diabetics and those with lipodystrophy. CASE A young woman with generalized lipodystrophy, who previously required greater than 1,000 units of insulin daily, had a normal hemoglobin A1c on leptin and metformin only. After an injection of DMPA, she developed severe hyperglycemia. Her levels returned to near normal only with extremely high doses of insulin (up to 1,700 units/d) and increased doses of leptin and metformin. CONCLUSION Progestin-only contraceptives may detrimentally affect glucose tolerance, particularly in patients with lipodystrophy, a cause of severe insulin resistance and leptin deficiency. One DMPA injection appeared to profoundly alter glucose metabolism in this patient with frank diabetes resulting from lipodystrophy. The effect of progestin-only contraceptives on glucose tolerance should be monitored closely in any diabetic patient. PMID:18669758

  3. SODIUM BICARBONATE FACILITATES LOW-DOSE ORAL TOLERANCE TO PEANUT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Oral tolerance specifically inhibits production of allergic IgE antibody and is therefore a potential method for suppressing food allergy. We have previously demonstrated that a single oral dose of one mg is sufficient to induce oral tolerance to egg white but not pean...

  4. SODIUM BICARBONATE FACILITATES LOW-DOSE ORAL TOLERANCE TO PEANUT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Oral tolerance specifically inhibits production of allergic IgE antibody and is therefore a potential method for suppressing food allergy. We have previously demonstrated that a single oral dose of one mg is sufficient to induce oral tolerance to egg white but not pean...

  5. Lack of agreement between the revised criteria of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children with excess body weight.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Morán-Villota, Segundo; Barradas-González, Rosalinda; Herrera-Márquez, Rocio; Cruz López, Miguel; Kumate, Jesus; Wacher, Niels H

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the agreement between impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in children with excess body weight using the original and the revised definitions of IFG. Obese and overweight children aged 4-17 years were included (n = 533). Anthropometric parameters and biochemical tests (fasting and 2-h glucose tests after an oral glucose load [1.75 g/kg]) were performed. Case subjects with a fasting plasma glucose >/=126 mg/dl were excluded. The diagnostic parameters of the original and the revised definitions of IFG for detecting IGT were estimated. The analysis of agreement between these categories was made using the kappa test. The prevalence of IFG increased from 6.2 to 13.3% using the new criteria. The prevalence of IFG became closer to the prevalence of IGT (14.8%). The revised criteria increased the sensitivity from 26.6 to 36.7%. However, the new IFG definition was not useful for identifying IGT cases. Of the 71 case subjects with IFG, only 29 (40.8%) had IGT. In addition, 50 case subjects with IGT (9.4%) and 13 with diabetes (2.4%) had a fasting glycemia <100 mg/dl. A poor agreement was found between the 2003 IFG definition and abnormal 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (kappa = 0.359). The proportion of false-positive cases increased (36.3-59.1%) under the new definition. The new definition modestly increases the sensitivity of IFG for detecting IGT in children with excess body weight. Despite this, more than one-half of these cases are not detected. In addition, the false-positive rate was increased by 61%.

  6. Senescence marker protein-30/gluconolactonase deletion worsens glucose tolerance through impairment of acute insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kadono, Mayuko; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Senmaru, Takafumi; Kondo, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Michiaki; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Naoki; Nakamura, Naoto; Ishigami, Akihito

    2010-02-01

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is an androgen-independent factor that decreases with age. We recently identified SMP30 as the lactone-hydrolyzing enzyme gluconolactonase (GNL), which is involved in vitamin C biosynthesis in animal species. To examine whether the age-related decrease in SMP30/GNL has effects on glucose homeostasis, we used SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice treated with L-ascorbic acid. In an ip glucose tolerance test at 15 wk of age, blood glucose levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Insulin levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min after glucose compared with WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose-lowering effect in SMP30/GNL KO mice. High-fat diet feeding severely worsened glucose tolerance in both WT and SMP30/GNL KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of high-fat diet-induced compensatory increase in beta-cell mass and proliferation. In the static incubation study of islets, insulin secretion in response to 20 mm glucose or KCl was significantly decreased in SMP30/GNL KO mice. On the other hand, islet ATP content at 20 mm in SMP30/GNL KO mice was similar to that in WT mice. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion due to dysfunction of the distal portion of the secretion pathway underlies glucose intolerance in SMP30/GNL KO mice. Decreased SMP30/GNL may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging.

  7. [Dynamics of erythrocyte hexokinase activity during glucose tolerance test in children with hereditary diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Ignatiuk, T E; Ermolenko, R I

    1979-01-01

    In determining the changes in hexokinase activity in erythrocytes during the glucose tolerance test in children with heredity aggravated by diabetes mellitus in comparison with such in apparently healthy children it was shown that in latent diabets the enzyme activity failed to alter during the whold period of study (on fasting stomach, 30, 60 and 180 minutes after glucose load), and increased 60 minutes after glucose load in potential diabetes, but to a lesser extent than in the control group. Changes of erythrocyte hexokinase response to glucose administration could serve as an auxiliary criterion for determination of the degree of risk in children with threatening diabetes.

  8. Limited value of the homeostasis model assessment to predict insulin resistance in older men with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, C M; Goldberg, A P

    2001-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in older individuals is associated with risk factors for coronary artery disease. The glucose clamp measures IR directly, but the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of IR, referred to here as HOMA-IR, is based on fasting glucose and insulin and is less invasive and labor intensive. This method requires validation in the elderly. We assessed the validity of HOMA-IR as an index of IR by comparing it to glucose infusion rates (GIRs) measured by a glucose clamp (600 pmol x m(-2) x min(-1)) in 45 obese men (61 +/- 8 years of age, mean +/- SD) with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 21) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 24). We also evaluated relationships between body composition, exercise capacity, and IR. Subjects with NGT had lower BMI (28 +/- 3 vs. 31 +/- 3 kg/m2), waist circumference (97 +/- 9 vs. 105 +/- 9 cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (0.93 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.97 +/- 0.05), and percent body fat (25 +/- 6 vs. 30 +/- 6) than subjects with IGT. Subjects with NGT also had lower areas above basal during the 2-h oral glucose tolerance test for glucose (274 +/- 95 vs. 419 +/- 124 mmol x min/l) and insulin (38,142 +/- 18,206 vs. 58,383 +/- 34,408 pmol x min/l) and lower HOMA-IR values (2.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.2 +/- 2.6) than subjects with IGT. GIR (micromol x kg(-1) FFM x min(-1)) was higher in subjects with NGT than in subjects with IGT (53 +/- 11 vs. 43 +/- 14). HOMA-IR correlated with GIR in subjects with NGT (r = -0.59), but not in subjects with IGT (r = -0.13). GIR correlated with VO2max in subjects with NGT (r = 0.58) and IGT (r = 0.42), but with WHR only in subjects with NGT (r = -0.53). HOMA-IR correlated with VO2max (r = -0.57) and waist circumference (r = 0.54) in subjects with NGT, but with percent body fat in subjects with IGT (r = 0.54). These findings indicate that HOMA-IR should not be used as an index of IR in older individuals who may be at risk for IGT, and suggest that lifestyle changes that increase VO2max and decrease body fat

  9. Pulsatile insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Leslie S.; Butler, Peter C.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) results when increases in beta cell function and/or mass cannot compensate for rising insulin resistance. Numerous studies have documented the longitudinal changes in metabolism that occur during the development of glucose intolerance and lead to T2DM. However, the role of changes in insulin secretion, both amount and temporal pattern has been understudied. Most of the insulin secreted from pancreatic beta cells of the pancreas is released in a pulsatile pattern, which is disrupted in T2DM. Here we review the evidence that changes in beta cell pulsatility occur during the progression from glucose intolerance to T2DM in humans, and contribute significantly to the etiology of the disease. We review the evidence that insulin pulsatility improves the efficacy of secreted insulin on its targets, particularly hepatic glucose production, but also examine evidence that pulsatility alters or is altered by changes in peripheral glucose uptake. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms responsible for oscillatory insulin secretion. Understanding how insulin pulsatility contributes to normal glucose homeostasis and is altered in metabolic disease states may help improve the treatment of T2DM. PMID:25637831

  10. Predictors of Risk Tolerance Among Oral Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Belin, Thomas R.; Black, Edward E.; Gironda, Melanie W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study attempts to provide insight on how the treatment preference for a mandible fracture and treatment received and its consequences, are related to the patient’s risk tolerance, as measured by the Standard Gamble(SG). Patients and Methods Data from a prospective cohort study of 203 subjects receiving treatment at the former King/Drew Medical Center (KDMC) in Los Angeles for either a mandible fracture(n=98) or third-molar removal (n=105) are examined. Subjects were interviewed at four time points; upon admission to the medical center, and at three monthly follow-up visits. Risk tolerance for hypothetical treatment scenarios is measured using the SG, a health-value utility measure assessing the tradeoff between good outcomes and serious complications associated with treatment. Separate regression analyses with subsets of predictors (sociodemographic, psychosocial health, and clinical characteristics) were conducted and then synthesized using the significant predictors in separate analyses. Results For fracture subjects, there is a noticeable rise in the SG reports from admission to the one-month follow-up. Their greater risk tolerance was associated with being older, receiving surgery, having a lower PTSD score, and having a swollen jaw or face. For third-molar subjects, SG does not change substantively over the course of the study. Predictors of greater risk tolerance for third molar subjects include the jaw or face being swollen and having to use less pain medication. Conclusions Findings from this study demonstrate a preference for less invasive treatment, with the majority of both groups preferring wiring and support the theory that treatment choices differ between subjects with different health states. Factors associated with risk tolerance include the patient’s age, treatment received, psychosocial health state, experience with prior treatment, and value for oral health quality of life. PMID:20678842

  11. Significant differences in fecal microbiota are associated with various stages of glucose tolerance in African American male veterans

    PubMed Central

    CIUBOTARU, IRINA; GREEN, STEFAN J.; KUKREJA, SUBHASH; BARENGOLTS, ELENA

    2016-01-01

    The importance of gut microbiota in pathogenesis of diabetes remains unknown. This study investigated the relationship between microbiota and metabolic markers in African American men (AAM) with prediabetes and hypovitaminosis D. The study was ancillary to a randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation with weekly ergocalciferol (50,000 IU) conducted in AAM veterans over 12 months (D Intervention in Veterans Affairs). Glycemic groups (Gr) were characterized based on changes in oral glucose tolerance between baseline and exit. Subjects with stable normal glucose tolerance were assigned to Gr-1 and those with stable prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose) to Gr-2. Microbiota composition was analyzed in stool collected at the exit (n = 115) and compared between Gr-1 and Gr-2, as well as between the lowest and highest quartiles of dietary intake of energy and fat, hemoglobin A1c, and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) level. Differences between Gr-1 and Gr-2 included the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes and Bacteroidales/Clostridia ratios and differences in genera such as Ruminococcus and Dialister. Changes in specific taxa associated with the lowest and highest quartiles of 25(OH) D (eg, Ruminococcus, Roseburia, Blautia, Dorea) were clearly distinct from those of dietary intake (eg, Bacteroides, Bacteroides/Prevotella ratio) or A1c (eg, Faecalibacterium, Catenibacterium, Streptococcus). These findings suggest a novel interaction between microbiota and vitamin D and a role for microbiota in early stages of diabetes development. Although results suggest that specific taxa are associated with glycemic stability over time, a causative relationship between microbiota makeup and dysglycemia is still to be demonstrated. PMID:26209747

  12. Significant differences in fecal microbiota are associated with various stages of glucose tolerance in African American male veterans.

    PubMed

    Ciubotaru, Irina; Green, Stefan J; Kukreja, Subhash; Barengolts, Elena

    2015-11-01

    The importance of gut microbiota in pathogenesis of diabetes remains unknown. This study investigated the relationship between microbiota and metabolic markers in African American men (AAM) with prediabetes and hypovitaminosis D. The study was ancillary to a randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation with weekly ergocalciferol (50,000 IU) conducted in AAM veterans over 12 months (D Intervention in Veterans Affairs). Glycemic groups (Gr) were characterized based on changes in oral glucose tolerance between baseline and exit. Subjects with stable normal glucose tolerance were assigned to Gr-1 and those with stable prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose) to Gr-2. Microbiota composition was analyzed in stool collected at the exit (n = 115) and compared between Gr-1 and Gr-2, as well as between the lowest and highest quartiles of dietary intake of energy and fat, hemoglobin A1c, and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) level. Differences between Gr-1 and Gr-2 included the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes and Bacteroidales/Clostridia ratios and differences in genera such as Ruminococcus and Dialister. Changes in specific taxa associated with the lowest and highest quartiles of 25(OH)D (eg, Ruminococcus, Roseburia, Blautia, Dorea) were clearly distinct from those of dietary intake (eg, Bacteroides, Bacteroides/Prevotella ratio) or A1c (eg, Faecalibacterium, Catenibacterium, Streptococcus). These findings suggest a novel interaction between microbiota and vitamin D and a role for microbiota in early stages of diabetes development. Although results suggest that specific taxa are associated with glycemic stability over time, a causative relationship between microbiota makeup and dysglycemia is still to be demonstrated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Metabolic syndrome and the early detection of impaired glucose tolerance among professionals living in Beijing, China: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components with the risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in high risk urban professionals. The goal is to improve the selection of candidates who would most benefit from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methods This is a cross sectional study in which MS was identified by both the definitions proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Results There were 928 eligible subjects in the study, and 23.9% of them failed in OGTT. The odds ratio of IGT was increased 3.16-fold for MS defined by the NCEP criteria and 2.79-fold for the hyperglycemia factor alone. Both MS and hyperglycemia were shown to be acceptable measures to discriminate subjects with IGT from those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The clustering of any 1, 2, or ≥3 metabolic components resulted in increased odds ratios for IGT: i.e., 1.71, 2.38 and 5.92, respectively. Even without hyperglycemia in the cluster, an increased odds ratio was still observed. The risk of IGT increased dramatically when the fasting plasma glucose and waist circumference were both at their highest defined level. Conclusions MS and its components are associated with the increased risk of IGT. People with MS, one of its components, especially hyperglycemia and central obesity, or a cluster of its components are strong candidates for an OGTT in order to achieve early cost-effective detection of IGT. PMID:24499585

  14. Ethnic differences in glycated haemoglobin between white subjects and those of South Asian origin with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Likhari, Taruna; Gama, Rousseau

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether ethnic differences exist in glycated haemoglobin between white subjects and those of South Asian origin with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) METHODS: Erythrocyte glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) was compared between white subjects and those of South Asian origin with NGT defined by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). 139 subjects with NGT comprising 36 people of South Asian origin (20 female) and 103 white subjects (49 female) were compared. Subjects of South Asian origin were younger (p<0.001) and weighed less (p<0.001) than white subjects. Fasting and 2 h capillary plasma glucose concentrations were similar in subjects of South Asian origin and white subjects, but HbA(1c) levels were higher (p<0.05) in subjects of South Asian origin (6.11+/-0.58%) compared with levels in white subjects (5.90+/-0.40%). In subjects with similar fasting and postprandial glycaemia on OGTT, those of South Asian origin have higher HbA(1c) levels than white subjects. It is speculated that the higher glycaemia-independent HBA(1c) levels in people of South Asian origin could possibly contribute to their increase cardiovascular risk.

  15. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  16. Intake of St John's wort improves the glucose tolerance in healthy subjects who ingest metformin compared with metformin alone.

    PubMed

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Feddersen, Søren; Larsen, John Teilmann; Højlund, Kurt; Brøsen, Kim

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between the antidepressive herbal medicine St John's wort and the antidiabetic drug metformin. We performed an open cross-over study in 20 healthy male subjects, who received 1 g of metformin twice daily for 1 week with and without 21 days of preceding and concomitant treatment with St John's wort. The pharmacokinetics of metformin was determined, and a 2 h oral glucose tolerance test was performed. St John's wort decreased the renal clearance of metformin but did not affect any other metformin pharmacokinetic parameter. The addition of St John's wort decreased the area under the glucose concentration-time curve [702 (95% confidence interval, 643-761) vs. 629 min*mmol/L (95% confidence interval, 568-690), P = 0.003], and this effect was caused by a statistically significant increase in the acute insulin response. St John's wort improves glucose tolerance by enhancing insulin secretion independently of insulin sensitivity in healthy male subjects taking metformin. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Insulin Dynamics in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Normal Glucose Tolerance across Categories of Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Manco, Melania; Castagneto-Gissey, Lidia; Arrighi, Eugenio; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Brufani, Claudia; Luciano, Rosa; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence favours insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia as the predominant, perhaps primary, defects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate insulin metabolism in young women with PCOS but normal glucose tolerance as compared with age, body mass index and insulin resistance-matched controls to answer the question whether women with PCOS hypersecrete insulin in comparison to appropriately insulin resistance-matched controls. Research Design and Methods Sixty-nine cases were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) in normal-weight (N = 29), overweight (N = 24) and obese patients (N = 16). Controls were 479 healthy women (age 16–49 y). Whole body Insulin Sensitivity (WBISI), fasting, and total insulin secretion were estimated following an oral glucose tolerance test (C-peptide deconvolution method). Results Across classes of BMI, PCOS patients had greater insulin resistance than matched controls (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons), but they showed higher fasting and total insulin secretion than their age, BMI and insulin resistance-matched peers (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons). Conclusion Women with PCOS show higher insulin resistance but also larger insulin secretion to maintain normal glucose homeostasis than age-, BMI- and insulin resistance-matched controls. PMID:24705280

  18. Glucose tolerance in mice is linked to the dose of the p53 transactivation domain

    PubMed Central

    Franck, Debra; Tracy, Laura; Armata, Heather L.; Delaney, Christine L.; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Kim, Jason K.; Scrable, Heidi; Sluss, Hayla K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has a critical role in maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Phosphorylation of Ser18 in the transaction domain of p53 controls the expression of Zpf385a, a zinc finger protein that regulates adipogenesis and adipose function. Mice with a mutation in p53Ser18 exhibit reduced Zpf385a expression in adipose tissue, adipose tissue-specific insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Mice with relative deficits in the transactivation domain of p53 exhibit similar defects in glucose homeostasis, while “Super p53” mice with an increased dosage of p53 exhibit improved glucose tolerance. These data support the role of an ATM—p53 cellular stress axis that helps combat glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and regulates glucose homeostasis. PMID:23102272

  19. Oral therapy in children with cholera: a comparison of sucrose and glucose electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Islam, S; Brown, K H; Islam, A; Kabir, A K; Chowdhury, A M; Ali, M A

    1980-01-01

    We performed a double-blind trial comparing sucrose electrolyte oral solution with glucose electrolyte oral solution in children less than 5 years of age with severe cholera-like diarrhea. Of 111 patients studied (102 with bacteriologically confirmed cholera), 55 received sucrose solution and 56 received glucose solution. The success rates, as defined by the absence of the need to give unscheduled intravenous therapy, were similar in the two groups (73% and 77% in the sucrose and glucose groups, respectively). There was no difference in purging rates between the two groups. The primary determinant of success for oral fluid regardless of the sugar was the purging rate. Sucrose malabsorption was responsible for oral therapy failure in one child. This study demonstrates that sucrose is an effective alternative to glucose in the oral therapy solution, but either must be used in conjunction with intravenous solution when treating severe dehydrating diarrhea.

  20. Glucose tolerance and free fatty acid metabolism in adults with variations in TCF7L2 rs7903146.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Varghese, Ron T; Zhou, Lianzhen; Vella, Adrian; Jensen, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    TCF7L2 variant rs7903146 is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of TCF7L2 variant rs7903146 and glucose tolerance on free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism. We recruited 120 individuals, half homozygous for the major CC allele and half homozygous for the minor TT allele at rs7903146; each underwent a 2-h, 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Plasma glucose, insulin and free fatty acid concentrations were measured on blood collected before and during the OGTT. Total FFA concentrations and percent FA species during OGTT were not different in CC and TT carriers when males and females were considered together. However, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) concentrations and percentages were greater in TT than CC females during the OGTT. TT carriers with high HOMA-IR had significantly greater fasting FFA concentrations, lower disposition index (DI) and greater AUC of glucose than high HOMA-IR CC carriers, whereas no such differences were observed in the low HOMA-IR group. We found that fasting (826±25 vs. 634±22μmol/L, P<0.0001) and OGTT plasma FFA concentrations were greater in IGT than NGT subjects, and the difference remained after adjusting for sex, age, BMI, and genotype. Finally, IGT subjects had greater MUFA concentrations and percentages than NGT subjects during OGTT. Despite similar fasting insulin and glucose, fasting plasma FFA are greater in IGT than NGT adults. Insulin resistance and sex influence plasma FFA responses amongst carriers of the minor T allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of pro- and antioxidants on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Volchegorskii, I A; Rassokhina, L M; Miroshnichenko, I Yu; Mester, K M; Novoselov, P N; Astakhova, T V

    2011-01-01

    We studied the correlation between the effect of α-lipoic acid, emoxipin, reamberin, and mexidol on LPO in vitro and the action of these drugs on insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose load in vivo. It was found that the preparations producing prooxidant effect in vitro (α-lipoic acid and reamberin) are characterized by pronounced insulin-potentiating activity, but only slightly increase (α-lipoic acid) or even decrease (reamberin) tolerance to glucose load. 3-Hydroxypyridine derivatives (emoxipin and mexidol) producing an antioxidant effect in vitro increase glucose tolerance, but exhibit relatively weak insulin-potentiating activity. These results suggest that differential use of the studied drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus depending on the type of the disease and individual insulin requirement is a promising trend in medical studies.

  2. Postpartum glucose tolerance in women with gestational diabetes using levonorgestrel intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Kiley, Jessica W; Hammond, Cassing; Niznik, Charlotte; Rademaker, Alfred; Liu, Dachao; Shulman, Lee P

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum contraception is critical in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We evaluated the effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on glucose tolerance in postpartum women with GDM. The study is a descriptive analysis of 12-month glucose tolerance in women with recent GDM who used the LNG-IUS, the copper IUD or postpartum sterilization. Twelve months postpartum, 3 of 13 LNG-IUS users (23.1%) and 1 of 6 nonhormonal contraceptive users (16.6%) had prediabetes. No woman developed overt diabetes. This study is the first and only to measure the metabolic effects of the LNG-IUS women with GDM. Larger trials are necessary. Use of levonorgestrel intrauterine contraception does not appear to negatively affect glucose tolerance in postpartum women with a history of gestational diabetes. Additional appropriately powered clinical studies are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations of Green Tea and Rock Tea Consumption with Risk of Impaired Fasting Glucose and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Chinese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huibin; Guo, Qiuxuan; Qiu, Changsheng; Huang, Baoying; Fu, Xianguo; Yao, Jin; Liang, Jixing; Li, Liantao; Chen, Ling; Tang, Kaka; Lin, Lixiang; Lu, Jieli; Bi, Yufang; Ning, Guang; Wen, Junping; Lin, Caijing; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the associations of green tea and rock tea consumption with risk of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods A multistage, stratified, cluster, random-sampling method was used to select a representative sample from Fujian Province in China. In total, 4808 subjects without cardiovascular disease, hypertension, cancer, or pancreatic, liver, kidney, or gastrointestinal diseases were enrolled in the study. A standard questionnaire was used to gather data on tea (green, rock, and black) consumption and other relevant factors. The assessment of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) was using 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), the diagnostic criteria of normal glucose tolerance was according to American Diabetes Association. Results Green tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of IFG, while rock tea consumption was associated with a lower risk of IGT. The adjusted odds ratios for IFG for green tea consumption of <1, 1–15, 16–30, and >30 cups per week were 1.0 (reference), 0.42 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.27–0.65), 0.23 (95% CI, 0.12–0.46), and 0.41 (95% CI, 0.17–0.93), respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for IGT for rock tea consumption of <1, 1–15, 16–30, and >30 cups per week were 1.0 (reference), 0.69 (95% CI, 0.48–0.98), 0.59 (95% CI, 0.39–0.90), and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.43–0.97), respectively. A U-shaped association was observed, subjects who consumed 16–30 cups of green or rock tea per week having the lowest odds ratios for IFG or IGT. Conclusions Consumption of green or rock tea may protect against the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese men and women, particularly in those who drink 16–30 cups per week. PMID:24260170

  4. Influence of food deprivation on intravenous glucose tolerance test traits in Holstein Friesian heifers.

    PubMed

    González-Grajales, L Antonio; Pieper, Laura; Kremer, Joachim; Staufenbiel, Rudolf

    2017-09-01

    Glucose is essential for numerous cellular functions due to its involvement in energy supply from early development to adulthood. In the lactating cow, glucose demands by the mammary gland significantly increase to support milk production when compared with other tissues. Thus, insufficient blood glucose levels might predispose dairy cows to metabolic disturbances. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) is a suitable tool to characterize glucose metabolism and insulin responses, but results must be reliable and repeatable. One factor influencing ivGTT is food deprivation period, which has been considered as an obligatory requirement before conduction of glucose tolerance studies in monogastric species, whereas it has been permissive in ruminants. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of 5 fasting periods (0, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h) on ivGTT traits and insulin responses in German Holstein heifers. A total of 140 tests were conducted in 28 females aged 12 to 19 mo. Blood samples were collected every 7 min within 1 h. Assessed glucose and insulin parameters included basal serum glucose and insulin concentration, maximum glucose and insulin concentration obtained between min 7 to 21, and concentrations at min 63 (last sampling) relative to glucose administration, glucose area equivalent (GA), glucose area under the curve (GAUC), insulin area equivalent (InsA), insulin area under the curve (InsAUC), and blood glucose half-life time (GHLT). Serum glucose and insulin concentration were measured according to the hexokinase colorimetric method and solid phase radio immunoassay, respectively. The generalized linear mixed model was used to test for significant differences in all glucose traits and insulin responses at different fasting periods. The model used season and weight as confounding variables. Glucose and insulin concentrations at 0, 7 to 21 (maximum concentration), and 63 min were affected by the duration of food deprivation. The GA, Ins

  5. Six weeks' sebacic acid supplementation improves fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and glucose tolerance in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Membrez, M; Chou, C J; Raymond, F; Mansourian, R; Moser, M; Monnard, I; Ammon-Zufferey, C; Mace, K; Mingrone, G; Binnert, C

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the impact of chronic ingestion of sebacic acid (SA), a 10-carbon medium-chain dicarboxylic acid, on glycaemic control in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods: Three groups of 15 db/db mice were fed for 6 weeks either a chow diet (Ctrl) or a chow diet supplemented with 1.5 or 15% (SA1.5% and SA15%, respectively) energy from SA. Fasting glycaemia was measured once a week and HbA1c before and after supplementation. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at the end of the supplementation. Gene expression was determined by transcriptomic analysis on the liver of the Ctrl and SA15% groups. Results: After 42 days of supplementation, fasting glycaemia and HbA1c were ∼70 and 25% lower in the SA15% group compared with the other groups showing a beneficial effect of SA on hyperglycaemia. During OGTT, plasma glucose area under the curve was reduced after SA15% compared with the other groups. This effect was associated with a tendency for an improved insulin response. In the liver, Pck1 and FBP mRNA were statistically decreased in the SA15% compared with Ctrl suggesting a reduced hepatic glucose output induced by SA. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of SA largely improves glycaemic control in a mouse model of T2D. This beneficial effect may be due to (i) an improved glucose-induced insulin secretion and (ii) a reduced hepatic glucose output. PMID:20977585

  6. Glucose tolerance female-specific QTL mapped in collaborative cross mice.

    PubMed

    Abu-Toamih Atamni, Hanifa J; Ziner, Yaron; Mott, Richard; Wolf, Lior; Iraqi, Fuad A

    2017-02-01

    Type-2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by impaired glucose tolerance. Despite environmental high risk factors, host genetic background is a strong component of T2D development. Herein, novel highly genetically diverse strains of collaborative cross (CC) lines from mice were assessed to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with variations of glucose-tolerance response. In total, 501 mice of 58 CC lines were maintained on high-fat (42 % fat) diet for 12 weeks. Thereafter, an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was performed for 180 min. Subsequently, the values of Area under curve for the glucose at zero and 180 min (AUC0-180), were measured, and used for QTL mapping. Heritability and coefficient of variations in glucose tolerance (CVg) were calculated. One-way analysis of variation was significant (P < 0.001) for AUC0-180 between the CC lines as well between both sexes. Despite Significant variations for both sexes, QTL analysis was significant, only for females, reporting a significant female-sex-dependent QTL (~2.5 Mbp) associated with IPGTT AUC0-180 trait, located on Chromosome 8 (32-34.5 Mbp, containing 51 genes). Gene browse revealed QTL for body weight/size, genes involved in immune system, and two main protein-coding genes involved in the Glucose homeostasis, Mboat4 and Leprotl1. Heritability and coefficient of genetic variance (CVg) were 0.49 and 0.31 for females, while for males, these values 0.34 and 0.22, respectively. Our findings demonstrate the roles of genetic factors controlling glucose tolerance, which significantly differ between sexes requiring independent studies for females and males toward T2D prevention and therapy.

  7. Peripheral activation of the Y2-receptor promotes secretion of GLP-1 and improves glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Irvine, Elaine E.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of peptide tyrosine–tyrosine (PYY) on feeding is well established but currently its role in glucose homeostasis is poorly defined. Here we show in mice, that intraperitoneal (ip) injection of PYY3-36 or Y2R agonist improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance and enhances insulin secretion; an effect blocked by peripheral, but not central, Y2R antagonist administration. Studies on isolated mouse islets revealed no direct effect of PYY3-36 on insulin secretion. Bariatric surgery in mice, enterogastric anastomosis (EGA), improved glucose tolerance in wild-type mice and increased circulating PYY and active GLP-1. In contrast, in Pyy-null mice, post-operative glucose tolerance and active GLP-1 levels were similar in EGA and sham-operated groups. PYY3-36 ip increased hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels, an effect blocked by ip Y2R antagonist. Collectively, these data suggest that PYY3-36 therefore acting via peripheral Y2R increases hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels and improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance. PMID:24049729

  8. Obesity is the predominant predictor of impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic disturbance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liang, So-Jung; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen; Hsu, Chun-Sen; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Hsu, Ming-I

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the contribution to glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome of obesity combined with the diagnostic criteria of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Prospective study. University teaching hospital from 31 August 2010 to 31 August 2011. Two hundred and twenty women with PCOS and seventy normal control women. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of women with PCOS and control women were evaluated. Main outcome measures. The impact of obesity, hyperandrogenism, oligo-anovulation and polycystic ovary morphology on impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic disturbances. Obese women with PCOS had significantly higher insulin resistance than obese normal control women. Logistic regression analysis showed that obesity was the only factor that predicted impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome. Use of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for the body mass index to predict impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome was more accurate than AUROCs for serum total testosterone level and the average menstrual interval. Body weight status was the major factor determining the risk of impaired glucose tolerance and metabolic syndrome in women with PCOS. Obesity should be treated as the major factor determining long-term health consequences associated with PCOS. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Association between optic disc haemorrhages in glaucoma and abnormal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Poinoosawmy, D; Gloster, J; Nagasubramanian, S; Hitchings, R A

    1986-01-01

    Data concerning the results of glucose tolerance tests and levels of intraocular pressure were analysed for 120 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, many of whom had been under observation for a period of four to five years. The patients consisted of two groups: in 62 patients a disc haemorrhage had been recorded at some time during the observation period, and in 58 no haemorrhages had been seen. Patients with disc haemorrhages had a higher incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance or frank diabetes and lower intraocular pressures than those without haemorrhages. PMID:3741826

  10. Spontaneous hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in athymic nude BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, A; Tosco, C; Kumar, D; Slavin, B; Parker, J

    1982-09-01

    Basal plasma glucose, glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion were investigated in young and mature athymic nude BALB/c mice and in age-matched controls. Basal plasma glucose levels in male athymic nude mice were similar to those of controls at 1, 3, and 4 wk of age. At 6, 8, and 12 wk of age, male athymic nudes had significantly higher basal plasma glucose levels when compared with controls (P less than 0.01). Plasma immunoreactive insulin concentrations were similar in athymic nudes and controls at 1 wk of age, but at 3 wk of age and subsequently at 6, 8, and 12 wk athymic nude mice had significantly decreased insulin levels when compared with their age-matched controls (P less than 0.05). We found impaired glucose tolerance in male athymic nude mice at all age groups when compared with both female athymic nudes and control BALB/c mice. The discovery of a spontaneous diabetic syndrome (hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and decreased insulin secretion) in a colony of athymic nude mice may provide an excellent model for studying the genetics and interactions between the immune and endocrine systems.

  11. Administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid prevents endothelial dysfunction caused by an oral glucose load

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Lauren K.; Restaino, Robert M.; Neuringer, Martha; Manrique, Camila; Padilla, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia leads to a transient impairment in endothelial function; however, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Previous work in cell culture models demonstrate that high glucose results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and, in animal studies, ER stress has been implicated as a cause of endothelial dysfunction. Herein we tested the hypothesis that acute oral administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 1500mg), a chemical chaperone known to alleviate ER stress, would prevent hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. In 12 young healthy subjects (seven men, five women), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed at baseline, 1 hour, and 2 hours post an oral glucose challenge. Subjects were tested on two separate visits in a single-blind randomized crossover design: after oral ingestion of TUDCA or placebo capsules. FMD was reduced from baseline during hyperglycemia under the placebo condition (−32% at 1 hr and −28% at 2 hr post oral glucose load; p<0.05 from baseline) but not under the TUDCA condition (−4% at 1 hr and +0.3% at 2 hr post oral glucose load; p>0.05 from baseline). Postprandial plasma glucose and insulin were not altered by TUDCA ingestion. Plasma oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine and TBARs remained unaltered throughout the oral glucose challenge in both conditions. These results suggest that hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction can be mitigated by oral administration of TUDCA, thus supporting the hypothesis that ER stress may contribute to endothelial dysfunction during postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:27503949

  12. Evaluation of intragastric vs intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests in the evaluation of insulin resistance in a rodent model of burn injury and glucagon-like polypeptide-1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Watada, Susumu; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J; Kurihara, Tomohiro; Shen, Chuan-An; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fagan, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of glucose tolerance in rodent models is usually performed after intraperitroneal administration of glucose (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test [IPGTT]), whereas in humans the test is performed with oral glucose. Hyperglycemia is a major clinical manifestation of burn injury. Our previous studies using IPGTT have demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the beneficial effects of glucagon-like polypeptide-1 (GLP-1) in improving insulin resistance. The goal of the present study is to compare the results of these two procedures under 1) burn injury-induced insulin resistance and 2) GLP-1 treatment after burn. Male CD rats were divided into three groups: sham burn, burn, and burn with GLP-1. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured during intragastric glucose tolerance test (IGGTT) on day 6 after 40% of full-thickness burn injury. The results were compared with our previous IPGTT. Blood glucose curves for IGGTT and IPGTT showed a similar pattern. However, IGGTT demonstrated a significant lower level of maximal blood glucose when compared with IPGTT. This was accompanied by higher peak insulin levels in sham burn and burn groups. In contrast, peak insulin levels of each burn with GLP-1 group were similar. 1) Both IPGTT and IGGTT demonstrated burn injury-induced insulin resistance and the efficacy of GLP-1 for reducing hyperglycemia after burn injury. 2) The observed differences in the plasma glucose and insulin levels between IGGTT and IPGTT suggest that endogenously produced GLP-1 during the IGGTT may play a role in ameliorating insulin resistance after burn injury.

  13. Heritability of metabolic response to the intravenous glucose tolerance test in German Holstein Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Laura; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Christ, Jana; Panicke, Lothar; Müller, Uwe; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2016-09-01

    Selection for improved health and welfare in farm animals is of increasing interest worldwide. Peripartum energy balance is a key factor for pathogenesis of diseases in dairy cows. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) can be used to study the metabolic response to a glucose stimulus. The aim of this study was to estimate heritability of ivGTT traits in German Holstein bulls. A total of 541 Holstein bulls aged 7 to 17 mo from 2 breeding stations were subjected to the ivGTT. Serum glucose concentrations were measured at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 63 min relative to glucose infusion. The maximum increase in blood glucose concentration, glucose area equivalent, and blood glucose half-life period were calculated. Heritabilities were estimated using a univariate animal model including station-year-season and age as fixed effects, and animal additive genetic and residual as random effects. The estimated heritabilities were 0.19 for fasting glucose concentration, 0.43 for glucose area equivalent, 0.40 for glucose half-life period, 0.14 for the peak glucose concentration, and 0.12 for the maximum increase of blood glucose concentration. Correlations between ivGTT traits and breeding values for milk yield and composition were not found. The results indicate that heritability for response to glucose is high, which warrants further investigation of this trait for genetic improvement of metabolic disorders. Research is necessary to determine the target levels of ivGTT traits and potential associations between ivGTT traits in breeding bulls and periparturient diseases in their offspring. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physicochemical characteristics of polysaccharide conjugates prepared from fresh tea leaves and their improving impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; We, Heng; Sun, Chaochao; Li, Jianrong; Jiang, Yongwen

    2014-11-04

    Hot-water extracts were prepared from fresh tea leaves and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose DE-52 column chromatography to yield one unexplored polysaccharide-conjugate fraction TPC-L (tea polysaccharide conjugates). Chemical components, molecular weight and its distribution, water vapor sorption properties, zeta potentials and optical characteristics of TPC-L were investigated. As compared with injured cell group, the two dosages of TPC-L (150 and 300 μg/mL) were discovered to possess remarkably protective effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells against impairments induced by high glucose in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Compared with group NC (normal control), the ingestion of 40 mg/kg of TPC-L could significantly reduce blood glucose levels of normal mice ingesting starch, and significant difference of AUC (area under the curve of blood glucose) and ΔAUC (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) at the postprandial time point of 0.5 and 1.0 h were observed. The three dosages of TPC-L (10, 40 and 160 mg/kg) did not significantly lower postprandial blood glucose levels of normal mice ingesting glucose. TPC-L could improve starch tolerance to prevent impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) from developing into diabetes as well as protective effects on HUVE cells against impairments induced by high glucose It was suggested that TPC-L improved IGT through its capability of inhibition on digestive enzymes.

  15. Dietary nitrate improves glucose tolerance and lipid profile in an animal model of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Khalifi, Saeedeh; Rahimipour, Ali; Jeddi, Sajad; Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Kazerouni, Faranak; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2015-01-30

    Reduction in nitric oxide (NO) production and bioavailability contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Administration of nitrate has strong NO-like outcomes in both animals and humans. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary nitrate on glucose tolerance and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin and nicotinamide. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: controls (C), control+nitrate (CN), diabetes (D), and diabetes+nitrate (DN). For 8 weeks, the CN and DN groups consumed sodium nitrate (100 mg/L in drinking water) while the C and D groups consumed tap water. Serum nitrate+nitrite (NOx), glucose, lipid profile, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and catalase (CAT) activity were measured before and at the end of the study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured every 10 days. Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed at the end of the study. Serum NOx decreased in diabetic rats and dietary nitrate restored it to normal values. Increases in serum glucose levels was significantly lower in the DN group compared to the D group (24.1% vs. 90.2%; p < 0.05). Nitrate therapy in diabetic rats significantly improved lipid profile, glucose tolerance (AUC: 20264 ± 659 vs. 17923 ± 523; p < 0.05 for D and DN groups respectively) and restored elevated SBP to normal values. Diabetic rats had lower TAC and CAT activity and dietary nitrate restored these to normal status. In conclusion, dietary nitrate prevented increase in SBP and serum glucose, improved glucose tolerance and restored dyslipidemia in an animal model of hyperglycemia.

  16. The incretin effect in cats: comparison between oral glucose, lipids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gilor, C; Graves, T K; Gilor, S; Ridge, T K; Weng, H-Y; Dossin, O

    2011-05-01

    Incretin hormones are secreted from the intestines in response to specific nutrients. They potentiate insulin secretion and have other beneficial effects in glucose homeostasis. We aimed to study the incretin effect in cats and to compare the effect of oral glucose, lipids, or amino acids on serum concentrations of insulin, total glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and total glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Ten healthy cats were used in a repeated measures design. Glucose, lipid, or amino acids were administered through nasoesophageal tubes on separate days. Blood glucose (BG) concentrations were matched between experiments by measuring BG every 5 min and infusing glucose intravenously at a changing rate. Intravenous glucose infusion with no prior treatment served as control. The incretin effect was estimated as the difference in insulin area under the curve (AUC) after oral compared with intravenous glucose. Temporal changes and total amount of hormone secretions were compared between treatment groups with the use of mixed models. Total glucose infused (TGI) at a mean dose of 0.49 g/kg resulted in slightly higher BG compared with 1 g/kg oral glucose (P = 0.038), but insulin concentrations were not significantly different (P = 0.367). BG and the TGI were not significantly different after the 3 oral challenges. Total GIP AUC was larger after lipids compared with amino acids (P = 0.0012) but GIP concentrations did not increase after oral glucose. Insulin and GIP concentrations were positively correlated after lipid (P < 0.001) and amino acids (P < 0.001) stimulations, respectively, but not after oral glucose stimulation. Total GLP-1 AUC was similar after all three oral stimulations. Insulin and GLP-1 concentrations were positively correlated after glucose (P = 0.001), amino acids (P < 0.001), or lipids (P = 0.001) stimulations. Our data indirectly support an insulinotropic effect of GIP and GLP-1. Potentiation of insulin secretion after oral glucose is

  17. Cocoa, glucose tolerance, and insulin signaling: cardiometabolic protection.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mai, Francesca; Martella, Letizia; De Feo, Martina; Soddu, Daniele; Fellini, Emanuela; Veneri, Mariangela; Stamerra, Cosimo A; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-11-18

    Experimental and clinical evidence reported that some polyphenol-rich natural products may offer opportunities for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, due to their biological properties. Natural products have been suggested to modulate carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as restoring β-cell integrity and physiology and enhancing insulin-releasing activity and glucose uptake. Endothelium is fundamental in regulating arterial function, whereas insulin resistance plays a pivotal role in pathophysiological mechanisms of prediabetic and diabetic states. Glucose and insulin actions in the skeletal muscle are improved by insulin-dependent production of nitric oxide, favoring capillary recruitment, vasodilatation, and increased blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction, with decreased nitric oxide bioavailability, is a critical step in the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, insulin resistance has been described, at least in part, to negatively affect endothelial function. Consistent with this, conditions of insulin resistance are usually linked to endothelial dysfunction, and the exposure of the endothelial cells to cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia is associated with reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, resulting in impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction has been described as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk and events. Cocoa and cocoa flavonoids may positively affect the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction with possible benefits in the prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.

  18. Choosing an optimal input for an intravenous glucose tolerance test to aid parameter identification.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emma C; Yates, James W T; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2017-10-01

    The minimal model is used to estimate insulin sensitivity in patients with diabetes, following an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Issues have been reported regarding parameter estimation, including correlation between insulin sensitivity and action parameters. The objective was to reduce these issues, by modifying the input of glucose in the test. Data were available for 24 volunteers following an IVGTT and glucose clamp test. Correlation between parameters was explored using likelihood heatmaps. An integrated glucose-insulin model was used to simulate glucose and insulin concentrations following new glucose inputs. The improved input for the test was selected by finding the minimum inverse of the determinant of the Fisher information matrix. When the minimal model was fitted to the IVGTT data, there was clear correlation between the insulin parameters. With the glucose clamp, all parameters were correlated and badly estimated. The modified input, a bolus dose followed by constant infusion, resulted in improvement in parameter estimation and reduction in parameter correlation. It is possible to reduce the issues with parameter estimation in the minimal model by modifying the glucose input, leading to a simplified test deign and a reduction in the total amount of glucose infused. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. A low glycaemic load breakfast can attenuate cognitive impairments observed in middle aged obese females with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lamport, D J; Chadwick, H K; Dye, L; Mansfield, M W; Lawton, C L

    2014-10-01

    There has been no systematic investigation of the individual and combined effects of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and obesity on cognitive function in the absence of ageing. The aims were to examine the effects of IGT and increased waist circumference on cognitive function in ostensibly healthy adults, and to investigate whether a low glycaemic load (GL) breakfast can attenuate cognitive impairments in these populations. Sixty five females aged 30-50 years were classified into one of four groups following waist circumference (WC) measurements and an oral glucose tolerance test: NGT/low WC (n = 25), NGT/high WC (n = 22), IGT/low WC (n = 9), IGT/high WC (n = 9). Memory, psychomotor and executive functions were examined 30 and 120 min after consuming low GL, high GL and water breakfasts according to a randomised, crossover, counterbalanced design. IGT was associated with impairment of verbal and spatial memory, and psychomotor function relative to females with NGT, independent of waist circumference. Increased waist circumference was associated with impairment of verbal memory and executive function relative to females with low WC, independent of IGT. Consumption of the LGL breakfast attenuated verbal memory impairment in the IGT/high WC group relative to the HGL breakfast and no energy control. Increased central adiposity and abnormalities in glucose tolerance preceding type 2 diabetes can have demonstrable negative effects on cognitive function, even in ostensibly healthy, middle-aged females. The potential for GL manipulations to modulate glycaemic response and cognitive function in type 2 diabetes and obesity merits further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and abnormal glucose tolerance in the Iranian urban population: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammad Reza; Ghasemi, Asghar; Harati, Hadi; Saadat, Navid; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and combined IFG/IGT in a large urban Iranian population aged ≥ 20 years. Methods The study population included 9,489 participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study with full relevant clinical data. Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes and glucose intolerance categories were reported according to the 2003 American Diabetes Association definitions. Age-adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the numbers needed to screen (NNTS) to find one person with undiagnosed diabetes. Results The prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, isolated IFG, isolated IGT, and combined IFG/IGT were 8.1%, 5.1%, 8.7%, 5.4% and 4.0% in men and 10%, 4.7%, 6.3%, 7.6%, and 4.5% in women respectively. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes had higher age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, triglycerides (all p values <0.001) and lower HDL-cholesterol (only in women, p < 0.01) compared to normoglycemic subjects. Undiagnosed diabetes was associated with family history of diabetes, increased BMI (≥ 25 kg/m2), abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridem