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Sample records for oral minipulse therapy

  1. A Comparative Study of Oral Cyclosporine and Betamethasone Minipulse Therapy in the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Kim, Sang Lim; Lee, Kyou Chae; Kim, Min Ji; Park, Kyung Hea; Lee, Weon Ju; Lee, Seok-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Various systemic agents have been assessed for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA); however, there is a paucity of comparative studies. Objective To assess and compare cyclosporine and betamethasone minipulse therapy as treatments for AA with regard to effectiveness and safety. Methods Data were collected from 88 patients who received at least 3 months of oral cyclosporine (n=51) or betamethasone minipulse therapy (n=37) for AA. Patients with ≥50% of terminal hair regrowth in the alopecic area were considered responders. Results The responder of the cyclosporine group was 54.9% and that of the betamethasone minipulse group was 37.8%. In the cyclosporine group, patients with mild AA were found to respond better to the treatment. Based on the patient self-assessments, 70.6% of patients in the cyclosporine group and 43.2% of patients in the betamethasone minipulse group rated their hair regrowth as excellent or good. Side effects were less frequent in the cyclosporine group. Conclusion Oral cyclosporine appeared to be superior to betamethasone minipulse therapy in terms of treatment effectiveness and safety. PMID:27746635

  2. Bullous Lichen Planus treated with Oral Minipulse Therapy: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha, K; Boyapati, Ramanaryana; Kumar D.R., Shravan

    2014-01-01

    Oral Lichen planus (OLP) is a common mucocutaneous disorder with a multifactorial aetiology, affecting the women more commonly than men. Most OLP are asymptomatic, except the atrophic and erosive forms.Till date many treatment modalities are implicated to treat this disorder, but no therapy is considered as the single most effective, without side-effects and remission of the lesion. As the treatment of OLP is challenging to the oral practitioners, here we report a case of successful management of extensive, symptomatic bullous and erosive oral lichen planus with a novel treatment protocol- oral minipulse therapy with betamethasone. PMID:25654047

  3. Oral mini-pulse therapy with betamethasone in vitiligo patients having extensive or fast-spreading disease.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, J S; Khaitan, B K

    1993-10-01

    Systemic corticosteroids can arrest the progression of vitiligo and lead to repigmentation in a significant proportion of patients, but may also produce unacceptable side effects. To minimize the side effects, we tried a new approach using mini-pulse therapy with betamethasone. Forty patients having extensive and/or fast-spreading vitiligo were given 5 mg betamethasone/dexamethasone as a single oral dose after breakfast on 2 consecutive days per week. The response to treatment was evaluated by photographs taken every 2-4 months and recording the side effects. Within 1-3 months, progression of the disease was arrested in 89% of the 36 patients having active disease, while 2 patients needed an increase in the dose to 7.5 mg per day to achieve complete arrest of lesions. Within 2-4 months, 80% of the patients started having spontaneous repigmentation of the existing lesions which progressed with continued treatment. The extent of repigmentation varied in different patients and even in different lesions in the same patient. It was less than 10% in 14 (35%) patients and almost complete (> 90%) in three patients. The side effects included weight gain of 5 and 7 kg in two patients, mild headache in two patients, transitory general weakness for 2 days after the pulse in two patients, and bad taste in the mouth in three patients; 23 patients, including six children, had no side effects. Oral mini-pulse therapy with betamethasone/dexamethasone seems to be an effective treatment modality to arrest the progression of vitiligo. It also induces spontaneous repigmentation. It deserves to be tried on a large scale to evaluate its advantages over the currently available methods of treatment.

  4. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  5. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  6. Oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P

    1996-08-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS), the best treatment of dehydration due to acute diarrhea, is the most important medical advance of this century since it is key to reducing infant and child morbidity and mortality. Pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea include those which produce enterotoxin at the intestinal mucosal surface, inducing secretion but are not invasive (e.g., Vibrio cholerae); those which invade and disrupt the mucosal lining (e.g., shigella species); and rotavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF ORS is considered a universal ORS. Much research has been done on the ideal composition of an ORS. An ORS must have sufficient sodium to replace losses on a volume to volume basis, a glucose concentration that matches that of sodium to ensure its delivery to the ileum, sufficient amounts of potassium and base (e.g., sodium bicarbonate or trisodium citrate dihydrate) to correct acidosis and to enhance sodium absorption, and sufficient amounts of liquid. The risk of hypernatremia with use of the WHO/UNICEF ORS is a concern since infants and young children have an immature renal concentrating capacity, increased insensible water losses, and an impaired natriuretic response. Neonates and young infants may be prone to relatively slow correction of acidosis. It appears that the potassium content (20 mmol/l) of WHO-ORS should be higher to promote a net positive potassium retention. Too much glucose in the ORS will induce reverse osmosis of water into the gut, effectively making the ORS a dehydrating solution rather than a hydrating solution. Some carbohydrates other than glucose have proven effective glucose substitutes (e.g., sucrose, rice starch and powder, other cereals). Cereals have higher acceptability levels in developing countries. Research is investigating the nutritional benefits of supplementing ORS with micronutrients (e.g., vitamin A, folic acid, and zinc). ORS use with early refeeding has a beneficial effect on nutritional status after an

  7. Hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Zac C; Schofield, Christopher; Prinsloo, Peter J J; Sturrock, Nigel D C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcaemia due to hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy is a relatively common occurrence. Standard treatment is with oral calcium and vitamin D replacement therapy; lack of response to oral therapy is rare. Herein we describe a case of hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy in a patient with a complex medical history. We consider the potential causes in the context of calcium metabolism including: poor adherence, hungry bone syndrome, malabsorption, vitamin D resistance, bisphosphonate use and functional hypoparathyroidism secondary to magnesium deficiency. Malabsorption due to intestinal hurry was likely to be a contributory factor in this case and very large doses of oral therapy were required to avoid symptomatic hypocalcaemia.

  8. [Oral ciprofloxacin therapy in salpingitis].

    PubMed

    De Wilde, R

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with clinical pelvic inflammatory disease were studied. Diagnosis was confirmed by laparoscopy. To determine the microbiological etiology, swab specimen for detection of aerobic, anaerobic and chlamydial infections were obtained from the endocervix, fimbriae and cul-de-sac. In 22 of 30 patients, microorganisms were detected. The patients received ciprofloxacin 2 X 750 mg p.o. daily at 12 hours interval for 10 days. During and after therapy, bacteriological examinations of the endocervix were performed. Based on the microbiological evaluation and clinical aspects, the bacteriological response and clinical efficacy were 86%. Laboratory analysis showed no alterations of blood values. As side effects we noticed gastrointestinal complaints (6/30), candidiasis vulvovaginalis (6/30), allergic exanthema (5/30) and non-bacterial cystitis (2/30). Oral ciprofloxacin-monotherapy proved to be safe and effective in pelvic inflammatory disease.

  9. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral therapy of infant diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ransome-Kuti, O; Bamisaiye, A

    1978-08-26

    Immediate oral therapy at home by the mother using a sugar-salt solution offers a real prospect of reducing mortality from gastroenteritis among preschool children in the developing world. The sugar-salt solution enables the mother to take action against a disease which is the most frequent cause of death among young children. In Lagos, Nigeria, knowledge of the treatment has diffused rapidly in a low-income community served by a clinic run by the Institute of Child Health. In a recent study, women expecting their 1st child and others who had never used the service were able to describe the sugar-salt solution treatment taught to all who attend the clinic. However, of the 217 women who described the method, less than 1/2 (34%) could give the correct proportions of sugar and salt to be used (4 teaspoons and 1/4 teaspoon respectively in a standard local beer bottle filled with water). Most errors involved the use of too much salt. In nearly 1/2 these cases, 4 times too much salt was described, and in 3 cases, 16 times too much salt. Under these circumstances, we can expect a possible increase in children admitted with hypernatremia, a situation which would bring the method into disrepute. Any attempt to transfer health skills to mothers in developing countries must recognize, as in this example, the problems posed by lack of education and unfamiliarity with measurement terms such as "1/4" or even "a teaspoon." What is required is a simple measuring spoon giving the actual quantity to be used. Manufactured on a large scale in plastic, this would be inexpensive. Ideally, every mother of a preschool child should have 1, but where this is not possible, all health workers should have such spoons so that they can measure into a mother's hand the correct amounts. In this way the mother can make correct use of a treatment which has such potential for saving lives.

  11. Regression of oral hairy leukoplakia after orally administered acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L; Herbst, J S; Ablashi, D V; Atherton, S; Frank, B; Rosen, L; Horwitz, S N

    1988-01-15

    To define the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of oral hairy leukoplakia, 13 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men with clinical and histologic evidence of oral hairy leukoplakia were enrolled in an open-label trial of orally administered acyclovir therapy (3.2 g/d for 20 days). Of six patients who received therapy, five exhibited clinical regression. Once therapy was discontinued, recurrences occurred in all responders. Among seven patients who refused therapy, no spontaneous remissions occurred. Before therapy, EBV replication within the leukoplakia was demonstrated by immunofluorescence tissue staining or electron microscopy in five patients who were studied. Human papillomavirus was not detected by immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy from tissue specimens of six patients. After therapy, biopsy specimens from two patients with complete responses revealed a normalization of histologic abnormalities and an inability to detect EBV in previously involved mucosa by immunofluorescence or in situ DNA hybridization assays. It was concluded that EBV replication within the epithelial cells of the tongue is necessary for the development of oral hairy leukoplakia.

  12. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  13. Erythema nodosum and oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, R K

    1978-04-03

    A generalized erythema nodosum developed in a 17 year old girl receiving oral contraceptive therapy, which was immediately discontinued. The erythema failed to respond to tetracycline, potassium iodide or prednisone therapy (partially successful), and recurred 6 times, usually just before menstruation. The recommended therapy is bed rest, salicylates and 10 cm roller elastic bandages. No medication can help in the face of unrestricted physical activity.

  14. [Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy].

    PubMed

    Olivera-Fernandez, R; Fernandez-Ribeiro, F; Piñeiro-Corrales, G; Crespo-Diz, C

    2014-11-03

    Introducción: Los tratamientos antineoplasicos orales presentan ventajas en cuanto a coste, comodidad y mejora potencial en la calidad de vida respecto al tratamiento endovenoso, pero es mas dificil controlar la adherencia y monitorizar los efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la adherencia real en pacientes con antineoplasicos orales en nuestro centro, analizar la influencia de las caracteristicas del paciente y del tratamiento, identificar motivos de no adherencia, oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica y evaluar la posible relacion adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Método: estudio prospectivo observacional de cuatro meses de duracion, en los pacientes con tratamiento antineoplasico oral dispensado desde la consulta de farmacia oncologica. Para la recogida de datos se utilizaron: orden medica, historia clinica y visita con entrevistas al paciente. Resultados: Se evaluaron un total de 141 pacientes. Un 72% se considero totalmente adherente, mientras que en un 28% se detecto algun tipo de no adherencia. El tiempo desde el diagnostico y la presencia de efectos adversos fueron las variables que afectaron a la adherencia. No se pudo demostrar relacion entre adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Conclusiones: La adherencia al tratamiento antineoplasico oral en nuestro centro fue del 72%, identificando oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica dirigidas a prevenir los efectos adversos y a potenciar la adherencia de nuestros pacientes.

  15. Oral health considerations in older women receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Joan C; O'Ryan, Felice; Yang, Jingrong; Hararah, Mohammad K; Gonzalez, Joel R; Gordon, Nancy; Silver, Paula; Ansfield, Alice; Wang, Benjamin; Go, Alan S

    2011-05-01

    Recent reports of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) have increased awareness of oral health in patients receiving osteoporosis therapy. This study describes the demographic, oral health, and clinical characteristics of a contemporary population of women aged 50 and older undergoing oral bisphosphonate treatment who returned a mailed questionnaire pertaining to dental symptoms. The study, as previously reported, was conducted within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. The cohort included 7,909 women with bisphosphonate exposure of at least 1 year, with a subset of 923 women reporting dental symptoms who underwent clinical examination. Overall, the average age was 71 ± 9; 70% were white, and 74% had at least some college education. Nearly two-thirds had received oral bisphosphonate therapy for 3 or more years. Most reported daily tooth brushing, 85% had had a dental examination in the past year, 22% reported denture use, and 6% reported moderate to severe periodontal disease. Oral healthcare patterns varied according to age and race and ethnicity. Five hundred seven (6.4%) women reported a tooth extraction in the prior year, of whom two developed BRONJ (0.4%). Tori or exostoses were found in 28% of examined participants with dental symptoms; these were predominantly in the lingual mandible and palate, with palatal BRONJ occurring in 1.6% of symptomatic participants with palatal tori. In summary, among older women with bisphosphonate exposure, oral health varied according to patient characteristics, and BRONJ occurred more frequently after tooth extraction or on palatal tori. These data support efforts to optimize oral health and to identify risk factors for BRONJ in older individuals receiving bisphosphonate drugs. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Oral ixazomib maintenance therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Offidani, Massimo; Corvatta, Laura; Gentili, Silvia; Maracci, Laura; Leoni, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Continuous therapy has proven to be an effective therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of both young and elderly multiple myeloma patients. Remarkably, lenalidomide and bortezomib showed to play a crucial role in this setting due to their safety profile allowing long-term exposure. Ixazomib, the first oral proteasome inhibitor to be evaluated in multiple myeloma, exerts substantial anti-myeloma activity as a single agent and particularly in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and it may be an attractive option for maintenance therapy. Here we address the issue of maintenance therapy as part of a therapeutic approach of multiple myeloma patients focusing on the potential role of ixazomib.

  17. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27298725

  18. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  19. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  20. Adherence to therapy with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Avorn, Jerry; Wang, Philip S; Winer, Eric P

    2002-05-01

    With the rise in availability and increasing use of oral anticancer agents, concerns about adherence to prescribed regimens will become an increasingly important issue in oncology. Few published studies have focused on adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy, in part because the vast majority of chemotherapy is delivered intravenously in physicians' offices or hospitals. In this article, we review current knowledge of adherence behavior with regard to oral medications in general, including factors associated with adherence and methods for measuring adherence. We also review published studies of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in adult and pediatric populations and adherence issues in cancer prevention. The available evidence reveals that patient adherence to oral chemotherapy recommendations is variable and not easily predicted. Adherence rates ranging from less than 20% to 100% have been reported, and certain populations, such as adolescents, pose particular challenges. Future efforts should focus on improving measurement and prediction of adherence and on developing interventions to improve adherence for both patients in clinical trials and patients being treated outside of the research setting. Assessment of adherence among individuals with cancer and implementation of interventions in situations of poor adherence should improve clinical outcomes.

  1. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glinski, Ronald W.; Siegel, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB) that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or without

  2. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  3. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  4. Oral Antimycobacterial Therapy in Chronic Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Wonder P.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Richmond, Bradley W.; Isom, Joan; Burke, Victoria E.; Algood, Holly; Braun, Nicole; Taylor, Thyneice; Pandit, Kusum V.; Aboud, Caroline; Yu, Chang; Kaminski, Naftali; Boyd, Alan S.; King, Lloyd E.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease for which there are limited therapeutic options. This is the first randomized, placebo-controlled study to demonstrate that antimycobacterial therapy reduces lesion diameter and disease severity among patients with chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of once-daily antimycobacterial therapy on the resolution of chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized, placebo-controlled, single-masked trial on 30 patients with symptomatic chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions deemed to require therapeutic intervention. SETTING A tertiary referral dermatology center in Nashville, Tennessee. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomized to receive either the oral concomitant levofloxacin, ethambutol, azithromycin, and rifampin (CLEAR) regimen or a comparative placebo regimen for 8 weeks with a 180-day follow-up. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Participants were monitored for absolute change in lesion diameter and decrease in granuloma burden, if present, on completion of therapy. OBSERVATIONS In the intention-to-treat analysis, the CLEAR-treated group had a mean (SD) decrease in lesion diameter of −8.4 (14.0) mm compared with an increase of 0.07 (3.2) mm in the placebo-treated group (P = .05). The CLEAR group had a significant reduction in granuloma burden and experienced a mean (SD) decline of −2.9 (2.5) mm in lesion severity compared with a decline of −0.6 (2.1) mm in the placebo group (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Antimycobacterial therapy may result in significant reductions in chronic cutaneous sarcoidosis lesion diameter compared with placebo. These observed reductions, associated with a clinically significant improvement in symptoms, were present at the 180-day follow-up period. Transcriptome analysis of sarcoidosis CD4+ T cells revealed reversal of pathways associated with disease severity and enhanced T-cell function following T

  5. Photodynamic therapy in treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Rabinovich, I M; Guseva, A V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the rationale for the application of photodynamic therapy in complex treatment of patient with severe oral lichen planus. Complex clinical and laboratory examination and treatment was performed in 54 patients divided on 3 groups. Diagnosis of oral lichen planus was based on clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features. Group 1 received standard treatment, in the second group photodynamic therapy was conducted in addition to conventional treatment, patients in the third group received only photodynamic therapy. The study results proved photodynamic therapy to be useful tool in complex treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

  6. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  7. Striae distensae of augmented breasts after oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Har-Shai, Y; Barak, A; Taran, A; Weissman, A

    1999-02-01

    A case of striae distensae (SD) of bilateral augmented breasts following oral contraceptive therapy is presented. Striae maturation and the prevention of additional skin marks was achieved with immediate cessation of oral contraceptive pill therapy and long-term daily topical application of tretinoin cream. It is suggested that patients who are candidates for breast augmentation surgery should be informed of the possible risk of developing SD if they are taking or planning to take the contraceptive pill.

  8. Oral surgery in patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Vicente Barrero, Mario; Knezevic, Milan; Tapia Martín, Manuel; Viejo Llorente, Aurora; Orengo Valverde, Juan Carlos; García Jiménez, Francisco; López Pérez, Omar; Domínguez Sarmiento, Sergio; Díaz Cremades, Jose Manuel; Castellano Reyes, Juan

    2002-01-01

    There is an evident need for procedural protocol for oral surgery patients who undergo oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) because of: 1) the possible severity of complications and 2) the growing demand for OAT, which in some cases may be as much as 8% of the oral surgery patients that are referred to the hospital from primary care centers. In this study, the authors define the parameters for creating a proto- col applicable to this group of patients. The conclusion is that it is not necessary to suspend OAT before surgery; rather, these procedures should be performed under multidisciplinary medical control. The authors demonstrate that it is possible to perform oral surgery on OAT patients, without having to sus- pend treatment beforehand. A longitudinal study was performed in OAT patients that required some type of oral surgical procedures. After an INR control, the patient underwent surgery and afterwards the patient was given tranexamic acid as a mouth rinse. Postoperative hemorrhage was classified as slight when it lasted less than 5 minutes, moderate when it lasted longer than five minutes, and severe when it required blood transfusion. The study was performed over a 5-year period (1996-2000), by the maxillofacial surgery department. In that time period, 125 patients with OAT were treated; 90 of them were males and 35 were females. Tooth extraction was per- formed in 229 sessions and a total of 367 teeth were extracted, with an average of 1.6% per session. With regards to postoperative hemorrahage, it was slight in 210 cases (91.7%), moderate in 18 (7.9%) and severe only in one case (0.4%). All the variables were compared and no statistically significant differences were found. We believe that OAT should not be suspended before oral surgery, but it surgery should be performed under multidisciplinary control-especially in the case of the elderly (over 65) or with those patients that have other concomitant illnesses such as renal insufficiency or anemia or other

  9. Oral reconstructive and corrective considerations in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert

    2005-09-01

    This paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. It is intended to provide information for the dental profession and other interested parties. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of oral reconstructive and corrective procedures used in periodontal therapy. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of this subject.

  10. A Systematic Review of Adherence to Oral Antineoplastic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Amoyal, Nicole; Nisotel, Lauren; Fishbein, Joel N.; MacDonald, James; Stagl, Jamie; Lennes, Inga; Temel, Jennifer S.; Safren, Steven A.; Pirl, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral antineoplastic therapies not only improve survival but also reduce the burden of care for patients. Yet patients and clinicians face new challenges in managing adherence to these oral therapies. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess rates and correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies and interventions aimed at improving adherence. Methods. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a comprehensive literature search of the Ovid MEDLINE database from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2015, using relevant terminology for oral antineoplastic agents. We included observational, database, and intervention studies. At least two researchers evaluated each paper to ensure accuracy of results and determine risk of bias. Results. We identified 927 records from the search and screened 214 abstracts. After conducting a full-text review of 167 papers, we included in the final sample 51 papers on rates/correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy and 12 papers on intervention studies to improve adherence. Rates of adherence varied widely, from 46% to 100%, depending on patient sample, medication type, follow-up period, assessment measure, and calculation of adherence. Of the intervention studies, only 1 of the randomized trials and 2 of the cohort studies showed benefit regarding adherence, with the majority suffering high risk of bias. Conclusions. Although no reliable estimate of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies can be gleaned from the literature, a substantial proportion of patients struggle to adhere to these medications as prescribed. The few intervention studies for adherence have notable methodological concerns, thereby limiting the evidence to guide practice in promoting medication adherence among patients with cancer. Implications for Practice: Given the tremendous growth and development of oral antineoplastic therapies in the last decade, significant

  11. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Oliveira, Thaís Marchini; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathophysiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment. current studies define oral mucositis as a very frequent and painful inflammation with ulcers on the oral mucosa that are covered by a pseudo membrane. The incidence and severity of lesions are influenced by patient and treatment variables. Oral mucositis is a result of two major mechanisms: direct toxicity on the mucosa and myelosuppression due to the treatment. Its pathophysiology is composed of four interdependent phases: an initial inflammatory/vascular phase; an epithelial phase; an ulcerative/bacteriological phase; and a healing phase. It is considered a potential source of life-threatening infection and often is a dose-limiting factor in anticancer therapy. Some interventions have been shown to be potentially effective to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Further intensive research through well-structured clinical trials to obtain the best scientific evidence over the standard therapy of oral mucositis is necessary to attain ideal parameters for radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  12. Oral mucosa and therapy of recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Landová, Hana; Daněk, Zdeněk; Gajdziok, Jan; Vetchý, David; Stembírek, Jan

    2013-02-01

    Oral mucosa is one of the specific surfaces of the human body, which is permanently exposed to external factors related with food intake, breathing and speaking processes, which can lead to the onset of some problems. Disorders of the oral mucosa are a group of diseases, affecting, in the course of life, the majority of the population. Many of the oral mucosa ailments are manifested by lesions. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common of these diseases. Despite much clinical and research attention, its causes remain poorly understood and treatment is only symptomatic. RAS is reported to affect up to 25% of the population worldwide. Topical or systemic therapy (corticosteroids, antiseptics, anti-inflamatory drugs, immunomodulating agents, etc.) can be used for treatment of RAS-associated symptoms. In general, topical therapy should be preferred due to the smaller drug load of the organism. In both cases, the active substance has to be in suitable dosage form. Recently, besides the conventional ways of application (rinses), the main disadvantage of which is the short time of resistance in the oral cavity, mucoadhesive dosage forms are used. The aim of this article is to give a theoretical overview of the oral mucosa topic and its most frequent disease - recurrent aphthous stomatitis in terms of various types of the disease classification, diagnosis and therapy, and in terms of the usage of various types of active substances and medical forms. oral mucosa recurrent aphthous stomatitis therapy mucoadhesive dosage forms.

  13. Editorial: Oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    1975-01-11

    Much clinical experience has been gained in the use of the glucose/electrolyte oral solutions in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Those patients who are in shock or too weak to drink need intravenous fluids to correct their total deficit. With isotonic polyelectrolyte fluids rehydration may be achieved in 2-4 hours. Subsequently, most of these patients can be given oral fluids to replace continuing stool loss. Patients who are not in shock and who are sufficiently strong to drink at the outset nearly always can be rehydrated with oral fluids alone. Vomiting is most likely caused by acidosis and volume depletion, and these can be corrected in severely dehydrated patients by intravenous therapy and by oral therapy in those not in shock and able to drink by oral therapy. Proponents of oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for diarrhea, like other proponents of new treatments, have great visions of its benefits to the world, yet these visions require validation. The biggest problem will be getting glucose and electrolytes to where they are most needed -- at the level of home and village.

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  15. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  16. Low Level Laser Therapy: A Panacea for oral maladies

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Vartika; Kalra, Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the applications of low level laser therapy on various soft and hard oral tissues. A variety of therapeutic effects of Low Level Laser Therapy have been reported on a broad range of disorders. It has been found amenably practical in dental applications including soft as well as hard tissues of the oral cavity. LLLT has been found to be efficient in acceleration of wound healing, enhanced remodelling and bone repair, regeneration of neural cells following injury, pain attenuation, endorphin release stimulation and modulation of immune system. The aforementioned biological processes induced by Low level lasers have been effectively applied in treating various pathological conditions in the oral cavity. With is article, we attempt to review the possible application of Low Laser Therapy in the field of dentistry. PMID:26557737

  17. Oral therapy for Peyronie’s disease, does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Harlow, Brittani

    2016-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a localized, wound-healing, connective tissue disorder of the penis characterized by scarring of the tunica albuginea. This fibrous inelastic scar leads to penile pain, penile deformity and erectile dysfunction (ED), and a difficulty performing coitus. Over the past several decades, a myriad of oral agents for the treatment of PD have been studied and suggested. While the gold standard of care remains surgical therapy, many physicians continue to prescribe oral and intralesional injections for treatment during the acute phase of the disease. This article seeks to summarize the different oral therapy agents for PD and the research associated with each medication. While the American Urological Association has not recommended most of the mentioned medications for the treatment of PD, two newer therapies have shown success and have the potential of becoming baseline treatments for the acute phase of PD. PMID:27298776

  18. Design of amphotericin B oral formulation for antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Zhiwen

    2017-11-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) remains the "gold standard" for systemic antifungal therapy, even though new drugs are emerging as the attractive antifungal agents. Since AmB has negligible oral absorption as a consequence of its unfavorable physicochemical characterizations, its use is restricted to parenteral administration which is accompanied by severe side effects. As greater understanding of the gastrointestinal tract has developed, the advanced drug delivery systems are emerging with the potential to overcome the barriers of AmB oral delivery. Much research has demonstrated that oral AmB formulations such as lipid formulations may have beneficial therapeutic efficacy with reduced adverse effects and suitable for clinical application. Here we reviewed the different formulation strategies to enhance oral drug efficacy, and discussed the current trends and future perspectives for AmB oral administration in the treatment of antifungal infections.

  19. Efficacy of oral cobalamin (vitamin B12) therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Fothergill, Helen; Mecili, Mustapha

    2010-02-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is particularly common in the elderly (> 15%). Management of cobalamin deficiency with cobalamin injections is well codified at present, but new routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) are being studied, especially oral cobalamin therapy for food-cobalamin malabsorption. The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of oral cobalamin treatment in elderly patients. To reach this objective, PubMed data were systematically searched for English and French articles published from January 1990 to July 2008. Data from our research group on cobalamin deficiency (Groupe d'Etude des CAREnce vitamine B12 - CARE B12) were also analyzed. Three prospective randomized studies, a systematic review by the Cochrane group and five prospective cohort studies were found and provide evidence that oral cobalamin treatment may adequately treat cobalamin deficiency. The efficacy was particularly highlighted when looking at the marked improvement in serum vitamin B12 levels and hematological parameters, for example hemoglobin level, mean erythrocyte cell volume and reticulocyte count. The effect of oral cobalamin treatment in patients presenting with severe neurological manifestations has not yet been adequately documented. Oral cobalamin treatment avoids the discomfort, inconvenience and cost of monthly injections. Our experience and the present analysis support the use of oral cobalamin therapy in clinical practice.

  20. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  1. [Oral or trandsdermanl hormone replacement therapy reduces interleukine-6 levels].

    PubMed

    Saucedo García, Renata; Basurto Acevedo, Lourdes; Rico Rosillo, Guadalupe; Galván, Rosa E; Zárate Treviño, Arturo

    2006-03-01

    To compare the effect of oral and transdermal estrogen replacement therapy (ET) on circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) in post-menopausal women. Prospective open trial study in 55 healthy hysterectomized postmenopausal women with a mean age of 52 years. Twenty-seven women received oral conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg daily) and the remaining 28 received transdermal estrogen replacement therapy (50 microg/day) during 6 months. At baseline both groups were similar as to age, body weight, and body mass index as well as serum levels of LH, FSH, 17-beta estradiol (E2) and IL-6. Baseline elevated IL-6 levels decreased significantly (p<0.05) after both oral and transdermal estrogen replacement therapy; this decrement showed no difference between the two groups. After the follow-up there were no differences in body weight and body mass index between groups; however, in the oral group there was a trend to increment this parameters. Serum levels of E2 and IL-6 were negatively correlated in the two groups and IL-6 was positively correlated with body mass index in untreated women and this correlation was the same in women with estrogen replacement therapy. The decrement of IL-6 after estrogen replacement therapy was similar for both routes of administration; in addition IL-6 had a negative correlation with E2 and a positive correlation with body mass index.

  2. Erythema multiforme limited to the oral mucosa in a teenager on oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Jawetz, Robert E; Elkin, Avigayil; Michael, Lisa; Jawetz, Sheryl A; Shin, Helen T

    2007-10-01

    Erythema multiforme has been linked to numerous drugs and infectious agents. A link to oral contraceptive use has been reported in the past in the adult population but thus far has not been reported in children or adolescents. We report the case of an 18-yr-old female who developed oral erosions consistent with erythema multiforme two and a half weeks after initiating therapy with an oral contraceptive agent. A thorough examination for other inciting factors was negative, and the lesions slowly resolved over the course of 3 weeks. This case illustrates that erythema multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adolescents with oral erosions who have been prescribed oral contraceptives.

  3. Oral Therapy of Diabetes Insipidus with Chlorpropamide

    PubMed Central

    Cushard, William G.; Beauchamp, Charles J.; Martin, Neil D.

    1971-01-01

    Chlorpropamide was found to be an effective antidiuretic agent in vasopressin-sensitive diabetes insipidus. Full clinical use of this action is limited by the frequent occurrence of hypoglycemia on higher doses. This complication can be avoided, however, by restricting the dose and by employing combination therapy with hydrochlorothiazide. PMID:5563815

  4. Pre-clinical Models for Oral and Periodontal Reconstructive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, G.; Seol, Y.J.; Gruber, R.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new medical formulations (NMF) for reconstructive therapies has considerably improved the available treatment options for individuals requiring periodontal repair or oral implant rehabilitation. Progress in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine modalities strongly depends on validated pre-clinical research. Pre-clinical testing has contributed to the recent approval of NMF such as GEM 21S® and INFUSE® bone grafts for periodontal and oral regenerative therapies. However, the selection of a suitable pre-clinical model for evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a NMF remains a challenge. This review is designed to serve as a primer to choose the appropriate pre-clinical models for the evaluation of NMF in situations requiring periodontal or oral reconstruction. Here, we summarize commonly used pre-clinical models and provide examples of screening and functional studies of NMF that can be translated into clinical use. PMID:19887682

  5. Effects of oral motor therapy in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sığan, Seray Nural; Uzunhan, Tuğçe Aksu; Aydınlı, Nur; Eraslan, Emine; Ekici, Barış; Çalışkan, Mine

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Oral motor dysfunction is a common issue in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Drooling, difficulties with sucking, swallowing, and chewing are some of the problems often seen. In this study, we aimed to research the effect of oral motor therapy on pediatric CP patients with feeding problems. Materials and Methods: Included in this single centered, randomized, prospective study were 81 children aged 12-42 months who had been diagnosed with CP, had oral motor dysfunction and were observed at the Pediatric Neurology outpatient clinic of the Children's Health and Diseases Department, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University. Patients were randomized into two groups: The training group and the control group. One patient from the training group dropped out of the study because of not participating regularly. Following initial evaluation of all patients by a blinded physiotherapist and pedagogue, patients in the training group participated in 1 h oral motor training sessions with a different physiotherapist once a week for 6 months. All patients kept on routine physiotherapy by their own physiotherapists. Oral motor assessment form, functional feeding assessment (FFA) subscale of the multidisciplinary feeding profile (MFP) and the Bayley scales of infant development (BSID-II) were used to evaluate oral motor function, swallowing, chewing, the gag reflex, the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex, tongue, jaw, and mouth function, severity of drooling, aspiration, choking, independent feeding and tolerated food texture during the initial examination and 6 months later. Results: When the initial and post-therapy FFA and BSID-II scores received by patients in the training and the study group were compared, the training group showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Oral motor therapy has a beneficial effect on feeding problems in children with CP. PMID:24101813

  6. Oral methotrexate therapy for chronic rheumatoid arthritis ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, L R; Espinoza, C G; Vasey, F B; Germain, B F

    1986-09-01

    Eight patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and cutaneous vasculitis ulcerations resistant to conventional therapy were treated successfully with a low-dose intermittent regimen of oral methotrexate. Objective clinical response was prompt and complete resolution was observed at about 12 weeks of therapy. The drug was well tolerated. Mild gastrointestinal side effects were the most common untoward reaction. We conclude that methotrexate therapy is an effective agent for some of the extraarticular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis including vasculitis, and further clinical evaluation should be a consideration.

  7. [Photodrugtherapy of psoriasis with oral psoralen and black light therapy].

    PubMed

    Corrales Padilla, H

    1975-01-01

    Oral 4, 5', 8 trimethoxypsoralen (TMP) or 8-M-methoxypsoralen (8 MP) plus black light therapy of psoriasis produced disappearing of lesions in 6 out of 8 pacients treated with TMP and in 6 out of 7 treated with 8 MP. In three patients treated with the first drug, a paired comparision demonstrated that the ingestion of it, when followed of black exposure, is more effective than the exposure to conventional ultraviolet light. Parrish et al. have shown this for oral methoxalen and long wave ultraviolet light. Combined TMP or 8-MP and black light therapy inhibits epidermal DNA synthesis and this is the scientific base of its application in the therapy of psoriasis, disease in which an accelerated celular cicle and DNA synthesis has been postulated.

  8. Oral lichen planus: therapy and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Loré, Bruno; Saraceno, Rosita; Poladas, Giulio; Fida, Monika; Khoury, Charbel; Arcuri, Claudio; Magnato, Roberto

    2016-12-16

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous disease of chronic inflammatory nature. Although many therapeutic options are available, none are curative. The aim of this article was to describe a therapeutic algorithm that take into consideration the clinical futures of oral LP (OLP). Patients affected by symptomatic OLP were enrolled into three groups to receive cyclosporine mouthwash, retinoic acid lotion 0.05%, and autologous platelet- rich plasma (PRP) gel in the treatment of reticular, plaque-like, and erosive-type respectively. The products were applied as follows: retinoic acid BID for 8 weeks, cyclosporine mouthwash OD for 8 weeks, PRP once a week for 8 weeks. Patients were assessed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Improvement was evaluated as complete response, partial response and no response. A total of 20 Caucasian patients, 8 male and 12 female, mean age 56 years (range 40-74) concluded the study. Seven patients showed a complete response, 7 patients a partial response, and 6 patients no response. We propose a therapeutic algorithm that take into consideration the clinical features and symptoms of OLP. Long-term experience on larger series of cases are necessary to confirm our data.

  9. [Antibiotic therapy of bacterial infections of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F; Castorina, A

    1989-09-30

    More than 300 commencial bacterial species may be found in the oral cavity. Other microorganisms, such as mycoplasms, mycetes, protozoa and viruses are present as well. The virulency of the saprofites and additional contamination by outside microorganisms are factors determining the development of infectious process in the oral tissues. Moreover, streptococci and anaerobes are the most frequent aetiology agents. The antibiotic therapy should comply with the general treatment criteria, on the one hand, and should be specific for these microorganism, on the other. The penicillines (ampicillin, bacampicillin and especially amoxycillin) process pharmacokinetic properties which make them a favorable choice for treatment. These drugs are effective in case of streptococcal infections, with cariogenic processes involvement and dissemination (endocarditis, glomerulonephritis). Other, frequently used drugs are spiramycin, erythromycin, josamycin and myocamycin that are selectively taken up by the oral tissues and present in large quantities in the saliva. The macrolides have a large spectrum of action on microorganisms normally found in the oral cavity. Lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) are active on anaerobes and are drugs of choice for treatment of staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Tetracycline therapy is restricted usually to parodontite cases caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. In conclusion, the choice of antibacterial therapy should be based on the bacterial aetiology, as well as on the intrinsic drug characteristics (pharmacokinetic, side effects, toxicity etc.).

  10. Supplemental oxygen therapy: Important considerations in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Gupta, Pranav; Khatana, Shruti; Bhagol, Amrish

    2011-01-01

    The administration of supplemental oxygen is an essential element of appropriate management for a wide range of clinical conditions; crossing different medical and surgical specialities. The present review summarizes the role of supportive oxygen therapy in various clinical conditions encountered in our day-to-day practice in the speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery; including major trauma, shock, sepsis; perioperative and postoperative considerations and in patients with various other medical comorbidities. Regular and judicious use of oxygen as a drug is thus recommended in our day-to-day practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery to reduce the morbidity and improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:22442602

  11. Targeted therapy of oral hairy leukoplakia with gentian violet.

    PubMed

    Bhandarkar, Sulochana S; MacKelfresh, Jamie; Fried, Levi; Arbiser, Jack L

    2008-04-01

    Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a common oral manifestation of HIV infection. Clinically, these lesions appear as white plaques on the edges of the tongue. Pathophysiologically, these lesions occur because of infection of oral epithelium with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). No universally effective therapy exists for OHL. We have previously shown that EBV infection and EBV viral products induce the generation of reactive oxygen. We have also demonstrated that the Food and Drug Administration-approved over-the-counter medication gentian violet is a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen species. We thus chose to treat a patient with biopsy-proven OHL with topical gentian violet. Gentian violet solution was applied topically to the tongue of a patient with OHL. Complete clinical resolution was noted after three treatments. Treatment with topical gentian violet resulted in resolution of the lesions. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are required. The application of gentian violet can be used as a method to OHL treatment. Gentian violet is an inexpensive and safe therapy and, given that it inhibits reactive oxygen, this old therapy is now a targeted novel therapy.

  12. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  13. Cholera, diarrhea, and oral rehydration therapy: triumph and indictment.

    PubMed

    Guerrant, Richard L; Carneiro-Filho, Benedito A; Dillingham, Rebecca A

    2003-08-01

    Cholera drove the sanitary revolution in the industrialized world in the 19th century and now is driving the development of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the developing world. Despite the long history of cholera, only in the 1960s and 1970s was ORT fully developed. Scientists described this treatment after the discovery of the intact sodium-glucose intestinal cotransport in patients with cholera. This new understanding sparked clinical studies that revealed the ability of ORT to reduce the mortality associated with acute diarrheal disease. Despite the steady reductions in mortality due to acute dehydrating diarrheal diseases achieved by ORT, the costly morbidity due to these diseases remains, the result of a failure to globalize sanitation and to control the developmental impact of diarrheal diseases and their associated malnutrition. New advances in oral rehydration and nutrition therapy and new methods to recognize its costs are discussed in this review.

  14. Oral anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Weibert, R T

    1992-10-01

    The literature on dental surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulants is reviewed, and methods of managing anticoagulant therapy to minimize the risk of complications are discussed. Although blood loss during and after oral surgery in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drugs can be substantial, research indicates that most bleeding incidents are not serious and can be controlled by local measures. Studies of 241 anticoagulant-treated patients undergoing more than 500 dental extractions during the 1950s and 1960s showed that only 9 had postoperative bleeding. More recent studies indicate that continued anticoagulation can increase the frequency of prolonged bleeding and delay wound healing. An antifibrinolytic mouthwash containing tranexamic acid can effectively suppress postoperative bleeding. Gelatin sponges, oxidized cellulose, and microcrystalline collagen are other useful hemostatic agents. A reduction in the intensity of anticoagulation therapy has been recommended; the prothrombin time should be measured shortly before the procedure in such patients. In many patients the duration of subtherapeutic anticoagulation must be minimized to reduce the possibility of thromboembolism. An option for high-risk patients is to switch them to heparin. Each patient must be evaluated individually, and the level of risk of the dental procedure and the risk of thromboembolism should be taken into account. In patients taking oral anticoagulants who must undergo dental surgery, careful control of the intensity of anticoagulation and improved methods of local hemostasis can minimize the risk of hemorrhagic complications and thromboembolism.

  15. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, Gérald E.; Humbert, Philippe; Berardesca, Enzo; Gaspard, Ulysse; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral) and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin. PMID:24455744

  16. Oral iron therapy and chronic idiopathic urticaria: sideropenic urticaria?

    PubMed

    Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio; Cannavò, Serafinella Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is frequent, remains often idiopathic despite diagnostic efforts, and sometimes poorly responds to oral antihistamines and/or corticosteroids. We noticed that hyposideremia is often found in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria poorly responsive to usual treatments (prCIU), and oral iron therapy is frequently associated to improvement or resolution of urticaria. Between 2003 and 2012, we observed 122 patients with prCIU, of which 81 had moderate hyposideremia at our first visit. They continued the antihistamines already practiced and received oral iron therapy for 30 or 45 days. Two months after our first visit, all had normal serum iron levels; 64 reported complete remission of urticaria and 17 reported improvement superior to 80%. No adverse reactions to treatment were observed. Follow-up visits confirmed stability of results over 6 months. Our preliminary data show that hyposideremia is the only abnormality in many patients with prCIU, and restoration of normal iron serum levels is associated to remission or remarkable clinical improvement of urticaria. In consideration of low cost and potential benefits for some patients, determination of serum levels of iron could be introduced in the diagnostic workup of chronic urticaria, maybe as a second-level exam in patients without other relevant clinical or laboratory abnormalities.

  17. Nonsurgical Management of Oral Mucocele by Intralesional Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rupam; Sarkar, Soumyabrata; Kabiraj, Arpita; Maji, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral mucocele is a common lesion resulting from an alteration of minor salivary glands due to mucus accumulation. Rapid appearance, specific location, history of trauma, bluish colour, and consistency help in the diagnosis. Conventional surgical removal is the treatment of choice but has several disadvantages like damage to adjacent ducts with further development of satellite lesions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of intralesional corticosteroid injection (betamethasone) as a nonsurgical treatment procedure in oral mucoceles. Material and Method. A total of 20 cases (males and females, 10–30 years of age) with clinically diagnosed oral mucoceles were given 1 mL of betamethasone intralesionally. All the patients were examined after a period of 7, 14, and 21 days to evaluate the response of the lesion towards treatment and consequently given the 2nd, 3rd, 4th injections. If the lesion resolved after one or two injections, the treatment was discontinued. Results. Out of the 20 cases, 18 of them showed complete regression of the lesion whereas the remaining 2 cases showed decrease in size. All the patients received maximum of 4 consecutive shots in weekly interval. Conclusion. Intralesional corticosteroid therapy can be considered as the first choice in the treatment of oral mucoceles. PMID:27822227

  18. Dosage and formulation issues: oral vitamin E therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Westergren, Tone; Kalikstad, Betty

    2010-02-01

    Oral vitamin E is used in several childhood diseases, but dosage recommendations differ. Few oral products have a marketing authorization for therapeutic use in children. Preliminary data indicate differences in bioavailability among the various vitamin E compounds. Our objective was to review published data on oral vitamin E therapy in neonates and children in order to establish dosage recommendations at a local level. A literature search was conducted, including Medline Ovid, EMBASE (1980-Feb 2008), Cochrane databases, product monographs, handbooks, and textbooks. The main vitamin E compounds being used in children are alpha-tocopherol, alpha-tocopheryl acetate, and tocofersolan. The most data are available on tocopheryl acetate, both in neonates and older children. In children with malabsorption disorders, tocofersolan appears to have an increased bioavailability compared to tocopherol or tocopheryl acetate. Published data on pharmacokinetics and dosages for clinical use are few and heterogeneous. No pharmacokinetic studies were found for tocofersolan in neonates and infants. There are few comparative studies on pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children. Dosages used in clinical studies and dosage recommendations in handbooks differ considerably. The differences in dosing recommendations in children may be due to lack of systematic studies. Existing published data on oral vitamin E do not provide a basis for evaluation of dosage recommendations in children. Comparative clinical studies are required for scientific evaluation of pharmacokinetics, dosage regimens, and efficacy/ADR assessments in children.

  19. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  20. New oral anticoagulants and dual antiplatelet therapy: Focus on apixaban.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-12-15

    The combination of AF and coronary artery disease not only is a common clinical setting, it is also a complex setting to deal with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, and it is associated with significantly higher mortality rates. Unfortunately, there are no sufficient data available to optimally guide clinical practice in such settings. This review focuses specifically on newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) associated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There are no randomized studies comparing vitamin K antagonists and NOACs in patients with AF undergoing PCI either for acute coronary syndromes or for stable patients, i.e. those patients who have an indication to receive DAPT. Moreover, new antiplatelet agents such as ticagrelor and prasugrel have entered the market for acute coronary syndromes. So far, there are no large-scale randomized studies published evaluating these newer antiplatelet agents in patients with AF receiving either vitamin K antagonists or NOACs, adding to the uncertainty on how to use these antithrombotics in combination when both coronary artery disease (unstable or stable patients) and AF converge in a given patient. The lack of large outcome trials and the large number of possible combinations are reflected in the wide variety of practices in the real world. To date, given the lack of data, watchfulness when using NOACs as component of DAPT or triple oral antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  1. Oral Rehydration Therapy for Preoperative Fluid and Electrolyte Management

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hideki; Sasaki, Toshio; Fujita, Hisae

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Preoperative fluid and electrolyte management is usually performed by intravenous therapy. We investigated the safety and effectiveness of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for preoperative fluid and electrolyte management of surgical patients. Methods: The study consisted of two studies, designed as a prospective observational study. In a pilot study, 20 surgical patients consumed 1000 mL of an oral rehydration solution (ORS) until 2 h before induction of general anesthesia. Parameters such as serum electrolyte concentrations, fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) as an index of renal blood flow, volume of esophageal-pharyngeal fluid and gastric fluid (EPGF), and patient satisfaction with ORT were assessed. In a follow-up study to assess the safety of ORT, 1078 surgical patients, who consumed ORS until 2 h before induction of general anesthesia, were assessed. Results: In the pilot study, water, electrolytes, and carbohydrate were effectively and safely supplied by ORT. The FENa value was increased at 2 h following ORT. The volume of EPGF collected following the induction of anesthesia was 5.3±5.6 mL. In the follow-up study, a small amount of vomiting occurred in one patient, and no aspiration occurred in the patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that ORT is a safe and effective therapy for the preoperative fluid and electrolyte management of selected surgical patients. PMID:21897763

  2. Dental phobia is no contraindication for oral implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Enkling, Norbert; Hardt, Katharina; Katsoulis, Joannis; Ramseier, Christoph A; Colombo, Alessandra; Jöhren, Peter; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2013-04-01

    Dental phobia is a psychological disease and a possible contraindication for implant therapy. The study aimed to show that implant therapy in dental-phobic patients (DP, test group) after adequate psychological and dental pretreatment (PDPT) is successfully possible and results in a similar implant prognosis as in nonfearful patients (NF, control group). 15 DP with PDPT and 15 NF were treated with dental implants and were re-evaluated 2 to 4 years after denture-mounting regarding: alteration of dental anxiety (Hierarchical Anxiety Questionnaire [HAQ], Visual Analog Scale [VAS]), patient satisfaction and compliance, implant success, and peri-implant health. Statistical tests of non-inferiority DP versus NF were performed with Hodges-Lehmann estimators and respective one-sided 97.5% confidence intervals of Moses, and pairwise testings with Mann-Whitney test. The DP test group rated its anxiety significantly lower at follow- up than at baseline (PHAQ < .001). However, at follow-up, anxiety was still higher in DP than in NF (PHAQ = .046; PVAS < .001). Implant success at follow-up was 100%. Oral health was equally good in DP and NF patients. At follow-up, all patients were satisfied with implant therapy, but compliance was better for NF (100%) than for DP (73% dental checkup; 67% dental hygienist). Implant therapy can be successfully performed in DP patients with PDPT as phobia is not negatively influenced by the invasive implant therapy. However, motivation for professional maintenance programs remains challenging.

  3. Review on development and community implementation of oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P G; Mondal, S K; Ghosh, S; Gupta, D N; Sikder, S N; Sircar, B K

    1994-01-01

    The review of the current status and implementation of Oral Rehydration Therapy at the community level have been presented in this communication with special emphasis on its development, ORS access rate, ORS use rate and home available fluids. The global ORS supply has gone up an increased eleven folds since 1981. Similarly the ORS access rate has also increase from 46% to 68% in 1991. However, the global ORS use rate was low (21%). The major constraints during ORT implementation which have been reported by several scientists are also discussed.

  4. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Application of Stem Cells in Oral Disease Therapy: Progresses and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Yi; Zhou, Niu; Ouyang, Hong; Ding, Junjun; Cheng, Bin; Sun, Jianbo

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated and pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells with a more specific function. Stem cell therapies become preferred methods for the treatment of multiple diseases. Oral and maxillofacial defect is one kind of the diseases that could be most possibly cured by stem cell therapies. Here we discussed oral diseases, oral adult stem cells, iPS cells, and the progresses/challenges/perspectives of application of stem cells for oral disease treatment. PMID:28421002

  6. Bridging of oral anticoagulation therapy for invasive procedures.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2005-09-01

    The management of patients who need temporary interruption of chronic oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy for an elective surgical or invasive procedure is problematic and complex. Patient and procedural risk factors for thrombosis and bleeding, anticoagulant-related risks of bleeding, and clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event need to be assessed and properly risk-stratified in the perioperative period. Certain procedures, such as dental, endoscopic, and cutaneous procedures, can be completed without discontinuing OAC, but most procedures with a high bleeding risk (including major surgeries) will necessitate temporary discontinuation of OAC. Bridging therapy with shorter-acting anticoagulants, such as heparin, for patients at intermediate to high risk of thromboembolism represents one strategy to maintain functional anticoagulation during this period. Large, prospective cohort studies and registries of patients on chronic OAC who underwent bridging therapy mostly with low-molecular-weight heparin have been completed recently. This paper reviews these clinical data on bridging therapy and provides an evidence-based perioperative management strategy for the at-risk patient on chronic OAC.

  7. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  8. Oral anatomy laboratory examinations in a physical therapy program.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days. During the time that a tagged examination is being created, student productivity may be reduced as the anatomy laboratory is inaccessible to students. Further, the type of questions that can be asked in a tagged laboratory examination may limit student assessment to lower level cognitive abilities and may limit the instructors' ability to assess the students' understanding of anatomical and clinical concepts. Anatomy is a foundational science in the Physical Therapy curriculum and a thorough understanding of anatomy is necessary to progress through the subsequent clinical courses. Physical therapy curricula have evolved to reflect the changing role of physical therapists to primary caregivers by introducing a greater scope of clinical courses earlier in the curriculum. Physical therapy students must have a thorough understanding of clinical anatomy early in the education process. However, traditional anatomy examination methods may not be reflective of the clinical thought processes required of physical therapy students. Traditional laboratory examination methods also reduce student productivity by limiting access during examination set-up and breakdown. To provide a greater complexity of questions and reduced overall laboratory time required for examinations, the Physical Therapy Program at Mercer University has introduced oral laboratory examinations for the gross anatomy course series. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. The Evolution of Transdermal/ Topical Overactive Bladder Therapy and Its Benefits Over Oral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Multiple antimuscarinic agents are available for the treatment of overactive bladder. Many of the agents have undergone reformulation in an attempt to improve patient adherence and drug tolerability. Oxybutynin evolved from an immediate-release pill to a once-daily oral preparation, and is now available as a transdermal patch and gel. This article discusses the clinical impact of oxybutynin reformulation and reviews the evolution and benefits of transdermal therapy. PMID:19609406

  10. The Evolution of Transdermal/Topical Overactive Bladder Therapy and Its Benefits Over Oral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Multiple antimuscarinic agents are available for the treatment of overactive bladder. Many of the agents have undergone reformulation in an attempt to improve patient adherence and drug tolerability. Oxybutynin evolved from an immediate-release pill to a once-daily oral preparation, and is now available as a transdermal patch and gel. This article discusses the clinical impact of oxybutynin reformulation and reviews the evolution and benefits of transdermal therapy. PMID:19390669

  11. Evaluation of social marketing of oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Koul, P B; Murali, M V; Gupta, P; Sharma, P P

    1991-09-01

    Attempts, at social marketing of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) through television, in changing the knowledge and practice of mothers with regard to its use was assessed. One hundred and eighty seven consecutive mothers (38 excluded due to non use of ORT) were administered a preplanned questionnaire to assess their socio-economic profile, educational status, concept of diarrhea and correct use of ORT. Fifty nine mothers who watched these programmes on TV regularly formed the study group. These were compared with 90 mothers who had gained such knowledge from non-television sources. The correct application of knowledge of ORT was significantly better in study group compared with control group. The educational status of mothers had a positive impact on motivation to use ORT at home in the study group. Mass media campaigns through "TV spots" is an effective way of improving knowledge of mothers on ORT in a developing country.

  12. [New therapies for diabetes: beyond injectable insulin and oral antidiabetics].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, John Edwin Feliciano; Ariza, Iván Darío Sierra

    2008-01-01

    New medicines for the therapy of the type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been incorporated in the list of traditional drugs: oral agents and injectable insulin. These treatment alternatives have a new mechanism of action that takes advantage of the antidiabetic properties of certain peptides such as amylin and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), whose levels are wanting or insufficient in diabetes. This is attained through amylin and GLP-1 analogues, although it can also be achieved by inhibiting the enzyme that degrades the latter. Furthermore, a new system to administer insulin in a noninvasive way through inhalation has become available in the market. This paper summarizes the most important and updated findings on the action mechanism, efficacy, adverse effects and indications of these innovative drugs.

  13. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  14. Improvement of oral anticoagulation therapy by INR self-management.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Dieter; Piper, Cornelia

    2004-05-01

    Thromboembolic complications after valve replacement are significantly reduced if the INR is increased from 1.0 to 2.0. Hemorrhagic events increase exponentially with more intensive oral anticoagulation. In INR (patient) self-testing (PST), patients self-check their INR after being appropriately educated and supplied with a coagulometer. Patients contact their home physician if the actual INR tends to run outside an individually defined target INR corridor for correction. For patient self-management (PSM), subjects are trained to self-test their INR and to adjust the anticoagulant dose according to their anticoagulation state. The median difference between self-tested and laboratory-tested INRs was < 5.0%, indicating no significant differences between the two methods. PSM resulted in a significantly more stable oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT), which was the strongest predictor for a low complication rate after valve replacement surgery. Lower rates of thromboembolism (0.9 versus 3.6% per patient-year; pt-yr) and bleeding (4.5 versus 10.9% per pt-yr) (p < 0.001) were seen in PSM subjects than with conventional INR management. A switch from conventional to PSM resulted in a 30% reduction in complication rates in the German Experience with Low Intensity Anticoagulation (GELIA) study. After appropriate education and provision with a handy coagulometer, the vast majority of patients after valve replacement can self-check INRs and adjust the anticoagulant dosage accordingly. PSM results in a significantly more stable oral anticoagulation treatment and consequently in lower incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding events.

  15. [Maternal practices in infantile diarrheic disease and oral rehydration therapy].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Larrauri, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine therapeutic practices used by mothers from Coatepec, Veracruz, in case of diarrheic episodes in their children under 5 years of age, the degree of generalization, and the relationship with the social frame that sustains them. A sample of 300 families was randomly selected from a total of 15,740. Quantitative and qualitative information was gathered through structured open surveys. Non-parametric statistical analysis of the therapeutic practices was performed and their relationship with socioeconomic variables was analyzed. The two practices considered to obstruct the oral rehydration therapy most, were common: infrequent use of oral rehydration serum (ORS) and contraindicated medication. Non-parametric analysis indicated a significant relationship between contraindicated practices and a mistaken concept of dehydration. On the other hand, the relationship between a correct concept of dehydration and a) using ORS, b) not using contraindicated medication and c) limiting the use of traditional medicine was also significant. Socioeconomic variables had no significant relationship with any particular practice nor with the concept of dehydration. Qualitative interpretation describes how the social meanings that sustain these practices are constructed and reproduced through social nets. The participation of health suppliers in the reproduction of therapeutic practices should be further investigated, as well as their relationship with the reproduction patterns of social meaning through the nets of social aid.

  16. Hypofractionated radiation therapy of oral melanoma in five cats.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, John; Denman, David L; Hohenhaus, Ann E; Patnaik, Amiya K; Bergman, Philip J

    2004-01-01

    Five cats with melanoma involving the oral cavity were treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Cobalt photons were used to administer three fractions of 8.0 Gray (Gy) for a total dose of 24 Gy. Four cats received radiation on days 0, 7, and 21 and one cat received radiation on days 0, 7, and 13. One of the cats received additional irradiation following the initial treatment course. Two cats received chemotherapy. Their age ranged from 11 to 15 years with a median age of 12 years. Three cats had a response to radiation, including one complete response and two partial responses. All five cats were euthanized due to progression of disease, with one cat having evidence of metastatic disease at the time of euthanasia. The median survival time for the five cats was 146 days (range 66-224 days) from the start of RT. The results of this study suggest that oral melanoma in cats may be responsive to hypofractionated RT, but response does not seem to be durable.

  17. Safety assessment of oral photodynamic therapy in rats.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carla R; Lerman, Mark A; Patel, Niraj; Grecco, Clovis; Costa, Carlos A de Souza; Amiji, Mansoor M; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the synergism of a photosensitive drug (a photosensitizer) and visible light to destroy target cells (e.g., malignant, premalignant, or bacterial cells). The aim of this study was to investigate the response of normal rat tongue mucosa to PDT following the topical application of hematoporphyrin derivative (Photogem®), Photodithazine®, methylene blue (MB), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with MB. One hundred and thirty three rats were randomly divided in various groups: the PDT groups were treated with the photosensitizers for 10 min followed by exposure to red light. Those in control groups received neither photosensitizer nor light, and they were subjected to light exposure alone or to photosensitizer alone. Fluorescent signals were obtained from tongue tissue immediately after the topical application of photosensitizers and 24 h following PDT. Histological changes were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 7, and 15 days post-PDT treatment. Fluorescence was detected immediately after the application of the photosensitizers, but not 24 h following PDT. Histology revealed intact mucosa in all experimental groups at all evaluation time points. The results suggest that there is a therapeutic window where PDT with Photogem®, Photodithazine®, MB, and MB-loaded PLGA nanoparticles could safely target oral pathogenic bacteria without damaging normal oral tissue.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy in Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Diana; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common chronic immunologic mucocutaneous disorder. Although there are many presenting treatments, some of them proved its failure. Recently, the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been expanding due to its numerous advantages, as it is safe, convenient, and non-invasive and has toxic effect towards selective tissues. This article provides comprehensive review on OLP, its etiology, clinical features and recent non-pharmacological treatments. We also describe the topical PDT and its mechanisms. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of PDT in treatment of OLP through collecting the data of the related clinical studies. We searched in PubMed website for the clinical studies that were reported from 2000 to 2014 using specific keywords: “photodynamic therapy” and “treatment of oral lichen planus”. Inclusion criteria were English publications only were concerned. In the selected studies of photodynamic treatment, adult patients (more than 20 years) were conducted and the OLP lesions were clinically and histologically confirmed. Exclusion criteria were classical and pharmacological treatments of OLP were excluded and also the using of PDT on skin lesions of lichen planus. We established five clinical studies in this review where all of them reported improvement and effectiveness of PDT in treatment of OLP lesions. The main outcome of comparing the related clinical studies is that the photodynamic is considered as a safe, effective and promising treatment modality for OLP. PMID:25883701

  19. Abbreviated oral itraconazole therapy for tinea corporis and tinea cruris.

    PubMed

    Sanmano, B; Hiruma, M; Mizoguchi, M; Ogawa, H

    2003-09-01

    The present study was designed to determine the lowest dose of orally administered itraconazole and the shortest duration of therapy necessary for treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris. For all patients, the itraconazole dose was 100 mg twice a day immediately after meals. Twenty-eight patients received itraconazole on days 1 and 8, 12 patients received itraconazole on days 1 and 2, and five patients received itraconazole only on day 1. Clinical and mycological evaluations were performed at baseline and on day 14. Based on the clinical and mycological responses, treatment efficacy was classified as excellent, good, fair, or poor. "Excellent" and "good" responses made up 86% of the first group, 100% of the second group, and 20% of the third group. A comparison of efficacy ratings of the three regimens showed that the patients who received a single 200-mg dose had a significantly inferior outcome compared with the other two groups. We conclude that an abbreviated oral regimen of itraconazole for treatment of tinea corporis and tinea cruris requires a total dose of at least 400 mg to induce a favorable outcome.

  20. Oral therapy for onychomycosis: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Daniel Coelho; Lamas, Ana Paula Botto; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-02-01

    Onychomycosis is a very common fungal infection of the nail apparatus; however, it is very hard to treat, even when the causative agent is identified, and usually requires prolonged systemic antifungal therapy. Until the 1990s, oral treatment options included only griseofulvin and ketoconazole, and the cure rate was very low. New generations of antimycotics, such as fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine have improved treatment success. Literature was identified by performing a PubMed Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) search. Prospective and randomized clinical trials were chosen to be included in this review. Forty-six trials were included. Fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine are effective in the treatment of onychomycosis and have a good safety profile. When a dermatophyte is the pathogen, terbinafine produces the best results. For Candida and nondermatophyte infections, the azoles, mainly itraconazole, are the recommended therapy. In the majority of the studies, terbinafine treatment showed a higher cure ratio than the other drugs for dermatophyte onychomycosis.

  1. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  2. Oral dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement therapy in women with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Gebre-Medhin, G; Husebye, E S; Mallmin, H; Helström, L; Berne, C; Karlsson, F A; Kämpe, O

    2000-06-01

    Patients with primary adrenocortical failure (Addison's disease) have abnormally low levels of DHEA and androgens relative to age. To define a suitable dose, the effect of oral dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement therapy in women with Addison's disease (n = 9) was evaluated. DHEA was administered as a daily oral dose of either 50 mg (n = 5) or 200 mg (n = 4). Blood sampling and measurements of insulin sensitivity (as measured with euglycemic insulin clamp technique) and body composition (as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) were performed before and during DHEA treatment and at a 3-month follow up. DHEA and DHEA(S) levels were restored to normal in those patients receiving 50 mg whereas DHEA(S) level was slightly above the normal reference value in those receiving 200 mg. Circulating levels of androgens (androstenedione, testosterone and testosterone/SHBG ratio) were normalized in all patients. A slight rise in IGF-1 levels was seen in both groups as was a decrease in the levels of low and high density lipoproteins. No effect on blood glucose levels or insulin sensitivity was seen and no change of body composition was observed. No serious side-effects were seen, but some of the patients experienced increased apocrine sweat secretion (n = 7), itchy scalp (n = 2) and acne (n = 7), all of which were reversed when DHEA was discontinued. A daily replacement dose of 50 mg of DHEA results in near physiological levels of DHEA, DHEA(S) androstenedione and testosterone in women with Addison's disease, without severe side-effects.

  3. Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy: from cancer treatment to survivorship.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Thariat, Juliette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Barasch, Andrei; Murphy, Barbara A; Kolnick, Leanne; Popplewell, Leslie; Maghami, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time.

  4. Oral therapy in children with cholera: a comparison of sucrose and glucose electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Islam, S; Brown, K H; Islam, A; Kabir, A K; Chowdhury, A M; Ali, M A

    1980-01-01

    We performed a double-blind trial comparing sucrose electrolyte oral solution with glucose electrolyte oral solution in children less than 5 years of age with severe cholera-like diarrhea. Of 111 patients studied (102 with bacteriologically confirmed cholera), 55 received sucrose solution and 56 received glucose solution. The success rates, as defined by the absence of the need to give unscheduled intravenous therapy, were similar in the two groups (73% and 77% in the sucrose and glucose groups, respectively). There was no difference in purging rates between the two groups. The primary determinant of success for oral fluid regardless of the sugar was the purging rate. Sucrose malabsorption was responsible for oral therapy failure in one child. This study demonstrates that sucrose is an effective alternative to glucose in the oral therapy solution, but either must be used in conjunction with intravenous solution when treating severe dehydrating diarrhea.

  5. The new paradigm of hepatitis C therapy: integration of oral therapies into best practices.

    PubMed

    Afdhal, N H; Zeuzem, S; Schooley, R T; Thomas, D L; Ward, J W; Litwin, A H; Razavi, H; Castera, L; Poynard, T; Muir, A; Mehta, S H; Dee, L; Graham, C; Church, D R; Talal, A H; Sulkowski, M S; Jacobson, I M

    2013-11-01

    Emerging data indicate that all-oral antiviral treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) will become a reality in the near future. In replacing interferon-based therapies, all-oral regimens are expected to be more tolerable, more effective, shorter in duration and simpler to administer. Coinciding with new treatment options are novel methodologies for disease screening and staging, which create the possibility of more timely care and treatment. Assessments of histologic damage typically are performed using liver biopsy, yet noninvasive assessments of histologic damage have become the norm in some European countries and are becoming more widespread in the United States. Also in place are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiatives to simplify testing, improve provider and patient awareness and expand recommendations for HCV screening beyond risk-based strategies. Issued in 2012, the CDC recommendations aim to increase HCV testing among those with the greatest HCV burden in the United States by recommending one-time testing for all persons born during 1945-1965. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force adopted similar recommendations for risk-based and birth-cohort-based testing. Taken together, the developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment will likely increase demand for therapy and stimulate a shift in delivery of care related to chronic HCV, with increased involvement of primary care and infectious disease specialists. Yet even in this new era of therapy, barriers to curing patients of HCV will exist. Overcoming such barriers will require novel, integrative strategies and investment of resources at local, regional and national levels. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Viral Hepatitis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The new paradigm of hepatitis C therapy: integration of oral therapies into best practices

    PubMed Central

    Afdhal, N H; Zeuzem, S; Schooley, R T; Thomas, D L; Ward, J W; Litwin, A H; Razavi, H; Castera, L; Poynard, T; Muir, A; Mehta, S H; Dee, L; Graham, C; Church, D R; Talal, A H; Sulkowski, M S; Jacobson, I M for the New Paradigm of HCV Therapy Meeting Participants

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY. Emerging data indicate that all-oral antiviral treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) will become a reality in the near future. In replacing interferon-based therapies, all-oral regimens are expected to be more tolerable, more effective, shorter in duration and simpler to administer. Coinciding with new treatment options are novel methodologies for disease screening and staging, which create the possibility of more timely care and treatment. Assessments of histologic damage typically are performed using liver biopsy, yet noninvasive assessments of histologic damage have become the norm in some European countries and are becoming more widespread in the United States. Also in place are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiatives to simplify testing, improve provider and patient awareness and expand recommendations for HCV screening beyond risk-based strategies. Issued in 2012, the CDC recommendations aim to increase HCV testing among those with the greatest HCV burden in the United States by recommending one-time testing for all persons born during 1945–1965. In 2013, the United States Preventive Services Task Force adopted similar recommendations for risk-based and birth-cohort-based testing. Taken together, the developments in screening, diagnosis and treatment will likely increase demand for therapy and stimulate a shift in delivery of care related to chronic HCV, with increased involvement of primary care and infectious disease specialists. Yet even in this new era of therapy, barriers to curing patients of HCV will exist. Overcoming such barriers will require novel, integrative strategies and investment of resources at local, regional and national levels. PMID:24168254

  7. Use of Low Level Laser Therapy for Oral Lichen Planus: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, O; Boostani, N; Jajarm, HH; Falaki, F; Tabesh, A

    2013-01-01

    Oral Lichen Planus is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Erosive/ ulcerative oral lichen planus is often a painful condition that tends to become malignant, urging appropriate therapy. Laser therapy has recently been suggested as a new treatment option without significant side effects. This article presents two cases of erosive/ ulcerative oral lichen planus, who had not received any treatment before, treated with 630 nm low level laser. Lesion type and pain was recorded before and after treatment. Severity of lesions and pain were reduced after treatment. Low Level Laser Therapy was an effective treatment with no side effects and it may be considered as an alternative therapy for erosive/ulcerative oral lichen planus. PMID:24724146

  8. Stem cell therapy: A novel treatment approach for oral mucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Suma, G. N.; Arora, Madhu Pruthi; Lakhanpal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential to alleviate sufferings of many diseases that currently have no effective therapy. The research in this field is growing at an exponential rate. Stem cells are master cells that have specialized capability for self-renewal, potency and capability to differentiate to many cell types. At present, the adult mesenchymal stem cells are being used in the head and neck region for orofacial regeneration (including enamel, dentin, pulp and alveolar bone) in lieu of their proliferative and regenerative properties, their use in the treatment of oral mucosal lesions is still in budding stages. Moreover, there is scanty literature available regarding role of stem cell therapy in the treatment of commonly seen oral mucosal lesions like oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, oral ulcers and oral mucositis. The present review will focus on the current knowledge about the role of stem cell therapies in oral mucosal lesions and could facilitate new advancements in this area (articles were obtained from electronic media like PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane and Medline etc., from year 2000 to 2014 to review the role of stem cell therapy in oral mucosal lesions). PMID:25709329

  9. Design of quality indicators for oral nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Gimenez Verotti, Cristiane Comeron; de Miranda Torrinhas, Raquel Susana Matos; Pires Corona, Ligiana; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-06-01

    Objetivo: los indicadores de calidad en la terapia nutricional han sido propuestos como herramientas útiles para mejorar la terapia nutricional (TN). Este estudio pretende diseñar indicadores de calidad de terapia nutricional oral (ICTNO) factibles en el control de calidad de TN oral. Métodos: el diseño de ICTNO fue realizado por una comisión de nutrición clínica compuesta por brasileños expertos en TN del International Life Science Institute (ILSI). Más tarde, la aprobación de estos ICTNO fue valorada con análisis psicométricos recogiendo las opiniones de otros brasileños dedicados independientemente a la TN (n = 40) vía SurveyMonkey (encuesta por internet). Esta consistió en cuatro atributos valorando cada ICTNO (simplicidad, utilidad, objetividad y bajo precio) seguida de una escala Likert con cinco puntos. Resultados: los expertos en TN de ILSI proporcionaron el diseño de 12 QIONT, que fueron todos consistentemente (Alfa de Cronbach = 0,84) clasificados como válidos por expertos independientes en NT. Por orden de relevancia, los nuevos ICTNO valoraron: la frecuencia de screening nutricional, la prescripción de suplementos de nutrición oral para pacientes desnutridos que ya reciben dieta oral, la prescripción de suplementos de nutrición oral para pacientes con bajo riesgo nutricional que ya reciben dieta oral, el consejo nutricional, la adhesión al suplemento nutricional oral, los pacientes hospitalizados con dieta oral insuficiente y prescripción de suplementos nutricionales orales, los pacientes de UCI con dieta oral insuficiente y prescripción de suplementos nutricionales orales, el consejo de nutrición oral en pacientes de UCI, el consejo de nutrición oral en pacientes en planta, la intolerancia al volumen de suplemento oral debido a dosificación inadecuada, la intolerancia al sabor del suplemento oral y la intolerancia al volumen de suplemento oral. Conclusión: según la opinión experta, 12 potenciales y factibles nuevos ICTNO

  10. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  11. Generalized Pustular Psoriasis and Hepatic Dysfunction Associated with Oral Terbinafine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Jwa, Seung-Wook; Jang, Bong-Seok; Kim, Moon-Bum; Oh, Chang-Keun; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Kwon, Kyung-Sool

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of 61-yr-old man with stable psoriasis who progressively developed generalized pustular eruption, erythroderma, fever, and hepatic dysfunction following oral terbinafine. Skin biopsy was compatible with pustular psoriasis. After discontinuation of terbinafine and initiating topical corticosteroid and calcipotriol combination with narrow band ultraviolet B therapy, patient'S condition slowly improved until complete remission was reached 2 weeks later. The diagnosis of generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) induced by oral terbinafine was made. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GPP accompanied by hepatic dysfunction associated with oral terbinafine therapy. PMID:17297275

  12. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S P; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-05-30

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab.

  13. Nimotuzumab increases the anti-tumor effect of photodynamic therapy in an oral tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Ng, Qin Feng; Thong, Patricia S.P.; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents 90% of all oral cancers and is characterized with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly expressed in oral cancer and is a target for cancer therapy and prevention. In this present work, we evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in combination with an EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in oral cancer cell lines and OSCC xenograft tumor model. PDT is a promising and minimally invasive treatment modality that involves the interaction of a photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light to destroy tumors. We demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors nimotuzumab and cetuximab exhibits anti-angiogenic properties by inhibiting the migration and invasion of oral cancer cell lines and human endothelial cells. The EGFR inhibitors also significantly reduced tube formation of endothelial cells. Chlorin e6-PDT in combination with nimotuzumab and cetuximab reduced cell proliferation in different oral cancer and endothelial cells. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that the combination therapy of PDT and nimotuzumab synergistically delayed tumor growth when compared with control and PDT treated tumors. Downregulation of EGFR, Ki-67 and CD31 was observed in the tumors treated with combination therapy. Analysis of the liver and kidney function markers showed no treatment related toxicity. In conclusion, PDT outcome of oral cancer can be improved when combined with EGFR inhibitor nimotuzumab. PMID:25918252

  14. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Victora, C. G.; Bryce, J.; Fontaine, O.; Monasch, R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  15. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Victora, C G; Bryce, J; Fontaine, O; Monasch, R

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  16. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D’Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections. Methods Thirty-nine articles that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were independently reviewed by two calibrated reviewers, each using a standard form. Information was extracted on a number of variables, including study design, study population, sample size, interventions, blinding, outcome measures, methods, results, and conclusions for each article. Areas of discrepancy between the two reviews were resolved by consensus. Studies were weighted as to the quality of the study design, and recommendations were based on the relative strength of each paper. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization. Results For all cancer treatments, the weighted prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection was found to be 7.5% pretreatment, 39.1% during treatment, and 32.6% after the end of cancer therapy. Head and neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy were each independently associated with a significantly increased risk for oral fungal infection. For all cancer treatments, the prevalence of oral colonization with fungal organisms was 48.2% before treatment, 72.2% during treatment, and 70.1% after treatment. The prophylactic use of fluconazole during cancer therapy resulted in a prevalence of clinical fungal infection of 1.9%. No information specific to oral fungal infections was found on quality of life or cost of care. Conclusions There is an increased risk of clinically significant oral fungal infection during cancer therapy. Systemic antifungals are effective in the prevention of clinical oral fungal infection in patients receiving cancer therapy. Currently available topical antifungal

  17. Initiation of insulin therapy in elderly patients taking oral antidiabetes drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Norma; Moisan, Jocelyne; Sirois, Caroline; Poirier, Paul; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background We sought to estimate the rate of initiation of insulin therapy among elderly patients using oral anti-diabetes drugs and to identify the factors associated with this initiation. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study involving people aged 66 or more years who were newly dispensed an oral antidiabetes drug. Individuals who had received acarbose or a thiazolidinedione were excluded. The rate of insulin initiation was calculated by use of the Kaplan–Meier method. Factors associated with insulin initiation were identified by multivariable Cox regression analyses. Results In this cohort of 69 674 new users of oral antidiabetes drugs, insulin was initiated at rate of 9.7 cases per 1000 patient-years. Patients who had initially received an insulin secretagogue (rather than metformin), who were prescribed an oral antidiabetes drug by an endocrinologist or an internist, who received higher initial doses of an oral antidiabetes drug, who received oral corticosteroids, used glucometer strips, or were admitted to hospital in the year before initiation of oral antidiabetes therapy, or who received 16 or more medications were more likely than those without these characteristics to have insulin therapy initiated. In contrast, patients who received thiazides or who used up to 12 medications (v. none) were less likely to have insulin therapy initiated. Interpretation Several factors related to drugs and health services are associated with the initiation of insulin therapy in elderly patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs. It is unclear whether these factors predict secondary failure of oral antidiabetes drugs or instead reflect better management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19546456

  18. Prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS children in highly active antiretroviral therapy era. A literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Octavio; Castillo, Nydia

    2015-08-01

    SummaryHighly active antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality related to HIV infection, including oral opportunistic infections. This paper offers an analysis of the scientific literature on the epidemiological aspects of oral candidiasis in HIV-positive children in the combination antiretroviral therapy era. An electronic databases search was made covering the highly active antiretroviral therapy era (1998 onwards). The terms used were oral lesions, oral candidiasis and their combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy and HIV/AIDS children. The following data were collected from each paper: year and country in which the investigation was conducted, antiretroviral treatment, oral candidiasis prevalence and diagnostic parameters (clinical or microbiological). Prevalence of oral candidiasis varied from 2.9% in American HIV-positive children undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy to 88% in Chilean HIV-positive children without antiretroviral therapy. With respect to geographical location and antiretroviral treatment, higher oral candidiasis prevalence in HIV-positive children on combination antiretroviral therapy/antiretroviral therapy was reported in African children (79.1%) followed by 45.9% reported in Hindu children. In HIV-positive Chilean children on no antiretroviral therapy, high oral candidiasis prevalence was reported (88%) followed by Nigerian children (80%). Oral candidiasis is still frequent in HIV-positive children in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era irrespective of geographical location, race and use of antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Molecular Imaging and Oral Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Maryam; Darijani, Mansoreh; Momeni, Fatemeh; Moradi, Pouya; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Masoudifar, Aria; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2017-10-01

    Oral cancer is known as one of relatively common type of cancer worldwide. Despite the easy access of the oral cavity to examination, oral tumors are diagnosed in more advanced stages of the disease. Imaging techniques have been recently emerged as non-invasive approaches to detect molecular and cellular changes in living cells and organisms. These techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) could help physicians to screen patients with oral tumors particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in early stage of the disease. In this review, we discuss that early detection and diagnosis of oral tumors through using more robust and precise imaging techniques and a variety of cellular/molecular biomarkers not only could lead to more effective and less aggressive form of treatment for the disease but also could improve survival rates and lower treatment costs. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3055-3060, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A review on adherence management in patients on oral cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Wood, Leslie

    2012-09-01

    There is currently an ongoing paradigm shift in cancer treatment from intravenous (IV) chemotherapeutics to oral therapies. Additionally, the increased use of long-term maintenance therapy with oral targeted agents or chemotherapy is contributing to a shift toward a chronic-disease model. This shift is creating challenges and responsibilities for health care professionals in patient adherence management. This article will inform health care professionals of current trends and describe ways that they can overcome common barriers to adherence. A comprehensive review of recommendations and evidence derived from oncological studies describing adherence to oral targeted therapies and maintenance chemotherapy will provide guidance for the use of emerging oral maintenance therapies. Articles in the scientific literature were reviewed if published between January 1985 and November 2010. Searches were conducted using the PubMed database-search terms included "oral therapy," "chemotherapy," "cancer," and "adherence" or "compliance." The change from IV therapy administered and monitored in hospitals or clinics to self-administered outpatient oral treatments decreases the likelihood of adherence. Methods, such as patient education and monitoring and involvement of family or caretakers, can improve adherence in patients undergoing treatment. At treatment onset, oncology nurses can engage patients directly in a collaborative dialogue, and when issues affecting adherence arise, oncology nurses may limit nonadherence by providing individually tailored educational material. A practical approach to patient education, along with building strong health care provider-patient relationships, can help patients overcome nonadherence to new oral anticancer therapies and treatment paradigms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Outpatient management of oral vitamin K antagonist therapy: defining and measuring high-quality management.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine W; Ansell, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is the mainstay of prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease. However, it remains one of the leading causes of harmful medication errors and medication-related adverse events. The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are directly dependent upon the quality of dose and anticoagulation management, but the literature is not robust with regards to what constitutes such management. This review focuses on, and attempts to define, the parameters of high-quality anticoagulation management and identifies the appropriate outcome measures constituting high-quality management. Elements discussed include the most fundamental measure, time in therapeutic range, along with other parameters including therapy initiation, time to therapeutic range, dosing management when patients are not in therapeutic range, perioperative dosing management, patient education, and other important outcome measures. Healthcare providers who manage oral anticoagulation therapy should utilize these parameters as a measure of their performance in an effort to achieve high-quality anticoagulation management.

  2. Adherence, compliance and persistence to oral antineoplastic therapy: a review focused on chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Bellavia, Giuseppe; Ferraù, Francesco; Valerio, Maria Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    To date, orally administered chemotherapy and biologic agents represent a significant percentage of all antineoplastic treatments in several types of cancer, which are most likely to increase in the near future. In this scenario, the issue of adherence and persistence to oral therapy is a key issue since poor compliance to oral antineoplastic treatments may negatively influence patients' clinical outcomes and, in turn, cause an increase in costs, number of hospitalizations and time spent in the hospital. The issue of adherence to new oral chemotherapeutic and/or biologic agents has not been deeply evaluated and data published in medical literature are quite scarce. Adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon, which may be influenced by patient- and health-care provider-related factors, anticancer therapy itself, education and socioeconomic aspects. Patients' selection plays, therefore, a key role in maximizing adherence and persistence to oral therapies. Treating health-care practitioners should first evaluate patient reliability to avoid prescribing oral treatments to patients with socioeconomic and medical conditions, which may predict poor adherence. Adherence and persistence to new oral biologic agents, which are linked to several side effects and whose use is constantly widening, should represent a main endpoint of clinical research in the nearest future.

  3. Phage Therapy: A New Horizon in the Antibacterial Treatment of Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shlezinger, Mor; Khalifa, Leron; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Resch, Grégory; Que, Yok-Ai; Beyth, Shaul; Dorfman, Elisheva; Hazan, Ronen; Beyth, Nurit

    2017-01-01

    Dental diseases are perhaps the most prevalent infection-related diseases in humans. Biofilm is involved in almost every infectious disease compromising oral health, notably caries, periodontal disease, gingivitis, endodontic infections and peri-implantitis. Current therapies of biofilm-derived oral infections lack sensitivity; they are not species-specific and kill pathogenic species as well as commensal species, which are protective against the formation of pathogenic biofilms. Moreover, antibiotics have a limited effect on biofilm and are almost unused in oral diseases. A promising alternative approach is bacteriophage (phage) therapy. Phages play a key role in the natural balance in a predator-prey relationship with bacteria and thus have the potential to be efficient anti-bacterial agents. Phages are highly efficient against biofilm, strain specific and easy to isolate and manipulate. Thus, like in many other medicinal fields, phage therapy offers new horizons to dentistry, both therapeutics and research. The present review presents the etiology of common oral diseases, characterization of the infection and the treatment challenges of phage therapy in dentistry. Recent findings and development in the use of phages for prevention, control, and treatment of oral infections as well as possibilities of engineering the oral microbiome are discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  5. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  6. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  7. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  8. Ocular changes with oral and transepidermal diethylcarbamazine therapy of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1981-07-01

    Twenty men with moderate infection of Onchocerca volvulus were studied in a double-masked, controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with topical DEC lotion. Visual acuity and colour vision did not alter during the 6 months of observation, although 2 patients receiving DEC lotion and 3 patients receiving oral DEC developed either visual field constriction or optic atrophy. Fluffy corneal opacities were common in both groups. Intraocular microfilariae also appeared in both groups but to a greater extent in those receiving DEC lotion. New chorioretinal changes developed in 4 men receiving lotion and in only 1 receiving tablets. It is concluded that DEC lotion offers no advantage over tablets in the treatment of ocular onchocerciasis and in fact may be associated with more ocular complications than the conventional oral treatment.

  9. Ocular changes with oral and transepidermal diethylcarbamazine therapy of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M

    1981-01-01

    Twenty men with moderate infection of Onchocerca volvulus were studied in a double-masked, controlled clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with topical DEC lotion. Visual acuity and colour vision did not alter during the 6 months of observation, although 2 patients receiving DEC lotion and 3 patients receiving oral DEC developed either visual field constriction or optic atrophy. Fluffy corneal opacities were common in both groups. Intraocular microfilariae also appeared in both groups but to a greater extent in those receiving DEC lotion. New chorioretinal changes developed in 4 men receiving lotion and in only 1 receiving tablets. It is concluded that DEC lotion offers no advantage over tablets in the treatment of ocular onchocerciasis and in fact may be associated with more ocular complications than the conventional oral treatment. Images PMID:7020746

  10. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Hamid R.; Janket, Sok J.; Baird, Alison E.; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” or “anticoagulation” and combined them with the search results of “dental”, “oral surgery” or “periodontal”. We restricted the results to “human” and “English”. Results: The early coagulation cascade, the new cell-based coagulation model, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conventional antithrombotics, and new oral anticoagulants were reviewed. The new direct factor Xa inhibitors and the direct thrombin inhibitor (s), called direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) have rapid onset of action, fast elimination on cessation, and fewer drug-drug or drug-food interactions than warfarin. However, the lack of antidotes raises concerns that some dental procedures may trigger serious hemorrhagic events. Additionally, careful perioperative withdrawal and resumption protocols for the DOAs are reviewed, because DOAs’ blood levels are dependent on renal function. Also, various reversal strategies in the event of excessive bleedings are summarized. Perioperative management of dental patients taking new DOAs and conventional oral anticoagulants are also discussed. However, the perioperative strategies for DOAs are yet to be validated in randomized trials. Key words:Coagulation cascade, cell-based coagulation model, factor Xa inhibitors, direct thrombin inhibitors, prothrombin complex concentrates. PMID:23524440

  11. Photodynamic Therapy As a Promising Method Used in the Treatment of Oral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Prażmo, Ewa J; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Łapiński, Mariusz; Mielczarek, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) consists of three elements: photosensitizer, light and oxygen. The photosensitizer has the property of selective accumulation in abnormal or infected tissues without causing any damage to the healthy cells. This innovative therapeutic method has already been successfully adapted in many fields of medicine, e.g. dermatology, gynecology, urology and cancer therapy. Dentistry is also beginning to incorporate photodisinfection for treatment of the oral cavity. The antibacterial and fungicidal properties of the photosensitizer have been used to achieve better results in root canal treatment, periodontal therapy and the eradication of candidiasis in prosthodontics. The aim of this article is to discuss the effectiveness of photodynamic methods in the diagnosis and therapy of selected oral diseases. Scientific data and published papers regarding the antibacterial properties of PDT will be subjected to analysis. Photodynamic therapy will be discussed as an alternative treatment protocol in oncology, endodontics, periodontology and other fields of dentistry.

  12. Novel oral taxane therapies: recent Phase I results

    PubMed Central

    Flores, John Paul; Saif, M Wasif

    2015-01-01

    The oral taxanes are analogues of existing taxanes with a possible broad range of antitumor activity. They also have the potential advantages of ease of administration, better efficacy and lesser toxicity than currently available taxanes. These drugs have been used in several Phase I clinical trials, the methodology and results of which will be reviewed here. PMID:26146540

  13. Topical and systemic therapies for oral and perioral herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-04-01

    Oral and perioral herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in healthy individuals often present with signs and symptoms that are clearly recognized by oral health care providers (OHCPs). Management of these infections is dependent upon a variety of factors and several agents may be used for treatment to accelerate healing and decrease symptoms associated with lesions. This article will review the pertinent aspects of topical and systemic therapies of HSV infections for the OHCP.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  15. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Trinacty, Connie M; Adams, Alyce S; Soumerai, Stephen B; Zhang, Fang; Meigs, James B; Piette, John D; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001) to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white) in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1) time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2) primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill); (3) time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4) long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed) over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7) and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes. PMID:19200387

  16. Oral Propranolol as an Alternative Therapy for Orbital Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia With Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    McClintic, Elysa A; Ting, Andrew; Yeatts, R Patrick

    An 8-year-old female patient presented with left upper eyelid swelling and erythema. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an orbital mass involving the left lacrimal gland with subsequent incisional biopsy leading to the diagnosis of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia. Initially prescribed an oral corticosteroid, alternative management was sought after 4 months due to unwanted side effects of steroid therapy. Oral propranolol (2 mg/kg/day) was initiated with concurrent steroid taper. Interval decrease in lesion size was observed on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging with complete resolution of subjective symptoms (Fig. 1). She remains stable 14 months after starting beta-blocker therapy. To our knowledge, our case is the second case report suggesting oral beta-blocker may be an alternative therapy for orbital angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia.

  17. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  18. Peripapillary subretinal neovascularization in sarcoidosis: remission and exacerbation during oral corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji; Shiraki, Kunihiko; Yasunari, Takaharu; Kohno, Takeya; Miki, Tokuhiko

    2002-01-01

    In sarcoidosis, peripapillary subretinal neovascularization is rare. The role of corticosteroid therapy for subretinal neovascularization is controversial. A 38-year-old female patient weighing 38 kg with histologically diagnosed sarcoidosis presented with peripapillary subretinal neovascularization, retinal phlebitis, a hyperemic disc, and snowball vitreous opacities in the left eye. Oral betamethasone therapy at an initial dose of 3 mg/day reduced the size of subretinal neovascular membrane, and the membrane became fibrous. Despite the total initial 140 mg of betamethasone given over 2.5 months and the additional total 700 mg of prednisolone given over the next 2 months, the subretinal neovascularization recurred. Six months after the first recurrence, a second recurrence developed during the tapering-off period of oral corticosteroid therapy. At the second recurrence, the oral corticosteroid therapy was ineffective in reducing the size of the neovascular membrane. In our patient, oral corticosteroids temporarily suppressed peripapillary subretinal neovascularization but failed to prevent extension of neovascular membrane to the fovea because of recurrent sarcoidosis. Over time, oral corticosteroids appear to lose their effectiveness for treating repeated recurrence of peripapillary subretinal neovascularization associated with sarcoidosis.

  19. Herpes simplex virus detection in oral mucosa lesions in patients undergoing oncologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda Tebache, Ester; Brethauer Meier, Ursula; Jiménez Moraga, Marco; Morales Figueroa, Rocío; Rojas Castro, Jaime; Le Fort Canales, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) has been a frequent detection in gingivitis and ulcerations of oral mucosa in patients undergoing oncologic therapy. In these patients, lesions tend to show atypical clinical patterns, leading to misdiagnosis. To detect HSV, using an ELISA test, in oral lesions of patients under oncologic therapy, to determine localization of these lesions in the oral cavity, to relate their presence with the general diagnosis of the patient and to compare the test results with the previous clinical diagnosis of the lesions. Thirty lesions where examined in nineteen pediatric patients under oncologic therapy. Direct samples of all lesions were taken and an ELISA test for HSV type I and II was applied to them. General diagnosis of the patients was consigned, as well as localization of the lesions in the oral cavity and clinical diagnosis of them. A database was elaborated with all the information. 33% of lesions were positive to the test, most of them in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Localization of lesions was not restricted to areas of mucosa attached to periosteum, but also in areas like the dorsum of the tongue. Positive predictivity of clinical diagnosis was 56,25% and negative predictive index was 92,86%. Sensitivity of the test was 90% and specificity was 65%. It is very important to corroborate clinical diagnosis of gingivitis and ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity of patients under oncologic therapy with laboratory tests, because of the atypical clinical presentation that can lead to misdiagnosis.

  20. Oral Nanostructured Lipid Carriers Loaded with Near-Infrared Dye for Image-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Kaikai; Zhou, Yiwen; Ding, Ling; Ullah, Aftab; Hu, Qi; Sun, Minjie; Oupický, David

    2016-09-28

    Photothermal therapy exerts its anticancer effect by converting laser radiation energy into hyperthermia using a suitable photosensitizer. This study reports development of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) suitable for noninvasive oral delivery of a near-infrared photosensitizer dye IR780. The carrier encapsulating the dye (IR780@NLCs) was stable in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions and showed greatly enhanced oral absorption of IR780 when compared with the free dye. As a result of increased oral bioavailability, enhanced accumulation of the dye in subcutaneous mouse colon tumors (CT-26 cells) was observed following oral gavage of IR780@NLCs. Photothermal antitumor activity of orally administered IR780@NLCs was evaluated following local laser irradiation of the CT-26 tumors. We observed significant effect of the photothermal IR780@NLCs treatment on the rate of the tumor growth and no toxicity associated with the oral administration of IR780@NLCs. Overall, orally administered IR780@NLCs represents a safe and noninvasive method to achieve systemic tumor delivery of a photosensitizing dye for applications in photothermal anticancer therapies.

  1. Bilateral nasal bone osteophytosis associated with short-term oral isotretinoin therapy for cystic acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Novick, N L; Lawson, W; Schwartz, I S

    1984-10-01

    Bilateral 2.5 and 3.0 mm nasal bone osteophytes developed five weeks following the initiation of oral isotretinoin therapy (50 mg daily) for severe cystic acne vulgaris in a healthy 30-year-old white woman who had undergone uneventful rhinoplasty 12 years earlier. Histologically mature bone fragments were removed at surgery. Vitamin A and its analogs have been reported to cause hyperostosis of the vertebrae and long bones, but no known reports link them to nasal bone changes. Clinically significant nasal bone osteophytosis may be another adverse reaction to oral isotretinoin therapy.

  2. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  3. Oral health education and therapy reduces gingivitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Maria L; Geurs, Nicolaas C; Bain, Jennifer L; Kaur, Maninder; Vassilopoulos, Philip J; Cliver, Suzanne P; Hauth, John C; Reddy, Michael S

    2014-02-01

    Pregnant women demonstrate increases in gingivitis despite similar plaque levels to non-pregnant counterparts. To evaluate an intensive protocol aimed at reducing gingivitis in pregnant women and provide pilot data for large-scale randomized controlled trials investigating oral hygiene measures to reduce pregnancy gingivitis and alter maternity outcomes. One hundred and twenty participants between 16 and 24 weeks gestation with Gingival Index (GI) scores ≥2 at ≥50% of tooth sites were enrolled. Plaque index (PI), gingival inflammation (GI), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were recorded at baseline and 8 weeks. Dental prophylaxis was performed at baseline and oral hygiene instructions at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Pregnancy outcomes were recorded at parturition. Mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare clinical measurements at baseline and 8 weeks. Statistically significant reductions in PI, GI, PD, and CAL occurred over the study period. Mean whole mouth PI and GI scores decreased approximately 50% and the percentage of sites with PI and GI ≥2 decreased from 40% to 17% and 53% to 21.8%, respectively. Mean decreases in whole mouth PD and CAL of 0.45 and 0.24 mm, respectively, were seen. Intensive oral hygiene regimen decreased gingivitis in pregnant patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Insight into barriers against optimal adherence to oral hormonal therapy in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Margaret C; Hudis, Clifford A

    2008-04-01

    Suboptimal adherence to prescribed oral anticancer agents has been demonstrated in several studies. Understanding the barriers to treatment compliance is becoming increasingly important because of the growing number of oral agents available to treat women with breast cancer. To identify barriers that affect patient adherence to oral hormonal medications, a self-reported, 30-question Internet survey was posted on the Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization Web site, www.y-me.org, from June 30, 2005, through October 31, 2005. Of the 542 respondents who began the survey, 328 completed it. Of those who answered the question related to whether healthcare professionals encouraged adherence, only 44.2% reported receiving instruction on the importance of taking oral medication as directed at every office visit. For 33%, the topic was reportedly discussed only once, and this occurred before treatment. Although 83.6% of patients indicated that they were taking their oral therapy as directed, only 57.4% rated their ability to adhere to therapy as excellent (not missing a single dose in the past month). The most frequently cited factors for increasing compliance to oral medications were knowing adherence could improve clinical outcomes (88.7%) and better management of treatment-related side effects (60.2%). The results of this survey suggest that treatment adherence could be improved if healthcare professionals discuss and emphasize (1) the importance of taking oral medications as directed and (2) the effect of adherence on clinical outcomes. Additional research is needed to evaluate the optimal methods for improving compliance with oral therapy.

  5. Examining the use of oral rehydration salts and other oral rehydration therapy for childhood diarrhea in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Blum, Lauren S; Oria, Prisca A; Olson, Christine K; Breiman, Robert F; Ram, Pavani K

    2011-12-01

    Reductions in the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in sub-Saharan Africa highlight the need to examine caregiver perceptions of ORT during diarrheal episodes. Qualitative research involving group discussions with childcare providers and in-depth interviews with 45 caregivers of children < 5 years of age who had experienced diarrhea was conducted in one rural and urban site in Kenya during July-December 2007. Diarrhea was considered a dangerous condition that can kill young children. Caregivers preferred to treat diarrhea with Western drugs believed to be more effective in stopping diarrhea than ORT. Inconsistent recommendations from health workers regarding use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) caused confusion about when ORS is appropriate and whether it requires a medical prescription. In the rural community, causal explanations about diarrhea, beliefs in herbal remedies, cost, and distance to health facilities presented additional barriers to ORS use. Health communication is needed to clarify the function of ORT in preventing dehydration.

  6. Examining the Use of Oral Rehydration Salts and Other Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhea in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Lauren S.; Oria, Prisca A.; Olson, Christine K.; Breiman, Robert F.; Ram, Pavani K.

    2011-01-01

    Reductions in the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in sub-Saharan Africa highlight the need to examine caregiver perceptions of ORT during diarrheal episodes. Qualitative research involving group discussions with childcare providers and in-depth interviews with 45 caregivers of children < 5 years of age who had experienced diarrhea was conducted in one rural and urban site in Kenya during July–December 2007. Diarrhea was considered a dangerous condition that can kill young children. Caregivers preferred to treat diarrhea with Western drugs believed to be more effective in stopping diarrhea than ORT. Inconsistent recommendations from health workers regarding use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) caused confusion about when ORS is appropriate and whether it requires a medical prescription. In the rural community, causal explanations about diarrhea, beliefs in herbal remedies, cost, and distance to health facilities presented additional barriers to ORS use. Health communication is needed to clarify the function of ORT in preventing dehydration. PMID:22144457

  7. Effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive therapy of Gram-negative bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Kutob, Leila F; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-11-01

    There is paucity of data evaluating intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch options for Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs). This retrospective cohort study examined the effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive treatment of Gram-negative BSI. Patients with Gram-negative BSI hospitalised for <14 days at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2013 and discharged on oral antibiotics were included in this study. The cohort was stratified into three groups based on bioavailability of oral antibiotics prescribed (high, ≥95%; moderate, 75-94%; and low, <75%). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine treatment failure. Among the 362 patients, high, moderate and low bioavailability oral antibiotics were prescribed to 106, 179 and 77 patients, respectively, for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Mean patient age was 63 years, 217 (59.9%) were women and 254 (70.2%) had a urinary source of infection. Treatment failure rates were 2%, 12% and 14% in patients receiving oral antibiotics with high, moderate and low bioavailability, respectively (P = 0.02). Risk of treatment failure in the multivariate Cox model was higher in patients receiving antibiotics with moderate [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-38.5; P = 0.005] and low bioavailability (aHR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.9-51.5; P = 0.003) compared with those receiving oral antimicrobial agents with high bioavailability. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of oral antibiotics with high bioavailability for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Risk of treatment failure increases as bioavailability of the oral regimen declines.

  8. Prevention and management of antineoplastic therapy induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bey, Afshan; Ahmed, Syed S; Hussain, Bilal; Devi, Seema; Hashmi, Sarwat H

    2010-07-01

    With the scientific advancements in the management of malignant diseases, the treatment is expensive and bears high morbidity in term of oral mucositis. It is a debilitating condition and has been researched extensively for its pathogenesis and treatment. Various treatment options include barrier forming, mucosal protectants, mouth rinses, growth factors, lasers and midline-sparing procedures. Some agents are used locally while others are administered systemically. Despite the availability of a wide range of treatment options for mucositis, a cost-effective treatment is yet to be evolved.

  9. Gene therapy in the management of oral cancer: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ayllón Barbellido, Sonia; Campo Trapero, Julián; Cano Sánchez, Jorge; Perea García, Miguel A; Escudero Castaño, Nayra; Bascones Martínez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy essentially consists of introducing specific genetic material into target cells without producing toxic effects on surrounding tissue. Advances over recent decades in the surgical, radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatment of oral cancer patients have not produced a significant improvement in patient survival. Increasing interest is being shown in developing novel therapies to reverse oral epithelial dysplastic lesions. This review provides an update on transfer techniques, therapeutic strategies, and the clinical applications and limitations of gene therapy in the management of oral cancer and precancer. We highlight the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy (e.g., 5-Fluoracil) and immunotherapy, given the promising results obtained in the use of adenovirus to act at altered gene level (e.g., p53). Other techniques such as suicide gene therapy, use of oncolytic viruses or the use of antisense RNA have shown positive although very preliminary results. Therefore, further research into these promising gene therapy techniques is required to assess their true efficacy and safety in the management of these lesions.

  10. Treatment of oral fungal infections using antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a systematic review of currently available evidence.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Romanos, Georgios E

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to review the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of oral fungal infections. To address the focused question "Should PDT be considered a possible treatment regimen for oral fungal infections?" PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1997 up to March 2014 using various combinations of the following key words: "Candida albicans"; "Candidiasis"; "Candidosis"; "denture stomatitis"; "oral" and "photodynamic therapy". Original studies, experimental studies and articles published solely in English language were sought. Letters to the editor, historic reviews and unpublished data were excluded. Pattern of the present literature review was customized to mainly summarize the pertinent information. Fifteen studies (3 clinical and 12 experimental) were included. All studies reported antimicrobial PDT to be an effective antifungal treatment strategy. One study reported PDT and azole therapy to be equally effective in the treatment of oral fungal infections. Methylene blue, toluidine blue and porphyrin derivative were the most commonly used photosensitizers. The laser wavelengths and power output ranged between ∼455 nm-660 nm and 30 mW-400 mW. The energy fluence ranged between 26-245 J cm(-2) and the duration or irradiation ranged between 10 seconds and 26 minutes. Clinical effectiveness of antimicrobial PDT as a potent therapeutic strategy for oral fungal infections requires further investigations.

  11. Oral ofloxacin therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in mice after irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Ledney, G D

    1990-01-01

    Death subsequent to whole-body irradiation is associated with gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with the new quinolone ofloxacin for orally acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 7.0 Gy of bilateral radiation from 60Co. A dose of 10(7) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Only 4 of 20 untreated mice (20%) survived for at least 30 days compared with 19 of 20 mice (95%) treated with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). P. aeruginosa was isolated from the livers of 21 to 28 untreated mice (75%), compared with only 2 of 30 treated mice (P less than 0.005). Ofloxacin reduced colonization of the ileum by P. aeruginosa; 24 of 28 untreated mice (86%) harbored the organisms, compared with only 5 of 30 (17%) with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). This experiment was replicated twice, and similar results were obtained. These data illustrate the efficacy of the quinolone ofloxacin for oral therapy of orally acquired P. aeruginosa infection in irradiated hosts. PMID:2117418

  12. Non-oral dopaminergic therapies for Parkinson’s disease: current treatments and the future

    PubMed Central

    Ray Chaudhuri, K; Qamar, Mubasher A; Rajah, Thadshani; Loehrer, Philipp; Sauerbier, Anna; Odin, Per; Jenner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract has now been recognized to affect all stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The consequences lead to problems with absorption of oral medication, erratic treatment response, as well as silent aspiration, which is one of the key risk factors in developing pneumonia. The issue is further complicated by other gut abnormalities, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and an altered gut microbiota, which occur in PD with variable frequency. Clinically, these gastrointestinal abnormalities might be associated with symptoms such as nausea, early-morning “off”, and frequent motor and non-motor fluctuations. Therefore, non-oral therapies that avoid the gastrointestinal system seem a rational option to overcome the problems of oral therapies in PD. Hence, several non-oral strategies have now been actively investigated and developed. The transdermal rotigotine patch, infusion therapies with apomorphine, intrajejunal levodopa, and the apomorphine pen strategy are currently in clinical use with a few others in development. In this review, we discuss and summarize the most recent developments in this field with a focus on non-oral dopaminergic strategies (excluding surgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation) in development or to be licensed for management of PD. PMID:28725704

  13. Non-oral dopaminergic therapies for Parkinson's disease: current treatments and the future.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, K; Qamar, Mubasher A; Rajah, Thadshani; Loehrer, Philipp; Sauerbier, Anna; Odin, Per; Jenner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract has now been recognized to affect all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). The consequences lead to problems with absorption of oral medication, erratic treatment response, as well as silent aspiration, which is one of the key risk factors in developing pneumonia. The issue is further complicated by other gut abnormalities, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and an altered gut microbiota, which occur in PD with variable frequency. Clinically, these gastrointestinal abnormalities might be associated with symptoms such as nausea, early-morning "off", and frequent motor and non-motor fluctuations. Therefore, non-oral therapies that avoid the gastrointestinal system seem a rational option to overcome the problems of oral therapies in PD. Hence, several non-oral strategies have now been actively investigated and developed. The transdermal rotigotine patch, infusion therapies with apomorphine, intrajejunal levodopa, and the apomorphine pen strategy are currently in clinical use with a few others in development. In this review, we discuss and summarize the most recent developments in this field with a focus on non-oral dopaminergic strategies (excluding surgical interventions such as deep brain stimulation) in development or to be licensed for management of PD.

  14. A novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy[S

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Gao, Feng; Meriwether, David; Grijalva, Victor; Springstead, James R.; Palgnachari, Mayakonda N.; Namiri-Kalantari, Ryan; Su, Feng; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Wagner, Alan C.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tomato plants were constructed with an empty vector (EV) or a vector expressing an apoA-I mimetic peptide, 6F. EV or 6F tomatoes were harvested, lyophilized, ground into powder, added to Western diet (WD) at 2.2% by weight, and fed to LDL receptor-null (LDLR−/−) mice at 45 mg/kg/day 6F. After 13 weeks, the percent of the aorta with lesions was 4.1 ± 4%, 3.3 ± 2.4%, and 1.9 ± 1.4% for WD, WD + EV, and WD + 6F, respectively (WD + 6F vs. WD, P = 0.0134; WD + 6F vs. WD + EV, P = 0.0386; WD + EV vs. WD, not significant). While body weight did not differ, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), total cholesterol, triglycerides, and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels were less in WD + 6F mice; P < 0.0295. HDL cholesterol and paroxonase-1 activity (PON) were higher in WD + 6F mice (P = 0.0055 and P = 0.0254, respectively), but not in WD + EV mice. Plasma SAA, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LPA, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) levels positively correlated with lesions (P < 0.0001); HDL cholesterol and PON were inversely correlated (P < 0.0001). After feeding WD + 6F: i) intact 6F was detected in small intestine (but not in plasma); ii) small intestine LPA was decreased compared with WD + EV (P < 0.0469); and iii) small intestine LPA 18:2 positively correlated with the percent of the aorta with lesions (P < 0.0179). These data suggest that 6F acts in the small intestine and provides a novel approach to oral apoA-I mimetic therapy. PMID:23378594

  15. [Dentistry oral hygiene and endocarditis. Pathophysiology and prophylactic therapy].

    PubMed

    Santacroce, Luigi; Cagiano, Raffaele; Carlaio, Roberto G; Del Prete, Raffaele; Bottalico, Lucrezia

    2008-10-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a cardiac pathology of bacterial, viral or more rarely mycotic origin developing on the surfaces of the endocardium or heart valves. Predisposing conditions are congenital malformations of the heart or valvular acquired alterations, as well as the presence of a valvular prosthesis. The microorganisms involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of the damage of such infection (bacterias, viruses or yeasts) determine the formation of the endocardic vegetations typical of this condition. Such lesions can be located on the valvular or the parietal endocardium and sometimes on the endothelium of a great artery. In despite of the elevated standards of instrumental investigations and therapeutic protocols, the bacterial endocarditis represents a pathology of wide interest, scientific and social, due to its high rate of incidence, morbility and mortality. Still now infectious endocarditis causes death in 20-30% of the patients. Although the significant progress on prevention of the infectious diseases and of the cross infections in dentistry practice, from the tartar ablation up to the oncologic oral surgery, still now the skills of oral hygiene and dentistry represent a potential threat for the development of an infectious endocarditis in predisposed patients. The authors, on the base of the revision of the literature and of their own clinical experience, show the etiology, pathophysiology and the clinical pictures related to such complex disease.

  16. Postoperative Bleeding Risk for Oral Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeuch, Jürgen; Haase, Martina; Semmusch, Jan; Eichhorn, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Object. To determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding for oral osteotomy carried out under continued monoantiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and dual therapy with clopidogrel/aspirin. Design. Retrospective single center observatory study of two study groups and a control group. Methods. A total of 64 and 60 oral osteotomy procedures carried out under continued monoclopidogrel therapy and dual clopidogrel/aspirin therapy, respectively, were followed for two weeks for postoperative bleeding. Another 281 similar procedures were also followed as a control group. All oral osteotomy procedures were carried out on an outpatient basis. Results. We observed postoperative bleeding in 2/281 (0.7%) cases in the control group, in 1/64 (1.6%) cases in the clopidogrel group, and in 2/60 (3.3%) cases in the dual clopidogrel/aspirin group. The corresponding 95% confidence intervals are 0–1.7%, 0–4.7%, and 0–7.8%, respectively, and the incidences did not differ significantly among the three groups (P > 0.09). Postoperative hemorrhage was treated successfully in all cases with local measures. No changes of antiplatelet medication, transfusion, nor hospitalisation were necessary. No major cardiovascular events were recorded. Conclusions. Our results indicate that minor oral surgery can be performed safely under continued monoantiplatelet medication with clopidogrel or dual antiplatelet medication with clopidogrel/aspirin. PMID:25632402

  17. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to treat chemotherapy-induced oral lesions: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Breno Amaral; Melo Filho, Mário Rodrigues; Simões, Alyne

    2016-03-01

    The development of Angular Cheilitis and the reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus, could be related to a decrease in the resistance of the immune system in the infected host, being common in cancer patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. The objective of the present manuscript is to report Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a treatment of infected oral lesions of patients submitted to chemotherapy.

  18. Effects of oral tacrolimus as a rapid induction therapy in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ken; Inoue, Takuya; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Narabayashi, Ken; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Nogami, Koji; Hida, Nobuyuki; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kenji; Umegaki, Eiji; Nakamura, Shiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy and safety of rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus without a meal in steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Between May 2010 and August 2012, 49 steroid-refractory UC patients (55 flare-ups) were consecutively enrolled. All patients were treated with oral tacrolimus without a meal at an initial dose of 0.1 mg/kg per day. The dose was adjusted to maintain trough whole-blood levels of 10-15 ng/mL for the first 2 wk. Induction of remission at 2 and 4 wk after tacrolimus treatment initiation was evaluated using Lichtiger’s clinical activity index (CAI). RESULTS: The mean CAI was 12.6 ± 3.6 at onset. Within the first 7 d, 93.5% of patients maintained high trough levels (10-15 ng/mL). The CAI significantly decreased beginning 2 d after treatment initiation. At 2 wk, 73.1% of patients experienced clinical responses. After tacrolimus initiation, 31.4% and 75.6% of patients achieved clinical remission at 2 and 4 wk, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus shortened the time to achievement of appropriate trough levels and demonstrated a high remission rate 28 d after treatment initiation. Rapid induction therapy with oral tacrolimus appears to be a useful therapy for the treatment of refractory UC. PMID:25684955

  19. Case reports: minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation resolves during oral isotretinoin therapy.

    PubMed

    Soung, Jennifer; Cohen, Justine; Phelps, Robert; Cohen, Steven R

    2007-12-01

    Although disfiguring hyperpigmentation is a well-defined complication of minocycline therapy, modalities to reverse the phenomenon are unpredictable. We report a case of minocycline-induced, blue-black pigmentation in a 23-year-old Hispanic man, which resolved after treatment with oral isotretinoin for acne vulgaris.

  20. Oral Vancomycin Therapy in a Child with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Buness, Cynthia; Miloh, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare progressive liver disease characterized by cholestasis and bile duct fibrosis, has no accepted, effective therapy known to delay or arrest its progression. We report a 15 year old female patient diagnosed with PSC and moderate chronic active ulcerative colitis (UC) who achieved normalization of her liver enzymes and bile ducts, and resolution of her UC symptoms with colonic mucosal healing, after treatment with a single drug therapy of the antibiotic oral vancomycin. We postulate that the oral vancomycin may be acting both as an antibiotic by altering the intestinal microbiome and as an immunomodulator. Oral vancomycin may be a promising treatment for PSC that needs to be further studied in randomized trials. PMID:27738604

  1. Administration of Coagulation-Altering Therapy in the Patient Presenting for Oral Health and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Halaszynski, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Oral health care providers are concerned with how to manage patients prescribed coagulation-altering therapy during the perioperative/periprocedural period for dental and oral surgery interventions. Management and recommendation can be based on medication pharmacology and the clinical relevance of coagulation factor levels/deficiencies. Caution should be used with concurrent use of medications that affect other components of the clotting mechanisms; prompt diagnosis and any necessary intervention to optimize outcome is warranted. However, evidence-based data on management of anticoagulation therapy during oral and maxillofacial surgery/interventions is lacking. Therefore, clinical understanding and judgment are needed along with appropriate guidelines matching patient- and intervention-specific recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women.

  3. Perceived Effectiveness, Self-efficacy, and Social Support for Oral Appliance Therapy Among Older Veterans With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Nancy J; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Michael N; Hays, Ron D; Col, Nananda; Patterson, Emily S; Jouldjian, Stella; Josephson, Karen; Fung, Constance H

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a prevalent sleep disorder among older adults. Oral appliances are increasingly prescribed as therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. Adherence to oral appliance therapy is highly variable. Based on value-expectancy theory and other social-psychological theories, adherence to oral appliance therapy may be influenced by patients' perceived effectiveness of the therapy, self-efficacy, and availability of social support. We examined these perceptions among older adults with obstructive sleep apnea who were prescribed oral appliance therapy. We mailed surveys to all patients aged ≥65 years who had been prescribed oral appliance therapy for obstructive sleep apnea over the prior 36 months at a Veterans Affairs medical center. We examined frequencies of responses to items that assessed perceived effectiveness, self-efficacy, and social support for nightly use of oral appliances from friends, family, or health care staff. Thirty-nine individuals responded (response rate, 30%; mean [SD] age 71.4 [SD 6.3] years; 97% male). Thirty-six percent of the respondents perceived regular use of oral appliance therapy to be effective in managing obstructive sleep apnea; 39% agreed that they felt confident about using oral appliances regularly; 41% felt supported by people in their life in using oral appliance therapy; and 38% agreed that health care staff would help them to use their oral appliance regularly. These rates represented less than half of respondents despite the finding that 65% of patients believed that they would use their oral appliance regularly. Although oral appliance therapy is increasingly prescribed for obstructive sleep apnea, only about one third of older adults prescribed it perceived it to be an effective treatment, were confident about oral appliance use, and/or believed that they would receive needed support. Future research is needed to better understand older adults' perceptions so that interventions can be designed to improve the

  4. [Improvements in oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Briongos Figuero, Sem; García Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Badimón, Juan José

    2013-12-07

    For the last decades vitamin K antagonists have been the most effective anticoagulant treatment of atrial fibrillation. New molecules are being designed, mainly due to the great amount of disadvantages in the management of conventional anticoagulation. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban will soon be available as an alternative to warfarin/acenocumarol. All of them have demonstrated to be non-inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke and systemic embolism, with even dabigatran 150 mg bid and apixaban being superior. They have also a lower risk of bleeding, especially regarding severe/fatal and intracranial hemorrhages. This is a real revolution. The advance of these new anticoagulants will be limited only by the higher cost, and will progressively become the protagonists of oral anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

  5. Oral antihyperglycemic therapy for type 2 diabetes: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Eric S

    2002-01-16

    Oral agents are the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for type 2 diabetes, and physicians now have a number of agents to choose from. However, more choices translate into more complex decision making. Many patients with diabetes have associated comorbidities, and most diabetic patients will require more than 1 agent to achieve good glycemic control. This article illustrates several of the pharmacologic approaches to type 2 diabetes through 4 situations that use principles of evidence-based medicine. The scenarios also highlight some of the difficulties in choosing the optimal pharmacologic treatment regimen for individual patients. Physicians should also recognize that type 2 diabetes is a multisystem disorder that requires multidisciplinary care, including education and ongoing counseling for effective patient self-management of the disease. Finally, patient preferences are a vital component of informed decision making for pharmacologic treatment of diabetes.

  6. Long-term oral antiarrhythmic therapy with mexiletine.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N P; Pantridge, J F; Adgey, A A

    1978-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with ischaemic heart disease received oral mexiletine for the control or prevention of ventricular arrhythmias. The most frequently used doses were 200, 250, and 300 mg 8-hourly. The treatment period varied from 2 days to more than 1 year (median 3 months). No ventricular arrhythmias were detected in more than one-half of the patients. Severe side effects occurred in 15 (31%) of the 48 patients. Major ventricular arrhythmias were observed in 14 (29%) of the 48 patients at a time when the majority had plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. The value of mexiletine in the management of patients at risk of sudden death is likely to be limited. PMID:687477

  7. Adverse effects of oral antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kayaaslan, Bircan; Guner, Rahmet

    2017-01-01

    Oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs) are currently the backbone of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection treatment. They are generally well-tolerated by patients and safe to use. To date, a significant number of patients have been treated with NAs. Safety data has accumulated over the years. The aim of this article is to review and update the adverse effects of oral NAs. NAs can cause class adverse effects (i.e., myopathy, neuropathy, lactic acidosis) and dissimilar adverse effects. All NAs carry a “Black Box” warning because of the potential risk for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, these adverse effects are rarely reported. The majority of cases are associated with lamivudine and telbivudine. Adefovir can lead to dose- and time-dependent nephrotoxicity, even at low doses. Tenofovir has significant renal and bone toxicity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, bone and renal toxicity in patients with CHB are not as prominent as in HIV infection. Entecavir and lamivudine are not generally associated with renal adverse events. Entecavir has been claimed to increase the risk of lactic acidosis in decompensated liver disease and high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. However, current studies reported that entecavir could be safely used in decompensated cirrhosis. An increase in fetal adverse events has not been reported with lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir use in pregnant women, while there is no adequate data regarding entecavir and adefovir. Further long-term experience is required to highlight the adverse effects of NAs, especially in special patient populations, including pregnant women, elderly and patients with renal impairment. PMID:28261380

  8. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. Aim: This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. Results: The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Conclusions: Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis. PMID:27688443

  9. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis.

  10. Tumor-targeting bacterial therapy: A potential treatment for oral cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SAI; XU, XIAOPING; ZENG, XIN; LI, LONGJIANG; CHEN, QIANMING; LI, JING

    2014-01-01

    Certain obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria, which exhibit an inherent ability to colonize solid tumors in vivo, may be used in tumor targeting. As genetically manipulated bacteria may actively and specifically penetrate into the tumor tissue, bacterial therapy is becoming a promising approach in the treatment of tumors. However, to the best of our knowledge, no reports have been published thus far regarding the bacterial treatment of oral cancer, one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. In this review, the progress in the understanding of bacterial strategies used in tumor-targeted therapy is discussed and particular bacterial strains that may have great therapeutic potential in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tumor-targeted therapy are predicted as determined by previous studies. PMID:25364397

  11. Cancer incidence attributable to the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Grevers, Xin; Grundy, Anne; Poirier, Abbey E.; Khandwala, Farah; Feldman, Matthew; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Brenner, Darren R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hormonal contraceptives and hormone replacement therapies are classified as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We sought to estimate the proportion and total number of cancers attributable to the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta in 2012. Methods: Population attributable risks were used to estimate the proportion of attributable cases for each associated cancer site. Relative risk estimates were obtained from the most relevant and recent epidemiologic literature. Prevalences of the use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy in Alberta were collected from Alberta's Tomorrow Project. Specific cancer incidence data were obtained from the Alberta Cancer Registry for the year 2012. Results: Overall, 6.3% of breast cancers (n = 135) diagnosed in Alberta in 2012 were estimated to be attributable to the use of oral contraceptives, and the exposure potentially prevented about 57.3% of endometrial cancers (n = 276) and 29.1% of ovarian cancers (n = 52). About 15.5% of breast cancers (n = 258) and 8.9% of ovarian cancers (n = 13) were estimated to be attributable to the use of hormone therapy, whereas 11.3% of endometrial cancers (n = 48) were possibly prevented by the exposure. Interpretation: Based on our estimates, oral contraceptive use resulted in a net protective effect among the cancer sites studied, thus reducing the cancer burden in Alberta in 2012. The use of hormone therapy was estimated to increase the cancer burden in the province, therefore the risk and benefit of hormone therapy should be carefully considered before use. PMID:28018891

  12. Inflammation and Oral Cancer: An Update Review on Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Anuprita; Anand, Rahul; Patil, Shankar Gouda; Rao, Roopa S; Augustine, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    In the recent past, numerous inflammation-mediated molecular pathways have been explored and studied as important events in carcinogenesis with respect to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These pathways are engaged in numerous stages during tumorigenesis; which includes processes, like initiation, promotion, malignant conversion, invasion and metastasis. The inflammation-mediated/related carcinogenesis pathways reported in OSCC involves COX-2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p38a MAP kinase, NF-kB, STAT, RhoC, PPARy, etc. Many researchers are trying to target these pathways to explore more effective therapeutic interventions in OSCC. The aim of the present paper is to briefly discuss these pathways, with special emphasis on the therapeutic utilities. The therapeutic targets for the aforementioned pathways were searched in databases pubmed and scopus with no restriction to date of publication. Articles published in English medical literature on OSCC were selected for discussion. The recent combinations, modifications in dosage and frequency, or the use of new anti-inflammatory compounds, may exemplify the next generation care for OSCC.

  13. The potential management of oral candidiasis using anti-biofilm therapies.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Warren; Joseph, Thomson P; Wang, Wendong; Padhiar, Arshad A; Zhong, Mintao

    2017-09-01

    Candida albicans is a minor component of the oral microbiota and an opportunistic pathogen that takes advantage of the immunocompromised host and causes oral mucositis and oral candidiasis. This organism is able to undergo phenotypic modification from a yeast to hyphae growth phase, one of the key arsenals for immune cell evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. The latter property coupled with overgrowth and immune compromising factors such as HIV/AIDS, cancer treatments, organ transplantation, diabetes, corticosteroid use, dentures, and broad-spectrum antibiotic use have modified the fungus from a normal component of the microflora to a foe of an oral cavity and resulting in reduced sensitivity towards commonly utilised antifungal agents. Hence, the need for alternative therapy to curb this plight is of importance. Making use of biomolecules produced by Streptococcus mutans, application of lactoferrin which is a nonspecific host defense factor found in saliva with metal chelating and broader antimicrobial properties, use of probiotics which have the capacity to boost the host immunity through eliciting Immunoglobulin A synthesis, and perturbing the pathogen's environment via competition of space and food, and application of photodynamic therapy can help to manage the burden of oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of surgical laser therapy in the management of oral pigmented lesions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Vohra, Fahim; Akram, Zohaib; Ghani, Siti Mariam Ab; Al-Hamoudi, Nawwaf; Javed, Fawad

    2017-08-01

    Oral pigmentation, especially in the gingiva poses esthetic problems. Laser therapy has been widely used for cosmetic therapy in dentistry. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the efficacy of surgical laser therapy (SLT) in the management of oral pigmented lesions (OPL). The addressed focused question was "Is SLT effective in the management of OPL?" Databases (MEDLINE via PubMed; EMBASE; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases) were searched from 1970 up to and including February 2017. Ten studies were included. The reported number of OPL ranged between 8 and 140. Oral pigmented sites included, gingiva, buccal and labial mucosa, alveolar mucosa and lips. Lasers used in the studies included Q-switched alexandrite, Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet, diode, Erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet and carbon dioxide laser. Laser wavelength, power output and number of irradiations were 635-10,600nm, 1-10W and 1 to 9 times, respectively. The follow up period ranged from 6 to 24months. All studies reported SLT to be effective in the treatment of OPL. In five studies, recurrence of OPL occurred which ranged from 21.4% to 45%. Lasers are effective in the management of OPL including physiologic gingival pigmentation, smokers' melanosis and pigmentation in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome. Different laser types (CO2, Er:YAG and Diode) showed comparable outcomes in the treatment of OPL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving anti-retroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Baghirath, P V; Krishna, A B; Gannepalli, A; Ali, M M

    2013-12-01

    To assess and compare the oral manifestations of HIV-infected paediatric patients undergoing ART (anti-retroviral therapy) and those not undergoing ART. A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst the 5-12 years old, HIV positive children (receiving and not receiving ART) registered at Nireekshana ART centre, Hyderabad and HIV negative children enrolled in a nearby school. HIV-related oral lesions were diagnosed according to WHO criteria. Information on age, gender, place of residence (urban/rural), socio-economic status, duration of HIV infection, duration of ART therapy, use of traditional medicine, presence of HIV-related systemic disease was recorded. CD4+ cell count was also determined for each subject. Chi-square test, stepwise multiple linear and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. For all tests, confidence interval and p value were set at 95 % and p ≤ 0.05, respectively. Twelve percent and 21.3 % of the study participants were on short-term and long-term ART (Group I), respectively. A greater proportion of HIV patients receiving treatment had CD4+ cell counts of more than 750 cells/mm(3). Nearly 81.3 % of HIV patients receiving long-term therapy did not have any oral lesions. Around half of the participants not receiving treatment suffered from HIV-related oral lesions. The best predictors for presence of oral lesions were socio-economic status, group (ART treatment), duration of HIV infection and CD4+ cell count. The results of the present study demonstrated that ART proved to be effective in reducing the prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions.

  16. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    PubMed

    Abeles, Shira R; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances.

  17. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  18. TransOral Robotic Photodynamic Therapy for the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Harry; Finlay, Jarod; Cengel, Keith; Zhu, Timothy; O’Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for head and neck carcinomas with little experience in the oropharynx due to technical challenges in achieving adequate exposure. We present the case of a patient with a second right tonsil carcinoma following previous treatment with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative chemoradiation for a left tonsil carcinoma. Repeat TORS for the right tonsil carcinoma reviewed multiple positive surgical margins. The power output from the robotic camera was modified to facilitate safe intraoperative three dimensional visualization of the tumor bed. The robotic arms facilitated clear exposure of the tonsil and tongue base with stable administration of the fluence. Real-time measurements confirmed stable photobleaching with augmentation of the prescribed light fluence secondary to light scatter in the oropharynx. We report a potential new role using TORS for exposure and accurate PDT in the oropharynx. PMID:21333937

  19. Suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir for recurrent herpes labialis: efficacy and tolerability in an open-label, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley C

    2007-04-01

    Oral valacyclovir's efficacy and tolerability as suppressive therapy versus episodic therapy were compared for recurrent herpes labialis (RHL). Subjects with a history of at least 3 RHL episodes in the past year were randomized to receive 6 months of oral valacyclovir episodic therapy at the first sign of prodrome (two 2-g doses separated by 12 hours) and 6 months of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy (1 g once daily) for 6 months in open-label, crossover fashion. The mean +/- SE number of recurrences per 120 days of follow-up (primary endpoint) was lower with suppressive therapy (0.30 +/- 0.41) than episodic therapy (0.71 +/- 0.79) (P < .005). The probability of remaining recurrence free over 6 months was significantly higher with suppressive therapy than episodic therapy. The median time to first recurrence was 81 days with episodic therapy and was not calculable (> 180 days) for suppressive therapy (P = 0.021). Data for secondary efficacy endpoints (pain severity score, mean duration of recurrences, maximal total lesion area) showed approximately a 30% to 50% reduction in mean values with suppressive therapy compared with episodic therapy, but results were statistically significantly different between the regimens for pain severity only. The percentage of subjects with at least one adverse event over 6 months of treatment that was considered to be drug related was 3% with suppressive therapy and 6% with episodic therapy. Suppressive therapy with oral valacyclovir was more effective than episodic therapy with oral valacyclovir in reducing the frequency of recurrences of herpes labialis and prolonging the time to first recurrence and was also similarly well-tolerated.

  20. Prostacyclin and Oral Vasodilator Therapy in Sarcoidosis-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Vij, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether recent advances in pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy can be safely applied to sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH). Evidence for prostacyclin (PG) therapy in SAPH is limited. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of 46 patients with sarcoidosis, 26 of whom had SAPH. Thirteen received PG as monotherapy or in combination with oral vasodilators. RESULTS: Follow-up right-sided heart catheterization at a mean of 12.7 months revealed improved cardiac output, cardiac index, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Functional class and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels also improved in patients treated with PG. No significant change in oxygen requirement was seen with vasodilator therapy initiation. At 2 years, 15 patients with SAPH survived, including eight on PG, and at 5 years, seven survived, including five on PG. Survival was significantly reduced in patients with SAPH compared with patients who had sarcoidosis without pulmonary hypertension. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of PG therapy in SAPH is not associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients with severe SAPH showed significant hemodynamic and clinical improvement on long-term IV or subcutaneous PG therapy and had survival outcomes similar to patients with moderate SAPH on oral vasodilator therapy. PMID:26437815

  1. Metronidazole for bacterial vaginosis. A comparison of vaginal gel vs. oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; McGregor, J A; Hillier, S L; Eschenbach, D A; Kreutner, A K; Galask, R P; Martens, M

    2000-11-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel with oral metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Nonpregnant women with BV were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, investigator-blind treatment trial. Patients were randomly assigned to either 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel (5 g twice daily for five days) or oral metronidazole (500 mg twice daily for seven days). Follow-up visits occurred approximately two and five weeks after initiation of therapy. BV was clinically eliminated at the first follow-up visit in 83.7% (36/43, 95% CI 72.3-95.1%) of the intravaginal group and 85.1% (40/47, 95% CI 74.6-95.6%) of the oral group. At the final visit, BV was eliminated in 70.7% (29/41, 95% CI 56.3-85.1%) of the intravaginal group and 71.1% (32/45, 95% CI 57.4-84.8%) of the oral group. Significantly more patients in the oral treatment group (51.8%) reported gastrointestinal complaints as compared to the intravaginal treatment group (32.7%, P = .04). The efficacy of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel twice daily for five days in treating BV was similar to that of standard oral metronidazole treatment and was associated with fewer gastrointestinal complaints.

  2. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  3. Prospects in the Application of Photodynamic Therapy in Oral Cancer and Premalignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Rajan; Lee, Nathan V.; Liu, Kelly Y. P.; Poh, Catherine F.

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is a global health burden with significantly poor survival, especially when the diagnosis is at its late stage. Despite advances in current treatment modalities, there has been minimal improvement in survival rates over the last five decades. The development of local recurrence, regional failure, and the formation of second primary tumors accounts for this poor outcome. For survivors, cosmetic and functional compromises resulting from treatment are often devastating. These statistics underscore the need for novel approaches in the management of this deadly disease. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that involves administration of a light-sensitive drug, known as a photosensitizer, followed by light irradiation of an appropriate wavelength that corresponds to an absorbance band of the sensitizer. In the presence of tissue oxygen, cytotoxic free radicals that are produced cause direct tumor cell death, damage to the microvasculature, and induction of inflammatory reactions at the target sites. PDT offers a prospective new approach in controlling this disease at its various stages either as a stand-alone therapy for early lesions or as an adjuvant therapy for advanced cases. In this review, we aim to explore the applications of PDT in oral cancer therapy and to present an overview of the recent advances in PDT that can potentially reposition its utility for oral cancer treatment. PMID:27598202

  4. Laser therapy and sclerotherapy in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial hemangioma and vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crişan, Bogdan; BǎciuÅ£, Mihaela; BǎciuÅ£, Grigore; Crişan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Moldovan, Iuliu; Vǎcǎraş, Sergiu; Mitre, Ileana; Barbur, Ioan; Magdaş, Andreea; Dinu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Hemangioma and vascular malformations in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery is a pathology more often found in recent years in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the laser photocoagulation performed with a diode laser (Ga-Al-As) 980 nm wavelength in the treatment of vascular lesions which are located on the oral and maxillofacial areas, using color Doppler ultrasonography for evaluation of the results. We also made a comparison between laser therapy and sclerotherapy in order to establish treatment protocols and recommendations associated with this pathology. We conducted a controlled study on a group of 92 patients (38 male and 54 female patients, with an average age of 36 years) having low flow hemangioma and vascular malformations. Patients in this trial received one of the methods of treatment for vascular lesions such as hemangioma and vascular malformations: laser therapy or sclerotherapy. After laser therapy we have achieved a reduction in size of hemangioma and vascular malformations treated with such a procedure, and the aesthetic results were favorable. No reperfusion or recanalization of laser treated vascular lesions was observed after an average follow-up of 6 to 12 months. In case of sclerotherapy a reduction in the size of vascular lesions was also obtained. The 980 nm diode laser has been proved to be an effective tool in the treatment of hemangioma and vascular malformations in oral and maxillofacial area. Laser therapy in the treatment of vascular lesions was more effective than the sclerotherapy procedure.

  5. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care

  6. Sulphurous mineral water oral therapy: effects on erythrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Maria Cristina; Teodori, Laura; Accorsi, Augusto; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Campanella, Luigi; Baldoni, Francesco; Dachà, Marina

    2008-10-01

    The ingestion of water containing hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is common in spring sulphurous mineral water (SMW) therapy. We hypothesized that observed detrimental effects are related to the alteration of erythrocytes metabolism caused by H(2)S. To verify our hypothesis, we treated 20 healthy volunteers with SMW and evidenced an increase of methemoglobin concentration, an inhibition of both erythrocyte glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities. To investigate the mechanism of H(2)S effect on GAPDH activity, an in vitro study was performed by incubating both erythrocytes from 12 healthy volunteers and purified GAPDH with buffered [(35)S]-H(2)S labelled sulphurous water. The interaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H), was also investigated. The results indicate that a direct reaction between GAPDH and H(2)S does not occur and the observed decrease of GAPDH activity is to ascribe to the reaction between H(2)S and NAD(+)(H). This may lead to GAPDH inhibition by two ways, namely (i) cellular NAD(+)(H) reduced availability and (ii) catalytic site blockage. In conclusion, our results show that among the detrimental effects of SMW administration are erythrocyte GAPDH and G6PDH activity inhibition and increased methemoglobin concentration. A mechanism to explain the occurrence of these biochemical events is also proposed.

  7. Mandibular advancement oral appliance therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea: effect on awake calibre of the velopharynx.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C F; Love, L L; Peat, D; Fleetham, J A; Lowe, A A

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of action of oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea are poorly understood. Videoendoscopy of the upper airway was used during wakefulness to examine whether the changes in pharyngeal dimensions produced by a mandibular advancement oral appliance are related to the improvement in the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea. Fifteen patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea (median (range) apnoea index (AI) 4(0-38)/h, apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) 28(9-45)/h) underwent overnight polysomnography and imaging of the upper airway before and after insertion of the oral appliance. Images were obtained in the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and velopharynx at end tidal expiration during quiet nasal breathing in the supine position. The cross sectional area and diameters of the upper airway were measured using image processing software with an intraluminal catheter as a linear calibration. AI decreased to a median (range) value of 0 (0-6)/h (p<0.01) and AHI to 8 (1-28)/h (p<0.001) following insertion of the oral appliance. The median (95% confidence interval) cross sectional area of the upper airway increased by 18% (3 to 35) (p<0.02) in the hypopharynx and by 25% (11 to 69) (p<0.005) in the velopharynx, but not significantly in the oropharynx. Although in general the shape of the pharynx did not change following insertion of the oral appliance, the lateral diameter of the velopharynx increased to a greater extent than the anteroposterior diameter. Following insertion of the oral appliance the reduction in AHI was related to the increase in cross sectional area of the velopharynx (p = 0.01). A mandibular advancement oral appliance increases the cross sectional area of the upper airway during wakefulness, particularly in the velopharynx. Assuming this effect on upper airway calibre is not eliminated by sleep, mandibular advancement oral appliances may reduce the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea by maintaining patency of the velopharynx

  8. Role of oral rehydration therapy in controlling epidemic of cholera and watery diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kamalesh

    2003-06-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is basically oral administration of liquid containing various electrolytes in specific proportions to prevent and treat dehydration. This treatment facilitates safe and optimal absorption of water and essential electrolytes such as sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride in dehydrated patients. Successful ORT was experienced in cholera patients in Kolkata and Dhaka which was followed by the development of oral rehydration salt (ORS). This procedure can be safely implemented at home. ORT reduced mortality rate both in cholera and non-cholera watery diarrhoea. The various health authorities must support preparedness before pre-positioning of adequate stocks of ORS packets for emergency situations. Health workers should have been the knowledge to prepare ORS solutions.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Kreimann, E L; Itoiz, M E; Longhino, J; Blaumann, H; Calzetta, O; Schwint, A E

    2001-12-15

    We have proposed and validated the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) studies and shown that boronophenylalanine delivers potentially therapeutic 36.9 +/- 17.5 ppm boron to tumor tissue with tumor:normal tissue and tumor:blood ratios of 2.4:1 and 3.2:1, respectively. Here we report the first evidence of the usefulness of BNCT for the treatment of oral cancer in an experimental model. We assessed the response of hamster cheek pouch tumors, precancerous tissue, and normal oral tissue to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT using the thermalized epithermal beam of the RA-6 Reactor at the Bariloche Atomic Center. BNCT leads to complete remission by 15 days posttreatment in 78% of tumors and partial remission in an additional 13% of tumors with virtually no damage to normal tissue.

  10. Oral but not transdermal estrogen replacement therapy changes the composition of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vrablik, Michal; Fait, Tomas; Kovar, Jan; Poledne, Rudolf; Ceska, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The role of hormone replacement therapy and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in cardiovascular disease prevention has not been unambiguously defined yet. The metabolic effects of estrogens may vary depending upon the route of administration. Therefore, we compared the impact of unopposed oral or transdermal ERT on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in 41 hysterectomized women. This was an open-label, randomized, crossover study (with 2 treatments and 2 periods). The 41 hysterectomized women were randomized to receive oral or transdermal 17beta-estradiol in the first or second of two 12-week study periods. Plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels were assayed before and after each treatment using standard automated methods. Lipid content of lipoprotein subclasses was assessed by sequential ultracentrifugation. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) was calculated as log(triglyceride [TG]/high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol). The difference between the 2 forms of administration was tested using a linear mixed model. The change from baseline for each of the forms was tested using paired t test. Oral ERT resulted in a significant increase in HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels, whereas it significantly decreased total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increased TG concentrations. Transdermal ERT had no such effect. Oral ERT led to a significant TG enrichment of HDL (0.19 +/- 0.06 vs 0.27 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P < .001) and LDL particles (0.23 +/- 0.08 vs 0.26 +/- 0.10 mmol/L, P < .001) compared with baseline, whereas transdermal therapy did not have any effect on lipoprotein subclasses composition. The difference between the 2 treatments was statistically significant for HDL-TG and LDL-TG (0.27 +/- 0.07 vs 0.19 +/- 0.05 mmol/L, P < .001 and 0.26 +/- 0.10 vs 0.22 +/- 0.07 mmol/L, P< .001, respectively). The transdermal but not oral ERT significantly reduced the AIP compared with baseline (-0.17 +/- 0.26 vs -0.23 +/- 0.25, P = .023), making the

  11. Interaction of St John's wort with low-dose oral contraceptive therapy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pfrunder, Arabelle; Schiesser, Monika; Gerber, Simone; Haschke, Manuel; Bitzer, Johannes; Drewe, Juergen

    2003-01-01

    Aims Breakthrough bleeding or even unwanted pregnancies have been reported in women during concomitant therapy with oral contraceptives and St John's wort extract. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of St John's wort extract on oral contraceptive therapy with respect to ovarian activity, breakthrough bleeding episodes and the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol and 3-ketodesogestrel. Methods Eighteen healthy females were treated with a low-dose oral contraceptive (0.02 mg ethinyloestradiol, 0.150 mg desogestrel) alone (control cycle) or combined with 300 mg St John's wort extract given twice daily (cycle A) or three times daily (cycle B). Ovarian activity was assessed by measuring follicle maturation and serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations. The number of breakthrough bleeding episodes and the pharmacokinetics of ethinyloestradiol and 3-ketodesogestrel were assessed under steady-state conditions. Results During concomitant administration of low-dose oral contraceptive and St John's wort, there was no significant change in follicle maturation, serum oestradiol or progesterone concentrations when compared with oral contraceptive treatment alone. However, significantly more subjects reported intracyclic bleeding during cycles A (13/17 (77%), P < 0.015) and cycle B (15/17 (88%), P < 0.001) than with oral contraceptives alone (6/17 (35%)). The AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax of ethinyloestradiol remained unchanged during all study cycles, whereas the AUC(0,24 h) and Cmax of 3-ketodesogestrel decreased significantly from 31.2 ng ml−1 h to 17.7 ng ml−1 h (43.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI) −49.3, −38.5, P = 0.001) and from 3.6 ng ml −1 to 3.0 ng ml −1(17.8%; CI −29.9, −5.7, P = 0.005), respectively, during cycle A and by 41.7% (CI −47.9, −35.6; P = 0.001) and by 22.8% (CI −31.2, −13.3; P < 0.001) during cycle B respectively, compared with the control cycle. Conclusions There was no evidence of ovulation during low

  12. Effectiveness of a standardized patient education program on therapy-related side effects and unplanned therapy interruptions in oral cancer therapy: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Riese, C; Weiß, B; Borges, U; Beylich, A; Dengler, R; Hermes-Moll, K; Welslau, M; Baumann, W

    2017-06-09

    Oral agents for cancer treatment are increasingly prescribed due to their benefits. However, oral cancer medications are difficult to handle and have a considerable potential for side effects. This type of therapy requires a high level of self-management competence by the patient. A standardized patient education program provided by physicians and oncology nurses may positively influence the handling of oral agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized patient education program provided by specially trained oncology nurses on therapy management regarding side effects and unplanned therapy interruptions. One hundred sixty-five patients from 28 office-based oncology practices from all over Germany participated in this cluster-randomized controlled study. Patients of both intervention (n = 111) and standard care groups (n = 54) received the usual oncologist counseling; in addition, the patients from the intervention group (k = 17 practices) received an education from specially trained oncology nurses. The time of observation was 3 months per patient. The patients of the intervention group reported fewer side effects (skin rash, pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting). Patients in the standard care group interrupted the therapy more frequently without informing their oncologist, compared to the intervention group. Patients benefit from a standardized patient education program provided by specially trained oncology nurses. They tend to handle side effects and critical situations better.

  13. Initial antibiotic therapy for alligator bites: characterization of the oral flora of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Flandry, F; Lisecki, E J; Domingue, G J; Nichols, R L; Greer, D L; Haddad, R J

    1989-02-01

    An open thumb fracture resulting from an alligator bite became infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, Enterobacter agglomerans, and Citrobacter diversus. The patient was treated by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. We obtained cultures from the mouth of ten alligators to characterize their oral flora. Initial empiric therapy after alligator bites should be directed at gram-negative species, in particular, Aeromonas hydrophila and anaerobic species including Clostridium. Of the numerous fungi that were isolated, none has been reported to result in wound infection after alligator bites.

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Pretherapy interventions to modify salivary dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Fox, P.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a common side effect of cancer therapies. Salivary secretions are reduced rapidly after starting head and neck radiotherapy. Salivary gland dysfunction has also been linked to bone marrow transplantation and to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Salivary gland stimulation during radiation has been suggested as a means of reducing radiation damage. Results of an ongoing study investigating the effects of pilocarpine on radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction suggest that parotid function was preserved, but not submandibular/sublingual function. Also, patients receiving pilocarpine had less frequent oral complaints. Further research is necessary to develop means of preventing or alleviating the salivary side effects of cancer therapies. 37 references.

  15. A review of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy for dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deanna G; Wilkerson, Eric C; Love, W Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologic surgeons will increasingly encounter patients on novel oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications. We conducted a complete overview of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and side effects of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies along with dietary supplements with anticoagulant or antiplatelet properties. A PubMed search was completed for "aspirin," "warfarin," "clopidogrel," "dabigatran," "rivaroxaban," "apixaban," "prasugrel," and "ticagrelor." Review articles and publications emphasizing perioperative management of oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications were selected. An additional PubMed search was completed for "hemorrhage," "bleeding," and "thrombosis" in conjunction with "dermatology," "dermatologic surgery," and "cutaneous surgery." Aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin have shortfalls in dosing, monitoring, and efficacy. Several trials show superior efficacy with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, with equal or reduced risk of bleeding compared with warfarin. Prasugrel and ticagrelor may be associated with an increased bleeding risk. Many over-the-counter medications also have anticoagulant properties with associated bleeding risks that cannot be overlooked. There are few publications evaluating the novel oral anticoagulants' effects on outpatient surgical procedures. Novel anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs are revolutionizing therapy for cardiovascular diseases. As these medications become more prevalent, dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons must be mindful of the bleeding risk that will apply in our everyday practices. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Responsiveness to parenteral iron therapy in children with oral iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Akin, Mehmet; Atay, Enver; Oztekin, Osman; Karadeniz, Cem; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul; Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdogan, Firat

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous (IV) ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are used for treating Fe deficiency in children with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA). An optimal treatment has yet to be determined. There are relatively little publications on the responsiveness to IV iron therapy in children with IRIDA. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy given to 11 children, ranging in age from 2 to 13 years (mean 4.8 years), with iron-deficiency anemia who were unresponsive to oral iron therapy. The hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean) of the 11 children with IRIDA were 7.7 g/dL and 4.8 ng/mL at diagnosis. Both hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased to 9.5 g/dL, and 24 ng/mL, respectively, at 6 weeks after the first therapy. Although the level of hemoglobin was steady at 6 months after the first, and 6 weeks after the second therapy, the ferritin levels continued to increase up to 30 ng/mL and 47 ng/mL at 6 months after the first and 6 weeks after the second therapy, respectively. We recommend that IRIDA should be considered in patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause that is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. Our results suggest that IV iron therapy should be administered only once in cases of IRIDA. Continued administration of IV iron would be of no benefit to increase hemoglobin levels. On the contrary, ferritin levels may continue to increase resulting in untoward effects of hyperferritinemia.

  17. Patterns of Care in Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Erqi L; Chin, Alexander L; Lee, Nancy Y; Tsai, C Jillian

    2017-07-15

    To characterize the patterns of care and potential barriers to access to care for elderly patients with oral cavity cancer in the adjuvant setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base and identified patients with resected oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, who survived for ≥3 months after surgery. We used logistic regression models to assess the association between age (<70, 70-79, and ≥80 years) and the receipt of adjuvant therapy within 3 months of surgery. We additionally assessed the association between patient and tumor characteristics and the receipt of adjuvant therapy among those aged ≥70 years. A total of 25,829 patients were included in the study. Compared with those aged <70 years, older patients were more likely to have no neck dissection or have fewer lymph nodes dissected and were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy than younger patients. Among our cohort, 11,361 patients (44%) had pathologic T3-T4 disease or N2-N3 disease, and 4185 patients (16%) had extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margins. In multivariate analyses controlling for comorbidity and demographic characteristics, older age was independently associated with lower odds of receiving adjuvant radiation therapy in the subgroup with T3 or T4 disease or N2 or N3 disease and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the positive extracapsular nodal extension or positive surgical margin subgroup. Among elderly patients, both greater patient distance from reporting facility and older age were associated with lower odds of receiving both adjuvant radiation therapy (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.81) and chemoradiation therapy (odds ratio 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.79). In a national hospital-based cohort of patients with oral cavity cancer, elderly patients were less likely to receive adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation therapy. Greater patient distance from reporting

  18. [A case of possible retroperitoneal metastasis of breast cancer successfully treated with oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy after TC therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kimiyasu; Takeshita, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Morise, Masaki; Suzuki, Tetsutarou; Kishi, Shinya; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Akiko

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of possible retroperitoneal metastasis of breast cancer successfully treated with oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy after docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) therapy. A 57-year-old woman with a history of bilateral breast cancer showed an increase in tumor markers during treatment with oral anastrozole as postoperative adjuvant therapy 4 years after her second cancer surgery. After careful examination, the patient was diagnosed as having multiple bone metastases and her medication was changed to oral letrozole. After 3 months, the patient developed left back pain and was referred to our hospital. CT scanning showed an enhanced mass in the region from the left perirenal and posterior pararenal spaces to the left psoas major muscle and the anterior aspect of the left iliacus muscle, suggesting retroperitoneal metastasis. TC therapy was performed and, as a result, tumor markers decreased and the mass disappeared on CT imaging. After discontinuation of TC therapy, the tumor markers increased again, following which oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy were administered, and the tumor markers decreased. At the time of this writing, the patient is still undergoing therapy, and no recurrence has been observed. We concluded that oral S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy were useful in the present case and were associated with few adverse effects.

  19. Therapy after single oral agent failure: adding a second oral agent or an insulin mixture?

    PubMed

    Malone, James K; Beattie, Scott D; Campaigne, Barbara N; Johnson, Patricia A; Howard, Andrew S; Milicevic, Zvonko

    2003-12-01

    to compare the glycemic response to an insulin lispro mixture (25% insulin lispro and 75% NPL) twice daily plus metformin (Mix25+M) with glibenclamide plus metformin (G+M), in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with a single oral agent. 597 patients treated in a randomized, open-label, 16-week parallel study. Variables evaluated: hemoglobin A1C (A1C), patient symptoms, hypoglycemia rate (episodes/patient/30 days), and incidence (% patients experiencing > or =1 episode). For a subset of patients (N=120), fasting, 1-h, and 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (FPG, 1-h ppPG, 2-h ppPG) in response to a standardized test meal (STM) and self-monitored blood glucose (BG) profiles were measured. improved A1C at endpoint for both groups, and A1C changes from baseline to endpoint were not significantly different between treatments (Mix25+M, -1.87+/-1.35% vs. G+M, -1.98+/-1.28%; p=0.288). Among patients completing STM; endpoint 2-h ppPG was significantly lower with Mix25+M (9.05+/-3.32 mmol/l vs. 12.31+/-3.65 mmol/l; p<0.001), as was 2-h ppPG excursion (2-h ppPGex)(0.38+/-3.23 mmol/l vs. 2.88+/-1.98 mmol/l; p<0.001). Percentage of patients achieving postprandial BG targets (<10 mmol/l) at endpoint was significantly greater with Mix25+M (80% vs. 48%; p<0.001). Although, overall hypoglycemia rates were similar, percentage of patients experiencing and rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia was less with Mix25+M (1% vs. 5%; p<0.01, and 0.01 vs. 0.08 episodes/pt/30 d; p=0.007). Patients reported less polyuria with Mix25+M (p<0.001). in patients with type 2 diabetes failing on metformin or a sulfonylurea, Mix25+M provided similar overall glycemic control, lower ppPG, reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia, and fewer hyperglycemic symptoms compared to G+M.

  20. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  1. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity. PMID:26421283

  2. Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Oral Anticancer Therapies for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Lúcia; Abreu, Catarina; Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; Macedo, Daniela; Sousa, Ana Rita; Pulido, Catarina; Quintela, António; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is still a common and debilitating side effect despite recent advances in its prevention and treatment. The intrinsic emetogenicity of chemotherapy agents allowed grouping into four risk groups (high, moderate, low, and minimal risk of emetogenicity). The prevention of acute and delayed CINV for intravenous agents and one day regimens is well studied, although, there are few data about management of CINV induced by oral cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies, usually administered in extended regimens of daily oral use. Until now treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by oral antineoplastic agents remains largely empirical. The level of evidence of prophylactic antiemetics recommended for these agents is low. There are differences in the classification of emetogenic potential of oral antineoplastic agents between the international guidelines and different recommendations for prophylactic antiemetic regimens. Herein we review the evidence for antiemetic regimens for the most used oral antineoplastic agents for solid tumors and propose antiemetic regimens for high to moderate risk and low to minimal risk of emetogenicity.

  3. Treatment of Oral Candidiasis Using Photodithazine®- Mediated Photodynamic Therapy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    G. Basso, Fernanda; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the treatment of oral candidiasis in a murine model using Photodithazine® (PDZ). This model of oral candidiasis was developed to allow the monitoring of the infection and the establishment of the aPDT treatment. Six-week-old female mice were immunosuppressed and inoculated with C. albicans to induce oral candidiasis. PDZ-mediated aPDT and nystatin treatment were carried out for 5 consecutive days with one application per day. The macroscopic evaluation of oral lesions was performed. After each treatment, the tongue was swabbed to recover C. albicans cells. Viable colonies were quantified and the number of CFU/ml determined. The animals were sacrificed 24 hours and 7 days after treatment and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis and analysis of inflammatory cytokines expression (IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6) by RT-qPCR. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. PDZ-mediated aPDT was as effective as Nystatin (NYS group) in the inactivation of C. albicans, reducing 3 and 3.2 logs10 respectively, 24 h after treatment (p<0.05). Animals underwent PDZ-mediated aPDT showed complete remission of oral lesions, while animals treated with NYS presented partial remission of oral lesions in both periods assessed. Histological evaluation revealed mild inflammatory infiltrate in the groups treated with aPDT and NYS in both periods assessed. The aPDT induced the TNF-α expression when compared with the control (P-L-) (p<0.05), 24 h and 7 days after treatment. In summary, the murine model developed here was able to mimic the infection and PDZ-mediated aPDT was effective to treat mice with oral candidiasis. PMID:27253525

  4. The effect of low level laser therapy in different wavelengths in the treatment of oral mucositis—proposal for extra-oral implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, J. J. C.; Queiroga, A. S.; de Biase, R. C. C. G.; Leite, E. P.; Cabral Júnior, C. R.; Limeira Júnior, F. A.

    2009-09-01

    The oral mucositis is the most frequent acute oral complication resulting from antineoplastic treatment and may worsen the clinical condition of the patient and interfere with his/her quality of life. This study aimed to comparatively evaluate, from a clinical point of view, the effect of Laser Therapy λ660 nm (wavelength of the red Laser) and λ830 nm (wavelength of the infrared Laser), at extra-oral points, in remission of severity of oral mucositis and pain associated with it in pediatric oncological patients undergoing chemotherapy with the anticancer drug methotrexate, noting which of the two wavelength is the most appropriate to this new technique. The sample consisted of 13 patients placed at random in each group and subjected to sessions of Low Level Laser Therapy, at pre-determined extra-oral points for five consecutive days, starting at the beginning of the observation of mucositis injuries. It became possible to note that from the group of patients in the group of Laser λ830 nm ( n = 6; 46.15%), four ( n = 4; 66.67%) of these patients had remission of injuries to grade 0 (WHO), and as for pain, five patients ( n = 5; 83.33%) showed no painful symptoms for mucositis injuries. In the Laser λ660 nm group ( n = 7; 53.85%), only two patients ( n = 2; 28.57%) achieved a regression of lesions to grade 0 (WHO), while four patients ( n = 4; 57.14%) had no pain. So, the extra-oral application of Laser Therapy was effective in treating injuries of oral mucositis in the patients treated; and Laser Therapy in the infrared spectrum (λ830 nm) was more effective in the treatment of oral mucositis injuries compared to the red spectrum (λ660 nm), which can be explained by the greater power of penetration of infrared rays, acting in a more expressive way in deeper places.

  5. Suicide gene therapy using adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Kagami, Hideaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Fukuhara, Hirokazu; Tohnai, Iwai; Ueda, Minoru; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Recently, suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) administration was evaluated for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of suicide gene therapy using the replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell lines. To evaluate transduction efficiency, each cell line was transduced in vitro with an adenovirus vector containing the beta-galactosidase gene. By 24 hours after transduction, nearly 100% of the cells were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10, and from 30 to 10% at an MOI of 1. Next, each cell line was transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the HSVtk gene, and a subsequent administration of GCV for the assessment of suicide gene therapy. A subsequent administration of GCV resulted in complete tumor cell death. In addition, we conducted a morphological analysis of that cell death using video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast microscopy, and we observed that it included both apoptosis and necrosis after HSVtk gene and GCV treatment. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy induced remarkable cytotoxicity with a bystander effect in human oral squamous cell carcinoma thus suggesting an effective treatment strategy for that tumor.

  6. Oral nitrate therapy does not affect glucose metabolism in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Henstridge, Darren C; Duffy, Stephen J; Formosa, Melissa F; Ahimastos, Anna A; Thompson, Bruce R; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2009-11-01

    1. Previously, we demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) may be an important mediator of peripheral glucose disposal. The aim of the present study was to determine whether acute oral nitrate therapy improves glucose metabolism in healthy individuals. 2. Healthy men (n = 10), aged between 19 and 46 years, participated in a randomized cross-over placebo-controlled study. During Visit 1, participants received a dose-graded intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside (SNP; titrated from a dose of 0.5 microg/kg per min to a maximum of 2 microg/kg per min and delivered at a rate of 2 mL/min over 30 min). On Visits 2, 3 and 4, participants received oral extended-release isosorbide mononitrate (120 mg), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (160 mg) and placebo in a randomized Latin square design (one treatment per visit). The main outcome measures were plasma glucose and insulin levels and glucose tolerance determined by an oral glucose tolerance test following the SNP infusion and 3 h after nitrate/placebo administration. Exhaled NO, cGMP and pulmonary blood flow were also measured for 3 h after administration of nitrate/placebo and after SNP infusion. 3. None of the nitrate interventions influenced measures of glucose metabolism. Following SNP infusion, there was no change in plasma glucose (P = 0.42) or insulin (P = 0.25) levels, and the response to a glucose load did not different from baseline (P = 0.46). Similarly, neither of the oral nitrates altered plasma glucose (P = 0.24) or insulin levels (P = 0.90) or glucose tolerance (P = 0.56) compared with placebo. 4. In conclusion, these results indicate that acute oral nitrate therapy does not influence glucose metabolism. Studies using NO donors in a chronic setting are required to clarify the role of NO in mediating peripheral glucose uptake.

  7. Experimental study of antiangiogenic gene therapy targeting VEGF in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasuo; Ueno, Hikaru; Katagiri, Masataka; Oneyama, Takahiro; Shimomura, Kana; Sakurai, Satoshi; Mataga, Izumi; Moride, Michiko; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2010-02-01

    It is well known that tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in local growth and metastasis of oral cancer; therefore, inhibiting angiogenesis is considered to be effective for treating oral cancer. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of systemically available antiangiogenic gene therapy targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is one of the most important angiogenesis accelerators. We administered a soluble form of VEGF receptor-expressing gene incorporated into adenovirus (AdVEGF-ExR) intraperitoneally to nude mice to which oral cancer cell lines (SAS, HSC-3, and Ca9-22) had been transplanted subcutaneously in vivo to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor proliferation. Then, we measured tumor volumes over time, and tumors were enucleated and examined histopathologically and immunohistologically at 28 days after AdVEGF-ExR administration. Compared to the controls to which we administered AdLacZ or saline, significant antiproliferative effects were observed (P < 0.05) in the AdVEGF-ExR administration group, and extensive tumor necrosis was found histopathologically. Immunohistochemical analysis with CD34 (NU-4A1) revealed tumor angiogenesis was suppressed significantly (P < 0.05), and that with ssDNA revealed apoptosis induction was significantly high (P < 0.05) in the AdVEGF-ExR group. However, analysis with Ki-67 (MIB-1) revealed tumor proliferative capacity was not significantly different between the groups. Consequently, we consider that AdVEGF-ExR administration achieved tumor growth suppression by inhibiting angiogenesis and inducing apoptosis, but not by inhibiting the proliferative capacity of tumor cells. Neither topical administration of a soluble form of VEGF receptor (sVEGFR) to the tumor nor a megadose was needed to achieve this inhibition effect. These results suggest gene therapy via sVEGFR would be an effective oral cancer therapy and benefit future clinical applications.

  8. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  9. Implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy: a community-based participatory project.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Maya; Wüthrich, Erika; Stauffer, Yvonne; Herczeg, Franziska; Fattinger, Karin; Hirter, Kathrin; Papalini, Marianne; Herrmann, Luzia

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at developing and implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy. The number of persons with chronic diseases who live at home is increasing. They have to manage multiple diseases and complex treatments. One such treatment is oral anticoagulation therapy, a high risk variable dose medication. Adherence to oral anticoagulation therapy is jeopardised by limited information about the medications, their risk and complications, the impact of individual daily routine and the limited inclusion of family members in education. Hence, improved and tailored education is essential for patients and families to manage oral anticoagulation therapy at home. A community-based participatory research design combined with the Precede-Proceed model was used including a systematic literature review, posteducation analysis, an online nurse survey, a documentation analysis and patient/family interviews. The study was conducted between April 2010-December 2012 at a department of general internal medicine in a teaching hospital in Switzerland. Participants were the department's nursing and medical professionals including the patients and their families. The evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy emerged comprising a learning assessment, teaching units, clarification of responsibilities of nurse professionals and documentation guidelines. The inclusion of the whole department has contributed to the development and implementation of this evidence-based patient family education on oral anticoagulation therapy, which encompasses local characteristics and patient preferences. This education is now being used throughout the department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment.

  11. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of oral versus injectable disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Longbrake, Erin E; Cross, Anne H; Salter, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of oral disease-modifying therapies fundamentally changed the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, impressions of their relative efficacy and tolerability are primarily founded on expert opinion. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether oral disease-modifying therapies were better tolerated and/or more effective for controlling multiple sclerosis compared to injectable therapies in clinical practice. Methods Single-center, retrospective cohort study. 480 patients initiated oral (fingolimod, teriflunomide, or dimethyl fumarate) or injectable therapy between March 2013–March 2015 and follow-up data was collected for 5–31 months. Outcomes included on-drug multiple sclerosis activity and drug discontinuation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to control for baseline differences and sensitivity analyses using propensity-weighted matching were performed. Results A higher proportion of teriflunomide-treated patients experienced multiple sclerosis activity compared to those treated with injectable therapies (p = 0.0053) in the adjusted model. Breakthrough multiple sclerosis was equally prevalent among fingolimod and dimethyl fumarate-treated compared to injectable therapy-treated patients. Of patients initiating a disease-modifying therapy, 32–46% discontinued or switched treatments during the study. After controlling for baseline differences, discontinuation rates were comparable across treatment groups. Conclusions In this cohort, oral and injectable disease-modifying therapies were equally well tolerated, but teriflunomide appeared less effective for controlling multiple sclerosis activity than injectable therapies. Further study is needed. PMID:28280599

  13. Insulin-based versus triple oral therapy for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: which is better?

    PubMed

    Lingvay, Ildiko; Legendre, Jaime L; Kaloyanova, Polina F; Zhang, Song; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip

    2009-10-01

    Early use of insulin after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is met with resistance because of associated weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fear of decreased compliance and quality of life (QoL). In treatment-naive patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, insulin and metformin were initiated for a 3-month lead-in period, then patients were randomly assigned to insulin and metformin (insulin group) or metformin, pioglitazone, and glyburide (oral group) for 36 months. Hypoglycemic events, compliance, A1C, weight, QoL, and treatment satisfaction were assessed. Of 29 patients randomly assigned into each group, 83% (insulin group) and 72% (oral group) completed this 3-year study. At study completion, A1C was 6.1 +/- 0.6% (insulin group) versus 6.0 +/- 0.8% (oral group). Weight increased similarly in both groups (P = 0.09) by 4.47 kg (95% CI 0.89-8.04 kg) (insulin group) and 7.15 kg (95% CI 4.18-10.13 kg) (orals group). Hypoglycemic events did not differ between groups (mild 0.51 event/person-month in the insulin group vs. 0.68 event/person-month in the orals group, P = 0.18 and severe 0.04 event/person-year in the insulin group vs. 0.09 event/person-year in the orals group, P = 0.53). Compliance, QoL, and treatment satisfaction were similar between groups, with 100% of patients randomly assigned to insulin willing to continue such treatment. When compared with a clinically equivalent treatment regimen, insulin-based therapy is effective and did not cause greater weight gain or hypoglycemia nor decrease compliance, treatment satisfaction, or QoL. Insulin is safe, well-accepted, and effective for ongoing treatment of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  14. Endometrial Hyperplasia Risk in Relation to Recent Use of Oral Contraceptives and Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Epplein, Meira; Reed, Susan D.; Voigt, Lynda F.; Newton, Katherine M.; Holt, Victoria L.; Weiss, Noel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Examine the relationship between recent use of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) risk. Methods Cases comprised women diagnosed with complex EH (n=289) or atypical EH (n=173) between 1985-2003. One age-matched control was selected for each case; excluded were women with a prior hysterectomy or diagnosis of EH or endometrial cancer. Hormone use in the six months prior to the date of the case’s first symptoms was ascertained using a pharmacy database and medical records. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results Three (1.1%) cases had used oral contraceptives, compared to sixteen (6.0%) controls (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.0–0.6). Fifty-one (16.8%) cases had taken estrogen-only hormone therapy, in contrast to two (0.7%) controls (OR = 37.6, 95% CI: 8.8–160.0). The risk of EH among estrogen plus progestin hormone users did not differ from that of non-users (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4–1.1). Conclusions This study suggests that previous findings of the association of estrogen-only hormone therapy with increased risk of EH and the lack of an association between estrogen plus progestin hormone therapy and EH risk are likely to apply to both complex EH and atypical EH. Further examination of the association between oral contraceptives and EH, with greater numbers of OC users, is warranted. PMID:19064186

  15. The efficacy of sequential therapy using pazufloxacin followed by oral fluoroquinolones for treatment of pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Muratani, Tetsuro; Akasaka, Soichiro; Yamada, Yoji; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of sequential therapy of pazufloxacin (PZFX), which is a parenteral fluoroquinolone, followed by oral fluoroquinolones [tosufloxacin tosilate (TFLX) or levofloxacin (LVFX)] for treatment of pyelonephritis, was evaluated. Patients with pyelonephritis who had fever (≥37.5 °C), pyuria (≥10 white blood cells/high-power field), and bacteriuria (≥10(4) colony-forming units/ml) were eligible for this study. PZFX (500 mg) was given intravenously twice a day for at least 3 days. If the patients were clinically improved, TFLX (150 mg) or LVFX (100 mg) was then administered orally three times a day for at least 5 days. Patients underwent clinical and microbiological evaluation at 5-9 days after final drug administration. Clinical and microbiological efficacy could be assessed in 21 of 25 cases enrolled. Both clinical and microbiological efficacy rates were 81.0 % (17/21 cases). In the effective cases, the mean administration time was 4.2 days for PZFX and 6.0 days for oral fluoroquinolones. The mean time to defervescence was 3.4 days for the effective cases. In the four treatment failure cases, three quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and a quinolone-resistant Enterococcus faecalis were isolated. This sequential therapy seemed to be clinically effective in the treatment of pyelonephritis; however, the prevalence of quinolone-resistant E. coli should be taken into account.

  16. Intravenous Iron Sucrose for Children with Iron Deficiency Failing to Respond to Oral Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crary, Shelley E.; Hall, Katherine; Buchanan, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Background For decades parenteral iron has been used in patients with iron deficiency unresponsive to oral iron therapy and in hemodialysis-dependent patients receiving erythropoietin. Newer intravenous (IV) iron formulations such as iron sucrose have replaced high molecular weight iron dextran in dialysis patients; however, the use of parenteral iron in children without renal disease has not been well defined. Procedure Pharmacy records were reviewed on children (≤ 18 yrs of age) who received IV iron sucrose at Children's Medical Center Dallas between January 1, 2004 and June 30, 2009. Patients who received iron sucrose for chronic renal disease were excluded from analysis. Results Thirty-eight children received iron sucrose for non-renal indications, 13 with iron deficiency refractory to oral iron therapy, 13 with iron malabsorption or dependence on parenteral nutrition, 7 for chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, and 5 for miscellaneous indications. Among these 38 children, who received a total of 510 doses of IV iron sucrose, there were only 6 adverse reactions. Patients in all categories had a good response to the iron sucrose, with a median hemoglobin rise of 1.9 – 3.1 g/dl depending on the indication. Conclusions Parenteral iron is a safe and effective means to treat iron deficiency in children who cannot receive or do not respond to oral iron due to intolerance, poor adherence or iron malabsorption. PMID:21298748

  17. New directions in type 2 diabetes mellitus: an update of current oral antidiabetic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. L.; Brillon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviewed the relevant literature including published clinical trials and reviews on currently available oral hypoglycemic agents. Results showed that the benefits of glycemic control have been established through multiple clinical trials. Long-term control of blood glucose levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients will decrease the incidence and prolong the time until progression of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Our increased understanding of the pathophysiology behind type 2 diabetes has led to the development of many new agents that are aimed at treating the underlying insulin resistance and relative insulinopenia. The sulfonylureas as a group have been used for many years and act by stimulating insulin secretion. They are useful alone or as combination therapy with insulin or another oral hypoglycemic agent. The biguanides act by decreasing hepatic glucose production and by increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors act nonsystemically by blocking the metabolism of digested polysaccharides and therefore lowering the amount of carbohydrate absorbed in a meal. Benzoic acid derivatives act in a manner similar to that of sulfonylureas by enhancing pancreatic insulin production. They offer a shorter duration of action, lowering the risk of hypoglycemia. The thiazolidinediones increase peripheral insulin sensitivity and are effective as both monotherapy and combination therapy. Oral hypoglycemic agents, when properly administered, are very effective in controlling type 2 diabetes and preventing long-term complications. PMID:10643211

  18. Currently approved and emerging oral therapies in multiple sclerosis: An update for the ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Christopher; Bhatti, M Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Although our understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) has grown substantially, its cause remains unknown. Nonetheless, in the past 3 decades, there have been tremendous advancements in the development of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs). In July 1993, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the first disease-modifying drug-interferon β- and there are currently 13 medications approved for use in relapsing MS. All the early medications are administered either as a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, and despite the clinical efficacy and safety of these medications, many patients were hampered by the inconvenience of injections and injection-related side effects. In September 2010, the first oral DMD-fingolimod-was approved. Since then, 2 additional oral DMDs (teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate) have been approved, and several other oral medications are being evaluated in extensive MS development programs. Because of frequent ocular involvement, ophthalmologists are often involved in the care of MS patients and therefore need to be aware of the current treatment regimens prescribed by neurologists, some of which can have significant ophthalmic adverse events. We update the current advancements in the treatment of MS and discuss the published clinical data on the efficacy and safety of the currently approved and emerging oral therapies in MS.

  19. Clinical guidelines for oral appliance therapy in the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, J; Balasubramaniam, R; Darendeliler, M A; Cheng, A T; Waters, K; Sullivan, C E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide guidelines for the use of oral appliances (OAs) for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in Australia. A review of the scientific literature up to June 2012 regarding the clinical use of OAs in the treatment of snoring and OSA was undertaken by a dental and medical sleep specialists team consisting of respiratory sleep physicians, an otolaryngologist, orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and an oral medicine specialist. The recommendations are based on the most recent evidence from studies obtained from peer reviewed literature. Oral appliances can be an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of snoring and OSA across a broad range of disease severity. However, the response to therapy is variable. While a significant proportion of subjects have a near complete control of the apnoea and snoring when using an OA, a significant proportion do not respond, and others show a partial response. Measurements of baseline and treatment success should ideally be undertaken. A coordinated team approach between medical practitioner and dentist should be fostered to enhance treatment outcomes. Ongoing patient follow-up to monitor treatment efficacy, OA comfort and side effects are cardinal to long-term treatment success and OA compliance. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy and postpartum: pathophysiology and effect of oral versus intravenous iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khalafallah, Alhossain A; Dennis, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization's global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.

  1. Combination oral antiangiogenic therapy with thalidomide and sulindac inhibits tumour growth in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, H M W; Panigrahy, D; Yuan, J; D'Amato, R J

    1999-01-01

    Neovascularization facilitates tumour growth and metastasis formation. In our laboratory, we attempt to identify clinically available oral efficacious drugs for antiangiogenic activity. Here, we report which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can inhibit corneal neovascularization, induced by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This antiangiogenic activity may contribute to the known effects of NSAIDs on gastric ulcers, polyps and tumours. We found that sulindac was one of the most potent antiangiogenic NSAIDs, inhibiting bFGF-induced neovascularization by 50% and VEGF-induced neovascularization by 55%. Previously, we reported that thalidomide inhibited growth factor-induced corneal neovascularization. When we combined sulindac with thalidomide, we found a significantly increased inhibition of bFGF- or VEGF-induced corneal neovascularization (by 63% or 74% respectively) compared with either agent alone (P< 0.01). Because of this strong antiangiogenic effect, we tested the oral combination of thalidomide and sulindac for its ability to inhibit the growth of V2 carcinoma in rabbits. Oral treatment of thalidomide or sulindac alone inhibited tumour growth by 55% and 35% respectively. When given together, the growth of the V2 carcinoma was inhibited by 75%. Our results indicated that oral antiangiogenic combination therapy with thalidomide and sulindac may be a useful non-toxic treatment for cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408702

  2. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  3. Determinants of use rate of oral rehydration therapy for management of childhood diarrhoea in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Atkinson, D; Underwood, P

    2000-09-01

    In rural Bangladesh, mothers were interviewed to identify factors that determine the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for management of diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. The point prevalence of diarrhoea among 1,600 children was 11.6%, with 46% having acute watery diarrhoea. The overall ORT-use rate was 29%; only 17% of the cases used it adequately. Common reasons for not using ORS included misperception about diarrhoea and age of patients. Other reasons included incorrect assessments, severity, and difficulties with the administration of oral rehydration solutions. Promotion of ORT can be effected by improving the level of understanding of mothers with regard to assessment of severity, early initiation of treatment regardless of age, sex, type of diarrhoea, breast-feeding, and nutrition status.

  4. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  5. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco; Abenavoli, Fabio M; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Alessio D; Scacco, Salvatore; Papa, Francesco; Inchingolo, Angelo M; Dipalma, Gianna

    2011-07-19

    Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients.

  6. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Results Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. Conclusions We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients. PMID:21771331

  7. Oral anticoagulation to reduce risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased incidence and severity of strokes. The burden of AF-related stroke is expected to increase in parallel with the aging of the population. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin has been the pharmacologic standard for stroke risk reduction in patients with AF. When used with close attention to dosing and monitoring, warfarin is effective prophylactic therapy against thromboembolic stroke. However, it is underused by physicians, in part because of the known risks of adverse events with warfarin. Consequently, many patients with AF live with an avoidably elevated risk of stroke. New options, ie, oral anticoagulants with novel mechanisms of action, have recently been approved to reduce the risk of stroke in AF, and others are in development. These newer agents may address some of the complexities of warfarin use while providing similar or better efficacy and safety.

  8. INFLUENCE OF OZONE THERAPY ON ORAL TISSUE IN MODELING OF CHRONIC RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS.

    PubMed

    Kovach, I; Kravchenko, L; Khotimska, Yu; Nazaryan, R; Gargin, V

    2017-03-01

    Chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis (CRAS) belongs to the group of chronic, inflammatory, ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ozone on the morphofunctional peculiarities of the soft tissues in modeling chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. We performed experimental investigation for study of the morpho-functional state of tissues of the oral mucosa in CRAS with using of previously proposed and widely used modeling scheme with ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide. Two groups of animals were formed (Dutch rabbits, males, aging three-month, weighting 2-2.4 kg). Group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was our comparison group. Other group of 8 animals with obtained mucosal changes was treated by ozone therapy. Histological investigation has been performed. Microscopical examination of tissue had shown that ozone therapy reduces inflammation and edema and is useful in wound healing in soft tissue as disappearance of necrobiotic processes, epithelialization of aphthous defect, growth of akantotic bands, pronounced reducing of inflammatory cells and changing of cellular ratio (with of neutrophils part from 38.30±2.46% to 6.34±0.63%, eosinophils from 5.49±0.23% to 2.87±0.05%), restoration of the cellular layers of the epithelium, moderately pronounced sclerosis of the papillary layer of the lamina propria. Described results allow to conclude that correction of tissual changes in chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis could be obtained with ozone therapy using.

  9. Surviving with Lung Cancer: Medication-Taking and Oral Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    WICKERSHAM, Karen E.; HAPP, Mary Beth; BENDER, Catherine M.; ENGBERG, Sandra J.; TARHINI, Ahmad; ERLEN, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a “window” into participants’ process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs. PMID:24702721

  10. Oral antiplatelet therapy in diabetes mellitus and the role of prasugrel: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillegass, William B; Brott, Brigitta C; Dobbs, James C; Papapietro, Silvio E; Misra, Vijay K; Zoghbi, Gilbert J

    2011-01-01

    Diabetics have a prothrombotic state that includes increased platelet reactivity. This contributes to the less favorable clinical outcomes observed in diabetics experiencing acute coronary syndromes as well as stable coronary artery disease. Many diabetics are relatively resistant to or have insufficient response to several antithrombotic agents. In the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention, hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel is particularly common among diabetics. Several strategies have been examined to further enhance the benefits of oral antiplatelet therapy in diabetics. These include increasing the dose of clopidogrel, triple antiplatelet therapy with cilostazol, and new agents such as prasugrel. The large TRITON TIMI 38 randomized trial compared clopidogrel to prasugrel in the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes. The diabetic subgroup (n = 3146) experienced considerable incremental benefit with a 4.8% reduction in cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke at 15-month follow-up with prasugrel treatment. Among diabetics on insulin this combined endpoint was reduced by 7.9% at 15 months. Major bleeding was not increased in the diabetic subgroup. This confirms the general hypothesis that more potent oral antiplatelet therapy can partially overcome the prothrombotic milieu and safely improve important clinical outcomes in diabetics. PMID:21822392

  11. From Therapy to Instruction: The Effect of Systemic Strategies on the Oral Performance of Foreign Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Solarte, Ana Clara; Sánchez Solarte, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a group intervention based on strategies derived from the systemic therapy model--brief strategic therapy. These strategies aimed at decreasing the anxiety levels commonly found in oral performance tasks related to L2 learning. Thirteen students from different semesters who belonged to two foreign language…

  12. Comparison of Low-Level Laser Therapy versus Ozone Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Erisen, Merve

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment options for oral lichen planus (OLP) are numerous and include topical and systemic agents. Intralesional and systemic corticosteroids are used; however, the therapeutic results are often disappointing. Objective To compare the influence of ozone, laser, and topical corticosteroid therapies in the treatment of OLP. Methods One hundred twenty adult patients with ≤3 cm atrophic-erosive biopsy-proven OLPs in the tongue or buccal mucosa were recruited into the study. They were randomly assigned, by preoperative envelope drawing, to be treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT group), ozone therapy (ozonated group), and topical corticosteroid therapy (positive control group). A placebo treatment containing base ointment without the active corticosteroid component was administered to patients in the negative control group. Response rate scores were determined on the basis of changes in the appearance score and pain score of the lesions between baseline and after each treatment. Results The study subjects consisted of 56 male and 64 female OLP patients with a combined mean age of 42.6±8.3 years (range, 28~55 years). No statistically significant difference was detected in clinical severity among the groups. The sign scores decreased in almost all scoring groups; however, statistically significant improvement was found in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Symptom improvement was achieved after treatment with LLLT, ozone, and corticosteroid (p<0.05). The efficacy indices were significantly higher in the ozonated and corticosteroid-treated groups. Conclusion Ozone and corticosteroid therapies were more effective than 808-nm LLLT in the treatment of OLP. PMID:26512161

  13. [Circulating immune complexes and complement fragment iC3b in chronic polyarthritis during 12 months therapy with oral enzymes in comparison with oral gold].

    PubMed

    Kullich, W; Schwann, H

    1992-01-01

    In the course of a double-blind randomized study lasting 1 year 19 patients suffering from ensured rheumatoid arthritis (ARA criteria) were treated with oral hydrolytic enzymes or oral gold salts. The effects of these therapies were examined in regard to changes in serum concentrations of circulating immune complexes (CIC) and the complement component iC3b. After 12 months treatment with oral enzymes we determined a therapeutically wanted significant decrease of CIC whereas CIC increased up to 6 months. The best but not significant result under therapy with oral gold salts concerning CIC was a decrease in 6 out of 9 patients after 9 months. The complement component iC3b diminished with either therapy during the first 6 months and increased afterwards. As well as the reduction of circulating immune complexes, the intensified inactivation of C3b into iC3b during the second half-year with both treatments indicates that there might be a slight improvement of the pathologically changed immunoreactions after 6 months only. Concerning the examined laboratory parameters, no significant difference was found between both therapies.

  14. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered. PMID:25639592

  15. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-03-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered.

  16. Prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy in management protocols of patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Bejarano, Elena-Beatriz; Serrera-Figallo, María-Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Corrales, Aida; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) linked to bisphosphonate treatment has specific characteristics that render its therapeutic management challenging for clinicians. Poor response to standard treatment makes it essential to take special precautions when treating this type of disease; therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy have been proposed as effective and helpful tools in these situations. Objectives This article seeks to assess published evidence in order to evaluate the different protocols used for antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy in the general context of patients treated with bisphosphonates. Material and Methods A literature review of the last 10 years was carried out in PubMed using the following keywords: “antibiotic prophylaxis and osteonecrosis,” “bisphosphonates AND osteonecrosis AND dental management,” “bisphosphonate AND osteonecrosis AND antibiotic prophylaxis AND oral surgery.” A total of 188 articles were obtained, of which 18 were ultimately selected. Results and Discussion In patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates without chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, antibiotic prophylaxis prior to oral surgery is an important tool to avoid osteonecrosis and promote healing of the affected area. If the patient previously exhibited chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis after tooth extraction, antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent recurrent osteonecrosis and promote healing of the extraction site. If chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis is already present, antibiotic therapy is a vital part of conservative management to reduce the symptomatology of MRONJ and keep it from worsening. Finally, a lack of clinical data and randomized controlled trials makes it difficult to choose the most appropriate protocol for the various clinical situations studied. Key words:Bisphosphonates, antibiotic prophylaxis, maxillary osteonecrosis, antibiotic treatment. PMID

  17. Comparison of oral and intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Aydin; Kahramaner, Zelal; Cosar, Hese; Turkoglu, Ebru; Kanik, Ali; Sutcuoglu, Sumer; Ozer, Esra Arun

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and complications of oral and intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration. A total of 75 term and near-term (>35 weeks) neonates with hypernatremic dehydration (Na ≥ 150 mmol/L) were included in this retrospective study. The patients were divided into two groups according to therapy approach for rehydration (breast milk-oral formula and intravenous fluid). The decline in sodium concentration (<0.5 mmol/L/h was regarded as safe drop) and complications were analyzed. The mean gestational age, birth weight and age at admission were 38.9 ± 1.4(36-42) weeks, 3341 ± 504 (2500-4500) gram and 4.3 ± 2.6 (1-17) day, respectively. Fever (61.8%) and jaundice (39.4%) were the most common presenting signs. Forty-four (58.6%) of the infants were treated with breast milk and/or oral formula (group 1) and 31 (41.4%) of the infants were treated with IV fluid (group 2). In group 1 and group 2, respectively, mean % weight loss, 5 and 7.5; median serum sodium at admission, 153 and 152 mmol/L; median change in sodium at 12 hours, 7 and 11 mmol/L; and median change in sodium at 24 hours, 10 and 15 mmol/L. The decline in sodium concentration was more safely in group 1 than group 2 at both 12 and 24 hours of rehydration. One patient had convulsion associated with cerebral edema in group 2. Otherwise no complication was observed in both groups. Enteral route for fluid replacement may be safe and effective and may be an alternative to intravenous fluid therapy in newborns with hypernatremic dehydration when clinical situation is stable.

  18. Adherence and discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Borges, Anna Paula de Sá; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira

    2014-02-01

    Oral treatment in women with breast cancer has been increasingly used. However, a potentially negative side of oral medication is poor patient adherence and/or discontinuation, which reduces the treatment effectiveness, accelerating progression of the disease and reducing the patient survival rate. To compare the rates of adherence and/or discontinuation and the methodologies used to assess these outcomes. It was conducted an integrative review of original articles published from 2000 to 2012, in which their primary outcome was to quantify medication adherence and/or discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Original studies were searched in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase and SciELO databases. The Medical Subject Heading was used to define descriptors. The descriptor "breast neoplasms" was used in all combinations. Each of the descriptors "medication adherence" and "patient compliance" were combined with each of the following descriptors "tamoxifen", "aromatase inhibitors", "selective estrogen receptor modulators", or the terms "letrozole", "anastrozole", and "exemestane". Twenty-four original articles were included. Our study showed a wide range of adherence and discontinuation rates, ranging from 45-95.7 and 12-73 %, respectively. Regarding the methodological development of the selected articles, a high prevalence (87.5 %) of prospective and/or retrospective longitudinal studies was found. In addition, there was a high prevalence of studies using a database (70.8 %). Among some of the studies, it was shown that patient adherence to hormonal therapy gradually reduces, while discontinuation increases during the treatment. It was observed a great diversity among rates of adherence and/or discontinuation of hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may be due to a lack of methodology standardization. Therefore, adequate and validated methods to ensure reliability of the results and allow comparison in the

  19. Safety and efficacy of bone wax in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Krasny, Marta; Krasny, Kornel; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions, apart from neoplastic diseases, remain the major cause of death in developed countries; therefore, the number of patients receiving oral anticoagulants is constantly increasing. Anticoagulant therapy considerably reduced mortality in patients with history of myocardial infarction among others. Although many interventions may be performed without withdrawal of the anticoagulant and tooth extraction was qualified as a procedure of low hemorrhage risk, a majority of dentists refer the patient to a cardiologist several days before the elective tooth extraction to withdraw anticoagulants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bone wax used to stop bleeding after dental procedures in a group of patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy and find an answer to a question, whether it is justified to temporarily withdraw anticoagulants for this type of procedures. The study involved 176 patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy undergoing tooth extraction (154 subjects) or surgical extraction of a retained tooth (48 subjects). After the procedure, in each case the alveolus was filled with bone wax to stop bleeding. In all patients involved in the study bleeding from the alveolus was successfully stopped during the procedure. None of the subjects reported increased bleeding from the operational site after coming back home. Bone wax is a good, efficient, and safe material to block bleeding from the alveolus following tooth extractions, also in patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy. The study demonstrated that withdrawal or adjustment of anticoagulant therapy is not necessary before an elective tooth extraction.

  20. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  1. Topical tacrolimus and periodontal therapy in the management of a case of oral chronic GVHD characterized by specific gingival localization.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  2. Topical Tacrolimus and Periodontal Therapy in the Management of a Case of Oral Chronic GVHD Characterized by Specific Gingival Localization

    PubMed Central

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement. PMID:24639902

  3. Lightpipe device for delivery of uniform illumination for photodynamic therapy of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and efficient lightpipe device to deliver light to the human oral cavity for photodynamic therapy was designed and fabricated, having dimensions 6.8 mm × 6.8 mm × 46 mm. An average irradiance of 76 mW/cm2 with an average deviation of 5% was measured on a square 25 mm2 treatment field for an input power of 100 mW. The device limits irradiation of healthy tissue and offers potential for improvement over the current treatment procedure, which requires shielding of the whole cavity to avoid damage to healthy tissue. PMID:21629308

  4. Mineral derivatives in alleviating oral mucositis during cancer therapy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Oral mucositis (mouth ulcers) is a cancer therapy side effect. Costly treatment interventions are often neglected in favor of cost-effective agents. This review assessed the general efficacy of mineral derivatives (a cost-effective agent) in alleviating oral mucositis (OM) during cancer therapy compared to the standard care, or placebo—including a decision tree to aide healthcare workers. Data Sources. Electronic searches of MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CANCERLIT via PubMed, and CINAHL via EBSCO (year 2000 to 11 September 2014) were undertaken for randomised controlled trials. A meta-search strategy extracted content from aggregate online databases. Review Methods. Randomized controlled trials were assessed (participants, intervention, outcome, results, and risk of bias) for inclusion. The author abstracted binary and continuous data synthesised to Hedges’ g in a random effects model. The primary outcome measures were severity (incidence of peak oral mucositis, duration of oral mucositis, and time to onset); secondary outcome measures were the incidence of pain, and analgesic use. Serum mineral levels, total parenteral nutrition, and adverse events were discussed. The decision tree was mapped using sensitivity, specificity, pre-test and post-test Bayesian probability. Results. 1027 citations were identified and 16 studies were included (n = 1120; mean age 49 years). Cancer therapies consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Outcome mineral derivatives were zinc (n = 549), calcium phosphate (n = 227), povidone-iodine (n = 228), or selenium (n = 116). Severity was measured across variable OM grading systems: In 13 studies, individuals in treatment groups (n = 958) experienced peak OM less than controls (g = −0.47, 95% CI −0.7 to −0.2, p = 0.0006); time to OM onset was significantly delayed in treatment than controls (g = −0.51, 95% CI−0.8 to −0.2, p = 0.0002; five studies

  5. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    PubMed

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  6. The effect of magnesium oral therapy on spasticity in a patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rossier, P; van Erven, S; Wade, D T

    2000-11-01

    The effects of magnesium glycerophosphate oral therapy on spasticity was studied in a 35-year-old woman with severe spastic paraplegia resulting from multiple sclerosis (MS). We found a significant improvement in the spasticity after only 1 week from the onset of the treatment on the modified Ashworth scale, an improvement in the range of motion and in the measures of angles at resting position in lower limbs. No side-effects were reported and there was no weakness in the arms during the treatment.

  7. Use of Orally Disintegrating Olanzapine During Electroconvulsive Therapy for Prevention of Postictal Agitation.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Adriana P; Janjua, A Umair; Tang, Yilang; Syre, Sharyn R; Job, Gregory; McDonald, William M

    2016-11-01

    A major medical problem for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the occurrence of postictal agitation (PIA). This phenomenon is associated with confusion and disorientation that can have severe clinical implications for the safety of the patient and health care professionals. Many different pharmacological strategies have been used to prevent PIA. We present data on 40 patients who suffered from PIA after a course of ECT and evaluate the prophylactic use of orally disintegrating olanzapine in the prevention of PIA in subsequent ECT treatments.

  8. Economic Burden of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in the Era of Oral Targeted Therapies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushi; Jain, Nitin; Ayer, Turgay; Wierda, William G.; Flowers, Christopher R.; O’Brien, Susan M.; Keating, Michael J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Oral targeted therapies represent a significant advance for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); however, their high cost has raised concerns about affordability and the economic impact on society. Our objective was to project the future prevalence and cost burden of CLL in the era of oral targeted therapies in the United States. Methods We developed a simulation model that evaluated the evolving management of CLL from 2011 to 2025: chemoimmunotherapy (CIT) as the standard of care before 2014, oral targeted therapies for patients with del(17p) and relapsed CLL from 2014, and for first-line treatment from 2016 onward. A comparator scenario also was simulated where CIT remained the standard of care throughout. Disease progression and survival parameters for each therapy were based on published clinical trials. Results The number of people living with CLL in the United States is projected to increase from 128,000 in 2011 to 199,000 by 2025 (55% increase) due to improved survival; meanwhile, the annual cost of CLL management will increase from $0.74 billion to $5.13 billion (590% increase). The per-patient lifetime cost of CLL treatment will increase from $147,000 to $604,000 (310% increase) as oral targeted therapies become the first-line treatment. For patients enrolled in Medicare, the corresponding total out-of-pocket cost will increase from $9,200 to $57,000 (520% increase). Compared with the CIT scenario, oral targeted therapies resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $189,000 per quality-adjusted life-year. Conclusion The increased benefit and cost of oral targeted therapies is projected to enhance CLL survivorship but can impose a substantial financial burden on both patients and payers. More sustainable pricing strategies for targeted therapies are needed to avoid financial toxicity to patients. PMID:27870563

  9. Oral propranolol therapy for infantile hemangiomas beyond the proliferation phase: a multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zvulunov, Alex; McCuaig, Catherine; Frieden, Ilona J; Mancini, Anthony J; Puttgen, Kate B; Dohil, Magdalene; Fischer, Gayle; Powell, Julie; Cohen, Bernard; Ben Amitai, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapies for infantile hemangiomas were considered effective only during the proliferative phases. Recently reported beneficial effects of propranolol may extend beyond the proliferative phase of infantile hemangiomas. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of oral propranolol therapy for infantile hemangiomas beyond the proliferative phase of these lesions. Members of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology were invited to participate in a multicenter retrospective study. Only children with infantile hemangiomas with documented cessation of lesions' growth or those older than 12 months of age were eligible for the study. Clinical and demographic information and digital photographs before, at the start, and following the treatment were collected. Scaled panels of photographs were distributed among preselected experienced pediatric dermatologists. Visual analog scale was used to assess photographs for each case. Paired t-test was used for statistical analyses. Data on 49 eligible patients from eight pediatric dermatology centers was collected. Seven cases were excluded because of insufficient photographic documentation. The age of the patients at the start of propranolol therapy ranged 7 to 120 months (mean 28 mos, median 22 mos). The duration of propranolol therapy ranged 1 to 8 months (mean 3.6 mos). The mean visual analog scale score before the treatment was 6.8 ± 2.15, and mean reduction in the visual analog scale score at the assessment was 2.6 ± 1.74 (p < 0.001). The rate of visual analog scale reduction was 0.4 per month before the start of the therapy, while this rate was accelerated to 0.9 per months following the therapy (p < 0.001). No significant side effects were reported. We conclude that propranolol is effective in infantile hemangiomas, including post-proliferative phase, and should be considered as the first-line therapy in that setting.

  10. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: Introduction to novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    González Bárcenas, Martha L; Pérez Aisa, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  11. Oral rehydration therapy in a rehydration centre at a teaching hospital in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Patidar, J V; Shaik, R

    1989-11-04

    A study was carried out to delineate the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for gastro-enteritis in a unit that had previously used intravenous therapy (IVT) almost exclusively. Most children with dehydrating gastro-enteritis who were 5% or less dehydrated received ORT initially, while those who were more severely affected were given IVT. The success rate using ORT alone was 73%, which was much lower than that achieved in other studies. Possible factors associated with this poor outcome are discussed. It was concluded that with the exceptions of lactose intolerance and coexisting infection, lack of commitment to ORT and the easy access to IVT must have contributed significantly to the suboptimal outcome.

  12. Bleeding complications in oral anticoagulant therapy. An analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, F J; Rosendaal, F R; Vandenbroucke, J P; Briët, E

    1993-07-12

    Insufficient data are available about the safety of oral anticoagulant therapy. The specialized organization of thrombosis services in the Netherlands can provide important information on the bleeding risk and various risk factors for bleeding in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy. In a follow-up study over a 12-month period beginning in January 1988 on all patients treated by the Leiden Thrombosis Service, the frequency of bleeding complications was assessed. A Poisson regression model was used to assess the relative contribution to the bleeding risk of age, sex, target zone (intensity of anticoagulant effect aimed at), achieved intensity of anticoagulant therapy (International Normalized Ratio), and the type of coumarin derivative used. Six thousand eight hundred fourteen patients experienced 1003 bleeding complications (16.5 per 100 treatment-years), 162 of which were major bleeds (2.7 per 100 treatment-years). Bleeding increased significantly with age (32% increase for all bleeding, 46% for major bleeding for every 10-year increase in age in comparison with age < 40 years). Women had more minor bleeding complications than men, whereas both sexes experienced major bleeding in an equal frequency. There was no influence of target zone, while every one-point increase in International Normalized Ratio gave 42% more major bleeding (54% more regarding all bleeding). Use of acenocoumarol resulted in fewer bleeds (26% less regarding all bleeding and 46% less regarding major bleeding) than use of phenprocoumon. The risk of anticoagulant therapy in a routine, real-life situation is similar as in the setting of several well-organized clinical trials. The risk of bleeding complications rises significantly with age and with the achieved intensity of anticoagulation, and is dependent on the type of coumarin derivative that is used.

  13. Antiplatelet versus oral anticoagulant therapy as antithrombotic prophylaxis after mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Domenico; Di Mauro, Michele; Bitton Worms, Keren; Bolotin, Gil; Russo, Claudio; Trunfio, Salvatore; Scrofani, Roberto; Antona, Carlo; Actis Dato, Guglielmo; Casabona, Riccardo; Colli, Andrea; Gerosa, Gino; Renzulli, Attilio; Serraino, Filiberto; Scrascia, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Salvatore; De Bonis, Michele; Taramasso, Maurizio; Delgado, Luis; Tritto, Francesco; Marmo, Joseph; Parolari, Alessandro; Myaseodova, Veronika; Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Nicolini, Francesco; Gherli, Tiziano; Whitlock, Richard; Conte, Manuela; Barili, Fabio; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lorusso, Roberto; Sciatti, Edoardo; Marinelli, Daniele; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Calafiore, Antonio Maria; Sheikh, Azmat; Alfonso, Juan Jaime; Glauber, Mattia; Miceli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    To verify the rate of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications during the first 6 months after mitral valve repair and to assess whether the type of antithrombotic therapy influenced clinical outcome. Retrospective data were retrieved from 19 centers. Inclusion criteria were isolated mitral valve repair with ring implantation. Exclusion criteria were ongoing or past atrial fibrillation and any combined intraoperative surgical procedures. The study cohort consisted of 1882 patients (aged 58 ± 15 years; 36% women), and included 1517 treated with an oral anticoagulant (VKA group) and 365 with antiplatelet drugs (APLT group). Primary efficacy outcome was the incidence of arterial thromboembolic events within 6 months and primary safety outcome was the incidence of major bleeding within 6 months. Propensity matching was performed to obtain 2 comparable cohorts (858 vs 286). No differences were detected for arterial embolic complications in matched cohort (1.6% VKA vs 2.1% APLT; P = .50). Conversely, patients in the APLT group showed lower incidence of major bleeding complications (3.9% vs 0.7%; P = .01). Six-month mortality rate was significantly higher in the VKA group (2.7% vs 0.3%; P = .02). Multivariable analysis in the matched cohort found VKA as independent predictor of major bleeding complications and mortality at 6 months. Vitamin K antagonist therapy was not superior to antiplatelet therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications after mitral valve repair. Our data suggest that oral anticoagulation may carry a higher bleeding risk compared with antiplatelet therapy, although these results should be confirmed in an adequately powered randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia: Presentation With Hyperferritinemia and Response to Oral Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E.; Majewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases. PMID:23319530

  15. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia: presentation with hyperferritinemia and response to oral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2013-02-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases.

  16. High-dose oral tegafur-uracil maintenance therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Motohara, Takeshi; Saito, Fumitaka; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Fukumatsu, Yukitoshi; Tohya, Toshimitsu; Shibata, Saburo; Mimori, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and toxicity of oral administration of tegafur-uracil (UFT) at a high dose, 600 mg/day, based on the tegafur dose, against uterine cervical cancer. Methods This study consisted of a retrospective analysis. From April 1986 to March 1997, 309 patients with uterine cervical cancer were registered. Oral UFT was administered to 162 patients for maintenance therapy after an initial treatment (the UFT group). The other 147 patients were not treated with UFT (the control group). The survival rate was calculated for both groups and statistically analyzed using the log-rank test. Adverse events were compared between the UFT and control groups. Results In the UFT group, 103 patients (63.6%) received UFT for ≥90 days. The drug dose was 600 mg/day for 137 patients (84.6%) and 300 to 400 mg/day for the remainder. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the UFT group than in the control group (p<0.05). The prognosis was particularly favorable in stage III cases, in cases of squamous cell carcinoma, and in cases that were treated by radiotherapy. The most frequent side effects were nausea/vomiting (12.2%), appetite loss (10.1%), and leukopenia/neutropenia (5.8%). Conclusion High-dose oral UFT maintenance treatment prolonged the disease-free survival and overall survival of patients with uterine cervical cancer, particularly of those with advanced disease. PMID:25686399

  17. Oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical outcomes in a context of specialized oral care using low-level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; Lopes, Roberta Marques da Graça; Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Brumatti, Melina; Vince, Carolina Sgaroni Camargo; de Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini; Vogel, Cristina; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    OM is a painful inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, derived from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High OM severity is frequently present in HSCT pediatric patients, who exhibit multiple painful ulcers that limit their mastication and swallowing, leading to poor nutritional status. Few studies have demonstrated OM clinical outcomes in young patients undergoing HSCT. Feasibility of oral care and LLLT on OM prophylaxis and treatment is also poorly discussed. The aim of this study was to describe a specialized oral care protocol that included LLLT for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes after OM prevention and treatment. Data from OM-related morbidity were collected from 51 HSCT pediatric patients treated daily with LLLT, followed by standard oral care protocols. All the patients, even infants and young children, accepted the daily oral care and LLLT well. The majority (80.0%) only exhibited erythema in the oral mucosa, and the maximum OM degree was WHO II. Patients who had undergone autologous and HLA-haploidentical transplants showed OM with the lowest severity. The frequency of total body irradiation and methotrexate prescriptions was higher in adolescents when compared with infants (p = 0.044), and adolescents also exhibited OM more severely than infants and young children. We found that good clinical outcomes were obtained using this therapy, mainly in regard to the control of OM severity and pain reduction in the oral cavity. Specialized oral care, including LLLT, is feasible and affordable for HSCT pediatric patients, although some adaptation in the patient's oral hygiene routine must be adopted with help from parents/companions and clinical staff.

  18. Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections in HIV: therapy and emerging problems - a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Vidya, K M; Rao, U K; Nittayananta, W; Liu, H; Owotade, F J

    2016-04-01

    Oral mycoses and other opportunistic infections are recognized features of HIV infection even after four decades of the epidemic. The therapeutic options, challenges of therapy, and evolving patterns of opportunistic infections were evaluated by the workshop. It was observed that high Candida counts and infection are still more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals even in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, one or more non-Candida albicans are present in some HIV-positive individuals. While Candida species are more virulent in HIV infection, similar virulence may be present in other states of immunosuppression. Consequently, the interplay between host factors and virulence ultimately determines the clinical outcomes. Adverse clinical outcomes such as candidemia and other deep fungal infections are on the increase in HIV infection. Disseminated histoplasmosis and penicilliosis have been reported, especially with low CD4 counts. Even with advances in antifungal therapy, mortality and morbidity from deep fungal infections have not changed significantly. In addition, long-term exposure to common antifungal drugs such as fluconazole has led to the development of antifungal resistance in 6% to 36%. Development of new antifungal therapeutic agents and the use of alternative therapies may offer breakthrough. In addition, effective strategies to enhance the host immune status are being explored. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  20. Trichophytum rubrum endonyx onychomycosis resistant to standard oral and topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Patrick M; Telang, Gladys H; Jellinek, Nat

    2015-09-17

    We present a 45 year-old man with an eight-year history of discoloration of the nail plate on his left hallux. He had been treated with two courses of oral terbinafine and topical 8% ciclopirox for presumed onychomycosis. On exam, his left great toenail contained a wide yellow-white longitudinal band involving a majority of the nail plate. No subungual debris, hyperkeratosis, or paronychial inflammation was present in the affected nail. Histopathology of the nail plate revealed numerous fungal elements arranged transversely and longitudinally, solely within the keratin layers of the nail plate; these were highlighted with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain confirming endonyx onychomycosis. Cultures grew Trichophyton rubrum. All types of onychomycosis under the new classification system proposed by Hay et al. have now been associated with T. rubrum. Endonyx related to T. rubrum may be a particularly difficult infection to treat with oral or topical agents owing to the absence of robust local immune response and limited drug penetration to the interior nail plate. Physicians should be aware that this type of infection may require treatment with dual-agent therapy or alternative modalities including chemical or surgical plate avulsion or photodynamic therapy.

  1. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with two photosensitizers on two oral streptococci: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahabi, S.; Fekrazad, R.; Ayremlou, S.; Taheri, S.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Kalhori, K. A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Periodontal diseases are caused by infection of tissues supporting the teeth due to complex aggregate of bacteria known as biofilm and firstly colonized by streptococci. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of Radachlorin® and Toluidine Blue O (TBO)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the viability of two oral streptococci. Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis were subjected to either TBO or Radachlorin®, Then exposed to two different diode laser light at energy densities of 3, 6 J/cm2 at 633 nm and 6, 12 J/cm2 at 662 nm, respectively. The control groups were subjected to laser light alone, photosensitizer alone or received neither photosensitizer nor light exposure. The suspensions were then spread over specific agar mediums and viable microorganisms were counted after overnight incubation aerobically at 37°C, 5% CO2 and then reported as colony forming unit. The results indicated that photosensitization by the energy density of 6 J/cm2 with Radachlorin® and both 3 and 6 J/cm2 with TBO caused significant reduction in bacterial colony formation ( p < 0.05). Radachlorin® and TBO-mediated photodynamic therapy seem to show excellent potential in significantly killing of two oral streptococci in vitro.

  2. Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; ρlvarez, Beatriz; Mejima, Mio; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yuko; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nochi, Tomonori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Aladin, Farah; Marcotte, Harold; Frenken, Leon G.J.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hammarström, Lennart; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in children in developing countries. We have developed a system for prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus disease using transgenic rice expressing the neutralizing variable domain of a rotavirus-specific llama heavy-chain antibody fragment (MucoRice-ARP1). MucoRice-ARP1 was produced at high levels in rice seeds using an overexpression system and RNAi technology to suppress the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins. Orally administered MucoRice-ARP1 markedly decreased the viral load in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. The antibody retained in vitro neutralizing activity after long-term storage (>1 yr) and boiling and conferred protection in mice even after heat treatment at 94°C for 30 minutes. High-yield, water-soluble, and purification-free MucoRice-ARP1 thus forms the basis for orally administered prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infections. PMID:23925294

  3. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in obstructive sleep apnea patients referred for oral appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Almeida, Fernanda R; Santos, Camila D; Valdrighi, Natalia Y; Nascimento, Liliane S; Dal'Fabbro, Cibele; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia Rita A

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pain associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients referred for oral appliance therapy. Eighty-seven patients (46 men and 41 women), between 18 and 65 years of age, with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5 and < 30 (events by sleep hour), and body mass index (BMI) of =or< 30 Kg/m(2) were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of signs and symptoms of TMD. Statistical analyses included correlations assessed by Pearson's test. Fifty-two percent of patients presented symptoms of TMD. Thirty-two patients (average age 47 +/- 11 years, AHI 17.3 +/- 8.7, BMI 25.9 +/- 3.8 kg/m(2)) completed the study. According to the Scoring Protocol for Graded Chronic Pain (Axis II-RDC/TMD), 75% of the patients presented chronic pain related to TMD, categorized as low disability grade I (< 50 points for pain intensity, and < 3 disability points). The most common TMD diagnosis was myofascial pain with and without limited mouth opening and arthralgia (50%). The high prevalence of TMD in the current study indicates that patients with OSAS referred for oral appliance therapy require specific evaluation related to TMD.

  4. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:28328969

  5. Hemolysis after Oral Artemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lingscheid, Tilman; Steiner, Florian; Stegemann, Miriam S.; Bélard, Sabine; Menner, Nikolai; Pongratz, Peter; Kim, Johanna; von Bernuth, Horst; Mayer, Beate; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Salama, Abdulgabar; Suttorp, Norbert; Zoller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of delayed hemolysis 2–6 weeks after treatment of severe malaria with intravenous artesunate have been described. We performed a prospective observational study of patients with uncomplicated malaria to investigate whether posttreatment hemolysis also occurs after oral artemisinin-based combination therapy. Eight of 20 patients with uncomplicated malaria who were given oral artemisinin-based combination therapy met the definition of posttreatment hemolysis (low haptoglobin level and increased lactate dehydrogenase level on day 14). Five patients had hemolysis persisting for 1 month. Patients with posttreatment hemolysis had a median decrease in hemoglobin level of 1.3 g/dL (interquartile range 0.3–2.0 g/dL) in the posttreatment period, and patients without posttreatment hemolysis had a median increase of 0.3 g/dL (IQR −0.1 to 0.7 g/dL; p = 0.002). These findings indicate a need for increased vigilance for hemolytic events in malaria patients, particularly those with predisposing factors for anemia. PMID:27434054

  6. Prevalence of residual excessive sleepiness during effective oral appliance therapy for sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, A E R; Dieltjens, M; Wouters, K; De Volder, I; Van de Heyning, P H; Braem, M J; Vanderveken, O M

    2014-02-01

    Oral appliance therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) can yield to complete therapeutic response (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]<5 events/h), though some patients show little or no improvement in daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of residual excessive sleepiness (RES) despite effective treatment with OAm therapy is unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of RES in patients treated with a titratable custom-made duobloc OAm. A prevalence study was performed, collecting data from 185 patients with an established diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) under OAm therapy with a titratable custom-made duobloc device (baseline data were male:female ratio, 129:56; age, 48±9 years; body mass index [BMI], 27±4 kg/m2; Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] score, 10±5; and AHI, 19±12 events/h). A full-night polysomnography was performed at baseline and after 3 months of OAm therapy. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the ESS with RES defined as an ESS score of 11 or higher out of 24, despite complete therapeutic response. Out of 185 patients, 84 patients (45%) showed a complete therapeutic response with an AHI of <5 events per hour after 3 months of OAm therapy. Despite this normalization of AHI, 27 out of these 84 patients (32%) showed RES and had a significantly higher baseline ESS (15±4 vs. 9±4; P<.001) and were younger (43±9 vs. 47±9; P=.028) compared to patients without RES. RES under OAm therapy showed a prevalence of up to 32% in SDB patients effectively treated with respect to AHI. Patients with RES were younger and had higher baseline daytime sleepiness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  8. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors.

  9. Supportive care needs in newly diagnosed oral cavity cancer patients receiving radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Ching; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chien; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to examine changes in physical symptom severity, functional status, supportive care needs, and related factors in oral cavity cancer patients during 6 months after beginning radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT). A prospective longitudinal study was conducted involving oral cavity cancer patients from an RT clinic at a medical center in northern Taiwan. Patients were assessed for supportive care needs and physical symptoms at five time points: before the beginning of RT or CCRT and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after beginning RT or CCRT. The generalized estimating equation was used to identify predictors of overall needs as well as six specific dimensions of needs. A total of 82 patients completed the 6 months of follow-up. Patients had moderate to high levels of supportive care needs over the 6 months. Although the highest information need was at the pretreatment phase, in general, the peak for overall and individual care needs was at 2 months since first receiving RT or CCRT. Patients without religious beliefs as well as those with higher educational level, functional level, overall physical symptom severity, and baseline anxiety reported more supportive care needs. Anxiety level before treatment was the most common factor across most supportive care needs. Individual physical symptoms, including fatigue, swallowing difficulty, and oral mucositis, were significantly related to higher physical and daily living needs. A systematic clinical assessment to detect patients' care needs is necessary to improve the provision of timely cancer care and meet patients' healthcare needs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  11. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time.

  12. Insulin versus an oral antidiabetic agent as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes after failure of an oral antidiabetic regimen: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, JM; Brown, Lauren C; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Although evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus provide clear recommendations for initial therapy, evidence on an optimal treatment strategy after secondary failure is unclear. Purpose To compare the efficacy of add-on therapy using basal insulin versus an additional oral antidiabetic agent in patients with type 2 diabetes and secondary failure. Data sources We searched the following electronic databases from inception until June 2007: MEDLINE; EMBASE; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Web of Science; Scopus; CINAHL; International Pharmaceutical Abstracts; Academic OneFile; PASCAL; Global Health Database; LILACS; HealthSTAR; PubMed. Reference lists of potentially relevant articles and clinical trial databases were searched, pharmaceutical manufacturers were contacted, and grey literature sources were sought. Study selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving subjects with type 2 diabetes with secondary failure who were randomly assigned to receive additional basal insulin therapy (insulin glargine, detemir, or NPH [neutral protamine Hagedorn]) versus another oral antidiabetic agent from any class. Data extraction Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Our primary outcome was glycemic control measured by change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and the proportion of subjects achieving a HbA1C value of ≤ 7%. Data synthesis To compare overall efficacy between the 2 treatment strategies, change in HbA1C was pooled across studies using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD). Eleven RCTs, involving 757 participants with a median age of 56 and a median known duration of diabetes of 11 years, were included in our analysis. Insulin treatment demonstrated a small but statistically significant improvement in HbA1C compared with the use of an additional oral agent as add-on therapy (WMD -0.17; 95% CI [confidence interval] -0

  13. Comparison of oral and subcutaneous iron chelation therapies in the prevention of major endocrinopathies in beta-thalassemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Hsing; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Peng, Ching-Tien; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2006-01-01

    While hypertransfusion and subcutaneous iron chelation therapy have increased longevity of patients with beta-thalassemia (thal) major, endocrinopathies have become more common and impair the quality of their lives. Additionally, subcutaneous iron chelation therapy is an uncomfortable experience and can prevent patients from regular compliance with iron chelation therapy. We compared the efficacy of oral deferiprone (L1) to subcutaneous desferrioxamine (DFO) chelation therapy for the prevention of major endocrinopathies (growth hormone insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and gonadal dysfunction) among patients with beta-thal major to see if we could offer these patients an easier and more painless way to reduce their body iron load and related endocrine complications.

  14. Oral monosaccharide therapies to reverse renal and muscle hyposialylation in a mouse model of GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Niethamer, Terren K.; Yardeni, Tal; Leoyklang, Petcharat; Ciccone, Carla; Astiz-Martinez, Adrian; Jacobs, Katherine; Dorward, Heidi M.; Zerfas, Patricia M.; Gahl, William A.; Huizing, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    GNE myopathy, previously termed hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM), is an adult-onset neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disorder results from biallelic mutations in GNE, encoding UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase, the key enzyme of sialic acid synthesis. GNE myopathy, associated with impaired glycan sialylation, has no approved therapy. Here we test potential sialylation-increasing monosaccharides for their effectiveness in prophylaxis (at the embryonic and neonatal stages) and therapy (after the onset of symptoms) by evaluating renal and muscle hyposialylation in a knock-in mouse model (Gne p.M712T) of GNE myopathy. We demonstrate that oral mannosamine (ManN), but not sialic acid (Neu5Ac), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), or glucosamine (GlcN), administered to pregnant female mice has a similar prophylactic effect on renal hyposialylation, pathology and neonatal survival of mutant offspring, as previously shown for N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) therapy. ManN may be converted to ManNAc by a direct, yet unknown, pathway, or may act through another mode of action. The other sugars (Man, Gal, GlcN) may either not cross the placental barrier (Neu5Ac) and/or may be able to directly increase sialylation. Because GNE myopathy patients will likely require treatment in adulthood after onset of symptoms, we also administered ManNAc (1 or 2 g/kg/day for 12 weeks), Neu5Ac (2g/kg/day for 12 weeks), or ManN (2g/kg/day for 6 weeks) in drinking water to 6 month old mutant Gne p.M712T mice. All three therapies markedly improved the muscle and renal hyposialylation, as evidenced by lectin histochemistry for overall sialylation status and immunoblotting of specific sialoproteins. These preclinical data strongly support further evaluation of oral ManNAc, Neu5Ac and ManN as therapy for GNE myopathy and conceivably for certain glomerular diseases with hyposialylation. PMID:23122659

  15. Impact of oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Masha Sh; Cheung, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Studies have identified non-adherence as one of the major contributing factors to treatment failure in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients receiving imatinib. Published literature has demonstrated a unique role of oncology pharmacists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, in contributing to overall positive outcomes for patients. To evaluate the impact of an oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program on oral medication adherence in CML patients versus usual care. Electronic refill history and medical records of patients diagnosed with CML treated with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) managed by oncology pharmacists during a 6-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. Imatinib adherence rate, as the primary endpoint, was compared with the rate for those in the usual care group within the same organization. The secondary endpoints were descriptive to characterize pharmacist interventions for all TKIs. A total of 56 patients including 45 who were treated with imatinib, were evaluated. The group managed by oncology pharmacists resulted in a higher percentage of imatinib adherence rate compared to usual care (88.6% vs 65.8%, p = 0.0046). A total of 3432 pharmacist encounters were reviewed, and 567 interventions of six categories including side effect monitoring/management (n = 95; 16.8%); drug interaction detection (n = 109; 19.2%); TKI dose adjustment (n = 82; 14.5%); laboratory monitoring (n = 200; 35.3%); non-CML related drug choice (n = 74; 13.1%); and copay assistance (n = 7; 1.2%), were documented. This resulted in a mean of 10.1 interventions per patient. Our oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program significantly improved TKI adherence rates in CML patients. We attribute the success of our program to consistent follow-up by utilizing routine phone, and secure email follow-ups, that allowed our oncology pharmacists to build a close and trustworthy relationship with patients and

  16. Topical therapies for oral lichen planus management and their efficacy: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bagan, José; Compilato, Domenico; Paderni, Carlo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Panzarella, Vera; Picciotti, Maria; Lorenzini, Guido; Di Fede, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition implicating T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and involving oral mucosal surfaces. Several therapeutic regimens have been evaluated to treat OLP and pain related, but often without high level of evidence. Topical formulations are the favourite for the majority of cases; bioadhesive formulations have been considered very useful and practical for local drug delivery in oral mucosa, due to the increased residence time on the oral mucosa of the dosage forms and better therapeutic efficacy. In this narrative review, authors try to illustrate the current topical managements for OLP from the accessible literature on this topic. Steroids are very helpful in discomfort and making better quality of life: they are considered the first-line treatment even if they could cause secondary candidosis, and sometimes bad taste, nausea, dry mouth, sore throat or swollen mouth. Other substances or devices by topical administration are adopted especially when the first line approach is refractory. This is the case when retinol with its synthetic and natural analogues (retinoids), hyaluronic acid, or Aloe Vera are chosen. Recent topical applications for OLP therapy include phototherapy and low/high energy pulsing light; the treatment with extracorporeal photochemotherapy is also reasonable and promising. Finally, calcineurin inhibitors (i.e. cyclosporine, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), antioxidant and biologics (i.e alefacept, efalizumab, basiliximab, TNF-α inhibitors - infliximab, rituximab) may be alternative approaches when OLP does not respond to the standard protocols. In this scenario, there are several studies on molecules different from glucocorticosteroids, but not sufficient or statistically adequate to justify their evidence-based use in OLP; large randomized placebo controlled trials are required to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of these non conventional therapies. In conclusion, since OLP is a chronic disease

  17. close: Closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence: Study design.

    PubMed

    Mas, Jean-Louis; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Amarenco, Pierre; Arquizan, Caroline; Aubry, Pierre; Barthelet, Martine; Bertrand, Bernard; Brochet, Eric; Cabanes, Laure; Donal, Erwan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Ernande, Laura; Finet, Gérard; Fraisse, Alain; Giroud, Maurice; Guérin, Patrice; Habib, Gilbert; Juliard, Jean-Michel; Leys, Didier; Lièvre, Michel; Lusson, Jean-René; Marcon, François; Michel, Patrick; Moulin, Thierry; Mounier-Vehier, François; Pierard, Luc; Piot, Christophe; Rey, Christian; Rodier, Gilles; Roudaut, Raymond; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Turc, Guillaume; Vuillier, Fabrice; Weimar, Christian; Woimant, France; Chatellier, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Currently available data do not provide definitive evidence on the comparative benefits of closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapy in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke To assess whether transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure plus antiplatelet therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy alone and whether oral anticoagulant therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy, for secondary stroke prevention in patients aged 16 to 60 years with a large patent foramen ovale or a patent foramen ovale associated with an atrial septal aneurysm, and an otherwise unexplained ischaemic stroke or retinal ischaemia. Six hundred and sixty-four patients were included in the study. CLOSE is an academic-driven, multicentre, randomized, open-label, three-group, superiority trial with blinded adjudication of outcome events. The trial has been registered with Clinical Trials Register (Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00562289). Patient recruitment started in December 2007. Patient follow-up will continue until December 2016. Expected mean follow-up = 5.6 years. The primary efficacy outcome is the occurrence of fatal or nonfatal stroke. Safety outcomes include fatal, life-threatening or major procedure- or device-related complications and fatal, life-threatening or major haemorrhagic complications. CLOSE is the first specifically designed trial to assess the superiority of patent foramen ovale closure over antiplatelet therapy alone and the superiority of oral anticoagulants over antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Efficacy of systemic adjuvant therapies administered to dogs after excision of oral malignant melanomas: 151 cases (2001-2012).

    PubMed

    Boston, Sarah E; Lu, Xiaomin; Culp, William T N; Montinaro, Vincenzo; Romanelli, Giorgio; Dudley, Robert M; Liptak, Julius M; Mestrinho, Lisa A; Buracco, Paolo

    2014-08-15

    To determine prognostic factors for and compare outcome among dogs with oral malignant melanoma following excision with or without various systemic adjuvant therapies. Retrospective case series. 151 dogs with naturally occurring oral malignant melanomas treated by excision with or without adjuvant therapies from 2001 to 2012. Case accrual was solicited from Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology members via an email list service. Information collected from case records included signalment, tumor staging, tumor characteristics, type of surgical excision, histologic diagnosis, adjuvant therapy, and survival time. The overall median survival time was 346 days. Results of multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size, patient age, and intralesional excision (vs marginal, wide, or radical excision) were considered poor prognostic indicators. All other demographic and clinical variables were not significantly associated with survival time after adjusting for the aforementioned 3 variables. A clear survival benefit was not evident with any systemic adjuvant therapy, including vaccination against melanoma or chemotherapy; however, the number of dogs in each treatment group was small. Ninety-eight dogs received no postoperative adjuvant therapy, and there was no difference in survival time between dogs that did (335 days) and did not (352 days) receive systemic adjuvant therapy. For dogs with oral malignant melanoma, increasing tumor size and age were negative prognostic factors. Complete excision of all macroscopic tumor burden improved survival time. Long-term survival was possible following surgery alone. Although systemic adjuvant therapy was not found to improve survival time, this could have been due to type II error.

  19. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Oral Diabetic Medications, Insulin Therapy, and Overall Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Azar, Sami T.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide. Diabetes is an important chronic health problem associated with insulin resistance, increased insulin level, changes in growth hormones and factors, and activation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, leading to an increased breast cancer risk. This paper looked at the epidemiologic studies of the association between type 2 diabetes and risk of breast cancer and its effect on overall cancer-specific survival. The combined evidence overall supported a modest association between type 2 diabetes and the risk of breast cancer, which was found to be more prevalent among postmenopausal women. Effect of oral diabetics and insulin therapy on breast cancer risk was also evaluated. It was found that metformin and thiazolidinones tended to have a protective role. Metformin therapy trials for its use as an adjuvant for breast cancer treatment are still ongoing. Sulfonylurea and insulin therapy were found to be mildly associated with increased overall cancers. No evidence or studies evaluated the association of DPPIV inhibitors and GLP 1 agonists with breast cancer risk because of their recent introduction into the management of diabetes. PMID:23401790

  20. Persistence of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity after systemic eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Gebara, E C E; Faria, C M; Pannuti, C; Chehter, L; Mayer, M P A; Lima, L A P A

    2006-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate if the oral cavity of chronic periodontitis patients can harbor Helicobacter pylori after systemic eradication therapy. Samples of 30 patients (15 with gingivitis and 15 with chronic periodontitis) positive for H. pylori in the stomach were evaluated. Samples were collected 3 months after triple systemic antibiotic therapy from saliva, microbiota from the dorsum of the tongue, supra- and sub-gingival plaque as well as gastric biopsies. DNA of each sample was extracted by the boiling method and used as a template in polymerase chain reaction with the primers JW22/23. Eighteen patients (60%) harboured H. pylori in their mouths. Five patients (16.6%) were positive in saliva, two (6.6%) on the dorsum of the tongue, nine (30%) in supra-gingival plaque, 14 (46.6%) in sub-gingival plaque and three (10%) in the stomach. There was no statistically significant difference between study groups. Eradication of H. pylori after therapy was more effective for the stomach than for the mouth (p<0.001). Mouths of patients with gingivitis or with chronic periodontitis, who are positive for H. pylori in their stomachs, may be considered as reservoirs of these bacteria.

  1. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K.R. Ashok; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. Aim The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. Results All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p < 0.001). Post-operative pain at HDD treated sites (1.87,1.27 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) was significantly lower than the control sites (4.0,1.87 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) p-value (0.001, 0.001 respectively). HDD treated oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1st and 3rd post-operative days (p <0.0001). Conclusion The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic dressing material that significantly shortens bleeding time following minor oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls. PMID:27790577

  2. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K R Ashok; Kumar, Jambukeshwar; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-09-01

    Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p < 0.001). Post-operative pain at HDD treated sites (1.87,1.27 on 1(st) and 3(rd) day respectively) was significantly lower than the control sites (4.0,1.87 on 1(st) and 3(rd) day respectively) p-value (0.001, 0.001 respectively). HDD treated oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1(st) and 3(rd) post-operative days (p <0.0001). The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic dressing material that significantly shortens bleeding time following minor oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls.

  3. One-month versus six-month therapy with oral anticoagulants after symptomatic deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, K; Andersson, G; Fagrell, B; Johnsson, H; Ljungberg, B; Nilsson, E; Wilhelmsson, S; Zetterquist, S

    1985-01-01

    The length of time for which deep vein thrombosis (DVT) should be treated with oral anticoagulants (OA) is controversial. In this study, 135 patients with symptomatic first period DVT (83% with proximal DVT) were randomly allocated to OA for one or six months. The diagnosis of initial and recurrent DVT was confirmed by phlebography or plethysmography and thermography, or by a combination of all these methods. Pulmonary emboli were confirmed by lung scans or at autopsy. The patients were followed for at least one year. One patient had to discontinue OA prematurely because of haemorrhage. Seventeen patients left the project for other reasons, ten during and seven after therapy; in one of these DVT recurred. The recurrence rate during the first year was high (17% symptomatic recurrences) irrespective of whether OA had been given for one or six months.

  4. Posttransplant oral iron-chelating therapy in patients with beta-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Yesilipek, M Akif; Karasu, Gulsun; Kazik, Mediha; Uygun, Vedat; Ozturk, Zeynep

    2010-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only radical cure of beta-thalassemia. However, iron overload remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in posttransplant period. The authors present 7 patients as a preliminary report who underwent bone marrow transplant (BMT) and received oral chelating therapy (deferasirox) because of poor compliance to phlebotomy and desferrioxamine. The patients investigated mainly for possible side effects of deferasirox. No negative effect was seen in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), hemoglobin (Hb), and donor chimerism of the patients while serum ferritin levels significantly reduced (P = .018). Although serum creatinin significantly increased (P = .034), it was in normal limits in all patients. The authors believe that this report shows promising findings to plan further studies to clarify clinical safety and efficacy of deferasirox in posttransplant period.

  5. From a pump handle to oral rehydration therapy: a model of translational research.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stanley G

    2007-12-01

    Few afflictions have attracted as much attention and impacted on as many societal and biomedical areas as cholera. Dr. John Snow's studies launched the field of epidemiology, were early applications of medical cartography, and promoted the use of statistical methods in medicine. The finding that cholera was due to the ingestion of contaminated water lent to the demise of the prevalent "miasmatic theory of contagion," set the platform for the "germ theory of disease," and promoted the growth of public health concerns for water purification and sanitation. More recent attention to this disease led to the notion of "secretory diarrhea" and the translation of basic principles to the development of oral rehydration therapy and its "spin-offs" (Gatorade and Pedilyte).

  6. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. Factors Associated with Adherence Rates for Oral and Intravenous Anticancer Therapy in Commercially Insured Patients with Metastatic Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Seal, Brian S; Anderson, Sibyl; Shermock, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, oncology therapies have trended toward orally administered regimens, and there has been growing attention on evaluation of factors that affect adherence. There has not been a rigorous investigation of factors associated with adherence to intravenous (i.v.) and oral anticancer drugs in the setting of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). To (a) assess potential patient-specific factors related to adherence to mCRC chemotherapy regimens and (b) compare adherence with IV versus oral dosage forms. A retrospective analysis was performed using the Optum Oncology Management claims database. Patients aged 18 years and older diagnosed with mCRC between July 1, 2004, and December 31, 2010, who were insured by a commercial health plan were included in the study. Adherence to i.v. and oral chemotherapy regimens was assessed using the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines as the standard for expected cycle/regimen duration. The most commonly prescribed chemotherapy regimens were assessed. Adherence was evaluated using the medication possession ratio (MPR), calculated as the number of days a patient was covered by their chemotherapy regimen, according to NCCN guidelines, divided by the number of days elapsed from the first to the last infusion of that regimen. For most analyses, the MPR was considered a continuous variable that could take on values between 0 and 1. In other analyses, a dichotomous categorical variable designated if the MPR was at least 0.8 versus less than 0.8. The Wilcoxon rank sum, Kruskal-Wallis, and Student's t-test were used to detect differences in continuous measures between patients receiving oral capecitabine therapy versus i.v. chemotherapy. The chi square test (X(2) test) or Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences in the dichotomous MPR variable. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used for regimen-level analyses to account for correlated responses within individuals. A total of 6

  8. Preclinical study of a cost-effective photodynamic therapy protocol for treating oral candidoses.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nathalia Ramos; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Bonfá, Karla; Menezes, Michelli Sobreiro; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; de Souza, Raphael Freitas

    2017-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for oral candidoses. Its use as an alternative to antifungals prevents several adverse effects, including microbial resistance. However, most PDT protocols do not employ devices and consumables commonly available in dental practice, thus influencing treatment affordability. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a PDT method based on light curing units' blue LEDs combined to a plaque-disclosing composition (5% erythrosine) against C. albicans in culture and in a murine model of oral candidosis. Standard and resistant fungal strains were tested in vitro in planktonic and biofilm forms. PDT (pre-irradiation time periods: 30 and 60 s; irradiation time: 3 min) was compared to control conditions without light and/or erythrosine. Mice with induced oral candidosis (n = 40) randomly received PDT or similar control conditions with subsequent C. albicans count. These mice underwent histological analysis, as well as 12 healthy mice submitted to experimental treatments. PDT completely inactivated C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilm. Control conditions presented minor differences (ANOVA, p < 0.05), with mean values ranging from 5.2 to 6.8 log10 (UFC/mL). Infected mice presented no significant difference in C. albicans counts consequent to treatments (ANOVA, p = 0.721), although the PDT protocol was able to enhance the inflammatory infiltrate in healthy mice. It can be concluded that the tested PDT protocol can inactivate C. albicans but still needs further investigation in order to achieve efficacy and safety.

  9. Novel Therapy To Reverse The Cellular Effects of Bisphosphonates on Primary Human Oral Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cozin, Matthew; Pinker, Bradley M.; Solemani, Kimberley; Zuniga, Jeremy M.; Dadaian, Stephen C.; Cremers, Serge; Landesberg, Regina; Raghavan, Srikala

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Osteonecrosis of the Jaws is a clinical condition that is characterized by a non-healing breach in the oral mucosa resulting in exposure of bone and has been increasingly reported in patients receiving bisphosphonate (BP) therapy. Although the pathogenesis and natural history of ONJ remain ill defined, it appears that the oral soft tissues play a critical role in the development of this condition. In this report we examined the effects of the nitrogen-containing BPs pamidronate and zoledronate on primary human gingival fibroblasts. Materials and Methods Primary gingival fibroblasts were exposed to clinically relevant doses of pamidronate and zoledronate. Cellular proliferation was measured using a MTS/PMS reagent-based kit, scratch wound assays were performed to measure cellular migration and apoptosis was measured by using TUNEL and caspase assays. The BP exposed cells were treated with 10ng/mL recombinant human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB, GEM21™) and 50μM geranylgeraniol (GGOH). Results Gingival fibroblasts are significantly more sensitive to inhibition of proliferation by zoledronate compared to pamidronate. Exposure of these cells to pamidronate but not zoledronate resulted in an increase in cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, exposure of gingival fibroblasts to pamidronate or zoledronate resulted in a decrease in cellular migration. We show that these defects are due to a loss of cell-substratum adhesion, and a reduction of F-actin bundles. Finally, we show that the addition of rhPDGF-BB, (GEM21™) and GGOH in vitro are able to partially rescue the cell proliferation, migration and adhesion defects. Conclusion The cytotoxic affects BPs on oral fibroblasts and its significant reversal by the addition of GGOH and rhPDGF-BB, (GEM21™) provide both the potential mechanism and treatment options for ONJ. PMID:21807448

  10. Gastrointestinal symptoms under opioid therapy: a prospective comparison of oral sustained-release hydromorphone, transdermal fentanyl, and transdermal buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Stefan; Wittmann, Maria; Schenk, Michael; Schroeck, Andreas; Schaefer, Nico; Mueller, Marcus; Standop, Jens; Kloecker, Norbert; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of long-term treatment with oral sustained-release hydromorphone, transdermal fentanyl, and transdermal buprenorphine on nausea, emesis and constipation. Randomly selected outpatients with cancer pain receiving one of the study medications were enrolled in a prospective, open-labeled, controlled trial (n=174). Mobility, pain, and gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed directly and per selected item on the ECOG (Eastern Cancer Oncology Group), EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) questionnaires, NRS (Numerical Rating Scales), and analyzed statistically. Demographic and medical data were comparable in all groups. Only 15% of patients suffered from constipation. 59% took the prescribed laxatives. The incidence of stool free periods >72 h was significantly higher with transdermal opioids (transdermal fentanyl: 22%; transdermal buprenorphine: 21%; oral hydromorphone: 2%; p=0.003). 21% of patients revealed nausea and emesis. The mean NRS for nausea (transdermal fentanyl:1.3; transdermal buprenorphine: 1.2; oral hydromorphone: 1.5; p=0.6), the consumption of antiemetics (transdermal fentanyl: 42%; transdermal buprenorphine: 33%; oral hydromorphone: 36%; p=0.6) and laxatives (transdermal fentanyl:53%; transdermal buprenorphine:66%; oral hydromorphone: 61%; p=0.2) did not differ significantly, in contrast to the score for emesis (transdermal fentanyl: 16%; transdermal buprenorphine:13%; oral hydromorphone: 33%; p=0.02). Morphine equivalent opioid doses differed (mg/d transdermal fentanyl: 183; transdermal buprenorphine: 89; oral hydromorphone: 143; p=0.001), because of obvious tolerance varying after long-term treatment. Gastrointestinal symptoms of cancer pain patients undergoing an opioid therapy are related to multifactorial causes. Transdermal opioids showed no benefit over oral controlled-release hydromorphone with regard to gastrointestinal symptoms. The conversion ratios for

  11. Oral resveratrol therapy inhibits cancer-induced skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shadfar, Scott; Couch, Marion E.; McKinney, Kibwei A.; Weinstein, Lisa J.; Yin, Xiaoying; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Willis, Monte

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which cancer mediates muscle atrophy has been delineated in the past 3 decades, and includes a prominent role of tumor-derived cytokines, such as IL-6, TNFα and IL-1. These cytokines interact with their cognate receptors on muscle to activate the downstream transcription factor NF-κB and induce sarcomere proteolysis. Experimentally, inhibiting NF-κB signaling largely prevents cancer-induced muscle wasting, indicating its prominent role in muscle atrophy. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes, has recently been shown to inhibit NF-κB in cancer cells, which led us to hypothesize that it might have a protective role in cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated if daily oral resveratrol could protect against skeletal muscle loss and cardiac atrophy in an established mouse model. We demonstrate resveratrol inhibits skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy induced by C26 adenocarcinoma tumors through its inhibition of NF-κB (p65) activity in the skeletal muscle and heart. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of oral resveratrol therapy to provide clinical benefit in cancer-induced atrophy through the inhibition of NF-κB in muscle. These findings may have application in the treatment of diseases with parallel pathophysiologies such as muscular dystrophy and heart failure. PMID:21660860

  12. Oral resveratrol therapy inhibits cancer-induced skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shadfar, Scott; Couch, Marion E; McKinney, Kibwei A; Weinstein, Lisa J; Yin, Xiaoying; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Guttridge, Denis C; Willis, Monte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which cancer mediates muscle atrophy has been delineated in the past 3 decades and includes a prominent role of tumor-derived cytokines, such as IL-6, TNFα, and IL-1. These cytokines interact with their cognate receptors on muscle to activate the downstream transcription factor NF-κB and induce sarcomere proteolysis. Experimentally, inhibiting NF-κB signaling largely prevents cancer-induced muscle wasting, indicating its prominent role in muscle atrophy. Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes, has recently been shown to inhibit NF-κB in cancer cells, which led us to hypothesize that it might have a protective role in cancer cachexia. Therefore, we investigated whether daily oral resveratrol could protect against skeletal muscle loss and cardiac atrophy in an established mouse model. We demonstrate resveratrol inhibits skeletal muscle and cardiac atrophy induced by C26 adenocarcinoma tumors through its inhibition of NF-κB (p65) activity in skeletal muscle and heart. These studies demonstrate for the first time the utility of oral resveratrol therapy to provide clinical benefit in cancer-induced atrophy through the inhibition of NF-κB in muscle. These findings may have application in the treatment of diseases with parallel pathophysiologies such as muscular dystrophy and heart failure.

  13. Bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy: registered hormones (non-oral estradiol ± progesterone) are optimal.

    PubMed

    L'Hermite, M

    2017-03-16

    The many advantages of registered bioidentical sex hormones over registered, conventional, non-bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are considered. The transdermal route of estrogen administration avoids excess venous thromboembolic and ischemic stroke events. There is some indication that conjugated equine estrogens are more thrombogenic and most likely induce some hypertensive responses; estradiol might also be superior to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in terms of global cardiovascular health. The most valid evidence presently suggests that CEE-only treatment does not increase the risk of breast cancer and even may reduce it. But its combination with a synthetic progestogen (mainly medroxyprogesterone acetate) is a critical issue since it seems to be primarily associated with an increased incidence of breast cancer, however similar to or lower than that associated with some common lifestyle factors. Though not yet proven in a randomized, controlled trial, MHT continuously combining oral micronized progesterone with transdermal estradiol can presently be considered as the optimal MHT. It is not only safer than custom-compounded bioidentical hormones but also than oral conventional MHT and has the best breast profile; registered products for such optimal MHT are available around the world and must be preferred.

  14. Electrolyte vs. glucose-electrolyte isotonic solutions for oral rehydration therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Monreal, L; Garzón, N; Espada, Y; Ruíz-Gopegui, R; Homedes, J

    1999-07-01

    An isotonic electrolyte solution with a composition similar to equine sweat was compared to an isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution for oral rehydration therapy in exercising horses. Ten horses were dehydrated by using frusemide and allocated randomly to receive 4 different oral solutions: isotonic sweat-like electrolyte solution, half-strength hypotonic electrolyte solution, isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution, and plain water. Solutions were given by nasogastric tube using the same volume as the bodyweight lost by each horse. Blood samples were collected before and throughout 6 h of the rehydration period. Results showed that all solutions recovered pre-frusemide values of packed cell volume (PCV) and total plasma protein (TP) in a similar fashion. No changes for Na+ values were observed during the rehydration period when the isotonic sweat-like solution was used. However, a significant hyponatraemia was induced throughout rehydration when the other 3 solutions were given, especially when hypotonic solution and water were used. Osmolality values did not change when both isotonic solutions were administered; but a significant hypotonicity was observed when hypotonic solution and water were given. When the isotonic sweat-like solution was used, plasma Cl-, K+ and creatinine values recovered to premedication values significantly faster than the other 3 solutions. In conclusion, the isotonic sweat-like electrolyte was the best solution because it restored rapidly the fluid and plasma electrolyte imbalances. In contrast, the isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution impaired the plasma electrolyte imbalances.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy accelerates vascularization in keratinized oral mucosal surgical flaps.

    PubMed

    Helmers, Renée; Milstein, Dan M J; van Hulst, Robert A; de Lange, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is thought to promote vascular regeneration in wounds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HBOT in advancing vascular regeneration in healing oral mucosal surgical flaps. A palatine partial-thickness mucosal flap was raised in 10 male-specific pathogen-free New Zealand White rabbits. Randomized into 2 groups of 5 animals each (control and HBOT), functional capillary density was measured preoperatively (baseline), and immediately postoperatively until day 21 using sidestream dark-field video microscopy. Ten HBOT sessions were administered over the course of 2 weeks at 2.5 atmospheres (2.5 bar O2 /90 minutes). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the HBOT and control group on the sequential functional capillary density measurements. A significant interaction effect was present between time and group (F [8, 64] = 9.60; p < .0001) resulting from a significant increase in microcirculation in the HBOT group relative to the control group on days 7, 9, and 11. Our results suggest that HBOT is capable of advancing wound vascular regeneration in healing keratinized oral mucosal flaps. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Computer-aided dosage in oral anticoagulation therapy using phenprocoumon. Problems and approaches.

    PubMed

    Cromme, L; Völler, H; Gäbler, F; Salzwedel, A; Taborski, U

    2010-11-01

    Oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists has been established for over 50 years. Although it is highly effective in preventing thromboembolic incidents, its therapeutic control still remains problematic. Therefore, a computer-aided approach is recommended for deriving dosages. Up to now, the dosage is often based on the visual inspection of previous INR measurements, average weekly doses, and the INR target range. Statistical variations of measurement results and time-delayed effects of dosages, however, frequently result in the misinterpretation of data and suggest pseudo-trends. Treating physicians are not only responsible for determining the patient-specific maintenance dose, but must also respond to deviating INR values, overdosage or underdosage, initiate the oral anticoagulation therapy, and control the INR level in case of a new target range (bridging). Instructive examples are provided to illustrate the described difficulties. A computer-aided expert system is currently developed to ensure the therapeutic safety under the specified conditions. We present preliminary results from a study designed to validate mathematical models underlying such expert systems.

  17. Should transdermal rather than oral estrogens be used in menopausal hormone therapy? A review.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Agnès

    2010-03-01

    The current evaluation of the benefit/risk ratio associated with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use is largely based on clinical trials which investigated the effects of oral treatments. Would MHT with transdermal estrogens be associated with a more favourable benefit/risk ratio? We reviewed the available epidemiologic evidence on that question. Epidemiologic studies were considered if they provided risk estimates of conditions which carry an important weight among menopausal women, and for which epidemiologic evidence of a possible link with MHT use is convincing: cardiovascular diseases, breast cancer, diabetes, colorectal cancer and hip fracture. We did not include studies with only surrogate measures. We found that the available information on the potential impact of the route of administration of MHT on the risk of our selected outcomes is limited. To date, epidemiologic data suggest that it has no impact on the risk of breast cancer and hip fracture. Results on the risk of coronary heart disease and colorectal cancer are inconsistent. Studies on stroke and diabetes risk are too few to allow meaningful conclusions. There is a suggestion that transdermal MHT may be less deleterious than oral MHT regarding venous thromboembolism which needs to be confirmed. The issue of the route of administration of MHT should remain an active area of research as part of an attempt to identify treatment modalities that would have the least potential for exerting adverse effects.

  18. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014. Results ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years). Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset. Conclusion Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg) and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy. PMID:26171862

  19. Clinical evaluation of near-continuous oral micronized progesterone therapy in estrogenized postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, I I; Mortimer, G; Grimes, H; Tallon, D F; O'Dwyer, E; Fottrell, P F

    1996-02-01

    In an open non-comparative prospective trial of 12 months' duration, we investigated the role of a novel hormone replacement therapy regimen in 40 post-menopausal women who sought hormone replacement therapy. The regimen consisted of continuous administration of 0.625 mg of conjugated equine estrogen coupled with a fixed low-dose of micronized oral progesterone administered for 23 days every calendar month. The regimen was well-tolerated, producing no major side-effects and was effective in relieving menopausal symptoms. The study showed that 40% of the women experienced side-effects and 20% withdrew from the study. Half of the 20% of the women who dropped out did so for reasons not related to treatment. All symptomatic women experienced improvement after the 1st month, and virtually all were asymptomatic by the 3rd month of treatment, persisting until the end of the trial with the average number of hot flushes per day declining from the pretreatment levels by 96%. Amenorrhea was observed in 47% of patients, amenorrhea and minimal vaginal bleeding in 78% but acyclic bleeding was present in 28% of those in whom bleeding was re-established. Endometrial atrophy was induced in the majority of patients and no atypical endometrial hyperplasia was encountered. No significant changes were observed in blood glucose or liver enzymes. The mean percentage changes from baseline for serum cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and LDL/HDL ratio were -6%, +32% (p < 0.001), -16% (p < 0.05), +15% (p < 0.05) and -23% (p < 0.05), respectively. The regimen was clinically effective and its apparent lack of major side-effects, the protective effect on the endometrium, the added advantage of minimal vaginal bleeding and the beneficial effect on lipid/lipoprotein levels, offer an attractive therapy and improved compliance with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy.

  20. Thulium laser vaporesection of the prostate: Can we operate without interrupting oral antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Salvatore; Macchione, Luciano; Netsch, Christopher; Tanidir, Yiloren; Dragos, Laurian; Pappalardo, Rosa; Magno, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Thulium vaporesection of the prostate (ThuVARP) is a new and safe approach for patients receiving anticoagulant therapy in whom transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) may possess a high bleeding risk. We aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of ThuVARP in patients receiving oral antiplatelet/anticoagulant (OAP/OAC) therapy. Materials and Methods A total of 103 patients who underwent ThuVARP between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group A consisted of 47 patients who underwent low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) bridging and group B consisted of 56 patients who were operated on while receiving OAP/OAC therapy. Results The drop in hemoglobin levels in the pre- and postoperative periods was significantly higher in group A than in group B. When subgroups were analyzed, the mean drop in hemoglobin was significantly lower in the warfarin and ticlopidine subgroups of group B than in group A. International Prostate Symptom Scores were significantly lower 3, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery in group A than in group B. Quality of life scores, maximal flow rate values, and postmicturition residual urine volumes (mL) were similar between the 2 groups. A total of 38 and 41 patients in groups A and B, respectively, had no complications. Conclusions Our study showed the safety profile of continuing different OAP/OAC therapies in terms of bleeding problems in patients undergoing ThuVARP. We strongly recommend abandoning LMWH bridging and maintaining the OAP/OAC regimen patients are already receiving. PMID:28480345

  1. Novel Oral Therapies for Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Holder, Renee M; Rhee, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives. The efficacy and safety of these agents in chronic noncancer pain were assessed from publications identified through Ovid and PubMed database searches. Trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of oral agents for opioid-induced constipation or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, excluding laxatives, were reviewed. Lubiprostone and naloxegol are approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration for use in opioid-induced constipation. Axelopran (TD-1211) and sustained-release naloxone have undergone phase 2 and phase 1 studies, respectively, for the same indication. Naloxegol and axelopran are peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Naloxone essentially functions as a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist when administered orally in a sustained-release formulation. Lubiprostone is a locally acting chloride channel (CIC-2) activator that increases secretions and peristalsis. All agents increase spontaneous bowel movements and reduce other bowel symptoms compared with placebo in patients with noncancer pain who are chronic opioid users. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, and none of the drugs were associated with severe adverse or cardiovascular events. Investigations comparing these agents to regimens using standard laxative and combination therapy and trials in special populations and patients with active cancer are

  2. Effect of oil gum massage therapy on common pathogenic oral microorganisms - A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nishu; Acharya, Shashidhar; Martena, Suganthi; Singla, Ritesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: (i) To assess reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species count in saliva sample after ten minutes of oil gum massage therapy (massage of gingival tissues) per day for three weeks with sesame oil, olive oil, and coconut oil in three different groups of subjects. (ii) To compare the efficacy between three different oils and the “gold standard” chlorhexidine gel. (iii) To assess reduction in gingival scores and plaque scores of study subjects. Materials and Methods: Study design – Single center, parallel design, and triple blind randomized clinical study with four treatment groups. Participants: 32 of the 40 study subjects working as housekeeping personnel at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal; aged 18-55 years completed the three-week study period. Interventions: Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva everyday for three weeks with sesame oil, olive oil, coconut oil (tests), and Chlorhexidine gel (control). Oral health status and paraffin stimulated saliva samples were obtained at baseline and after three weeks of oil gum massage therapy. Outcome measures: Microbial culture, plaque index, and gingival index. Statistical analysis: Paired t test and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean Streptococcus mutans count, Lactobacillus count, plaque scores, and gingival scores in all four groups after the study. However, there was no significant difference found in percentage reduction of these variables between the four groups. Conclusion: These oils can be used as valuable preventive agents in maintaining and improving oral health in low socioeconomic status population. However, it is recommended that further research should be conducted in other populations with a larger sample and longer duration of follow-up period. PMID:25210256

  3. Adherence and patients' attitudes to oral anticancer drugs: a prospective series of 201 patients focusing on targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Philippe; Asmane-De la Porte, Irène; Meyer, Nicolas; Duclos, Brigitte; Serra, Sebastian; Dourthe, Louis-Marie; Amé, Shanti; Litique, Valère; Giron, Cathy; Goldbarg, Veronica; Fornecker, Luc; Quoix, Elisabeth; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Patient adherence is a challenge in oncology and hematology practice. Hormone therapy data in breast cancer suggest insufficient adherence and poor persistence. Limited data are available for targeted therapies (TT) including tyrosine kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We performed a prospective survey using a 15-item questionnaire in patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies receiving oral anticancer therapy. Treatment duration, setting (adjuvant vs. metastatic), cancer type, age, and comedication were recorded. 201 patients (median age 65.5 years) participated, 102 with TT and 99 with hormone therapy or chemotherapy (HC). The median time of drug intake was 11.0 months. Written information was more frequently given to TT patients (68.6 vs. 23.2%, p < 0.0001). TT and HC patients showed equal adherence to therapy (72.5 vs. 69.6%, p = n.s.) despite TT patients experiencing more side effects (p < 0.0001) and taking more concomitant oral medication (p = 0.0042). Forgotten doses were the leading cause of nonadherence in HC patients (83%, as compared to 54% in the TT group), whereas dose reduction by the patient was higher in the TT group (32 vs. 17%). Despite advances in providing information to patients leading to better adherence among TT patients, efforts towards better patient education are warranted including dedicated staff for monitoring outpatient anticancer oral therapy. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Predictors of Oral Rehydration Therapy use among under-five children with diarrhea in Eastern Ethiopia: a community based case control study.

    PubMed

    Mengistie, Bezatu; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu

    2012-11-24

    Rehydration therapy is a critical intervention to save the lives of children during the episodes of diarrhea. However, millions of children die every year due to failure to replace fluid effectively. The objective of this study was to identify the predictors of Oral Rehydration Therapy use among under-five children with diarrhea. A community based unmatched case control study was conducted in Kersa district, Eastern Ethiopia, in February, 2011. The cases were 241 under-five children with diarrhea in the preceding two weeks before the survey and who had received Oral Rehydration Therapy while the controls were 253 under-five children with diarrhea in the preceding two weeks before the survey and who had not received Oral Rehydration Therapy. The cases and the controls were compared to find out the factors that were associated with the utilization of Oral Rehydration Therapy. The study revealed that caregivers' previous experience of Oral Rehydration Therapy use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI = 2.63-6.22), seeking advice or treatment from health facilities, (AOR = 3.25, 95% CI = 2.06-5.11) and knowledge of Oral Rehydration Therapy (AOR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.97-4.85) were found to be the positive determinants of Oral Rehydration Therapy use. Perception of teething as a cause of diarrhea was negatively associated with the utilization of Oral rehydration Therapy (AOR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37-0.98). Health education should be strengthened on the benefit, preparation, early initiation of Oral Rehydration Therapy and the causes of diarrhea. Attention should be given to those who do not have previous experience of Oral Rehydration Therapy use and have less frequent contacts with the health facilities.

  5. Predictors of Oral Rehydration Therapy use among under-five children with diarrhea in Eastern Ethiopia: a community based case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rehydration therapy is a critical intervention to save the lives of children during the episodes of diarrhea. However, millions of children die every year due to failure to replace fluid effectively. The objective of this study was to identify the predictors of Oral Rehydration Therapy use among under-five children with diarrhea. Method A community based unmatched case control study was conducted in Kersa district, Eastern Ethiopia, in February, 2011. The cases were 241 under-five children with diarrhea in the preceding two weeks before the survey and who had received Oral Rehydration Therapy while the controls were 253 under-five children with diarrhea in the preceding two weeks before the survey and who had not received Oral Rehydration Therapy. The cases and the controls were compared to find out the factors that were associated with the utilization of Oral Rehydration Therapy. Result The study revealed that caregivers’ previous experience of Oral Rehydration Therapy use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI = 2.63–6.22), seeking advice or treatment from health facilities, (AOR = 3.25, 95% CI = 2.06–5.11) and knowledge of Oral Rehydration Therapy (AOR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.97–4.85) were found to be the positive determinants of Oral Rehydration Therapy use. Perception of teething as a cause of diarrhea was negatively associated with the utilization of Oral rehydration Therapy (AOR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37–0.98). Conclusion Health education should be strengthened on the benefit, preparation, early initiation of Oral Rehydration Therapy and the causes of diarrhea. Attention should be given to those who do not have previous experience of Oral Rehydration Therapy use and have less frequent contacts with the health facilities. PMID:23176055

  6. Evaluating the Primary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke of Oral Antithrombotic Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer Patients with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), the impact of oral antithrombotic therapy (OAT) on this risk has not yet been assessed. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of OAT in patients with HNC treated with RT. This retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. A total of 37,638 patients diagnosed with HNC included in the study were classified as users and nonusers of OAT. Primary outcome was IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA), and secondary outcomes were death and major bleeding. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no significant difference in the risk of IS or TIA between patients on continuous OAT and nonusers (adjusted HR, 0.812; 95% CI, 0.199–3.309). The risk of major bleeding was not significantly different between the groups. From a national population database, we did not find an association between OAT and decreasing risk of ischemic stroke/TIA or increasing hazard of major bleeding. PMID:27990433

  7. Oral magnesium therapy, exercise heart rate, exercise tolerance, and myocardial function in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Pokan, R; Hofmann, P; von Duvillard, S P; Smekal, G; Wonisch, M; Lettner, K; Schmid, P; Shechter, M; Silver, B; Bachl, N

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) upward deflection of the heart rate (HR) performance curve can be observed and that this upward deflection and the degree of the deflection are correlated with a diminished stress dependent left ventricular function. Magnesium supplementation improves endothelial function, exercise tolerance, and exercise induced chest pain in patients with CAD. Purpose We studied the effects of oral magnesium therapy on exercise dependent HR as related to exercise tolerance and resting myocardial function in patients with CAD. Methods In a double blind controlled trial, 53 male patients with stable CAD were randomised to either oral magnesium 15 mmol twice daily (n = 28, age 61±9 years, height 171±7 cm, body weight 79±10 kg, previous myocardial infarction, n = 7) or placebo (n = 25, age 58±10 years, height 172±6 cm, body weight 79±10 kg, previous myocardial infarction, n = 6) for 6 months. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the degree and direction of the deflection of the HR performance curve described as factor k<0 (upward deflection), and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were the outcomes measured. Results Magnesium therapy for 6 months significantly increased intracellular magnesium levels (32.7±2.5 v 35.6±2.1 mEq/l, p<0.001) compared to placebo (33.1±3.1.9 v 33.8±2.0 mEq/l, NS), VO2max (28.3±6.2 v 30.6±7.1 ml/kg/min, p<0.001; 29.3±5.4 v 29.6±5.2 ml/kg/min, NS), factor k (−0.298±0.242 v −0.208±0.260, p<0.05; −0.269±0.336 v −0.272±0.335, NS), and LVEF (58±11 v 67±10%, p<0.001; 55±11 v 54±12%, NS). Conclusion The present study supports the intake of oral magnesium and its favourable effects on exercise tolerance and left ventricular function during rest and exercise in stable CAD patients. PMID:16825271

  8. ANALYSIS OF FLOW THROUGH A HUMAN ORAL MODEL FOR USE IN INHALATION TOXICOLOGY AND AEROSOL THERAPY PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    RATIONALE
    Understanding the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols is of fundamental importance to inhalation toxicology and aerosol therapy. Herein, we focus on the development of a computer based oral morphology and related computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studi...

  9. ANALYSIS OF FLOW THROUGH A HUMAN ORAL MODEL FOR USE IN INHALATION TOXICOLOGY AND AEROSOL THERAPY PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    RATIONALE
    Understanding the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols is of fundamental importance to inhalation toxicology and aerosol therapy. Herein, we focus on the development of a computer based oral morphology and related computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studi...

  10. Cost-effectiveness of combined oral bisphosphonate therapy and falls prevention exercise for fracture prevention in the USA.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Crandall, C J; Ganz, D A

    2017-02-01

    We developed a Markov microsimulation model among hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling US white women without prior major osteoporotic fractures over a lifetime horizon. At ages 75 and 80, adding 1 year of exercise to 5 years of oral bisphosphonate therapy is cost-effective at a conventionally accepted threshold compared with bisphosphonates alone.

  11. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  12. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  13. Oral fluid cannabinoids in chronic cannabis smokers during oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol therapy and smoked cannabis challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Vandrey, Ryan; Mendu, Damodara R.; Anizan, Sebastien; Milman, Garry; Murray, Jeannie A.; Barnes, Allan J.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is effective for attenuating cannabis withdrawal and may benefit treatment of cannabis use disorders. Oral fluid (OF) cannabinoid testing, increasing in forensic and workplace settings, could be valuable for monitoring during cannabis treatment. METHODS Eleven cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit for 51 days, and received daily 0, 30, 60, and 120 mg oral THC in divided doses for 5 days. There was a 5-puff smoked cannabis challenge on the 5th day. Each medication session was separated by 9 days of ad libitum cannabis smoking. OF was collected the evening prior to and throughout oral THC sessions and analyzed by 2-dimensional GC-MS for THC, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). RESULTS During all oral THC administrations, THC OF concentrations decreased to ≤78.2, 33.2, and 1.4 μg/L by 24, 48, and 72h, respectively. CBN also decreased over time with concentrations 10-fold lower than THC, with none detected beyond 69h. CBD and 11-OH-THC were rarely detected, only within 19 and 1.6h post smoking, respectively. THCCOOH OF concentrations were dose-dependent and increased over time during 120 mg THC dosing. After cannabis smoking, THC, CBN, and THCCOOH concentrations showed a significant dose-effect and decreased significantly over time. CONCLUSIONS Oral THC dosing significantly affected OF THCCOOH but minimally contributed to THC OF concentrations; prior ad libitum smoking was the primary source of THC, CBD and CBN. Higher cannabinoid concentrations following active oral THC administrations versus placebo suggest a compensatory effect of THC tolerance on smoking topography. PMID:23938457

  14. Long acting injectable versus oral naltrexone maintenance therapy with psychosocial intervention for heroin dependence: A quasi-experiment

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Adam C.; Comer, Sandra D.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Bisaga, Adam; Carpenter, Kenneth; Raby, Wilfrid M.; Yu, Elmer; O’Brien, Charles P.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To conduct a quasi-experimental comparison of early clinical outcomes between injectable, sustained release, depot naltrexone formulation versus oral naltrexone maintenance therapy. Method Early retention and urine results were compared between patients participating in two concurrently run randomized clinical trials of oral (N = 69) and long acting injectable naltrexone maintenance therapy with psychosocial therapy (N = 42). Retention in treatment and opiate use in the first 8-weeks post-detoxification were compared. Results Long acting injectable naltrexone produced significantly better outcome than oral naltrexone on days retained in treatment and one measure of opiate use; other measures were not significantly different, but differences were in the same direction. In subanalyses, there were interaction effects between baseline heroin severity and type of treatment. In subanalyses, heroin users with more severe baseline use showed better retention in oral naltrexone maintenance combined with intensive psychotherapy (Behavior Naltrexone Therapy) as compared to retention of severe users treated with long acting naltrexone injections combined with standard cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy; less severe heroin users evidenced better outcomes when treated with long acting injectable naltrexone. Conclusions This quasi-experimental analysis provides tentative indications of superior outcomes for heroin dependent patients treated with long acting injectable naltrexone compared to oral naltrexone. The finding that heroin users with more severe baseline use achieved better outcomes with oral naltrexone is most probably attributable to the intensive nature of the psychosocial treatments provided, and points to the opportunity for continued research in augmenting injectable naltrexone with psychosocial strategies to further improve outcome especially in more severe users. The results should be considered exploratory given the quasi-experimental nature of the

  15. Use of oral combination therapy for type 2 diabetes in primary care: Meeting individualized patient goals.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Frank; Adkins, Sarah E; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-01-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by primary care physicians (PCPs) has become increasingly complex due to limitations on consultation time, an increasing array of drug treatment options, and issues of comorbidities and polypharmacy. Diabetes is a progressive condition and treatment with a single glucose-lowering agent can only address limited pathophysiologic targets and does not provide adequate glycemic control in many cases. Consequently, most patients with T2DM will eventually require treatment with multiple glucose-lowering medications. Oral combination therapy in T2DM may be given as multiple-pills, or as single-pill, fixed-dose combinations (FDCs), the latter of which offer convenience, ease of administration, and a reduction in the medication burden. Therefore, FDCs can potentially improve patients' treatment adherence and optimize achievement and maintenance of glycemic targets. However, cost factors also need to be considered. An understanding of the issues associated with the use of combination therapy in T2DM will help PCPs to guide patient-centered decision making and promote the effective management of T2DM.

  16. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  17. [Protein catabolism and malnutrition in liver cirrhosis - impact of oral nutritional therapy].

    PubMed

    Norman, K; Valentini, L; Lochs, H; Pirlich, M

    2010-07-01

    Malnutrition with loss of muscle is common in patients with liver cirrhosis and has negative impact on morbidity and mortality. The aetiology of malnutrition is multifactorial and includes inflammation, early onset of gluconeogenesis due to impaired glycogen storage and sometimes hypermetabolism. Reduced nutritional intake, however, plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of malnutrition. There is, however, ample evidence that nutritional intake and therapy are inadequate in liver cirrhosis although studies have clearly shown that dietary counselling and nutritional therapy with oral supplements improve intake in these patients. Protein requirement is considered to be increased in liver cirrhosis and high protein intake has been shown to be well tolerated and associated with an improvement of liver function and nutritional status. Protein intolerance on the other hand is uncommon and hepatic encephalopathy can thus rarely be attributed to high protein consumption. Recommendations for general protein restriction must therefore be considered obsolete and rather a risk factor for an impaired clinical outcome. Furthermore, the administration of late evening meals is highly beneficial in patients with liver disease since the rapid onset of the overnight catabolic state is counteracted. The serum concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is decreased in patients with liver cirrhosis and long-term supplementation of BCAA has been shown to improve nutritional status and prolong event-free survival and quality of life.

  18. Cupreous Complex-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles for Photothermal Therapy and Chemotherapy of Oral Epithelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Wang, Dandan; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Tingting; Sun, Bin; Cui, Yan; Zhang, Daqi; Sun, Hongchen; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Hui; Yang, Bai

    2015-09-23

    Electron transition materials on the basis of transition metal ions usually possess higher photothermal transduction efficiency but lower extinction ability, which have not been considered as efficient photothermal agents for therapeutic applications. In this work, we demonstrate a facile and feasible approach for enhancing 808 nm photothermal conversion effect of d orbits transition Cu(II) ions by forming Cu-carboxylate complexes. The coordination with carboxylate groups greatly enlarges the splitting energy gap of Cu(II) and the capability of electron transition, thus enhancing the extinction ability in near-infrared region. The cupreous complexes are further loaded in biocompatible and biodegradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs) of chitosan to temporarily lower the toxicity, which allows the photothermal therapy of human oral epithelial carcinoma (KB) cells in vitro and KB tumors in vivo. Animal experiments indicate the photothermal tumor inhibition rate of 100%. In addition, the gradual degradation of chitosan NPs leads to the release of cupreous complexes, thus exhibiting additional chemotherapeutic behavior in KB tumor treatment. Onefold chemotherapy experiments indicate the tumor inhibition rate of 93.1%. The combination of photothermal therapy and chemotherapy of cupreous complex-loaded chitosan NPs indicates the possibility of inhibiting tumor recurrence.

  19. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaymakamzade, Bahar; Karabudak, Rana; Kurne, Aslı Tuncer; Nurlu, Gülay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, commonly attributed to infections or vaccinations. Toxic or allergenic compounds can also trigger a response in the immune system and may cause demyelination. We present a case with ADEM after using oral herbal medications. Case Report: A 25 year-old male developed bilateral central facial palsy and severe quadriparesis after taking herbal drugs (containing echinacea and many other herbal ingredients) for two weeks. He had used the extract to increase his potency and reproductivity. He had no past history of recent immunization or viral infection. The clinical findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compatible with ADEM. The neurological findings were improved after seven doses of pulse methylprednisolone treatment. To our knowledge, this is the third report in the literature that links herbal therapy and demyelinating disease. Conclusion: Most of the ADEM cases related to herbal therapy in the literature similarly used echinacea. It is our opinion that other ingredients of the herbal extract used by our case, besides echinacea, could have the potential to cause a trigger in the immune system. Further studies are needed to clarify the immunological effects of different kinds of herbal compounds, as well as the effects of different parts of the plants and the results of various dosages. Moreover, ingredients should also be tested for toxicity, adverse effects and drug interactions. PMID:27308086

  20. Effects of food with two oral rehydration therapies: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Alam, N H; Ahmed, T; Khatun, M; Molla, A M

    1992-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of food on the efficacy of oral rehydration solution (ORS), a randomised, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 182 adults with cholera. After initial rehydration with an intravenous polyelectrolyte solution for four hours, the patients were randomised to receive one of four rehydration therapies: glucose based ORS and no food for the first 24 hours (group A), glucose based ORS plus food from the beginning of treatment (group B), rice based ORS with no food for the first 24 hours (group C), and rice based ORS plus food from start of therapy (group D). Tetracycline was given after 72 hours to all patients. No significant differences in ORS intake, stool output, and duration of diarrhoea were noted between groups A and B and between groups C and D. A substantial and significant reduction in stool output was, however, shown in the groups who received rice based ORS irrespective of feeding. These results show that food does not potentiate the efficacy of either glucose based or rice based ORS in adults with cholera. Rice based ORS compared with glucose ORS substantially reduces purging in cholera patients.

  1. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy in Patients Receiving Haemodialysis: Is It Time to Abandon It?

    PubMed Central

    Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy in haemodialysis patients causes a great deal of controversy. This is because a number of pro- and anticoagulant factors play an important role in end-stage renal failure due to the nature of the disease itself. In these conditions, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the OACs used change as well. In the case of the treatment of venous thromboembolism, the only remaining option is OAC treatment according to regimens used for the general population. Prevention of HD vascular access thrombosis with the use of OACs is not very effective and can be dangerous. However, OAC treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation in dialysis population may be associated with an increase in the incidence of stroke and mortality. Doubts should be dispelled by prospective, randomised studies; at the moment, there is no justification for routine use of OACs in the above-mentioned indications. In selected cases of OAC therapy in this group of patients, it is absolutely necessary to control and monitor the applied treatment thoroughly. Indications for the use of OACs in patients with end-stage renal disease, including haemodialysis patients, should be currently limited. PMID:24379737

  2. Effect of class IV laser therapy on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Gobbo, Margherita; Sturnega, Mauro; Martinelli, Valentina; Mano, Miguel; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bussani, Rossana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Long, Carlin S; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Giacca, Mauro; Biasotto, Matteo; Zacchigna, Serena

    2013-12-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a serious and acute side effect in patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, often leading to the suspension of therapy and a need for opioid analgesic and enteral/parenteral nutrition, with an effect on patient survival. Among the various interventions proposed in OM management, laser therapy is becoming a recommended treatment option but has limitations due to its heterogeneous laser parameters. Here, we report on our successful clinical experience on the use of class IV laser therapy to treat OM induced by different chemotherapy regimens. To shed light on the mechanisms of action of laser therapy in improving OM resolution, we have developed an animal model of chemotherapy-induced OM, in which we compare the efficacy of the standard low-power laser therapy protocol with an innovative protocol, defined as high-power laser therapy. We show that high-power laser therapy is more effective than low-power laser therapy in improving OM lesion healing, reducing the inflammatory burden, and preserving tissue integrity. In addition, high-power laser therapy has been particularly effective in promoting the formation of new arterioles within the granulation tissue. Our results provide important insights into the mechanism of action of biostimulating laser therapy on OM in vivo and pave a way for clinical experimentation with the use of high-power laser therapy.

  3. Boron microlocalization in oral mucosal tissue: implications for boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G M; Smith, D R; Patel, H; Chandra, S; Morrison, G H; Hopewell, J W; Rezvani, M; Micca, P L; Coderre, J A

    2000-01-01

    Clinical studies of the treatment of glioma and cutaneous melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are currently taking place in the USA, Europe and Japan. New BNCT clinical facilities are under construction in Finland, Sweden, England and California. The observation of transient acute effects in the oral mucosa of a number of glioma patients involved in the American clinical trials, suggests that radiation damage of the oral mucosa could be a potential complication in future BNCT clinical protocols, involving higher doses and larger irradiation field sizes. The present investigation is the first to use a high resolution surface analytical technique to relate the microdistribution of boron-10 (10B) in the oral mucosa to the biological effectiveness of the 10B(n,α)7Li neutron capture reaction in this tissue. The two boron delivery agents used clinically in Europe/Japan and the USA, borocaptate sodium (BSH) and p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), respectively, were evaluated using a rat ventral tongue model. 10B concentrations in various regions of the tongue mucosa were estimated using ion microscopy. In the epithelium, levels of 10B were appreciably lower after the administration of BSH than was the case after BPA. The epithelium:blood 10B partition ratios were 0.2:1 and 1:1 for BSH and BPA respectively. The 10B content of the lamina propria was higher than that measured in the epithelium for both BSH and BPA. The difference was most marked for BSH, where 10B levels were a factor of six higher in the lamina propria than in the epithelium. The concentration of 10B was also measured in blood vessel walls where relatively low levels of accumulation of BSH, as compared with BPA, was demonstrated in blood vessel endothelial cells and muscle. Vessel wall:blood 10B partition ratios were 0.3:1 and 0.9:1 for BSH and BPA respectively. Evaluation of tongue mucosal response (ulceration) to BNC irradiation indicated a considerably reduced radiation sensitivity using BSH as

  4. Oral antioxidant therapy for juvenile rats with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative and nitrosylative changes have been shown to occur in conjunction with the hypoxic changes and cellular/axonal damage in hydrocephalic rodent brains. We hypothesized that antioxidant therapy would improve behavioral, neurophysiological, and/or neurobiochemical outcomes in juvenile rats following induction of hydrocephalus. Methods Three-week old rats received an injection of kaolin (aluminum silicate) into the cisterna magna. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed two weeks later to assess ventricle size and stratify rats to four treatment conditions. Rats were treated for two weeks daily with sham therapy of either oral canola oil or dextrose or experimental therapy of a low or high dose of an antioxidant mixture containing α-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), reduced glutathione, and reduced lipoic acid. Behavior was examined thrice weekly. Results All hydrocephalic groups lagged in weight gain in comparison to non-hydrocephalic controls, all developed significant ventriculomegaly, and all exhibited white matter destruction. Canola oil with or without the antioxidant mixture normalized antioxidant capacity in brain tissue, and the dextrose-treated rats had the greatest ventricular enlargement during the treatment period. However, there were no significant differences between the four treatment groups of hydrocephalic rats for the various behavioral tasks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein quantitation showed no differences between the treatment groups or with control rats. There was increased lipid peroxidation in the hydrocephalic rats compared to controls but no differences between treatment groups. Conclusion The antioxidant cocktail showed no therapeutic benefits for juvenile rats with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus although canola oil might have mild benefit. PMID:25324960

  5. Objective measurement of compliance during oral appliance therapy for sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Vanderveken, Olivier M; Dieltjens, Marijke; Wouters, Kristien; De Backer, Wilfried A; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Braem, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral appliance (OA) therapy is increasingly prescribed as a non-continuous positive airway pressure treatment modality for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Although OA therapy is reported to be efficacious for the treatment of SDB, data on compliance remain limited to self-report. Methods In this 3-month prospective clinical trial, the main outcome was to assess the safety and feasibility of an objective measurement of compliance during OA therapy using an embedded microsensor thermometer with on-chip integrated readout electronics in 51 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SDB (AHI 18.0±11.9/h; age 47±10 y; BMI 26.6±4.0 kg/m2; men/women: 31/20). Patients were unaware of the purpose of the study. Results No microsensor-related adverse events were recorded. In addition, no problems were encountered during the readout of the compliance data. Out of 51 microsensors, one had a technical defect and was lost to follow-up. In this study, the overall objective mean rate of OA use was 6.6±1.3 h per day with a regular OA users’ rate of 82% at the 3-month follow-up. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between objective and self-reported OA compliance data in this study. Measurement of the objective OA compliance allowed us to calculate the mean disease alleviation (MDA) as the product of objective compliance and therapeutic efficacy. MDA serves as a measure of the overall therapeutic effectiveness, and turned out to be 51.1%. Conclusions The results illustrate the safety and feasibility of objective measurement of OA compliance. The objective measurement of OA compliance allows for calculation of the MDA. PMID:22993169

  6. Combination Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: Orally Targeted Nanoparticles Prevent Mucosal Damage and Relieve Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Zhan; Viennois, Emilie; Kang, Yuejun; Zhang, Mingzhen; Han, Moon Kwon; Chen, Jiucun; Merlin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy is an emerging strategy that is under intensive preclinical investigation for the treatment of various diseases. CD98 is highly overexpressed on the surfaces of epithelial cells and macrophages in the colon tissue with ulcerative colitis (UC), which is usually associated with mucosal damage and inflammation. We previously proved that CD98 siRNA (siCD98)-induced down-regulation of CD98 in colitis tissue decreased the severity of UC to a certain extent. In an effort to further improve the therapeutic efficacy, we aim to simultaneously deliver siCD98 in combination with a potent anti-inflammatory agent, curcumin (CUR), using hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). The resultant spherical HA-siCD98/CUR-NPs are featured by a desirable particle size (∼246 nm) and slightly negative zeta potential (∼-14 mV). The NPs functionalized with HA are able to guide the co-delivery of drugs to the targeted cells related to UC therapy (colonic epithelial cells and macrophages). Compared to either siCD98- or CUR-based monotherapy, co-delivery of siCD98 and CUR by HA-functionalized NPs can exert combinational effects against UC by protecting the mucosal layer and alleviating inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. This study shows the promising capability of the co-delivered siCD98 and CUR for boosting the conventional monotherapy via this novel nanotherapeutic agent, which offers a structurally simple platform for orally administered delivery of drugs to target cells in UC therapy. PMID:27924161

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015.

    PubMed

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C; Katz, Sheri G; Lettieri, Christopher J; Harrod, Christopher G; Thomas, Sherene M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2015-07-15

    Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) commissioned a seven-member task force. A systematic review of the literature was performed and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the quality of evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of the evidence counterbalanced by an assessment of the relative benefit of the treatment versus the potential harms. The AASM and AADSM Board of Directors approved the final guideline recommendations. 1. We recommend that sleep physicians prescribe oral appliances, rather than no therapy, for adult patients who request treatment of primary snoring (without obstructive sleep apnea). (STANDARD) 2. When oral appliance therapy is prescribed by a sleep physician for an adult patient with obstructive sleep apnea, we suggest that a qualified dentist use a custom, titratable appliance over non-custom oral devices. (GUIDELINE) 3. We recommend that sleep physicians consider prescription of oral appliances, rather than no treatment, for adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are intolerant of CPAP therapy or prefer alternate therapy. (STANDARD) 4. We suggest that qualified dentists provide oversight—rather than no follow-up—of oral appliance therapy in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, to survey for dental-related side effects or occlusal changes and reduce their incidence. (GUIDELINE) 5. We suggest that sleep physicians conduct follow-up sleep testing to improve or confirm

  8. Photodynamic Therapy With HPPH in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  9. Metronomic therapy with oral 6-mercaptopurine in elderly acute myeloid leukemia: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Beniwal, Surender Kumar; Kalwar, Ashok; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in elderly patients differs biologically from that in younger patients and is known to have unfavorable chromosomal rearrangements, higher resistance, and lower tolerance to chemotherapy. In such circumstances, instead of giving full-blown chemotherapy, palliative metronomic chemotherapy (MCT) could be a treatment option. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective pilot study of old AML patients (age >60 years) not amenable to curative treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled into the study and were treated with daily oral 6-mercaptopurine 75 mg/m2. The following inclusion criteria were used: age >60 years, nonpromyelocytic AML, the absence of uncontrolled comorbidities, and patient not amenable to curative treatment. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to calculate the hazards ratio of significant factors. Results: The median age of the patients was 69 years (range: 61–86 years) with male: female ratio of 2.5:1. About 59.4% of patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 while rest had the status of 3. The median OS was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4–7.6). Males had median OS of 7 months (95% CI: 5.4–8.6) versus females with OS of 3 months (95% CI: 1.5–4.4; P = 0.008). There was no survival difference on the basis of baseline hemoglobin or French-American-British class. There were no Grade 4 toxicities and no episode of febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: MCT with oral 6-mercaptopurine is an attractive treatment option in elderly AML patients who are not amenable to curative therapy with minimal toxicities. PMID:27275453

  10. Biodistribution of sodium borocaptate (BSH) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in an oral cancer model.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Nievas, Susana; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2013-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of ¹⁰B carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We previously proved the therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by the boron compounds boronophenylalanine and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Based on the clinical relevance of the boron carrier sodium borocaptate (BSH) and the knowledge that the most effective way to optimize BNCT is to improve tumor boron targeting, the specific aim of this study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and evaluate the feasibility of BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3. The general aim of these studies is to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology and optimize BNCT for head and neck cancer. Sodium borocaptate (50 mg ¹⁰B/kg) was administered to tumor-bearing hamsters. Groups of 3-5 animals were killed humanely at nine time-points, 3-12 h post-administration. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous pouch tissue, normal pouch tissue and other clinically relevant normal tissues were processed for boron measurement by optic emission spectroscopy. Tumor boron concentration peaked to therapeutically useful boron concentration values of 24-35 ppm. The boron concentration ratio tumor/normal pouch tissue ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Pharmacokinetic curves showed that the optimum interval between BSH administration and neutron irradiation was 7-11 h. It is concluded that BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3 would be feasible.

  11. Phenytoin (Dilantin) and acupuncture therapy in the treatment of intractable oral and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I; Lu, Gabriel P

    2011-01-01

    Phenytoin is an anti-convulsant and anti-arrhythmic medication. Manufactured by various pharmaceutical companies with various brand names, phenytoin (PHT) is also known as Dilantain, Hydantoin or Phenytek in the United States; Dilantain or Remytoine in Canada; Epamin, Hidantoina in Mexico; and Fenidatoin or Fenitron or other names elsewhere in the world. Phenytoin (PHT) is especially useful for patients suffering from intractable oral and facial pain especially those who exhibit anger, stress, depression and irrational emotions commonly seen in the patients with oral and facial pain. When used properly, Phenytoin is also an effective anxiolysis drug in addition to its theraputic effects on pain and can be used alone or, even better, if combined with other compatible sedatives. Phenytoin is particularly valuable when combined with acupuncture for patients with trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyneal neuralgia, Bell's palsy, and some other facial paralysis and pain. It also has an advantage of keeping the patient relatively lucid after treatment. Either PHT or acupuncture alone can benefit patients but the success of treatment outcome may be limited. We found by combining both acupuncture and PHT with Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement by stimulating middle finger at the first segment of ventral (palmar) and lateral surfaces, as well as prescribing PHT with the dosage predetermined for each patient by Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), the treatment outcome was much better resulted with less recurrence and intensity of pain during episodes of attack. Patients with Bell's palsy were most benefited by acupuncture therapy that could completely get rid of the illness.

  12. Alternative antiretroviral therapy formulations for patients unable to swallow solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Joan M; Akpanudo, Barbara; Shukla, Vipul; Gutterson, Glen; Eitniear, Lindsey; Sahloff, Eric G

    2015-09-15

    Evidence-based guidance is presented to assist clinicians in selecting alternative formulations of antiretroviral (ARV) agents for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who are unable to swallow tablets or capsules. The inability to take medications in standard oral dosage forms can be associated with nonadherence or the use of alternative administration strategies such as capsule or tablet breaking, crushing, or chewing. Patients with HIV infection require long-term ARV therapy to maintain viral suppression; ARV agents are predominately available as tablets and capsules that may pose swallowing difficulties for some patients. Using a variety of sources (the primary literature, pharmaceutical package inserts, and requests for unpublished data from drug manufacturers), available evidence on the bioavailability of ARV medications after disruption of the capsule or tablet matrix was reviewed; information on alternative formulations of ARV agents was also assessed. With several ARV agents, disruption of the solid oral dosage form by crushing, chewing, or breaking tablets or opening capsules prior to ingestion has been shown to result in altered bioavailability or pharmacokinetics and thus the potential for incomplete virological suppression, increased adverse effects, and suboptimal health outcomes. Of the 33 single-agent ARV medications and combination ARV products in five classes available at the time of review, approximately half exist as powders, liquids, injectables, or chewable or dissolvable tablets. If alternative ARV formulations or administration methods are used, close monitoring for achievement of virological and immunologic success and potential toxicities is recommended. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Recombinant Feline Interferon-Omega as an alternative immune modulation therapy in FIV positive cats: clinical and laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gil, S; Leal, R O; McGahie, D; Sepúlveda, N; Duarte, A; Niza, M M R E; Tavares, L

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant-Feline Interferon-Omega (rFeIFN-ω) is an immune-modulator licensed for use subcutaneously in Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV) therapy. Despite oral protocols have been suggested, little is known about such use in FIV-infected cats. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical improvement, laboratory findings, concurrent viral excretion and acute phase proteins (APPs) in naturally FIV-infected cats under oral rFeIFN-ω therapy (0.1 MU/cat rFeIFN-ω PO, SID, 90 days). 11 FIV-positive cats were treated with oral rFeIFN-ω (PO Group). Results were compared to previous data from 7 FIV-positive cats treated with the subcutaneous licensed protocol (SC Group). Initial clinical scores were similar in both groups. Independently of the protocol, rFeIFN-ω induced a significant clinical improvement of treated cats. Concurrent viral excretion and APP's variation were not significant in the PO Group. Oral rFeIFN-ω can be an effective alternative therapy for FIV-infected cats, being also an option for treatment follow-up in cats submitted to the licensed protocol.

  14. Efficacy of combination therapy of oral zinc sulfate with imiquimod, podophyllin or cryotherapy in the treatment of vulvar warts.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Setareh; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Modarres Gillani, Mitra; Mousavi, Azam Sadat; Shirazi, Mahboobeh

    2014-10-01

    Zinc sulfate is beneficial in the treatment of epithelial warts. We conducted this study to compare the efficacy of combination therapy of oral zinc sulfate with conventional treatments in the treatment of vulvar warts. This study was a randomized controlled trial. The sample size was 42 in each group. Women aged 20-50 years were placed by the block randomized method into six groups: the podophyllin-, imiquimod- and cryotherapy-treated groups, and another three groups receiving 8-week combination therapy of 400 mg oral zinc sulfate with one of the above-mentioned treatments. Data were analyzed using anova and Fischer's exact test with spss16. A total of 228 patients were recruited and completed the study in six treatment groups. No significant difference was observed in the response to treatment among these groups. Relapse after 6 months was significantly higher in the podophyllin-, imiquimod- and cryotherapy-treated patients compared to patients receiving these treatments in combination with oral zinc sulfate (P<0.05). Combined therapy of oral zinc sulfate with conventional treatments of vulvar warts appears to reduce the relapse rate. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. [Oral rehydration therapy: an analysis of its results and impact on the hospitalization and mortality of children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Dohi-Fujii, B; Godoy-Olvera, L M; Durazo-Ortíz, J

    1993-11-01

    We present results of four years in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora. There was 10.2 consults by diarrhoea for day. Children lower of one year old received oral rehydration therapy in 86.8%, were included 11% of prolonged diarrhoea and 32.3% of children with malnutrition. During the procedure diarrhoea there was complicated in 3% with paralytic ileus sepsis and pneumonia. Effectivity of ORT was in 90.9%; 92.8% in light dehydration and 78.7% moderate. Failure in 8.6% was due to vomitus, no acceptation of the oral solution, abundant evacuations and other complication presented. Were observed reduction in hospitalization, rate of 19.2% in 1986 to 38.4% in 1989. The diarrheal mortality decreased in the Urgence Department in 42% and in the Infectology Department in 54%. We considered these results as satisfactory, but are susceptible to better when we diffuse more the oral rehydration therapy in own region.

  16. Differential effects of oral and transdermal menopausal hormone therapy on prostacyclin and thromboxane in platelets.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Hunter, Larry W; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Heit, John A; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) may increase thrombotic risk but modulate endothelial function and reduce development of vascular lesions. This study compared effects of MHT on prostanoid-modulated adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion from platelets in relationship with endothelial reactive hyperemia (RH) index and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Participants were healthy, recently menopausal women of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) randomized to one of three treatments: oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, 0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (tE2, 50 μg/day) each with intermittent oral progesterone or placebo pills and patch (PL). Prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were assessed by quantification of their stable metabolites (6-keto-prostaglandin F1α, 6-k-PGF1α; thromboxane B2, TXB2), using ELISA. Dense granule ATP secretion from activated platelets was determined by bioluminescence; RH and CIMT were determined by fingertip tonometry and ultrasound, respectively. After 48 months of treatment, platelet content of 6-k-PGF1α and TXB2 was significantly lower in oCEE compared to the PL. Inhibition of ATP secretion by exogenous activation of cAMP associated with platelet 6-k-PGF1α (r = -0.41, P = 0.04) and TXB2 (r = 0.71, P = 0.0005) only in the oCEE group. Serum and platelet content of 6-k-PGF1α and TXB2 associated positively in the PL and tE2 groups. Serum 6-k-PGF1α positively associated with RH in the oCEE group (r = 0.73, P = 0.02), while serum TXB2 positively associated with CIMT in the tE2 group (r = 0.64, P = 0.01). Thus, oCEE and tE2 differentially affect prostanoid-mediated platelet secretory pathways but alone would not account for an increased thrombotic risk for oral MHT. Furthermore, platelet-derived prostanoids may contribute to RH and vascular remodeling in healthy menopausal women.

  17. Differential effects of oral and transdermal menopausal hormone therapy on prostacyclin and thromboxane in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Limor; Hunter, Larry W.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Heit, John A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) may increase thrombotic risk but modulate endothelial function and reduce development of vascular lesions. This study compared effects of MHT on prostanoid‐modulated adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion from platelets in relationship with endothelial reactive hyperemia (RH) index and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Participants were healthy, recently menopausal women of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) randomized to one of three treatments: oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, 0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β‐estradiol (tE2, 50 μg/day) each with intermittent oral progesterone or placebo pills and patch (PL). Prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 were assessed by quantification of their stable metabolites (6‐keto‐prostaglandin F1α, 6‐k‐PGF1α; thromboxane B2, TXB2), using ELISA. Dense granule ATP secretion from activated platelets was determined by bioluminescence; RH and CIMT were determined by fingertip tonometry and ultrasound, respectively. After 48 months of treatment, platelet content of 6‐k‐PGF1α and TXB2 was significantly lower in oCEE compared to the PL. Inhibition of ATP secretion by exogenous activation of cAMP associated with platelet 6‐k‐PGF1α (r = −0.41, P = 0.04) and TXB2 (r = 0.71, P = 0.0005) only in the oCEE group. Serum and platelet content of 6‐k‐PGF1α and TXB2 associated positively in the PL and tE2 groups. Serum 6‐k‐PGF1α positively associated with RH in the oCEE group (r = 0.73, P = 0.02), while serum TXB2 positively associated with CIMT in the tE2 group (r = 0.64, P = 0.01). Thus, oCEE and tE2 differentially affect prostanoid‐mediated platelet secretory pathways but alone would not account for an increased thrombotic risk for oral MHT. Furthermore, platelet‐derived prostanoids may contribute to RH and vascular remodeling in healthy menopausal women. PMID:24760527

  18. An Audit of Management of Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy With International Normalized Ratio (INR) Five or Above.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sandeep; Kakkar, Naveen

    2013-03-01

    Maintaining the international normalized ratio (INR) within the therapeutic range in patients on oral anticoagulant treatment is a challenge for the physician. Excessive anticoagulation poses the risk of bleeding in patients. Management strategies vary among clinicians although standard guidelines exist for the same. We conducted an audit in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy in our hospital with excessive anticoagulation. This retrospective study was carried out among patients on oral anticoagulant therapy for various thrombotic conditions with at least a single INR recording of 5 or more. Other than demographic details, the type of oral anticoagulant used, indication, duration of treatment, dosage and concomitant use of interacting drugs or alcohol were also recorded. Detail of the nature and site of bleed and management for the same was also noted. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Fifty episodes with INR ≥ 5 (5.0-10.75) were noted in 44 patients (M:F = 1:1). Their age ranged from 20 to 88 years (mean 50.3 ± 16.4 years). The duration of anticoagulant therapy varied from 3 days to 180 months. Of the 43 episodes in patients who had no bleeding, the anticoagulant was stopped on 32 occasions for variable periods with dose reduction in the rest of the patients. Spontaneous bleeding was seen in seven patients (6 major and 1 minor). Among the seven patients with bleeding, other than stopping he oral anticoagulant drug, other measures taken were vitamin K therapy, fresh frozen plasma or packed red cell transfusion. Overall management strategy of patients with high INR was in compliance with standard recommendations.

  19. Comparing clinical effects of photodynamic therapy as a novel method with topical corticosteroid for treatment of Oral Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Mojahedi, Seyyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Namdari, Mahshid; Rankohi, Zahra Elmi

    2017-06-29

    Oral lichen planus is an autoimmune disorder with several challenges in treatment. Photodynamic therapy has been proposed as a new treatment option for the disease. The present study compared the clinical effects of the photodynamic therapy and dexamethasone mouthwash in the treatment of oral lichen planus lesions. In this randomized clinical trial, 30 patients with oral lichen planus were included.15 patients were treated with 5% methylene blue mediated photodynamic therapy using Fotosan device for 30seconds (630nm wavelength and 7.2-14.4J/CM2 dose) for 4 sessions in the days 1,4,7,14. In another group, the treatment was done on 15 patients by 0.5mg tab dexamethasone solution in 5cc water, rinsed 4 times in a day within two weeks. The sign score, symptoms scores (pain), clinical severity and treatment efficacy were measured at the days 15,30,60,90 after beginning of the treatment. The results were subjected to Mann-whitney U test in both groups. No significant difference existed between two modalities regarding the treatment efficacy index, sign score, symptom score and clinical severity on the 15, 30, 60 and 90 post-treatment days. Decreases in patient's symptoms were statistically significant in both groups. Photodynamic therapy was as effective as the dexamethasone mouth wash in the treatment of oral lichen planus It could be used as a safe modality in the treatment of oral lichen planus lesions without identified side effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Oral administration of lactulose: a novel therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dan-Feng; Hu, Hui-Jun; Sun, Xue-Jun; Meng, Xiang-En; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that the pathophysiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is related to hypoxia, the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Studies have shown that the novel, safe and effective free radical scavenger, hydrogen, has neuroprotective effects in both acute CO poisoning and delayed neuropsychological sequelae in CO poisoning. Orally administered lactulose, which may be used by some intestinal bacteria as a food source to produce endogenous hydrogen, can ameliorate oxidative stress. Based on the available findings, we hypothesize that oral administration of lactulose may be a novel therapy for acute CO poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

  1. Comparison between once weekly, twice weekly, and daily oral iron therapy in Jordanian children suffering from iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Hasan M; Rawashdeh, Mohammad; Aughsteen, Adib Abdulahad

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of daily versus twice weekly and once weekly oral iron therapy was analyzed to optimize a protocol for treatment of IDM among Jordanian children. One hundred and forty-eight children aged between 6 and 60 months with Hb estimate less than 11 gm/dl were screened. They were randomly divided into three regimens of oral iron therapy for a period of 12 weeks; a group was supplemented with a single weekly dose of iron; a second group received two doses weekly; and a third group had a daily dose of iron. Hb was assayed 3 and 12 weeks after therapy, while ferritin was assayed after 12 weeks of treatment. A significant rise in Hb concentration was observed which was most significant 12 weeks after treatment. Iron supplementation after 3 weeks was similar in all treated groups, and no significant difference in Hb concentration among the three groups was noticed. By the end of the third week, the anemia had respectively resolved by 18, 11.8 and 23.4% in the daily, twice weekly, and once weekly groups. On the other hand, the percentage of recovery of anemia respectively was 78, 90.2 and 74.5% at the end of 12 weeks of iron therapy. Hb recovery percentage was comparable in the three treated groups, and no significant difference was reported between them either at 3 or at 12 weeks of therapy. Ferritin levels in the daily and twice weekly treated groups were similar after 12 weeks of iron therapy and were significantly higher than the ferritin levels of weekly treated group. Although the anemia in the three treated groups was resolved after 3 and 12 weeks of oral iron therapy, we conclude that the regimen of two doses per week is the most effective in resolving anemia with less cost and fewer side effects.

  2. Prevalence of oral lesions and percent CD4+ T-lymphocytes in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Okunseri, Christopher; Badner, Victor; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenberg, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study examined prevalence of oral lesions and how it relates to CD4 percentages in vertically infected children with HIV undergoing combination antiretroviral therapy. One hundred two HIV-infected children between the ages of 3 and 15 years attending a specialized pediatric outpatient clinic were examined for oral lesions, and their CD4 percent and viral load extracted from their medical records. Of the 102 HIV-infected children, 69% had evidence of oral pathology and 31% were disease free. The proportion with disease was: 20.6% had conventional gingivitis, 19.6% had dental caries in their primary and permanent teeth combined, 13.7% had depapillated tongue, 3.9% had early childhood caries, 2.9% had oral candidiasis, 2% had bilateral enlarged parotid gland, 1% had median rhomboid glossitis, 1% had enlarged cervical lymph nodes and 2% had other developmental abnormalities. In the group with no evidence of suppression 15% had gingival lesion, 14% tongue lesion, and 1% parotid enlargement, and in the severe suppression group 55% had gingival lesion, 45% had tongue lesion, 9% had enlarged cervical lymph nodes, and another 9% had parotid gland enlargement. The association between conventional gingivitis and low CD4 percent was statistically significant (p = 0.001). Compared to previous studies, overall prevalence estimates of oral lesions in this study was low. Children with low CD4 percent had more oral lesions, consistent with results from other HIV studies.

  3. The effectiveness of oral resonance therapy on the perception of femininity of voice in male-to-female transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Carew, Lisa; Dacakis, Georgia; Oates, Jennifer

    2007-09-01

    Ten male-to-female transsexuals participated in five sessions of oral resonance voice therapy targeting lip spreading and forward tongue carriage. Acoustic analysis of recordings made pre- and posttherapy found that participant formant frequency values (F1, F2, and F3, from the vowels /a/, /i/, and /mho/), as well as fundamental frequency (F0), underwent a general increase posttherapy. F3 values, in particular, increased significantly posttreatment. Trends in listener ratings of these recordings showed that the majority of participants were perceived to sound more feminine following treatment. Participants' self-ratings of their voices pre- and posttreatment also indicated that participants perceived their voices as sounding more feminine and that they were more satisfied with their voices following treatment. The present study supports the findings of previous studies that have demonstrated that resonance characteristics in male-to-female transsexuals can be changed to more closely approximate those of females through oral resonance therapy. This intervention study also demonstrates that a spontaneous increase in F0 is achieved during the course of therapy. Further, this study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that oral resonance therapy may be effective in increasing femininity of voice in male-to-female transsexual clients.

  4. Changes in treatment after the start of oral hypoglycaemic therapy in Type 2 diabetes: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Donnan, P T; Steinke, D T; Newton, R W; Morris, A D

    2002-07-01

    To determine the changes in oral hypoglycaemic therapy and the time to incidence of insulin therapy in people with Type 2 diabetes. A retrospective incidence cohort was constructed of 1305 subjects with Type 2 diabetes, who obtained a first prescription for oral hypoglycaemic medication between 1 July 1993 and 31 December 1994 in Tayside, Scotland. The primary endpoint of changes in oral hypoglycaemic therapy and time to insulin was determined up to the end of the follow-up, on 31 December 1995. Overall, 9.4% of subjects switched to insulin, while 11% of those initially on sulphonylurea, and 6% of those initially on metformin switched to insulin therapy. Approximately three-quarters (72%) remained on the same class of drug throughout the study period (median follow-up 588 days). Only 9% died during the follow-up and this did not differ appreciably by drug group. Males were more likely to switch to insulin compared with females (10.3% vs. 8.5%), and those who switched were slightly younger with a mean age of 58 years compared with a mean age of 60 years of those who did not switch. The median time of switching to insulin was 186 days or approximately 6 months for this cohort, giving a rate of switching to insulin of 5.84% per year. Poorer glycaemic control (HBA1c) and low body mass index (BMI) were associated with switching to insulin. Following initial therapy with oral hypoglycaemic medication in the population, switching to insulin occurred at a rate of 5.84% per year. Switching to insulin was associated with being younger, male, having low BMI and higher HbA1c.

  5. "Zeus" a new oral anticoagulant therapy dosing algorithm: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cafolla, A; Melizzi, R; Baldacci, E; Pignoloni, P; Dragoni, F; Campanelli, M; Caraccini, R; Foà, R

    2011-10-01

    The demand for oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) has constantly increased during the last ten years with an extended use of computer assistance. Many mathematical algorithms have been projected to suggest doses and time to next visit for patients on OAT. We designed a new algorithm: "Zeus". A "before-after" study was planned to compare the efficacy and safety of this algorithm dosing OAT with manual dosage decided by the same expert physicians according to the target of International Normalized Ratio (INR). The study analysed data of 1876 patients managed with each of the two modalities for eight months, with an interval of two years between them. The aim was to verify the increased quality of therapy by time spent in INR target and efficiency and safety of Zeus algorithm. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher during the algorithm dosing period in comparison with the TTR during manual management period (62.3% vs 50.3%). The number of PT/INR tests above 5 was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced by algorithm suggested prescriptions in comparison with manual those (254 vs 537 times). The anticoagulant drug amount prescribed according to the algorithm suggestions was significantly (p < 0.0001) lower than that of the manual method. The number of clinical events observed in patients during the algorithm management time was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that in those managed with the manual dosage. This study confirms the clinical utility of the computer-assisted OAT and shows the efficacy and safety of the Zeus algorithm.

  6. Is the oral contraceptive or hormone replacement therapy a risk factor for cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siqi; Wang, Yuqiong; Xu, Jinming; Chen, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between exogenous estrogen intake and cholelithiasis risk has been reported in several epidemiological studies, including oral contraceptive (OC) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), while the results were controversial. This study aimed to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of this issue. Methods: PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane library database were searched up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently extracted data from eligible studies, relative risks (RRs), and/or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the highest versus lowest categories of intake were adopted. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall RRs or ORs. Besides, subgroup and publication bias analyses were applied to explain the heterogeneity. An original study was also conducted to verify our conclusion. Results: A total of 19 studies with approximately 556,620 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled RR of cholelithiasis for the highest versus the lowest categories was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.44–1.75), indicating that exogenous estrogen was positive associated with the intake of exogenous estrogen. However, the pooled RR of OC intake and cholelithiasis risk was 1.19 (95% CI: 0.97–1.45), and the RR for HRT was 1.79 (95% CI: 1.61–2.00). Conclusion: The HRT was positively associated with the cholelithiasis risk, and the OC will not increase the risk of cholelithiasis. PMID:28383429

  7. Precise optical dosimetry in low-level laser therapy of soft tissues in oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Sabotinov, O.

    2004-06-01

    The new low level laser therapy (LLLT) is widely applied for treatment of diseases of the oral mucosa and parodont. Depending on indication, different optical tips and light-guides are used to create beams with a required shape. However, to the best of our knowledge, the developed irradiation geometries are usually proposed assuming validity of Bouger-Lambert law. This hardly corresponds to the real situation because of the dominating multiple scattering within 600-1200 nm range that destroys correlation between the emitted laser beam and the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose inside the tissue. The aim of this work is to base the dosimetry of the LLLT procedures of periodontal tissues on radiation transfer theory using a flexible Monte-Carlo code. We studied quantitatively the influence of tissue optical parameters (absorption and scattering coefficients, tissue refraction index, anisotropy factor) on decreasing of correlation between the emitted beam and the energy deposition for converging or diverging beams. We evaluated energy deposition for the developed by us LLLT system in a 3-D model of periodontal tissues created using a cross-sectional image of this region with internal structural information on the gingival and the tooth. The laser source is a CW diode laser emitting elliptical beam within 650-675 nm at output power 5-30 mW. To determine the geometry of the irradiating beam we used CCD camera Spiricon LBA 300.

  8. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for inactivation of biofilms formed by oral key pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Tabenski, Laura; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Maisch, Tim

    2014-01-01

    With increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant pathogens all over the world there is a pressing need for strategies that are capable of inactivating biofilm-state pathogens with less potential of developing resistances in pathogens. Antimicrobial strategies of that kind are especially needed in dentistry in order to avoid the usage of antibiotics for treatment of periodontal, endodontic or mucosal topical infections caused by bacterial or yeast biofilms. One possible option could be the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), whereby the lethal effect of aPDT is based on the principle that visible light activates a photosensitizer (PS), leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species, e.g., singlet oxygen, which induce phototoxicity immediately during illumination. Many compounds have been described as potential PS for aPDT against bacterial and yeast biofilms so far, but conflicting results have been reported. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to outline the actual state of the art regarding the potential of aPDT for inactivation of biofilms formed in vitro with a main focus on those formed by oral key pathogens and structured regarding the distinct types of PS. PMID:25161649

  9. Efficacy of gasiform ozone and photodynamic therapy on a multispecies oral biofilm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2007-02-01

    Ozone gas and photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been claimed to be antimicrobially effective. This study assessed their antimicrobial potential in vitro. Mature six-species oral biofilms were treated as follows (n = 9 per group): (i) a 60-s application of gasiform vacuum-ozone or vacuum alone (on wet or air-dried biofilm samples); (ii) PDT (i.e. methylene blue in combination with or without a diode soft laser, and a soft laser alone); or (iii) antimicrobial solutions: immersion of biofilms for 60 s in 0.2 and 2% chlorhexidine or in 0.5 and 5% hypochlorite solution. Treatment with chlorhexidine or hypochlorite served as a positive control, whereas untreated samples served as negative controls. Colony-forming units on blood agar were counted. Only the 5% hypochlorite solution was able to totally eliminate the microorganisms in the biofilm. The observed reduction of viable counts by vacuum-ozone application and PDT was less than one log(10) step. Under the conditions of the current study, gasiform ozone and PDT had a minimal effect on the viability of microorganisms organized in a cariogenic biofilm.

  10. [Major thromboembolic complications during oral anticoagulant therapy. Importance of level of anticoagulation].

    PubMed

    de Vicente Cámara, M P; Lucía Cuesta, J F; Aguilar Franco, C; Solano Bernad, V; Serrano González, C; García-Erce, J A

    1999-12-01

    The incidence of major thromboembolic complications in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) and the correlation of this with the intensity of the OAT and the INR level at the time of the episode have been assessed in our study. We have carried out a retrospective study including 1350 patients with an overall follow-up period of 6432 patient-years. The mean INR level throughout OAT and at the time of the mayor thromboembolic event were considered. The statistical analysis was performed by means of a survival analysis test. The incidence of major thromboembolic complications found in our study was 1.18/100 patient-years. Those patients with a mean INR below the therapeutic range showed significantly a higher risk (3.31 times higher) of suffering from some sort of major thromboembolic complication. Mean INR level at the time of the event was 1.9 and 47% of those patients had an INR level < 2 at the time of the thromboembolic complication. The probability of suffering a major thromboembolic complication for those subjects on OAT increases as the INR falls below the therapeutic range; therefore we must pay special attention to this factor in order to avoid any further recurrences.

  11. Oral hormone replacement therapy: factors that influence the estradiol concentrations achieved in a multiracial study population.

    PubMed

    Gavaler, Judith S

    2002-02-01

    The assumption that estradiol (E2) concentrations are reliably increased to therapeutic levels in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has not been explicitly tested. Nor have factors that may modulate the E2 levels achieved been evaluated. The author examined E2 concentrations in a multiracial study population of 309 postmenopausal women treated with oral HRT and observed that 51.1% had achieved estradiol levels of at least 45 pg/ml (achievers). The odds of being an achiever were significantly elevated among non-Caucasian women by a HRT dose greater than 0.625 mg, current moderate drinking, and increasing duration of HRT use. The odds were significantly decreased by having a high school education or less and increasing time since last HRT dose. White postmenopausal women had significantly reduced odds of being an achiever, and both a dose of less than 0.625 mg and a dose equal to 0.625 mg significantly reduced the odds of being an achiever. Increasing body mass index and menopause duration were both associated with lower odds. This report demonstrates not only that women treated with HRTdo not all achieve therapeutic levels of estradiol but also that factors can be identified that modulate the E2 concentration achieved in response to HRT administration.

  12. Amelioration of lipid abnormalities by vitamin therapy in women using oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Torkzahrani, Shahnaz; Heidari, Afrooz; Mostafavi-pour, Zohreh; Ahmadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have some adverse effects on the serum lipid profile. Because hyperlipidemia is one of the risk factors in cardiovascular diseases, lipid abnormalities should be evaluated in women consuming COCs. Vitamins E and C are known to have beneficial effects on serum lipid profiles. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the effects of vitamins E and C on serum lipids in women using COCs. Methods The study compared changes in lipid parameters with and without vitamin therapy in women consuming COCs compared to those of a control group (40 non-contraceptive users or NCU) for 4 weeks. Total cholesterol and triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels along with HDL/LDL ratios were measured for all participants. Results COC users experienced significantly higher increases in the levels of triglycerides and LDL than non-users (p<0.05). However, no significant differences were noted in the total cholesterol and HDL levels. In the treated COC group receiving vitamins E and C, the HDL level and the HDL/LDL ratio increased and the LDL and triglycerides levels decreased significantly compared with those of the other groups. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that supplementation with antioxidant vitamins E and C restores a normal lipid profile in COC users. PMID:24693493

  13. Dosimetric study of photobiomodulation therapy in 5-FU-induced oral mucositis in hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomacio, Claudia Carrara; Campos, Luana; Nesadal de Souza, Douglas; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Simões, Alyne

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating consequence of cancer treatment that could be treated with photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT); however, there is no consensus about its dosimetric parameters for OM healing. The aim of this study was to compare different PBMT protocols on OM treatment, through clinical and histological analysis. Thirty hamsters were used, in an induced model of OM by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and superficial scratching, in seven days of follow-up. The animals were divided into five groups: control (C), which received only anesthesia and chemotherapeutic vehicle; chemotherapy (Ch), which received anesthesia, 5-FU, and scratches; laser 1 (L1), the same as Ch group, PBMT 6 J/cm2 and 0.24 J (one point); laser 2 (L2), the same as Ch group, PBMT 25 J/cm2 and 1 J (one point); and laser 3 (L3), the same as Ch group, PBMT 4 points of 0.24 J and 6 J/cm2 each. The laser used has λ=660 nm, 0.04 cm2 of spot area, and 40 mW. The best PBMT protocol to maintain lowest OM levels compared to Ch group was L1, followed by L2 and L3. Our results suggest that the application mode of PBMT and the energy delivered per area could interfere with the OM healing.

  14. Anti-angiogenic therapy (bevacizumab) in the management of oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Maha M; Afifi, Marwa M

    2016-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP), a mucocutaneous chronic inflammatory disease, is conventionally managed using topical corticosteroid therapy. Given the fact that OLP is strongly linked to angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic drugs, such as bevacizumab, might be introduced as an alternative treatment for contraindicated, non-responsive patients. The aim of the present study was to report the short-term effectiveness and safety of intralesional bevacizumab injection in the management of atrophic/erosive OLP. A case series study was conducted in patients with atrophic/erosive OLP in the buccal mucosa, assigned to receive either 2.5 mg of bevacizumab, by intralesional injection (n = 20, test), or topical 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment (n = 20, control). The size, score, and pain intensity of the lesions were assessed pre- and post-treatment. Tissue biopsies were collected for histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural examination. After 1 wk, the test group had significant reductions both in lesion seize and in pain scores compared with controls. A marked decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 immunoexpression was noted in tissue biopsies from bevacizumab-treated lesions compared with control lesions. Furthermore, ultrastructural examination of OLP tissue specimens revealed significant healing signs associated with bevacizumab treatment. Short-term data suggest that intralesional bevacizumab injection effectively and safely achieved resolution of atrophic/erosive OLP lesions without disease exacerbations during a 3-month follow-up period.

  15. Predicting Adherence and Persistence with Oral Bisphosphonate Therapy in an Integrated Health Care Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Hui, Rita L; Adams, Annette L; Niu, Fang; Ettinger, Bruce; Yi, David K; Chandra, Malini; Lo, Joan C

    2017-04-01

    Examining drug exposure is essential to pharmacovigilance, especially for bisphosphonate (BP) therapy. To examine differences in 4 measures of oral BP exposure: treatment discontinuation, adherence, persistence, and nonpersistence. Among women aged ≥ 50 years who initiated oral BP therapy during 2002-2007 with at least 3 years of health plan membership follow-up, discontinuation was defined by evidence of no further treatment during the study observation period. Among those with at least 2 filled BP prescriptions during the study period, adherence was calculated for each year of follow-up using the (modified) proportion of days covered (mPDC) metric that allows for stockpiling of prescription/refills overlap ≤ 30 days supply. Persistence was quantified by treatment duration, allowing a gap of up to 60 days between prescription/refill days covered. Nonpersistence was quantified by the periods without drugs outside this allowable gap. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare age and race groups and the relationships of early adherence (adherence during the first year) with subsequent adherence. Among 48,390 women initiating oral BP therapy and followed for 3 years, 26.7% discontinued in year 1, and 14.7% of the remaining 35,456 women discontinued in year 2. Discontinuation rates were slightly higher (29.4%, P < 0.001) for women aged ≥ 75 years and somewhat lower (21.1%, P < 0.001) for Asian women. During the first year, 60.4% of the women achieved an mPDC of ≥ 75%, with demographic differences in adherence similar to that seen for treatment discontinuation. Over the 3 years, the median mPDC levels for BP therapy were 86%, 84%, and 85% in years 1, 2, and 3, respectively, for those receiving treatment. Cumulative persistence was 2.3 years (median, IQR = 1.0-3.0) overall and slightly greater for Asian versus white women and lower for older women. There were 18,174 (42.9%) women with at least 1 period of nonpersistence during 3 years follow-up in

  16. Continuation rates for oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy. The ESHRE Capri Workshop Group.

    PubMed

    2000-08-01

    Despite the safety and effectiveness of low oestrogen-dose oral contraceptives (OC) and postmenopausal hormone replacement there is poor continuity of use of these agents by women. Patterns of use and the reasons affecting different frequencies of use in different countries are presented. Continuity and discontinuation rates are difficult to assess accurately but it is believed that the main reasons why women discontinue use of these agents are concerns about their perceived health risks and the presence of, or fear of, adverse clinical effects, particularly unscheduled uterine bleeding and weight gain. More information is needed about OC continuation rates in order to improve the acceptability of these safe, effective agents. Most women discontinue use of postmenopausal hormonal replacement within 2 years of initiating the therapy. Reasons include disappearance of symptoms of oestrogen deficiency, lack of awareness of health benefits of oestrogen, presence of side-effects (such as breast tenderness and weight gain), presence of uterine bleeding and increasing age. Suggestions to increase continuation of OC include extensive individual pretreatment counselling with a different emphasis in different age groups, education at the time of follow-up visits and telephone calls, and extensive use of educational aids such as brochures, pamphlets and audio tapes, and improvement of pharmaceutical packaging information. In conclusion there is an urgent need to assess the value of these strategies by long-term large controlled studies.

  17. [Contributions by integrative community therapy to users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) and family members: thematic oral history].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Mariana Albernaz Pinheiro de; Dias, Maria Djair; Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes de; Ferreira Filha, Maria de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze contributions by integrative community therapy to behavior changes in users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS). This was a comprehensive-interpretative study with a qualitative approach, based on thematic oral history. The study site was the Caminhar Center in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil. The study material was produced with interviews conducted with six subjects and was discussed using thematic analysis as proposed by Minayo, providing the basis for two major thematic lines: integrative community therapy as a liberating praxis and changes that make the difference. The subjects' stories revealed significant changes in the personal, professional, and community fields, based on their inclusion in the integrative community therapy circles, a strategy that promoted the recovery of processes of natural socialization that constitute human life. The use of integrative community therapy was clearly related to proposals for the participants' psychosocial integration and rehabilitation.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the upper airway in obstructive sleep apnea before and after oral appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, X M; Zeng, X L; Fu, M K; Huang, X Z

    1999-05-01

    To determine the mechanism by which an oral appliance may be used to treat obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Eleven OSAS patients (8 males and 3 females) were involved in the study. Mean age was 52.2 +/- 10.6 years; height was 166.6 +/- 7.2 cm, and weight was 75.6 +/- 9.3 kg; body mass index (BMI) was 27.2 +/- 2.9 kg/m2. Each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and polysomnography before and after oral appliance therapy. Pharyngeal changes were measured and compared with the variation in sleep parameters. Also, Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression were performed to investigate the relationship of sleep parameters and MRI items. Through oral appliance therapy, the sleep disorder decreased. Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) decreased from 44.6 +/- 21.5 to 9.6 +/- 6.3 per hour of sleep. Lowest oxygen desaturation rose from 71.4 +/- 15.0% to 82.0 +/- 7.7%. Meanwhile, the upper airway increased at most levels, and especially at oropharynx. As measured by the correlation and regression analysis, the AHI changes had a negative association with tongue volume (R = -0.5730) and a positive association with the area alternation of high oropharynx (R = 0.5823); the change of the lowest oxygen desaturation (SaO2%) was positively associated with whole airway volume (R = 0.6554). The oral appliance works by enlarging the upper airway morphology and keeping the airway open, mainly at the back of soft palate. The effect of the oral appliance is associated with the degree of enlargement of the high oropharynx. Those who have a small tongue and a large pharynx may expect to have good results with the use of the oral appliance.

  19. Treatment intensification using long-acting insulin -predictors of future basal insulin supported oral therapy in the DIVE registry.

    PubMed

    Danne, Thomas; Bluhmki, Tobias; Seufert, Jochen; Kaltheuner, Matthias; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Beyersmann, Jan; Bramlage, Peter

    2015-10-07

    In patients with type-2 diabetes receiving oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), the addition of insulin is frequently required to achieve sufficient control over blood glucose levels. It is, however, difficult to predict if, when and in which patients insulin therapy will be needed. We aimed to identify patient related variables associated with the addition of basal insulin to oral therapy resulting in a basal supported oral therapy (BOT). DIVE (DIabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation) is a prospective, observational, multi-centre diabetes registry established in Germany in 2011. For the present explorative analysis, 31,008 patients with type-2 diabetes prescribed at least one OAD were included. Patients who had previously received insulin and those over 90 years old were excluded. The event of interest was defined as the initiation of BOT during the observational period. Cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models based on a competing risk framework were applied for risk quantification. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios demonstrated that longer diabetes duration, higher BMI, poorer glycaemic control, documentation of any micro- or macrovascular comorbidity, the presence of concomitant non-antidiabetic pharmacotherapies, and greater numbers of prescribed OADs increased the likelihood of BOT initiation. On the other hand BOT initiation was less likely in patients with older age and female gender. Analysing the likelihood of OAD termination without initiation of BOT provided supportive evidence for the variables predictive of BOT initiation. Analysis of the DIVE registry has resulted in the identification of a number of factors that may be predictive for the initiation of BOT for type-2 diabetes patients initially prescribed one or more OADs. Poor glycaemic control, the presence of vascular comorbidities and concomitant medications, and a greater number of OADs were all detected to increase the risk of a switch to BOT. Female gender and younger age showed protective

  20. Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Richard J; Kim, C; Siegel, Lawrence; Keenan, B T; Black, Jed; Farid-Moayer, Mehran; Podmore, Jonathan; Vaska, Matt

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism of action of the oral pressure therapy (OPT) device, a new treatment for sleep apnea. Case series. Academic medical center. Fifteen subjects with sleep apnea who had been successfully treated (responders) with the OPT device and 4 subjects who were not successfully treated (non-responders) with the OPT device. All subjects underwent a MRI (without the device, with the device in place without vacuum and with the device in place with vacuum) to examine the biomechanical changes associated with the OPT device. Oral pressure therapy significantly (P = 0.002) increased the size of the retropalatal airway in both the lateral and anterior-posterior dimensions by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward, toward the teeth. The percentage and absolute increase in the cross-sectional area of the retropalatal region, the superior movement of the soft palate, and the anterior displacement of the tongue were significantly greater in the responders than in the non-responders. In responders, there were significant increases in the mean (P = 0.002), maximum (P = 0.0002), and minimum (P = 0.04) cross-sectional areas of the retropalatal region with the OPT device. However, in the retroglossal region, airway caliber decreased with the OPT device. In those who responded to oral pressure therapy, it increased airway caliber in the retropalatal region by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward. Schwab RJ, Kim C, Siegel L, Keenan BT, Black J, Farid-Moayer M, Podmore J, Vaska M. Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  1. Management of dental patients receiving antiplatelet therapy or chronic oral anticoagulation: A review of the latest evidence.

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András; Dézsi, Balázs Bence; Dézsi, András Döme

    2017-12-01

    The perioperative management of patients treated with antithrombotic medications who undergo surgical procedures represents a common clinical problem. Dental interventions are usually associated with a low risk of bleeding; however, the dental implications of new antithrombotic agents are not yet fully understood. The present review is based on the latest evidence and recommendations published on the periprocedural management of dental patients treated with single or dual antiplatelet therapy, vitamin K antagonists, or direct oral anticoagulants for a variety of indications.

  2. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  3. Clinical Assessment of the Efficiency of Low Level Laser Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Elshenawy, Hanaa M.; Eldin, Amany Mohy; Abdelmonem, Mohamed Adel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa of uncertain etiology. AIM: To evaluate the effect of using low level laser therapy (LLLT (970 nm Siro laser Advance) for the treatment of symptomatic (OLP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted on ten patients suffering from persistent oral lichen planus (OLP). Patients were treated with diode laser (970nm) for the symptomatic relief of pain and burning sensation. The patients were assessed before, during and after the completion of the laser treatment which was done twice weekly for two successive months with maximum of ten sessions. The assessment was performed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and clinical investigation for each patient. RESULTS: Detailed significant reduction in lesion size and showed complete remission of burning sensation and pain. No reported complications or therapy side effects were observed in any of the treated patients. CONCLUSION: Diode laser therapy seems to be an effective adjunctive treatment modality for relieving pain and clinical symptoms of OLP. PMID:27275315

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliance Therapy: An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ramar, Kannan; Dort, Leslie C.; Katz, Sheri G.; Lettieri, Christopher J.; Harrod, Christopher G.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since the previous parameter and review paper publication on oral appliances (OAs) in 2006, the relevant scientific literature has grown considerably, particularly in relation to clinical outcomes. The purpose of this new guideline is to replace the previous and update recommendations for the use of OAs in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. Methods: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) commissioned a seven-member task force. A systematic review of the literature was performed and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the quality of evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of the evidence counterbalanced by an assessment of the relative benefit of the treatment versus the potential harms. The AASM and AADSM Board of Directors approved the final guideline recommendations. Recommendations: We recommend that sleep physicians prescribe oral appliances, rather than no therapy, for adult patients who request treatment of primary snoring (without obstructive sleep apnea). (STANDARD) When oral appliance therapy is prescribed by a sleep physician for an adult patient with obstructive sleep apnea, we suggest that a qualified dentist use a custom, titratable appliance over non-custom oral devices. (GUIDELINE) We recommend that sleep physicians consider prescription of oral appliances, rather than no treatment, for adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are intolerant of CPAP therapy or prefer alternate therapy. (STANDARD) We suggest that qualified dentists provide oversight— rather than no follow-up—of oral appliance therapy in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea, to survey for dental-related side effects or occlusal changes and reduce their incidence. (GUIDELINE) We suggest that sleep physicians conduct follow-up sleep testing

  5. Low-level Laser Therapy: A Review of Its Applications in the Management of Oral Mucosal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-11-01

    Due to its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and biostimulating effects, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used for oral disorders, such as oral lichen planus (OLP), xerostomia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), herpes labialis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and oral mucositis (OM). The research team for the present study has reviewed the literature on the subject, with an emphasis on the applicability of LLLT in general and of its various clinical protocols for the management of those oral disorders. In lesions such as the ones occurring in OM, RAS, herpes labialis, and OLP, the course of wound healing and the pain have been shown to decrease, with a few, or most often, no adverse side effects. The literature shows that LLLT can also be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with BMS. For the treatment of hyposalivation and xerostomia, the use of LLLT has been described in the literature, but no consensus has resulted. Very few controlled clinical studies with well-established therapeutic protocols have occurred, except for OM, for which LLLT has been widely researched. Although information on the use of the laser for some lesions has already been consolidated, further research is needed, especially randomized, controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Those studies will allow the safe use of LLLT, permitting the creation of care protocols for the management of oral disorders.

  6. A matched cohort comparison of mTHPC-mediated photodynamic therapy and trans-oral surgery of early stage oral cavity squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakullukcu, Baris; Stoker, Sharon D; Wildeman, Anne P E; Copper, Marcel P; Wildeman, Maarten A; Tan, I Bing

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of early stage oral cavity tumors have been thoroughly reported. However, statistical comparison of PDT to the surgical treatment is not available in published literature. We have identified and matched cohorts of patients with early stage oral cavity cancers undergoing surgery (n = 43) and PDT (n = 55) from a single institute experience. The groups are matched demographically and had the same pre-treatment screening and follow-up schedule. Both groups consisted only of tumors thinner than 5 mm to ensure comparability. The endpoints were local disease free survival, disease free survival, overall survival and response to initial treatment. Local disease free survival at 5 years were 67 and 74 % for PDT and surgery groups, respectively [univariate HR = 1.9 (p = 0.26), multivariable HR = 2.7 (p = 0.13)]. Disease free survival at 5 years are 47 and 53 % for PDT and surgery groups, respectively [univariate HR = 0.8 (p = 0.52), multivariable HR = 0.75 (p = 0.45)]. Overall survival was 83 and 75 % for PDT and surgery groups, respectively [(univariate HR = 0.5 (p = 0.19), multivariable HR = 0.5 (p = 0.17)]. In the PDT group, six patients (11 %) and in the surgery group 11 patients (26 %) had to receive additional treatments after the initial. All of the tested parameters did not have statistical significant difference. Although there is probably a selection bias due to the non-randomized design, this study shows that PDT of early stage oral cavity cancer is comparable in terms of disease control and survival to trans-oral resection and can be offered as an alternative to surgical treatment.

  7. Oral lesions as clinical markers of highly active antiretroviral therapy failure: a nested case-control study in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree Ramírez, Brenda; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2007-10-01

    Clinical markers that may predict virological failure during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have not been evaluated adequately. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related oral lesions as clinical predictors of virological failure in HIV-infected patients receiving HAART. A nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 1134 HIV-infected patients receiving HAART who attended the AIDS Clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán in Mexico City during the period 1997-2005. Case patients were patients who, after achieving an undetectable viral load, had at least 1 viral load determination > or = 2000 copies/mL while receiving treatment. Control subjects were patients who, after achieving an undetectable viral load, continued to have undetectable viral loads during the follow-up period. There were 2-3 control subjects for each case patient, matched according to duration of follow-up. Oral examinations were blinded to viral loads and CD4+ lymphocyte counts. Analyses were performed with multivariate conditional logistic regression models, and associations were shown as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Positive predictive values were calculated. The target cohort consisted of 431 HIV-infected individuals; 47 case patients and 132 control subjects underwent complete oral examinations and formed the basis of the analysis. At the visit at which an undetectable viral load was determined, case patients and control subjects showed a similar frequency of HIV-related oral lesions (21.3% vs. 17.4%) (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 0.57-3.38; P=.47). At the visit at which virological failure was determined, case patients showed a higher risk for HIV-related oral lesions (OR, 14.5; 95% CI, 4.21-49.94; P<.001) and oral candidosis (OR, 26.2; 95% CI, 3.34-205.9; P<.001) than did control subjects. The positive predictive value of HIV-related oral lesions

  8. A multicenter evaluation of oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Colrain, Ian M; Black, Jed; Siegel, Lawrence C; Bogan, Richard K; Becker, Philip M; Farid-Moayer, Mehran; Goldberg, Rochelle; Lankford, D Alan; Goldberg, Andrew N; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of a novel noninvasive oral pressure therapy (OPT) (Winx®, ApniCure) system on polysomnographic measures of sleep-disordered breathing, sleep architecture, and sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A 4-week, multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized, crossover, first-night order of control vs treatment, single-arm trial was conducted in five American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) - accredited sleep clinics and one research laboratory. Sixty-three subjects (analysis cohort) were studied from a screening cohort of 367 subjects. The analysis cohort was 69.8% men, ages 53.6±8.9 years (mean±SD), body mass index of 32.3±4.5kg/m(2), with mild to severe OSA. At treatment initiation, subjects received random assignment to one night with and one without (control) treatment, and they were assessed again following 28 nights of treatment. Breathing and sleep architecture were assessed each night based on blind scoring by a single centralized scorer using AASM criteria. Average nightly usage across the take-home period was 6.0±1.4h. There were no severe or serious device-related adverse events (AEs). Median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 27.5 events per hour on the control night, 13.4 events per hour on the first treatment night, and 14.8 events per hour after 28days of treatment. A clinically significant response (treatment AHI ⩽10/h and ⩽50% of control values) was seen in 20 of the 63 subjects evaluated. Rapid eye movement percentage (REM%) was significantly increased, and N1%, stage shifts to N1 sleep, overall stage shifts, total awakenings, and arousals per hour were all significantly reduced at both treatment nights compared to controls. Mean Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was significantly reduced from 12.1 to 8.6 (Cohen d effect size, 0.68) in those untreated for two or more weeks prior to OPT study participation and remained unchanged in subjects who directly switched from continuous positive airway pressure

  9. Vascular alterations after photodynamic therapy mediated by 5-aminolevulinic acid in oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Flávia Cristina Perillo; Barcessat, Ana Rita Ribeiro; Borges, Giuliana Gadoni Giovanni; Ferreira, Luciana Gonçalves Valente; Corrêa, Luciana

    2017-02-01

    Impairment of vascular functions after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is frequently associated with tumor remission and is considered one of the main antineoplastic PDT effects. Vascular alterations in oral leukoplakia (OL) treated with PDT have not yet been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical 5-ALA-mediated PDT on the vascular network of 4NQO-induced OL in rats. After applying 4NQO topically on the tongue during 16 weeks, there was induction of dysplastic lesions, which were treated with two PDT sessions (with an interval of 72 h between them), using topical application of 5-ALA and posterior irradiation with a laser (90 J/cm(2) fluency). Histological sections of the tongues were obtained and analyzed concerning plasmatic exudation and microvessel density after immunolabeling with CD31 and CD34 vessel markers. There was intense plasmatic exudation after 6 h of the first PDT session; at 6 h of the second PDT session, there was a significant reduction in the density of CD31- and CD34-positive microvessels in comparison to controls (p < 0.05). In the PDT intervals, there was an increase in the density of CD31 and CD34 microvessels, suggesting angiogenesis. Topical application of 5-ALA-mediated PDT caused an immediate deleterious effect on the vascular network, increasing vessel permeability and reducing vessel density, mainly after two sessions of the treatment. However, secondary angiogenesis emerged in these lesions during intervals of the PDT session. This fact may be considered during the adoption of a PDT protocol, to avoid OL resistance and recurrence after the treatment.

  10. Patients' perspectives on self-testing of oral anticoagulation therapy: content analysis of patients' internet blogs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Robinson, Ian

    2011-02-03

    Patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) require regular testing of the prothrombin time (PT) and the international normalised ratio (INR) to monitor their blood coagulation level to avoid complications of either over or under coagulation. PT/INR can be tested by a healthcare professional or by the patient. The latter mode of the testing is known as patient self-testing or home testing. The objective of this study was to elicit patients' perspectives and experiences regarding PT/INR self-testing using portable coagulometer devices. Internet blog text mining was used to collect 246 blog postings by 108 patients, mainly from the USA and the UK. The content of these qualitative data were analysed using XSight and NVivo software packages. The key themes in relation to self-testing of OAT identified were as follows: Patient benefits reported were time saved, personal control, choice, travel reduction, cheaper testing, and peace of mind. Equipment issues included high costs, reliability, quality, and learning how to use the device. PT/INR issues focused on the frequency of testing, INR fluctuations and individual target (therapeutic) INR level. Other themes noted were INR testing at laboratories, the interactions with healthcare professionals in managing and testing OAT and insurance companies' involvement in acquiring the self-testing equipment. Social issues included the pain and stress of taking and testing for OAT. Patients' blogs on PT/INR testing provide insightful information that can help in understanding the nature of the experiences and perspectives of patients on self-testing of OAT. The themes identified in this paper highlight the substantial complexities involved in self-testing programmes in the healthcare system. Thus, the issues elicited in this study are very valuable for all stakeholders involved in developing effective self-testing strategies in healthcare that are gaining considerable current momentum particularly for patients with chronic

  11. Patients' perspectives on self-testing of oral anticoagulation therapy: Content analysis of patients' internet blogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) require regular testing of the prothrombin time (PT) and the international normalised ratio (INR) to monitor their blood coagulation level to avoid complications of either over or under coagulation. PT/INR can be tested by a healthcare professional or by the patient. The latter mode of the testing is known as patient self-testing or home testing. The objective of this study was to elicit patients' perspectives and experiences regarding PT/INR self-testing using portable coagulometer devices. Methods Internet blog text mining was used to collect 246 blog postings by 108 patients, mainly from the USA and the UK. The content of these qualitative data were analysed using XSight and NVivo software packages. Results The key themes in relation to self-testing of OAT identified were as follows: Patient benefits reported were time saved, personal control, choice, travel reduction, cheaper testing, and peace of mind. Equipment issues included high costs, reliability, quality, and learning how to use the device. PT/INR issues focused on the frequency of testing, INR fluctuations and individual target (therapeutic) INR level. Other themes noted were INR testing at laboratories, the interactions with healthcare professionals in managing and testing OAT and insurance companies' involvement in acquiring the self-testing equipment. Social issues included the pain and stress of taking and testing for OAT. Conclusions Patients' blogs on PT/INR testing provide insightful information that can help in understanding the nature of the experiences and perspectives of patients on self-testing of OAT. The themes identified in this paper highlight the substantial complexities involved in self-testing programmes in the healthcare system. Thus, the issues elicited in this study are very valuable for all stakeholders involved in developing effective self-testing strategies in healthcare that are gaining considerable current momentum

  12. Sustained vertebral antifracture efficacy of oral anti-osteoporotic therapies in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brandi, M-L

    2010-11-01

    Vertebral fractures are common in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, a chronic condition requiring long-term treatment with anti-osteoporotic treatments. Therefore, it is important to assess sustainability of antifracture efficacy. A review of the literature to determine pivotal vertebral fracture studies for oral bisphosphonates (ibandronate, risedronate and alendronate), strontium ranelate, and raloxifene and to evaluate vertebral antifracture efficacy over time. Data from the BONE trial showed that ibandronate sustained vertebral antifracture efficacy over time (58% vertebral fracture risk reduction in first year p = 0.0561, increased to 62% for years 0-3; p < 0.001). The Vertebral Efficacy with Risedronate Therapy-North America (VERT-NA) and VERT-multi-national (VERT-MN) studies demonstrated that the relative risk reduction (RRR) with risedronate versus placebo decreased over time (VERT-NA: 65% for first year to 41% for years 0-3; VERT-MN: 61% for first year to 49% for years 0-3). Data from the Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT) I trial with alendronate showed that the RRR in the cumulative incidence of new vertebral fractures versus placebo decreased from 62% for years 0-2 to 47% for years 0-3. Similar decreases in RRR over time were reported with strontium ranelate in the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention study (SOTI; 49% for first year to 33% for years 0-4) and Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis Study (TROPOS; 45% for first year to 24% for years 0-5). No clear trend exists for sustained efficacy over time with raloxifene. Vertebral fracture protection could be interpreted to decrease over time with alendronate, risedronate and strontium ranelate, and may be due to multiple factors. Ibandronate sustained vertebral antifracture efficacy over time.

  13. Oral Monomethyl Fumarate Therapy Ameliorates Retinopathy in a Humanized Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Promsote, Wanwisa; Powell, Folami Lamoke; Veean, Satyam; Thounaojam, Menaka; Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Gutsaeva, Diana; Bartoli, Manuela; Smith, Sylvia B; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Martin, Pamela M

    2016-12-10

    Sickle retinopathy (SR) is a major cause of blindness in sickle cell disease (SCD). The genetic mutation responsible for SCD is known, however; oxidative stress and inflammation also figure prominently in the development and progression of pathology. Development of therapies for SR is hampered by the lack of (a) animal models that accurately recapitulate human SR and (b) strategies for noninvasive yet effective retinal drug delivery. This study addressed both issues by validating the Townes humanized SCD mouse as a model of SR and demonstrating the efficacy of oral administration of the antioxidant fumaric acid ester monomethyl fumarate (MMF) in the disease. In vivo ophthalmic imaging, electroretinography, and postmortem histological RNA and protein analyses were used to monitor retinal health and function in normal (HbAA) and sickle (HbSS) hemoglobin-producing mice over a one-year period and in additional HbAA and HbSS mice treated with MMF (15 mg/ml) for 5 months. Functional and morphological abnormalities and molecular hallmarks of oxidative stress/inflammation were evident early in HbSS retinas and increased in number and severity with age. Treatment with MMF, a known inducer of Nrf2, induced γ-globin expression and fetal hemoglobin production, improved hematological profiles, and ameliorated SR-related pathology. Innovation and Conclusion: United States Food and Drug Administration-approved formulations in which MMF is the primary bioactive ingredient are currently available to treat multiple sclerosis; such drugs may be effective for treatment of ocular and systemic complications of SCD, and given the pleiotropic effects, other nonsickle-related diseases in which oxidative stress, inflammation, and retinal vascular pathology figure prominently. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 921-935.

  14. Child survival in the Third World: a functional analysis of oral rehydration therapy dissemination campaigns.

    PubMed

    Suarez De Balcazar, Y; Balcazar, F E

    1991-01-01

    Behavior analysts conducted a functional analysis of different intervention strategies employed in 14 oral rehydration therapy (ORT) campaigns in 10 developing countries. The intervention researchers manipulated antecedents, behaviors, and/or consequences to improve diarrhea management. The strategies used radio announcements, posters, and pamphlets to promote behavior change. Only 2 campaigns (Thailand and Egypt) limited their intervention to these antecedents. Only 3 programs manipulated antecedents, behaviors, and consequences. The 1983 campaign in Bangladesh incorporated school instruction to siblings and home visits as part of skill training and provided incentives to trainers (US$30) as its consequences. The 1985 project in the Gambia used health workers to teach mothers at home about ORT and awarded happy baby lottery prizes (rice, sugar, and soap). The skills training component of the 1984 campaign in Honduras involved 1-on-1 instruction. A radio course on breast feeding, school instruction of siblings, and an illustrated health care manual. Its consequences were games and prizes on radio program call in, free calendars, key rings, t-shirts and a trip to Tegucigalpa. The only program limited to a skills training component was the campaign in South India in 1976. The training involved training nurses to instruct mothers about diarrhea management. An obstacle in all the campaigns was that ORT does not outwardly improve diarrhea and vomiting immediately. Those campaigns that had a skills training component were more effective than those that did not. Behavior analysts could contribute to ORT campaigns by developing simple and effective training programs and developing economical and effective mechanisms to evaluate the effectiveness of such campaigns.

  15. Single-agent therapy with oral mercaptopurine for nonlymphoid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Boluda, J C; Cervantes, F; Alvarez, A; Costa, D; Montserrat, E

    2001-09-01

    Currently, no effective treatment is available for the nonlymphoid blast crisis (BC) of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and because of this the prognosis for such patients remains invariably poor. In an attempt to determine the results provided by palliative treatment with oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in the above hematological condition, 30 such patients were analyzed for hospital stay, days of intravenous (i.v.) antibiotics, transfusion requirements, response rate, and survival. Thirty patients with nonlymphoid BC matched for their initial characteristics and treated with different i.v. regimens were used for comparison purposes. Patients managed with 6-MP spent less days in hospital (median: 9, range: 0-46 vs median: 42, range: 5-140; P<0.0001), needed antibiotics for less days (median: 0. range: 0-46 vs median: 20, range: 0-57; P<0.0001), and received less platelet transfusions (median: 0, range: 0-20 vs median: 6, range: 0-63; P=0.004) than those treated with i.v. chemotherapy. Although no complete or partial remission was achieved by patients receiving 6-MP vs six in the i.v. chemotherapy group, no significant difference was observed when the survival of both groups was compared (median: 4.7 months, range: 0.1-22.7 vs median: 3.8 months, range: 0.2-12, respectively). These results indicate that 6-MP therapy constitutes a good palliative treatment for patients with nonlymphoid BC of CML. However, new treatment strategies for this hematological condition are required.

  16. Addition of biphasic, prandial, or basal insulin to oral therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Thorne, Kerensa I; Farmer, Andrew J; Davies, Melanie J; Keenan, Joanne F; Paul, Sanjoy; Levy, Jonathan C

    2007-10-25

    Adding insulin to oral therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus is customary when glycemic control is suboptimal, though evidence supporting specific insulin regimens is limited. In an open-label, controlled, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 708 patients with a suboptimal glycated hemoglobin level (7.0 to 10.0%) who were receiving maximally tolerated doses of metformin and sulfonylurea to receive biphasic insulin aspart twice daily, prandial insulin aspart three times daily, or basal insulin detemir once daily (twice if required). Outcome measures at 1 year were the mean glycated hemoglobin level, the proportion of patients with a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or less, the rate of hypoglycemia, and weight gain. At 1 year, mean glycated hemoglobin levels were similar in the biphasic group (7.3%) and the prandial group (7.2%) (P=0.08) but higher in the basal group (7.6%, P<0.001 for both comparisons). The respective proportions of patients with a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or less were 17.0%, 23.9%, and 8.1%; respective mean numbers of hypoglycemic events per patient per year were 5.7, 12.0, and 2.3; and respective mean weight gains were 4.7 kg, 5.7 kg, and 1.9 kg. Rates of adverse events were similar among the three groups. A single analogue-insulin formulation added to metformin and sulfonylurea resulted in a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or less in a minority of patients at 1 year. The addition of biphasic or prandial insulin aspart reduced levels more than the addition of basal insulin detemir but was associated with greater risks of hypoglycemia and weight gain. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN51125379 [controlled-trials.com].). Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  17. Prevalence and clinical significance of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea in patients using oral appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Dieltjens, Marijke; Braem, Marc J; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Wouters, Kristien; Vanderveken, Olivier M

    2014-09-15

    The prevalence of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea (sdOSA) in a general population ranges from 20% to 60%, depending on the criteria used. Currently, the prevalence and evolution of sdOSA once oral appliance therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) has started is unknown. In addition, literature on the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm is not unequivocal. The first purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA during OAm therapy was evaluated. The third and final goal was to analyze the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm therapy in the patient population. Two hundred thirty-seven consecutive patients (age 48 ± 9 years; male/female ratio 173/64; AHI 20.1 ± 14.7 events/h; BMI 27.2 ± 4.3 kg/m(2)) starting OAm therapy were included. The prevalence of sdOSA before the start of OAm therapy, ranged from 27.0% to 67.5%. The prevalence of residual sdOSA under OAm therapy in this study ranged from 17.5% to 33.9%. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA ranged from 23.0% to 37.5%. Third, the presence of sdOSA at baseline was not a significant factor for treatment success with OAm therapy. The results of this study indicate that the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy is relatively high. One-third of patients shift from non-sdOSA to sdOSA. Finally, treatment success for OAm therapy was not significantly correlated with the presence of sdOSA at baseline. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in management of symptomatic oral lichen planus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Al-Soneidar, Walid A; Al-Shamiri, Hashem Motahir; Alakhali, Mohammed Sultan; Alaizari, Nader

    2017-08-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and indefinite cure. This systematic review assessed the efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of symptomatic OLP. Electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched from date of inception till and including December 2016, using various combinations of the following keywords: oral lichen planus, laser therapy, low-level laser therapy, and phototherapy. Owing to heterogeneity of data, no statistical analyses were conducted. Initially, 227 publications were identified. After selection, only six studies were included in this systematic review. In these studies, the laser wavelengths, power output, and duration of irradiation ranged between 630-980 nm, 20-300 mW, and 10 s-15 min, respectively. All of the included studies found laser to be effective in management of OLP, without any reported adverse effects. The results of the included studies confirm that low-level laser therapy is effective in management of symptomatic OLP and can be used as an alternative to corticosteroids. However, due to variety of methods and substantial variations in laser parameters among these studies, more randomized clinical trials with large sample sizes are highly warranted.

  19. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy in treatment of oral erosive lichen planus in comparison with topically applied corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Diana; Moussa, Eglal; Alnouaem, Manal

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of erosive oral lichen planus represents a therapeutic challenge. Despite numerous existing remedies, some of these treatments display disappointing results. Since it is a chronic disease with no current cure, the best treatment should target mainly the reduction of the duration and severity of symptomatic outbreaks with minimal side effects. To date, corticosteroids remain the first choice of treatment for oral lichen planus (OLP) patients. Although, topical corticosteroids have been found to be the safest and the most successful agents in the treatment of OLP, their prolonged use may cause mucosal problems and may lead to systemic complications. Recently, the use of photodynamic therapy has been well introduced in the treatment of oral diseases. Our clinical study was done to evaluate clinically the effect of photodynamic therapy mediated by methylene blue (MB-PDT) on signs and symptoms of erosive oral lichen planus (EOLP) lesions in comparison with the conventional topical corticosteroids (TC) treatment. The present work tried this recent modality of treatment to overcome the disadvantages of TC. Twenty patients with clinical and histological diagnosis of EOLP were selected from Oral Medicine and periodontology department in Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University in a randomized parallel study design. They were divided into two groups; group A (control group) involved ten patients who were instructed to use the conventional TC (kenakort A-orabase). While, group B (study group) contained ten patients who received PDT using diode laser 660nm mediated by methylene blue (MB). Both groups presented statistically significant difference from baseline to follow up periods. But, the MB-PDT in treatment of EOLP showed more remarkable reduction in pain and lesion scores in comparison with corticosteroids treatment. The results of this study allow the conclusion that the MB-PDT is considered to be a better treatment for OELP in comparison with TC because

  20. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Supine-Dependent Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients Using Oral Appliance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dieltjens, Marijke; Braem, Marc J.; Van de Heyning, Paul H.; Wouters, Kristien; Vanderveken, Olivier M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: The prevalence of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea (sdOSA) in a general population ranges from 20% to 60%, depending on the criteria used. Currently, the prevalence and evolution of sdOSA once oral appliance therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) has started is unknown. In addition, literature on the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm is not unequivocal. The first purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA during OAm therapy was evaluated. The third and final goal was to analyze the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm therapy in the patient population. Methods: Two hundred thirty-seven consecutive patients (age 48 ± 9 years; male/female ratio 173/64; AHI 20.1 ± 14.7 events/h; BMI 27.2 ± 4.3 kg/m2) starting OAm therapy were included. Results: The prevalence of sdOSA before the start of OAm therapy, ranged from 27.0% to 67.5%. The prevalence of residual sdOSA under OAm therapy in this study ranged from 17.5% to 33.9%. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA ranged from 23.0% to 37.5%. Third, the presence of sdOSA at baseline was not a significant factor for treatment success with OAm therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy is relatively high. One-third of patients shift from non-sdOSA to sdOSA. Finally, treatment success for OAm therapy was not significantly correlated with the presence of sdOSA at baseline. Citation: Dieltjens M, Braem MJ, Van de Heyning PH, Wouters K, Vanderveken OM. Prevalence and clinical significance of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea in patients using oral appliance therapy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(9):959-964. PMID:25142766

  1. Adjuvant antifungal therapy using tissue tolerable plasma on oral mucosa and removable dentures in oral candidiasis patients: a randomised double-blinded split-mouth pilot study.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Saskia; Kastner, Isabell; Schütte, Eyke; Hartwig, Stefan; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Robert; Hertel, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Extended use of antimycotics in oral candidiasis therapy gives rise to problems related to fungal drug resistance. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy of tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) in denture stomatitis patients. It was hypothesised that (I): erythema and (IIa): complaint remission would be accelerated and (IIb): colony forming unit (CFU) reduction would be improved. The halves of the upper jaws of eight patients were randomly assigned to control (nystatin, chlorhexidine and placebo treatment) and test sides (nystatin, chlorhexidine and TTP administered six times each 7 days). The patients and the investigators, who were different from the therapists, were both blinded. Compared to the control sides, the erythema surface was reduced significantly more extensively on the test sides between 2 and 6 weeks of antifungal therapy (P ≤ 0.05). Visual analogue scale values and the frequency of moderate or heavy growth of Candida post-treatment did not differ significantly between both sides (P > 0.05). The primary hypothesis was confirmed, which may be interpreted as an accelerated remission. As drug therapy is usually limited to the time in which signs of infection are present, TTP might help reducing antifungal use. Even though the secondary hypotheses were not confirmed, persistence of Candida might be only colonisation. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  3. Salivary Cytokine Levels and Oral Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Paolo; Bergamini, Cristiana; Miceli, Rosalba; Cova, Agata; Orlandi, Ester; Resteghini, Carlo; Locati, Laura; Alfieri, Salvatore; Imbimbo, Martina; Granata, Roberta; Mariani, Luigi; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Huber, Veronica; Cavallo, Anna; Licitra, Lisa; Rivoltini, Licia

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the presence of salivary cytokines, their modulation during chemoradiation therapy (CTRT), and their association with oral mucositis severity in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). The present prospective observational study enrolled 55 patients with locally advanced HNC requiring CTRT. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other cancers. The salivary levels of 13 cytokines were analyzed. We constructed a cytokine predictive score of oral mucositis severity. The baseline salivary cytokine levels were not associated with the severity of treatment-induced oral mucositis. The cytokine levels overall increased during treatment, especially in patients with worse mucositis. In particular, on univariable analysis, an increase of interleukin (IL)-1β (area under the curve [AUC] 0.733; P=.009), IL-6 (AUC 0.746; P=.005), and tumor necrosis factor-α (AUC 0.710; P=.005) at the third week of treatment was significantly associated with the development of severe oral mucositis. On multivariable analysis, the predictive score based on the IL-1β and IL-6 changes from baseline to week 3 was an early strong predictor of higher grade oral mucositis. The treatment of HNC patients with concurrent CTRT induces a significant increase in the salivary levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, all positively associated with the severity of mucosal toxicity. A greater increase of IL-1β and IL-6 3 weeks after treatment initiation is predictive of worse oral mucositis, representing a potential tool for the early identification of patients at risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct effects of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy(®) on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Konradi, Jürgen; Lerch, Annekatrin; Cataldo, Marilena; Kerz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy(®) on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia. Within a pre-, post-/during and follow-up study design, 19 non-tracheotomised dysphagic patients were included consecutively and treated according to three specific preselected Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques. The primary outcome was the direct effect of the three different Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques on the number of swallows. We found a significant effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy on swallowing frequency as compared to baseline with an increase by 65.63% and medium effect size of D = 0.62. No significant difference could be demonstrated when comparing baseline to follow-up. For the first time, this positive therapy effect could be demonstrated on a population of non-tracheotomised patients. Facio-Oral Tract Therapy seems to be an appropriate means for improving effectiveness and safety of swallowing. Since improvement was not long lasting, it appears to be reasonable to apply therapy frequently during the day with the plausible result of minimising the amount of aspirated saliva and thereby reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Further studies may consider choosing a randomised controlled trial design to demonstrate that change in swallow frequency is related to the target intervention only.

  5. cDNA microarray analysis of human keratinocytes cells of patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy and oral photobiomodulation therapy: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Heliton S; Wajnberg, Gabriel; Pinho, Marcos B; Jorge, Natasha Andressa Nogueira; de Moraes, Joyce Luana Melo; Stefanoff, Claudio Gustavo; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Dias, Fernando L; de Araujo-Souza, Patricia Savio; Passetti, Fabio; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2017-08-24

    Oral mucositis is an acute toxicity that occurs in patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy to treat head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated differences in gene expression in the keratinocytes of the oral mucosa of patients treated with photobiomodulation therapy and tried to associate the molecular mechanisms with clinical findings. From June 2009 to December 2010, 27 patients were included in a randomized double-blind pilot study. Buccal smears from 13 patients were obtained at days 1 and 10 of chemoradiotherapy, and overall gene expression of samples from both dates were analyzed by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray. In addition, samples from other 14 patients were also collected at D1 and D10 of chemoradiotherapy for subsequent validation of cDNA microarray findings by qPCR. The expression array analysis identified 105 upregulated and 60 downregulated genes in our post-treatment samples when compared with controls. Among the upregulated genes with the highest fold change, it was interesting to observe the presence of genes related to keratinocyte differentiation. Among downregulated genes were observed genes related to cytotoxicity and immune response. The results indicate that genes known to be induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes were upregulated while genes associated with cytotoxicity and immune response were downregulated in the laser group. These results support previous clinical findings indicating that the lower incidence of oral mucositis associated with photobiomodulation therapy might be correlated to the activation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation.

  6. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus in children: An institutional study at highly active antiretroviral therapy centre in India.

    PubMed

    Ponnam, Srinivas Rao; Srivastava, Gautam; Theruru, Kotaih

    2012-05-01

    More than 1000 children are newly infected with Human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV) every day, and of these more than half will die as a result of AIDS due to lack of access to HIV treatment. HIV disease varies considerably in children. Among those infected prenatally, some experience few or no symptoms for years, whereas in others the disease progresses rapidly. The risk factors that influence the development of such oral manifestations include, low CD4+ T cell count, xerostomia and lack of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To identify the oral manifestations of HIV in children receiving HAART. The study comprised 95 children receiving HAART. 95 HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and 95 HIV -ve children were also included for comparing the manifestations of HIV. Statistical analysis was done using Fisher's Chi-square test. Probability value (P value) was obtained for the three groups. The manifestations of HIV that were observed in children receiving HAART include dental caries (26%), periodontal diseases (23%), candidiasis (19%), hyperpigmentation (17%), ulcerative stomatitis (9%) and one case of mucocele. These manifestations were compared with HIV +ve children not receiving HAART and HIV -ve children to find manifestations with statistical significance. We conclude that HAART had increased the disease-free states in HIV +ve children on HAART promising them better life span. The incidence of oral lesions can further come down with adequate oral hygiene measures in HIV-infected children.

  7. Recent advances in host defense mechanisms/therapies against oral infectious diseases and consequences for systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Herzberg, M C; Taubman, M A; Van Dyke, T E

    2014-05-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems are both crucial to oral disease mechanisms and their impact on systemic health status. Greater understanding of these interrelationships will yield opportunities to identify new therapeutic targets to modulate disease processes and/or increase host resistance to infectious or inflammatory insult. The topics addressed reflect the latest advances in our knowledge of the role of innate and adaptive immune systems and inflammatory mechanisms in infectious diseases affecting the oral cavity, including periodontitis and candidiasis. In addition, several potential links with systemic inflammatory conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, are explored. The findings elucidate some of the defense mechanisms utilized by host tissues, including the role of IL-17 in providing immunity to oral candidiasis, the antimicrobial defense of mucosal epithelial cells, and the pro-resolution effects of the natural inflammatory regulators, proresolvins and lipoxins. They also describe the role of immune cells in mediating pathologic bone resorption in periodontal disease. These insights highlight the potential for therapeutic benefit of immunomodulatory interventions that bolster or modulate host defense mechanisms in both oral and systemic disease. Among the promising new therapeutic approaches discussed here are epithelial cell gene therapy, passive immunization against immune cell targets, and the use of proresolvin agents.

  8. Plant-based oral delivery of β-glucocerebrosidase as an enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaaltiel, Yoseph; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Tzaban, Salit; Fiks, Nadia; Tekoah, Yoram; Aviezer, David

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GCD), is currently treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant GCD that is administered intravenously every 2 weeks. However, intravenous administration includes discomfort or pain and might cause local and systemic infections that may lead to low patient compliance. An orally administered drug has the potential to alleviate these problems. In this study, we describe the potential use of plant cells as a vehicle for the oral delivery of recombinant human GCD (prGCD) expressed in carrot cells. The in vitro results demonstrate that the plant cells protect the recombinant protein in the gastric fluids and may enable absorption into the blood. Feeding experiments, with rat and pig as model animals, using carrot cells containing prGCD, show that active recombinant prGCD was found in the digestive tract and blood system and reached both, liver and spleen, the target organs in GD. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of proteins encapsulated in plant cells is feasible. Specifically, carrot cells containing recombinant human prGCD can be used as an oral delivery system and are a feasible alternative to intravenous administration of ERT for GD.

  9. Brazilian popular healers as effective promoters of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and related child survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Nations, M K; de Sousa, M A; Correia, L L; da Silva, D M

    1988-01-01

    In Ceara State in northeastern Brazil in 1986 infant mortality reached 110-139 per 1000 live births, and 50% of those deaths were due to diarrhea and dehydration. Diarrheal deaths can be prevented by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), which replaces lost fluids and electrolytes with oral rehydration salts (ORS) and water. ORT was known in the 1830s, but only in the 1960s was the importance of sugar, which increases the body's ability to absorb fluid some 25 times, realized. In northeastern Brazil access to ORT has been severely limited by poverty, official incompetence, and bureaucratic restrictions. In 1984 a 2-year research project was initiated in the village of Pacatuba to test the theory that mobilizing and training popular healers in ORT would 1) increase awareness and use of ORS, 2) promote continued feeding during diarrhea, 3) increase breast feeding, and 4) reduce the use of costly and nonindicated drugs. 46 popular healers, including rezadeiras and oradores (prayers), Umbandistas (priests), espiritas (mediums), an herbalist, and a lay doctor, were recruited and trained. Most of these people practiced a mixture of folk medicine and religion and were highly respected in the community. For purposes of survey, Pacatuba was divided into 3 groups, each containing houses at 4 different income levels. The mothers in 204 Group 1 homes were interviewed concerning ORT and diarrhea-related knowledge before intervention, and 226 households in Group 2 were interviewed after intervention. The healers were taught the basic biomedical concept of rehydration and how to mix the ORS -- 7 bottle cap-fulls of sugar and 1 of salt in a liter of unsweetened traditional tea. The healers were also taught how to use the World Health Organization's (WHO) ORS packets (2% glucose, 90 mmol/1 of sodium chloride, 1.5 gm potassium chloride, and 2.9 gm sodium bicarbonate) for cases of moderate to severe dehydration. In addition, the healers were taught the 5 basic health messages: give ORS

  10. Oral sensorimotor therapy in the developmentally disabled: a multiple baseline study.

    PubMed

    Ottenbacher, K; Hicks, J; Roark, A; Swinea, J

    1983-08-01

    The efficacy of a program of sensorimotor facilitation procedures to improve oral motor function and feeding behaviors in students with severe developmental delay was explored. Four severely handicapped students were administered the oral habilitation program using a multiple baseline across-subjects design with staggered introduction of the treatment. Graphic analysis and the split middle method of trend estimation revealed that one subject evidenced an increase in weight and improved oral motor evaluation as a result of the intervention. Two other subjects displayed partial improvement. The correlates of treatment effectiveness are briefly discussed and the need for continued investigation is emphasized.

  11. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  12. Response of bone turnover markers to three oral bisphosphonate therapies in postmenopausal osteoporosis: the TRIO study.

    PubMed

    Naylor, K E; Jacques, R M; Paggiosi, M; Gossiel, F; Peel, N F A; McCloskey, E V; Walsh, J S; Eastell, R

    2016-01-01

    We used bone turnover markers to identify women who responded to bisphosphonate treatment for osteoporosis. Response was more likely with alendronate and ibandronate than risedronate. There was a greater decrease in bone markers if baseline bone turnover markers were higher and if the patient took more than 80 % of her medication. Biochemical response to bisphosphonate therapy can be assessed using either a decrease in bone turnover marker beyond the least significant change (LSC) or a reduction to within a reference interval (RI). We compared the performance of these target responses and determined whether response was related to the type of bisphosphonate, compliance and baseline bone turnover markers. Biochemical responses to three oral bisphosphonates were assessed in an open, controlled trial comprising 172 postmenopausal osteoporotic women (age 53-84 years), randomised to alendronate, ibandronate or risedronate, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation for 2 years. The LSC for each marker was derived within the study population, whereas RIs were obtained from a control group of healthy premenopausal women (age 35-40 years). Over 70 % of women achieved a target response for serum CTX and PINP, irrespective of the approach used. The percentage decrease at 12 weeks was greater for women with baseline PINP above the RI -63 % (difference 13 %, 95 % CI 0 to 27.1, P = 0.049) and good compliance -67 % (difference 15.9 %, 95 % CI 6.3 to 25.5, P = 0.001). Responders had a greater increase in spine bone density compared to nonresponders; for example 6.2 vs. 2.3 % (difference 3.9 %, 95 % CI 1.6 to 6.3, P = 0.0011) for PINP LSC. The magnitude of change in bone markers was greater with ibandronate and alendronate than risedronate. Both approaches to response identified similar proportions of women as responders. Nonresponders had smaller increases in BMD, and we suggest that biochemical assessment of response is a useful tool for the management of women with

  13. Amylase-resistant starch as adjunct to oral rehydration therapy in children with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, P; Ramakrishna, B S; Oommen, Samuel P; Ahmed, Mir Shovkat; Priyaa, G; Dziura, James; Young, Graeme P; Binder, Henry J

    2006-04-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) for treatment of diarrhea relies on enhancement of small intestinal sodium and fluid absorption to correct dehydration. Amylase-resistant starch added to ORS significantly reduced the duration and severity of diarrhea in adults with cholera, presumably by generation of short-chain fatty acids in the colon and enhancement of colonic sodium and fluid absorption. The present study was initiated to determine whether addition of amylase-resistant starch to standard World Health Organization glucose-ORS (G-ORS) would reduce the duration of diarrhea and fecal fluid losses in children with acute diarrhea. One hundred eighty-three children (6 months to 3 years) with acute watery diarrhea were randomized to receive either standard treatment with G-ORS or G-ORS with additional amylase-resistant starch, HAMS (HAMS-ORS, 50g/L). Stool weight and consistency were monitored serially until development of formed stool or development of treatment failure defined as either the need for unscheduled intravenous fluid therapy or diarrhea longer than 72 hours. Five of the subjects were lost to follow up. In 178 remaining children (87 HAMS-ORS and 91 G-ORS) with evaluable data, time from enrolment to last unformed stool was significantly less in children receiving HAMS-ORS (median, 6.75 hours; 95% confidence interval, 4.27-9.22) than in children treated with G-ORS (12.80 hours, 8.69-16.91) (P = 0.0292). Time to first formed stool was also significantly shorter in children receiving HAMS-ORS (median, 18.25 hours; 95% confidence interval, 13.09-23.41) compared with children receiving G-ORS (median, 21.50 hours; 95% confidence interval, 17.26-25.74) (P = 0.0440). The total amount of ORS consumed was similar in both groups. There was a trend toward lower mean stool weight in first 24 hours (P = 0.0752) as well as total diarrheal stool weight (P = 0.0926) in patients in the HAMS group compared with the G-ORS group. In children with acute diarrhea, the addition of

  14. Needs and barriers to improve the collaboration in oral anticoagulant therapy: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) involves many health care disciplines. Even though collaboration between care professionals is assumed to improve the quality of OAT, very little research has been done into the practice of OAT management to arrange and manage the collaboration. This study aims to identify the problems in collaboration experienced by the care professionals involved, the solutions they proposed to improve collaboration, and the barriers they encountered to the implementation of these solutions. Methods In the Netherlands, intensive follow-up of OAT is provided by specialized anticoagulant clinics (ACs). Sixty-eight semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 103 professionals working at an AC. These semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Wagner's chronic care model (CCM) and Cabana's framework for improvement were used to categorize the results. Results AC professionals experienced three main bottlenecks in collaboration: lack of knowledge (mostly of other professionals), lack of consensus on OAT, and limited information exchange between professionals. They mentioned several solutions to improve collaboration, especially solutions of CCM's decision support component (i.e. education, regular meetings, and agreements and protocols). Education is considered a prerequisite for the successful implementation of other proposed solutions such as developing a multidisciplinary protocol and changing the allocation of tasks. The potential of the health care organization to improve collaboration seemed to be underestimated by professionals. They experienced several barriers to the successful implementation of the proposed solutions. Most important barriers were the lack motivation of non-AC professionals and lack of time to establish collaboration. Conclusions This study revealed that the collaboration in OAT is limited by a lack of knowledge, a lack of consensus, and a limited information

  15. Injuries and outcomes associated with traumatic falls in the elderly population on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Melissa M; Podany, Abigail B; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-09-01

    Fall risk for older adults is a multi-factorial public health problem as 90% of geriatric injuries are caused by traumatic falls. The CDC estimated 33% of adults >65 years incurred a fall in 2011, with 30% resulting in moderate injury. While much has been written about overall risk to trauma patients on oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy, less has been reported on outcomes in the elderly trauma population. We used data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) to identify the types of injury and complications incurred, length of stay, and mortality associated with OACs in elderly patients sustaining a fall. Using standard NTDB practices, data were collected on elderly patients (≥65 years) on OACs with diagnosis of fall as the primary mechanism of injury from 2007 to 2010. Univariate analysis was used to determine patient variables influencing risk of fall on OACs. Odds ratios were calculated for types of injury sustained and post-trauma complications. Logistic regression was used to determine mortality associated with type of injury incurred. Of 118,467 elderly patients sampled, OAC use was observed in 444. Predisposing risk factors for fall on OACs were >1 comorbidity (p<0.0001). Patients on OACs were 188% and 370% more likely to develop 2 and >3 complications (p<0.0001); the most significant being ARDS and ARF (p<0.0001). The mortality rate on OACs was 16%. Injuries to the GI tract, liver, spleen, and kidney (p<0.0002) were more likely to occur. However, if patients suffered a mortality, the most significant injuries were skull fractures and intracranial haemorrhage (p<0.0001). Risks of anticoagulation in elderly trauma patients are complex. While OAC use is a predictor of 30-day mortality after fall, the injuries sustained are markedly different between the elderly who die and those who do not. As a result there is a greater need for healthcare providers to identify preventable and non-preventable risks factors indicative of falls in the anti-coagulated elderly

  16. Towards microbiome transplant as a therapy for periodontitis: an exploratory study of periodontitis microbial signature contrasted by oral health, caries and edentulism.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Leroux, Brian G; Randolph, Timothy W; Beikler, Thomas; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A

    2015-10-14

    Conventional periodontal therapy aims at controlling supra- and subgingival biofilms. Although periodontal therapy was shown to improve periodontal health, it does not completely arrest the disease. Almost all subjects compliant with periodontal maintenance continue to experience progressive clinical attachment loss and a fraction of them loses teeth. An oral microbial transplant may be a new alternative for treating periodontitis (inspired by fecal transplant). First, it must be established that microbiomes of oral health and periodontitis are distinct. In that case, the health-associated microbiome could be introduced into the oral cavity of periodontitis patients. This relates to the goals of our study: (i) to assess if microbial communities of the entire oral cavity of subjects with periodontitis were different from or oral health contrasted by microbiotas of caries and edentulism patients; (ii) to test in vitro if safe concentration of sodium hypochlorite could be used for initial eradication of the original oral microbiota followed by a safe neutralization of the hypochlorite prior transplantation. Sixteen systemically healthy white adults with clinical signs of one of the following oral conditions were enrolled: periodontitis, established caries, edentulism, and oral health. Oral biofilm samples were collected from sub- and supra-gingival sites, and oral mucosae. DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA genes were amplified. Amplicons from the same patient were pooled, sequenced and quantified. Volunteer's oral plaque was treated with saline, 16 mM NaOCl and NaOCl neutralized by ascorbate buffer followed by plating on blood agar. Ordination plots of rRNA gene abundances revealed distinct groupings for the oral microbiomes of subjects with periodontitis, edentulism, or oral health. The oral microbiome in subjects with periodontitis showed the greatest diversity harboring 29 bacterial species at significantly higher abundance compared to subjects with the other

  17. [The importance of adherence to oral therapies in the field of oncology: the example of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Huiart, Laetitia; Bardou, Valérie-Jeanne; Giorgi, Roch

    2013-10-01

    Today, over 40 different oral anticancer therapies are available in the French prescription pricing authority dictionary. Adherence to these therapies has become a major issue in the field of oncology. Most of the available research has focused on adherence to hormonal therapy for breast cancer (BC). The objective of this paper is to synthesize current knowledge on adherence and persistence to hormonal therapy for BC. Available studies display significant heterogeneity due to variability in the measurements and data sources used, as well as in the timing of the measurements. Adherence and persistence estimates have recently been summarized in a meta-regression analysis. For tamoxifen, adherence ranges from 79% at one year to 65% at five years, and for Aromatase Inhibitors (AI), from 80% at one year to 72% at five years. Persistence decreases with the increasing duration of treatment: from a high of 86% of patients persistent at 1 year to a low of 53% at five years for tamoxifen, and from 88% to 69% for AI. Some of the modifiable determinants of adherence are directly linked to the patient-physician relation, to information provided during consultations, or to the specialty of the physician involved in the patient follow-up. Non-modifiable determinants, such as age or comorbidities, can be used to identify sub-groups of patients at high risk of non-adherence in order to target interventions. Few trials have been conducted in oncology to evaluate the efficacy of interventions to improve adherence. Adherence directly impacts both the efficacy of treatment and long-term treatment costs. Interventions to improve adherence to oral therapies should be systematically promoted in oncology. Improving adherence should be considered a priority in the field, lest physicians continue writing inefficient prescriptions for highly efficacious treatments.

  18. Efficacy and toxicity of an accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Valérie J; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara; Vail, David M; Straw, Rodney C

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common feline oral tumor. Standard radiation protocols have been reported to achieve tumor control durations of 1.5-5.5 months (45-165 days). The purpose of this study was to describe the efficacy and toxicity of an accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol in cats with oral SCC. Twenty-one cats with histologically confirmed oral SCC and T1-3N0M0 were treated with 10 once-daily fractions (Monday-Friday) of 4.8 Gy. Seventeen cats had macroscopic disease and four were microscopic after incomplete excision. Acute toxicity consisted of grade 2 mucositis in all cats and this was effectively managed using esophageal or gastric tube feeding, pain medication, and antibiotics. Late toxicity effects for cats with available follow-up data included alopecia (4 cats), leukotricia (6), tongue ulceration (1), and oronasal fistula (1). Response could be assessed in 17 cats (seven complete response and five partial response). Four cats (19%) developed metastatic disease without evidence of local progression. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 105 days (1 year PFS of 23%), median local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 219 days (1 year LPFS of 41%), and median overall survival (OS) was 174 days (1 year OS of 29%). Only tumor stage was prognostic, with T1 having a median PFS of 590 days. Findings indicated that this accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy protocol was well tolerated in cats with oral SCC, with manageable adverse events. Tumor response was observed in most cats and long tumor control durations were achieved in some cats.

  19. Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Systems Versus Oral Cyclic Medroxyprogesterone Acetate in Endometrial Hyperplasia Therapy: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jin-Sung; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Won I; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with oral cyclic medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in endometrial hyperplasia therapy using randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The study searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and other databases. All regression outcomes were calculated for dichotomous outcomes in terms of relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a Mantel-Haenszel random effects model. The search found 543 articles but selected 342 articles after the removal of duplicates. A meta-analysis found five RCTs (377 patients). The study did not analyze RR for total outcome because of high heterogeneity (I (2) = 87%). In a subgroup analysis of studies with non-obese women, the LNG-IUS treatment appeared to have a higher regression rate than oral MPA (RR 1.41; 95% CI 1.23-1.62; 4 trials, 265 patients; I (2) = 0%). In a subgroup analysis of studies with obese women, LNG-IUS appeared to have a regression rate similar to that of oral MPA (RR 1.03; 95% CI 0.94-1.13; 1 trial, 60 patients). In a subgroup analysis according to histology in the non-obese group, the LNG-IUS treatment appeared to have a higher regression rate than oral cyclic MPA in a meta-analysis of women with non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia (RR 1.36; 95% CI 1.07-1.73; 2 trials, 92 patients; I (2) = 6%) and mixed endometrial hyperplasia (atypical and non-atypical) (RR 1.44; 95% CI 1.21-1.71; 2 trials, 173 patients; I (2) = 0%). The LNG-IUS treatment has a higher regression rate than cyclic MPA in non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia and mixed endometrial hyperplasia therapy for non-obese women but has a similar regression rate, albeit limited, for obese women.

  20. Oral iron chelating therapy. A single center interim report on deferiprone (L1) in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Mazza, P; Amurri, B; Lazzari, G; Masi, C; Palazzo, G; Spartera, M A; Giua, R; Sebastio, A M; Suma, V; De Marco, S; Semeraro, F; Moscogiuri, R

    1998-06-01

    Deferiprone (L1) is a largely studied oral chelator in clinical setting, however, no definite conclusions concerning efficacy and toxicity still could be drawn. In an ongoing prospective trial with L1, we evaluated the efficacy and tolerance-toxicity in patients with thalassemia major previously treated by desferrioxamine (DFO); the specific aim of the study is to demonstrate that L1 could be an alternative to DFO in some patients with an acceptable toxicity. Sixty-nine patients over 13 years of age with poor compliance to DFO were considered for the study. The design included a liver biopsy before starting L1 in all patients in order to define liver siderosis either by histologic grading or by hepatic iron concentration (HIC); only patients with a minimum HIC of 4 mg/g dry weight entered the study. A repetition of the liver biopsy after one year of L1 was planned; further evaluations included serum ferritin, plasma iron, transferrin TIBC and iron urine excretion. L1 was given at 70 mg/kg/day in three divided doses. Toxicity was monitored either clinically or by controlling liver, kidney and marrow function by specific tests. Concerning clinical characteristics 52 patients showed hypogonadism (78%), 39 growth retardation (58%), 6 diabetes (9%), 4 cardiomyopathy (6%), 9 hypothyroidism (12%); 45 patients had chronic liver damage (65%). We focus this report on data collected in a group of 29 patients with a minimum follow-up of one year (14-33 months). The mean ferritin value was 3748 ng/mL (range: 200-10,000) and 2550 ng/mL (range: 80-14,500), before and while on L1 therapy, respectively (p = 0.001); the mean sideruria changed from 17.25 mg/dL (range: 5.4-50) to 20.98 mg/dL (range: 10-40), on DFO and L1, respectively (p = 0.078); the ratio between plasma iron (sideremia) and transferrin TIBC changed from 0.96 with DFO to 0.86 with L1 (0.014). A correlation with grade of liver siderosis and serum ferritin (p = 0.069) and iron urine excretion (p = 0.008) was recorded

  1. Oral Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: Current Pathogenesis, Therapy, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Mays, JW; Fassil, H; Edwards, DA; Pavletic, SZ; Bassim, CW

    2012-01-01

    Optimal management of complex autoimmune diseases requires a multidisciplinary medical team including dentists to care for lesions of the oral cavity. In this review, we discuss the presentation, prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of oral manifestations in chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease (cGVHD) which is a major late complication in patients treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We assess current general knowledge of systemic and oral cGVHD, and present general treatment recommendations based on literature review and our clinical experience. Additionally, we review areas where the understanding of oral cGVHD could be improved by further research, and address tools with which to accomplish the long-term goal of providing better health and quality-of-life to patients with cGVHD. PMID:23107104

  2. Biologic Mechanisms of Oral Cancer Pain and Implications for Clinical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Viet, C.T.; Schmidt, B.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer pain is an ever-present public health concern. With innovations in treatment, cancer patients are surviving longer, but uncontrollable pain creates a poor quality of life for these patients. Oral cancer is unique in that it causes intense pain at the primary site and significantly impairs speech, swallowing, and masticatory functions. We propose that oral cancer pain has underlying biologic mechanisms that are generated within the cancer microenvironment. A comprehensive understanding of key mediators that control cross-talk between the cancer and peripheral nervous system, and possible interventions, underlies effective cancer pain management. The purpose of this review is to explore the current studies on oral cancer pain and their implications in clinical management for cancer pain in general. Furthermore, we will explore the endogenous opioid systems and novel cancer pain therapeutics that target these systems, which could solve the issue of opiate tolerance and improve quality of life in oral cancer patients. PMID:21972258

  3. Oral versus intravenous iron replacement therapy distinctly alters the gut microbiota and metabolome in patients with IBD.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas; Clavel, Thomas; Smirnov, Kirill; Schmidt, Annemarie; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Walker, Alesia; Lucio, Marianna; Michalke, Bernhard; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Fedorak, Richard; Haller, Dirk

    2017-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common complication in patients with IBD and oral iron therapy is suggested to exacerbate IBD symptoms. We performed an open-labelled clinical trial to compare the effects of per oral (PO) versus intravenous (IV) iron replacement therapy (IRT). The study population included patients with Crohn's disease (CD; N=31), UC (N=22) and control subjects with iron deficiency (non-inflamed, NI=19). After randomisation, participants received iron sulfate (PO) or iron sucrose (IV) over 3 months. Clinical parameters, faecal bacterial communities and metabolomes were assessed before and after intervention. Both PO and IV treatments ameliorated iron deficiency, but higher ferritin levels were observed with IV. Changes in disease activity were independent of iron treatment types. Faecal samples in IBD were characterised by marked interindividual differences, lower phylotype richness and proportions of Clostridiales. Metabolite analysis also showed separation of both UC and CD from control anaemic participants. Major shifts in bacterial diversity occurred in approximately half of all participants after IRT, but patients with CD were most susceptible. Despite individual-specific changes in phylotypes due to IRT, PO treatment was associated with decreased abundances of operational taxonomic units assigned to the species Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Ruminococcus bromii, Dorea sp. and Collinsella aerofaciens. Clear IV-specific and PO-specific fingerprints were evident at the level of metabolomes, with changes affecting cholesterol-derived host substrates. Shifts in gut bacterial diversity and composition associated with iron treatment are pronounced in IBD participants. Despite similar clinical outcome, oral administration differentially affects bacterial phylotypes and faecal metabolites compared with IV therapy. clinicaltrial.gov (NCT01067547). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  4. Clinical effectiveness of 125I-seed implantation in combination with nimotuzumab therapy for the advanced oral carcinoma: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Meng, J; Wang, X; Zhuang, Q-W; Gu, Q-P; Zhang, J; Li, Z-P

    2014-01-01

    This study determines the short-term efficacy and toxicity of combined 125I-seed implantation and nimotuzumab in treating the advanced oral carcinoma. 125I-seed implantation is safe and has shown good short-term efficacy in clinical practice. Nimotuzumab is a useful biological agent for targeted therapy. Effect of 125I-seed implantation with nimotuzumab in treating oral carcinomas remains unclear. From November 2011 to December 2012, 11 patients with advanced oral carcinoma (pathologic types: 7 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 4 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma) were enrolled in our hospital. The patients did not receive surgery due to systemic disease or locally advanced cancer. All of them underwent 125I-seed implantation with the matched peripheral doses (MPD) ranging from 90-100 Gy. The apparent activity per seed ranged from 0.6 mCi (2.22 MBq) to 0.7 mCi (2.59 MBq). Later, all patients were given nimotuzumab (200 mg, intravenous drip, weekly, for 6 weeks). The patients were then followed up and the response rate, acute/chronic radiation-induced injury, and safety of the induction treatment were analyzed. Three patients achieved complete while 6 patients had partial response; yielding a response rate of 81.8%. Major adverse events included radiation-induced oral mucositis, local hemorrhage, bone marrow suppression, nausea/vomiting, and alopecia. Adverse reaction was not significantly different between the group of patients under 65 years of age and over 65 years of age (p > 0.05). Nimotuzumab enhanced the tumor sensitivity to brachytherapy without increasing AEs and improved the patients' life quality. 125I-seed implantation combined with nimotuzumab is effective and safe for patients with unresectable oral carcinoma.

  5. Oral Gentamicin Gut Decontamination for Prevention of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections: Relevance of Concomitant Systemic Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P < 0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P < 0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P < 0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P = 0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  6. Probiotic therapy reduces inflammation and improves intestinal morphology in rats with induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Dayana; Sousa, Frederico José da Silva Simão de; Andraus, Rodrigo Antonio Carvalho; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo; Nai, Gisele Alborguetti; Neto, Hermann Bremer; Messora, Michel Reis; Maia, Luciana Prado

    2017-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of probiotics (PROB) on the progression of experimentally induced oral and intestinal mucositis in rats immunosuppressed by chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil: 5-FU). Twenty-four rats were divided into the following groups (n=6): GC (control), GPROB, G5FU and G5-FU/PROB. Groups GPROB and G5-FU/PROB received 1 g of probiotic incorporated into each 100 g of feed (Bacillus subtilis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacilllus acidophilus), beginning 30 days before oral mucositis induction. Groups G5FU and G5-FU/PROB received 60 mg/kg of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. The left oral mucosa of each animal was irritated by mechanical trauma (days 1 and 2). On days 3 and 7, three animals from each group were sacrificed, and their oral mucosa and small intestine were biopsied and processed for histopathological analysis. Groups G5-FU and G5-FU/PROB showed ulcerated oral lesions at day 3, with progression in group G5-FU and regression in group G5-FU/PROB at day 7. Histologically, less severe signs of inflammation in the oral mucosa were observed in group G5-FU/PROB than in group G5-FU. Regarding the intestine, villus-related defects of lesser magnitude were observed in group G5-FU/PROB, compared with group G5-FU. Group GPROB showed greater villus height than group GC. It can be concluded that probiotic supplementation reduced oral and intestinal inflammation in immunosuppressed rats with experimentally induced mucositis, and may protect the intestine from changes induced by chemotherapy, thus contributing to overall health.

  7. Factors Affecting Patients' Perception On, and Adherence To, Anticoagulant Therapy: Anticipating the Role of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ekta Y; Bajorek, Beata

    2017-04-01

    The role of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in practice has been given extensive consideration recently, albeit largely from the clinician's perspective. However, the effectiveness and safety of using anticoagulants is highly dependent on the patient's ability to manage and take these complex, high-risk medicines. This structured narrative review explores the published literature to identify the factors underpinning patients' non-adherence to anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF), and subsequently contemplates to what extent the DOACs might overcome the known challenges with traditional warfarin therapy. This review comprised a two-tier search of various databases and search platforms (CINAHL, Cochrane, Current Contents Connect, EMBASE, MEDLINE Ovid, EBSCO, PubMed, Google, Google Scholar) to yield 47 articles reporting patients perspectives on, and patients adherence to, anticoagulant therapy. The findings from the literature were synthesised under five interacting dimensions of adherence: therapy-related factors, patient-related factors, condition-related factors, social-economic factors and health system factors. Factors negatively affecting patients' day-to-day lives (especially regular therapeutic drug monitoring, dose adjustments, dietary considerations) predominantly underpin a patient's reluctance to take warfarin therapy, leading to non-adherence. Other patient-related factors underpinning non-adherence include patients' perceptions and knowledge about the purpose of anticoagulation; understanding of the risks and benefits of therapy; socioeconomic status; and expectations of care from health professionals. In considering these findings, it is apparent that the DOACs may overcome some of the barriers to traditional warfarin therapy at least to an extent, particularly the need for regular monitoring, frequent dose adjustment and dietary considerations. However, their high cost, twice-daily dosing and gastrointestinal adverse effects may present

  8. Class IV laser therapy as treatment for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in onco-haematological paediatric patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chermetz, Maddalena; Gobbo, Margherita; Ronfani, Luca; Ottaviani, Giulia; Zanazzo, Giulio A; Verzegnassi, Federico; Treister, Nathaniel S; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Biasotto, Matteo; Zacchigna, Serena

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy. Laser therapy has recently demonstrated efficacy in the management of oral mucositis (OM). This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of class IV laser therapy in patients affected by OM. Eighteen onco-haematological paediatric patients receiving chemotherapy and/or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, prior to total body irradiation, affected by OM, were enrolled in this study. Patients were treated with class IV laser therapy for four consecutive days; the assessment of OM was performed through WHO Oral Mucositis Grading Objective Scale, and pain was evaluated through visual analogue scale. Patients completed a validated questionnaire, and photographs of lesions were taken during each session. Patients were re-evaluated 11 days after the first day of laser therapy. All patients demonstrated improvement in pain sensation, and all mucositis was fully resolved at the 11-day follow-up visit, with no apparent side effects. Laser therapy was well tolerated with remarkable reduction in pain associated with oral mucositis after 1-2 days of laser therapy. Given class IV laser therapy appears to be safe, non-invasive, and potentially effective, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are necessary to further assess efficacy and to determine optimal treatment parameters. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Is combined oral and topical therapy better than oral therapy alone in patients with moderate to moderately severe acne vulgaris? A comparison of the efficacy and safety of lymecycline plus adapalene gel 0.1%, versus lymecycline plus gel vehicle.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, William J; Meynadier, Jean; Alirezai, Mohsen; George, Sheru A; Coutts, Ian; Roseeuw, Diane I; Hachem, Jean Pierre; Briantais, Philippe; Sidou, Farzaneh; Soto, Pascale

    2003-09-01

    This multicenter, randomized, investigator-blinded study compared the efficacy and tolerability of a combination of lymecycline 300 mg/day orally and adapalene topical gel 0.1% (n = 118) to lymecycline 300 mg/day orally plus vehicle gel (n = 124) in patients with moderate to moderately severe acne vulgaris with both inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions. The primary efficacy end point, total lesion count at end point (last observation carried forward), showed a statistically significant difference in favor of the lymecycline plus adapalene group (P =.0011). The mean decrease in total, inflammatory and noninflammatory lesion counts was significantly greater at end point in the lymecycline plus adapalene group than in the lymecycline plus vehicle group (P <.01). In addition, a significant difference for inflammatory and total acne lesions was seen sooner in the adapalene plus lymecycline group. In total, 75.5% of patients in the lymecycline plus adapalene group were markedly improved, almost clear or clear of their lesions at week 12, compared with 51.8% of those in the lymecycline plus vehicle group (P <.001). Local cutaneous tolerance was generally good in both groups, although more patients receiving the lymecycline plus adapalene combination experienced cutaneous reactions than those receiving lymecycline plus vehicle. There are relatively few studies comparing the efficacy of combined oral and topical therapy with either individual therapy alone. This study clearly demonstrates that lymecycline plus adapalene combination treatment resulted in a significantly greater mean decrease in the number of inflammatory, noninflammatory and total lesions than lymecycline plus vehicle and was well tolerated.

  10. Is the 810-nm diode laser the best choice in oral soft tissue therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Nihat; Kursun, E. Sebnem; Tumer, M. Kemal; Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Gulsen, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an 810-nm diode laser for treatment of benign oral soft tissue lesions. Materials and Methods: Treatment with the 810-nm diode laser was applied to a group of eighteen patients with pathological frenulum and epulis fissuratum; five patients with oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and mucous membrane pemphigoid; and four patients with pyogenic granuloma. Results: Although the conventional surgery wound heals in a fairly short time, in the present study, the simple oral soft tissue lesions healed within two weeks, the white and vesiculobullous lesions healed completely within six weeks, and the pyogenic granuloma lesions healed within four weeks. Any complication was treated by using the 810-nm diode laser. Conclusions: Patient acceptance and satisfaction, without compromising health and function, have been found to be of a high degree in this present study. Thus, we can say that the use of the 810-nm diode laser may indeed be the best choice in oral soft tissue surgery. PMID:24883028

  11. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  12. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  13. Oral antihypertensive therapy for severe hypertension in pregnancy and postpartum: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, T; Magee, LA; MacDonell, K; Payne, BA; Gordon, R; Vidler, M; von Dadelszen, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnant and postpartum women with severe hypertension are at increased risk of stroke and require blood pressure (BP) reduction. Parenteral antihypertensives have been most commonly studied, but oral agents would be ideal for use in busy and resource-constrained settings. Objectives To review systematically, the effectiveness of oral antihypertensive agents for treatment of severe pregnancy/postpartum hypertension. Search strategy A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials in pregnancy and postpartum with at least one arm consisting of a single oral antihypertensive agent to treat systolic BP ≥ 160 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Data collection and analysis Cochrane RevMan 5.1 was used to calculate relative risk (RR) and weighted mean difference by random effects. Main results We identified 15 randomised controlled trials (915 women) in pregnancy and one postpartum trial. Most trials in pregnancy compared oral/sublingual nifedipine capsules (8–10 mg) with another agent, usually parenteral hydralazine or labetalol. Nifedipine achieved treatment success in most women, similar to hydralazine (84% with nifedipine; relative risk [RR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.98–1.17) or labetalol (100% with nifedipine; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95–1.09). Less than 2% of women treated with nifedipine experienced hypotension. There were no differences in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Target BP was achieved ∼ 50% of the time with oral labetalol (100 mg) or methyldopa (250 mg) (47% labetelol versus 56% methyldopa; RR 0.85 95% CI 0.54–1.33). Conclusions Oral nifedipine, and possibly labetalol and methyldopa, are suitable options for treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy/postpartum. PMID:24832366

  14. Oral antihypertensive therapy for severe hypertension in pregnancy and postpartum: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Firoz, T; Magee, L A; MacDonell, K; Payne, B A; Gordon, R; Vidler, M; von Dadelszen, P

    2014-09-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women with severe hypertension are at increased risk of stroke and require blood pressure (BP) reduction. Parenteral antihypertensives have been most commonly studied, but oral agents would be ideal for use in busy and resource-constrained settings. To review systematically, the effectiveness of oral antihypertensive agents for treatment of severe pregnancy/postpartum hypertension. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed. Randomised controlled trials in pregnancy and postpartum with at least one arm consisting of a single oral antihypertensive agent to treat systolic BP ≥ 160 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 110 mmHg. Cochrane RevMan 5.1 was used to calculate relative risk (RR) and weighted mean difference by random effects. We identified 15 randomised controlled trials (915 women) in pregnancy and one postpartum trial. Most trials in pregnancy compared oral/sublingual nifedipine capsules (8-10 mg) with another agent, usually parenteral hydralazine or labetalol. Nifedipine achieved treatment success in most women, similar to hydralazine (84% with nifedipine; relative risk [RR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.98-1.17) or labetalol (100% with nifedipine; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09). Less than 2% of women treated with nifedipine experienced hypotension. There were no differences in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Target BP was achieved ~ 50% of the time with oral labetalol (100 mg) or methyldopa (250 mg) (47% labetelol versus 56% methyldopa; RR 0.85 95% CI 0.54-1.33). Oral nifedipine, and possibly labetalol and methyldopa, are suitable options for treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy/postpartum. © 2014 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Boron neuron capture therapy using epithermal neutrons for recurrent cancer in the oral cavity and cervical lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Shimahara, Takeshi; Kawabata, Shinji; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji; Shimahara, Masashi

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the utility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutrons for cases of recurrent cancer in the oral cavity, which are not indicated for a conventional treatment modality. We enrolled four patients with local recurrence or metastasis to the regional lymph nodes after completion of initial treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Before receiving BNCT, patients underwent 18F-p-bononophenylalanine (BPA) positron emission tomography (PET) examinations to assess the BPA accumulation ratios in tumors and normal tissues. All patients showed at least a tentative partial response, while a marked improvement in quality of life was seen in one patient. Before BNCT, that patient could not be discharged from the hospital because of eating difficulties and malaise; after treatment, he was comfortably discharged. Mild malaise, oral mucositis and alopecia were seen as mild adverse effects; however, no life-threatening systemic symptoms were observed in any of the cases. Our results suggested that BNCT is a useful treatment modality for recurrent or regionally metastasized oral cancer.

  16. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  17. Randomized controlled pilot trial of nifedipine as oral therapy vs. topical application in the treatment of fissure-in-ano.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vivek; Kaushal, Gourav; Gupta, Rachna

    2013-11-01

    Fissure-in-ano is a common condition that leads to pain and affects quality of life. Sphincterotomy remains the gold standard, but it may lead to troublesome incontinence in some patients. To overcome this problem, numerous pharmacologic therapies have been tested with varying outcomes. The investigators compared the effect of the addition of oral and topical nifedipine to conservative measures in the treatment of patients with fissure-in-ano. Ninety patients with fissure-in-ano, randomized into 3 groups of 30 each, were included in the study. Group I received conventional treatment, group II received oral nifedipine and conventional treatment, and group III received topical nifedipine along with conventional treatment. Patients were followed for 8 weeks for pain relief (assessed using a visual analogue scale) and healing to evaluate the effect of treatment. Pain relief was significantly better in the group III at 3 weeks and 2 months compared with group I (P < .05). Groups II and III were comparable in terms of pain relief. Healing rates were significantly better in group II (P = .03) and group III (P = .00) compared with group I, but groups II and III were found to be comparable. Adverse effects were most commonly reported by group II patients, but these were not significantly higher than in other 2 groups. We recommend the addition of either oral or topical nifedipine to conservative measures to significantly improve pain relief and healing rates in patients with fissure-in-ano. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hematological response to short-term oral cyanocobalamin therapy for the treatment of cobalamin deficiencies in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Andrès, E; Kaltenbach, G; Noblet-Dick, M; Noel, E; Vinzio, S; Perrin, A E; Berthel, M; Blicklé, J F

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to demonstrate the efficacy of one month of oral cobalamin (vitamin B12) therapy in elderly patients with cobalamin deficiency related to food-cobalamin malabsorption (FCM). Twenty elderly patients (mean age: 78+/-17 years) with established cobalamin deficiency related to FCM were included in an open-label, non-randomized, non-placebo trial. They were treated with a maximum of 1,000 microgram per day of oral crystalline cyanocobalamin for at least 1 month. Serum cobalamin levels (primary endpoint), blood count abnormalities and reticulocytes count (secondary endpoints) were determined at baseline and during the first month of treatment. 85% of the patients normalized their serum cobalamin levels with a mean increase of+167 pg/ml (p<0.001 compared with baseline). 100% of the patients corrected their initial macrocytosis and 25% their anemia; 100% of the patients had medullar regeneration with a mean increase of reticulocytes count of 32+/-11.3 x 106/l (p=0.03 compared with baseline). Our findings support the view that one month of oral crystalline cyanocobalamin is effective to correct serum vitamin B12 levels and to obtain hematological responses in elderly patients with cobalamin deficiency related to FCM.

  19. Safe Oral Triiodo-L-Thyronine Therapy Protects from Post-Infarct Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmias without Cardiovascular Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhang, Youhua; Ojamaa, Kaie; Chen, Yue-feng; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pol, Christine J.; Saunders, Debra; Balasubramanian, Krithika; Towner, Rheal A.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence suggests that thyroid hormones (THs) are beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. We have shown that 3 days of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) rats increased left ventricular (LV) contractility and decreased myocyte apoptosis. However, no clinically translatable protocol is established for T3 treatment of ischemic heart disease. We hypothesized that low-dose oral T3 will offer safe therapeutic benefits in MI. Methods and Results Adult female rats underwent left coronary artery ligation or sham surgeries. T3 (~6 μg/kg/day) was available in drinking water ad libitum immediately following MI and continuing for 2 month(s) (mo). Compared to vehicle-treated MI, the oral T3-treated MI group at 2 mo had markedly improved anesthetized Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based LV ejection fraction and volumes without significant negative changes in heart rate, serum TH levels or heart weight, indicating safe therapy. Remarkably, T3 decreased the incidence of inducible atrial tachyarrhythmias by 88% and improved remodeling. These were accompanied by restoration of gene expression involving several key pathways including thyroid, ion channels, fibrosis, sympathetic, mitochondria and autophagy. Conclusions Low-dose oral T3 dramatically improved post-MI cardiac performance, decreased atrial arrhythmias and cardiac remodeling, and reversed many adverse changes in gene expression with no observable negative effects. This study also provides a safe and effective treatment/monitoring protocol that should readily translate to humans. PMID:26981865

  20. [Development of oral therapies for multiple sclerosis--fingolimod, cladribine and other drugs].

    PubMed

    Hecht, Birgit

    2010-04-01

    Orally disposable drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis have been research topics for long-term. Actually there are several drugs in clinical trial. Their mode of action differs among themselves and from established therapeutic agents. While cladribine acts as an antimetabolite and reduces lymphocytopoiesis, fingolimod influences circulation of lymphocytes. Fampridine alleviates symptoms by blocking potassium-channels. These and other drugs which are currently examined for oral administration are presented. The main focus is on the mode of action of these new drugs, in addition important results of clinical trials are summarized.

  1. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Caroline S.; Martins, Marco A.T.; Almeida, Luciana O.; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Martins, Manoela D.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  2. Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, Adriana; Díaz, Mirna; Valenzuela, María Laura; Vidal, Victoria; Racca, Liliana; Bottai, Hebe; Priore, Graciela; Peluffo, Graciela; Di Bartolomeo, Susana; Cabral, Graciela; Toca, María del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Oral rehydration salt (ORS) treatment in young children with acute diarrhoea (AD) has contributed to decrease mortality associated with dehydration although effective strategies to reduce morbidity associated with this disease are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diarrhoea duration when using combined colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG) and oral rehydration salt treatment compared with ORS therapy in children with AD. We designed a double-blind, randomised prospective study with treatment and control groups. Patients aged one to 12 years, with no prior pathology and with AD of less than 48 h were included. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney tests were used, as well as the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Patients were randomised into an ORS and CBHG treatment group and a control group for ORS plus placebo. (Average age: 3.2 years). The result of the post-treatment evaluation with respect to the average duration of AD was 25.5 h for the treated group vs. 41.5 h for the control group (p = 0.015). The average number of stools was 4.8 in the treated group and 8.2 in the control group (p = 0.032). We conclude that the use of CBHG plus ORS significantly reduced the duration of AD, the number of stools and the percentage of children with persistent AD after 24 h of treatment compared to the control group. AD remitted almost twice as fast in patients treated with CBHG and ORS compared to those who received ORS plus placebo. PMID:28009823

  3. Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Adriana; Díaz, Mirna; Valenzuela, María Laura; Vidal, Victoria; Racca, Liliana; Bottai, Hebe; Priore, Graciela; Peluffo, Graciela; Di Bartolomeo, Susana; Cabral, Graciela; Toca, María Del Carmen

    2016-12-21

    Oral rehydration salt (ORS) treatment in young children with acute diarrhoea (AD) has contributed to decrease mortality associated with dehydration although effective strategies to reduce morbidity associated with this disease are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diarrhoea duration when using combined colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG) and oral rehydration salt treatment compared with ORS therapy in children with AD. We designed a double-blind, randomised prospective study with treatment and control groups. Patients aged one to 12 years, with no prior pathology and with AD of less than 48 h were included. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney tests were used, as well as the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Patients were randomised into an ORS and CBHG treatment group and a control group for ORS plus placebo. (Average age: 3.2 years). The result of the post-treatment evaluation with respect to the average duration of AD was 25.5 h for the treated group vs. 41.5 h for the control group (p = 0.015). The average number of stools was 4.8 in the treated group and 8.2 in the control group (p = 0.032). We conclude that the use of CBHG plus ORS significantly reduced the duration of AD, the number of stools and the percentage of children with persistent AD after 24 h of treatment compared to the control group. AD remitted almost twice as fast in patients treated with CBHG and ORS compared to those who received ORS plus placebo.

  4. Comparison of laboratory and immediate diagnosis of coagulation for patients under oral anticoagulation therapy before dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kruse-Loesler, Birgit; Kelker, Matthias; Kleinheinz, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Background Dental surgery can be carried out on patients under oral anticoagulation therapy by using haemostyptic measures. The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of coagulation by laboratory methods and immediate patient diagnosis on the day of the planned procedure. Methods On the planned day of treatment, diagnoses were carried out on 298 patients for Prothrombin Time (PT), the International Normalised Ratio (INR), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT). The decision to proceed with treatment was made with an INR < 4.0 according to laboratory results. Results Planned treatment did not go ahead in 2.7% of cases. Postoperatively, 14.8% resulted in secondary bleeding, but were able to be treated as out-patients. 1.7% had to be treated as in-patients. The average error between the immediate diagnosis and the laboratory method: 95% confidence interval was -5.8 ± 15.2% for PT, -2.7 ± 17.9 s for PTT and 0.23 ± 0.80 for INR. The limits for concordance were 9.4 and -21.1% for PT, 15.2 and -20.5 s for PTT, and 1.03 and -0.57 for INR. Conclusion This study showed a clinically acceptable concordance between laboratory and immediate diagnosis for INR. Concordance for PT and PTT did not meet clinical requirements. For patients under oral anticoagulation therapy, patient INR diagnosis enabled optimisation of the treatment procedure when planning dental surgery. PMID:16316464

  5. Nanoparticle delivery of Wnt-1 siRNA enhances photodynamic therapy by inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuan; Shi, Leilei; Huang, Yu; Shen, Lingyue; Peng, Hao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Zhou, Guoyu

    2017-02-28

    Activation of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in photodynamic therapy (PDT) can lead to the recurrence and progression of tumors. To enhance the effects of PDT, it is essential to inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway involved in EMT progression. Herein, we used polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine-chlorin e6 (PEG-PEI-Ce6) nanoparticles to efficiently deliver Wnt-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the cytoplasm of KB cells (oral squamous cell carcinoma) that were subjected to PDT. Wnt-1 siRNA effectively inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, reducing the expression of Wnt-1, β-catenin and vimentin that are crucial to the EMT. Combined with Wnt-1 siRNA, PEG-PEI-Ce6 nanoparticle mediated PDT inhibited cell growth and enhanced the cancer cell killing effect remarkably. Our results show the promise of combination therapy of PEG-PEI-Ce6 nanoparticles for delivery of Wnt-1 siRNA along with PDT in the treatment of oral cancer.

  6. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huan-Chun; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Li-Yu; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-09-01

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems.

  7. Gene Therapy for Bone Defects in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Fliefel, Riham; Kühnisch, Jan; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven

    2017-02-15

    Craniofacial bone defects are challenging problems for maxillofacial surgeons over the years. With the development of cell and molecular biology, gene therapy is a breaking new technology with the aim of regenerating tissues by acting as a delivery system for therapeutic genes in the craniofacial region rather than treating genetic disorders. A systematic review was conducted summarizing the articles reporting gene therapy in maxillofacial surgery to answer the question: Was gene therapy successfully applied to regenerate bone in the maxillofacial region? Electronic searching of online databases was performed in addition to hand searching of the references of included articles. No language or time restrictions were enforced. Meta-analysis was done to assess significant bone formation after delivery of gene material in the surgically induced maxillofacial defects. The search identified 2081 articles, of which 57 were included with 1726 animals. Bone morphogenetic proteins were commonly used proteins for gene therapy. Viral vectors were the universally used vectors. Sprague-Dawley rats were the frequently used animal model in experimental studies. The quality of the articles ranged from excellent to average. Meta-analysis results performed on 21 articles showed that defects favored bone formation by gene therapy. Funnel plot showed symmetry with the absence of publication bias. Gene therapy is on the top list of innovative strategies that developed in the last 10 years with the hope of developing a simple chair-side protocol in the near future, combining improvement of gene delivery as well as knowledge of the molecular basis of oral and maxillofacial structures.

  8. Effectiveness of oral health education versus nicotine replacement therapy for tobacco cessation- a parallel randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Raja, Mitali; Saha, Sabyasachi; Krishna-Reddy, Vamsi; Mohd, Shafaat; Narang, Ridhi; Sood, Poonam

    2016-02-01

    India has millions of tobacco users. It is the leading cause of deaths due to oral cancer and hence needs effective strategies to curb it. Hence the aim of present study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of Oral Health Education (OHE) and Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) in tobacco cessation. The clinical trial consisted of Manohar Lal Kapoor (MLK) factory workers (n= 40) giving history of tobacco consumption (smoking/smokeless) within past 30 days. They were randomized into OHE (n=20) and NRT (n=20) groups. Baseline evaluation (demographic, smoking/ smokeless behaviour) was done. Fagerstrom test was used for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and to assess nicotine addiction level. Follow up was done at an interval of 1week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months to assess the reduction in the mean FTND score. "Nano-CheckTM Rapid Nicotine test" was used for the qualitative detection of cotinine in human urine. Appropriate statistical analysis was performed (Paired and Unpaired t test). In both OHE and NRT group there was a significant reduction (p< 0.00001) in mean Fagerstrom score at every follow up but when both the groups were compared mean Fagerstrom score reduction was more in NRT than OHE at all time interval though it was not statistically significant (p>0.05). NRT is better than OHE when both the groups were compared. However, it was found that any intervention given to tobacco users either NRT or OHE is helpful for the patients in the process of quitting tobacco. Tobacco cessation, nicotine replacement therapy, oral health education, fagerstrom test, urine cotinine.

  9. Effectiveness of oral health education versus nicotine replacement therapy for tobacco cessation- a parallel randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; Krishna-Reddy, Vamsi; Mohd, Shafaat; Narang, Ridhi; Sood, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Background India has millions of tobacco users. It is the leading cause of deaths due to oral cancer and hence needs effective strategies to curb it. Hence the aim of present study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of Oral Health Education (OHE) and Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) in tobacco cessation. Material and Methods The clinical trial consisted of Manohar Lal Kapoor (MLK) factory workers (n= 40) giving history of tobacco consumption (smoking/smokeless) within past 30 days. They were randomized into OHE (n=20) and NRT (n=20) groups. Baseline evaluation (demographic, smoking/ smokeless behaviour) was done. Fagerstrom test was used for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and to assess nicotine addiction level. Follow up was done at an interval of 1week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months to assess the reduction in the mean FTND score. “Nano-CheckTM Rapid Nicotine test” was used for the qualitative detection of cotinine in human urine. Appropriate statistical analysis was performed (Paired and Unpaired t test). Results In both OHE and NRT group there was a significant reduction (p< 0.00001) in mean Fagerstrom score at every follow up but when both the groups were compared mean Fagerstrom score reduction was more in NRT than OHE at all time interval though it was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions NRT is better than OHE when both the groups were compared. However, it was found that any intervention given to tobacco users either NRT or OHE is helpful for the patients in the process of quitting tobacco. Key words:Tobacco cessation, nicotine replacement therapy, oral health education, fagerstrom test, urine cotinine. PMID:26855709

  10. Assessment of indomethacin oral spray for the treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis-induced pain during anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Momo, Kenji; Nagaoka, Hiroka; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Bukawa, Hiroki; Chiba, Shigeru; Kohda, Yukinao; Homma, Masato

    2017-07-15

    The efficacy and safety of indomethacin (IM) oral spray (OS) as a pain control therapy for oropharyngeal mucositis due to anticancer chemo- and radiotherapy were assessed in patients with head and neck carcinomas and haematological tumours. We observed 35 patients (male/female, 20/15; 53 ± 17 years) with oropharyngeal mucositis who were treated with IM-OS preparation for pain relief at University of Tsukuba Hospital, Japan. Analgesic effects were assessed using the six-grade face scale for pain in 28 patients at the start of IM oral spray treatment. Systemic exposure was assessed by determining urinary excretions of IM in seven patients. Pain relief was achieved in 26 (93%) patients at 25 (5-60) min after applying the IM-OS preparation (15.6 ± 3.4 μg/kg) and analgesic effects were maintained for 120 (10-360) min. The pain was significantly decreased after using the spray (3.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 0.9, p < 0.01). Moreover, urinary IM excretion rates after applying the IM spray preparation were 1.8 ± 0.8% of the IM oral spray dose (130.5 ± 77.7 μg/kg/day), which was markedly lower than that following oral administration of IM (60%). No adverse events were observed following application of the spray. The present IM spray is an effective and safe preparation for pain relief and can be used as an alternative therapeutic option for oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer patients.

  11. Decision-making about the use of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant therapies for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists, warfarin being the most commonly used agent in the United States, have been the only oral anticoagulant therapies available to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In the last 5 years four new, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, the so-called NOACs or novel oral anticoagulants, have come to market and been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. Despite comparable if not superior efficacy in preventing AF-related stroke, and generally lower risks of major hemorrhage, particularly intracranial bleeding, the uptake of these agents has been slow. A number of barriers stand in the way of the more widespread use of these novel agents. Chief among them is concern about the lack of antidotes or reversal agents. Other concerns include the need for strict medication adherence, since missing even a single dose can lead to a non-anticoagulated state; out-of-pocket costs for patients; the lack of easily available laboratory tests to quantitatively assess the level of anticoagulant activity when these agents are being used; contraindications to use in patients with severe chronic kidney disease; and black-box warnings about the increased risk of thromboembolic events if these agents are discontinued prematurely. Fortunately, a number of reversal agents are in the pipeline. Three reversal agents, idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine, have already progressed to human studies and show great promise as either antidotes for specific drugs or as universal reversal agents. The availability of these reversal agents will likely increase the clinical use of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. In light of the many complex and nuanced issues surrounding the choice of an optimal anticoagulant for any AF patient, a patient-centered/shared decision-making approach will be useful.

  12. Medication Therapy Management for Patients Receiving Oral Chemotherapy Agents at a Community Oncology Center: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Nathan S; Bindler, Ross J; Wilson, Poppy L; Kim, Anne P; Ward, Beverly

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of a pharmacist-driven medication therapy management (MTM) program for patients receiving oral chemotherapy agents. Methods: We assessed the impact of MTM consultations with a pharmacist for patients who were receiving a new prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent. Data were assessed for outcomes including (1) number of medication errors identified in electronic medical records (EMRs), (2) number of interventions performed by the pharmacist, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) patient satisfaction. Data were compared between patients who received their oral chemotherapy agents from the onsite specialty pharmacy or from a mail-order pharmacy. The data were also examined for correlations, and logistic regression was utilized to determine the largest variant cofactor to create an equation for estimating the number of errors in a patient's EMR. Results: Fifteen patients received an MTM consultation, and the pharmacists identified an average of 6 medication EMR errors per patient. There was an average of 3 pharmacist-led interventions per patient. Multiple significant correlations were noted between the variables: (1) total number of prescriptions a patient was taking, (2) total number of medication errors identified, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) total number of interventions performed by the pharmacist. Patient satisfaction was favorable for the program. Conclusion: The implementation of a pharmacist-driven MTM program for patients receiving a prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent had a significant impact on patient care by improving medication reconciliation, identifying drug-related problems, and strengthening pharmacist-patient interactions in the oncology clinic.

  13. Parents' attitudes toward oral rehydration therapy in children with mild-to-moderate dehydration.

    PubMed

    Nir, Vered; Nadir, Erez; Schechter, Yaffa; Kline-Kremer, Adi

    2013-01-01

    According to current guidelines, the first line of treatment for mild-to-moderate dehydration is oral rehydration; the second line is rehydration through a nasogastric tube. Both methods are widely underused. This study was conducted to evaluate parents' attitudes towards rehydration methods used in pediatric emergency departments. 100 questionnaires were distributed to parents of children who visited emergency room due to gastroenteritis and suspected dehydration. 75 of the parents expected their child to get IV fluids. 49 of them would refuse to consider oral rehydration. 75 of the parents would refuse to consider insertion of nasogastric tube. Parents whose children were previously treated intravenously tended to be less likely to agree to oral treatment. Parents were more prone to decline oral rehydration if the main measurement of dehydration was the child's clinical appearance, clinical appearance with vomiting, or child's refusal to drink and were more likely to agree if the main measurement was diarrhea, diarrhea with clinical appearance, or clinical personnel opinion. This is the first study to examine parents' expectations. We found that in the majority of cases, parents' expectations contradict current guidelines. Efforts should be taken to educate parents in order to allow full implementation of the guidelines.

  14. Chelation Therapy with Oral Solution of Deferiprone in Transfusional Iron-Overloaded Children with Hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Makis, Alexandros; Chaliasos, Nikolaos; Alfantaki, Sapfo; Karagouni, Paraskevi; Siamopoulou, Antigone

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload in hemoglobinopathies is secondary to blood transfusions, chronic hemolysis, and increased iron absorption and leads to tissue injury requiring the early use of chelating agents. The available agents are parenteral deferoxamine and oral deferiprone and deferasirox. There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of deferiprone at a very young age. The aim of our study was the presentation of data regarding the use of oral solution of deferiprone in 9 children (mean age 6.5, range 2–10) with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies (6 beta thalassemia major, 1 thalassemia intermedia, and 2 sickle cell beta thalassemia). The mean duration of treatment was 21.5 months (range 15–31). All children received the oral solution without any problems of compliance. Adverse reactions were temporary abdominal discomfort and diarrhea (1 child), mild neutropenia (1 child) that resolved with no need of discontinuation of treatment, and transient arthralgia (1 child) that resolved spontaneously. The mean ferritin levels were significantly reduced at the end of 12 months (initial 2440 versus final 1420 μg/L, P < 0.001). This small study shows that oral solution of deferiprone was well tolerated by young children and its use was not associated with major safety concerns. Furthermore, it was effective in decreasing serum ferritin. PMID:24294523

  15. Efficacy of oral zinc therapy in epidermodysplasia verruciformis with squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhanshu; Barman, Krishna Deb; Sarkar, Rashmi; Manjhi, Mukesh; Garg, Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, inherited disorder that predisposes patients to widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. There is still no definitive therapeutic modality for EV. A 24 year old male patient with EV was treated with oral zinc sulphate, one of the cheapest and safe immuno-modulator available as therapeutic agent with satisfactory result.

  16. Multiple subcutaneous mycetomas caused by Pseudallescheria boydii: response to therapy with oral potassium iodide solution.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fida A; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Sarwari, Arif R

    2010-02-01

    We describe the case of a sixteen-year-old male who presented with multiple subcutaneous mycetomas proven on culture to be secondary to Pseudallescheria boydi., The lesions responded completely to oral potassium iodide solution. To our knowledge this has never been reported in humans.

  17. Effects of intravenous and oral esomeprazole in the prevention of recurrent bleeding from peptic ulcers after endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joseph J Y; Suen, Bing-Yee; Wu, Justin C Y; Lau, James Y W; Ching, Jessica Y L; Lee, Vivian W Y; Chiu, Philip W Y; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Francis K L

    2014-07-01

    The use of intravenous proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) has shown to reduce recurrent bleeding and improve patient outcome after endoscopic hemostasis on patients with peptic ulcer. However, the efficacy of oral PPI is uncertain. Studies from Asia indicated that even oral PPI can achieve the same therapeutic effect. This study is designed to compare the efficacy of high-dose intravenous PPI to oral PPI in preventing recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. This is a single-center, randomized-controlled, double-blind, and double-dummy study. Patients had Forrest IA/IB or IIA/IIB peptic ulcer bleeding and received endoscopic hemostasis before recruitment into the study. They were randomized to receive either (i) esomeprazole IV bolus at a dose of 80 mg plus infusion at 8 mg/h for 72 h and oral placebo every 12 h (IVP group), or (ii) IV placebo bolus plus infusion for 72 h and high-dose oral esomeprazole at a dose of 40 mg every 12 h (ORP group). Patients were followed up for 30 days after index bleeding. The primary end point was defined as the 30-day recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic hemostasis. A total of 118 patients were randomized to the IVP group and 126 to the ORP group in this study. In all, 39.8% in the IVP and 42.9% in the ORP group used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and/or aspirin before bleeding. In the IVP group (vs. ORP), Forrest IA represented 1.7% (5.6%), IB 41.5% (38.1%), IIA 52.5% (50.8%), and IIB 4.2% (5.6%). Recurrent bleeding in 30 days was reported in 7.7% of patients in the IVP group and 6.4% of patients in the ORP group, and the difference of recurrent bleeding was -1.3% (95% CI: -7.7%, 5.1%). There was no difference in blood transfusion, repeated endoscopic therapy, and hospital stay between the two groups. High-dose oral esomeprazole at 40 mg BID may be considered as a useful alternative to IV bolus plus infusion of esomeprazole in the management of ulcer bleeding in patients who are not candidates for high-dose IV

  18. New oral anticoagulants in addition to single or dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oldgren, Jonas; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H; James, Stefan; Jönelid, Birgitta; Steg, Gabriel; Sundström, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet treatment after an acute coronary syndrome might reduce ischaemic events but increase bleeding risk. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding direct thrombin or factor-Xa inhibition by any of the novel oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, darexaban, rivaroxaban, and ximelagatran) to single (aspirin) or dual (aspirin and clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy in this setting. All seven published randomized, placebo-controlled phase II and III studies of novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes were included. The database consisted of 30 866 patients, 4135 (13.4%) on single, and 26 731 (86.6%) on dual antiplatelet therapy, with a non-ST- or ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome within the last 7-14 days. We defined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) as the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke; and clinically significant bleeding as the composite of major and non-major bleeding requiring medical attention according to the study definitions. When compared with aspirin alone the combination of an oral anticoagulant and aspirin reduced the incidence of MACE [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval 0.70; 0.59-0.84], but increased clinically significant bleeding (HR: 1.79; 1.54-2.09). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, adding an oral anticoagulant decreased the incidence of MACE modestly (HR: 0.87; 0.80-0.95), but more than doubled the bleeding (HR: 2.34; 2.06-2.66). Heterogeneity between studies was low, and results were similar when restricting the analysis to phase III studies. In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of a new oral anticoagulant to antiplatelet therapy results in a modest reduction in cardiovascular events but a substantial increase in bleeding, most pronounced when new oral anticoagulants are combined with dual antiplatelet therapy.

  19. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the prevalence of oral manifestation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Neelkant; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Babaji, Prashant; Ramesh, Dnsv; Jhamb, Kshitij; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a highly lethal, progressively epidemic viral infection characterized by profound impairment of the immune system. Oral manifestations are common in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected AIDS patients, and are usually the first indicator of symptom and disease progression. The main objective of the current study was to compare the prevalence of oral manifestations in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) with those, not on HAART therapies. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 100 patients diagnosed as human immune virus sero-positive. These patients were divided equally into two groups (50 each); Group I patients on HAART and Group II patients who were not on HAART. Information regarding age, sex and cluster of differentiation 4 cell count was obtained from the medical records. Oral examination was done, and findings were recorded by using internationally accepted presumptive clinical criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square statistical test. Results: The presence of oral manifestations was significantly decreased in subjects on HAART (32%) compared to those who are not on HAART (56%). The most common oral lesions detected in patients on HAART were increased oral hyper-pigmentation (14%), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (8%), non-specific ulcerations (4%), pseudo-membranous candidiasis (2%), periodontitis (2%) and xerostomia (2%), whereas in non HAART oral hyperpigmentation (10%), pseudo-membranous candidiasis (8%), angular cheilitis (4%), and erythematous candidiasis (4%) and Periodontitis (14%) were more prevalent. Conclusion: The number and severity of oral manifestation decreased, and even there was a change in the type of oral manifestations on HAART, which may be because of the improvement in immunity gained by the therapy. PMID:25713484

  20. Considerations for long-term anticoagulant therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism in the novel oral anticoagulant era

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who have had a venous thromboembolic event are generally advised to receive anticoagulant treatment for 3 months or longer to prevent a recurrent episode. Current guidelines recommend initial heparin and an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for long-term anticoagulation. However, because of the well-described disadvantages of VKAs, including extensive food and drug interactions and the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have become an attractive option in recent years. These agents are given at fixed doses and do not require routine coagulation-time monitoring. The NOACs are discussed in this review with regard to the needs of patients on long-term anticoagulation. Methods Current guidelines from Europe and North America that refer to the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism are included, as well as published randomized Phase III clinical trials of NOACs. PubMed searches were used for sourcing case studies of long-term anticoagulant treatment, and results were filtered for human application and screened for relevance. Conclusion NOAC-based therapy showed a similar efficacy and safety profile to heparins/VKAs but without the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring or dietary adjustments, and can be taken as a fixed-dose regimen once or twice daily. This represents a significant step forward in facilitating the management of long-term anticoagulation therapy. Furthermore, in the EINSTEIN studies, improved patient satisfaction was documented with the NOAC rivaroxaban, which may result in better adherence to therapy and an overall reduction in the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. PMID:26929637

  1. Oral health-related quality of life following third molar surgery with or without application of ice pack therapy.

    PubMed

    Ibikunle, Adebayo A; Adeyemo, Wasiu L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of ice pack therapy on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) following third molar surgery. All consecutive subjects who required surgical extraction of lower third molars and satisfied the inclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups. Subjects in group A were instructed to apply ice packs directly over the masseteric region on the operated side intermittently after third molar surgery. This first application was supervised in the clinic and was repeated at the 24-h postoperative review. Subjects in group A were further instructed to apply the ice pack when at home every one and a half hours on postoperative days 0 and 1 while he/she was awake as described. Group B subjects did not apply ice pack therapy. Facial swelling, pain, trismus, and quality of life (using Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) instrument) were evaluated both preoperatively and postoperatively. Postoperative scores in both groups were compared. A significant increase in the mean total and subscale scores of OHIP-14 was found in both groups postoperatively when compared with preoperative value. Subjects who received ice pack therapy had a better quality of life than those who did not. Subjects whose postoperative QoL were affected were statistically significantly higher in group B than in group A at all postoperative evaluation points (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were also observed between the groups in the various subscales analyzed, with better quality of life seen among subjects in group A. Quality of life after third molar surgery was significantly better in subjects who had cryotherapy after third molar than those who did not have cryotherapy. Cryotherapy is a viable alternative or adjunct to other established modes of improving the quality of life of patients following surgical extraction of third molars.

  2. [Plasma volume expansion may explain the attenuation of antianginal activity of oral isosorbide dinitrate in long-term therapy].

    PubMed

    Kośmicki, M; Sadowski, Z

    1999-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether tolerance to oral isosorbide dinitrate in sustained-release form (ISDN-SR) may be related to reduction in hematocrit (HCT)--an indirect indicator of plasma volume expansion. In a double blind, cross-over and placebo (P) controlled study 38 men, with mean age 52.5 +/- 7.4 years, with stable angina and angiographically proven coronary artery disease, received ISDN-SR 120 mg or P as initial dose and after 7 days of therapy: 4-times-daily (ISDN-SR 480 mg a day) and once-daily (ISDN-SR 120 mg a day). Venous HCT was measured: before treatment and after each of the 3 long-term phases. Antianginal efficacy of ISDN-SR 120 mg was evaluated by analysis of walking time to ischemia (WTI) on treadmill during stress tests performed 2 and 6 hours after drug ingestion in acute and long-term therapy. 6 hours after first ingestion of ISDN-SR 120 mg the mean walking time to ischaemia WTI was significantly improved in comparison to P by 58.4% (p < 0.0001) and after 7 days of once-daily treatment by 36.2% (p < 0.01) but not after the 4-times-daily period (NS). HCT fell from mean 43.2 +/- 3.6% before and 42.0 +/- 3.4% (NS) after P phase, to 40.5 +/- 3.0% (p < 0.05) after 4-times-daily period, but HCT remained unchanged after one week of once-daily treatment (NS). Significant reduction in hematocrit--an indirect indicator of plasma volume expansion--during oral ISDN-SR 120 mg in long-term therapy 4-times-daily, when tolerance occurred, but not once-daily (without tolerance), may contribute to the mechanism of attenuation of antianginal activity of nitrates.

  3. Quality Assessment of Systematic Reviews on the Efficacy of Oral Appliance Therapy for Adult and Pediatric Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Gaffar, Balgis O.; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the methodological quality of published systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) about the efficacy of oral appliances (OA) in the management of adult and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Methods: SRs/MAs that evaluated the efficacy of OA therapy on the treatment of SDB in human subjects of all age groups were sought. Multiple electronic databases were searched for articles published in any language from the database's inception until January 2016. Two reviewers independently selected and then assessed the methodological quality of the studies using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) measurement tool. Results: Thirteen reviews on adult SDB were included (2 SRs and 11 SRs with MAs). Of those, seven were medium quality and six were high quality. Only four reviews were included on pediatric SDB (3 SRs and 1 SR with MA). Three of these were of high quality and one was medium quality. The identified limitations in the included reviews were failing to reference the excluded studies or describe reasons for exclusion, lack of applying valid criteria to assess the quality of included studies, lack of publication bias assessment, and absence of conflicts of interest reporting. Conclusions: Overall, SRs/MAs on OA therapy for adult and pediatric SDB were conducted with acceptable methodological quality. High AMSTAR scores should not be extrapolated as a proxy of the methodological quality of the included evidence. There is a need for more primary studies and then that information can be used to be synthesized through SRs on pediatric SDB. Citation: Al-Jewair TS, Gaffar BO, Flores-Mir C. Quality assessment of systematic reviews on the efficacy of oral appliance therapy for adult and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1175–1183. PMID:27397656

  4. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  5. Manual de Adiestramiento sobre Terapia de Rehidratacion Oral y Control de las Enfermedades Diarreicas (Oral Rehydration Therapy and the Control of Diarrheal Diseases). Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This Spanish-language manual was developed to train Peace Corps volunteers and other community health workers in Spanish-speaking countries in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and the control of diarrheal diseases. Using a competency-based format, the manual contains three training modules (organized in seven sessions) that focus on interrelated…

  6. Chronic invasive sinus and intracerebral aspergillosis controlled by combination therapy with micafungin and a daily dose of 400 mg itraconazole oral solution.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taku; Matsumoto, Kana; Tsujimoto, Kazunori; Hishiya, Naokuni; Yamada, Yutaka; Uno, Kenji; Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Nario, Kazuhiko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Morita, Kunihiko

    2015-02-01

    Chronic invasive aspergillosis of the sinus is frequently fatal in the absence of early surgical and chemotherapeutic intervention because of its invasion of vascular tissue. We attempted to control a case of inoperable invasive aspergillosis of the sinus with micafungin and itraconazole oral solution. We prescribed a daily oral dose of 400 mg of itraconazole, which is twice the usual dose, and monitored the serum concentration of the drug. Finally, we were able to control the spread of the lesion. This case indicates that combination therapy with micafungin and a daily dose of 400 mg itraconazole oral solution is an alternative treatment strategy for inoperable invasive aspergillosis of the sinus.

  7. An in vitro study of isolation of candidal strains in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients undergoing radiation therapy and quantitative analysis of the various strains using CHROMagar.

    PubMed

    Ainapur, Mohammad Mohsin Abdul Razak; Mahesh, Pushpalatha; Kumar, K Vinod; Deepak, A; Mrinal, Ujjwal; Sharada, P

    2017-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have an increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. Radiation-induced hyposalivation is thought to be a major predisposing factor for it. Radiation therapy for 2-3 weeks leads to increase in the number of candidal species in the oral cavity, eventually leading to oral candidiasis. To evaluate and correlate the prevalence of candidal species in the oral cavity of OSCC patients and to compare with radiation dosage at 3(rd) and 6(th) week following radiotherapy. This study includes fifty patients undergoing radiation therapy for OSCC. Patients were examined at 3(rd) and 6(th) week following radiation therapy, and smear samples were obtained from lesional sites and the radiation dose was recorded. Smear samples were cultured on CHROMagar, and identification of various candidal species was done on the basis of colony color and their morphology. The present study isolated four types of candidal species, namely, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. All the organisms, except C. krusei, showed a significant increase from 3(rd) to 6(th) week of radiotherapy whereas C. glabrata and C. tropicalis showed a sudden exponential increase. Total radiation dosage did not show any correlation to candidal colonization at 3(rd) and 6(th) week following radiotherapy. OSCC patients undergoing radiotherapy show an increase in candidal colonization which is independent of radiation dosage and may be related to other factors. However, such findings should be further evaluated using a larger sample size.

  8. Oral 5-Aminosalicylate, Mesalamine Suppository, and Mesalamine Enema as Initial Therapy for Ulcerative Proctitis in Clinical Practice with Quality of Care Implications.

    PubMed

    Richter, James M; Arshi, Nabeela K; Oster, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ulcerative proctitis (UP) is typically treated initially with oral 5-aminosalicylate ("5-ASA"), mesalamine suppository, or mesalamine enema ("UP Rx"). Little is known about their effectiveness in practice. Methods. Using a US health insurance database, we identified new-onset UP patients between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, based on the following: (1) initiation of UP Rx; (2) endoscopy in prior 30 days resulting in diagnosis of UP; and (3) no prior encounters for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. We examined the incidence of therapy escalation and total costs in relation to initial UP Rx. Results. We identified 548 patients: 327 received mesalamine suppository, 138 received oral 5-ASA, and 83 received mesalamine enema, as initial UP Rx. One-third receiving oral 5-ASA experienced therapy escalation over 12 months, 21% for both mesalamine suppository and enema. Mean cumulative total cost of UP Rx over 12 months was $1552, $996, and $986 for patients beginning therapy with oral 5-ASA, mesalamine enema, and mesalamine suppository, respectively. Contrary to expert recommendations the treatments were often not continued prophylactically. Conclusions. Treatment escalation was common, and total costs of therapy were higher, in patients who initiated treatment with oral 5-ASA. Further study is necessary to assess the significance of these observations.

  9. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, V L; Lima, I F P; Ziegelmann, P K; Paranhos, L R; de Matos, F R

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The search was conducted in seven electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS, Embase, Web of Science, and OpenGrey), without restriction on publication period or language. Studies that showed the prevalence of oral lesions manifested in adult HIV-positive patients, subjected or not to HAART, were selected. The meta-analysis estimate of relative risk was calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method and DerSimonian and Laird estimator to determine the variance between studies in the random-effects model. The meta-analysis showed significant results in favour of the group on HAART, with lower prevalence for angular cheilitis, erythematous candidiasis, oral herpes, pseudomembranous candidiasis, Kaposi sarcoma, and oral hairy leukoplakia. The prevalence of oral mucosal hyperpigmentation was higher in patients on HAART. These results suggest that the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients is lower for those on HAART, which might occur because of the improvement in immunity provided by the therapy. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent oral cancer and metastasis of cervical lymph node.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ariyoshi, Y; Shimahara, M; Miyatake, S; Kawabata, S; Ono, K; Suzuki, M; Maruhashi, A

    2009-07-01

    We treated 6 patients with recurrent oral cancer and metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes after conventional treatments in 5 and non-conventional in 1 using BNCT, and herein report our results. The clinical response in our patients ranged from CR to PD. In 5 cases, spontaneous pain decreased immediately after BNCT. Three of the 6 are alive at the time of writing and we found that BNCT contributed to QOL improvement in all.

  11. The Use of Oral Disease-Modifying Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Benedikt; Pellkofer, Hannah; Weber, Martin S

    2016-04-01

    Three oral disease-modifying drugs-fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate (DMF)-are available for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). All three agents were approved in the last decade, primarily on the basis of a moderate to substantial reduction in the occurrence of MS relapses and central nervous system lesion formation detected by MRI. In the trials leading to approval, the first oral disease-modifying drug, fingolimod, reduced the annualized relapse rate (ARR) from 0.40 in placebo-treated patients to 0.18 (FREEDOMS) and from 0.33 in patients treated with interferon β1a intramuscularly to 0.16 (TRANSFORMS). Teriflunomide, approved on the basis of the two placebo-controlled trials TEMSO and TOWER, demonstrated a reduction in the ARR from 0.54 to 0.37 and from 0.50 to 0.32 respectively. The latest oral MS medication, approved in 2014, is DMF, which had been used in a different formulation for treatment of psoriasis for decades. In the 2-year DEFINE study, the proportion of patients with a relapse was reduced to 27 %, compared with 46 % in placebo arm, whereas in the CONFIRM trial, the ARR was reduced from 0.40 (placebo) to 0.22 in the DMF-treated group of patients. In this review, we will elucidate the mechanisms of action of these three medications and compare their efficacy, safety, and tolerability as a practical guideline for their use. We will further discuss effects other than relapse reduction these small molecules may exert, including potential activities within the central nervous system, and briefly summarize emerging data on new oral MS drugs in clinical development.

  12. Past, present, and future use of oral appliance therapies in sleep-related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert R

    2012-02-01

    Upper airway patency is a delicate balancing act pitting pharyngeal anatomy and baseline muscle tone against the negative pressures created upon inhalation. This uniquely human phenomenon has created for some patients the need for upper airway management during sleep. In this regard, the ability of removable oral appliances utilized during sleep to create and maintain a patent airway has seen the creation of a new area of interest in dentistry termed dental sleep medicine.

  13. Neutron Beam Radiation Therapy: An Overview of Treatment and Oral Complications When Treating Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Sikes, Justin; Namaranian, Parshan; Laramore, George; Dillon, Jasjit K

    2016-04-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding the oral complications of neutron radiotherapy, with an associated lack of guidelines for their management. The purpose of this study was to review the indications, dosing, prognosis, and oral complications of neutron radiotherapy for salivary gland malignancies. This is a retrospective case series of patients with salivary gland malignancies treated with neutron radiotherapy by the Radiation Oncology Department at the University of Washington from 1997 to 2006. Variables included patient demographics, tumor staging and characteristics, operative treatment, final diagnosis, operative and pathologic findings (ie, perineural invasion, lymph node involvement, and skull base invasion), dosing, complications, and locoregional control and survival rates. Data were extracted from patients' charts and by telephone for follow-up and quality-of-life information. The sample was composed of 140 patients (49% men, 51% women) with a mean age of 53 years (standard deviation, 15 yr). Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the submandibular gland was the most common tumor type and location. Post-treatment trismus occurred in 56%. Acute mucositis and xerostomia occurred in approximately 88 and 89% of patients, respectively. Osteoradionecrosis was reported in 5.7% of patients. The 6-year survival rate was 58% and the 6-year locoregional control was 72%. The current standard neutron dose for head and neck tumors is 1.15 neutron Gray (nGy) 4 times per week for 4 weeks (total, 18.4 nGy), which is an equivalent amount of radiation as the standard 60 to 70 Gy given for 6 to 7 weeks with conventional photon radiation. The 6-year overall survival of 58% found in this study compares favorably to the survival rate reported in the literature for traditional photon radiation treatment of advanced salivary gland tumors. The dental profession should be educated regarding neutron radiotherapy and its indications, dosing methods, and oral complications

  14. Use of prophylactic antibiotic therapy in oral surgical procedures: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Jaime Santiago

    2008-12-01

    Despite myriad evidence-based data on the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in oral surgical procedures, their inaccurate use and indiscriminate abuse still continues in all clinical settings. Although controversy remains, clear-cut guidelines relying on established scientific principles do exist and must be followed. This paper provides a critical and systematic review of each principle and encourages practitioners fit to what current evidence demands.

  15. Successful switch to oral therapy with doxycycline in the case of an actinomycotic hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Petrache, Diana; Popescu, Gabriel-Adrian

    2013-05-13

    A 72-year-old female was admitted with the symptoms of malaise, loss of appetite, upper right quadrant pain, fever, and sweats, which had been present for last 7 days. CT-scan of the abdomen revealed a hypodense mass in the right liver lobe; histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen yielded a diagnosis of actinomycotic abscess. Treatment with intravenous ampicillin for 8 weeks followed by a course of oral doxicycline for 28 weeks resulted in the complete resolution of the abscess.

  16. Oral and parenteral therapy with saperconazole (R 66905) of invasive aspergillosis in normal and immunocompromised animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, J; Van Gerven, F; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Saperconazole (R 66905) is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole with potent in vitro activity against Aspergillus spp. A total of 279 strains were tested in brain heart infusion broth. Development of the Aspergillus spp. was completely inhibited at 0.1 and 1 microgram of saperconazole per ml for 80.3 and 99.6% of the strains, respectively. Normal and immunocompromised guinea pigs were infected intravenously with Aspergillus fumigatus and treated orally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally with saperconazole or intraperitoneally with amphotericin B. Leukopenia, neutropenia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis were obtained with mechlorethamine hydrochloride; leukopenia, neutrophilia, and lymphopenia were obtained with cyclophosphamide. Saperconazole was dissolved for oral treatment in polyethylene glycol and for parenteral treatment in cyclodextrins. Amphotericin B was given parenterally as Fungizone (E.R. Squibb & Sons). Treatment was given once daily for 14 days. An early starting treatment was efficacious, but the activity of saperconazole was maintained even when the onset of the treatment was delayed to the moribund state. The activity of saperconazole was not altered in immunocompromised animals. Saperconazole was clearly superior to amphotericin B and free of side effects. The oral and parenteral formulations of saperconazole were equipotent. The systemic activity of saperconazole in guinea pigs was confirmed in invasive aspergillosis in pigeons. PMID:2619273

  17. Oral Solubilized Ursodeoxycholic Acid Therapy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ju-Hong; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jung-Joon; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Jung Bok

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) with oral solubilized formula in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, patients with probable or definite ALS were randomized to receive oral solubilized UDCA (3.5 g/140 mL/day) or placebo for 3 months after a run-in period of 1 month and switched to receive the other treatment for 3 months after a wash-out period of 1 month. The primary outcome was the rate of progression, assessed by the Appel ALS rating scale (AALSRS), and the secondary outcomes were the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) and forced vital capacity (FVC). Fifty-three patients completed either the first or second period of study with only 16 of 63 enrolled patients given both treatments sequentially. The slope of AALSRS was 1.17 points/month lower while the patients were treated with UDCA than with placebo (95% CI for difference 0.08-2.26, P = 0.037), whereas the slopes of ALSFRS-R and FVC did not show significant differences between treatments. Gastrointestinal adverse events were more common with UDCA (P < 0.05). Oral solubilized UDCA seems to be tolerable in ALS patients, but we could not make firm conclusion regarding its efficacy, particularly due to the high attrition rate in this cross-over trial. PMID:22323869

  18. Oral drug therapy in elderly with dysphagia: between a rock and a hard place!

    PubMed

    Logrippo, Serena; Ricci, Giovanna; Sestili, Matteo; Cespi, Marco; Ferrara, Letizia; Palmieri, Giovanni F; Ganzetti, Roberta; Bonacucina, Giulia; Blasi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Demographic indicators forecast that by 2050, the elderly will account for about one-third of the global population. Geriatric patients require a large number of medicines, and in most cases, these products are administered as solid oral solid dosage forms, as they are by far the most common formulations on the market. However, this population tends to suffer difficulties with swallowing. Caregivers in hospital geriatric units routinely compound in solid oral dosage forms for dysphagic patients by crushing the tablets or opening the capsules to facilitate administration. The manipulation of a tablet or a capsule, if not clearly indicated in the product labeling, is an off-label use of the medicine, and must be supported by documented scientific evidence and requires the patient's informed consent. Compounding of marketed products has been recognized as being responsible for an increased number of adverse events and medical errors. Since extemporaneous compounding is the rule and not the exception in geriatrics departments, the seriousness and scope of issues caused by this daily practice are probably underestimated. In this article, the potential problems associated with the manipulation of authorized solid oral dosage forms are discussed.

  19. Oral drug therapy in elderly with dysphagia: between a rock and a hard place!

    PubMed Central

    Logrippo, Serena; Ricci, Giovanna; Sestili, Matteo; Cespi, Marco; Ferrara, Letizia; Palmieri, Giovanni F; Ganzetti, Roberta; Bonacucina, Giulia; Blasi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Demographic indicators forecast that by 2050, the elderly will account for about one-third of the global population. Geriatric patients require a large number of medicines, and in most cases, these products are administered as solid oral solid dosage forms, as they are by far the most common formulations on the market. However, this population tends to suffer difficulties with swallowing. Caregivers in hospital geriatric units routinely compound in solid oral dosage forms for dysphagic patients by crushing the tablets or opening the capsules to facilitate administration. The manipulation of a tablet or a capsule, if not clearly indicated in the product labeling, is an off-label use of the medicine, and must be supported by documented scientific evidence and requires the patient’s informed consent. Compounding of marketed products has been recognized as being responsible for an increased number of adverse events and medical errors. Since extemporaneous compounding is the rule and not the exception in geriatrics departments, the seriousness and scope of issues caused by this daily practice are probably underestimated. In this article, the potential problems associated with the manipulation of authorized solid oral dosage forms are discussed. PMID:28203065

  20. Low-intensity international normalized ratio (INR) oral anticoagulant therapy in Chinese patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Haibo, Zhang; Jinzhong, Li; Yan, Liu; Xu, Meng

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the optimal international normalized ratio (INR) intensity of oral anticoagulant therapy in Chinese patients with valve replacement surgery. We studied 1,658 patients who underwent mechanical valve replacement in Beijing Anzhen Hospital; the focus of the study was on correlation between intensity of anticoagulant therapy and thromboembolism/hemorrhage complications. We further followed up 1,508 patients for 46 ± 16 months (range 1-61 months). Average INR was 2.13 ± 0.56, and warfarin dose was 3.09 ± 0.85 mg/day. The incidence rate of anticoagulation-related thromboembolism was 1.17 per 100 patient-years (%/pt-y), and the incidence rate of anticoagulation-related hemorrhage was 2.02%/pt-y. The incidence rate of total complications (i.e., combined thromboembolism and hemorrhages) was 3.24%/pt-y. The rate of total complications in group on INR 1.3-2.3 (aortic valve replacement: 1.3-1.8; mitral valve replacement and double valve replacement: 1.8-2.3) was the lowest among all anticoagulant therapy regimens followed. In conclusion, the relatively low anticoagulant strategy presented above efficiently prevents thrombosis and hemorrhage complications.

  1. Recommendations for improving adherence to type 2 diabetes mellitus therapy--focus on optimizing oral and non-insulin therapies.

    PubMed

    Nau, David P

    2012-04-01

    Adherence to therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is contingent upon a number of variables, including variables specific to the patient, to the provider, and to the treatment. While treatment selection will involve consideration to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects, the physician must also take into account the priorities and preferences of each individual patient. For some patients, the risk of weight gain may exert a significant influence on adherence, while for others the risk of hypoglycemia or the cost of medications may be more important factors. It is incumbent upon physicians to discuss these issues with patients and to develop a patient-centric treatment plan to achieve optimal adherence and therapeutic outcomes. The nature of the clinical setting can also influence the likelihood of patient adherence to treatment. A multidisciplinary team approach to diabetes management has been shown to improve outcomes and to have a neutral or beneficial effect on costs. The treatment plan itself plays an additional role in the likelihood of a patient adhering to treatment. Less complex treatment regimens with fewer pills are associated with higher rates of adherence, as are fixed-dose combinations for those patients requiring combination therapy. Frequency and timing of dosing are also important aspects of adherence, as once-daily dosing is associated with higher rates of adherence than twice-daily dosing for anti-hyperglycemic medications.

  2. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve intestinal amplification and to improve diarrhea

  3. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  4. Monitoring oral iron therapy with protoporphyrin/heme ratios i